WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic clocks

  1. Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynands, Robert

    Time is a strange thing. On the one hand it is arguably the most inaccessible physical phenomenon of all: both in that it is impossible to manipulate or modify—for all we know—and in that even after thousands of years mankind's philosophers still have not found a fully satisfying way to understand it. On the other hand, no other quantity can be measured with greater precision. Today's atomic clocks allow us to reproduce the length of the second as the SI unit of time with an uncertainty of a few parts in 1016—orders of magnitude better than any other quantity. In a sense, one can say [1

  2. Optical atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today’s best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  3. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  4. Optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  5. Optical atomic clocks and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The atomic clock has long demonstrated the capability to measure time or frequency with very high precision. Consequently, these clocks are used extensively in technological applications such as advanced synchronization or communication and navigation networks. Optical atomic clocks are next- generation timekeepers which reference narrowband optical transitions between suitable atomic states. Many optical time/frequency standards utilize state-of-the-art quantum control and precision measurement. Combined with the ultrahigh quality factors of the atomic resonances at their heart, optical atomic clocks have promised new levels of timekeeping precision, orders of magnitude higher than conventional atomic clocks based on microwave transitions. Such measurement capability enables and/or enhances many of the most exciting applications of these clocks, including the study of fundamental laws of physics through the measurement of time evolution. Here, I will highlight optical atomic clocks and their utility, as well as review recent advances in their development and performance. In particular, I will describe in detail the optical lattice clock and the realization of frequency measurement at the level of one part in 1018. To push the performance of these atomic timekeepers to such a level and beyond, several key advances are being explored worldwide. These will be discussed generally, with particular emphasis on our recent efforts at NIST in developing the optical lattice clock based on atomic ytterbium.

  6. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Vuletic, Vladan; Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  7. Atomic clock ensemble in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission using high-performance clocks and links to test fundamental laws of physics in space. Operated in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station, the ACES clocks, PHARAO and SHM, will generate a frequency reference reaching instability and inaccuracy at the 1 · 10−16 level. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. ACES has now reached an advanced technology maturity, with engineering models completed and successfully tested and flight hardware under development. This paper presents the ACES mission concept and the status of its main instruments.

  8. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature 87Sr 1S0 (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  9. Mitigating aliasing in atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Hermann; Akhalwaya, Ismail; Sastrawan, Jarrah; Biercuk, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Passive atomic clocks periodically calibrate a classical local oscillator against an atomic quantum reference through feedback. The periodic nature of this correction leads to undesirable aliasing noise. The Dick Effect, is a special case of aliasing noise consisting of the down-conversion of clock noise at harmonics of the correction frequency to a frequency of zero. To combat the Dick effect and aliasing noise in general, we suggest an extension to the usual feedback protocol, in which we incorporate information from multiple past measurements into the correction after the most recent measurement, approximating a crude low pass anti-aliasing filter of the noise. An analytical frequency domain analysis of the approach is presented and supported by numerical time domain simulations.

  10. Cold atom Clocks and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bize, S; Abgrall, M; Marion, H; Maksimovic, I; Cacciapuoti, L; Gruenert, J; Vian, C; Dos Santos, F P; Rosenbusch, P; Lemonde, P; Santarelli, G; Wolf, P; Clairon, A; Luiten, A; Tobar, M; Salomon, C

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes advances in microwave frequency standards using laser-cooled atoms at BNM-SYRTE. First, recent improvements of the $^{133}$Cs and $^{87}$Rb atomic fountains are described. Thanks to the routine use of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator as an ultra-stable local frequency reference, a fountain frequency instability of $1.6\\times 10^{-14}\\tau^{-1/2}$ where $\\tau $ is the measurement time in seconds is measured. The second advance is a powerful method to control the frequency shift due to cold collisions. These two advances lead to a frequency stability of $2\\times 10^{-16}$ at $50,000s for the first time for primary standards. In addition, these clocks realize the SI second with an accuracy of $7\\times 10^{-16}$, one order of magnitude below that of uncooled devices. In a second part, we describe tests of possible variations of fundamental constants using $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs fountains. Finally we give an update on the cold atom space clock PHARAO developed in collaboration with CNES. This ...

  11. Atomic clocks: the atoms as primary time and frequency standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we present the atomic clock as time and frequency standard and as one of the peaceful uses of atoms for development. In the first part, we present the general principles of time and frequency metrology and the key role of the caesium atom in this field as well as the main applications of atomic clocks. In the second part we introduce the different clock technologies based on Ramsey method, with a focus on atomic beam clocks and atomic fountain clocks. (author)

  12. Atomic clocks: A mathematical physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Accuracy of atomic clocks (since their introduction in 50's) is increasing by roughly one order per decade. A natural theoretical problem posed by this development is to seek the ultimate accuracy of atomic clocks and means to achieve it. This problem was indeed extensively studied and various bounds on the accuracy are well understood, e.g. shot noise limit. I would present a mathematical minded (but simple) model of atomic clocks and discuss accuracy bounds within the model. (author)

  13. Could Atomic clocks be affected by neutrinos?

    CERN Document Server

    Hanafi, Hanaa

    2016-01-01

    An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electronic transition frequency of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard in order to derive a time standard since time is the reciprocal of frequency. If the electronic transition frequencies are in an "optical region", we are talking in this case about optical atomic clocks. If they are in an "microwave region" these atomic clocks are made of the metallic element cesium so they are called Cesium atomic clocks. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known despite the different perturbations that can affect them, a lot of researches were made in this domain to show how the transitions can be different for different type of perturbations..Since atomic clocks are very sensitive devices, based on coherent states (A coherent state tends to loose coherence after interacting). One question can arise (from a lot of questions) which is why cosmic neutrinos are not affecting these clocks? The answer to this question requir...

  14. Using Atomic Clocks to Detect Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clocks have recently reached a fractional timing precision of $<10^{-18}$. We point out that an array of atomic clocks, distributed along the Earth's orbit around the Sun, will have the sensitivity needed to detect the time dilation effect of mHz gravitational waves (GWs), such as those emitted by supermassive black hole binaries at cosmological distances. Simultaneous measurement of clock-rates at different phases of a passing GW provides an attractive alternative to the interferometric detection of temporal variations in distance between test masses separated by less than a GW wavelength, currently envisioned for the eLISA mission.

  15. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr87 using the 1S0 → 3P0 transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr87 atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10-15 and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10-15 level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr88 by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10-14. (author)

  16. High-Accuracy Microwave Atomic Clock via Magic Optical Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao

    2005-01-01

    A microwave atomic clock scheme based on Rb and Cs atoms trapped in optical lattice with magic wavelength for clock transition is proposed. The ac Stark shift of clock transition due to trapping laser can be canceled at some specific laser wavelengths. Comparing with in fountain clock, the cavity related shifts, the collision shift, and the Doppler effect are eliminated or suppressed dramatically in atomic clock when the magic optical lattice is exploited. By carefully analyzing various sourc...

  17. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  18. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  19. Microwave Atomic Clock in the Optical Lattice with Specific Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for a microwave atomic clock is proposed for Cs or Rb atoms trapped in a blue detuned optical lattice. The ac Stark shift of the clock transition due to a trapping laser is calculated. We analyze it at some specific laser wavelength. Compared with the case of the fountain clock, the cavity related shifts, the collision shift and the Doppler effect are eliminated or suppressed dramatically in an atomic lattice clock. By analyzing various sources of clock uncertainty, a microwave atomic lattice clock with a high accuracy and small volume is feasible

  20. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  1. Satellite virtual atomic clock with pseudorange difference function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Satellite atomic clocks are the basis of GPS for the control of time and frequency of navigation signals. In the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS), a satellite navigation system without the satellite atomic clocks onboard is successfully developed. Thus, the method of time synchronization based on satellite atomic clocks in GPS is not suitable. Satellite virtual atomic clocks are used to implement satellite navigation. With the satellite virtual atomic clocks, the time at which the signals are transmitted from the ground can be delayed into the time that the signals are transmitted from the satellites and the pseudorange measuring can be fulfilled as in GPS. Satellite virtual atomic clocks can implement the navigation, make a pseudorange difference, remove the ephemeris error, and improve the accuracy of navigation positioning. They not only provide a navigation system without satellite clocks, but also a navigation system with pseudorange difference.

  2. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  3. From atomic clocks to coordinate times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, G.

    2006-08-01

    The IAU'1991 Resolution A4, complemented by IAU'2000 Resolution B1.3-4, provide rigorous definitions for barycentric and geocentric reference systems in a relativistic framework and define the coordinate times of these systems as TCB and TCG, respectively. Other coordinate times in use are TT, defined from TCG through IAU'2000 Resolution B1.9, and TDB, whose rigorous definition from TCB is now proposed. For practical use, these coordinate times must be realized and the proper time provided by atomic clocks (Atomic time AT) is used to generate all coordinate times. The present sequence is AT => TT ||> TCG -> TCB ||> TDB, where the sign => indicates the complex series of operations involved in generating International atomic time TAI and where ||> is an exact transformation. The paper examines the uncertainty of realization of TAI and the uncertainty brought by the transformation TCG -> TCB. On-going and future evolutions of atomic clocks are reviewed along with their impact on the diagram of time transformations.

  4. Atomic Clocks with Suppressed Blackbody Radiation Shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift and its fluctuations can be suppressed by 1-3 orders of magnitude independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies ν1 and ν2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a 'synthetic' frequency νsyn ∝ (ν1-ε12ν2) largely immune to the blackbody radiation shift. For example, in the case of 171Yb+ it is possible to create a synthetic-frequency-based clock in which the fractional blackbody radiation shift can be suppressed to the level of 10-18 in a broad interval near room temperature (300±15 K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies ν1 and ν2, where the frequency νsyn is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum.

  5. Atomic fountains and optical clocks at SYRTE: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, M; De Sarlo, L; Guéna, J; Laurent, Ph; Coq, Y Le; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lours, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D; Bize, S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on the work done with the LNE-SYRTE atomic clock ensemble during the last 10 years. We cover progress made in atomic fountains and in their application to timekeeping. We also cover the development of optical lattice clocks based on strontium and on mercury. We report on tests of fundamental physical laws made with these highly accurate atomic clocks. We also report on work relevant to a future possible redefinition of the SI second.

  6. The quantum beat principles and applications of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F

    2007-01-01

    This work attempts to convey a broad understanding of the physical principles underlying the workings of these quantum-based atomic clocks, with introductory chapters placing them in context with the early development of mechanical clocks and the introduction of electronic time-keeping as embodied in the quartz-controlled clocks. While the book makes no pretense at being a history of atomic clocks, it nevertheless takes a historical perspective in its treatment of the subject. Intended for nonspecialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering, The Quantum Beat covers a wide range of salient topics relevant to atomic clocks, treated in a broad intuitive manner with a minimum of mathematical formalism. Detailed descriptions are given of the design principles of the rubidium, cesium, hydrogen maser, and mercury ion standards; the revolutionary changes that the advent of the laser has made possible, such as laser cooling, optical pumping, the formation of "optical molasses," and the cesium "fountain" stand...

  7. Atomic clocks: new prospects in metrology and geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Delva, Pacôme

    2013-01-01

    We present the latest developments in the field of atomic clocks and their applications in metrology and fundamental physics. In the light of recent advents in the accuracy of optical clocks, we present an introduction to the relativistic modelization of frequency transfer and a detailed review of chronometric geodesy.

  8. An atomic clock with $10^{-18}$ instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkley, N; Phillips, N B; Schioppo, M; Lemke, N D; Beloy, K; Pizzocaro, M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2013-01-01

    Atomic clocks have been transformational in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Next-generation optical atomic clocks can extend the capability of these timekeepers, where researchers have long aspired toward measurement precision at 1 part in $\\bm{10^{18}}$. This milestone will enable a second revolution of new timing applications such as relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests on physics beyond the Standard Model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both utilizing spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of $\\bm{1.6\\times 10^{-18}}$ after only $\\bm{7}$ hours of averaging.

  9. Quantum Atomic Clock Synchronization: An Entangled Concept of Nonlocal Simultaneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D.; Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Jozsa, R.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that two spatially separated parties (Alice and Bob) can utilize shared prior quantum entanglement, as well as a classical information channel, to establish a synchronized pair of atomic clocks.

  10. Design and Construction of an Atomic Clock on an Atom Chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design and construction of an atomic clock on an atom chip, intended as a secondary standard, with a stability in the range of few 10-13 at 1 s. This clock is based on a two-photon transition between the hyperfine states |F = 1; mF = -1> and |2; 1> of the electronic ground state of the 87Rb atom. This transition is interrogated using a Ramsey scheme, operating on either a cloud of thermal atoms or a Bose-Einstein condensate. In contrast to atomic fountain clocks, this clock is magnetically trapped on an atom chip. We describe a theoretical model of the clock stability and the design and construction of a dedicated apparatus. It is able to control the magnetic field at the relative 10-5 level and features a hybrid atom chip, containing DC conductors as well as a microwave transmission line for the clock interrogation. (author)

  11. Geophysical applicability of atomic clocks: direct continental geoid mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Hetényi, György; Boschi, Lapo; Jetzer, Philippe; Balakrishna, Jayashree; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05636.x

    2012-01-01

    The geoid is the true physical figure of the Earth, a particular equipotential surface of the gravity field of the Earth that accounts for the effect of all subsurface density variations. Its shape approximates best (in the sense of least squares) the mean level of oceans, but the geoid is more difficult to determine over continents. Satellite missions carry out distance measurements and derive the gravity field to provide geoid maps over the entire globe. However, they require calibration and extensive computations including integration, which is a non-unique operation. Here we propose a direct method and a new tool that directly measures geopotential differences on continents using atomic clocks. General Relativity Theory predicts constant clock rate at sea level, and faster (resp. slower) clock rate above (resp. below) sea level. The technology of atomic clocks is on the doorstep of reaching an accuracy level in clock rate that is equivalent to 1 cm in determining equipotential surface (including geoid) he...

  12. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  13. A Movable-Cavity Cold Atom Space Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Feng-Gang; WEI Rong; JIANG Hai-Feng; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present an experimental scheme of a cold atom space clock with a movable cavity. By using a single microwave cavity, we find that the clock has a significant advantage, i.e. the longitudinal cavity phase shift is eliminated. A theoretical analysis has been carried out in terms of the relation between the atomic transition probability and the velocity of the moving cavity by taking into account the velocity distribution of cold atoms. The requirements for the microwave power and its stability for atomic πr /2 excitation at different moving velocities of the cavity lead to the determination of the proper working parameters of the rubidium clock in frequency accuracy 10-17. Finally,the mechanical stability for the scheme is analysed and the ways of solving the possible mechanical instability of the device are proposed.

  14. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Pikovski, Igor; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a lev...

  15. Tests of local position invariance using continuously running atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Peil, Steven; Hanssen, James L; Swanson, Thomas B; Ekstrom, Christopher R; 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.010102

    2013-01-01

    Tests of local position invariance (LPI) made by comparing the relative redshift of atomic clocks based on different atoms have been carried out for a variety of pairs of atomic species. In most cases, several absolute frequency measurements per year are used to look for an annual signal, resulting in tests that can span on order of a decade. By using the output of continuously running clocks, we carry out LPI tests with comparable or higher precision after less than 1.5 years. These include new measurements of the difference in redshift anomalies \\beta\\ for hyperfine transitions in Rb87 and Cs133 and in H and Cs133 and a measurement comparing Rb87 and H, resulting in a stringent limit on LPI, \\beta(Rb) - \\beta(H)=(-2.7 +/- 4.9) x 10^(-7). The method of making these measurements for continuous clocks is discussed.

  16. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kómár, P.; Topcu, T.; Kessler, E. M.; Derevianko, A.; Vuletić, V.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  17. Searching for dark matter with optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wcislo, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions of modern physics is the existence of yet unknown forms of matter and interactions. The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by some hypothetical dark matter (DM). However, beyond its gravitational interaction at galactic scale, little is known about the DM nature and properties. One possibility is that it has a form of stable topological defects built from light scalar fields which, for nonzero DM-SM coupling, would result in transient variations of fundamental constants. Optical atomic clocks, highly sensitive to variations of the fine-structure constant, seem to be natural candidates for such searches. Here we demonstrate the first experimental constraint on the strength of transient DM-SM coupling determined with optical atomic clocks. Instead of measuring the phase difference between two distant clocks we determine a common component of their readouts. We show that our constraint, even for one-day measurement, greatly exceeds previous laboratory...

  18. Conceptual Design of a Micron-Scale Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical proposal for reducing an entire atomic clock to micron dimensions. A phosphorus or nitrogen atom is introduced into a fullerene cage. This endohedral fullerene is then coated with an insulating shell and a number of them are deposited as a thin layer on a silicon chip. Next to this layer a GMR sensor is fabricated which is close to the endohedral fullerenes. This GMR sensor measures oscillating magnetic fields on the order of micro-gauss from the nuclear spins varying at the frequency of the hyperfine transition (413 MHz frequency). Given the micron scale and simplicity of this system only a few transistors are needed to control the waveforms and to perform digital clocking. This new form of atomic clock exhibits extremely low power (nano watts), high vibration and shock resistance, stability on the order of 10^{-9}, and is compatible with MEMS fabrication and chip integration. As GMR sensors continue to improve in sensitivity the stability of this form of atomic clock will increase proportionat...

  19. 2e-18 total uncertainty in an atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, T L; Hutson, R B; Marti, G E; Bloom, B J; McNally, R L; Zhang, W; Barrett, M D; Safronova, M S; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Ye, J

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation, and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. This work takes an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Here, we achieve fractional stability of 2.2e-16 at 1 s by using seconds-long coherent interrogations of our clock transition in a low-density system not limited by atomic interactions. With this better stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, improving many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as the lattice ac Stark and blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts. For the lattice ac Stark systematic, we identify the lattice laser frequency where the scalar and tensor components of the shift cancel, allowing for state ind...

  20. Atomic clocks as a tool to monitor vertical surface motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Lundgren, Andrew; Hetényi, György; Houlié, Nicolas; Jetzer, Philippe; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clock technology is advancing rapidly, now reaching stabilities of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-18}$, which corresponds to resolving $1$ cm in equivalent geoid height over an integration timescale of about 7 hours. At this level of performance, ground-based atomic clock networks emerge as a tool for monitoring a variety of geophysical processes by directly measuring changes in the gravitational potential. Vertical changes of the clock's position due to magmatic, volcanic, post-seismic or tidal deformations can result in measurable variations in the clock tick rate. As an example, we discuss the geopotential change arising due to an inflating point source (Mogi model), and apply it to the Etna volcano. Its effect on an observer on the Earth's surface can be divided into two different terms: one purely due to uplift and one due to the redistribution of matter. Thus, with the centimetre-level precision of current clocks it is already possible to monitor volcanoes. The matter redistribution term is estimated to b...

  1. Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space: Scientific Objectives and Mission Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1 - P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk ZH (Netherlands)], E-mail: Luigi.Cacciapuoti@esa.int; Dimarcq, N.; Santarelli, G.; Laurent, P.; Lemonde, P.; Clairon, A. [SYRTE-CNRS UMR8630, Observatoire de Paris, 61, avenue de l' Observatoire 75014 Paris (France); Berthoud, P.; Jornod, A. [Observatoire de Neuchatel, 58, rue de l' Observatoire, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Reina, F.; Feltham, S. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1 - P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk ZH (Netherlands); Salomon, C. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, 24, rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2007-04-15

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission in fundamental physics that will operate a new generation of atomic clocks in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy at the 10{sup -16} level will be achieved. The on-board time base, distributed on Earth via a microwave link, will be used for space-to-ground as well as ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards. Based on these comparisons, ACES will perform fundamental physics tests and develop applications in time and frequency metrology, universal time scales, global positioning and navigation, geodesy, and gravimetry. After a general overview of the mission concept and its scientific objectives, the present status of ACES instruments and sub-systems will be discussed.

  2. Synchronization of Active Atomic Clocks via Quantum and Classical Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Superradiant lasers based on atomic ensembles exhibiting ultra-narrow optical transitions can emit light of unprecedented spectral purity and may serve as active atomic clocks. We consider two frequency-detuned active atomic clocks, which are coupled in a cascaded setup, i.e. as master & slave lasers, and study the synchronization of the slave to the master clock. In a setup where both atomic ensembles are coupled to a common cavity mode such synchronization phenomena have been predicted by Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 154101 (2014)] and experimentally observed by Weiner et al. [arXiv:1503.06464 (2015)]. Here we demonstrate that synchronization still occurs in cascaded setups but exhibits distinctly different phase diagrams. We study the characteristics of synchronization in comparison to the case of coupling through a common cavity. We also consider synchronization through a classical channel where light of the master laser is measured phase sensitively and the slave laser is injection locked by feed...

  3. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  4. Atomic clocks comparison by means of television chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various methods and techniques of time and frequency dissemination are presented. One of them, the Line 10 Method, was used to compare two atomic clocks, localized in different places is a distance of more or less four-hundred kilometers. The results are compared with parallel results obtained with another method, physical transport, giving the necessary experimental basis of the applicability of the Line 10 Method in Brazil

  5. Suppressing Loss of Ions in an Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An improvement has been made in the design of a compact, highly stable mercury- ion clock to suppress a loss of ions as they are transferred between the quadrupole and higher multipole ion traps. Such clocks are being developed for use aboard spacecraft for navigation and planetary radio science. The modification is also applicable to ion clocks operating on Earth: indeed, the success of the modification has been demonstrated in construction and operation of a terrestrial breadboard prototype of the compact, highly stable mercury-ion clock. Selected aspects of the breadboard prototype at different stages of development were described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The following background information is reviewed from previous articles: In this clock as in some prior ion clocks, mercury ions are shuttled between two ion traps, one a 16- pole linear radio-frequency trap, while the other is a quadrupole radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a 202Hg lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at approximately 40.507 GHz. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling that would otherwise be caused by collisions between clock atoms and the wall of a gas cell. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave-resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. This is similar to the operation of an atomic beam clock, except that with ions the beam can be halted and reversed as ions are shuttled back and forth between the two traps. When the two traps are driven at the same radio frequency, the strength of confinement can be reduced near the junction between the two traps, depending upon the relative phase of the RF voltage used to operate each of the two traps, and

  6. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  7. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  8. Stability of a trapped atom clock on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Szmuk, Ramon; Maineult, Wilfried; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact atomic clock interrogating ultracold 87Rb magnetically trapped on an atom chip. Very long coherence times sustained by spin self-rephasing allow us to interrogate the atomic transition with 85% contrast at 5 s Ramsey time. The clock exhibits a fractional frequency stability of $5.8\\times 10^{-13}$ at 1 s and is likely to integrate into the $1\\times10^{-15}$ range in less than a day. A detailed analysis of 7 noise sources explains the measured frequency stability. Fluctuations in the atom temperature (0.4 nK shot-to-shot) and in the offset magnetic field ($5\\times10^{-6}$ relative fluctuations shot-to-shot) are the main noise sources together with the local oscillator, which is degraded by the 30% duty cycle. The analysis suggests technical improvements to be implemented in a future second generation set-up. The results demonstrate the remarkable degree of technical control that can be reached in an atom chip experiment.

  9. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  10. Ultra-stable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppo, M; McGrew, W F; Hinkley, N; Fasano, R J; Beloy, K; Yoon, T H; Milani, G; Nicolodi, D; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with dead time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise of the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited optical clock performance. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability of $6 \\times 10^{-17} / \\sqrt{\\tau}$ for an averaging time $\\tau$ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the stan...

  11. Resolved atomic interaction sidebands in an optical clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishof, Michael; Swallows, Matthew D; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    We report the observation of resolved atomic interaction sidebands (ISB) in the ${}^{87}$Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional (2D) optical lattice. The ISB are a manifestation of the strong interactions that occur between atoms confined in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry and disappear when the confinement is relaxed along one dimension. The emergence of ISB is linked to the recently observed suppression of collisional frequency shifts in [1]. At the current temperatures, the ISB can be resolved but are broad. At lower temperatures, ISB are predicted to be substantially narrower and usable as powerful spectroscopic tools in strongly interacting alkaline-earth gases.

  12. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  13. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  14. Atomic clocks: A brief history and current status of research in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poonam Arora; Amrita Awasthi; Vattikonda Bharath; Aishik Acharya; Suchi Yadav; Aashish Agarwal; Amitava Sen Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Frequency corresponding to the energy difference between designated levels of an atom provides precise reference for making a universally accurate clock. Since the middle of the 20th century till now, there have been tremendous efforts in the field of atomic clocks making time the most accurately measured physical quantity. National Physical Laboratory India (NPLI) is the nation’s timekeeper and is developing an atomic fountain clock which will be a primary frequency standard. The fountain is currently operational and is at the stage of complete frequency evaluation. In this paper, a brief review on atomic time along with some of the recent results from the fountain clock will be discussed.

  15. A mathematical model for the atomic clock error in case of jumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the mathematical model based on stochastic differential equations describing the error gained by an atomic clock to the cases of anomalous behavior including jumps and an increase of instability. We prove an exact iterative solution that can be useful for clock simulation, prediction, and interpretation, as well as for the understanding of the impact of clock error in the overall system in which clocks may be inserted as, for example, the Global Satellite Navigation Systems. (authors)

  16. Accelerating the averaging rate of atomic ensemble clock stability using atomic phase lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally demonstrated that the stability of an atomic clock improves at its fastest rate τ −1 (where τ is the averaging time) when the phase of a local oscillator is genuinely compared to the continuous phase of many atoms in a single trap (an atomic phase lock). For this demonstration, we developed a simple method that repeatedly monitors the atomic phase while retaining its coherence by observing only a portion of the whole ion cloud. Using this new method, we measured the continuous phase over three measurement cycles, and thereby improved the stability scaling from τ−1/2 to τ −1 during the three measurement cycles. This simple method provides a path by which atomic clocks can approach a quantum projection noise limit, even when the measurement noise is dominated by the technical noise. (paper)

  17. Development of an atomic clock on an atom chip: Optimisation of the coherence time and preliminary characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the construction and preliminary characterization of an atomic clock on an atom chip. A sample of magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms is cooled below 1 μK, close to Bose- Einstein condensation temperature. The trapped states |F = 1; mF = -1> and |F = 2;mF = 1> define our two-photon clock transition. Atoms are trapped around a field B0 = 3.23 G, where the clock frequency is first-order insensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. We have designed an atom chip that includes a microwave coplanar waveguide which drives the 6.835 GHz transition. The whole clock cycle is performed in the vicinity of the chip surface, making the physics package compact (5 cm)3. We first describe the experimental setup of the clock, and the optical bench that has been developed and characterized during this thesis. We then give the results obtained for atom cooling, which led to obtaining a 3 104 atoms Bose-Einstein condensate. We finally present the results obtained by Ramsey spectroscopy of the clock transition. We measure coherence times exceeding 10 seconds with our setup, dominated by atom losses. A preliminary measurement shows that the clock relative frequency stability is of 6 10-12 at 1 s, limited by technical noise. Our goal is to reach a stability in the low 10-13 at 1 s, i.e. better than commercial clocks and competitive with today's best compact clocks. (author)

  18. Microwave interrogation cavity for the rubidium space cold atom clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ren; Yuan-Ci, Gao; Tang, Li; De-Sheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    The performance of space cold atom clocks (SCACs) should be improved thanks to the microgravity environment in space. The microwave interrogation cavity is a key element in a SCAC. In this paper, we develop a microwave interrogation cavity especially for the rubidium SCAC. The interrogation cavity has two microwave interaction zones with a single feed-in source, which is located at the center of the cavity for symmetric coupling excitation and to ensure that the two interaction zones are in phase. The interrogation cavity has a measured resonance frequency of 6.835056471 GHz with a loaded quality factor of nearly 4200, which shows good agreement with simulation results. We measure the Rabi frequency of the clock transition of the rubidium atom in each microwave interaction zone, and subsequently demonstrate that the distributions of the magnetic field in the two interaction zones are the same and meet all requirements of the rubidium SCAC. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11034008), the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094304), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  20. Towards a Re-definition of the Second Based on Optical Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in accuracy and stability of optical atomic clocks compared to the caesium atomic clock as primary standard of time and frequency asks for a future re-definition of the second in the International System of Units (SI). The status of the optical clocks based on either single ions in radio-frequency traps or on neutral atoms stored in an optical lattice is described with special emphasis of the current work at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Besides the development and operation of different optical clocks with estimated fractional uncertainties in the 10^-18 range, the supporting work on ultra-stable lasers as core elements and the means to compare remote optical clocks via transportable standards, optical fibers, or transportable clocks is reported. Finally, the conditions, methods and next steps are discussed that are the prerequisites for a future re-definition of the second.

  1. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  2. Decreasing the uncertainty of atomic clocks via real-time noise distinguish

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Richang; Wei, Rong; Wang, Wenli; Zou, Fan; Du, Yuanbo; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental perturbation on atoms is the key factor restricting the performance of atomic frequency standards, especially in long term scale. In this letter, we demonstrate a real-time noise distinguish operation of atomic clocks. The operation improves the statistical uncertainty by about an order of magnitude of our fountain clock which is deteriorated previously by extra noises. The frequency offset bring by the extra noise is also corrected. The experiment proves the real-time noise distinguish operation can reduce the contribution of ambient noises and improve the uncertainty limit of atomic clocks.

  3. Clock-transition spectrum of 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical atomic clock with 171Yb atoms is devised and tested. By using a two-stage Doppler cooling technique, the 171Yb atoms are cooled down to a temperature of 6±3 μK, which is close to the Doppler limit. Then, the cold 171Yb atoms are loaded into a one-dimensional optical lattice with a wavelength of 759 nm in the Lamb—Dicke regime. Furthermore, these cold 171Yb atoms are excited from the ground-state 1S0 to the excited-state 3P0 by a clock laser with a wavelength of 578 nm. Finally, the 1S0–3P0 clock-transition spectrum of these 171Yb atoms is obtained by measuring the dependence of the population of the ground-state 1S0 upon the clock-laser detuning. (general)

  4. Enhancing coherence in molecular spin qubits via atomic clock transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Muhandis; Komijani, Dorsa; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Hill, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Quantum computing is an emerging area within the information sciences revolving around the concept of quantum bits (qubits). A major obstacle is the extreme fragility of these qubits due to interactions with their environment that destroy their quantumness. This phenomenon, known as decoherence, is of fundamental interest. There are many competing candidates for qubits, including superconducting circuits, quantum optical cavities, ultracold atoms and spin qubits, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. When dealing with spin qubits, the strongest source of decoherence is the magnetic dipolar interaction. To minimize it, spins are typically diluted in a diamagnetic matrix. For example, this dilution can be taken to the extreme of a single phosphorus atom in silicon, whereas in molecular matrices a typical ratio is one magnetic molecule per 10,000 matrix molecules. However, there is a fundamental contradiction between reducing decoherence by dilution and allowing quantum operations via the interaction between spin qubits. To resolve this contradiction, the design and engineering of quantum hardware can benefit from a ‘bottom-up’ approach whereby the electronic structure of magnetic molecules is chemically tailored to give the desired physical behaviour. Here we present a way of enhancing coherence in solid-state molecular spin qubits without resorting to extreme dilution. It is based on the design of molecular structures with crystal field ground states possessing large tunnelling gaps that give rise to optimal operating points, or atomic clock transitions, at which the quantum spin dynamics become protected against dipolar decoherence. This approach is illustrated with a holmium molecular nanomagnet in which long coherence times (up to 8.4 microseconds at 5 kelvin) are obtained at unusually high concentrations. This finding opens new avenues for quantum computing based on molecular spin qubits.

  5. Enhancing coherence in molecular spin qubits via atomic clock transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Muhandis; Komijani, Dorsa; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Hill, Stephen

    2016-03-17

    Quantum computing is an emerging area within the information sciences revolving around the concept of quantum bits (qubits). A major obstacle is the extreme fragility of these qubits due to interactions with their environment that destroy their quantumness. This phenomenon, known as decoherence, is of fundamental interest. There are many competing candidates for qubits, including superconducting circuits, quantum optical cavities, ultracold atoms and spin qubits, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. When dealing with spin qubits, the strongest source of decoherence is the magnetic dipolar interaction. To minimize it, spins are typically diluted in a diamagnetic matrix. For example, this dilution can be taken to the extreme of a single phosphorus atom in silicon, whereas in molecular matrices a typical ratio is one magnetic molecule per 10,000 matrix molecules. However, there is a fundamental contradiction between reducing decoherence by dilution and allowing quantum operations via the interaction between spin qubits. To resolve this contradiction, the design and engineering of quantum hardware can benefit from a 'bottom-up' approach whereby the electronic structure of magnetic molecules is chemically tailored to give the desired physical behaviour. Here we present a way of enhancing coherence in solid-state molecular spin qubits without resorting to extreme dilution. It is based on the design of molecular structures with crystal field ground states possessing large tunnelling gaps that give rise to optimal operating points, or atomic clock transitions, at which the quantum spin dynamics become protected against dipolar decoherence. This approach is illustrated with a holmium molecular nanomagnet in which long coherence times (up to 8.4 microseconds at 5 kelvin) are obtained at unusually high concentrations. This finding opens new avenues for quantum computing based on molecular spin qubits. PMID:26983539

  6. Invited Review Article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed.

  7. Integrated physics package of a chip-scale atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics package of a chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) has been successfully realized by integrating vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), neutral density (ND) filter, λ/4 wave plate, 87Rb vapor cell, photodiode (PD), and magnetic coil into a cuboid metal package with a volume of about 2.8 cm3. In this physics package, the critical component, 87Rb vapor cell, is batch-fabricated based on MEMS technology and in-situ chemical reaction method. Pt heater and thermistors are integrated in the physics package. A PTFE pillar is used to support the optical elements in the physics package, in order to reduce the power dissipation. The optical absorption spectrum of 87Rb D1 line and the microwave frequency correction signal are successfully observed while connecting the package with the servo circuit system. Using the above mentioned packaging solution, a CSAC with short-term frequency stability of about 7 × 10−10 τ−1/2 has been successfully achieved, which demonstrates that this physics package would become one promising solution for the CSAC. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarescu Ruxandra; Schärer Andreas; Jetzer Philippe; Angélil Raymond; Saha Prasenjit; Lundgren Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gra...

