WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic clock application

  1. Cold atom Clocks and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bize, S; Abgrall, M; Marion, H; Maksimovic, I; Cacciapuoti, L; Gruenert, J; Vian, C; Dos Santos, F P; Rosenbusch, P; Lemonde, P; Santarelli, G; Wolf, P; Clairon, A; Luiten, A; Tobar, M; Salomon, C

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes advances in microwave frequency standards using laser-cooled atoms at BNM-SYRTE. First, recent improvements of the $^{133}$Cs and $^{87}$Rb atomic fountains are described. Thanks to the routine use of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator as an ultra-stable local frequency reference, a fountain frequency instability of $1.6\\times 10^{-14}\\tau^{-1/2}$ where $\\tau $ is the measurement time in seconds is measured. The second advance is a powerful method to control the frequency shift due to cold collisions. These two advances lead to a frequency stability of $2\\times 10^{-16}$ at $50,000s for the first time for primary standards. In addition, these clocks realize the SI second with an accuracy of $7\\times 10^{-16}$, one order of magnitude below that of uncooled devices. In a second part, we describe tests of possible variations of fundamental constants using $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs fountains. Finally we give an update on the cold atom space clock PHARAO developed in collaboration with CNES. This ...

  2. Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynands, Robert

    Time is a strange thing. On the one hand it is arguably the most inaccessible physical phenomenon of all: both in that it is impossible to manipulate or modify—for all we know—and in that even after thousands of years mankind's philosophers still have not found a fully satisfying way to understand it. On the other hand, no other quantity can be measured with greater precision. Today's atomic clocks allow us to reproduce the length of the second as the SI unit of time with an uncertainty of a few parts in 1016—orders of magnitude better than any other quantity. In a sense, one can say [1

  3. The quantum beat principles and applications of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F

    2007-01-01

    This work attempts to convey a broad understanding of the physical principles underlying the workings of these quantum-based atomic clocks, with introductory chapters placing them in context with the early development of mechanical clocks and the introduction of electronic time-keeping as embodied in the quartz-controlled clocks. While the book makes no pretense at being a history of atomic clocks, it nevertheless takes a historical perspective in its treatment of the subject. Intended for nonspecialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering, The Quantum Beat covers a wide range of salient topics relevant to atomic clocks, treated in a broad intuitive manner with a minimum of mathematical formalism. Detailed descriptions are given of the design principles of the rubidium, cesium, hydrogen maser, and mercury ion standards; the revolutionary changes that the advent of the laser has made possible, such as laser cooling, optical pumping, the formation of "optical molasses," and the cesium "fountain" stand...

  4. Geophysical applicability of atomic clocks: direct continental geoid mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Hetényi, György; Boschi, Lapo; Jetzer, Philippe; Balakrishna, Jayashree; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05636.x

    2012-01-01

    The geoid is the true physical figure of the Earth, a particular equipotential surface of the gravity field of the Earth that accounts for the effect of all subsurface density variations. Its shape approximates best (in the sense of least squares) the mean level of oceans, but the geoid is more difficult to determine over continents. Satellite missions carry out distance measurements and derive the gravity field to provide geoid maps over the entire globe. However, they require calibration and extensive computations including integration, which is a non-unique operation. Here we propose a direct method and a new tool that directly measures geopotential differences on continents using atomic clocks. General Relativity Theory predicts constant clock rate at sea level, and faster (resp. slower) clock rate above (resp. below) sea level. The technology of atomic clocks is on the doorstep of reaching an accuracy level in clock rate that is equivalent to 1 cm in determining equipotential surface (including geoid) he...