  9. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant. PMID:18352368

  10. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hachisu, H; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  11. Improvement in medium-long term frequency stability of integrating sphere cold atom clock

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peng; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Xiao, Ling; Cheng, Huadong; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  12. Study on the clock-transition spectrum of cold 171Yb ytterbium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a detailed study of the clock-transition spectrum of cold 171Yb ytterbium atoms in a 1D optical lattice. A typical clock-transition spectrum with a carrier-sideband structure is observed. After minimizing the power broadening effect and compensating the stray magnetic field, the carrier linewidth is narrowed to about 16 Hz for a 60 ms interrogation time. By increasing the interrogation time to 150 ms, the linewidth is further reduced to 6.8 Hz. By applying the bias magnetic field parallel to the clock-laser polarization, a two-peak spectrum corresponding to two π transitions is obtained. Finally, spin polarization of atoms to a single desired Zeeman sublevel of the ground state is also demonstrated. The presented results will be very useful for developing better optical lattice clocks. (letter)

  13. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe. (authors)

  14. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berengut J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe.

  15. An atomic clock with $1\\times 10^{-18}$ room-temperature blackbody Stark uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Beloy, K; Phillips, N B; Sherman, J A; Schioppo, M; Lehman, J; Feldman, A; Hanssen, L M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2014-01-01

    The Stark shift due to blackbody radiation (BBR) is the key factor limiting the performance of many atomic frequency standards, with the BBR environment inside the clock apparatus being difficult to characterize at a high level of precision. Here we demonstrate an in-vacuum radiation shield that furnishes a uniform, well-characterized BBR environment for the atoms in an ytterbium optical lattice clock. Operated at room temperature, this shield enables specification of the BBR environment to a corresponding fractional clock uncertainty contribution of $5.5 \\times 10^{-19}$. Combined with uncertainty in the atomic response, the total uncertainty of the BBR Stark shift is now $1\\times10^{-18}$. Further operation of the shield at elevated temperatures enables a direct measure of the BBR shift temperature dependence and demonstrates consistency between our evaluated BBR environment and the expected atomic response.

  16. Modeling and Estimation of Stationary and Non-stationary Noises of Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Mishra,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Noise estimation of atomic clock is one of the important research areas in the field of atomic clock development and application. Most of the atomic clocks are having random-stochastic noises and periodic noises due to temperature variation. Random-stochastic noises have a well identified signature in time domain but periodic noises are difficult to analyze in time domain. However, in this paper, an effort is made to identify and analyze the deterministic trends of both random-stochastic noises and periodic noises due to variation in temperature using an alternate approach of least-squares normalized-error (LSNE regression algorithm. A MATLAB based application with graphical user interface (GUI is developed to estimate and analyze random-stochastic noises and periodic noises and re-estimate the stability of rubidium atomic clock after removing these noises from the raw phase data. The estimation of stationary noises are done using Allan variance from time domain data and noise profile is calculated using curve fit method. The estimation of periodic noises due to temperature variation is carried in frequency domain through spurious analysis of the frequency data of atomic clock.

  17. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  18. Loading of a fountain clock with an enhanced Low-Velocity Intense Source of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrev, Georgi; Weyers, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a caesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms (LVIS) [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3331 (1996)], which we modified by adding a "dark" state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of $4 \\times 10^{8}$ atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of $8.6$ m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieved a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms $N_{\\mathrm{at}}=2.9 \\times 10^6$ in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability $\\sigma_y\\left(1\\text{s}\\right)=2.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ was demonstrated.

  19. The Deep Space Atomic Clock: Ushering in a New Paradigm for Radio Navigation and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Todd; Seubert, Jill; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the on-orbit performance of a high-accuracy, high-stability miniaturized mercury ion atomic clock during a year-long experiment in Low Earth Orbit. DSAC's timing error requirement provides the frequency stability necessary to perform deep space navigation based solely on one-way radiometric tracking data. Compared to a two-way tracking paradigm, DSAC-enabled one-way tracking will benefit navigation and radio science by increasing the quantity and quality of tracking data. Additionally, DSAC also enables fully-autonomous onboard navigation useful for time-sensitive situations. The technology behind the mercury ion atomic clock and a DSAC mission overview are presented. Example deep space applications of DSAC, including navigation of a Mars orbiter and Europa flyby gravity science, highlight the benefits of DSAC-enabled one-way Doppler tracking.

  20. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D1 line of 87Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications

  1. The Potential of Continuous, Local Atomic Clock Measurements for Earthquake Prediction and Volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Jetzer, Philippe; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  2. Testing General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity with Space-based Atomic Clocks and Atom Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Jetzer, Philippe; Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-16}$ in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters $|\\beta -1|, |\\gamma-1| \\lesssim 10^{-6}$. We also briefly revi...

  3. Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions to the electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2016-01-01

    Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions may significantly increase probabilities of otherwise very weak electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions (e.g. transitions between $s$ and $f$ electron orbitals). These transitions can be used for exceptionally accurate atomic clocks, quantum information processing and search for dark matter. They are very sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model, such as temporal variation of the fine structure constant, the Lorentz invariance and Einstein equivalence principle violation. We formulate conditions under which the hyperfine-induced electric dipole contribution dominates. Due to the hyperfine quenching the electric octupole clock transition in $^{173}$Yb$^+$ is two orders of magnitude stronger than that in currently used $^{171}$Yb$^+$. Some enhancement is found in $^{143}$Nd$^{13+}$, $^{149}$Pm$^{14+}$, $^{147}$Sm$^{14+}$, and $^{147}$Sm$^{15+}$ ions.

  4. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability

  5. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on ...

  6. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin||lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2009-01-01

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin||lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of rf modulation power, and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2*10^{-11} tau^{-1/2} for observation times 1sclock with environmental impacts minimized.

  7. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Topcu, T

    2016-01-01

    We predict the possibility of "triply-magic" optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the ${^1}\\!S_{0}$ and ${^3}\\!P_{0}$ clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  8. Proposal of a dual-ball atomic fountain clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Shi; Rong Wei; Zichao Zhou; Tang Li; Yuzhu Wang

    2011-01-01

    @@ A simple improved structure is designed to trap and launch two cold atomic balls vertically at the same time, which works like "two fountains", but is more compact since most components of the "two fountains"are shared.It is expected to improve the stability of the fountain markedly.%A simple improved structure is designed to trap and launch two cold atomic balls vertically at the same time, which works like “two fountains”, but is more compact since most components of the “two fountains”are shared. It is expected to improve the stability of the fountain markedly.

  9. Microfabricated rubidium vapour cell with a thick glass core for small-scale atomic clock applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new fabrication method to manufacture alkali reference cells having dimensions larger than standard micromachined cells and smaller than glass-blown ones, for use in compact atomic devices such as vapour-cell atomic clocks or magnetometers. The technology is based on anodic bonding of silicon and relatively thick glass wafers and fills a gap in cell sizes and technologies available up to now: on one side, microfabrication technologies with typical dimensions ≤ 2 mm and on the other side, classical glass-blowing technologies for typical dimensions of about 6–10 mm or larger. The fabrication process is described for cells containing atomic Rb and spectroscopic measurements (optical absorption spectrum and double resonance) are reported. The analysis of the bonding strength of our cells was performed and shows that the first anodic bonding steps exhibit higher bonding strengths than the later ones. The spectroscopic results show a good quality of the cells. From the double-resonance signals, we predict a clock stability of ≈3 × 10−11 at 1 s of integration time, which compares well to the performance of compact commercial Rb atomic clocks. (paper)

  10. Microwave lensing frequency shift of the PHARAO laser-cooled microgravity atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Phillip; Gibble, Kurt; Laurent, Phillipe; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the microwave lensing frequency shift of the microgravity laser-cooled caesium clock PHARAO. We find microwave lensing frequency shifts of δν/ν  =  11  ×  10-17 to 13  ×  10-17, larger than the shift of typical fountain clocks. The shift has a weak dependence on PHARAO parameters, including the atomic temperature, size of the atomic cloud, detection laser intensities, and the launch velocity. We also find the lensing frequency shift to be insensitive to selection and detection spatial inhomogeneities and the expected low-frequency vibrations. We conservatively assign a nominal microwave lensing frequency uncertainty of  ±4  ×  10-17.

  11. The potential of continuous, local atomic clock measurements for earthquake prediction and volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  12. Limits on gravitational Einstein Equivalence Principle violation from monitoring atomic clock frequencies during a year

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2016-01-01

    Sun's gravitation potential at earth varies during a year due to varying Earth-Sun distance. Comparing the results of very accurate measurements of atomic clock transitions performed at different time in the year allows us to study the dependence of the atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential. We examine the measurement data for the ratio of the frequencies in Hg$^+$ and Al$^+$ clock transitions and absolute frequency measurements (with respect to caesium frequency standard) for Dy, Sr, H, hyperfine transitions in Rb and H, and obtain significantly improved limits on the values of the gravity related parameter of the Einstein Equivalence Principle violating term in the Standard Model Extension Hamiltonian $c_{00} = (3.0 \\pm 5.7) \\times 10^{-7}$ and the parameter for the gravity-related variation of the fine structure constant $\\kappa_{\\alpha} = (-5.3 \\pm 10) \\times 10^{-8}$.

  13. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft’s reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth’s gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ∼ 10−16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β − 1|, |γ − 1| ≲ 10−6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  14. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Berengut J. C.; Flambaum V. V.; Ong A.

    2013-01-01

    We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be re...

  15. Distinguishing between evidence and its explanations in the steering of atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum theory reflects within itself a separation of evidence from explanations. This separation leads to a known proof that: (1) no wave function can be determined uniquely by evidence, and (2) any chosen wave function requires a guess reaching beyond logic to things unforeseeable. Chosen wave functions are encoded into computer-mediated feedback essential to atomic clocks, including clocks that step computers through their phases of computation and clocks in space vehicles that supply evidence of signal propagation explained by hypotheses of spacetimes with metric tensor fields. The propagation of logical symbols from one computer to another requires a shared rhythm—like a bucket brigade. Here we show how hypothesized metric tensors, dependent on guesswork, take part in the logical synchronization by which clocks are steered in rate and position toward aiming points that satisfy phase constraints, thereby linking the physics of signal propagation with the sharing of logical symbols among computers. Recognizing the dependence of the phasing of symbol arrivals on guesses about signal propagation transports logical synchronization from the engineering of digital communications to a discipline essential to physics. Within this discipline we begin to explore questions invisible under any concept of time that fails to acknowledge unforeseeable events. In particular, variation of spacetime curvature is shown to limit the bit rate of logical communication. - Highlights: • Atomic clocks are steered in frequency toward an aiming point. • The aiming point depends on a chosen wave function. • No evidence alone can determine the wave function. • The unknowability of the wave function has implications for spacetime curvature. • Variability in spacetime curvature limits the bit rate of communications

  16. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10−11/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10−22 m2 s−1 Pa−1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases

  17. Distinguishing between evidence and its explanations in the steering of atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, John M., E-mail: myers@seas.harvard.edu [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hadi Madjid, F., E-mail: gmadjid@aol.com [82 Powers Road, Concord, MA 01742 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Quantum theory reflects within itself a separation of evidence from explanations. This separation leads to a known proof that: (1) no wave function can be determined uniquely by evidence, and (2) any chosen wave function requires a guess reaching beyond logic to things unforeseeable. Chosen wave functions are encoded into computer-mediated feedback essential to atomic clocks, including clocks that step computers through their phases of computation and clocks in space vehicles that supply evidence of signal propagation explained by hypotheses of spacetimes with metric tensor fields. The propagation of logical symbols from one computer to another requires a shared rhythm—like a bucket brigade. Here we show how hypothesized metric tensors, dependent on guesswork, take part in the logical synchronization by which clocks are steered in rate and position toward aiming points that satisfy phase constraints, thereby linking the physics of signal propagation with the sharing of logical symbols among computers. Recognizing the dependence of the phasing of symbol arrivals on guesses about signal propagation transports logical synchronization from the engineering of digital communications to a discipline essential to physics. Within this discipline we begin to explore questions invisible under any concept of time that fails to acknowledge unforeseeable events. In particular, variation of spacetime curvature is shown to limit the bit rate of logical communication. - Highlights: • Atomic clocks are steered in frequency toward an aiming point. • The aiming point depends on a chosen wave function. • No evidence alone can determine the wave function. • The unknowability of the wave function has implications for spacetime curvature. • Variability in spacetime curvature limits the bit rate of communications.

  18. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence, Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel CH-2000 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  19. Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions to the electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions may significantly increase probabilities of otherwise very weak electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions (e.g., transitions between s and f electron orbitals). These transitions can be used for exceptionally accurate atomic clocks, quantum information processing, and the search for dark matter. They are very sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model, such as temporal variation of the fine-structure constant, the Lorentz invariance, and Einstein equivalence principle violation. We formulate conditions under which the hyperfine-induced electric dipole contribution dominates and perform calculations of the hyperfine structure and E3, M2 and the hyperfine-induced E1 transition rates for a large number of atoms and ions of experimental interest. Due to the hyperfine quenching the electric octupole clock transition in +173Yb is 2 orders of magnitude stronger than that in currently used +171Yb. Some enhancement is found in 13+143Nd, 14+149Pm, 14+147Sm, and 15+147Sm ions.

  20. Quantum projection noise limited stability of a 88Sr+ atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, B.; Dubé, P.; Madej, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluated accuracy of a single trapped 88Sr+ ion clock referenced to the 5s2 S 1/2 - 4d 2 D 5/2 transition at 445 THz at the National Research Council of Canada has reached 1.2 x 10-17 over recent years. On the other hand, the stability of an atomic clock determines how long the signals from two similar clocks have to be compared to reach a given level of uncertainty. Here, we report on the improvement of the stability of NRC's 88Sr+ single ion clock by reducing the Allan deviation from 1 x 10-14 to 3 x 10-15 at 1 second averaging time. This is done by the implementation of a clear out laser that transfers the ion from the metastable state to the ground state at each cycle, followed by a state-preparation step that transfers the ion to the desired ground state magnetic sublevel of the probed transition.

  1. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D1 line of 87Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to ≅25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hachisu, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based ...

  3. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  4. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Y b+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11/τ1/2.

  5. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atom as a candidate for optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Tolstikhina, I; Kalganova, E; Vishnyakova, G; Khabarova, K; Tregubov, D; Golovizin, A; Sorokin, V; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-01-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the $^{169}$Tm atom at the wavelength of $1.14\\,\\mu$m as a candidate for a 2D optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=7/2)$ and $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=5/2)$ in the spectral range from $250\\,$nm to $1200\\,$nm, we suggest the "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at $807\\,$nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at $1.14\\,\\mu$m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to $8\\times10^{-17}$ in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ in fractional units. By direct excitation of the $1.14\\,\\mu$m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole ...

  6. Status of the atomic fountain clock at the National Research Council of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, S.; Alcock, J.; Jian, B.; Gertsvolf, M.; Bernard, J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the rapid advances in optical frequency standards, caesium fountain clocks retain a critical role as the most accurate primary frequency standards available. At the National Research Council Canada, we are working to develop a second generation caesium fountain clock. Work is currently underway to improve several systems of FCs1, such as the laser system and microwave local oscillator, which will be incorporated into its refurbished version, FCs2. In addition, we have added an optical pumping stage which has increased the detected atom number by over a factor of six. In collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), we are planning on replacing the physics package of FCs1. We will report on several recent improvements to FCs1, along with our progress in the development of FCs2.

  7. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2015-01-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf$^{12+}$ to U$^{34+}$, which have the $4f^{12}$ configuration of valence electrons, the Ir$^{17+}$ ion, which has a hole in almost filled $4f$ subshell, the Ho$^{14+}$, Cf$^{15+}$, Es$^{17+}$ and Es$^{16+}$ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, $\\alpha$ ($\\alpha = e^2/\\hbar c$). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to $\\alpha$-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  8. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with the current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10-11τ-1/2 for observation times 1 s≤τ≤20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  9. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, T; Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  10. Role of the multipolar black-body radiation shifts in the atomic clocks at the 10-18 uncertainty level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    We present here an overview of the role of the multipolar black-body radiation (BBR) shifts in the single ion atomic clocks to appraise the anticipated 10-18 uncertainty level. With an attempt to use the advanced technologies for reducing the instrumental uncertainties at the unprecedented low, it is essential to investigate contributions from the higher-order systematics to achieve the ambitious goal of securing the most precise clock frequency standard. In this context, we have analysed contributions to the BBR shifts from the multipolar polarizabilities in a few ion clocks.

  11. δ-electron spectroscopy and the atomic clock effect in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of strongly bound electrons in superheavy quasimolecular systems with combined nuclear charge numbers Z = ZP + ZT ≥ 110 are investigated. The emission of δ-electrons may serve as an atomic clock for nuclear reactions which is associated with the large overlap of the electron probability density with the nuclear interior. Excitation and emission rates of inner-shell electrons in collisions of very heavy ions with beam energies at or above the nuclear Coulomb barrier depend explicitly on details of the nuclear dynamics. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed. (orig.)

  12. Some theoretical aspects of the group-IIIA-ion atomic clocks: Intercombination transition probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main focus of this paper is the theoretical study of the 3P1→1S0 intercombination transition probabilities of the group-IIIA ions that are excellent candidates for high-accuracy atomic clocks. The importance of relativistic effects on the intercombination transition probabilities is made apparent by comparing their calculated values with those of the allowed 1P1→1S0 transition probabilities. In striking contrast to the allowed transition probabilities, the intercombination transition probabilities exhibit a strong Z dependence

  13. High-precision atomic clocks with highly charged ions: nuclear spin-zero $f^{12}$-shell ions

    OpenAIRE

    Dzuba, V. A.; Derevianko, A; Flambaum, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    Optical atomic clocks using highly-charged ions hold an intriguing promise of metrology at the 19th significant figure. Here we study transitions within the $4f^{12}$ ground-state electronic configuration of highly charged ions. We consider isotopes lacking hyperfine structure and show that the detrimental effects of coupling of electronic quadrupole moments to gradients of trapping electric field can be effectively reduced by using specially chosen virtual clock transitions. The estimated sy...

  14. Effects of getters on hermetically sealed micromachined cesium–neon cells for atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wafer-level integration technique of PageWafer® (SAES Getters’ solution for getter film integration into wafer to wafer bonded devices) has been tested in hermetically sealed miniature glass-Si-glass cells filled with Cs and Ne, e.g. for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) atomic clock applications. Getter effects on the cell atmosphere are analyzed by quadruple mass spectroscopy and coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The quadruple mass spectroscopy revealed that the residual gases (H2, O2, N2 and CO2) that are attributed to anodic bonding process are drastically reduced by the getter films while desirable gases such as Ne seem to remain unaffected. The impurity pressure in the getter-integrated cells was measured to be less than 4 × 10−2 mbar, i.e. pressure 50 times lower than the one measured in the cells without getter (2 mbar). Consequently, the atmosphere of the getter-integrated cells is much more pure than that of the getter-free cells. CPT signals obtained from the getter-integrated cells are stable and are, in addition, similar to each other within a cell batch, suggesting the strong potential of applications of this getter film and especially for its wafer-level integration to MEMS atomic clocks and magnetometers. (paper)

  15. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  16. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  17. Effects of variation of fundamental constants from big bang to atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental 'constants' in expanding Universe. I discuss effects of variation of the fine structure constant alpha=e2/h c, strong interaction and quark mass. The measurements of these variations cover lifespan of the Universe from few minutes after Big Bang to the present time and give controversial results. There are some hints for the variation in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, quasar absorption spectra and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. A billion times enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic energy levels. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  18. Review of chip-scale atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on chip-scale atomic clocks (CSACs) based on coherent population trapping (CPT) is reviewed. The background and the inspiration for the research are described, including the important schemes proposed to improve the CPT signal quality, the selection of atoms and buffer gases, and the development of micro-cell fabrication. With regard to the reliability, stability, and service life of the CSACs, the research regarding the sensitivity of the CPT resonance to temperature and laser power changes is also reviewed, as well as the CPT resonance's collision and light of frequency shifts. The first generation CSACs have already been developed but its characters are still far from our expectations. Our conclusion is that miniaturization and power reduction are the most important aspects calling for further research. (review)

  19. 0.75 atoms improve the clock signal of 10,000 atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, I.; Lange, K; Peise, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Ramsey, atom interferometers are employed for precision metrology, in particular to measure time and to realize the second. In a classical interferometer, an ensemble of atoms is prepared in one of the two input states, whereas the second one is left empty. In this ca...

  20. Explaining atomic clock behavior in a gravitational field with only 1905 Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hidalgo-Gato, Rafael A Valls

    2010-01-01

    Supported only in the two 1905 Einstein's papers on Relativity and a very rigid respect for the historical context, an analysis is done of the derivation of the universal mass-energy relationship. It is found, contrary to the today accepted Physics knowledge, that a body's Rest Mass measures its Potential Energy in the 1905 context. After emphasizing the difference between 1905 Relativity (1905R) and Special Relativity (SR), the developing of a 1905R relativistic gravity is started for a small mass m material point moving in the central gravitational field of a great mass M one. A formula for the rest mass m_0 as a function of its distance r from M is obtained. Finally, those results are applied to an atomic clock in a gravitational field, reaching a factor to obtain the clock time rate change very close to the GR one. The factors from 1905R and GR are compared, emphasizing the absent of a singularity in 1905R. In the conclusions, a new road for the development of a 1905R relativistic mechanics is declared, r...

  1. Atom interferometers and optical atomic clocks: New quantum sensors for fundamental physics experiments in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present projects for future space missions using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms. They will enable fundamental physics experiments testing quantum physics, physics beyond the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions, special relativity, gravitation and general relativity

  2. Two-step pulse observation for Raman-Ramsey coherent population trapping atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, Yuichiro; Kajita, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a two-step pulse observation method to enhance frequency stability for coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clocks. The proposed method is a Raman-Ramsey scheme with low light intensity at resonance observation, and provides a Ramsey-CPT resonance with both reduced frequency sensitivity to the light intensity and a high signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the repumping into a steady dark state. The resonance characteristics were calculated based on density matrix analysis of a $\\Lambda$-type three level system that was modeled on the $^{133}$Cs-D$_1$ line, and the characteristics were also measured using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and a Cs vapor cell.

  3. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  4. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Devenoges; André, Stefanov; Antoine, Jallageas; Jacques, Morel; Thomas, Südmeyer; Pierre, Thomann

    2016-01-01

    We report the evaluation of the second order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of the continuous operation and its geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountain are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. The pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to measure the Zeeman frequency with spatial resolution and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with an uncertainty smaller than 10E-16 in relative units.

  5. Towards development of the lamp-based 113Cd+ ion atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We review the development of the microwave frequency standard based on trapped Cd+ ions. The purpose of this development is to test for a possible variation of the fine structure constant by measuring differences of fractional frequency shifts of two (or three) atomic clocks in strong gravitational potential near the sun. The 113Cd+ ions are trapped in the linear quadrupole rf ion trap, similar to one described elsewhere. The trap region was not shielded from an ambient magnetic field. Approximately 105 Torr of He as a buffer gas is used to cool ions to near room temperature and increase loading efficiency. The ions are optically pumped into the S1/2, F=0 hyperfine level of the ground state by a UV light from the Cd rf discharge lamp. The 106Cd lamp has about 1 Torr of Ar and about 1 mg of 106Cd. With 10 W of rf power, the lamp substantially pumps 113Cd+ ions in the F=0 hyperfine level in one second. The ions are interrogated by one Rabi pulse using microwave radiation tuned to a clock transition ∼ 15.2 GHz that couples 52S1/2 hyperfine levels, F=1, mf=0 - F=0, mf=0. The microwave signal was referenced to a hydrogen maser. Detection, i.e., measurements of how many ions made the microwave transition, was performed using the light from the same 106Cd lamp. The UV light-microwave double-resonance spectrum is at 15.199862903 GHz, 45 Hz higher then the high precision measurement of Cd hyperfine splitting at zero magnetic field. The obtained resonance width of ∼ 0.17 Hz when interrogating for 5 sec and high signal to background light ratio gives an estimated short-term stability below 5x10-13. (author)

  6. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition 1S0 - 3P0 in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the 1S0-1P1 transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in 87Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10-3 Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  7. 原子钟、原子弹哪个更重要%Which one is more important, Atomic Bomb or Atomic Clock?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李滚; 蔡成林; 袁海波

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1945年原子弹(Atomic Bomb)在广岛长崎爆炸之前,一般人很难理解原子弹的威力,原子钟(Atomic Clock)也不是大家都能一睹为快的;但是,原子弹和原子钟的概念的确已是家喻户晓.

  8. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad2/Hz and −129 dB rad2/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10−14 at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out

  9. Accurate measurement of the quadratic Zeeman coefficient of 87Rb clock transition based on the Ramsey atom interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quadratic Zeeman coefficient was previously measured by using the single pulse spectroscopy method, in which the experimental resolution is limited by the line width of the spectrum of the clock transition. In this paper, an accurate measurement of the quadratic Zeeman coefficient is presented by using the Ramsey atom interferometer. The line width of the central Ramsey fringe of the 87Rb clock transition, which depends on the interrogation time, is much narrower than that of the single pulse spectroscopy method. The measurement uncertainty of less than 1 Hz G−2 is realized, which is much better than the other current existing results. The measured quadratic Zeeman coefficient of the 87Rb clock transition is 575.33±0.36 Hz G−2 by the Raman Ramsey atom interferometer, and 575.48 ± 0.30 Hz G−2 by the microwave Ramsey atom interferometer, which coincides well with the theoretical result of 575.15 Hz G−2 calculated by the Breit–Rabi formula. (paper)

  10. Reliability characteristics of microfabricated Rb mini-lamps for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; de Rooij, Nico; Shea, Herbert

    2013-03-01

    With the rising need for microfabricated chip-scale atomic clocks to enable high precision timekeeping in portable applications, there has been active interest in developing miniature (pumping in double-resonance clocks. We reported in 2012 a first microfabricated chip-scale Rubidium dielectric barrier discharge lamp. The device's preliminary results indicated its high potential for optical pumping applications and wafer-scale batch fabrication. The chip-scale plasma light sources were observed to be robust with no obvious performance change after thousands of plasma ignitions, and with no electrode erosion from plasma discharges since the electrodes are external. However, as atomic clocks have strict lamp performance requirements including less than 0.1% sub-second optical power fluctuations, power consumption less than 20 mW and a device lifetime of at least several years, it is important to understand the long-term reliability of these Rb planar mini-lamps, and identify the operating conditions where these devices can be most reliable and stable. In this paper, we report on the reliability of such microfabricated lamps including a continuous several month run of the lamp where the optical power, electrical power consumption and temperature stability were continuously monitored. We also report on the effects of temperature, rf-power and the lamp-drive parasitics on the optical power stability and discuss steps that could be taken to further improve the device's performance and reliability.

  11. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  12. Precision Clock Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests and evaluates high-precision atomic clocks for spacecraft, ground, and mobile applications. Supports performance evaluation, environmental testing,...

  13. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10-16 accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10-18.

  14. Stable clocks and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Will, C M

    1995-01-01

    We survey the role of stable clocks in general relativity. Clock comparisons have provided important tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle, which underlies metric gravity. These include tests of the isotropy of clock comparisons (verification of local Lorentz invariance) and tests of the homogeneity of clock comparisons (verification of local position invariance). Comparisons of atomic clocks with gravitational clocks test the Strong Equivalence Principle by bounding cosmological variations in Newton's constant. Stable clocks also play a role in the search for gravitational radiation: comparision of atomic clocks with the binary pulsar's orbital clock has verified gravitational-wave damping, and phase-sensitive detection of waves from inspiralling compact binaries using laser interferometric gravitational observatories will facilitate extraction of useful source information from the data. Stable clocks together with general relativity have found important practical applications in navigational systems s...

  15. A CPT-based Cs vapor cell atomic clock with a short-term fractional frequency stability of 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Liu, Xiaochi; Guérandel, Stéphane; De Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on the development and short-term fractional frequency stability of a continuous-regime (CW) Cs vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The push-pull optical pumping technique is used to increase the number of atoms that participate to the clock transition, yielding a typical CPT resonance contrast of 25% for a CPT linewidth of about 450 Hz. The clock short-term fractional frequency stability is measured to be 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2 up to 100 seconds averaging time, in correct agreement with the signal-to-noise ratio limit. The mid-term frequency stability results are currently mainly limited by laser power effects. The detection of high-contrast narrow Raman-Ramsey fringes is demonstrated with this setup by making the atoms interact with a light pulse sequence.

  16. Frequency shift due to blackbody radiation in a cesium atomic fountain and improvement of the clock performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FO1 was the first caesium fountain primary frequency standard in the world. The most recent evaluation in 2002 before improvement reached an accuracy of 1*10-15 when operated with optical molasses. Working as an extremely precise and stable instrument, FO1 has contributed to fundamental physics and technical measurements: - Frequency comparison between Cs and Rb fountains over an interval of 5 years sets an upper limit for a possible variation of the fine structure constant as |alpha/alpha| -15/y. The resolution is about 5 times better than the previous test in our laboratory. The projected accuracy of the space clock PHARAO is 1*10-16. We confirmed its Ramsey cavity performance by testing the phase difference between the two interaction zones in FO1. The measured temperature T dependent frequency shift of the Cs clock induced by the blackbody radiation field is given as nu(T)=154(6)*10-6*(T/300)4[1+ε(T/300)2] Hz with the theoretical value ε = 0,014. The obtained accuracy represents a 3 times improvement over the previous measurement by the PTB group. Some improvements have been carried out on FO1. The new FO1 version works directly with optical molasses loaded by a laser slowed atomic beam. The application of the adiabatic passage method to perform the state selection allows us to determine the atom number dependent frequency shifts due to the cold collision and cavity pulling effects at a level of of 10-16. Recently, the obtained frequency stability is 2,8*10-14*τ-1/2 for about 4*106 detected atoms. The accuracy is currently under evaluation, the expected value is a few times 10-16. (author)

  17. Active optical clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JingBiao

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the principles and techniques of active optical clock, a special laser combining the laser physics of one-atom laser, bad-cavity gas laser, super-cavity stabilized laser and optical atomic clock together. As a simple example, an active optical clock based on thermal strontium atomic beam shows a quantum-limited linewidth of 0.51 Hz, which is insensitive to laser cavity-length noise, and may surpass the recorded narrowest 6.7 Hz of Hg ion optical clock and 1.5 Hz of very recent optical lattice clock. The estimated 0.1 Hz one-second instability and 0.27 Hz uncertainty are limited only by the rela-tivistic Doppler effect, and can be improved by cold atoms.

  18. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  19. Compact Yb$^+$ optical atomic clock project: design principle and current status

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroûte, Clément; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Millo, Jacques; Saleh, Khaldoun; Bigler, Emmanuel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Giordano, Vincent; Kersalé, Yann

    2016-01-01

    We present the design of a compact optical clock based on the $^2S_{1/2} \\rightarrow ^2D_{3/2}$ 435.5 nm transition in $^{171}$Yb$^+$. The ion trap will be based on a micro-fabricated circuit, with surface electrodes generating a trapping potential to localize a single Yb ion a few hundred $\\mu$m from the electrodes. We present our trap design as well as simulations of the resulting trapping pseudo-potential. We also present a compact, multi-channel wavelength meter that will permit the frequency stabilization of the cooling, repumping and clear-out lasers at 369.5 nm, 935.2 nm and 638.6 nm needed to cool the ion. We use this wavelength meter to characterize and stabilize the frequency of extended cavity diode lasers at 369.5 nm and 638.6 nm.

  20. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  1. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  2. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10−14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10−14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10−15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards

  3. Limits on the temporal variation of the fine structure constant, quark masses and strong interaction from quasar absorption spectra and atomic clock experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V; Thomas, A W; Young, R D

    2004-01-01

    We perform calculations of the dependence of nuclear magnetic moments on quark masses and obtain limits on the variation of $(m_q/\\Lambda_{QCD})$ from recent measurements of hydrogen hyperfine (21 cm) and molecular rotational transitions in quasar absorption systems, atomic clock experiments with hyperfine transitions in H, Rb, Cs, Yb$^+$, Hg$^+$ and optical transition in Hg$^+$. Experiments with Cd$^+$, deuterium/hydrogen, molecular SF$_6$ and Zeeman transitions in $^3$He/Xe are also discussed.

  4. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  5. Identifying Nonstationary Clock Noises in Navigation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia Tavella; Lorenzo Galleani

    2008-01-01

    The stability of the atomic clocks on board the satellites of a navigation system should remain constant with time. In reality there are numerous physical phenomena that make the behavior of the clocks a function of time, and for this reason we have recently introduced the dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR), a measure of the time-varying stability of an atomic clock. In this paper we discuss the dynamic Allan variance for phase and frequency jumps, two common nonstationarities of atomic clocks. T...

  6. Phase Coherent Link of an Atomic Clock to a Self-Referenced Microresonator Frequency Comb

    CERN Document Server

    Del'Haye, Pascal; Fortier, Tara; Beha, Katja; Cole, Daniel C; Yang, Ki Youl; Lee, Hansuek; Vahala, Kerry J; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    The counting and control of optical cycles of light has become common with modelocked laser frequency combs. But even with advances in laser technology, modelocked laser combs remain bulk-component devices that are hand-assembled. In contrast, a frequency comb based on the Kerr-nonlinearity in a dielectric microresonator will enable frequency comb functionality in a micro-fabricated and chip-integrated package suitable for use in a wide-range of environments. Such an advance will significantly impact fields ranging from spectroscopy and trace gas sensing, to astronomy, communications, atomic time keeping and photonic data processing. Yet in spite of the remarkable progress shown over the past years, microresonator frequency combs ("microcombs") have still been without the key function of direct f-2f self-referencing and phase-coherent frequency control that will be critical for enabling their full potential. Here we realize these missing elements using a low-noise 16.4 GHz silicon chip microcomb that is coher...

  7. A HBAR-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Daugey, Thomas; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source. A 2.298~GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally-controlled two-port AlN-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24000 at 68$^{\\circ}$C, is frequency multiplied by 2 to 4.596~GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the HBAR is measured to be $-23$~ppm/$^{\\circ}$C at 2.298~GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596~GHz source is $-105$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 1~kHz offset and $-150$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 100~kHz offset. The 4.596~GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator (LO) in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter (VCPS) implemented in the 2.298~GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming...

  8. Stability Analysis of the In-Orbit Satellite Atomic Clocks%GPS在轨卫星原子钟的稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长会; 闫国锋

    2012-01-01

    导航卫星星载原子钟的相位或频率数据,作为导航系统应用研究的基础,将直接影响导航系统时间尺度建立以及定位的精度和准确性.本文针对由IGS官网提供的四种GPS卫星钟的钟差数据,采用修正阿伦方差进行了稳定性分析,得到了一些有益的结论.%As the application research basis of navigation system, the phase or frequency data of in - orbit satellite atomic clocks directly affect the precision and accuracy of navigation system. This paper analyzes the stability of four types of data of GPS satellite a-tomic clocks which is provided by the official website of IGS using Allan variance method and reaches some beneficial conclusions.

  9. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10-18 fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  10. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10−9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10−11 τ−1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance

  11. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  12. Selection and amplification of a single optical frequency comb mode for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the active filtering and amplification of a single mode from an optical femtosecond laser comb with mode spacing of 250 MHz by optical injection of two external-cavity diode lasers operating in cascade to build a narrow linewidth laser for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical lattice clock. Despite the low injection of individual comb mode of approximately 50 nW, a single comb line at 689 nm could be filtered and amplified to reach as high as 10 mW with 37 dB side mode suppression and a linewidth of 240 Hz. This method could be applied over a broad spectral band to build narrow linewidth lasers for various applications

  13. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Jonathan D.; Beloy, Kyle; Derevianko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a ``magic'' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency -- to maintain clock accuracy -- while an open-shell J=1/2 ``head'' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent ``Archimedes' screw'' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of th...

  14. Progress of the ~(87)Rb Fountain Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zi-Chao; WEI Rong; SHI Chun-Yan; LV De-Sheng; LI Tang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A fountain atomic clock based on cold ~(87)Rb atoms has been in operation in our laboratory for several months.We therefore report the design of the rubidium fountain clock including its physical package,optical system and daily operation.Ramsey fringes have been attained with the signal to noise ratio of about 100.

  15. Progress of the 87Rb Fountain Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fountain atomic clock based on cold 87 Rb atoms has been in operation in our laboratory for several months. We therefore report the design of the rubidium fountain clock including its physical package, optical system and daily operation. Ramsey fringes have been attained with the signal to noise ratio of about 100

  16. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Jonathan D; Derevianko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a ``magic'' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency -- to maintain clock accuracy -- while an open-shell J=1/2 ``head'' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent ``Archimedes' screw'' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of the vanishing vector polarizability of the scalar, J=0, clock states of bosonic isotopes of divalent atoms. The on-site interactions between the clock atoms and the head atom are used to engineer entanglement and for clock readout.

  17. Body Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2000-01-01

    “Body clocks” are biological methods of controling body activities.Every living thing has one. In humans, a body clock controls normal periods of sleeping and waking. It controls the time swhen you are most likely to feel pain.Eating, sleeping and exercising at about the same time each day will help keep body activities normal. But changes in your life, a new job, for example, destroy the balance and thus cause health problems.

  18. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  19. 欧洲空间原子钟组ACES 与超高精度时频传递技术新进展%Advances in Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space of Europe and Ultraprecise Time and Frequency Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文可; 孟文东; 韩文标; 谢勇辉; 任晓乾; 胡小工; 董文丽

    2016-01-01

    高精度时间频率的产生和超高精度时频信号的传递是现代物理学、天文学和计量科学的基础。空间原子钟组计划(Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space, ACES)是由欧洲空间局实施的基于国际空间站(International Space Station, ISS)微重力环境下的新型空间微波原子钟实验验证项目。概要介绍ACES项目基本情况,重点介绍ACES项目的主要科学和技术目标,围绕科学目标而形成的ACES 组成结构,并梳理涉及的关键技术,特别介绍了ACES 将应用的超高精度时频传递技术,为我国自主研究并实现相关空间时间频率系统及其应用提供参考。最后简述了我国正在建设的空间站时频系统主要情况和实施计划。%One of the foundations for the development of modern physics, astronomy and metrology is the generation, transfer and measurement of high precision time frequency signals. As a space mission for the study of high precision time frequency signals, Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space, or ACES, sponsored by European Space Agency to launch in 2017 or later, will take advantage of the excellent stability performance of microwave atomic clocks in a microgravity environment. One clock using laser-cooled Cs atoms working together with one hydrogen maser clock are planned to be placed onboard the International Space Station in hope to produce a frequency standard with both accuracy and stability reaching the level of 10−16. A microwave link along with a laser link will be set up between ACES and ground atomic clocks distributed around the world for high precision comparison and transfer. Various basic researches will benefit from a high precision space atomic clock such as the verification of Einstein’s general relativity, detection of possible time variability of certain fundamental constants in physics, as well as brand new applications such as relativistic gravity and GNSS remote sensing. This paper reviews and summarizes the

  20. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 0} in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms; Premiere observation de la transition fortement interdite {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 0} du strontium, pour une horloge optique a atomes pieges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtillot, I

    2003-11-01

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition in {sup 87}Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10{sup -3} Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  1. Performances evaluation of the PHARAO atomic fountain: participation to the study of the PHARAO space clock; Evaluation des performances de la fontaine atomique PHARAO, participation a l'etude de l'horloge spatiale PHARAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, M

    2003-01-01

    The performances of an atomic frequency standard depend drastically on the observation time of the atoms. The interrogation of laser cooled atoms allows to obtain about half a second interaction time in a fountain geometry. This duration could be much more varied in absence of gravity, and would allow a better trade-off between stability and accuracy. The application of this principle is the aim of the PHARAO project, that should attend to the ACES mission planned in 2006 onboard the International Space Station. The first part of this thesis deals with the cold Cs{sup 133} PHARAO fountain. This clock stems from the transformation of a space clock prototype previously tested in microgravity. A detailed evaluation of the whole frequency shifts has been carried out, reaching a 7.7 10{sup -16} accuracy and a 1.7 10{sup -13}{tau}{sup -1/2} short term stability. These values are obtained for 4 10{sup 5} detected atoms, that provides a good stability-accuracy trade-off. This transportable fountain, built at BNM-SYRTE, has been operating at MPQ in Munich (Germany). The collaboration between the 2 laboratories gave a {approx} 10 improvement factor on the measurement accuracy (1.8 10{sup -14}) for the 1S - 2S two photons hydrogen transition. In a second part of this thesis, we present the characterisation of 2 elements of the PHARAO space clock: the construction of a standard extended cavity laser and the test of the phase symmetry between the two interrogating areas of the space cavity. (author)

  2. S-Wave Collisional Frequency Shift of a Fermion Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hazlett, Eric L; Stites, Ronald W; Gibble, Kurt; O'Hara, Kenneth M

    2012-01-01

    We report an s-wave collisional frequency shift of an atomic clock based on fermions. In contrast to bosons, the fermion clock shift is insensitive to the population difference of the clock states, set by the first pulse area in Ramsey spectroscopy, \\theta_1. The fermion shift instead depends strongly on the second pulse area \\theta_2. It allows the shift to be canceled, nominally at \\theta_2 = \\pi/2, but correlations shift the null to slightly larger \\theta_2. The shift applies to optical lattice clocks and increases with the spatial inhomogeneity of the clock excitation field, naturally large at optical frequencies.

  3. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  4. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  5. Lego clocks : building a clock from parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Michael; Simons, Mirre J. P.; Merrow, Martha

    2008-01-01

    A new finding opens up speculation that the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks in Synechococcus elongatus is composed of multiple oscillator systems (Kitayama and colleagues, this issue, pp. 1513-1521), as has been described in many eukaryotic clock model systems. However, an alternative intepr

  6. Optical Clocks in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, S; Nevsky, A; Koelemeij, J C J; Wicht, A; Gill, P; Klein, H A; Margolis, H S; Mileti, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Peik, E; Tamm, C; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Klein, V; Salomon, C; Tino, G M; Lemonde, P; Holzwarth, R; Hänsch, T W; Tamm, Chr.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of optical clocks has strongly progressed in recent years, and accuracies and instabilities of 1 part in 10^18 are expected in the near future. The operation of optical clocks in space provides new scientific and technological opportunities. In particular, an earth-orbiting satellite containing an ensemble of optical clocks would allow a precision measurement of the gravitational redshift, navigation with improved precision, mapping of the earth's gravitational potential by relativistic geodesy, and comparisons between ground clocks.

  7. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  8. A quantum network of clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Peter; Kessler, Eric; Bishof, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Sorensen, Anders; Ye, Jun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Shared timing information constitutes a key resource for positioning and navigation with a direct correspondence between timing accuracy and precision in applications such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). By combining precision metrology and quantum networks, we propose here a quantum, cooperative protocol for the operation of a network consisting of geographically remote optical atomic clocks. Using non-local entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of the global network resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental limit set by quantum theory yielding an ultra-precise clock signal. Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with basic techniques from quantum communication, guarantees security both from internal and external threats. Realization of such a global quantum network of clocks may allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy. See also: Komar et al. arXiv:1310.6045 (2013) and Kessler et al. arXiv:1310.6043 (2013).

  9. Atomic Properties of Lu$^+$

    OpenAIRE

    Paez, Eduardo; Arnold, K. J.; Hajiyev, Elnur; Porsev, S. G.; Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M.S.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Singly ionised Lutetium has recently been suggested as a potential clock candidate. Here we report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of \\ce{Lu^+}. Measurements relevant to practical clock operation are made and compared to atomic structure calculations. Calculations of scalar and tensor polarizabilities for clock states over a range of wavelengths are also given. These results will be useful for future work with this clock candidate.

  10. Atomic properties of Lu+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Eduardo; Arnold, K. J.; Hajiyev, Elnur; Porsev, S. G.; Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    Singly ionized lutetium has recently been suggested as a potential clock candidate. Here we report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of Lu+. Measurements relevant to practical clock operation are made and compared to atomic structure calculations. Calculations of scalar and tensor polarizabilities for clock states over a range of wavelengths are also given. These results will be useful for future work with this clock candidate.

  11. Recent progress of neutral mercury lattice clock in SIOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R. C.; Fu, X. H.; Liu, K. K.; Gou, W.; Sun, J. F.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Neutral mercury atom is one of good candidates of optical lattice clock. Due to its large atomic number, mercury atom is insensitive to black body radiation, which is the severe limitation for the development of optical clocks. However, the challenge of neutral mercury lattice clock is the requirement of high power deep-UV lasers, especially for both the cooling laser and the lattice laser. Here, we report the recent progress of neutral mercury lattice clock in SIOM, including the development for laser cooling of mercury atom and the cooling laser system with fiber laser amplifier. We have realized the magneto-optical trap of mercury atoms and measured the parameters of cold mercury atoms. A home-made external cavity diode laser works as a seed laser for a room temperature 1014.8 nm fiber laser amplifier. A new efficient frequency-doubling cavity from 1015 nm to 507 nm has been developed.

  12. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  13. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard. PMID:25734183

  14. Hanle detection for optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with 423 nm electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. And the potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. This Hanle detection configur...

  15. Magic Wavelength of an Optical Clock Transition of Barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar to most of the other alkaline earth elements, barium atoms can be candidates for optical clocks, thus the magic wavelength for an optical lattice is important for the clock transition. We calculate the magic wavelength of a possible clock transition between 6s21S0 and 6s5d3 D2 states of barium atoms. Our theoretical result shows that there are three magic wavelengths 615.9nm, 641.2nm and 678.8nm for a linearly polarized optical lattice laser for barium. (atomic and molecular physics)

  16. Superradiance on the milliHertz linewidth strontium clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Norcia, Matthew A; Cline, Julia R K; Thompson, James K

    2016-01-01

    Today's best atomic clocks are limited by frequency noise on the lasers used to interrogate the atoms. A proposed solution to this problem is to create a superradiant laser using an optical clock transition as its gain medium. This laser would act as an active atomic clock, and would be highly immune to the fluctuations in reference cavity length that limit today's best lasers. Here, we demonstrate and characterize superradiant emission from the mHz linewidth clock transition in an ensemble of laser-cooled $^{87}$Sr atoms trapped within a high-finesse optical cavity. We measure a collective enhancement of the emission rate into the cavity mode by a factor of more than 10,000 compared to independently radiating atoms. We also demonstrate a method for seeding superradiant emission and observe interference between two independent transitions lasing simultaneously. We use this interference to characterize the relative spectral properties of the two lasing sub-ensembles.

  17. Frequency Ratio of ${}^{199}$Hg and ${}^{87}$Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a ${}^{199}$Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a ${}^{87}$Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of $7.2 \\times 10^{-17}$ for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be $\

  18. Realization of a time-scale with an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Grebing, C; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Lipphardt, B; Riehle, F; Sterr, U; Lisdat, C

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks are not only powerful tools for prime fundamental research, but are also deemed for the re-definition of the SI base unit second as they surpass the performance of caesium atomic clocks in both accuracy and stability by more than an order of magnitude. However, an important obstacle in this transition has so far been the limited reliability of the optical clocks that made a continuous realization of a time-scale impractical. In this paper, we demonstrate how this dilemma can be resolved and that a time-scale based on an optical clock can be established that is superior to one based on even the best caesium fountain clocks. The paper also gives further proof of the international consistency of strontium lattice clocks on the $10^{-16}$ accuracy level, which is another prerequisite for a change in the definition of the second.

  19. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  20. Design of Alarm Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Budík, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to create alarm clock, which respect the functional, technical and aesthetic requirements of this device and attain an attractive design of this product. The final draft should be innovative, original and user attractive alarm clock.

  1. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  2. Stimulated Raman clock transition without a differential ac Stark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We considered a stimulated Raman clock transition between the ground hyperfine states of an alkali atom by using the second-order perturbation theory and the spherical tensor formalism. When the light fields are circularly polarized and properly detuned, the differential ac Stark shift of the clock transition vanishes with non-vanishing transition amplitude. With a two-zone Raman Ramsey method and a slow atomic beam, the proposed scheme should result in a clock with a systematic shift of the order of a few mHz for the case of cesium. (author)

  3. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  4. On-chip clock error characterization for clock distribution system

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Chuan; Galayko, Dimitri; Anceau, François

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a test strategy for characterization of clock error statistics between two clock domains in high-speed clocking systems (gigahertz and more). The method allows an indirect measurement (not based on time interval measurement) of clock error distribution by observing the integrity of a periodic sequence transmitted between two clocking domains. The method is compatible with fully on-chip implementation, and the readout of result to off-chip signals is cadenced at l...

  5. Subtleties of the clock retardation

    OpenAIRE

    Redzic, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    For a simple electromagnetic model of a clock introduced by Jefimenko (clock $\\#$ 1 in 1996 {\\it Am. J. Phys.} {\\bf 64} 812), a change of the rate of the clock when it is set in uniform motion is calculated exactly, employing the correct equation of motion of a charged particle in the electromagnetic field and the universal boostability assumption. Thus, for the clock under consideration, a dynamical content of the clock retardation is demonstrated. Somewhat surprisingly, the analysis present...

  6. Toward A Neutral Mercury Optical Lattice Clock: Determination of the Magic Wavelength for the Ultraviolet clock Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lattice clock combines the advantages of ion and neutral atom based clocks, namely the recoil and first order Doppler free spectroscopy allowed by the Lamb-Dicke regime. This lattice light field shifts the energy levels of the clock transition. However a wavelength can be found where the light-shift of the clock states cancelled to first order. In this thesis, we present the latest advances in optical lattice clock with mercury atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the current performances of different optical clock are currently under development, we focus on the concept of optical lattice clock and the features of the mercury that make him an excellent candidate for the realization of an optical lattice clock achievement the uncertainty of the level of 10-17. The second part is devoted to the characterization of the mercury MOT, using a sensitive detection system, which allowed us to evaluate the temperature of different isotopes present in the MOT and have a good evidence of sub-Doppler cooling for the fermionic isotopes. The third part of this these, present the experimental aspects of the implementation and the development of the laser source required for trapping mercury atoms operating near the predicted magic wavelength. Finally, we report on the Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of the 1S0 →3 P0 clock transition in the 199Hg atoms confined in lattice trap. With use of the ultra-stable laser system, linked to LNE-SYRTE primary frequency reference, we have determined the center frequency of the transition for a range of lattice wavelengths and different lattice depths. Analyzing these measurement, we have carried out the first experimental determination of the magic wavelength, which is the crucial step towards achieving a highly accurate frequency standard using mercury. (author)

  7. A self-interfering clock as a "which path" witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-11

    In Einstein's general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global-all clocks "tick" uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets "tick" at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields "which path" information, degrading the pattern's visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield "which path" information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world. PMID:26249229

  8. Clocking in the face of unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2015-05-01

    In earlier papers we showed unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty in atomic clocks, ensuing from a proven gap between given evidence and explanations of that evidence. Here we reconceive a clock, not as an isolated entity, but as enmeshed in a self-adjusting communications network adapted to one or another particular investigation, in contact with an unpredictable environment. From the practical uses of clocks, we abstract a clock enlivened with the computational capacity of a Turing machine, modified to transmit and to receive numerical communications. Such "live clocks" phase the steps of their computations to mesh with the arrival of transmitted numbers. We lift this phasing, known in digital communications, to a principle of logical synchronization, distinct from the synchronization defined by Einstein in special relativity. Logical synchronization elevates digital communication to a topic in physics, including applications to biology. One explores how feedback loops in clocking affect numerical signaling among entities functioning in the face of unpredictable influences, making the influences themselves into subjects of investigation. The formulation of communications networks in terms of live clocks extends information theory by expressing the need to actively maintain communications channels, and potentially, to create or drop them. We show how networks of live clocks are presupposed by the concept of coordinates in a spacetime. A network serves as an organizing principle, even when the concept of the rigid body that anchors a special-relativistic coordinate system is inapplicable, as is the case, for example, in a generic curved spacetime.

  9. On clocks and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Witte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cumulus clouds exhibit a life cycle that consists of: (a the growth phase (increasing size, most notably in the vertical direction; (b the mature phase (growth ceases; any precipitation that develops is strongest during this period; and (c the dissipation phase (cloud dissipates because of precipitation and/or entrainment; no more dynamical support. Although radar can track clouds over time and give some sense of the age of a cloud, most aircraft in situ measurements lack temporal context. We use large eddy simulations of trade wind cumulus cloud fields from cases during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX and Rain In Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO campaigns to demonstrate a potential cumulus cloud "clock". We find that the volume-averaged total water mixing ratio rt is a useful cloud clock for the 12 clouds studied. A cloud's initial rt is set by the subcloud mixed-layer mean rt and decreases monotonically from the initial value due primarily to entrainment. The clock is insensitive to aerosol loading, environmental sounding and extrinsic cloud properties such as lifetime and volume. In some cases (more commonly for larger clouds, multiple pulses of buoyancy occur, which complicate the cumulus clock by replenishing rt. The clock is most effectively used to classify clouds by life phase.

  10. A mercury optical lattice clock at LNE-SYRTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarlo, L.; Favier, M.; Tyumenev, R.; Bize, S.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the development of an optical lattice clock based on mercury and the results obtained since the 7 th SFSM. We briefly present a new solution for the cooling laser system and an improved lattice trap that allows us to interrogate a few thousand atoms in parallel. This translates into a fractional short term stability of 1.2 x 10-15 at the clock frequency of 1.129 PHz.

  11. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of "clocks"

    CERN Document Server

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of "clocks", which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. "Clock" interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  12. Frequency ratios of Sr, Yb and Hg based optical lattice clocks and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Masao; Das, Manoj; Nemitz, Nils; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Takano, Tetsushi; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the recent progress of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium ($^{87}$Sr), ytterbium ($^{171}$Yb) and mercury ($^{199}$Hg) atoms. In particular, we present frequency comparison between the clocks locally via an optical frequency comb and between two Sr clocks at remote sites using a phase-stabilized fibre link. We first review cryogenic Sr optical lattice clocks that reduce the room-temperature blackbody radiation shift by two orders of magnitude and serve as a reference in the following clock comparisons. Similar physical properties of Sr and Yb atoms, such as transition wavelengths and vapour pressure, have allowed our development of a compatible clock for both species. A cryogenic Yb clock is evaluated by referencing a Sr clock. We also report on a Hg clock, which shows one order of magnitude less sensitivity to blackbody radiation, while its large nuclear charge makes the clock sensitive to the variation of fine-structure constant. Connecting all three types of clocks by an o...

  13. Study of laser-pumped double-resonance clock signals using a microfabricated cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our microwave spectroscopic studies on laser-microwave double-resonance (DR) signals obtained from a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell. This study focuses on the characteristics and systematic shifts of the ground-state 'clock transition' in 87Rb (| Fg = 1,mF = 0) → | Fg = 2, mF = 0)) used in Rb atomic clocks, and represents a first step toward a miniature atomic clock based on the DR scheme. A short-term clock instability below 2 × 1011τ-1/2 is demonstrated, staying below 10-11 up to τ = 104 s.

  14. Collisional Losses, Decoherence, and Frequency Shifts in Optical Lattice Clocks with Bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have quantified collisional losses, decoherence and the collision shift in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock on the highly forbidden transition 1S0-3P0 at 698 nm with bosonic 88Sr. We were able to distinguish two loss channels: inelastic collisions between atoms in the upper and lower clock state and atoms in the upper clock state only. Based on the measured coefficients, we determine the operation parameters at which a 1D-lattice clock with 88Sr shows no degradation due to collisions on the fractional uncertainty level of 10-16.

  15. The circadian clock goes genomic

    OpenAIRE

    Staiger, D; Shin, J; Johansson, M; Davis, S

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale biology among plant species, as well as comparative genomics of circadian clock architecture and clock-regulated output processes, have greatly advanced our understanding of the endogenous timing system in plants.

  16. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs

  17. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  18. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-09-27

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs.

  19. Mercury Ion Clock for a NASA Technology Demonstration Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, Robert L; Prestage, John D; Burt, Eric A; Chen, Pin; Chong, Yong J; Chung, Sang K; Diener, William; Ely, Todd; Enzer, Daphna G; Mojaradi, Hadi; Okino, Clay; Pauken, Mike; Robison, David; Swenson, Bradford L; Tucker, Blake; Wang, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    There are many different atomic frequency standard technologies but only few meet the demanding performance, reliability, size, mass, and power constraints required for space operation. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a linear ion-trap-based mercury ion clock, referred to as DSAC (Deep-Space Atomic Clock) under NASA's Technology Demonstration Mission program. This clock is expected to provide a new capability with broad application to space-based navigation and science. A one-year flight demonstration is planned as a hosted payload following an early 2017 launch. This first-generation mercury ion clock for space demonstration has a volume, mass, and power of 17 L, 16 kg, and 47 W, respectively, with further reductions planned for follow-on applications. Clock performance with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)*Q limited stability of 1.5E-13/τ(1/2) has been observed and a fractional frequency stability of 2E-15 at one day measured (no drift removed). Such a space-based stability enables autonomous timekeeping of with a technology capable of even higher stability, if desired. To date, the demonstration clock has been successfully subjected to mechanical vibration testing at the 14 grms level, thermal-vacuum operation over a range of 42(°)C, and electromagnetic susceptibility tests. PMID:27019481

  20. Science 101: How Do Atomic Clocks Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 2008

    2008-01-01

    You might be wondering why in the world we need such precise measures of time. Well, many systems we use everyday, such as Global Positioning Systems, require precise synchronization of time. This comes into play in telecommunications and wireless communications, also. For purely scientific reasons, we can use precise measurement of time to…

  1. Conveyor belt clock synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannetti, V; Maccone, L; Shapiro, J H; Wong, F N C; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2004-01-01

    A protocol for synchronizing distant clocks is proposed that does not rely on the arrival times of the signals which are exchanged, and an optical implementation based on coherent-state pulses is described. This protocol is not limited by any dispersion that may be present in the propagation medium through which the light signals are exchanged. Possible improvements deriving from the use of quantum-mechanical effects are also addressed.

  2. Synchronization of clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we recall the famous Huygens’ experiment which gave the first evidence of the synchronization phenomenon. We consider the synchronization of two clocks which are accurate (show the same time) but have pendula with different masses. It has been shown that such clocks hanging on the same beam can show the almost complete (in-phase) and almost antiphase synchronizations. By almost complete and almost antiphase synchronization we defined the periodic motion of the pendula in which the phase shift between the displacements of the pendula is respectively close (but not equal) to 0 or π. We give evidence that almost antiphase synchronization was the phenomenon observed by Huygens in XVII century. We support our numerical studies by considering the energy balance in the system and showing how the energy is transferred between the pendula via oscillating beam allowing the pendula’s synchronization. Additionally we discuss the synchronization of a number of different pendulum clocks hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. It has been shown that after a transient, different types of synchronization between pendula can be observed; (i) the complete synchronization in which all pendula behave identically, (ii) pendula create three or five clusters of synchronized pendula. We derive the equations for the estimation of the phase differences between phase synchronized clusters. The evidence, why other configurations with a different number of clusters are not observed, is given.

  3. Analysis of inhomogeneous-excitation frequency shifts of ytterbium optical lattice clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the frequency shifts caused by inhomogeneous excitation in a 171Yb optical lattice clock. The dependences of the inhomogeneity on the temperature of the cold ytterbium atoms and the misaligning angle between the lattice laser and the clock laser are analyzed by numerical calculations. The dependence of the fractional collisional frequency shift on the ground state fraction under different cold atom temperatures, atom numbers, lattice trap depths and unequal transverse and longitudinal temperatures are also shown. The results show that the uncertainty of the ytterbium clocks, contributed by the inhomogeneous excitation, can be reduced to be 10−19 or even lower with certain conditions. (letter)

  4. Frequency ratios of optical lattice clocks at the 17th decimal place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-05-01

    Optical lattice clocks benefit from a low quantum-projection noise by simultaneously interrogating a large number of atoms, which are trapped in an optical lattice tuned to the ``magic wavelength'' to largely cancel out light shift perturbation in the clock transition. About a thousand atoms enable the clocks to achieve 10-18 instability in a few hours of operation, allowing intensive investigation and control of systematic uncertainties. As optical lattice clocks have reached inaccuracies approaching 10-18, it is now the uncertainty of the SI second (~ 10-16) itself that restricts the measurement of the absolute frequencies of such optical clocks. Direct comparisons of optical clocks are, therefore, the only way to investigate and utilize their superb performance beyond the SI second. In this presentation, we report on frequency comparisons of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium (87 Sr), ytterbium (171 Yb) and mercury (199 Hg) atoms. By referencing cryogenic Sr clocks, we determine frequency ratios, νYb/νSr and νHg/νSr, of a cryogenic Yb clock and a Hg clock with uncertainty at the mid 10-17 level. Such ratios provide an access to search for temporal variation of the fundamental constants. We also present remote comparisons between cryogenic Sr clocks located at RIKEN and the University of Tokyo over a 30-km-long phase-stabilized fiber link. The gravitational red shift Δν /ν0 ~ 1.1× 10-18 Δh cm-1 reads out the height difference of Δh ~ 15 m between the two clocks with uncertainty of 5 cm, which demonstrates a step towards relativistic geodesy. ERATO, JST.

  5. Prediction of GNSS satellite clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the characterisation and prediction of GNSS-satellite-clocks. A prerequisite to develop powerful algorithms for the prediction of clock-corrections is the thorough study of the behaviour of the different clock-types of the satellites. In this context the predicted part of the IGU-clock-corrections provided by the Analysis Centers (ACs) of the IGS was compared to the IGS-Rapid-clock solutions to determine reasonable estimates of the quality of already existing well performing predictions. For the shortest investigated interval (three hours) all ACs obtain almost the same accuracy of 0,1 to 0,4 ns. For longer intervals the individual predictions results start to diverge. Thus, for a 12-hours- interval the differences range from nearly 10 ns (GFZ, CODE) until up to some 'tens of ns'. Based on the estimated clock corrections provided via the IGS Rapid products a simple quadratic polynomial turns out to be sufficient to describe the time series of Rubidium-clocks. On the other hand Cesium-clocks show a periodical behaviour (revolution period) with an amplitude of up to 6 ns. A clear correlation between these amplitudes and the Sun elevation angle above the orbital planes can be demonstrated. The variability of the amplitudes is supposed to be caused by temperature-variations affecting the oscillator. To account for this periodical behaviour a quadratic polynomial with an additional sinus-term was finally chosen as prediction model both for the Cesium as well as for the Rubidium clocks. The three polynomial-parameters as well as amplitude and phase shift of the periodic term are estimated within a least-square-adjustment by means of program GNSS-VC/static. Input-data are time series of the observed part of the IGU clock corrections. With the estimated parameters clock-corrections are predicted for various durations. The mean error of the prediction of Rubidium-clock-corrections for an interval of six hours reaches up to 1,5 ns. For the 12-hours

  6. Low-power, miniature 171Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped 171Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm3 ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes + clock reaches the 10−14 range after a few days of integration.

  7. A Light Clock Satisfying the Clock Hypothesis of Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The design of the FMEL, a floor-mirrored Einstein-Langevin "light clock", is introduced. The clock provides a physically intuitive manner to calculate and visualize the time dilation effects for a spatially extended set of observers (an accelerated "frame") undergoing unidirectional acceleration or observers on a rotating cylinder of constant…

  8. Frequency noise processes in a strontium ion optical clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent comparison of the frequencies of a pair of optical clocks based on the 674 nm 2S1/2–2D5/2 optical clock transition in 88Sr+ has highlighted the need to understand factors affecting frequency instability. We have developed statistical models to show that our clock is capable of reaching the quantum projection noise limit; for our clock using 100 ms probe pulses, this is ∼3 × 10−15/√τ. However, this optical clock uses atomic transitions with a linear Zeeman shift, which can lead to a degradation in stability in the presence of magnetic field noise. We show that this generally leads to an increase in white frequency noise, even in cases dominated by magnetic field flicker or random walk noise. By taking into account both the quantum projection and magnetic field noise we are able to explain our observed frequency instabilities. This analysis will relate to any optical clock with a linear Zeeman shift where cancellation of this shift is achieved by interrogating pairs of components. Furthermore, implementing automatic control of lasers and minimization of micromotion requires pausing of the frequency servo occasionally; this leads to only a small degradation of frequency stability. (paper)

  9. Clock Synchronisation in the Vicinity of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Goy, Francois

    1997-01-01

    The transmission time of an electromagnetic signal in the vicinity of the earth is calculated to c-2 and contains an orbital Sagnac term. On earth, the synchronisation of the Barycentric Coordinate Time (TCB) can be realised by atomic clocks, but not the one of Geocentric Coordinate Time (TCG). The principle of equivalence is discussed.

  10. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  11. Polarizabilities of the beryllium clock transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarizabilities of the three lowest states of the beryllium atom are determined from a large basis configuration interaction calculation. The polarizabilities of the 2s21Se ground state (37.73a03) and the 2s2p 3P0o metastable state (39.04a03) are found to be very similar in size and magnitude. This leads to an anomalously small blackbody radiation shift at 300 K of -0.018(4) Hz for the 2s21Se-2s2p 3P0o clock transition. Magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of the ground and metastable states are also computed.

  12. Strontium Optical Lattice Clock: In Quest of the Ultimate Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the Sr optical lattice clock experiment at LNESYRTE, Observatoire de Paris. After having described the general principles for optical lattice clocks and the operation of the clock in question, the emphasis is put on the features that have been added to the experiment since 2007. The most important new elements are an ultra-stable reference cavity for the clock laser, the development of a non-destructive detection technique, and the construction of a second Sr lattice clock. The ultra-stable cavity is constructed from a ULE spacer and fused silica mirrors and has shown a thermal noise floor at 6.5 * 10-16, placing it among the best in the world. The non-destructive detection is effectuated by a phase measurement of a weak probe beam that traverses the atoms placed in one arm of a Mach-Zender interferometer. The non-destructive aspect enables a recycling of the atoms from cycle to cycle which consequently increases the duty cycle, allowing for an increase of the stability of the clock. With these new tools the frequency stability is expected to be 2.2 * 10-16/√τ for an optimized sequence. The most recent comparisons between the two Sr clocks reach an accuracy level of 10-16 after about 1000 s, and this way we have been able to characterize lattice related frequency shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. The measurements ensure a control of lattice related effects at the 10-18 level even for trap depths as large as 50Er. (authors)

  13. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  14. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  15. Suppression of collisional shifts in a strongly interacting lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Swallows, Matthew D; Lin, Yige; Blatt, Sebastian; Martin, Michael J; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined in optical lattices provide a unique opportunity for precise studies of quantum many-body systems. The 87Sr optical lattice clock at JILA has reached an overall fractional frequency uncertainty of 1x10^-16 [1, 2]. This uncertainty is dominated by two contributions: atomic collisions and frequency shifts due to room-temperature blackbody radiation. The density-dependent frequency shift arises from collisions between fermionic atoms that are subject to slightly inhomogeneous optical excitation [3, 4]. Several theories of the underlying frequency shift mechanism have been proposed [5-7]. A three-dimensional optical lattice clock, where each lattice site contains at most one atom, has been reported [8], and its collisional shift has been characterized with an uncertainty of 7x10^-16. Here we present a different and seemingly paradoxical solution to the problem: by strongly confining atoms in an array of quasi-one-dimensional potentials formed by a two-dimensional opti...