  5. Optical atomic clocks and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The atomic clock has long demonstrated the capability to measure time or frequency with very high precision. Consequently, these clocks are used extensively in technological applications such as advanced synchronization or communication and navigation networks. Optical atomic clocks are next- generation timekeepers which reference narrowband optical transitions between suitable atomic states. Many optical time/frequency standards utilize state-of-the-art quantum control and precision measurement. Combined with the ultrahigh quality factors of the atomic resonances at their heart, optical atomic clocks have promised new levels of timekeeping precision, orders of magnitude higher than conventional atomic clocks based on microwave transitions. Such measurement capability enables and/or enhances many of the most exciting applications of these clocks, including the study of fundamental laws of physics through the measurement of time evolution. Here, I will highlight optical atomic clocks and their utility, as well as review recent advances in their development and performance. In particular, I will describe in detail the optical lattice clock and the realization of frequency measurement at the level of one part in 1018. To push the performance of these atomic timekeepers to such a level and beyond, several key advances are being explored worldwide. These will be discussed generally, with particular emphasis on our recent efforts at NIST in developing the optical lattice clock based on atomic ytterbium.

  6. Optical atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today’s best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  7. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  8. Optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  9. Atomic clocks: the atoms as primary time and frequency standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we present the atomic clock as time and frequency standard and as one of the peaceful uses of atoms for development. In the first part, we present the general principles of time and frequency metrology and the key role of the caesium atom in this field as well as the main applications of atomic clocks. In the second part we introduce the different clock technologies based on Ramsey method, with a focus on atomic beam clocks and atomic fountain clocks. (author)

  10. Atomic clock ensemble in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission using high-performance clocks and links to test fundamental laws of physics in space. Operated in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station, the ACES clocks, PHARAO and SHM, will generate a frequency reference reaching instability and inaccuracy at the 1 · 10−16 level. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. ACES has now reached an advanced technology maturity, with engineering models completed and successfully tested and flight hardware under development. This paper presents the ACES mission concept and the status of its main instruments.

  11. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Vuletic, Vladan; Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  12. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  13. Microfabricated rubidium vapour cell with a thick glass core for small-scale atomic clock applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new fabrication method to manufacture alkali reference cells having dimensions larger than standard micromachined cells and smaller than glass-blown ones, for use in compact atomic devices such as vapour-cell atomic clocks or magnetometers. The technology is based on anodic bonding of silicon and relatively thick glass wafers and fills a gap in cell sizes and technologies available up to now: on one side, microfabrication technologies with typical dimensions ≤ 2 mm and on the other side, classical glass-blowing technologies for typical dimensions of about 6–10 mm or larger. The fabrication process is described for cells containing atomic Rb and spectroscopic measurements (optical absorption spectrum and double resonance) are reported. The analysis of the bonding strength of our cells was performed and shows that the first anodic bonding steps exhibit higher bonding strengths than the later ones. The spectroscopic results show a good quality of the cells. From the double-resonance signals, we predict a clock stability of ≈3 × 10−11 at 1 s of integration time, which compares well to the performance of compact commercial Rb atomic clocks. (paper)

  14. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature 87Sr 1S0 (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  15. Atomic fountains and optical clocks at SYRTE: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, M; De Sarlo, L; Guéna, J; Laurent, Ph; Coq, Y Le; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lours, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D; Bize, S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on the work done with the LNE-SYRTE atomic clock ensemble during the last 10 years. We cover progress made in atomic fountains and in their application to timekeeping. We also cover the development of optical lattice clocks based on strontium and on mercury. We report on tests of fundamental physical laws made with these highly accurate atomic clocks. We also report on work relevant to a future possible redefinition of the SI second.

  16. Mitigating aliasing in atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Hermann; Akhalwaya, Ismail; Sastrawan, Jarrah; Biercuk, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Passive atomic clocks periodically calibrate a classical local oscillator against an atomic quantum reference through feedback. The periodic nature of this correction leads to undesirable aliasing noise. The Dick Effect, is a special case of aliasing noise consisting of the down-conversion of clock noise at harmonics of the correction frequency to a frequency of zero. To combat the Dick effect and aliasing noise in general, we suggest an extension to the usual feedback protocol, in which we incorporate information from multiple past measurements into the correction after the most recent measurement, approximating a crude low pass anti-aliasing filter of the noise. An analytical frequency domain analysis of the approach is presented and supported by numerical time domain simulations.