  16. Accuracy Evaluation of NIM5 Cesium Fountain Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NIM5 fountain clock is the second fountain clock built at NIM (National Institute of Metrology, China), and has been operating stably and sub-continually since 2008. The fountain operates with a simple one-stage optical molasses to collect cold atoms, which reduces the collisional frequency shift dramatically. The fractional frequency uncertainty is estimated to be 2 × 10−15. The typical frequency instability of 2.5 × 10−14 is obtained at 10 s. Comparisons with other fountain frequency standards worldwide demonstrate agreement within the stated uncertainties

  17. Frequency shift due to blackbody radiation in a cesium atomic fountain and improvement of the clock performances; Deplacement de frequence du au rayonnement du corps noir dans une fontaine atomique a cesium et amelioration des performances de l'horloge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S

    2004-07-01

    FO1 was the first caesium fountain primary frequency standard in the world. The most recent evaluation in 2002 before improvement reached an accuracy of 1*10{sup -15} when operated with optical molasses. Working as an extremely precise and stable instrument, FO1 has contributed to fundamental physics and technical measurements: - Frequency comparison between Cs and Rb fountains over an interval of 5 years sets an upper limit for a possible variation of the fine structure constant as |alpha/alpha| < 2*10{sup -15}/y. The resolution is about 5 times better than the previous test in our laboratory. The projected accuracy of the space clock PHARAO is 1*10{sup -16}. We confirmed its Ramsey cavity performance by testing the phase difference between the two interaction zones in FO1. The measured temperature T dependent frequency shift of the Cs clock induced by the blackbody radiation field is given as nu(T)=154(6)*10{sup -6}*(T/300){sup 4}[1+{epsilon}(T/300){sup 2}] Hz with the theoretical value {epsilon} = 0,014. The obtained accuracy represents a 3 times improvement over the previous measurement by the PTB group. Some improvements have been carried out on FO1. The new FO1 version works directly with optical molasses loaded by a laser slowed atomic beam. The application of the adiabatic passage method to perform the state selection allows us to determine the atom number dependent frequency shifts due to the cold collision and cavity pulling effects at a level of of 10{sup -16}. Recently, the obtained frequency stability is 2,8*10{sup -14}*{tau}{sup -1/2} for about 4*10{sup 6} detected atoms. The accuracy is currently under evaluation, the expected value is a few times 10{sup -16}. (author)

  18. Controllable clock circuit design in PEM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-precision synchronized clock circuit design will be presented, which can supply steady, reliable and anti-jamming clock signal for the data acquirement (DAQ) system of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). This circuit design is based on the Single-Chip Microcomputer and high-precision clock chip, and can achieve multiple controllable clock signals. The jamming between the clock signals can be reduced greatly with the differential transmission. Meanwhile, the adoption of CAN bus control in the clock circuit can prompt the clock signals to be transmitted or masked simultaneously when needed. (authors)

  19. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations...... have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed...

  20. The Kitaev–Feynman clock for open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that Kitaev's construction of Feynman's clock, in which the time-evolution of a closed quantum system is encoded as a ground state problem, can be extended to open quantum systems. In our formalism, the ground states of an ensemble of non-Hermitian Kitaev–Feynman clock Hamiltonians yield stochastic trajectories, which unravel the evolution of a Lindblad master equation. In this way, one can use the Kitaev–Feynman clock not only to simulate the evolution of a quantum system, but also its interaction with an environment such as a heat bath or measuring apparatus. A simple numerical example of a two-level atom undergoing spontaneous emission is presented and analyzed. (paper)

  1. A Two-Photon E1-M1 Optical Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Alden, E A; Leanhardt, A E

    2014-01-01

    An allowed E1-M1 excitation scheme creates optical access to the ${^1S_0} \\rightarrow {^3P_0}$ clock transition in group II type atoms. This method does not require the hyperfine mixing or application of an external magnetic field of other optical clock systems. The advantages of this technique include a Doppler-free excitation scheme and increased portability with the use of vapor cells. We will discuss technical mechanisms of a monochromatic excitation scheme for a hot E1-M1 clock and briefly discuss a bichromatic scheme to eliminate light shifts. We determine the optimal experimental parameters for Hg, Yb, Ra, Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg, and Be and calculate that neutral Hg has ideal properties for a hot, portable frequency standard.

  2. Constructive polarization modulation for coherent population trapping clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a constructive polarization modulation scheme for atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT). In this scheme, the polarization of a bichromatic laser beam is modulated between two opposite circular polarizations to avoid trapping the atomic populations in the extreme Zeeman sublevels. We show that if an appropriate phase modulation between the two optical components of the bichromatic laser is applied synchronously, the two CPT dark states which are produced successively by the alternate polarizations add constructively. Measured CPT resonance contrasts up to 20% in one-pulse CPT and 12% in two-pulse Ramsey-CPT experiments are reported, demonstrating the potential of this scheme for applications to high performance atomic clocks

  3. Highly-charged ions as a basis of optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Derevianko, Andrei; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel class of atomic clocks based on highly charged ions. We consider highly-forbidden laser-accessible transitions within the $4f^{12}$ ground-state configurations of highly charged ions. Our evaluation of systematic effects demonstrates that these transitions may be used for building exceptionally accurate atomic clocks which may compete in accuracy with recently proposed nuclear clock.

  4. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  5. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cansu Özbayer; İrfan Değirmenci

    2011-01-01

    There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome ...

  6. Gravitomagnetism and Relative Observer Clock Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Jantzen, Robert T; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2000-01-01

    The gravitomagnetic clock effect and the Sagnac effect for circularly rotating orbits in stationary axisymmetric spacetimes are studied from a relative observer point of view, clarifying their relationships and the roles played by special observer families. In particular Semer\\'ak's recent characterization of extremely accelerated observers in terms of the two-clock clock effect is shown to be complemented by a similarly special property of the single-clock clock effect.

  7. Variable molecular clocks in hominoids

    OpenAIRE

    Elango, Navin; Thomas, James W.; Yi, Soojin V.

    2006-01-01

    Generation time is an important determinant of a neutral molecular clock. There are several human-specific life history traits that led to a substantially longer generation time in humans than in other hominoids. Indeed, a long generation time is considered an important trait that distinguishes humans from their closest relatives. Therefore, humans may exhibit a significantly slower molecular clock as compared to other hominoids. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed a large-scale anal...

  8. The circadian clock in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, Mauro; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2000-01-01

    The basic physiological and anatomical basis for circadian rhythms in mammalian behaviour and physiology is introduced. The pathways involved in photic entrainment of the circadian clock are discussed in relation of new findings that identify the molecules that are involved in signalling between the environment and the clock. The molecular basis of endogenous cycles is described in the mouse, and compared to the mechanism that is present in the fly. Finally we speculate on the relationship be...

  9. The circadian clock in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, M. A.; Kyriacou, C P

    2005-01-01

    The basic physiological and anatomical basis for circadian rhythms in mammalian behaviour and physiology is introduced. The pathways involved in photic entrainment of the circadian clock are discussed in relation of new findings that identify the molecules that are involved in signalling between the environment and the clock. The molecular basis of endogenous cycles is described in the mouse, and compared to the mechanism that is present in the fly. Finally we speculate on the relationship be...

  10. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  11. Spin-orbit coupled fermions in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, S; Bothwell, T; Wall, M L; Marti, G E; Koller, A P; Zhang, X; Rey, A M; Ye, J

    2016-01-01

    Engineered spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in cold atom systems can aid in the study of novel synthetic materials and complex condensed matter phenomena. Despite great advances, alkali atom SOC systems are hindered by heating from spontaneous emission, which limits the observation of many-body effects. Here we demonstrate the use of optical lattice clocks (OLCs) to engineer and study SOC with metrological precision and negligible heating. We show that clock spectroscopy of the ultra-narrow transition in fermionic 87Sr represents a momentum- and spin-resolved in situ probe of the SOC band structure and eigenstates, providing direct access to the SOC dynamics and control over lattice band populations, internal electronic states, and quasimomenta. We utilize these capabilities to study Bloch oscillations, spin-momentum locking, and van Hove singularities in the transition density of states. Our results lay the groundwork for the use of OLCs to probe novel SOC phases including magnetic crystals, helical liquids, and to...

  12. A scheme for implementing quantum clock synchronization algorithm in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Qin-Qin; Kuang Le-Man

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for implementing the quantum clock synchronization (QCS) algorithm in cavity quantum electrodynamic (QED) formalism. Our method is based on three-level ladder-type atoms interacting with classical and quantized cavity fields. Atom-qubit realizations of three-qubit and four-qubit QCS algorithms are explicitly presented.

  13. Acting with the Clock: Clocking Practices in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses intra-actions that take place among humans and non-human others--the physical world, the materials--in early childhood education's everyday practices. Her object of study is the clock. Specifically, she provides an example of what it might mean to account for the intra-activity of the material-discursive…

  14. Single-transistor-clocked flip-flop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peiyi; Darwish, Tarek; Bayoumi, Magdy

    2005-08-30

    The invention provides a low power, high performance flip-flop. The flip-flop uses only one clocked transistor. The single clocked transistor is shared by the first and second branches of the device. A pulse generator produces a clock pulse to trigger the flip-flop. In one preferred embodiment the device can be made as a static explicit pulsed flip-flop which employs only two clocked transistors.

  15. 47 CFR 80.935 - Station clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station clock. 80.935 Section 80.935... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.935 Station clock. Each station subject to this subpart must have a working clock or timepiece readily available to...

  16. Microtraps and Atom Chips: Toolboxes for Cold Atom Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Feenstra, L.; Andersson, L. M.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic microtraps and Atom Chips are safe, small-scale, reliable and flexible tools to prepare ultra-cold and degenerate atom clouds as sources for various atom-optical experiments. We present an overview of the possibilities of the devices and indicate how a microtrap can be used to prepare and launch a Bose-Einstein condensate for use in an atom clock or an interferometer.

  17. CLOCK and NPAS2 have overlapping roles in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    DeBruyne, Jason P.; Weaver, David R.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1, bHLH-PAS transcription factors, are believed to be the major transcriptional regulators of the circadian clock mechanism in mammals. However, a recent study shows that CLOCK-deficient mice continue to exhibit robust behavioral and molecular rhythms. Here we report that the transcription factor NPAS2 (MOP4) is able to functionally substitute for CLOCK in the master brain clock in mice to regulate circadian rhythmicity.

  18. The NIST 27 Al+ quantum-logic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrandt, David; Brewer, Samuel; Chen, Jwo-Sy; Hume, David; Hankin, Aaron; Huang, Yao; Chou, Chin-Wen; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2016-05-01

    Optical atomic clocks based on quantum-logic spectroscopy of the 1 S0 3 P0 transition in 27 Al+ have reached a systematic fractional frequency uncertainty of 8 . 0 ×10-18 , enabling table-top tests of fundamental physics as well as measurements of gravitational potential differences. Currently, the largest limitations to the accuracy are second order time dilation shifts due to the driven motion (i.e., micromotion) and thermal motion of the trapped ions. In order to suppress these shifts, we have designed and built new ion traps based on gold-plated, laser-machined diamond wafers with differential RF drive, and we have operated one of our clocks with the ions laser cooled to near the six mode motional ground state. We present a characterization of the time dilation shifts in the new traps with uncertainties near 1 ×10-18 . Furthermore, we describe a new protocol for clock comparison measurements based on synchronous probing of the two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators, which allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time and avoids the Dick effect. This work is supported by ARO, DARPA, and ONR.

  19. Metrological characterization of the pulsed Rb clock with optical detection

    CERN Document Server

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Levi, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    We report on the implementation and the metrological characterization of a vapor-cell Rb frequency standard working in pulsed regime. The three main parts that compose the clock, physics package, optics and electronics, are described in detail in the paper. The prototype is designed and optimized to detect the clock transition in the optical domain. Specifically, the reference atomic transition, excited with a Ramsey scheme, is detected by observing the interference pattern on a laser absorption signal. \\ The metrological analysis includes the observation and characterization of the clock signal and the measurement of frequency stability and drift. In terms of Allan deviation, the measured frequency stability results as low as $1.7\\times 10^{-13} \\ \\tau^{-1/2}$, $\\tau$ being the averaging time, and reaches the value of few units of $10^{-15}$ for $\\tau=10^{4}$ s, an unprecedent achievement for a vapor cell clock. We discuss in the paper the physical effects leading to this result with particular care to laser...

  20. Clock Drawing in Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Guinevere F.; Wood, Frank B.; Stein, John F.

    2003-01-01

    A study involving 93 children (ages 10-12), 295 with poor reading skills, found many children with dyslexia and some garden-variety poor readers showed significant left neglect on the Clock Drawing Test. In poor readers with dyslexia, spatial construction deficits were observed like those of parents with acquired right-hemisphere lesions.…

  1. Clock gene expression during development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Bendová, Zdeňka; Sládek, Martin; Kováčiková, Zuzana; El-Hennamy, Rehab; Laurinová, Kristýna; Illnerová, Helena

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 191, Suppl.658 (2007), s. 18-18. ISSN 1748-1708. [Joint meeting of The Slovak Physiological Society, The Physiological Society and The Federation of European Physiological Societies. 11.09.2007-14.09.2007, Bratislava] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * clock genes * suprachiasmatic nucleus * rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  2. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10-18 and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s21S0-5s5p 3P0 in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10-16. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10-18 to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states Δαdc = α(5s5p 3P0)-α(5s21S0) = 4.078 73(11) x 10-39 Cm2 /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference Δαdc corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using Δαdc and experimental data for other atomic properties. To interrogate the ultracold atoms in the electric field a novel transport technique has been developed, which uses the magic wavelength (813 nm) optical lattice

  3. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  4. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  5. Testing the Gravitational Redshift with Atomic Gravimeters?

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Bordé, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Atom interferometers allow the measurement of the acceleration of freely falling atoms with respect to an experimental platform at rest on Earth's surface. Such experiments have been used to test the universality of free fall by comparing the acceleration of the atoms to that of a classical freely falling object. In a recent paper, M\\"uller, Peters and Chu [Nature {\\bf 463}, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometers also provide a very accurate test of the gravitational redshift (or universality of clock rates). Considering the atom as a clock operating at the Compton frequency associated with the rest mass, they claimed that the interferometer measures the gravitational redshift between the atom-clocks in the two paths of the interferometer at different values of gravitational potentials. In the present paper we analyze this claim in the frame of general relativity and of different alternative theories, and conclude that the interpretation of atom interferometers as testing the gravitational redshift ...

  6. Cryogenic optical lattice clocks with a relative frequency difference of $1\\times 10^{-18}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohkubo, Takuya; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Time and frequency are the most accurately measurable quantities, providing foundations for science and modern technologies. The accuracy relies on the SI (Syst\\'eme International) second that refers to Cs microwave clocks with fractional uncertainties at $10^{-16}$. Recent revolutionary progress of optical clocks aims to achieve $1\\times 10^{-18}$ uncertainty, which however has been hindered by long averaging-times or by systematic uncertainties. Here, we demonstrate optical lattice clocks with $^{87}$Sr atoms interrogated in a cryogenic environment to address the blackbody radiation-induced frequency-shift, which remains the primary source of clocks' uncertainties and has initiated vigorous theoretical and experimental investigations. The quantum-limited stability for $N \\sim 1,000$ atoms allows investigation of the uncertainties at $2\\times 10^{-18}$ in two hours of clock operation. After 11 measurements performed over a month, the two cryo-clocks agree to within $(-1.1\\pm 1.6)\\times 10^{-18}$. Besides its...

  7. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA 87Sr and NIST 171Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics

  8. Direct detection of the 229Th nuclear clock transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B.; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Trautmann, Norbert G.; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2016-05-01

    Today’s most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of 229Th (denoted 229mTh). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for 229mTh2+. More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard.

  9. A Study on the Steering Strategy for the Master Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Hong; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Yin, Dong-Shan

    2015-01-01

    A physical realization of UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) by the master clock system in a time laboratory is named UTC(k). In order to make the deviation of UTC(k) from UTC as small as possible, and keep high short-term and long-term frequency stabilities as well, a new steering algorithm is proposed, and the detailed algorithm is as follows: Firstly, a stable reference time scale (TA) for real-time monitoring UTC(NTSC) is introduced. The time scale algorithm for generating TA, which is computed as a weighted average of about 22 free-running atomic clocks at the National Time Service Center (NTSC), is based on the ALGOS algorithm. And the weighting procedure is designed to optimize the short-term frequency stability of the scale. Secondly, the frequency offset is calculated. (1) The frequency of the master clock in the next time interval is calculated; (2) The phase difference between TA and UTC(NTSC) is deducted; (3) The final frequency offset is generated on the basis of above steps. A software is compiled according to this algorithm. The results calculated with the software are sent to the microphase stepper automatically, so that the time signal derived from the steered master clock can be accurate, meanwhile its stability is not influenced. Finally, the experimental result shows that the new master clock steering strategy can control the phase offset within ±15 ns, meanwhile it can also improve its short-term stability on the condition that its long-term one is not influenced.

  10. Recent progress in optically-pumped cesium beam clock at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Zhou, S.; Wan, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, long-life, and low-drift cesium beam clock is investigated at Peking University, where the atoms are magnetic-state selected and optically detected. Stability close to that of the best commercial cesium clocks has been achieved from 10 to 105 s. As previously shown, the short-term stability is determined by atomic shot noise or laser frequency noise. The stabilizations of microwave power and C-field improve the long-term stability, with the help of a digital servo system based on field-programmable gate array.

  11. Synthetic dimensions and spin-orbit coupling with an optical clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Livi, L F; Diem, M; Franchi, L; Clivati, C; Frittelli, M; Levi, F; Calonico, D; Catani, J; Inguscio, M; Fallani, L

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel way of synthesizing spin-orbit interactions in ultracold quantum gases, based on a single-photon optical clock transition coupling two long-lived electronic states of two-electron $^{173}$Yb atoms. By mapping the electronic states onto effective sites along a synthetic "electronic" dimension, we have engineered synthetic fermionic ladders with tunable magnetic fluxes. We have detected the spin-orbit coupling with fiber-link-enhanced clock spectroscopy and directly measured the emergence of chiral edge currents, probing them as a function of the magnetic field flux. These results open new directions for the investigation of topological states of matter with ultracold atomic gases.

  12. Clocks, Quantum Oscillators and Gravity: A Rigorous Analysis and a New Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper is a comprehensive treatment of clocks in the presence of matter and gravity. With cold atom and single ion based ultra-precision clocks becoming available for research and metrology, a rigorous understanding of the influence of gravity on clocks is necessary, especially in the context of the ever-present cosmic gravity which in fact points to the necessity of a paradigm shift in thinking about time metrology. The phase of a stable oscillator is equivalent to physical time and this identification has enormous consequence in the context of quantum physics and gravity. Every quantum state is a superposition of abstract 'oscillators' and the phase shift induced by gravity is universal, independent of the nature of the oscillator, obeying the equivalence principle and the general principle of relativity. What constitutes a genuine clock and what is its ultimate precision in a measurement of gravitational time dilation is a hard problem in the context of the apparent universal behaviour of waves, quantum states and physical clocks in a gravitational field. In this paper I will establish two results: 1) the proper and the physical time of any clock is completely determined by the dominant cosmic gravitational potentials with small corrections induced by local gravitational potentials, and 2) atom interferometer gravimeters that measure relative phase shift of two stationary states in a gravitational field is not equivalent to two atomic clocks in a gravitational field. The first result provides a rigorous basis for all precision estimates of time accumulated by arbitrarily moving clocks with cosmic frame as the unambiguous decider of physical time, like GPS time, and solves all debates hitherto on clock comparisons. The second result is based on a rigorous treatment of the difference as well as the relation between the gravitational mass and the inertial mass. The result resolves the recent debate whether the measurement of the gravitational phase shift in

  13. Signal processing in cellular clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Forger, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(...

  14. Gaming in Combinatorial Clock Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Maarten; Karamychev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, Combinatorial Clock Auctions (CCAs) have been used around the world to allocate frequency spectrum for mobile telecom licenses. CCAs are claimed to significantly reduce the scope for gaming or strategic bidding. In this paper, we show, however, that CCAs significantly enhance the possibilities for strategic bidding. Real bidders in telecom markets are not only interested in the spectrum they win themselves and the price they pay for that, but also in the price com...

  15. Design principles underlying circadian clocks.

    OpenAIRE

    Rand, D.A.; Shulgin, B. V.; D. Salazar; Millar, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental problem for regulatory networks is to understand the relation between form and function: to uncover the underlying design principles of the network. Circadian clocks present a particularly interesting instance, as recent work has shown that they have complex structures involving multiple interconnected feedback loops with both positive and negative feedback. While several authors have speculated on the reasons for this, a convincing explanation is still lacking.We analyse both t...

  16. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  17. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  18. Optical to microwave clock frequency ratios with a nearly continuous strontium optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Bookjans, Eva; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Shi, Chunyan; Vallet, Grégoire; Targat, Rodolphe Le; Nicolodi, Daniele; Coq, Yann Le; Guéna, Jocelyne; Abgrall, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Bize, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Optical lattice clocks are at the forefront of frequency metrology. Both the instability and systematic uncertainty of these clocks have been reported to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the best microwave clocks. For this reason, a redefinition of the SI second based on optical clocks seems possible in the near future. However, the operation of optical lattice clocks has not yet reached the reliability that microwave clocks have achieved so far. In this paper, we report on the operation of a strontium optical lattice clock that spans several weeks, with more than 80% uptime. We make use of this long integration time to demonstrate a reproducible measurement of frequency ratios between the strontium clock transition and microwave Cs primary and Rb secondary frequency standards.

  19. The Square Light Clock and Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J. Ronald; Amiri, Farhang

    2012-01-01

    A thought experiment that includes a square light clock is similar to the traditional vertical light beam and mirror clock, except it is made up of four mirrors placed at a 45[degree] angle at each corner of a square of length L[subscript 0], shown in Fig. 1. Here we have shown the events as measured in the rest frame of the square light clock. By…

  20. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcri...

  1. Performance Evaluation of Clock Synchronization Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Anceaume, Emmanuelle; Puaut, Isabelle

    1998-01-01

    Clock synchronization algorithms ensure that physically dispersed processors have a common knowledge of time. This report proposes a survey of software fault-tolerant clock synchronization algorithms: deterministic, probabilistic and statistical ; internal and external ; and resilient from crash to Byzantine failures. Our survey is based on a classification of clock synchronization algorithms (according to their internal structure and to three orthogonal and independent basic building blocks ...

  2. Interaction of circadian clock proteins PER2 and CRY with BMAL1 and CLOCK

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon Alain; Tallone Tiziano; Langmesser Sonja; Rusconi Sandro; Albrecht Urs

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Circadian oscillation of clock-controlled gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 act as activators of target gene transcription; however, interactions of PER and CRY proteins with the heterodimer abolish its transcriptional activation capacity. PER and CRY are therefore referred to as negative regulators of the circadian clock. To further elucidate the mechanism how positive and negative components of the clock int...

  3. Search for Effects of an Electrostatic Potential on Clocks in the Frame of Reference of a Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Conradi, Mark S.; Cassenti, Brice

    2005-01-01

    Results of experiments to confirm a theory that links classical electromagnetism with the geometry of spacetime are described. The theory, based on the introduction of a Torsion tensor into Einstein s equations and following the approach of Schroedinger, predicts effects on clocks attached to charged particles, subject to intense electric fields, analogous to the effects on clocks in a gravitational field. We show that in order to interpret this theory, one must re-interpret all clock changes, both gravitational and electromagnetic, as arising from changes in potential energy and not merely potential. The clock is provided naturally by proton spins in hydrogen atoms subject to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance trials. No frequency change of clocks was observed to a resolution of 6310(exp -9). A new "Clock Principle" was postulated to explain the null result. There are two possible implications of the experiments: (a) The Clock Principle is invalid and, in fact, no metric theory incorporating electromagnetism is possible; (b) The Clock Principle is valid and it follows that a negative rest mass cannot exist.

  4. Frequency ratio of Yb and Sr clocks with $5 \\times 10^{-17}$ uncertainty at 150 s averaging time

    CERN Document Server

    Nemitz, Nils; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transition frequencies of atoms and ions are among the most accurately accessible quantities in nature, playing important roles in pushing the frontiers of science by testing fundamental laws of physics, in addition to a wide range of applications such as satellite navigation systems. Atomic clocks based on optical transitions approach uncertainties of $10^{-18}$, where full frequency descriptions are far beyond the reach of the SI second. Frequency ratios of such super clocks, on the other hand, are not subject to this limitation. They can therefore verify consistency and overall accuracy for an ensemble of super clocks, an essential step towards a redefinition of the second. However, with the measurement stabilities so far reported for such frequency ratios, a confirmation to $1 \\times 10^{-18}$ uncertainty would require an averaging time $\\tau$ of multiple months. Here we report a measurement of the frequency ratio of neutral ytterbium and strontium clocks with a much improved stability of $4 \\times 10^{-1...

  5. Introduction: Finding new clock components; past and future

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of circadian clocks has been unraveled primarily by the use of phenotype-driven (forward) genetic analysis in a number of model systems. We are now in a position to consider what constitutes a clock component, whether we can establish criteria for clock components, and whether we have found most of the primary clock components? This perspective discusses clock genes and how genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry have been used to find clock gene...

  6. Comparing a mercury optical lattice clock with microwave and optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Tyumenev, R; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Nicolodi, D; Coq, Y Le; Abgrall, M; Guéna, J; De Sarlo, L; Bize, S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the evaluation of an optical lattice clock based on neutral mercury down to a relative uncertainty of $1.7\\times 10^{-16}$. Comparing this characterized frequency standard to a Cs atomic fountain we determine the absolute frequency of the $^1S_0 \\rightarrow \\phantom{}^3P_0$ transition of $^{199}$Hg as $\

  7. Prospect for a compact strontium optical lattice clock

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; M. G. Tarallo; Tino, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on our progress toward the realization of a compact optical frequency standard referenced to strontium intercombination lines. Our current setup allows the production of ultracold Sr atoms in hundreds of ms. For high resolution spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 doubly forbidden transition we have prepared a 698 nm clock laser stabilized on a high finesse, symmetrically suspended cavity and a high power 813 nm light source for the optical lattice trap at the magic wavelength. Due to their ...

  8. Strontium optical lattice clock with all semiconductor sources

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; M. G. Tarallo; Tino, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on our progress toward the realization of an optical frequency standard referenced to strontium intercombination lines. Our current setup allows the production of ultracold Sr atoms in hundreds of ms. For high resolution spectroscopy of 1S0-3P0 doubly forbidden transition we have also prepared a 698 nm clock laser stabilized on high finesse symmetrically suspended cavity and a high power 813 nm light source for the optical lattice trap at the magic wavelength. All the laser source e...

  9. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  10. Fast Clock Recovery for Digital Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit extracts clock signal from random non-return-to-zero data stream, locking onto clock within one bit period at 1-gigabitper-second data rate. Circuit used for synchronization in opticalfiber communications. Derives speed from very short response time of gallium arsenide metal/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's).

  11. Temperature influences in receiver clock modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kan; Meindl, Michael; Rothacher, Markus; Schoenemann, Erik; Enderle, Werner

    2016-04-01

    In Precise Point Positioning (PPP), hardware delays at the receiver site (receiver, cables, antenna, …) are always difficult to be separated from the estimated receiver clock parameters. As a result, they are partially or fully contained in the estimated "apparent" clocks and will influence the deterministic and stochastic modelling of the receiver clock behaviour. In this contribution, using three years of data, the receiver clock corrections of a set of high-precision Hydrogen Masers (H-Masers) connected to stations of the ESA/ESOC network and the International GNSS Service (IGS) are firstly characterized concerning clock offsets, drifts, modified Allan deviations and stochastic parameters. In a second step, the apparent behaviour of the clocks is modelled with the help of a low-order polynomial and a known temperature coefficient (Weinbach, 2013). The correlations between the temperature and the hardware delays generated by different types of antennae are then analysed looking at daily, 3-day and weekly time intervals. The outcome of these analyses is crucial, if we intend to model the receiver clocks in the ground station network to improve the estimation of station-related parameters like coordinates, troposphere zenith delays and ambiguities. References: Weinbach, U. (2013) Feasibility and impact of receiver clock modeling in precise GPS data analysis. Dissertation, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.

  12. "Molecular Clock" Analogs: A Relative Rates Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Although molecular clock theory is a commonly discussed facet of evolutionary biology, undergraduates are rarely presented with the underlying information of how this theory is examined relative to empirical data. Here a simple contextual exercise is presented that not only provides insight into molecular clocks, but is also a useful exercise for…

  13. Network properties of the mammalian circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohling, Johannes Hermanus Theodoor

    2009-01-01

    The biological clock regulates daily and seasonal rhythms in mammals. This clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), which are two small nuclei each consisting of 10,000 neurons. The neurons of the SCN endogenously generate a rhythm of approximately 24 hours. Under the influence of the l

  14. A colorful model of the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Steven M

    2006-01-27

    The migration of the colorful monarch butterfly provides biologists with a unique model system with which to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying a sophisticated circadian clock. The monarch circadian clock is involved in the induction of the migratory state and navigation over long distances, using the sun as a compass. PMID:16439193

  15. Tectonic blocks and molecular clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales have mainly used fossils for calibrating molecular clocks, though fossils only really provide minimum clade age constraints. In their place, phylogenetic trees can be calibrated by precisely dated geological events that have shaped biogeography. However, tectonic episodes are protracted, their role in vicariance is rarely justified, the biogeography of living clades and their antecedents may differ, and the impact of such events is contingent on ecology. Biogeographic calibrations are no panacea for the shortcomings of fossil calibrations, but their associated uncertainties can be accommodated. We provide examples of how biogeographic calibrations based on geological data can be established for the fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent: (i) for the uplift of the Isthmus of Panama, (ii) the separation of New Zealand from Gondwana, and (iii) for the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Biogeographic and fossil calibrations are complementary, not competing, approaches to constraining molecular clock analyses, providing alternative constraints on the age of clades that are vital to avoiding circularity in investigating the role of biogeographic mechanisms in shaping modern biodiversity. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325840

  16. Single electron relativistic clock interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bushev, Pavel; Sholokhov, Dmitry; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Zych, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Although time is one of the fundamental notions in physics, it does not have a unique description. In quantum theory time is a parameter ordering the succession of the probability amplitudes of a quantum system, while according to relativity theory each system experiences in general a different proper time, depending on the system's world line, due to time to time dilation. It is therefore of fundamental interest to test the notion of time in the regime where both quantum and relativistic effects play a role, for example, when different amplitudes of a single quantum clock experience different magnitudes of time dilation. Here we propose a realization of such an experiment with a single electron in a Penning trap. The clock can be implemented in the electronic spin precession and its time dilation then depends on the radial (cyclotron) state of the electron. We show that coherent manipulation and detection of the electron can be achieved already with present day technology. A single electron in a Penning trap...

  17. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, M J; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems are fundamentally compelling and ubiquitous in science. However, their complexity generally prevents exact solutions of their dynamics. Precisely engineered ultracold atomic gases are emerging as a powerful tool to unravel these challenging physical problems. Here we present a new laboratory for the study of many-body effects: strongly interacting two-level systems formed by the clock states in ${}^{87}$Sr, which are used to realize a neutral atom optical clock that performs at the highest level of optical-atomic coherence and with precision near the limit set by quantum fluctuations. Our measurements of the collective spin evolution reveal signatures of many-body dynamics, including beyond-mean-field effects. We derive a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of severely distorted lineshapes, atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, and correlated quantum spin noise. These investigations open the door to explori...

  18. A low maintenance Sr optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Ian R; Bowden, William; Bridge, Elizabeth M; Donnellan, Sean; Curtis, E Anne; Gill, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Sr optical lattice clock apparatus at NPL with particular emphasis on techniques used to increase reliability and minimise the human requirement in its operation. Central to this is a clock-referenced transfer cavity scheme for the stabilisation of cooling and trapping lasers. We highlight several measures to increase the reliability of the clock with a view towards the realisation of an optical time-scale. The clock contributed 502 hours of data over a 25 day period (84% uptime) in a recent measurement campaign with several uninterrupted periods of more than 48 hours. An instability of $2\\times10^{-17}$ was reached after $10^5$ s of averaging in an interleaved self-comparison of the clock.

  19. The absolute frequency of the 87Sr optical clock transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian;

    2008-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the 1S0–3P0 clock transition of 87Sr has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.65 (37) Hz using lattice-confined atoms, where the fractional uncertainty of 8.6 × 10-16 represents one of the most accurate measurements of an atomic transition frequency to date. After a d...

  20. Dilatation effect of ''quantum clocks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relativistic dilatation effect of the life-time of unstable microparticles combined with quantum symmetry of their description results in the ''quantum-dilatation'' dilemma. It is due to the classical character of the relativity theory which here reveals itself in the classical world-line of the clock necessary in order to deduce the dilatation effect from the Lorentz transformation. It is shown how to solve this dilemma, basing on the relation continuum C4. Two types of measurements of time intervals, the direct and indirect one, are analyzed. The former type corresponds to the external space-time continuum, where any direct measurement takes place, and the latter, to the internal relation continuum C4, where the internal structures of isolated micro-systems are sunk. (author)

  1. Circadian clocks are designed optimally

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival by synchronizing to the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. Since both properties have been tuned through natural selection, their adaptation can be formalized in the framework of mathematical optimization. By using a succinct model, we found that simultaneous optimization of regularity and entrainability entails inherent features of the circadian mechanism irrespective of model details. At the behavioral level we discovered the existence of a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. At the molecular level we demonstrate the role-sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. We also reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments and predict molecular elements responsible for the clockwork...

  2. Three errors in the article:" The OPERA neutrino velocity result and the synchronisation of clocks, "

    CERN Document Server

    Besida, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    We found three mistakes in the article " The OPERA neutrino velocity result and the synchronisation of clocks" by Contaldi \\cite{Contaldi}. First, the definition of the angle of the latitude in the geoid description leads to a prolate spheroid (rugby ball shape) instead of an oblate spheroid with the usual equatorial flattening. Second, Contaldi forgot a cosine of the latitude in the centripetal contribution term. And last but not least, a profound conceptual mistake was done in believing that an atomic clock or any timekeeper apparatus was carried in a journey by car or plane between CERN and Gran Sasso; instead of that atomic clocks are continuously resynchronized through a GPS device, and the variation of the potential term applies only for the neutrino travel itself. Thus instead of a $\\Delta t \\approx 30ns $ correction claimed by the author in a travel of 12 hours plus 4 days at rest for an atomic clock, we have found a time correction only for the neutrino itself $\\Delta t=3.88 \\, 10^{-16} s$! That mean...