  17. Atomic clocks: A mathematical physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Accuracy of atomic clocks (since their introduction in 50's) is increasing by roughly one order per decade. A natural theoretical problem posed by this development is to seek the ultimate accuracy of atomic clocks and means to achieve it. This problem was indeed extensively studied and various bounds on the accuracy are well understood, e.g. shot noise limit. I would present a mathematical minded (but simple) model of atomic clocks and discuss accuracy bounds within the model. (author)

  18. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  19. Atomic clocks: new prospects in metrology and geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Delva, Pacôme

    2013-01-01

    We present the latest developments in the field of atomic clocks and their applications in metrology and fundamental physics. In the light of recent advents in the accuracy of optical clocks, we present an introduction to the relativistic modelization of frequency transfer and a detailed review of chronometric geodesy.

  20. Could Atomic clocks be affected by neutrinos?

    CERN Document Server

    Hanafi, Hanaa

    2016-01-01

    An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electronic transition frequency of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard in order to derive a time standard since time is the reciprocal of frequency. If the electronic transition frequencies are in an "optical region", we are talking in this case about optical atomic clocks. If they are in an "microwave region" these atomic clocks are made of the metallic element cesium so they are called Cesium atomic clocks. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known despite the different perturbations that can affect them, a lot of researches were made in this domain to show how the transitions can be different for different type of perturbations..Since atomic clocks are very sensitive devices, based on coherent states (A coherent state tends to loose coherence after interacting). One question can arise (from a lot of questions) which is why cosmic neutrinos are not affecting these clocks? The answer to this question requir...

  1. An atomic clock with $10^{-18}$ instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkley, N; Phillips, N B; Schioppo, M; Lemke, N D; Beloy, K; Pizzocaro, M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2013-01-01

    Atomic clocks have been transformational in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Next-generation optical atomic clocks can extend the capability of these timekeepers, where researchers have long aspired toward measurement precision at 1 part in $\\bm{10^{18}}$. This milestone will enable a second revolution of new timing applications such as relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests on physics beyond the Standard Model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both utilizing spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of $\\bm{1.6\\times 10^{-18}}$ after only $\\bm{7}$ hours of averaging.

  2. Using Atomic Clocks to Detect Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clocks have recently reached a fractional timing precision of $<10^{-18}$. We point out that an array of atomic clocks, distributed along the Earth's orbit around the Sun, will have the sensitivity needed to detect the time dilation effect of mHz gravitational waves (GWs), such as those emitted by supermassive black hole binaries at cosmological distances. Simultaneous measurement of clock-rates at different phases of a passing GW provides an attractive alternative to the interferometric detection of temporal variations in distance between test masses separated by less than a GW wavelength, currently envisioned for the eLISA mission.

  3. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr87 using the 1S0 → 3P0 transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr87 atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10-15 and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10-15 level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr88 by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10-14. (author)

  4. High-Accuracy Microwave Atomic Clock via Magic Optical Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao

    2005-01-01

    A microwave atomic clock scheme based on Rb and Cs atoms trapped in optical lattice with magic wavelength for clock transition is proposed. The ac Stark shift of clock transition due to trapping laser can be canceled at some specific laser wavelengths. Comparing with in fountain clock, the cavity related shifts, the collision shift, and the Doppler effect are eliminated or suppressed dramatically in atomic clock when the magic optical lattice is exploited. By carefully analyzing various sourc...

  5. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  6. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  7. Microwave Atomic Clock in the Optical Lattice with Specific Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for a microwave atomic clock is proposed for Cs or Rb atoms trapped in a blue detuned optical lattice. The ac Stark shift of the clock transition due to a trapping laser is calculated. We analyze it at some specific laser wavelength. Compared with the case of the fountain clock, the cavity related shifts, the collision shift and the Doppler effect are eliminated or suppressed dramatically in an atomic lattice clock. By analyzing various sources of clock uncertainty, a microwave atomic lattice clock with a high accuracy and small volume is feasible

  8. Satellite virtual atomic clock with pseudorange difference function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Satellite atomic clocks are the basis of GPS for the control of time and frequency of navigation signals. In the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS), a satellite navigation system without the satellite atomic clocks onboard is successfully developed. Thus, the method of time synchronization based on satellite atomic clocks in GPS is not suitable. Satellite virtual atomic clocks are used to implement satellite navigation. With the satellite virtual atomic clocks, the time at which the signals are transmitted from the ground can be delayed into the time that the signals are transmitted from the satellites and the pseudorange measuring can be fulfilled as in GPS. Satellite virtual atomic clocks can implement the navigation, make a pseudorange difference, remove the ephemeris error, and improve the accuracy of navigation positioning. They not only provide a navigation system without satellite clocks, but also a navigation system with pseudorange difference.