  3. Lasing and suppressed cavity-pulling effect of Cesium active optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhichao; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the collective emission behavior and suppressed cavity-pulling effect of four-level active optical clock with Cesium atoms. Thermal Cesium atoms in a glass cell velocity selective pumped with a 455.5 nm laser operating at 6S$_{1/2}$ to 7P$_{3/2}$ transition are used as lasing medium. Population inverted Cesium atoms between 7S$_{1/2}$ and 6P$_{3/2}$ levels are optical weakly coupled by a pair cavity mirrors working at deep bad-cavity regime with a finesse of 4.3, and the ratio between cavity bandwidth and gain bandwidth is approximately 45. With increased 455.5 nm pumping laser intensity, the output power of cesium active optical clock at 1469.9 nm from 7S$_{1/2}$ level to 6P$_{3/2}$ level shows a threshold and reach a power of 13 $\\mu$W. Active optical clock would dramatically improve the optical clock stability since the lasing frequency does not follow the cavity length variation exactly, but in a form of suppressed cavity pulling effect. In this letter the cavity pulling effe...

  4. Raman transitions between hyperfine clock states in a magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Naber, J B; Hubert, T; Spreeuw, R J C

    2016-01-01

    We present our experimental investigation of an optical Raman transition between the magnetic clock states of $^{87}$Rb in an atom chip magnetic trap. The transfer of atomic population is induced by a pair of diode lasers which couple the two clock states off-resonantly to an intermediate state manifold. This transition is subject to destructive interference of two excitation paths, which leads to a reduction of the effective two-photon Rabi-frequency. Furthermore, we find that the transition frequency is highly sensitive to the intensity ratio of the diode lasers. Our results are well described in terms of light shifts in the multi-level structure of $^{87}$Rb. The differential light shifts vanish at an optimal intensity ratio, which we observe as a narrowing of the transition linewidth. We also observe the temporal dynamics of the population transfer and find good agreement with a model based on the system's master equation and a Gaussian laser beam profile. Finally, we identify several sources of decoheren...

  5. Synthetic Frequency Protocol in the Ramsey Spectroscopy of Clock Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Yudin, V I; Basalaev, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    We develop an universal method to significantly suppress probe-induced shifts in any types of atomic clocks using the Ramsey spectroscopy. Our approach is based on adaptation of the synthetic frequency concept [V. I. Yudin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 030801 (2011)] (previously developed for BBR shift suppression) to the Ramsey spectroscopy with the use of interrogations for different dark time intervals. Universality of the method consists in arbitrariness of the possible Ramsey schemes. However, most extremal results are obtained in combination with so-called hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy [V. I. Yudin, et al., Phys. Rev. A 82, 011804(R) (2010)]. In the latter case, the probe-induced frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10$^{-18}$ practically for any optical atomic clocks, where this shift previously was metrologically significant. The main advantage of our method in comparison with other radical hyper-Ramsey approaches [R. Hobson, et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 010501(R) (2016...

  6. Iterative quantum algorithm for distributed clock synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clock synchronization is a well-studied problem with many practical and scientific applications. We propose an arbitrary accuracy iterative quantum algorithm for distributed clock synchronization using only three qubits. The n bits of the time difference Δ between two spatially separated clocks can be deterministically extracted by communicating only O(n) messages and executing the quantum iteration process n times based on the classical feedback and measurement operations. Finally, we also give the algorithm using only two qubits and discuss the success probability of the algorithm

  7. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  8. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brand (Karl)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces pe

  9. Cold-collision-shift cancellation and inelastic scattering in a Yb optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, p-wave cold collisions were shown to dominate the density-dependent shift of the clock transition frequency in a 171Yb optical lattice clock. Here we demonstrate that by operating such a system at the proper excitation fraction, the cold-collision shift is canceled below the 5x10-18 fractional frequency level. We report inelastic two-body loss rates for 3 P0 -3 P0 and 1 S0 -3 P0 scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2 171Yb system are relevant for high-performance optical clocks as well as strongly interacting systems for quantum information and quantum simulation applications.

  10. Atom gravimeters and gravitational redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Borde, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; 10.1038/nature09340

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper, H. Mueller, A. Peters and S. Chu [A precision measurement of the gravitational redshift by the interference of matter waves, Nature 463, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometry experiments published a decade ago did in fact measure the gravitational redshift on the quantum clock operating at the very high Compton frequency associated with the rest mass of the Caesium atom. In the present Communication we show that this interpretation is incorrect.

  11. Draper Clock-Synchronization Protocol in SAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In 1973, Daly, Hpokins, and McKenna (from Draper Lab.) presented a fault-tolerant digital clocking system at the FTCS conference. This is probably one of the first...

  12. The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu

    2013-01-01

    "The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks" presents historical views and mathematical models of mechanical watches and clocks. Although now over six hundred years old, mechanical watches and clocks are still popular luxury items that fascinate many people around the world. However few have examined the theory of how they work as presented in this book. The illustrations and computer animations are unique and have never been published before. It will be of significant interest to researchers in mechanical engineering, watchmakers and clockmakers, as well as people who have an engineering background and are interested in mechanical watches and clocks. It will also inspire people in other fields of science and technology, such as mechanical engineering and electronics engineering, to advance their designs. Professor Ruxu Du works at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, China. Assistant Professor Longhan Xie works at the South China University of Technology, China.

  13. Entrainment of the Neurospora circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M; Boesl, C; Ricken, J; Messerschmitt, M; Goedel, M; Roenneberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been systematically investigated for circadian entrainment behavior. Many aspects of synchronization can be investigated in this simple, cellular system, ranging from systematic entrainment and drivenness to masking. Clock gene expression during entrainment and entrainment with

  14. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  15. Micro Mercury Ion Clock (MMIC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate micro clock based on trapped Hg ions with more than 10x size reduction and power; Fractional frequency stability at parts per 1014 level, adequate for...

  16. Automated Synthesis of Skew-Based Clock Distribution Networks

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Neves; Eby G. Friedman

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a top-down methodology is presented for synthesizing clock distribution networks based on application-dependent localized clock skew. The methodology is divided into four phases: 1) determination of an optimal clock skew schedule for improving circuit performance and reliability; 2) design of the topology of the clock tree based on the circuit hierarchy and minimum clock path delays; 3) design of circuit structures to implement the delay values associated with the branches of th...

  17. Working around the clock: circadian rhythms and skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, XIPING; Dube, Thomas J.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of the circadian molecular clock in skeletal muscle is in the very early stages. Initial research has demonstrated the presence of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle and that skeletal muscle of a clock-compromised mouse, Clock mutant, exhibits significant disruption in normal expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. In light of the growing association between the molecular clock, metabolism, and metabolic disease, it will also be important to ...

  18. An atomic clockwork using phase dependent energy shifts

    CERN Document Server

    De Munshi, D; Mukherjee, M

    2011-01-01

    A frequency stabilized laser referenced to an unperturbed atomic two level system acts as the most accurate clock with femtosecond clock ticks. For any meaningful use, a Femtosecond Laser Frequency Comb (FLFC) is used to transfer the atomic clock accuracy to electronically countable nanosecond clock ticks. Here we propose an alternative clockwork based on the phenomenon that when an atomic system is slowly evolved in a cyclic path, the atomic energy levels gather some phase called the geometric phase. This geometric phase dependent energy shift has been used here to couple the two frequency regimes in a phase coherent manner. It has also been shown that such a technique can be implemented experimentally, bypassing the highly involved setup of a FLFC.

  19. Clock genes, hair growth and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Geyfman, Mikhail; Andersen, Bogi

    2010-01-01

    Hair follicles undergo continuous cycles of growth, involution and rest. This process, referred to as the hair growth cycle, has a periodicity of weeks to months. At the same time, skin and hair follicles harbor a functional circadian clock that regulates gene expression with a periodicity of approximately twenty four hours. In our recent study we found that circadian clock genes play a role in regulation of the hair growth cycle during synchronized hair follicle cycling, uncovering an unexpe...

  20. Expression of Clock Proteins in Developing Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Li; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago D.; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Papagerakis, Petros

    2010-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation suggest that enamel and dentin formation is under circadian control. Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with periods of 24 hours that control diverse physiological and metabolic processes. Mammalian clock genes play a key role in synchronizing circadian functions in many organs. However, close to nothing is known on clock genes expression during tooth development. In this work, we ...

  1. Circadian Clock Proteins in Mood Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Partonen, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Mood regulation is known to be affected by the change of seasons. Recent research findings have suggested that mood regulation may be influenced by the function of circadian clocks. In addition, the activity of brown adipocytes has been hypothesized to contribute to mood regulation. Here, the overarching link to mood disorders might be the circadian clock protein nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1.

  2. Circadian clock proteins in mood regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo ePartonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood regulation is known to be affected by the change of seasons. Recent research findings have suggested that mood regulation may be influenced by the function of circadian clocks. In addition, the activity of brown adipocytes has been hypothesized to contribute to mood regulation. Here, the overarching link to mood disorders might be the circadian clock protein NR1D1 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1.

  3. Reduced Kalman Filters for Clock Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the author's work ontimescales based on Kalman filters that act upon the clock comparisons. The natural Kalman timescale algorithm tends to optimize long-term timescale stability at the expense of short-term stability. By subjecting each post-measurement error covariance matrix to a non-transparent reduction operation, one obtains corrected clocks with improved short-term stability and little sacrifice of long-term stability.

  4. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Cassone, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to...

  5. From Sundials to Atomic Clocks: Understanding Time and Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, James; Fitz-Randolph, Jane

    An introduction to time, timekeeping, and the uses of time information, especially in the scientific and technical areas, are offered in this book for laymen. Historical and philosophical aspects of time and timekeeping are included. The scientific thought on time has been simplified. Contents include: the nature of time, time and frequency, early…

  6. Initial Tests of a Rubidium Space Cold Atom Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Qiu-Zhi, Qu; Bin, Wang; Tang, Li; Jian-Bo, Zhao; Jing-Wei, Ji; Wei, Ren; Xin, Zhao; Mei-Feng, Ye; Yuan-Yuan, Yao; De-Sheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China under Grant No 2013YQ09094304, the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11034008 and 11274324.

  7. The Chemical and Educational Appeal of the Orange Juice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.; Johnson, Tanya; Mauricio Castro-Acuña, Carlos

    1996-12-01

    characterized by seeing educational possibilities in so many things, created a modified version of the clock, with the atomic numbers of the elements representing the hours in the day (see Fig. 2) in his internationally popular workshops. Due largely to Talesnick's efforts, the orange juice clock is a standard demonstration in many chemistry programs and presentations. Figure 2.Irwin Talesnick represents the hours of the day by the corresponding elements in his clock. The Procedure This can be done as a demonstration or as an activity, although at about 10 per clock, expense does become an issue. There are no unusual safety precautions with this demonstration. We know of no accidents that have occurred with the orange juice clock. The demonstration requires: a single AA-cell battery-operated wall clock with a sweep-second hand a medium-sized beaker (600 mL is fine) enough orange juice or other electrolyte mixture or solution to fill the beaker about 2/3 full (tap water often works fine!) a 20-30-cm magnesium strip, coiled at one end or wrapped around a popsicle stick a 20-30-cm copper strip, coiled at one end alligator clips to connect the strips to the battery terminals on the clock a stand against which to lean the setup The demonstration is put together as shown in Figure 3. Connect the magnesium to the "-" contact of the clock and the copper to the "+" contact. Immerse the other ends of the strips into the solution. The clock will start to tick within a few seconds. If it does not work within a short period of time, check that the strips are well connected to the battery terminals, are hooked to the proper poles, and are not touching each other. The clock should keep reasonably close time (in orange juice) for a couple of days, or until the magnesium is nearly completely oxidized. Figure 3.A schematic of the orange juice clock seup. Video of orange juice clock. In video, the copper electrode is on the left and the magnesium electrode is on the right. Video was filmed and

  8. Helium Pressure Shift of the Hyperfine Clock Transition in Hg-201(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larigani, S. Taghavi; Burt, E. A.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave atomic clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). We are investigating the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+) in a configuration that uses a buffer gas to increase ion loading efficiency and counter ion heating from rf trapping fields. Traditionally, either helium or neon is used as the buffer gas at approx. 10(exp -5) torr to confine mercury ions near room temperature. In addition to the buffer gas, other residual background gasses such as H2O, N2, O2, CO, CO2, and CH2 may be present in trace quantities. Collisions between trapped ions and buffer gas or background gas atoms/molecules produce a momentary shift of the ion clock transition frequency and constitute one of the largest systematic effects in this type of clock. Here we report an initial measurement of the He pressure shift in Hg-201(+) and compare this to Hg-199(+).

  9. Interaction of circadian clock proteins PER2 and CRY with BMAL1 and CLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordon Alain

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian oscillation of clock-controlled gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 act as activators of target gene transcription; however, interactions of PER and CRY proteins with the heterodimer abolish its transcriptional activation capacity. PER and CRY are therefore referred to as negative regulators of the circadian clock. To further elucidate the mechanism how positive and negative components of the clock interplay, we characterized the interactions of PER2, CRY1 and CRY2 with BMAL1 and CLOCK using a mammalian two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Results Both PER2 and the CRY proteins were found to interact with BMAL1 whereas only PER2 interacts with CLOCK. CRY proteins seem to have a higher affinity to BMAL1 than PER2. Moreover, we provide evidence that PER2, CRY1 and CRY2 bind to different domains in the BMAL1 protein. Conclusion The regulators of clock-controlled transcription PER2, CRY1 and CRY2 differ in their capacity to interact with each single component of the BMAL1-CLOCK heterodimer and, in the case of BMAL1, also in their interaction sites. Our data supports the hypothesis that CRY proteins, especially CRY1, are stronger repressors than PER proteins.

  10. DESIGN OF TWO-PHASE SINUSOIDAL POWER CLOCK AND CLOCKED TRANSMISSION GATE ADIABATIC LOGIC CIRCUIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Pengjun; Yu Junjun

    2007-01-01

    First the research is conducted on the design of the two-phase sinusoidal power clock generator in this paper. Then the design of the new adiabatic logic circuit adopting the two-phase sinusoidal power clocks-Clocked Transmission Gate Adiabatic Logic (CTGAL) circuit is presented. This circuit makes use of the clocked transmission gates to sample the input signals, then the output loads are charged and discharged in a fully adiabatic manner by using bootstrapped N-Channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (NMOS) and Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) latch structure.Finally, with the parameters of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.25 μm CMOS device, the transient energy consumption of CTGAL, Bootstrap Charge-Recovery Logic (BCRL)and Pass-transistor Adiabatic Logic (PAL) including their clock generators is simulated. The simulation result indicates that CTGAL circuit has the characteristic of remarkably low energy consumption.

  11. Al+ Optical Clocks for Fundamental Physics and Geodesy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, James Chin-wen (Ion Storage Group, NIST)

    2011-07-13

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ “quantum-logic” clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37±17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant.

  12. Dual-wavelength active optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhichao; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally realize the dual-wavelength active optical clock for the first time. As the Cs cell temperature is kept between 118 $^{\\circ }C$ and 144 $^{\\circ }C$, both the 1359 nm and the 1470 nm stimulated emission output of Cs four-level active optical clock are detected. The 1470 nm output linewidth of each experimental setup of Cs four-level active optical clock is measured to be 590 Hz with the main cavity length unstabilized. To stabilize the cavity length of active optical clock, the experimental scheme of 633 nm and 1359 nm good-bad cavity dual-wavelength active optical clock is proposed, where 633 nm and 1359 nm stimulated emission is working at good-cavity and bad-cavity regime respectively. The cavity length is stabilized by locking the 633 nm output frequency to a super-cavity with the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique. The frequency stability of 1359 nm bad-cavity stimulated emission output is then expected to be further improved by at least 1 order of magnitude than the 633 nm PDH system d...

  13. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26657326

  14. Direct laser cooling Al+ ions optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Luo, J; Lu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Al$^+$ ions optical clock is a very promising optical frequency standard candidate due to its extremely small blackbody radiation shift. It has been successfully demonstrated with indirect cooled, quantum-logic-based spectroscopy technique. Its accuracy is limited by second-order Doppler shift, and its stability is limited by the number of ions that can be probed in quantum logic processing. We propose a direct laser cooling scheme of Al$^+$ ions optical clocks where both the stability and accuracy of the clocks are greatly improved. In the proposed scheme, two Al$^+$ ions traps are utilized. The first trap is used to trap a large number of Al$^+$ ions to improve the stability of the clock laser, while the second trap is used to trap a single Al$^+$ ions to provide the ultimate accuracy. Both traps are cooled with a continuous wave 167 nm laser. The expected clock laser stability can reach $9.0\\times10^{-17}/\\sqrt{\\tau}$. For the second trap, in addition to 167 nm laser Doppler cooling, a second stage pulsed ...

  15. State labelling Wannier-Stark atomic interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Pelle B.; Hilico A.; Tackmann G.; Beaufils Q.; Pereira Dos Santos F.

    2013-01-01

    Using cold 87Rb atoms trapped in a 1D-optical lattice, atomic interferometers involving coherent superpositions between different Wannier-Stark atomic states are realized. Two di fferent kinds of trapped interferometer schemes are presented: a Ramsey-type interferometer sensitive both to clock frequency and external forces, and a symmetric accordion-type interferometer, sensitive to external forces only. We evaluate the limits in terms of sensitivity and accuracy of those schemes and discuss ...

  16. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  17. A New Navigation Satellite Clock Bias Prediction Method Based on Modified Clock-bias Quadratic Polynomial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. P.; Lu, Z. P.; Sun, D. S.; Wang, N.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better express the characteristics of satellite clock bias (SCB) and improve SCB prediction precision, this paper proposed a new SCB prediction model which can take physical characteristics of space-borne atomic clock, the cyclic variation, and random part of SCB into consideration. First, the new model employs a quadratic polynomial model with periodic items to fit and extract the trend term and cyclic term of SCB; then based on the characteristics of fitting residuals, a time series ARIMA ~(Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average) model is used to model the residuals; eventually, the results from the two models are combined to obtain final SCB prediction values. At last, this paper uses precise SCB data from IGS (International GNSS Service) to conduct prediction tests, and the results show that the proposed model is effective and has better prediction performance compared with the quadratic polynomial model, grey model, and ARIMA model. In addition, the new method can also overcome the insufficiency of the ARIMA model in model recognition and order determination.

  18. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  19. Susceptibility of Redundant Versus Singular Clock Domains Implemented in SRAM-Based FPGA TMR Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present the challenges that arise when using redundant clock domains due to their clock-skew. Radiation data show that a singular clock domain (DTMR) provides an improved TMR methodology for SRAM-based FPGAs over redundant clocks.

  20. Quantum clock: A critical discussion on spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burderi, Luciano; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Iaria, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    We critically discuss the measure of very short time intervals. By means of a Gedankenexperiment, we describe an ideal clock based on the occurrence of completely random events. Many previous thought experiments have suggested fundamental Planck-scale limits on measurements of distance and time. Here we present a new type of thought experiment, based on a different type of clock, that provide further support for the existence of such limits. We show that the minimum time interval Δ t that this clock can measure scales as the inverse of its size Δ r . This implies an uncertainty relation between space and time: Δ r Δ t >G ℏ/c4, where G , ℏ, and c are the gravitational constant, the reduced Planck constant, and the speed of light, respectively. We outline and briefly discuss the implications of this uncertainty conjecture.

  1. Which came first, spacetime or clocks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergent quantum mechanics seeks a deeper level theory, anticipating that such a theory will provide a clearer picture of the relation between the quantum and classical worlds. In this work we show that the quantum-classical divide is a manifestation of the transition from Newton's absolute time to relativity's path-dependent time. The prior theory in this case is that particles are intrinsic clocks. The emergence of separate classical and quantum behaviour is seen by considering different continuum limits in a single digital clock model. A continuum limit that constructs a continuous worldline provides a simple basis for Minkowski spacetime. An alternative limit in which the clock itself contains boost information leads to the Dirac equation.

  2. Quantum clock: A critical discussion on spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Burderi, Luciano; Iaria, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    We critically discuss the measure of very short time intervals. By means of a Gedankenexperiment, we describe an ideal clock based on the occurrence of completely random events. Many previous thought experiments have suggested fundamental Planck-scale limits on measurements of distance and time. Here we present a new type of thought experiment, based on a different type of clock, that provide further support for the existence of such limits. We show that the minimum time interval $\\Delta t$ that this clock can measure scales as the inverse of its size $\\Delta r$. This implies an uncertainty relation between space and time: $\\Delta r$ $\\Delta t$ $> G \\hbar / c^4$; where G, $\\hbar$ and c are the gravitational constant, the reduced Planck constant, and the speed of light, respectively. We outline and briefly discuss the implications of this uncertainty conjecture.

  3. Models of the Primordial Standard Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Oscillating massive fields in the primordial universe can be used as Standard Clocks. The ticks of these oscillations induce features in the density perturbations, which directly record the time evolution of the scale factor of the primordial universe, thus if detected, provide a direct evidence for the inflation scenario or the alternatives. In this paper, we construct a full inflationary model of primordial Standard Clock and study its predictions on the density perturbations. This model provides a full realization of several key features proposed previously. We compare the theoretical predictions from inflation and alternative scenarios with the Planck 2013 temperature data on Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and identify a statistically marginal but interesting candidate. We discuss how future CMB temperature and polarization data, non-Gaussianity analysis and Large Scale Structure data may be used to further test or constrain the Standard Clock signals.

  4. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  5. The development of clocks into the eighteenth century

    OpenAIRE

    Dugan, David

    2004-01-01

    The advantages of clocks with escapements over water clocks, that they can be miniaturized. The superb chronometers of the seventeenth century onwards, Harrison and others. The emergence of clockmakers and precise engineering. Superb luxury goods. Simon Schaffer explains.

  6. Clocking Scheme for Switched-Capacitor Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper

    A novel clocking scheme for switched-capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It can enhance the understanding of SC circuits and the errors caused by MOSFET (MOS) switches. Charge errors, and techniques to make SC circuits less sensitive to them are discussed.......A novel clocking scheme for switched-capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It can enhance the understanding of SC circuits and the errors caused by MOSFET (MOS) switches. Charge errors, and techniques to make SC circuits less sensitive to them are discussed....

  7. Caring around the Clock: rounding in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Marie

    A large acute trust in the East Midlands looked to the US to inform its implementation of hourly rounding, otherwise known as intentional rounding. A combination of transformational leadership and meaningful interactions form the basis of a new approach to rounding--Caring around the Clock. The trust piloted the concept on 10 wards with results showing a 32% reduction in call lights. The successful change in practice required an investment in staff education to equip staff with the necessary skills. The trust is currently rolling out Caring around Hourly rounding can reducethe Clock to 79 inpatient wards. PMID:23342834

  8. Clocking Scheme for Switched-Capacitor Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    A novel clocking scheme for switched-capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It can enhance the understanding of SC circuits and the errors caused by MOSFET (MOS) switches. Charge errors, and techniques to make SC circuits less sensitive to them are discussed.......A novel clocking scheme for switched-capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It can enhance the understanding of SC circuits and the errors caused by MOSFET (MOS) switches. Charge errors, and techniques to make SC circuits less sensitive to them are discussed....

  9. Clocking Surface Reaction by In-Plane Product Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggara, Kelvin; Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Chatterjee, Avisek; Cheng, Fang; Polanyi, John C

    2016-06-15

    Electron-induced reaction of physisorbed meta-diiodobenzene (mDIB) on Cu(110) at 4.6 K was studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and molecular dynamics theory. Single-electron dissociation of the first C-I bond led to in-plane rotation of an iodophenyl (IPh) intermediate, whose motion could be treated as a "clock" of the reaction dynamics. Alternative reaction mechanisms, successive and concerted, were observed giving different product distributions. In the successive mechanism, two electrons successively broke single C-I bonds; the first C-I bond breaking yielded IPh that rotated directionally by three different angles, with the second C-I bond breaking giving chemisorbed I atoms (#2) at three preferred locations corresponding to the C-I bond alignments in the prior rotated IPh configurations. In the concerted mechanism a single electron broke two C-I bonds, giving two chemisorbed I atoms; significantly these were found at angles corresponding to the C-I bond direction for unrotated mDIB. Molecular dynamics accounted for the difference in reaction outcomes between the successive and the concerted mechanisms in terms of the time required for the IPh to rotate in-plane; in successive reaction the time delay between first and second C-I bond-breaking events allowed the IPh to rotate, whereas in concerted reaction the computed delay between excitation and reaction (∼1 ps) was too short for molecular rotation before the second C-I bond broke. The dependence of the extent of motion at a surface on the delay between first and second bond breaking suggested a novel means to "clock" sub-picosecond dynamics by imaging the products arising from varying time delays between impacting pairs of electrons. PMID:27191189

  10. 47 CFR 80.865 - Radiotelephone station clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiotelephone station clock. 80.865 Section 80.865 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... W § 80.865 Radiotelephone station clock. A clock having a face of at least 12.7 cm (5 in.)...

  11. On synchronization of clocks in general space-times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. H Khajehpour

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Einstein and transport synchronizations of infinitesimally spaced and distant clocks are considered in a general Riemannian space-time. It is shown that infinitesimally spaced clocks can always be synchronized. In general one can not find observers for whom distant clock are Einstein synchronized but transport synchronized observers do always exit. Whenever both procedures are possible, they are equivalent.

  12. Ionization and transient absorption control with a resonant attosecond clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastable states are important actors in the ionisation of atoms and molecules. Sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses can coherently populate several transiently bound states at once, thus starting the attosecond clocks which are required to monitor and control ultrafast electronic evolution above the ionisation threshold. Here we illustrate, from a theoretical point of view, the effects coherent superpositions of 1Po doubly excited states in the helium atom have on channel-resolved photoelectron spectra as well as on the transient absorption spectrum of the atom in the extreme ultraviolet region, when they are created by a single-attosecond pulse in the presence of a strong few-cycle near-infrared/visible pulse which acts as a probe. Interference fringes varying rapidly with the pump-probe time delay are visible in both photoelectron and transient absorption spectra. From such fringes, the wave packet itself can conceivably be reconstructed. Conversely, all observables are modulated by the characteristic beating periods of the wave packet, so that control of partial ionisation yields, branching ratios, and light absorption or amplification can be achieved

  13. NIM5 Cs fountain clock and its evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Li, Mingshou; Lin, Pingwei; Chen, Weiliang; Liu, Nianfeng; Lin, Yige; Wang, Ping; Liu, Kun; Suo, Rui; Li, Tianchu

    2015-08-01

    The cesium fountain primary frequency standard NIM5 has been developed at the National Institute of Metrology in China. The NIM5 loads atoms in an optical molasses from the background Cs vapor directly. Atoms are then cooled to a temperature of about 2 μK and launched to a height of 81 cm. The fringes of the Ramsey pattern have a width of 0.98 Hz. The NIM5 operates for more than 300 d a year, operating nearly continuously for 15 d at a time. By stabilizing the 9.19 GHz microwave frequency to the center of the central Ramsey fringe, a typical fractional frequency instability of 3 × 10-13 (τ/s)-1/2 is obtained when running at high atom density, and a combined uncertainty, including Type A and B uncertainties, is typically 1.6 × 10-15. Comparisons of data between NIM5 and 5 other fountain clocks were carried out in May 2013 via two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT), and the results show good agreement within the uncertainties. Six groups of NIM5 data from January to June 2014 have been published in Circular T 319 and 320.

  14. A high stability semiconductor laser system for a $^{88}$Sr-based optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Tarallo, Marco G; Schioppo, Marco; Tino, Guglielmo M

    2010-01-01

    We describe a frequency stabilized diode laser at 698 nm used for high resolution spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 strontium clock transition. For the laser stabilization we use state-of-the-art symmetrically suspended optical cavities optimized for very low thermal noise at room temperature. Two-stage frequency stabilization to high finesse optical cavities results in measured laser frequency noise about a factor of three above the cavity thermal noise between 2 Hz and 11 Hz. With this system, we demonstrate high resolution remote spectroscopy on the 88Sr clock transition by transferring the laser output over a phase-noise-compensated 200 m-long fiber link between two separated laboratories. Our dedicated fiber link ensures a transfer of the optical carrier with frequency stability of 7 \\cdot 10^{-18} after 100 s integration time, which could enable the observation of the strontium clock transition with an atomic Q of 10^{14}. Furthermore, with an eye towards the development of transportable optical clocks, we in...

  15. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25310406

  16. Analytic clock frequency selection for global DVFS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, Marco E.T.; Hurink, Johann L.; Hölzenspies, Philip K.F.; Kuper, Jan; Smit, Gerard J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Computers can reduce their power consumption by decreasing their speed using Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS). A form of DVFS for multicore processors is global DVFS, where the voltage and clock frequency is shared among all processor cores. Because global DVFS is efficient and cheap to

  17. Circadian Clock Regulates Bone Resorption in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Ochi, Hiroki; Fukuda, Toru; Sato, Shingo; Sunamura, Satoko; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock controls many behavioral and physiological processes beyond daily rhythms. Circadian dysfunction increases the risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although clinical studies have shown that bone resorption is controlled by circadian rhythm, as indicated by diurnal variations in bone resorption, the molecular mechanism of circadian clock-dependent bone resorption remains unknown. To clarify the role of circadian rhythm in bone resorption, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Bmal1), a prototype circadian gene, was knocked out specifically in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-specific Bmal1-knockout mice showed a high bone mass phenotype due to reduced osteoclast differentiation. A cell-based assay revealed that BMAL1 upregulated nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (Nfatc1) transcription through its binding to an E-box element located on the Nfatc1 promoter in cooperation with circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a heterodimer partner of BMAL1. Moreover, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family members were shown to interact with and upregulate BMAL1:CLOCK transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data suggest that bone resorption is controlled by osteoclastic BMAL1 through interactions with the SRC family and binding to the Nfatc1 promoter. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26841172

  18. The salient features of the clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2005-01-01

    functional semiotics is explained in short terms and then further demonstrated in the analysis of a basic mechanical alarm clock. On this ground, the digital watch and digital design products in general are characterised and three possible avenues for the interpretation of the interactive possibilities of...

  19. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  20. On accelerated clocks and the quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the locality hypothesis of relativity breaks down for large proper accelerations which are relevant to semiclassical phenomena. A general modification for the rate of accelerated clocks incorporating the effect of proper acceleration is thus proposed. Connection is made with Caianiello's quantum line element

  1. Clock Synchronization for Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Robles, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, more so generally than in other types of distributed systems, clock synchronization is crucial since by having this service available, several applications such as media access protocols, object tracking, or data fusion, would improve their performance. In this dissertation, we propose a set of algorithms to achieve…

  2. Suppression of clock shifts at field-insensitive transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to significantly reduce quadrupole and tensor polarizability shifts of a clock transition by operating at a judiciously chosen field-insensitive point. In some cases shifts are almost completely eliminated making the transition an effective J = 0 to J = 0 candidate. This significantly improves the feasibility of a recent proposal for clock operation with large ion crystals. For such multi-ion clocks, geometric constraints and selection rules naturally divide clock operation into two categories based on the orientation of the magnetic field. We discuss the limitations imposed on each type and how calibrations might be carried out for clock operation.

  3. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock; Bestimmung des Einflusses thermischer Strahlung auf eine optische Strontium-Gitteruhr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middelmann, Thomas

    2013-05-31

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10{sup -18} and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10{sup -16}. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10{sup -18} to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} = {alpha}(5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0})-{alpha}(5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) = 4.078 73(11) x 10{sup -39} Cm{sup 2} /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} and experimental data for other atomic properties. To

  4. Study on the Distribution of Networked Devices’ Clock Skew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Chengbo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Clock skews of devices on the Internet are viewed as one way delay noise, but their distribution is unknown. We explore the distribution of clock skews to see the conflict probability. In this paper, we introduce an accurate clock skew estimation algorithm to filter inaccurate clock skew estimation by comparing the results between linear programming method and least square fitting. Delay jitter and other noises affect the estimation result. When the difference of two methods is large, the estimation result is unstable and inaccurate, so the estimation result should be dropped. Based on this algorithm, we use traces of real Internet measurements to collect 1825 accurate clock skews of different devices to establish a fingerprint database. Furthermore, we show the distribution of clock skews and comparing conflict probability with different number of devices. The distribution shows that clock skews are diverse, and most of clock skews are in the region of [-100, 100] PPM. The results indicate that when the number of devices is small (<5, clock skews won’t be conflict with each other, so clock skews are good tools to detect faked devices or NAT; When the number of devices increases, the conflict probability increases linearly, so clock skews of different devices can not distinguish each devices effectively.

  5. An optically-guided atomic fountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed the experiment of optically guided atomic fountain by using a cylindrical hollow laser beam (HLB). Cold atoms after polarization-gradient cooling (PGC) are launched upward in a rather simple way by just varying rapidly the current of vertical directional Helmholz coils, so that the frequency difference between the upgoing and the downgoing cooling laser can be obtained due to the atomic Zeeman shift. The entire process is equivalent to the moving molasses scheme, and consequently atoms are cooled down below the Doppler limit. We observe that 0.5% of the launched atoms are detected without the HLB, whereas tenfold enhancement of the HLB-guided atomic fountain is clearly obtained without appreciable broadening of the time of flight (TOF) signal. We have demonstrated tenfold enhancement of the atomic funneling efficiency for the HLB-guided atomic fountain which may lead to the improved performance of atom optical experiments based on atomic fountain such as Rb atomic clock. Moreover, if two ground-state hyperfine levels experience the similar light shifts at the appropriate detuning, it may be also useful to apply to Rb atomic fountain clock

  6. Clock distribution system for large high altitude air shower observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report a clock distribution system for Water Cherenkov Detector Arrays (WCDAs) in Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project. The designed electronics system is of high performance in implementing the clock distribution among detectors of a large scale of dimension. Based on Serializer/Deserializer (SerDes) and fiber transmission, the clock distribution system is the modules of central back end to distributed front end. The clock distribution system has been evaluated with a two modules system. While all the four SerDes candidates for clock transmission with jitters below 17 ps, the DS92LV16 has a fixed phase relationship between transmission clock and recovered clock, hence its use in LHAASO WCDAs. (authors)

  7. Comparison of Two Independent Sr Optical Clocks with 1*10^-17 Stability at 10^3 s

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Bloom, B J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Campbell, S L; Ye, J

    2012-01-01

    Many-particle optical lattice clocks have the potential for unprecedented measurement precision and stability due to their low quantum projection noise (QPN). However, this potential has so far never been realized because clock stability has been limited by frequency noise of optical local oscillators. By synchronously probing two 87Sr lattice systems using a laser with a thermal noise floor of 1*10^-15, we remove classically correlated laser noise from the inter-comparison, but this approach does not improve the stability of an independent clock. With an improved optical oscillator that has a 1*10^-16 thermal noise floor, we demonstrate an order of magnitude improvement over the best reported independent clock stability, achieving a record fractional instability of 1*10^-17 in 1000 s of averaging time for synchronous or asynchronous comparisons. This result is within a factor of 2 of the combined QPN limit for a 160 ms probe time with ~10^3 atoms in each clock. We further demonstrate that even at this high p...

  8. Optimal implementations for reliable circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival through synchronizing with the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. We find by using a phase model with multiple inputs that achieving the maximal limit of regularity and entrainability entails many inherent features of the circadian mechanism. At the molecular level, we demonstrate the role sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. At the behavioral level, the optimal phase-response curve inevitably contains a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. We reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments entrained by two types of periodic light pulses. Our results indicate that circadian clocks are designed optimally for reliable clockwork through evolution. PMID:25238386

  9. Supporting Family Awareness with the Whereabouts Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, Abigail; Taylor, Alex S.; Kaye, Joseph ‘Jofish'; Brown, Barry; Izadi, Shahram

    We report the results of a field trial of a situated awareness device for families called the “Whereabouts Clock”. The Clock displays the location of family members using cellphone data as one of four privacy-preserving, deliberately coarse-grained categories ( HOME, WORK, SCHOOL or ELSEWHERE). The results show that awareness of others through the Clock supports not only family communication and coordination but also more emotive aspects of family life such as reassurance, connectedness, identity and social touch. We discuss how the term “awareness” means many things in practice and highlight the importance of designing not just for family activities, but in order to support the emotional, social and even moral aspects of family life.

  10. The suprachiasmatic nuclei as a seasonal clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomans, Claudia P; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) contains a central clock that synchronizes daily (i.e., 24-h) rhythms in physiology and behavior. SCN neurons are cell-autonomous oscillators that act synchronously to produce a coherent circadian rhythm. In addition, the SCN helps regulate seasonal rhythmicity. Photic information is perceived by the SCN and transmitted to the pineal gland, where it regulates melatonin production. Within the SCN, adaptations to changing photoperiod are reflected in changes in neurotransmitters and clock gene expression, resulting in waveform changes in rhythmic electrical activity, a major output of the SCN. Efferent pathways regulate the seasonal timing of breeding and hibernation. In humans, seasonal physiology and behavioral rhythms are also present, and the human SCN has seasonally rhythmic neurotransmitter levels and morphology. In summary, the SCN perceives and encodes changes in day length and drives seasonal changes in downstream pathways and structures in order to adapt to the changing seasons. PMID:25451984

  11. The Large Built Water Clock Of Amphiaraeion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, E.; Katsiotis, M.; Manimanis, V. N.; Mantarakis, P.

    A very well preserved ancient water clock was discovered during excavations at the Amphiaraeion, in Oropos, Greece. The Amphiaraeion, a famous religious and oracle center of the deified healer Amphiaraus, was active from the pre-classic period until the replacement of the ancient religion by Christianity in the 5th Century A.D.. The foretelling was supposedly done through dreams sent by the god to the believers sleeping in a special gallery. In these dreams the god suggesting to them the therapy for their illness or the solution to their problems. The patients, then threw coins into a spring of the sanctuary. In such a place, the measurement of time was a necessity. Therefore, time was kept with both a conical sundial and a water clock in the form of a fountain. According to archeologists, the large built structure that measured the time for the sanctuary dates from the 4th Century B.C.

  12. Light-shift elimination in Generalized Hyper-Ramsey quantum clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Arimondo, Ennio

    2015-01-01

    We present a new generation of quantum clocks absolutely free from ac Stark-shift based on generalized hyper-Ramsey resonances with separated oscillating fields. Sequences of composite laser pulses with specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are combined to generate a very efficient and robust frequency locking signal with a perfect elimination of the light-shift from off resonant states. Laser phase-step modulations during interactions with electromagnetic fields are applied in order to decouple the unperturbed frequency measurement from the laser's intensity. The frequency lock point is protected against laser pulse area fluctuations and errors in potentially applied frequency shift compensations. Quantum clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden optical transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these hyper-stable laser frequency stabilization schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  13. Probe light-shift elimination in generalized hyper-Ramsey quantum clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; de Clercq, E.; Arimondo, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present an interrogation scheme for the next generation of quantum clocks to suppress frequency shifts induced by laser probing fields that are themselves based on generalized hyper-Ramsey resonances. Sequences of composite laser pulses with a specific selection of phases, frequency detunings, and durations are combined to generate a very efficient and robust frequency locking signal with an almost perfect elimination of the light shift from off-resonant states and to decouple the unperturbed frequency measurement from the laser's intensity. The frequency lock point generated from synthesized error signals using either π /4 or 3 π /4 laser phase steps during the intermediate pulse is tightly protected against large laser-pulse area variations and errors in potentially applied frequency shift compensations. Quantum clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden optical transitions in atoms, ions, molecules, and nuclei will benefit from these hyperstable laser frequency stabilization schemes to reach relative accuracies below the 10-18 level.

  14. Caesium cell coherent population trapping clock: main effects affecting the frequency stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic clocks using coherent population trapping (CPT) allow to improve performances of vapour cell conventional microwave clocks, or else to miniaturize them thanks to of a full optical interrogation. In this paper, we describe a prototype developed at LNE-SYRTE. It combines two original techniques: an excitation scheme with two linearly and orthogonally polarized beams, and a Ramsey interrogation. This enables the observation of narrow resonances with a good signal-to-noise ratio. A few major effects influencing the frequency stability are addressed; they are the effect of the buffer gas, of the magnetic field, of the laser power, and finally the effect of the local oscillator noise or Dick effect. The measured frequency stability is 7x10-13 at 1 s and 2x10-14 at 2000 s. (authors)

  15. Universality in the Gravitational Stretching of Clocks, Waves and Quantum States

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, C S

    2011-01-01

    There are discernible and fundamental differences between clocks, waves and physical states in classical physics. These fundamental concepts find a common expression in the context of quantum physics in gravitational fields; matter and light waves, quantum states and oscillator clocks become quantum synonymous through the Planck-Einstein-de Broglie relations and the equivalence principle. With this insight, gravitational effects on quantum systems can be simply and accurately analyzed. Apart from providing a transparent framework for conceptual and quantitative thinking on matter waves and quantum states in a gravitational field, we address and resolve with clarity the recent controversial discussions on the important issue of the relation and the crucial difference between gravimetery using atom interferometers and the measurement of gravitational time dilation.

  16. Clock drawing performance in cognitively normal elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, E J; Santini, V; Blankevoort, C.G.; Volkers, K.M.; Barrup, M.S.; Byerly, L; Chaisson, C.; Jefferson, A.L.; Kaplan, E; Green, R.C.; Stern, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a common neuropsychological measure sensitive to cognitive changes and functional skills (e.g., driving test performance) among older adults. However, normative data have not been adequately developed. We report the distribution of CDT scores using three common scoring systems (Mendez, Ala, and Underwood, 1992; Freund, Gravenstein, Ferris, Burke, & Shaheen, 2005; and Cahn, Salmon, Monsch, Butters, Wiederholt, & Corey-Bloom, 1996), among 207 cognitively normal e...

  17. The circadian clock, reward and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-01-01

    During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance, and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describe the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  18. Absolute clock synchronisation and special relativity paradoxes

    OpenAIRE

    Ciborowski, Jacek; Wlodarczyk, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Solving special relativity paradoxes requires rigorous analysis of event timing, due to relative simultaneity in consequence of the Lorentz transformation. Since clock synchronisation is a convention in special theory of relativity, instead of the Einstein's procedure one may choose such that offers absolute simultaneity. We present in short the corresponding formalism in one spatial dimension. We show that paradoxes do not arise with this choice of synchronisation and descriptions of these i...

  19. Molecular clock in neutral protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Claus O

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent observation in molecular evolution is that amino-acid substitution rates show an index of dispersion (that is, ratio of variance to mean substantially larger than one. This observation has been termed the overdispersed molecular clock. On the basis of in silico protein-evolution experiments, Bastolla and coworkers recently proposed an explanation for this observation: Proteins drift in neutral space, and can temporarily get trapped in regions of substantially reduced neutrality. In these regions, substitution rates are suppressed, which results in an overall substitution process that is not Poissonian. However, the simulation method of Bastolla et al. is representative only for cases in which the product of mutation rate μ and population size Ne is small. How the substitution process behaves when μNe is large is not known. Results Here, I study the behavior of the molecular clock in in silico protein evolution as a function of mutation rate and population size. I find that the index of dispersion decays with increasing μNe, and approaches 1 for large μNe . This observation can be explained with the selective pressure for mutational robustness, which is effective when μNe is large. This pressure keeps the population out of low-neutrality traps, and thus steadies the ticking of the molecular clock. Conclusions The molecular clock in neutral protein evolution can fall into two distinct regimes, a strongly overdispersed one for small μNe, and a mostly Poissonian one for large μNe. The former is relevant for the majority of organisms in the plant and animal kingdom, and the latter may be relevant for RNA viruses.

  20. Regulated DNA Methylation and the Circadian Clock: Implications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy M. Joska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the cloning and discovery of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT, there has been a growing interest in DNA methylation, its role as an epigenetic modification, how it is established and removed, along with the implications in development and disease. In recent years, it has become evident that dynamic DNA methylation accompanies the circadian clock and is found at clock genes in Neurospora, mice and cancer cells. The relationship among the circadian clock, cancer and DNA methylation at clock genes suggests a correlative indication that improper DNA methylation may influence clock gene expression, contributing to the etiology of cancer. The molecular mechanism underlying DNA methylation at clock loci is best studied in the filamentous fungi, Neurospora crassa, and recent data indicate a mechanism analogous to the RNA-dependent DNA methylation (RdDM or RNAi-mediated facultative heterochromatin. Although it is still unclear, DNA methylation at clock genes may function as a terminal modification that serves to prevent the regulated removal of histone modifications. In this capacity, aberrant DNA methylation may serve as a readout of misregulated clock genes and not as the causative agent. This review explores the implications of DNA methylation at clock loci and describes what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying DNA methylation at circadian clock genes.

  1. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  2. Clock drawing performance in cognitively normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Emily J; Santini, Veronica; Blankevoort, Christiaan G; Volkers, Karin M; Barrup, Melissa S; Byerly, Laura; Chaisson, Christine; Jefferson, Angela L; Kaplan, Edith; Green, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2008-05-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a common neuropsychological measure sensitive to cognitive changes and functional skills (e.g., driving test performance) among older adults. However, normative data have not been adequately developed. We report the distribution of CDT scores using three common scoring systems [Mendez, M. F., Ala, T., & Underwood, K. L. (1992). Development of scoring criteria for the Clock Drawing Task in Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 40, 1095-1099; Cahn, D. A., Salmon, D. P., Monsch, A. U., Butters, N., Wiederholt, W. C., & Corey-Bloom, J. (1996). Screening for dementia of the Alzheimer type in the community: The utility of the Clock Drawing Test. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 11(6), 529-539], among 207 cognitively normal elderly. The systems were well correlated, took little time to use, and had high inter-rater reliability. We found statistically significant differences in CDT scores based on age and WRAT-3 Reading score, a marker of education quality. We present means, standard deviations, and t- and z-scores based on these subgroups. We found that "normal" CDT performance includes a wider distribution of scores than previously reported. Our results may serve as useful comparisons for clinicians wishing to know whether their patients perform in the general range of cognitively normal elderly. PMID:18243644

  3. A microresonator frequency comb optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, Scott B; DelHaye, Pascal; Quinlan, Franklyn; Lee, Hansuek; Vahala, Kerry J; Diddams, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Optical-frequency combs enable measurement precision at the 20th digit, and accuracy entirely commensurate with their reference oscillator. A new direction in experiments is the creation of ultracompact frequency combs by way of nonlinear parametric optics in microresonators. We refer to these as microcombs, and here we report a silicon-chip-based microcomb optical clock that phase-coherently converts an optical-frequency reference to a microwave signal. A low-noise comb spectrum with 25 THz span is generated with a 2 mm diameter silica disk and broadening in nonlinear fiber. This spectrum is stabilized to rubidium frequency references separated by 3.5 THz by controlling two teeth 108 modes apart. The optical clocks output is the electronically countable 33 GHz microcomb line spacing, which features an absolute stability better than the rubidium transitions by the expected factor of 108. Our work demonstrates the comprehensive set of tools needed for interfacing microcombs to state-of-the-art optical clocks.

  4. Quantum mechanics, matter waves, and moving clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Holger

    2013-01-01

    This paper is divided into three parts. In the first (section 1), we demonstrate that all of quantum mechanics can be derived from the fundamental property that the propagation of a matter wave packet is described by the same gravitational and kinematic time dilation that applies to a clock. We will do so in several steps, first deriving the Schroedinger equation for a nonrelativistic particle without spin in a weak gravitational potential, and eventually the Dirac equation in curved space-time describing the propagation of a relativistic particle with spin in strong gravity. In the second part (sections 2-4), we present interesting consequences of the above quantum mechanics: that it is possible to use wave packets as a reference for a clock, to test general relativity, and to realize a mass standard based on a proposed redefinition of the international system of units, wherein the Planck constant would be assigned a fixed value. The clock achieved an absolute accuracy of 4 parts per billion (ppb). The exper...

  5. On the clock paradox in the case of circular motion of the moving clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very often in many textbooks the formalism of the general theory of relativity is applied to gravitational problems. We think that it would be didactically useful to show how it can be adopted also for describing physical situations in accelerated frames of reference by working out in detail a particular case. This choice will also offer an opportunity to discuss a classical topic of relativistic physics. Indeed, we deal analytically with a version of the so-called clock paradox in which the moving clock performs a circular motion. The rest clock is denoted as (1), the rotating clock is (2), the inertial frame in which (1) is at rest and (2) moves is I and, finally, the accelerated frame in which (2) is at rest and (1) rotates is A. By using the general theory of relativity in order to describe the motion of (1) as seen in A we will show the following features. (I) A differential ageing between (1) and (2) occurs at their reunion and it has an absolute character, i.e. the proper time interval measured by a given clock is the same both in I and in A. (II) From a quantitative point of view, the magnitude of the differential ageing between (1) and (2) does depend on the kind of rotational motion performed by A. Indeed, if it is uniform there is no tangential force in the direction of motion of (2) but only normal to it. In this case, the proper time interval reckoned by (2) does depend only on its constant velocity v = rω. In contrast, if the rotational motion is uniformly accelerated, i.e. a constant force acts tangentially along the direction of motion, the proper time intervals do depend on the angular acceleration α. (III) Finally, in regard to the sign of the ageing, the moving clock (2) always measures a shorter interval of proper time with respect to (1)

  6. The Effects of Clock Drift on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khaled S.; Vanelli, C. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    All clocks drift by some amount, and the mission clock on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is no exception. The mission clock on both MER rovers drifted significantly since the rovers were launched, and it is still drifting on the Opportunity rover. The drift rate is temperature dependent. Clock drift causes problems for onboard behaviors and spacecraft operations, such as attitude estimation, driving, operation of the robotic arm, pointing for imaging, power analysis, and telecom analysis. The MER operations team has techniques to deal with some of these problems. There are a few techniques for reducing and eliminating the clock drift, but each has drawbacks. This paper presents an explanation of what is meant by clock drift on the rovers, its relationship to temperature, how we measure it, what problems it causes, how we deal with those problems, and techniques for reducing the drift.

  7. Clock Auto-synchronizing Method for BES III ETOF Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Si-Yu, Wang; Shu-Bin, Liu; Qi, An

    2015-01-01

    An automatic clock synchronizing method implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA) is proposed in this paper. It is developed for the clock system which will be applied in the end-cap time of flight (ETOF) upgrade of the Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII). In this design, an FPGA is used to automatically monitor the synchronization circuit and deal with signals coming from external clock synchronization circuit. By testing different delay time of the detection signal and analyzing state signals returned, the synchronization windows will be found automatically in FPGA. The new clock system not only retains low clock jitter which is less than 20ps root mean square (RMS), but also demonstrates automatic synchronization to the beam bunches. So far, the clock auto-synchronizing function has been working successfully under a series of tests. It will greatly simplify the system initialization and maintenance in the future.

  8. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science

    CERN Document Server

    Lisdat, C; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J -L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Coq, Y Le; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Leveraging the unrivaled performance of optical clocks in applications in fundamental physics beyond the standard model, in geo-sciences, and in astronomy requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks truthfully. Meeting this requirement, we report on the first comparison and agreement of fully independent optical clocks separated by 700 km being only limited by the uncertainties of the clocks themselves. This is achieved by a phase-coherent optical frequency transfer via a 1415 km long telecom fiber link that enables substantially better precision than classical means of frequency transfer. The fractional precision in comparing the optical clocks of three parts in $10^{17}$ was reached after only 1000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than with any other existing frequency transfer method. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optic...

  9. Electromagnetic synchronisation of clocks with finite separation in a rotating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For clocks on the vertices of a triangle, it is shown that clock synchronisation using electromagnetic signals between finitely spaced clocks in a rotating frame leads to the same synchronisation error as a closely spaced band of clocks along the same light path. In addition, the above result is generalised to n equally spaced clocks. (author)

  10. A Blind Circadian Clock in Cavefish Reveals that Opsins Mediate Peripheral Clock Photoreception

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallari, N; E.Frigato; Vallone, D.; N.Fröhlich; J.F. Lopez-Olmeda; A.Foà; R.De Berti; Sánchez-Vázquez, F. J.; C.Bertolucci; Foulkes, N S

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock is a physiological timing mechanism that allows organisms to anticipate and adapt to the day-night cycle. Since it ticks with a period that is not precisely 24 h, it is vital that it is reset on a daily basis by signals such as light to ensure that it remains synchronized with the day-night cycle. The molecular mechanisms whereby light regulates the clock remain incompletely understood. Here we have studied a cavefish that has evolved for millions of years in the perpetual...

  11. Clock rates, clock settings and the physics of the space-time Lorentz transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Field, J H

    2006-01-01

    A careful study is made of the operational meaning of the time symbols appearing in the space-time Lorentz transformation. Four distinct symbols, with different physical meanings, are needed to describe reciprocal measurements involving stationary and uniformly-moving clocks. Physical predictions concern only the observed rate of a clock as a function of its relative speed, not its setting. How the failure to make this distinction leads to the conventional predictions of spurious `relativity of simultaneity' and `length contraction' effects in special relativity is explained.

  12. Light scattering from dense cold atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Bihui; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study the propagation of light through a cold atomic medium, where the effects of motion, laser intensity, atomic density, and polarization can all modify the properties of the scattered light. We present two different microscopic models: the "coherent dipole model" and the "random walk model", both suitable for modeling recent experimental work done in large atomic arrays in the low light intensity regime. We use them to compute relevant observables such as the linewidth, peak intensity and line center of the emitted light. We further develop generalized models that explicitly take into account atomic motion. Those are relevant for hotter atoms and beyond the low intensity regime. We show that atomic motion can lead to drastic dephasing and to a reduction of collective effects, together with a distortion of the lineshape. Our results are applicable to model a full gamut of quantum systems that rely on atom-light interactions including atomic clocks, quantum simulators and nanophotonic system...

  13. The circadian clock and cell cycle: Interconnected biological circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Masri, Selma; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock governs biological timekeeping on a systemic level, helping to regulate and maintain physiological processes, including endocrine and metabolic pathways with a periodicity of 24-hours. Disruption within the circadian clock machinery has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, including cancer, suggesting that clock-dependent regulation of the cell cycle is an essential control mechanism. This review will highlight recent advances on the ‘gating’ controls of the ci...

  14. Clocks and dynamics in quantum models of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Malkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the quantum dynamics of gravitational models depend on the clocks employed in quantization procedure. Our previous result demonstrates that almost all physical features of quantum cosmological bounces depend on the choice of clock. The vital question whether all the quantum (or, semiclassical) solutions admit, away from the quantum interaction region in the far past and future, invariant asymptotic limits irrespectively of the clock's choice is addressed herein. We analyze ...

  15. The Clock-Proxy Auction: A Practical Combinatorial Auction Design

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton; Paul Milgrom

    2004-01-01

    We propose the clock-proxy auction as a practical means for auctioning many related items. A clock auction phase is followed by a last-and-final proxy round. The approach combines the simple and transparent price discovery of the clock auction with the efficiency of the proxy auction. Linear pricing is maintained as long as possible, but then is abandoned in the proxy round to improve efficiency and enhance seller revenues. The approach has many advantages over the simultaneous ascending auct...

  16. Gated Clock Implementation of Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU)

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Neelam R. Prakash; Akash

    2013-01-01

    Low power design has emerged as one of the challenging area in today’s ASIC (Application specific integrated circuit) design. With continuous decrease in transistor size, power density is increasing and there is an urgent need for reduction in total power consumption. Clock gating is one most effective technique for low power synchronous circuit design. Clock gating technique in low power design is used to reduce the dynamic power consumption. Clock signal in a synchronous circuit is used for...

  17. Relativity theory and time perception: single or multiple clocks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin V Buhusi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current theories of interval timing assume that humans and other animals time as if using a single, absolute stopwatch that can be stopped or reset on command. Here we evaluate the alternative view that psychological time is represented by multiple clocks, and that these clocks create separate temporal contexts by which duration is judged in a relative manner. Two predictions of the multiple-clock hypothesis were tested. First, that the multiple clocks can be manipulated (stopped and/or reset independently. Second, that an event of a given physical duration would be perceived as having different durations in different temporal contexts, i.e., would be judged differently by each clock. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were trained to time three durations (e.g., 10, 30, and 90 s. When timing was interrupted by an unexpected gap in the signal, rats reset the clock used to time the "short" duration, stopped the "medium" duration clock, and continued to run the "long" duration clock. When the duration of the gap was manipulated, the rats reset these clocks in a hierarchical order, first the "short", then the "medium", and finally the "long" clock. Quantitative modeling assuming re-allocation of cognitive resources in proportion to the relative duration of the gap to the multiple, simultaneously timed event durations was used to account for the results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the three event durations were effectively timed by separate clocks operated independently, and that the same gap duration was judged relative to these three temporal contexts. Results suggest that the brain processes the duration of an event in a manner similar to Einstein's special relativity theory: A given time interval is registered differently by independent clocks dependent upon the context.

  18. AMPK at the crossroads of circadian clocks and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Sabine D.; Lamia, Katja A.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate behavior and physiology with daily environmental cycles and thereby optimize the timing of metabolic processes such as glucose production and insulin secretion. Such circadian regulation of metabolism provides an adaptive advantage in diverse organisms. Mammalian clocks are primarily based on a transcription and translation feedback loop in which a heterodimeric complex of the transcription factors CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and BMAL1 (brain an...

  19. Stability limits of an optical frequency standard based on free Ca atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, J A

    2011-01-01

    We have quantified a short term instability budget for an optical frequency standard based on cold, freely expanding calcium atoms. Such systems are the subject of renewed interest due to their high frequency stability and relative technical simplicity compared to trapped atom optical clocks. By filtering the clock laser light at 657 nm through a high finesse cavity, we observe a slight reduction in the optical Dick effect caused by aliased local oscillator noise. The ultimately limiting technical noise is measured using a technique that does not rely on a second clock or fs-comb.

  20. Power and Skew Aware Point Diffusion Clock Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gunok; Kim, Chunghee; Chae, Kyoungkuk; Park, Giho; Park, Sung Bae

    This letter presents point diffusion clock network (PDCN) with local clock tree synthesis (CTS) scheme. The clock network is implemented with ten times wider metal line space than typical mesh networks for low power and utilized to nine times smaller area CTS execution for minimized clock skew amount. The measurement results show that skew amount of PDCN with local CTS is reduced to 36% and latency is shrunk to 45% of the amount in a 4.81mm2 CortexA-8 core with 65nm Samsung process.

  1. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Karl

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces periods of light and dark which define what we all experience as a ‘day’. This profound cyclic variation in solar energy is responsible for driving the evolution of adaptive responses as early as 3.8...

  2. Real-time geopotentiometry with synchronously linked optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Tetsushi; Ushijima, Ichiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kuroishi, Yuki; Munekane, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Basara; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    According to the Einstein's theory of relativity, the passage of time changes in a gravitational field. On earth, raising a clock by one centimetre increases its tick rate by 1.1 parts in 10$^{18}$, enabling optical clocks to perform precision geodesy. Here, we demonstrate geopotentiometry by determining the height difference of master and slave clocks separated by 15 km with uncertainty of 5 cm. The subharmonic of the master clock is delivered through a telecom fibre to phase-lock and synchronously interrogate the slave clock. This protocol rejects laser noise in the comparison of two clocks, which improves the stability of measuring the gravitational red shift. Such phase-coherently operated clocks facilitate proposals for linking clocks and interferometers. Over half a year, 11 measurements determine the fractional frequency difference between the two clocks to be $1,652.9(5.9)\\times 10^{-18}$, or a height difference of 1,516(5) cm, consistent with an independent measurement by levelling and gravimetry. Ou...

  3. Temperature regulates transcription in the zebrafish circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been well-documented that temperature influences key aspects of the circadian clock. Temperature cycles entrain the clock, while the period length of the circadian cycle is adjusted so that it remains relatively constant over a wide range of temperatures (temperature compensation. In vertebrates, the molecular basis of these properties is poorly understood. Here, using the zebrafish as an ectothermic model, we demonstrate first that in the absence of light, exposure of embryos and primary cell lines to temperature cycles entrains circadian rhythms of clock gene expression. Temperature steps drive changes in the basal expression of certain clock genes in a gene-specific manner, a mechanism potentially contributing to entrainment. In the case of the per4 gene, while E-box promoter elements mediate circadian clock regulation, they do not direct the temperature-driven changes in transcription. Second, by studying E-box-regulated transcription as a reporter of the core clock mechanism, we reveal that the zebrafish clock is temperature-compensated. In addition, temperature strongly influences the amplitude of circadian transcriptional rhythms during and following entrainment by light-dark cycles, a property that could confer temperature compensation. Finally, we show temperature-dependent changes in the expression levels, phosphorylation, and function of the clock protein, CLK. This suggests a mechanism that could account for changes in the amplitude of the E-box-directed rhythm. Together, our results imply that several key transcriptional regulatory elements at the core of the zebrafish clock respond to temperature.

  4. The role of the mechanical clock in medieval science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Víctor Pérez

    2015-03-01

    The invention and spread of the mechanical clock is a complex and multifaceted historical phenomenon. Some of these facets, such as its social impact, have been widely studied, but their scientific dimensions have often been dismissed. The mechanical clock was probably born as a scientific instrument for driving a model of the universe, and not only natural philosophers but also kings, nobles and other members of the social elites showed an interest in clocks as scientific instruments. Public clocks later spread a new way of telling time based on equal hours, laying the foundations for changes in time consciousness that would accelerate scientific thinking. PMID:25802023

  5. Velocity Distribution of Effective Atoms in a Small Optically Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the velocity distribution of effective atoms in a small optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard has been achieved from the Fourier transforms of the experimentally recorded Ramsey patterns. The result fits well with the theoretical calculation. The second order Doppler shift correction of the small cesium atomic clock is obtained from the velocity distribution of effective atoms.

  6. The Space Optical Clocks Project: Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and advanced subsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, S; Nevsky, A; Alighanbari, S; Vasilyev, S; Abou-Jaoudeh, C; Mura, G; Franzen, T; Sterr, U; Falke, S; Lisdat, Ch; Rasel, E; Kulosa, A; Bize, S; Lodewyck, J; Tino, G M; Poli, N; Schioppo, M; Bongs, K; Singh, Y; Gill, P; Barwood, G; Ovchinnikov, Y; Stuhler, J; Kaenders, W; Braxmaier, C; Holzwarth, R; Donati, A; Lecomte, S; Calonico, D; Levi, F

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultra-precise optical clocks in space ("master clocks") will allow for a range of new applications in the fields of fundamental physics (tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, time and frequency metrology by means of the comparison of distant terrestrial clocks), geophysics (mapping of the gravitational potential of Earth), and astronomy (providing local oscillators for radio ranging and interferometry in space). Within the ELIPS-3 program of ESA, the "Space Optical Clocks" (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the ISS towards the end of this decade, as a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Undertaking a necessary step towards optical clocks in space, the EU-FP7-SPACE-2...

  7. Clocks underneath: the role of peripheral clocks in the timing of female reproductive physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelTSellix

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The central circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is a critical component of the neuroendocrine circuit controlling gonadotropin secretion from the pituitary gland. The SCN conveys photic information to hypothalamic targets including the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons. Many of these target cells are also cell autonomous clocks. It has been suggested that, rather then being singularly driven by the SCN, the timing of gonadotropin secretion depends on the activity of multiple hypothalamic oscillators. While this view provides a novel twist to an old story, it does little to diminish the central role of rhythmic hypothalamic output in this system. It is now clear that the pituitary, ovary, uterus and oviduct have functional molecular clocks. Evidence supports the notion that the clocks in these tissues contribute to the timing of events in reproductive physiology. The goal of this review is to highlight the current evidence for molecular clock function in the peripheral components of the female hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis as it relates to the timing of gonadotropin secretion, ovulation and parturition.

  8. An association between clock genes and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in murine colorectal tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soták, Matúš; Polidarová, Lenka; Ergang, Peter; Sumová, Alena; Pácha, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 5 (2013), s. 1032-1041. ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9982 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cancer * circadian rhythm * peripheral circadian clock Subject RIV: FE - Other Internal Medicine Disciplines Impact factor: 5.007, year: 2013

  9. Grand-mother clocks and quiet lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Jacques; Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    7 pages Galileo noted in the 16th century that the period of oscillation of a pendulum is almost independent of the amplitude. However, such a pendulum is damped by air friction. The latter may be viewed as resulting from air molecules getting in contact with the pendulum. It follows that air friction, not only damps the oscillation, but also introduces randomness. In the so-called ``grand-mother'' clock, discovered by Huygens in the 18th century, damping is compensated for, on the average...

  10. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-06-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  11. Dopamine receptor-mediated regulation of neuronal "clock" gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbesi, M; Yildiz, S; Dirim Arslan, A; Sharma, R; Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-23

    Using a transgenic mice model (i.e. "clock" knockouts), clock transcription factors have been suggested as critical regulators of dopaminergic behaviors induced by drugs of abuse. Moreover, it has been shown that systemic administration of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine regulates the striatal expression of clock genes. However, it is not known whether dopamine receptors mediate these regulatory effects of psychostimulants at the cellular level. Primary striatal neurons in culture express dopamine receptors as well as clock genes and have been successfully used in studying dopamine receptor functioning. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine receptors on neuronal clock gene expression in this model using specific receptor agonists. We found an inhibitory effect on the expression of mClock and mPer1 genes with the D2-class (i.e. D2/D3) receptor agonist quinpirole. We also found a generalized stimulatory effect on the expression of clock genes mPer1, mClock, mNPAS2 (neuronal PAS domain protein 2), and mBmal1 with the D1-class (i.e. D1) receptor agonist SKF38393. Further, we tested whether systemic administration of dopamine receptor agonists causes similar changes in striatal clock gene expression in vivo. We found quinpirole-induced alterations in mPER1 protein levels in the mouse striatum (i.e. rhythm shift). Collectively, our results indicate that the dopamine receptor system may mediate psychostimulant-induced changes in clock gene expression. Using striatal neurons in culture as a model, further research is needed to better understand how dopamine signaling modulates the expression dynamics of clock genes (i.e. intracellular signaling pathways) and thereby influences neuronal gene expression, neuronal transmission, and brain functioning. PMID:19017537

  12. Improving prediction accuracy of GPS satellite clocks with periodic variation behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broadcast ephemeris and IGS ultra-rapid predicted (IGU-P) products are primarily available for use in real-time GPS applications. The IGU orbit precision has been remarkably improved since late 2007, but its clock products have not shown acceptably high-quality prediction performance. One reason for this fact is that satellite atomic clocks in space can be easily influenced by various factors such as temperature and environment and this leads to complicated aspects like periodic variations, which are not sufficiently described by conventional models. A more reliable prediction model is thus proposed in this paper in order to be utilized particularly in describing the periodic variation behaviour satisfactorily. The proposed prediction model for satellite clocks adds cyclic terms to overcome the periodic effects and adopts delay coordinate embedding, which offers the possibility of accessing linear or nonlinear coupling characteristics like satellite behaviour. The simulation results have shown that the proposed prediction model outperforms the IGU-P solutions at least on a daily basis. (rapid communication)

  13. Dual cesium and rubidium atomic fountain with a 10-16 level accuracy and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic fountains are the most accomplished development of the atomic clocks based on the cesium atom whose hyperfine resonance defines the SI second since 1967. Today these systems are among those which realize the second with the best accuracy. We present the last developments of the cold cesium and rubidium atom dual fountain experiment at LNE-SYRTE. This unique dual setup would allow to obtain an outstanding resolution in fundamental physics tests based on atomic transition frequency comparisons. In order to enable operation with both atomic species simultaneously, we designed, tested and implemented on the fountain new collimators which combine the laser lights corresponding to each atom. By comparing our rubidium fountain to another cesium fountain over a decade, we performed a test of the stability of the fine structure constant at the level of 5 * 10-16 per year. We carried on the work on the clock accuracy and we focused on the phase gradients effects in the interrogation cavity and on the microwave leakage. The fountain accuracy has been evaluated to 4 * 10-16 for the cesium clock and to 5 * 10-16 for the refurbished rubidium clock. As a powerful instrument of metrology, our fountain was implicated in many clock comparisons and contributed many times to calibrate the International Atomic Time. Furthermore, we used the fountain to perform a new test of Lorentz local invariance. (author)

  14. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Landgraf, Dominic; Wang, Lexie L.; Diemer, Tanja; Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and periph...