  9. From atomic clocks to coordinate times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, G.

    2006-08-01

    The IAU'1991 Resolution A4, complemented by IAU'2000 Resolution B1.3-4, provide rigorous definitions for barycentric and geocentric reference systems in a relativistic framework and define the coordinate times of these systems as TCB and TCG, respectively. Other coordinate times in use are TT, defined from TCG through IAU'2000 Resolution B1.9, and TDB, whose rigorous definition from TCB is now proposed. For practical use, these coordinate times must be realized and the proper time provided by atomic clocks (Atomic time AT) is used to generate all coordinate times. The present sequence is AT => TT ||> TCG -> TCB ||> TDB, where the sign => indicates the complex series of operations involved in generating International atomic time TAI and where ||> is an exact transformation. The paper examines the uncertainty of realization of TAI and the uncertainty brought by the transformation TCG -> TCB. On-going and future evolutions of atomic clocks are reviewed along with their impact on the diagram of time transformations.

  10. Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space: Scientific Objectives and Mission Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1 - P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk ZH (Netherlands)], E-mail: Luigi.Cacciapuoti@esa.int; Dimarcq, N.; Santarelli, G.; Laurent, P.; Lemonde, P.; Clairon, A. [SYRTE-CNRS UMR8630, Observatoire de Paris, 61, avenue de l' Observatoire 75014 Paris (France); Berthoud, P.; Jornod, A. [Observatoire de Neuchatel, 58, rue de l' Observatoire, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Reina, F.; Feltham, S. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1 - P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk ZH (Netherlands); Salomon, C. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, 24, rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2007-04-15

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission in fundamental physics that will operate a new generation of atomic clocks in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy at the 10{sup -16} level will be achieved. The on-board time base, distributed on Earth via a microwave link, will be used for space-to-ground as well as ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards. Based on these comparisons, ACES will perform fundamental physics tests and develop applications in time and frequency metrology, universal time scales, global positioning and navigation, geodesy, and gravimetry. After a general overview of the mission concept and its scientific objectives, the present status of ACES instruments and sub-systems will be discussed.

  11. Atomic Clocks with Suppressed Blackbody Radiation Shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift and its fluctuations can be suppressed by 1-3 orders of magnitude independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies ν1 and ν2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a 'synthetic' frequency νsyn ∝ (ν1-ε12ν2) largely immune to the blackbody radiation shift. For example, in the case of 171Yb+ it is possible to create a synthetic-frequency-based clock in which the fractional blackbody radiation shift can be suppressed to the level of 10-18 in a broad interval near room temperature (300±15 K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies ν1 and ν2, where the frequency νsyn is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum.

  12. Atomic clocks comparison by means of television chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various methods and techniques of time and frequency dissemination are presented. One of them, the Line 10 Method, was used to compare two atomic clocks, localized in different places is a distance of more or less four-hundred kilometers. The results are compared with parallel results obtained with another method, physical transport, giving the necessary experimental basis of the applicability of the Line 10 Method in Brazil

  13. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  14. Suppressing Loss of Ions in an Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An improvement has been made in the design of a compact, highly stable mercury- ion clock to suppress a loss of ions as they are transferred between the quadrupole and higher multipole ion traps. Such clocks are being developed for use aboard spacecraft for navigation and planetary radio science. The modification is also applicable to ion clocks operating on Earth: indeed, the success of the modification has been demonstrated in construction and operation of a terrestrial breadboard prototype of the compact, highly stable mercury-ion clock. Selected aspects of the breadboard prototype at different stages of development were described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The following background information is reviewed from previous articles: In this clock as in some prior ion clocks, mercury ions are shuttled between two ion traps, one a 16- pole linear radio-frequency trap, while the other is a quadrupole radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a 202Hg lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at approximately 40.507 GHz. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling that would otherwise be caused by collisions between clock atoms and the wall of a gas cell. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave-resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. This is similar to the operation of an atomic beam clock, except that with ions the beam can be halted and reversed as ions are shuttled back and forth between the two traps. When the two traps are driven at the same radio frequency, the strength of confinement can be reduced near the junction between the two traps, depending upon the relative phase of the RF voltage used to operate each of the two traps, and

  15. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  16. Quantum Atomic Clock Synchronization: An Entangled Concept of Nonlocal Simultaneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D.; Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Jozsa, R.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that two spatially separated parties (Alice and Bob) can utilize shared prior quantum entanglement, as well as a classical information channel, to establish a synchronized pair of atomic clocks.

  17. Design and Construction of an Atomic Clock on an Atom Chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design and construction of an atomic clock on an atom chip, intended as a secondary standard, with a stability in the range of few 10-13 at 1 s. This clock is based on a two-photon transition between the hyperfine states |F = 1; mF = -1> and |2; 1> of the electronic ground state of the 87Rb atom. This transition is interrogated using a Ramsey scheme, operating on either a cloud of thermal atoms or a Bose-Einstein condensate. In contrast to atomic fountain clocks, this clock is magnetically trapped on an atom chip. We describe a theoretical model of the clock stability and the design and construction of a dedicated apparatus. It is able to control the magnetic field at the relative 10-5 level and features a hybrid atom chip, containing DC conductors as well as a microwave transmission line for the clock interrogation. (author)

  18. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  19. A Movable-Cavity Cold Atom Space Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Feng-Gang; WEI Rong; JIANG Hai-Feng; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present an experimental scheme of a cold atom space clock with a movable cavity. By using a single microwave cavity, we find that the clock has a significant advantage, i.e. the longitudinal cavity phase shift is eliminated. A theoretical analysis has been carried out in terms of the relation between the atomic transition probability and the velocity of the moving cavity by taking into account the velocity distribution of cold atoms. The requirements for the microwave power and its stability for atomic πr /2 excitation at different moving velocities of the cavity lead to the determination of the proper working parameters of the rubidium clock in frequency accuracy 10-17. Finally,the mechanical stability for the scheme is analysed and the ways of solving the possible mechanical instability of the device are proposed.

  20. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Pikovski, Igor; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a lev...

  1. Tests of local position invariance using continuously running atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Peil, Steven; Hanssen, James L; Swanson, Thomas B; Ekstrom, Christopher R; 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.010102

    2013-01-01

    Tests of local position invariance (LPI) made by comparing the relative redshift of atomic clocks based on different atoms have been carried out for a variety of pairs of atomic species. In most cases, several absolute frequency measurements per year are used to look for an annual signal, resulting in tests that can span on order of a decade. By using the output of continuously running clocks, we carry out LPI tests with comparable or higher precision after less than 1.5 years. These include new measurements of the difference in redshift anomalies \\beta\\ for hyperfine transitions in Rb87 and Cs133 and in H and Cs133 and a measurement comparing Rb87 and H, resulting in a stringent limit on LPI, \\beta(Rb) - \\beta(H)=(-2.7 +/- 4.9) x 10^(-7). The method of making these measurements for continuous clocks is discussed.

  2. Modeling and Estimation of Stationary and Non-stationary Noises of Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Mishra,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Noise estimation of atomic clock is one of the important research areas in the field of atomic clock development and application. Most of the atomic clocks are having random-stochastic noises and periodic noises due to temperature variation. Random-stochastic noises have a well identified signature in time domain but periodic noises are difficult to analyze in time domain. However, in this paper, an effort is made to identify and analyze the deterministic trends of both random-stochastic noises and periodic noises due to variation in temperature using an alternate approach of least-squares normalized-error (LSNE regression algorithm. A MATLAB based application with graphical user interface (GUI is developed to estimate and analyze random-stochastic noises and periodic noises and re-estimate the stability of rubidium atomic clock after removing these noises from the raw phase data. The estimation of stationary noises are done using Allan variance from time domain data and noise profile is calculated using curve fit method. The estimation of periodic noises due to temperature variation is carried in frequency domain through spurious analysis of the frequency data of atomic clock.