  15. Quantum optics and nuclear clocks: a look at the 2012 physics nobel prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioneering researches in the field of quantum optics are presented. These have laid the foundation for photonics research, that has grasped the particle properties of light to create new technologies and deepen the understanding of the physical laws. The quantum computation and quantum clocks have been highlighted. Individual particles have managed to manipulate without losing its properties in quantum, using photons to immobilize atoms with electric charges (ions) and study their properties. Researches conducted by the French scientist Serge Haroche and American David Wineland nobel prize winners for Physics 2012, have been commented

  16. Modified hyper-Ramsey methods for the elimination of probe shifts in optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hobson, R; King, S A; Baird, P E G; Hill, I R; Gill, P

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new extension of existing techniques of hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy in optical clocks, achieving complete immunity to the frequency shifts induced by the probing fields themselves. Using particular pulse sequences with tailored phases, frequencies, and durations, we can derive an error signal centered exactly at the unperturbed atomic resonance with a steep discriminant which is robust against variations in the probe shift. We experimentally investigate the scheme using the magnetically-induced $^1$S$_0- ^3$P$_0$ transition in $^{88}$Sr, demonstrating automatic suppression of a sizeable \

  17. Oscillation of Clock and Clock Controlled Genes Induced by Serum Shock in Human Breast Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cells: Regulation by Melatonin

    OpenAIRE

    S. Xiang; Mao, L; T. Duplessis; Yuan, L.; R. Dauchy; Dauchy, E.; D.E. Blask,; T. Frasch; Hill, S M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates differences in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes (CCGs) between human breast epithelial and breast cancer cells and breast tumor xenografts in circadian intact rats and examines if the pineal hormone melatonin influences clock gene and CCG expression. Oscillation of clock gene expression was not observed under standard growth conditions in vitro, however, serum shock (50% horse serum for 2 h) induced oscillation of clock gene and CCG expression in MCF-10A ...

  18. Real-time estimation of satellite clock offset using adaptively robust Kalman filter with classified adaptive factors

    OpenAIRE

    G Huang; Q. Zhang;  

    2012-01-01

    In order to estimate the satellite clock offset in a real-time mode, a new algorithm of adaptively robust Kalman filter with classified adaptive factors for clock offset estimation is proposed. Compared with standard Kalman filter clock offset model, the new method can detect and control outliers and clock jumps automatically in real-time. Moreover, the clock model parameters, which contain the clock offset, clock speed and clock shift, are classified to decide the adaptive factors in the new...

  19. Limits to clock synchronization induced by completely dephasing communication channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clock synchronization procedures are analyzed in the presence of imperfect communications. In this context we show that there are physical limitations, which prevent one from synchronizing distant clocks when the intervening medium is completely dephasing, as in the case of a rapidly varying dispersive medium

  20. Molecular clock integration of brown adipose tissue formation and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Deokhwa; Yechoor, Vijay K.; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The circadian clock is an essential time-keeping mechanism that entrains internal physiology to environmental cues. Despite the well-established link between the molecular clock and metabolic homeostasis, an intimate interplay between the clock machinery and the metabolically active brown adipose tissue (BAT) is only emerging. Recently, we came to appreciate that the formation and metabolic functions of BAT, a key organ for body temperature maintenance, are under an orchestrated circadian clock regulation. Two complementary studies from our group uncover that the cell-intrinsic clock machinery exerts concerted control of brown adipogenesis with consequent impacts on adaptive thermogenesis, which adds a previously unappreciated temporal dimension to the regulatory mechanisms governing BAT development and function. The essential clock transcriptional activator, Bmal1, suppresses adipocyte lineage commitment and differentiation, whereas the clock repressor, Rev-erbα, promotes these processes. This newly discovered temporal mechanism in fine-tuning BAT thermogenic capacity may enable energy utilization and body temperature regulation in accordance with external timing signals during development and functional recruitment. Given the important role of BAT in whole-body metabolic homeostasis, pharmacological interventions targeting the BAT-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders, particularly those associated with circadian dysregulation.

  1. The Circadian Clock-Controlled Transcriptome of Developing Soybean Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of metabolic and physiological processes in plants are controlled by the circadian clock, which enables the plant to anticipate daily changes in the environment. Microarray expression profiling was used to identify circadian clock controlled genes expressed in developing soybean seeds. 1.8...

  2. Optimal Infinite Runs in One-Clock Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Ejsing-Duun, Daniel; Fontani, Lisa; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Popescu, Vasile; Haubach Smedegård, Jacob

    We address the problem of finding an infinite run with the optimal cost-time ratio in a one-clock priced timed automaton and pro- vide an algorithmic solution. Through refinements of the quotient graph obtained by strong time-abstracting bisimulation partitioning, we con- struct a graph with time...... of the one-clock priced timed automaton....

  3. Verge and Foliot Clock Escapement: A Simple Dynamical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The earliest mechanical clocks appeared in Europe in the 13th century. From about 1250 CE to 1670 CE, these simple clocks consisted of a weight suspended from a rope or chain that was wrapped around a horizontal axle. To tell time, the weight must fall with a slow uniform speed, but, under the action of gravity alone, such a suspended weight would…

  4. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  5. Development and entrainment of the colonic circadian clock during ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Olejníková, Lucie; Paušlyová, Lucia; Sládek, Martin; Soták, Matúš; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 4 (2014), G346-G356. ISSN 0193-1857 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian clock * clock gene * ontogenesis * circadian entrainment Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.798, year: 2014

  6. The circadian clock regulates auxin signaling and responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Covington

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day-specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.

  7. The role of biological clock in glucose homeostasis 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Chrościcki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the biological clock is based on a rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes. As a result of their transcripto-translational associations, endogenous rhythms in the synthesis of key proteins of various physiological and metabolic processes are created. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms exists in the central nervous system. The master circadian clock, localized in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, regulates multiple metabolic pathways, while feeding behavior and metabolite availability can in turn regulate the circadian clock. It is also suggested that in the brain there is a food entrainable oscillator (FEO or oscillators, resulting in activation of both food anticipatory activity and hormone secretion that control digestion processes. Moreover, most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks. Maintenance of the glucose homeostasis is particularly important for the proper function of the body, as this sugar is the main source of energy for the brain, retina, erythrocytes and skeletal muscles. Thus, glucose production and utilization are synchronized in time. The hypothalamic excited orexin neurons control energy balance of organism and modulate the glucose production and utilization. Deficiency of orexin action results in narcolepsy and weight gain, whereas glucose and amino acids can affect activity of the orexin cells. Large-scale genetic studies in rodents and humans provide evidence for the involvement of disrupted clock gene expression rhythms in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In general, the current lifestyle of the developed modern societies disturbs the action of biological clock

  8. A Novel Method of Clock Synchronization in Distributed System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Niu, M. J.; Cai, Y. S.; Chen, X.; Ren, Y. Q.

    2016-03-01

    Time synchronization plays an important role in application of aircraft flying formation and constellation autonomous navigation, etc. In application of clock synchronization in the network system, it is not always true that each observed node may be interconnected, therefore, it is difficult to achieve time synchronization of network system with high precision in the condition that a certain node can only obtain the measurement information of clock from one of its corresponding neighbors, and cannot obtain from other nodes. According to this special problem, a novel method of high precision time synchronization of network system has been proposed. In this paper, we regard each clock as a node in the network system, and based on different distributed topology definition, the following three control algorithms of time synchronization under three circumstances have been designed: without a master clock (reference clock), with a master clock (reference clock), and with a fixed communication delay in the network system. The validity of the designed clock synchronization protocol has been proved both theoretically and through numerical simulation.

  9. Animal clocks: when science meets nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronfeld-Schor, Noga; Bloch, Guy; Schwartz, William J

    2013-08-22

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian 'clock'), with the alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizing (entraining) these rhythms to the natural day-night cycle. Our knowledge of the circadian system of animals at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organismal levels is remarkable, and we are beginning to understand how each of these levels contributes to the emergent properties and increased complexity of the system as a whole. For the most part, these analyses have been carried out using model organisms in standard laboratory housing, but to begin to understand the adaptive significance of the clock, we must expand our scope to study diverse animal species from different taxonomic groups, showing diverse activity patterns, in their natural environments. The seven papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B take on this challenge, reviewing the influences of moonlight, latitudinal clines, evolutionary history, social interactions, specialized temporal niches, annual variation and recently appreciated post-transcriptional molecular mechanisms. The papers emphasize that the complexity and diversity of the natural world represent a powerful experimental resource. PMID:23825215

  10. The clock ambiguity: Implications and new developments

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We consider the ambiguity associated with the choice of clock in time reparameterization invariant theories. This arbitrariness undermines the goal of prescribing a fixed set of physical laws, since a change of time variable can completely alter the predictions of the theory. We review the main features of the clock ambiguity and our earlier work on its implications for the emergence of physical laws in a statistical manner. We also present a number of new results: We show that (contrary to suggestions in our earlier work) time independent Hamiltonians may quite generally be assumed for laws of physics that emerge in this picture. We also further explore the degree to which the observed Universe can be well approximated by a random Hamiltonian. We discuss the possibility of predicting the dimensionality of space, and also relate the 2nd derivative of the density of states to the heat capacity of the Universe. This new work adds to the viability of our proposal that strong predictions for physical laws may eme...

  11. An Integrated Architectural Clock Implemented Memory Design Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Khatwal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently Low power consumption and Custom Memory design is major issue for embedded designer. Micro wind and Xilinx simulator implements SRAM design architecture and performs efficient simulation. These simulators implements high performances and low power consumption of SRAM design. SRAM efficiency analyzed with 6-T architecture design and row/column based architectural design. We have analyzed clock implemented memory design and simulated with specific application. We have implemented clock based SRAM architecture that improves the internal clock efficiency of SRAM. Architectural Clock implemented memory design reduces the propagation delay and access time. Internal semiconductor material design implemented technique also improves the SRAM data transitions scheme. Semiconductor material and clock implemented design improve simulation performance of SRAM and these design implements for recently developed Application Specific Memory Design Architecture and mobile devices.

  12. Multiple-bit-rate clock recovery circuit: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiple-bit-rate clock recovery circuit has been recently proposed as a part of the communications packet switch. All packets must be the same length and be preceded by the frequency header, which is a number of consecutive ones (return-to-zero mode). The header is compared with the internal clock, and the result is used to set output clock frequency. The clock rate is defined by a number of fluxons propagating in ring oscillator, which is a close circular Josephson transmission line. The theory gives a bit rate bandwidth as a function of internal clock frequency, header length and silence time (maximum number of consecutive zeros in the packet). (author)

  13. Standard Clock in primordial density perturbations and cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard Clocks in the primordial epoch leave a special type of features in the primordial perturbations, which can be used to directly measure the scale factor of the primordial universe as a function of time a(t), thus discriminating between inflation and alternatives. We have started to search for such signals in the Planck 2013 data using the key predictions of the Standard Clock. In this Letter, we summarize the key predictions of the Standard Clock and present an interesting candidate example in Planck 2013 data. Motivated by this candidate, we construct and compute full Standard Clock models and use the more complete prediction to make more extensive comparison with data. Although this candidate is not yet statistically significant, we use it to illustrate how Standard Clocks appear in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and how they can be further tested by future data. We also use it to motivate more detailed theoretical model building

  14. Clock-turning gait synthesis for humanoid robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe TANG; Zengqi SUN; Hongbo LIU; Meng Joo ER

    2007-01-01

    Turning gait is a basic motion for humanoid robots.This paper presents a method for humanoid turning.i.e.clock-turning.The objective of clock-turning is to change robot direction at a stationary spot.The clock-turning planning consists of four steps:ankle trajectory generation,hip trajectory generation,knee trajectory generation,and inverse kinematics calculation.Our proposed method is based on a typical humanoid structure with 12 DOFs(degrees of freedom).The final output of clock-turning planning is 12 reference trajectories.which are used to control a humanoid robot wim 12 DOFs.ZMP(zero moment point)is used as stability criterion for the planning.Simulation experiments are conducted to verify the effectiveness of our proposed clock-turning method.

  15. The Retina and Other Light-sensitive Ocular Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharse, Joseph C; McMahon, Douglas G

    2016-06-01

    Ocular clocks, first identified in the retina, are also found in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), cornea, and ciliary body. The retina is a complex tissue of many cell types and considerable effort has gone into determining which cell types exhibit clock properties. Current data suggest that photoreceptors as well as inner retinal neurons exhibit clock properties with photoreceptors dominating in nonmammalian vertebrates and inner retinal neurons dominating in mice. However, these differences may in part reflect the choice of circadian output, and it is likely that clock properties are widely dispersed among many retinal cell types. The phase of the retinal clock can be set directly by light. In nonmammalian vertebrates, direct light sensitivity is commonplace among body clocks, but in mice only the retina and cornea retain direct light-dependent phase regulation. This distinguishes the retina and possibly other ocular clocks from peripheral oscillators whose phase depends on the pace-making properties of the hypothalamic central brain clock, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, in mice, retinal circadian oscillations dampen quickly in isolation due to weak coupling of its individual cell-autonomous oscillators, and there is no evidence that retinal clocks are directly controlled through input from other oscillators. Retinal circadian regulation in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates uses melatonin and dopamine as dark- and light-adaptive neuromodulators, respectively, and light can regulate circadian phase indirectly through dopamine signaling. The melatonin/dopamine system appears to have evolved among nonmammalian vertebrates and retained with modification in mammals. Circadian clocks in the eye are critical for optimum visual function where they play a role fine tuning visual sensitivity, and their disruption can affect diseases such as glaucoma or retinal degeneration syndromes. PMID:27095816

  16. Atom interferometry and the Einstein equivalence principle

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Bordé, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Clande

    2011-01-01

    The computation of the phase shift in a symmetric atom interferometer in the presence of a gravitational field is reviewed. The difference of action-phase integrals between the two paths of the interferometer is zero for any Lagrangian which is at most quadratic in position and velocity. We emphasize that in a large class of theories of gravity the atom interferometer permits a test of the weak version of the equivalence principle (or universality of free fall) by comparing the acceleration of atoms with that of ordinary bodies, but is insensitive to that aspect of the equivalence principle known as the gravitational redshift or universality of clock rates.

  17. The eCDR-PLL, a radiation-tolerant ASIC for clock and data recovery and deterministic phase clock synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation-tolerant CDR/PLL ASIC has been developed for the upcoming LHC upgrades, featuring clock Frequency Multiplication (FM) and Clock and Data Recovery (CDR), showing deterministic phase and low jitter. Two FM modes have been implemented: either generating 40, 60, 120 and 240 MHz clock outputs for GBT-FPGA applications or providing 40, 80, 160 and 320 MHz clocks for TTC and e-link applications. The CDR operates with 40, 80, 160 or 320 Mbit/s data rates while always generating clocks at 40, 80, 160 and 320 MHz, regardless of the data rate. All the outputs are phase programmable with a resolution of 195 ps or 260 ps, depending on the selected mode. The ASIC has been designed using radiation-tolerant techniques in a 130 nm CMOS technology and operates at a 1.2 V supply voltage

  18. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  19. Clocks for quaternary environments in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian continent offers a variety of natural systems where records of the Earth's past environment have been stored, including sediment cores, tree rings, rock surfaces and corals. Rock varnish, mud-wasp nests and pack-rat middens provide alternative archives for vegetation and environmental change in arid areas, where continuous sedimentary sequences or trees are not available. Each of these media contain specific information on past climatic conditions but we must determine their chronology and decipher the relevant environmental parameters. Cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 14C, 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl, analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry, provide valuable radiometric clocks to establish an absolute time scale for the environmental events of the Quaternary. U-series, potassium-argon, argonargon and optically stimulated luminescence are other dating methods used in palaeoenvironmental studies. ANSTO supports the Quaternary science community in Australia providing the analysis of long-lived radionuclides: some significant projects from this program will be illustrated. (author)

  20. The Information Flow Problem on Clock Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The information flow problem on a network asks whether $r$ senders, $v_1,v_2, \\ldots ,v_r$ can each send messages to $r$ corresponding receivers $v_{n+1}, \\ldots ,v_{n+r}$ via intermediate nodes $v_{r+1}, \\ldots ,v_n$. For a given finite $R \\subset \\mathbb{Z}^+$, the clock network $N_n(R)$ has edge $v_iv_k$ if and only if $k>r$ and $k-i \\in R$. We show that the information flow problem on $N_n(\\{1,2, \\ldots ,r\\})$ can be solved for all $n \\geq r$. We also show that for any finite $R$ such tha...

  1. Somitogenesis clock-wave initiation requires differential decay and multiple binding sites for clock protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Campanelli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Somitogenesis is a process common to all vertebrate embryos in which repeated blocks of cells arise from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM to lay a foundational pattern for trunk and tail development. Somites form in the wake of passing waves of periodic gene expression that originate in the tailbud and sweep posteriorly across the PSM. Previous work has suggested that the waves result from a spatiotemporally graded control protein that affects the oscillation rate of clock-gene expression. With a minimally constructed mathematical model, we study the contribution of two control mechanisms to the initial formation of this gene-expression wave. We test four biologically motivated model scenarios with either one or two clock protein transcription binding sites, and with or without differential decay rates for clock protein monomers and dimers. We examine the sensitivity of wave formation with respect to multiple model parameters and robustness to heterogeneity in cell population. We find that only a model with both multiple binding sites and differential decay rates is able to reproduce experimentally observed waveforms. Our results show that the experimentally observed characteristics of somitogenesis wave initiation constrain the underlying genetic control mechanisms.

  2. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  3. Automatic minimisation of micromotion in a 88Sr+ optical clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical clocks based on narrow linewidth transitions in single cold ions confined in RF traps are being developed at a number of laboratories worldwide. For these ion clock systems, excess micromotion can cause both Stark and Doppler frequency shifts and also a degradation of frequency stability as a result of a reduced excitation rate to the clock transition. At NPL, we detect micromotion in our 88Sr+ optical clocks by observing the correlation between photon arrival times and the zero crossing of the RF trap drive signal. Recently, two nominally identical 88Sr+ optical clocks have been operated over several days and their frequencies compared against one another. During this time the dc voltages on the endcap and compensation voltage electrodes required to minimise the micromotion can change significantly, particularly following the loading of an ion. This paper describes an automatic method to monitor and minimise micromotion applicable to single ion clocks and which we demonstrate using our two NPL 88Sr+ ion clocks. (paper)

  4. Circadian clock and the onset of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Norihiko; Maemura, Koji

    2016-06-01

    The onset of cardiovascular diseases often shows time-of-day variation. Acute myocardial infarction or ventricular arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia occurs mainly in the early morning. Multiple biochemical and physiological parameters show circadian rhythm, which may account for the diurnal variation of cardiovascular events. These include the variations in blood pressure, activity of the autonomic nervous system and renin-angiotensin axis, coagulation cascade, vascular tone and the intracellular metabolism of cardiomyocytes. Importantly, the molecular clock system seems to underlie the circadian variation of these parameters. The center of the biological clock, also known as the central clock, exists in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In contrast, the molecular clock system is also activated in each cell of the peripheral organs and constitute the peripheral clock. The biological clock system is currently considered to have a beneficial role in maintaining the homeostasis of each organ. Discoordination, however, between the peripheral clock and external environment could potentially underlie the development of cardiovascular events. Therefore, understanding the molecular and cellular pathways by which cardiovascular events occur in a diurnal oscillatory pattern will help the establishment of a novel therapeutic approach to the management of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26888119

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans opens up new insights into circadian clock mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Saigusa, Tetsu; Tamai, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    The roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, is known to carry homologues of clock genes such as per (=period) and tim (=timeless), which constitute the core of the circadian clock in Drosophila and mammals: lin-42 and tim-1. Analyses using WormBase (C. elegans gene database) have identified with relatively high identity analogous of the clock genes recognized in Drosophila and mammals, with the notable exception of cry (=cryptochrome), which is lacking in C. elegans. All of these C. elegans cognates of the clock genes appear to belong to members of the PAS-superfamily and to participate in development or responsiveness to the environment but apparently are not involved in the C. elegans circadian clock. Nevertheless, C. elegans exhibits convincing circadian rhythms in locomotor behavior in the adult stage and in resistance to hyperosmotic stress in starved larvae (L1) after hatching, indicating that it has a circadian clock with a core design entirely different from that of Drosophila and mammals. Here two possibilities are considered. First, the core of the C. elegans circadian clock includes transcriptional/translational feedback loops between genes and their protein products that are entirely different from those of Drosophila and mammals. Second, a more basic principle such as homeostasis governs the circadian cellular physiology, and was established primarily to minimize the accumulation of DNA damage in response to an environment cycling at 24 h intervals. PMID:15865318

  6. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kadomatsu

    Full Text Available Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2 contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  7. Automatic minimisation of micromotion in a 88Sr+ optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.

    2015-07-01

    Optical clocks based on narrow linewidth transitions in single cold ions confined in RF traps are being developed at a number of laboratories worldwide. For these ion clock systems, excess micromotion can cause both Stark and Doppler frequency shifts and also a degradation of frequency stability as a result of a reduced excitation rate to the clock transition. At NPL, we detect micromotion in our 88Sr+ optical clocks by observing the correlation between photon arrival times and the zero crossing of the RF trap drive signal. Recently, two nominally identical 88Sr+ optical clocks have been operated over several days and their frequencies compared against one another. During this time the dc voltages on the endcap and compensation voltage electrodes required to minimise the micromotion can change significantly, particularly following the loading of an ion. This paper describes an automatic method to monitor and minimise micromotion applicable to single ion clocks and which we demonstrate using our two NPL 88Sr+ ion clocks.

  8. The Bird of Time: Cognition and the Avian Biological Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Michael Cassone

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian behavior and physiology are embedded in time at many levels of biological organization. Biological clock function in birds is critical for sleep/wake cycles, but may also regulate the acquisition of place memory, learning of song from tutors, social integration and time-compensated navigation. This relationship has two major implications. First, mechanisms of the circadian clock should be linked in some way to the mechanisms of all these behaviors. How is not yet clear, and evidence that the central clock has effects is piecemeal. Second, selection acting on characters that are linked to the circadian clock should influence aspects of the clock mechanism itself. Little evidence exists for this in birds, but there have been few attempts to assess this idea. At its core, the avian circadian clock is a multi-oscillator system comprising the pineal gland, the retinae and the avian homologues of the suprachiasmatic nuclei, whose mutual interactions ensure coordinated physiological functions, which are in turn synchronized to ambient light cycles via encephalic, pineal and retinal photoreceptors. At the molecular level, avian biological clocks comprise a genetic network of positive elements clock and bmal1 whose interactions with the negative elements period2, period3 and the cryptochromes form an oscillatory feedback loop that circumnavigates the 24 hrs of the day. We assess the possibilities for dual integration of the clock with time-dependent cognitive processes. Closer examination of the molecular, physiological, and behavioral elements of the circadian system would place birds at a very interesting fulcrum in the neurobiology of time in learning, memory and navigation. 

  9. Using a transportable optical clock for chronometric levelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe; Koller, Silvio; Grotti, Jacopo; Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Herbers, Sofia; Al-Masoudi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    With their supreme accuracy and precision, optical clocks in combination with new methods of long-distance frequency transfer can be used to determine height differences by measuring the gravitational red shift between two clocks without accumulation of measurement errors, as in classical levelling. We are developing transportable optical clocks for this purpose that will also serve for the technology development regarding optical clocks in Space and for international comparisons between optical clocks that cannot be linked with sufficient accuracy otherwise. In this talk we will focus on the transportable strontium lattice clock that we are developing and its first evaluation. Presently, we achieve a fractional frequency instability of 3 × 10^{-17} after 1000 s averaging time, which is equivalent to a height resolution of 30 cm. The first uncertainty evaluation of the system yielded 7 × 10^{-17}. We expect rapid improvements to an uncertainty of a few parts in 10^{17}. The clock is now located within a car trailer, which requires compact and rugged lasers systems and physics package. Special care has been taken in the design of the ultra-frequency stable interrogation laser that has to achieve fractional frequency instabilities of considerably below 10^{-15}. Typical laboratory constructions of the reference resonator system used to pre-stabilize the laser frequency are not compatible with the requirement of transportability. In an actual levelling campaign, this clock will be connected via a stabilized optical fibre link with another, stationary frequency standard. The measured gravitational red shift will be compared with the ones calculated from potential differences derived with state of the art geodetic data and models. We will discuss the status of measurements of geodetic relevance with optical clocks and give an outlook on our next steps. This work is supported by QUEST, DFG (RTG 1729, CRC 1128), EU-FP7 (FACT) and EMRP (ITOC). The EMRP is jointly funded

  10. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  11. Gravitational wave detection with single-laser atom interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    We present a new general design approach of a broad-band detector of gravitational radiation that relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser will be used for operating the two atom interferometers. We consider atoms in the atom interferometers not only as perfect inertial reference sensors, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser. The un...

  12. Time in the 10,000-Year Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Hillis, Danny; Seaman, Rob; Allen, Steve; Giorgini, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The Long Now Foundation is building a mechanical clock that is designed to keep time for the next 10,000 years. The clock maintains its long-term accuracy by synchronizing to the Sun. The 10,000-Year Clock keeps track of five different types of time: Pendulum Time, Uncorrected Solar Time, Corrected Solar Time, Displayed Solar Time and Orrery Time. Pendulum Time is generated from the mechanical pendulum and adjusted according to the equation of time to produce Uncorrected Solar Time, which is ...

  13. Progress Towards a Compact Optical Clock at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Scott; Rellergert, Wade; Grudinin, Ivan; Baumgartel, Lukas; Yu, Nan

    2014-05-01

    The unprecedented stability and accuracy provided by optical clocks allows improved navigation and planetary science in space applications as well as more precise tests of fundamental laws of physics. However, technological advances towards the miniaturization of the physical volume and reduced power consumption of these clocks must be made to suit space-based application. We will describe JPL's effort towards the development of a compact, low-power optical clock based on 171Yb+. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Partial support from NASA Fundamental Physics Program is acknowledged.

  14. Relativistic effects for the JUICE on‐board clock

    OpenAIRE

    S. Bauer; Hussmann, H.; J. Mueller; Oberst, J.

    2014-01-01

    We studied relativistic effects on spacecraft clock rates for ESA’s JUICE mission and derived a relationship between dynamical time TDB and on‐board time. We analysed the S/C on‐board clock rate by using the JUICE mission nominal trajectory. We identify significant changes in the rate of the clock due to large changes of the S/C velocity and its distance to the solar system bodies during the various spacecraft operational phases. After ≈ 11.5 years, at the end of the mission, the offset in ti...

  15. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms. PMID:26483181

  16. High speed fiber-based clock enhancement of NRZ data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Wu; Kun Qiu

    2005-01-01

    A scheme for all-fiber clock enhancement of non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data based on cross-phase modulation (XPM) effect in nonlinear fibers is proposed and demonstrated in simulation. The simulation results indicate that the clock-to-data ratio of NRZ signals at 64 Gb/s can be increased to 22.94 dB by using this scheme, and the pattern effect in clock enhanced signals is very weak. The ability of high speed operation up to 140 Gb/s of this scheme is also proved in our simulation.

  17. Regulation of behavioral circadian rhythms and clock protein PER1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Bédard, Nathalie;

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous 24-hour rhythms are generated by circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important for regulating the clock...

  18. Optical lattice clocks: Hz-level spectral width with sub-Hz reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    State-of-the-art optical clocks have surpassed microwave clocks in this century, causing discussions to redefine the SI second based on an optical transition. The superiority of optical standards was clearly revealed by two of optical-optical comparisons, one of which is a remote comparison of two strontium lattice clocks, and the other is a characterization of a single Ca+ ion clock using a Sr lattice clock as a frequency reference. The former for the first time demonstrated the frequency reproducibility of physically separated clocks at the 10−16 level. The latter has confirmed the capability of single Ca+ clocks to reach the ∼10−16 instability.

  19. Two-photon assisted clock comparison to picosecond precision

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shi-Wei; Yao, Yin-Ping; Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a clock comparison scheme utilizing time-correlated photon pairs generated from the spontaneous parametric down conversion process of a laser pumped beta-barium borate crystal. The coincidence of two-photon events are analyzed by the cross correlation of the two time stamp sequences. Combining the coarse and fine part of the time differences at different resolutions, a 64 ps precision for clock synchronization has been realized. We also investigate the effects of hardware devices used in the system on the precision of clock comparison. The results indicate that the detector's time jitter and the background noise will degrade the system performance. With this method, comparison and synchronization of two remote clocks could be implemented with a precision at the level of a few tens of picoseconds.

  20. Measurement of Magic Wavelengths for the ^{40}Ca^{+} Clock Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Huang, Yao; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yong-Bo; Li, Cheng-Bin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of magic wavelengths and determine the ratio of oscillator strengths for a single trapped ion. For the first time, two magic wavelengths near 396 nm for the ^{40}Ca^{+} clock transition are measured simultaneously with high precision. By tuning the applied laser to an intermediate wavelength between transitions 4s_{1/2}→4p_{1/2} and 4s_{1/2}→4p_{3/2}, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, with the measured magic wavelengths, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths with a deviation of less than 0.5%. Our experimental method may be applied to measure magic wavelengths for other ion clock transitions. Promisingly, the measurement of these magic wavelengths paves the way to building all-optical trapped ion clocks. PMID:26196619

  1. Complementary approaches to understanding the plant circadian clock

    CERN Document Server

    Akman, Ozgur E; Loewe, Laurence; Troein, Carl; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.1

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are oscillatory genetic networks that help organisms adapt to the 24-hour day/night cycle. The clock of the green alga Ostreococcus tauri is the simplest plant clock discovered so far. Its many advantages as an experimental system facilitate the testing of computational predictions. We present a model of the Ostreococcus clock in the stochastic process algebra Bio-PEPA and exploit its mapping to different analysis techniques, such as ordinary differential equations, stochastic simulation algorithms and model-checking. The small number of molecules reported for this system tests the limits of the continuous approximation underlying differential equations. We investigate the difference between continuous-deterministic and discrete-stochastic approaches. Stochastic simulation and model-checking allow us to formulate new hypotheses on the system behaviour, such as the presence of self-sustained oscillations in single cells under constant light conditions. We investigate how to model the timing of...

  2. A Simple Loop for Simultaneous OTDM Demultiplexing and Clock Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and stable loop consisting of a pair of concatenated electroabsorption modulators (EAMs) and 10 GHz clock recovery module is presented and demonstrated experimentally for simultaneous demultiplexing and clock recovery for OTDM networks. The 10Gb/s demultiplexed signal and 10 GHz recovered clock are successfully implemented from 80 Gbit/s and 160 Gbit/s OTDM signals utilizing the loop. The loop based on EAM-PLL can provide excellent tolerance range (> 5 dB) of the OSCR of the source laser, and the recovered clock signal exhibits low rms jitter over a dynamic input optical power range of 15 dB. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  3. Speed of light as measured by two terrestrial stable clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that despite the recent criticism within the special theory of relativity there exists an arrangement of stable clocks rotating with the earth which predicts diurnal variations of the one-way speed of light, as suggested previously

  4. Speed of light as measured by two terrestrial stable clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J. P.; Sherry, T. N.; Chiu, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Despite the recent criticism within the special theory of relativity, there exists an arrangement of stable clocks rotating with the earth which predicts diurnal variations of the one-way speed of light, as suggested previously.

  5. Clocks and dynamics in quantum models of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Malkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the quantum dynamics of gravitational models depend on the clocks employed in quantization procedure. Our previous result demonstrates that almost all physical features of quantum cosmological bounces depend on the choice of clock. The vital question whether all the quantum (or, semiclassical) solutions admit, away from the quantum interaction region in the far past and future, invariant asymptotic limits irrespectively of the clock's choice is addressed herein. We analyze the semiclassical dynamics of the Bianchi Type I model undergoing a quantum bounce. Our result follows from the universal principle of the free choice of clock and thus, it applies to all quantum gravity models based on the concept of the physical Hilbert space and inner dynamics. Then we propose a suitable interpretation of quantum models of gravity. As a by-product of the pursuit of our main goal, we elaborate the semiclassical description of anisotropic singularity resolution.

  6. Clock synchronization of a broadband seismometer through IEEE-1588 protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Pallares, Oriol; Río Fernandez, Joaquín del; Shariat Panahi, Shahram

    2010-01-01

    In seismology, the time of the signal acquisition is highly important in order to know the magnitude and location of the earthquake. This paper presents the tests carried out to synchronize the seismometer clock through the IEEE-1588 protocol.

  7. Novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Catalin, Bogdan; Buga, Ana-Maria

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock coordinates the internal physiology to increase the homeostatic capacity thereby providing both a survival advantage to the system and an optimization of energy budgeting. Multiple-oscillator circadian mechanisms are likely to play a role in regulating human health and may contribute to the aging process. Our aim is to give an overview of how the central clock in the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks relate to aging and metabolic disorders, including hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. In particular, we unravel novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging. This review may lead to the design of large-scale interventions to help people stay healthy as they age by adjusting daily activities, such as feeding behavior, and or adaptation to age-related changes in individual circadian rhythms. PMID:24297467

  8. A Low-jitter 2.5-to-10 GHz Clock Multiplier Unit in CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Beek, van, P.; Vaucher, C.S.; Leenaerts, D. M. W.; Klumperink, E.A.M.; Nauta, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a low-jitter clock multiplier unit [1] that generates a 10 GHz output clock from a 2.5 GHz reference clock. An integrated 10 GHz LCoscillator is locked to the input clock, using a simple and fast phase detector circuit. This phase detector overcomes the speed limitation of a conventional tri-state Phase Frequency Detector, by eliminating an internal feedback loop. A frequency detector guarantees PLL locking without degenerating jitter performance. The clock multiplier ...

  9. CLOCK:BMAL1 is a pioneer-like transcription factor

    OpenAIRE

    Menet, Jerome S.; Pescatore, Stefan; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock requires the master transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1 to drive rhythmic gene expression. Here, Menet et al. report that rhythmic binding of CLOCK:BMAL1 on DNA promotes rhythmic chromatin opening. Mechanisms include CLOCK:BMAL1 binding to nucleosomes and chromatin modifications such as incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z. The data indicate that clock regulation of transcription relies on rhythmic regulation of chromatin accessibility, thus extending the con...

  10. Low Power at Different levels of VLSI Design an clock Distribution Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Low power chip requirement in the VLSI industry is main considerable field due to the reduction of chip dimension day by day and environmental factors. In this paper various low power techniques at Gate level, Architecture level and different tradeoffs between different clock distribution schemes like as single driver clock scheme and distributed buffers clock scheme are reviewed. Here it is also tried to showing various effects of particular clock distribution scheme such as clock skew, cloc...

  11. Design of Resonant Clock Distribution Networks for 3-D Integrated Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimian Omam, Somayyeh; Pavlidis, Vasileios; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Designing a low power clock network in synchronous circuits is an important task. This requirement is stricter for 3-D circuits due to the increased power densities. Resonant clock networks are considered efficient low-power alternatives to conventional clock distribution schemes. These networks utilize additional inductive circuits to reduce the power consumption while delivering a full swing clock signal to the sink nodes. A design method for 3-D resonant clock networks is presented. The p...

  12. SpiraClock: a continuous and non-intrusive display for upcoming events

    OpenAIRE

    Dragicevic, Pierre; Huot, Stéphane

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present SpiraClock, a new visualization technique for nearby events. SpiraClock fills a gap between static calendar displays and pop-up reminders by giving the user a continuous and non-intrusive feedback on nearby events. Events are displayed inside an analog clock that can be used as a regular computer clock. We used SpiraClock for displaying bus schedules, and collected user feedback.

  13. Clock is important for food and circadian regulation of macronutrient absorption in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Xiaoyue; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2009-01-01

    Clock genes respond to external stimuli and exhibit circadian rhythms. This study investigated the expression of clock genes in the small intestine and their contribution in the regulation of nutrient absorption by enterocytes. We examined expression of clock genes and macronutrient transport proteins in the small intestines of wild-type and Clock mutant (Clkmt/mt) mice with free or limited access to food. In addition, we studied absorption of macronutrients in these mice. Intestinal clock ge...

  14. Improving X10 Program Performances by Clock Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Feautrier, Paul; Violard, Eric; Ketterlin, Alain

    2014-01-01

    X10 is a promising recent parallel language designed specifically to address the challenges of productively programming a wide variety of target platforms. The sequential core of X10 is an object-oriented language in the Java family. This core is augmented by a few parallel constructs that create activities as a generalization of the well known fork/join model. Clocks are a generalization of the familiar barriers. Synchronization on a clock is specified by the advance() method call. Activitie...

  15. Motion and gravity effects in the precision of quantum clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Lindkvist, Joel; Sabín, Carlos; Johansson, Göran; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We show that motion and gravity affect the precision of quantum clocks. We consider a localised quantum field as a fundamental model of a quantum clock moving in spacetime and show that its state is modified due to changes in acceleration. By computing the quantum Fisher information we determine how relativistic motion modifies the ultimate bound in the precision of the measurement of time. While in the absence of motion the squeezed vacuum is the ideal state for time estimation, we find that...

  16. The Bird of Time: Cognition and the Avian Biological Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Michael Cassone; David F Westneat

    2012-01-01

    Avian behavior and physiology are embedded in time at many levels of biological organization. Biological clock function in birds is critical for sleep/wake cycles, but may also regulate the acquisition of place memory, learning of song from tutors, social integration and time-compensated navigation. This relationship has two major implications. First, mechanisms of the circadian clock should be linked in some way to the mechanisms of all these behaviors. How is not yet clear, and evidence tha...

  17. The bird of time: cognition and the avian biological clock

    OpenAIRE

    Cassone, Vincent M.; David F Westneat

    2012-01-01

    Avian behavior and physiology are embedded in time at many levels of biological organization. Biological clock function in birds is critical for sleep/wake cycles, but may also regulate the acquisition of place memory, learning of song from tutors, social integration, and time-compensated navigation. This relationship has two major implications. First, mechanisms of the circadian clock should be linked in some way to the mechanisms of all these behaviors. How is not yet clear, and evidence th...

  18. When the circadian clock meets the melanin pigmentary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of BMAL1 and PER1 stimulates melanogenic activity of follicular and epidermal melanocytes, indicating a novel role for peripheral circadian clock processes in the regulation of melanin pigmentation. Linking the expression levels of BMAL1/PER1 with changes in melanogenesis opens exciting opportunities to study the role of the local molecular clock in modulation of melanocyte functions in the hair follicle and the epidermis with attendant effects on epidermal barrier functions in general. PMID:25785947

  19. Interpretable Machine Learning Models for the Digital Clock Drawing Test

    OpenAIRE

    Souillard-Mandar, William; Davis, Randall; Rudin, Cynthia; Au, Rhoda; Penney, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a rapid, inexpensive, and popular neuropsychological screening tool for cognitive conditions. The Digital Clock Drawing Test (dCDT) uses novel software to analyze data from a digitizing ballpoint pen that reports its position with considerable spatial and temporal precision, making possible the analysis of both the drawing process and final product. We developed methodology to analyze pen stroke data from these drawings, and computed a large collection of featu...

  20. The clock ambiguity and the emergence of physical laws

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Andreas; Iglesias, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The process of identifying a time variable in time reparameterization invariant theories results in great ambiguities about the actual laws of physics described by a given theory. A theory set up to describe one set of physical laws can equally well be interpreted as describing any other laws of physics by making a different choice of time variable or ``clock''. In this article we demonstrate how this ``clock ambiguity'' arises and then discuss how one might still hope to extract specific pre...

  1. An Integrated Architectural Clock Implemented Memory Design Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Khatwal; Manoj Kumar Jain

    2015-01-01

    Recently Low power consumption and Custom Memory design is major issue for embedded designer. Micro wind and Xilinx simulator implements SRAM design architecture and performs efficient simulation. These simulators implements high performances and low power consumption of SRAM design. SRAM efficiency analyzed with 6-T architecture design and row/column based architectural design. We have analyzed clock implemented memory design and simulated with specific application. We have implemented clock...

  2. The Regulation of Segmentation Clock Period in Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Herrgen, Leah

    2008-01-01

    Oscillations are present at many different levels of biological organization. The cell cycle that directs the division of individual cells, the regular depolarization of neurons in the sinu-atrial node which underlies the regular beating of the heart, the circadian rhythms that govern the daily activity cycles of virtually all organisms, and the clocks that make entire populations of fireflies flash on and off in unison feature as prominent examples of biological clocks. During development, b...

  3. Consistency Models in Distributed Systems with Physical Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jiaqing

    2014-01-01

    Most existing distributed systems use logical clocks to order events in the implementation of various consistency models. Although logical clocks are straightforward to implement and maintain, they may affect the scalability, availability, and latency of the system when being used to totally order events in strong consistency models. They can also incur considerable overhead when being used to track and check the causal relationships among events in some weak consistency models. In this thesi...

  4. Master Clock and Time-Signal-Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, Robert; Calhoun, Malcolm; Kuhnle, Paul; Sydnor, Richard; Lauf, John

    2007-01-01

    A timing system comprising an electronic master clock and a subsystem for distributing time signals from the master clock to end users is undergoing development to satisfy anticipated timing requirements of NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) for the next 20 to 30 years. This system has a modular, flexible, expandable architecture that is easier to operate and maintain than the present frequency and timing subsystem (FTS).

  5. Methylphenidate Modifies the Motion of the Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Antle, Michael C.; van Diepen, Hester C; Deboer, Tom; Pedram, Pardis; Pereira, Rob Rodrigues; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2012-01-01

    People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience sleep problems, and these are frequently exacerbated by the methylphenidate they take to manage their ADHD symptoms. Many of the changes to sleep are consistent with a change in the underlying circadian clock. The present study was designed to determine if methylphenidate alone could alter properties of the circadian clock. Young male mice were examined in light–dark cycles and in constant darkness and recordings wer...

  6. Clocks, computers, black holes, spacetime foam, and holographic principle

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Y. Jack

    2000-01-01

    What do simple clocks, simple computers, black holes, space-time foam, and holographic principle have in common? I will show that the physics behind them is inter-related, linking together our concepts of information, gravity, and quantum uncertainty. Thus, the physics that sets the limits to computation and clock precision also yields Hawking radiation of black holes and the holographic principle. Moreover, the latter two strongly imply that space-time undergoes much larger quantum fluctuati...

  7. Clocking In Turbines: Remarks On Physical Nature And Geometric Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swirydczuk Jerzy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses two issues relating to the clocking phenomenon in turbines, which are the physical course of stator wake deformation in rotor passages and its further interaction with downstream stator blades, and turbine geometry parameters which are believed to be most favourable for clocking. In both cases, the results presented in the article have made it possible to verify and reformulate the previously accepted opinions.

  8. Adrenergic regulation of clock gene expression in mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Yamaguchi, Shun; Kobayashi, Masaki; Akiyama, Masashi; Udo, Rhyuta; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Okamura, Hitoshi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2003-01-01

    A main oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) conveys circadian information to the peripheral clock systems for the regulation of fundamental physiological functions. Although polysynaptic autonomic neural pathways between the SCN and the liver were observed in rats, whether activation of the sympathetic nervous system entrains clock gene expression in the liver has yet to be understood. To assess sympathetic innervation from the SCN to liver tissue, we investigated whether inj...

  9. Clock Face Drawing Test Performance in Children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  Introduction: The utility and discriminatory pattern of the clock face drawing test in ADHD is unclear. This study therefore compared Clock Face Drawing test performance in children with ADHD and controls.   Material & methods: 95 children with ADHD and 191 school children were matched for gender ratio and age. ADHD symptoms severities were assessed using DSM-IV ADHD checklist and their intellectual functioning was assessed. The participants completed three clock-drawing tasks, and the following four functions were assessed: Contour score, Numbers score, Hands setting score, and Center score    Results: All the subscales scores of the three clock drawing tests of the ADHD group were lower than that of the control group. In ADHD children, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity scores were not related with free drawn clock test scores. When pre-drawn contour test was performed, inattentiveness score was statistically associated with Number score. None of the other variables of age, gender, intellectual functioning, and hand use preference were associated with Numbers score. In pre-drawn clock, no association of ADHD symptoms with any CDT subscales was significant. In addition, more errors are observed with free drawn clock and Pre-drawn contour than pre-drawn clock.    Conclusion: Putting Numbers and Hands setting are more sensitive measures to screen ADHD than Contour and Center drawing. Test performance, except Hands setting, may have already reached a developmental plateau. It is probable that Hand setting deficit in children with ADHD may not decrease from age 8 to 14 years. Performance of children with ADHD is associated with the complexity of CDT.

  10. A Clock Enhanced Loop for Simultaneous Error-Free Demultiplexing and Clock Recovery of 160 Gb/s OTDM Signal Single-Channel Transmission over 100 km

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Nan; LI Tang-Jun; ZHONG Kang-Ping; WANG Mu-Guang; CHEN Ming; LI Jing; CHI Jian-Feng

    2010-01-01

    @@ A simple clock enhanced loop of cascaded electro-absorption modulators(EAMs)and 10GHz clock recovery modules is presented.The intensity of harmonic of clock-frequency component is analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in a 160Gb/s OTDM 100km transmission system.The 10GHz clock component is enhanced obviously before launching into the clock recovery module and the recovered clock signal exhibits low rms jitter of < 400 fs.Moreover,completely error-free(10-12)transmission is observed for more than two hours without using forward error correction technology.The power penalty is about 3.6dB.The proposed loop has merits of enhancing base clock component,simultaneously de-multiplexing and clock recovery,which make the performance of this loop more stable and high suppression of non-target channels.

  11. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisdat, C; Grosche, G; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J-L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Le Targat, R; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P-E

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10(-17) via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10(-17) is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second. PMID:27503795

  12. Dark energy from quantum uncertainty of distant clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    The observed cosmic acceleration was attributed to an exotic dark energy in the framework of classical general relativity. The dark energy behaves very similar with vacuum energy in quantum mechanics. However, once the quantum effects are seriously taken into account, it predicts a completely wrong result and leads to a severe fine-tuning. To solve the problem, the exact meaning of time in quantum mechanics is reexamined. We abandon the standard interpretation of time in quantum mechanics that time is just a global parameter, replace it by a quantum dynamical variable playing the role of physical clock. We find that synchronization of two spatially separated clocks can not be precisely realized at quantum level. There is an intrinsic quantum uncertainty of distant clock time, which implies an apparent vacuum energy fluctuation and gives an observed dark energy density at tree level approximation, where L P and L H are the Planck and Hubble scale cutoffs. The fraction of the dark energy is given by , which does not evolve with the internal clock time. The "dark energy" as a quantum cosmic variance is always seen comparable with the matter energy density by an observer using the internal clock time. The corrected distance-redshift relation of cosmic observations due to the distant clock effect are also discussed, which again gives a redshift independent fraction . The theory is consistent with current cosmic observations.

  13. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Valcin, Jennifer A.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases. PMID:26473939

  14. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  15. Serum factors in older individuals change cellular clock properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Lucia; Schmitt, Karen; Meier, Fides; Izakovic, Jan; Roemer, Konstanze; Viola, Antoine; Cajochen, Christian; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Brown, Steven A.; Eckert, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Human aging is accompanied by dramatic changes in daily sleep–wake behavior: Activity shifts to an earlier phase, and the consolidation of sleep and wake is disturbed. Although this daily circadian rhythm is brain-controlled, its mechanism is encoded by cell-autonomous circadian clocks functioning in nearly every cell of the body. In fact, human clock properties measured in peripheral cells such as fibroblasts closely mimic those measured physiologically and behaviorally in the same subjects. To understand better the molecular mechanisms by which human aging affects circadian clocks, we characterized the clock properties of fibroblasts cultivated from dermal biopsies of young and older subjects. Fibroblast period length, amplitude, and phase were identical in the two groups even though behavior was not, thereby suggesting that basic clock properties of peripheral cells do not change during aging. Interestingly, measurement of the same cells in the presence of human serum from older donors shortened period length and advanced the phase of cellular circadian rhythms compared with treatment with serum from young subjects, indicating that a circulating factor might alter human chronotype. Further experiments demonstrated that this effect is caused by a thermolabile factor present in serum of older individuals. Thus, even though the molecular machinery of peripheral circadian clocks does not change with age, some age-related circadian dysfunction observed in vivo might be of hormonal origin and therefore might be pharmacologically remediable. PMID:21482780

  16. Quantum arrival and dwell times via idealized clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of approaches to the problem of defining arrival- and dwell-time probabilities in quantum theory makes use of idealized models of clocks. An interesting question is the extent to which the probabilities obtained in this way are related to standard semiclassical results. In this paper, we explore this question using a reasonably general clock model, solved using path-integral methods. We find that, in the weak-coupling regime, where the energy of the clock is much less than the energy of the particle it is measuring, the probability for the clock pointer can be expressed in terms of the probability current in the case of arrival times, and the dwell-time operator in the case of dwell times, the expected semiclassical results. In the regime of strong system-clock coupling, we find that the arrival-time probability is proportional to the kinetic-energy density, consistent with an earlier model involving a complex potential. We argue that, properly normalized, this may be the generically expected result in this regime. We show that these conclusions are largely independent of the form of the clock Hamiltonian.

  17. Inexpensive Clock for Displaying Planetary or Sidereal Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, James

    2007-01-01

    An inexpensive wall clock has been devised for displaying solar time or sidereal time as it would be perceived on a planet other than the Earth, or for displaying sidereal time on the Earth. The concept of a wall clock synchronized to a period other than the terrestrial mean solar day is not new in itself. What is new here is that the clock is realized through a relatively simple electronic modification of a common battery-powered, quartz-crystal-oscillator-driven wall clock. The essence of the modification is to shut off the internal oscillator of the clock and replace the internal-oscillator output signal with a signal of the required frequency generated by an external oscillator. The unmodified clock electronic circuitry includes a quartz crystal connected to an integrated circuit (IC) that includes, among other parts, a buffer amplifier that conditions the oscillator output. The modification is effected by removing the quartz crystal and connecting the output terminal of the external oscillator, via a capacitor, to the input terminal of the buffer amplifier

  18. Influence of relativistic effects on satellite-based clock synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieci; Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2016-03-01

    Clock synchronization between the ground and satellites is a fundamental issue in future quantum telecommunication, navigation, and global positioning systems. Here, we propose a scheme of near-Earth orbit satellite-based quantum clock synchronization with atmospheric dispersion cancellation by taking into account the spacetime background of the Earth. Two frequency entangled pulses are employed to synchronize two clocks, one at a ground station and the other at a satellite. The time discrepancy of the two clocks is introduced into the pulses by moving mirrors and is extracted by measuring the coincidence rate of the pulses in the interferometer. We find that the pulses are distorted due to effects of gravity when they propagate between the Earth and the satellite, resulting in remarkably affected coincidence rates. We also find that the precision of the clock synchronization is sensitive to the source parameters and the altitude of the satellite. The scheme provides a solution for satellite-based quantum clock synchronization with high precision, which can be realized, in principle, with current technology.

  19. Clock auto-synchronization method for BESIII ETOF upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Yu; Cao, Ping; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2015-12-01

    An automatic clock synchronization method implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) is proposed in this paper. It is developed for the clock system which will be applied in the end-cap time of flight (ETOF) upgrade of the Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII). In this design, an FPGA is used to automatically monitor the synchronization circuit and deal with signals coming from the external clock synchronization circuit. By testing different delay time of the detection signal and analyzing the signal state returned, the synchronization windows can be found automatically by the FPGA. The new clock system not only retains low clock jitter which is less than 20ps root mean square (RMS), but also demonstrates automatic synchronization to the beam bunches. So far, the clock auto-synchronizing function has been working successfully under a series of tests. It will greatly simplify the system initialization and maintenance in the future. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10979003, 11005107), CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  20. Rigorous Comparison of Gravimetry Employing Atom Interferometers and the Measurement of Gravitational Time Dilation

    CERN Document Server

    Unnikrishnan, C S

    2011-01-01

    We present a gravitationally rigorous and clear answer, in the negative, to the question whether gravimetry with atom interferometers is equivalent to the the measurement of the relative gravitational time dilation of two clocks separated in space. Though matter and light waves, quantum states and oscillator clocks are quantum synonymous through the Planck-Einstein-de Broglie relations and the equivalence principle, there are crucial differences in the context of tests of gravitation theories.

  1. Circadian Rhythms: Hijacking the Cyanobacterial Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; O’Neill, John S

    2016-01-01

    The production of limitless carbon-free energy is a long-sought dream of scientists and politicians alike. One strategy for achieving this aim is the production of hydrogen by photosynthetic microorganisms – harnessing the effectively limitless power of the sun to power our cars, toasters and PCR machines. It may be tempting to think of host expression systems as miniature factories given over entirely to the production our molecule of interest. However, the biological nature of the host must be taken into account if we are to maximize productivity. The circadian rhythm, an organism’s entrainable oscillation of biological processes with a period of around 24 hours, is one such aspect that has received scant attention but is likely to be of particular importance to photosynthetic host systems. In this issue of current biology Xu et al. describe how our knowledge of the Synechococcus elongatus circadian clock can be leveraged to improve the production of exogeneous proteins, including those involved in the production of hydrogen [1]. PMID:24309283

  2. Reduced Voltage Scaling in Clock Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel circuit technique to generate a reduced voltage swing (RVS signals for active power reduction on main buses and clocks. This is achieved without performance degradation, without extra power supply requirement, and with minimum area overhead. The technique stops the discharge path on the net that is swinging low at a certain voltage value. It reduces active power on the target net by as much as 33% compared to traditional full swing signaling. The logic 0 voltage value is programmable through control bits. If desired, the reduced-swing mode can also be disabled. The approach assumes that the logic 0 voltage value is always less than the threshold voltage of the nMOS receivers, which eliminate the need of the low to high voltage translation. The reduced noise margin and the increased leakage on the receiver transistors using this approach have been addressed through the selective usage of multithreshold voltage (MTV devices and the programmability of the low voltage value.

  3. Cardiovascular tissues contain independent circadian clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, A. J.; London, B.; Block, G. D.; Menaker, M.

    2005-01-01

    Acute cardiovascular events exhibit a circadian rhythm in the frequency of occurrence. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not yet fully understood, but they may be due to rhythmicity inherent in the cardiovascular system. We have begun to characterize rhythmicity of the clock gene mPer1 in the rat cardiovascular system. Luciferase activity driven by the mPer1 gene promoter is rhythmic in vitro in heart tissue explants and a wide variety of veins and arteries cultured from the transgenic Per1-luc rat. The tissues showed between 3 and 12 circadian cycles of gene expression in vitro before damping. Whereas peak per1-driven bioluminescence consistently occurred during the late night in the heart and all arteries sampled, the phases of the rhythms in veins varied significantly by anatomical location. Varying the time of the culture procedure relative to the donor animal's light:dark cycle revealed that, unlike some other rat tissues such as liver, the phases of in vitro rhythms of arteries, veins, and heart explants were affected by culture time. However, phase relationships among tissues were consistent across culture times; this suggests diversity in circadian regulation among components of the cardiovascular system.

  4. Chemical clocks for early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Carretero, C; Beckman, J E

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed stellar population analysis of 27 massive elliptical galaxies within 4 very rich clusters at redshift z~0.2. We obtained accurate estimates of the mean luminosity-weighted ages and relative abundances of CN, Mg and Fe as functions of the galaxy velocity dispersion, sigma. Our results are compatible with a scenario in which the stellar populations of massive elliptical galaxies, independently of their environment and mass, had formation timescales shorter than ~1 Gyr. This result implies that massive elliptical galaxies have evolved passively since, at least, as long ago as z~2. For a given galaxy mass the duration of star formation is shorter in those galaxies belonging to more dense environments. Finally, we show that the abundance ratios [CN/Fe] and [Mg/Fe] are the key "chemical clocks" to infer the star formation history timescales in ellipticals. In particular, [Mg/Fe] provides an upper limit for those formation timescales, while [CN/Fe] apperars to be the most suitable parameter to ...

  5. Frequency ratio of Yb and Sr clocks with 5 × 10‑17 uncertainty at 150 seconds averaging time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Nils; Ohkubo, Takuya; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Transition frequencies of atoms and ions are among the most accurately accessible quantities in nature, playing important roles in pushing the frontiers of science by testing fundamental laws of physics, in addition to a wide range of applications such as satellite navigation systems. Atomic clocks based on optical transitions approach uncertainties of 10‑18 (refs 1–3), where full frequency descriptions are far beyond the reach of the SI second. Direct measurements of the frequency ratios of such super clocks, on the other hand, are not subject to this limitation. They can verify consistency and overall accuracy for an ensemble of super clocks, an essential step towards a redefinition of the second. Here we report a measurement that finds the frequency ratio of neutral ytterbium and strontium clocks to be ℛ = 1.207507039343337749(55), with a fractional uncertainty of 4.6 × 10‑17 and a measurement instability as low as 4 × 10‑16 (τ/s)‑1/2.

  6. Characterization of a clock based on coherent population trapping in a thermal cesium vapor. Main effects that may affect its mid- and long-term frequency stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a Cs - buffer gas vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT), and the main frequency shifts affecting its mid- and long-term stability. The developed atomic clock based on CPT uses two original techniques: a so-called double-Λ scheme for the CPT-resonance excitation and a temporal Ramsey interrogation technique, which produce a high contrast and narrow resonances with reduced light shift dependence. Generally, the mid and long term stability of the vapor cell atomic clock is limited by the collisional shift induced by alkali-buffer gas collisions and the light shift (or the effects depending on the laser intensity). We report on the study of the collisional shift of Cs clock frequency in the presence of Ne, N2 or Ar buffer gas, and its temperature dependence. The coefficient values of this dependence for these three buffer gases were revealed (some of them for the first time), allowing us to realise a cell with optimal combination of buffer gases to cancel the temperature dependence around the working temperature. Following the study of the signal amplitude and the coherence relaxation rate the optimal values for such parameters as interrogation cycle, magnetic field, cell temperature, pressure of the buffer gas mixture, etc. were found for the chosen cell. The investigation on the light shift and the effects depending on the laser intensity allowed us to determine the most sensitive parameters (laser intensity ratio, temperature) and to implement the required stabilizations in order to better control them. Finally, the mid- and long-term clock frequency stability was improved by a factor 40, reaching 2.5 10-14 at 1 hour. (author)

  7. Atom Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Folman, R; Cassettari, D; Hessmo, B; Maier, T; Schmiedmayer, J; Folman, Ron; Krüger, Peter; Cassettari, Donatella; Hessmo, Björn; Maier, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Atoms can be trapped and guided using nano-fabricated wires on surfaces, achieving the scales required by quantum information proposals. These Atom Chips form the basis for robust and widespread applications of cold atoms ranging from atom optics to fundamental questions in mesoscopic physics, and possibly quantum information systems.

  8. British domestic synchronous clocks 1930-1980 the rise and fall of a technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pook, Leslie Philip

    2015-01-01

    This book complements available one-make books on domestic synchronous clocks. It is also a history of science book that sets British domestic synchronous clocks, their manufacturers and technology in their social context. Part I covers the historical background, British domestic synchronous clock manufacturers and brands, how synchronous clocks work, domestic synchronous clock cases, practical advice on the servicing of domestic synchronous clocks, and analysis of the marketing and reliability of British domestic synchronous clocks. This analysis provides an explanation of the rise and eventual fall of their technology. Part II contains galleries of a selection of British domestic synchronous clocks, and of the movements with which they are fitted. There is a front and back view of each clock, together with a brief description. Views of each movement include views with the movement partly dismantled, together with a brief technical description of the movement. This profusely illustrated book is primarily fo...

  9. Functional Implications of the CLOCK 3111T/C Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozburn, Angela R; Purohit, Kush; Parekh, Puja K; Kaplan, Gabrielle N; Falcon, Edgardo; Mukherjee, Shibani; Cates, Hannah M; McClung, Colleen A

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disruptions are prominently associated with bipolar disorder (BD). Circadian rhythms are regulated by the molecular clock, a family of proteins that function together in a transcriptional-translational feedback loop. The CLOCK protein is a key transcription factor of this feedback loop, and previous studies have found that manipulations of the Clock gene are sufficient to produce manic-like behavior in mice (1). The CLOCK 3111T/C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs1801260) is a genetic variation of the human CLOCK gene that is significantly associated with increased frequency of manic episodes in BD patients (2). The 3111T/C SNP is located in the 3'-untranslated region of the CLOCK gene. In this study, we sought to examine the functional implications of the human CLOCK 3111T/C SNP by transfecting a mammalian cell line (mouse embryonic fibroblasts isolated from Clock(-/-) knockout mice) with pcDNA plasmids containing the human CLOCK gene with either the T or C SNP at position 3111. We then measured circadian gene expression over a 24-h time period. We found that the CLOCK3111C SNP resulted in higher mRNA levels than the CLOCK 3111T SNP. Furthermore, we found that Per2, a transcriptional target of CLOCK, was also more highly expressed with CLOCK 3111C expression, indicating that the 3'-UTR SNP affects the expression, function, and stability of CLOCK mRNA. PMID:27148095

  10. Lifetime Measurement of Cold Atoms in an Integrating Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Zhuo; WANG Xu-Cheng; CHENG Hua-Dong; XIAO Ling; LIU Liang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the lifetime of the cold 87Rb atoms in an integrating sphere.The atoms are cooled by the diffuse light which is generated by the diffuse reflection of laser beams in the integrating sphere.Our result shows that the lifetime is primarily determined by the free fall of the cold 87Rb atoms,and its half-life can reach 40 ms,which is suitable for many experiments,especially for a cold atom clock.

  11. Feasibility of Extreme Ultraviolet Active Optical Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Wei; CHEN Jing-Biao

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose an experimental scheme of vacuum ultraviolet(VUV)and extreme ultraviolet(XUV)optical fre-quency standards with noble gas atoms.Considering metastable state 3P2 noble atoms pumped by a conventional discharging method,the atomic beam is collimated with transverse laser cooling at the metastable state and en-ters into the laser cavity in the proposed setup.Due to stimulated emission from the metasable state to the ground state inside the laser cavity consisting of VUV reflection coating mirrors,our calculations show that with enough population inversion to compensate for the cavity loss,an active optical frequency standard at VUV and XUV is feasible.

  12. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Okaba, Shoichi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturisation. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kKagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the $^1 S_0-{}^3P_1$ (m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibresHC-PCFs improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  13. Pacemaker-neuron-dependent disturbance of the molecular clockwork by a Drosophila CLOCK mutant homologous to the mouse Clock mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Euna; Cho, Eunjoo; Kang, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Eun Hee; Chen, Zheng; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-08-16

    Circadian clocks are composed of transcriptional/translational feedback loops (TTFLs) at the cellular level. In Drosophila TTFLs, the transcription factor dCLOCK (dCLK)/CYCLE (CYC) activates clock target gene expression, which is repressed by the physical interaction with PERIOD (PER). Here, we show that amino acids (AA) 657-707 of dCLK, a region that is homologous to the mouse Clock exon 19-encoded region, is crucial for PER binding and E-box-dependent transactivation in S2 cells. Consistently, in transgenic flies expressing dCLK with an AA657-707 deletion in the Clock (Clk(out)) genetic background (p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out)), oscillation of core clock genes' mRNAs displayed diminished amplitude compared with control flies, and the highly abundant dCLKΔ657-707 showed significantly decreased binding to PER. Behaviorally, the p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out) flies exhibited arrhythmic locomotor behavior in the photic entrainment condition but showed anticipatory activities of temperature transition and improved free-running rhythms in the temperature entrainment condition. Surprisingly, p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out) flies showed pacemaker-neuron-dependent alterations in molecular rhythms; the abundance of dCLK target clock proteins was reduced in ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) but not in dorsal neurons (DNs) in both entrainment conditions. In p{dClk-Δ};Clk(out) flies, however, strong but delayed molecular oscillations in temperature cycle-sensitive pacemaker neurons, such as DN1s and DN2s, were correlated with delayed anticipatory activities of temperature transition. Taken together, our study reveals that the LNv molecular clockwork is more sensitive than the clockwork of DNs to dysregulation of dCLK by AA657-707 deletion. Therefore, we propose that the dCLK/CYC-controlled TTFL operates differently in subsets of pacemaker neurons, which may contribute to their specific functions. PMID:27489346

  14. A high-precision synchronization circuit for clock distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel structure of a high-precision synchronization circuit, HPSC, using interleaved delay units and a dynamic compensation circuit is proposed. HPSCs are designed for synchronization of clock distribution networks in large-scale integrated circuits, where high-quality clocks are required. The application of a hybrid structure of a coarse delay line and dynamic compensation circuit performs roughly the alignment of the clock signal in two clock cycles, and finishes the fine tuning in the next three clock cycles with the phase error suppressed under 3.8 ps. The proposed circuit is implemented and fabricated using a SMIC 0.13 μm 1P6M process with a supply voltage at 1.2 V. The allowed operation frequency ranges from 200 to 800 MHz, and the duty cycle ranges between [20%, 80%]. The active area of the core circuits is 245 × 134 μm2, and the power consumption is 1.64 mW at 500 MHz. (paper)

  15. Progress Toward a Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2009-01-01

    There was an update on the subject of two previous NASA Tech Briefs articles: Compact, Highly Stable Ion Clock (NPO-43075), Vol. 32, No. 5 (May 2008), page 63; and Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock (NPO-42919), Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 62. To recapitulate: A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump maintains the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a neon buffer gas. There was progress in the development of the clock, with emphasis on the design, fabrication, pump-down, and bake-out of the vacuum tube (based on established practice in the travelingwave- tube-amplifier industry) and the ability of the tube to retain a vacuum after a year of operation. Other developments include some aspects of the operation of mercury-vapor source (a small appendage oven containing HgO) so as to maintain the optimum low concentration of mercury vapor, and further efforts to miniaturize the vacuum and optical subsystems to fit within a volume of 2 L.

  16. Energy Efficient Global Clock Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Namboodiri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Clock synchronization is critical to many sensor networks for the success of the application as well as energyefficiency. Achieving a global time frame through localized averaging of clock values for multiple rounds till convergenceis a promising approach to clock synchronization due to the decentralized nature of computation coupled withscalability. However, it is not clear what power levels for all nodes would make the synchronization process energyefficient.Large power levels lead to faster convergence but consume a lot of energy per round of synchronization.On the other hand, smaller powers consume little energy per round, but convergence is very slow requiring a lotof rounds to achieve synchronization. In this paper we look at the problem of finding a power assignment thatachieves global clock synchronization in the most energy-efficient manner possible. We look at the problem throughtwo dimensions; rate of convergence and energy consumed per round of synchronization. A centralized algorithm ispresented that uses the path congestion of the induced communication graph to estimate which power assignmentshave good convergence properties and find one that minimizes the total energy to achieve clock synchronization.Our evaluation demonstrates that the power assignment derived from this algorithm is very energy-efficient and isapplicable for wireless communication environments with various distance-power gradients. Further, we present asimple distributed algorithm which nodes can execute locally to derive energy-efficient power levels for global clocksynchronization, and is especially useful in large-scale deployments.

  17. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  18. Atom Interferometers and the Gravitational Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Supurna

    2011-01-01

    Muller, Peters and Chu (MPC) claim that a reinterpretation of decade old experiments with atom interferometers leads to a sensitive test of the gravitational redshift effect. This claim has been disputed by Wolf et al (WBBRSC), who adduce arguments to show that MPC's claim is incorrect. In this Letter, we distill the arguments offered by WBBRSC to a single fundamental objection: an atom is not a clock ticking at the Compton frequency. We show that atom interferometric experiments conducted to date do not test the gravitational redshift effect. Our analysis is general and focuses on points of principle rather thanon the present state of technology. We then observe that it is in principle possible to use atom lasers to produce sensitive tests of the red shift effect at the Compton frequency. Such tests may become technologically realisable in the future.

  19. An alternative derivation of the gravitomagnetic clock effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of detecting the gravitomagnetic clock effect using artificial Earth satellites provides the incentive to develop a more intuitive approach to its derivation. We first consider two test electric charges moving on the same circular orbit but in opposite directions in orthogonal electric and magnetic fields and show that the particles take different times in describing a full orbit. The expression for the time difference is completely analogous to that of the general relativistic gravitomagnetic clock effect in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. The latter is obtained by considering the gravitomagnetic force as a small classical non-central perturbation of the main central Newtonian monopole force. A general expression for the clock effect is given for a spherical orbit with an arbitrary inclination angle. This formula differs from the result of the general relativistic calculations by terms of order c-4

  20. Performance of a 229Thorium solid-state nuclear clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229thorium has been suggested as a clock transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a ‘solid-state nuclear clock’ from thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of calcium fluoride. At liquid nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the thorium nuclei to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose clock stabilization based on a fluorescence spectroscopy method and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the large number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10−19 might be reached within the solid-state approach. (paper)