  3. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D1 line of 87Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications

  4. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kómár, P.; Topcu, T.; Kessler, E. M.; Derevianko, A.; Vuletić, V.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  5. A HBAR-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Daugey, Thomas; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source. A 2.298~GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally-controlled two-port AlN-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24000 at 68$^{\\circ}$C, is frequency multiplied by 2 to 4.596~GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the HBAR is measured to be $-23$~ppm/$^{\\circ}$C at 2.298~GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596~GHz source is $-105$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 1~kHz offset and $-150$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 100~kHz offset. The 4.596~GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator (LO) in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter (VCPS) implemented in the 2.298~GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming...

  6. Searching for dark matter with optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wcislo, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions of modern physics is the existence of yet unknown forms of matter and interactions. The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by some hypothetical dark matter (DM). However, beyond its gravitational interaction at galactic scale, little is known about the DM nature and properties. One possibility is that it has a form of stable topological defects built from light scalar fields which, for nonzero DM-SM coupling, would result in transient variations of fundamental constants. Optical atomic clocks, highly sensitive to variations of the fine-structure constant, seem to be natural candidates for such searches. Here we demonstrate the first experimental constraint on the strength of transient DM-SM coupling determined with optical atomic clocks. Instead of measuring the phase difference between two distant clocks we determine a common component of their readouts. We show that our constraint, even for one-day measurement, greatly exceeds previous laboratory...

  7. Conceptual Design of a Micron-Scale Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical proposal for reducing an entire atomic clock to micron dimensions. A phosphorus or nitrogen atom is introduced into a fullerene cage. This endohedral fullerene is then coated with an insulating shell and a number of them are deposited as a thin layer on a silicon chip. Next to this layer a GMR sensor is fabricated which is close to the endohedral fullerenes. This GMR sensor measures oscillating magnetic fields on the order of micro-gauss from the nuclear spins varying at the frequency of the hyperfine transition (413 MHz frequency). Given the micron scale and simplicity of this system only a few transistors are needed to control the waveforms and to perform digital clocking. This new form of atomic clock exhibits extremely low power (nano watts), high vibration and shock resistance, stability on the order of 10^{-9}, and is compatible with MEMS fabrication and chip integration. As GMR sensors continue to improve in sensitivity the stability of this form of atomic clock will increase proportionat...

  8. 2e-18 total uncertainty in an atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, T L; Hutson, R B; Marti, G E; Bloom, B J; McNally, R L; Zhang, W; Barrett, M D; Safronova, M S; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Ye, J

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation, and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. This work takes an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Here, we achieve fractional stability of 2.2e-16 at 1 s by using seconds-long coherent interrogations of our clock transition in a low-density system not limited by atomic interactions. With this better stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, improving many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as the lattice ac Stark and blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts. For the lattice ac Stark systematic, we identify the lattice laser frequency where the scalar and tensor components of the shift cancel, allowing for state ind...

  9. Atomic clocks as a tool to monitor vertical surface motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Lundgren, Andrew; Hetényi, György; Houlié, Nicolas; Jetzer, Philippe; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clock technology is advancing rapidly, now reaching stabilities of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-18}$, which corresponds to resolving $1$ cm in equivalent geoid height over an integration timescale of about 7 hours. At this level of performance, ground-based atomic clock networks emerge as a tool for monitoring a variety of geophysical processes by directly measuring changes in the gravitational potential. Vertical changes of the clock's position due to magmatic, volcanic, post-seismic or tidal deformations can result in measurable variations in the clock tick rate. As an example, we discuss the geopotential change arising due to an inflating point source (Mogi model), and apply it to the Etna volcano. Its effect on an observer on the Earth's surface can be divided into two different terms: one purely due to uplift and one due to the redistribution of matter. Thus, with the centimetre-level precision of current clocks it is already possible to monitor volcanoes. The matter redistribution term is estimated to b...

  10. The Deep Space Atomic Clock: Ushering in a New Paradigm for Radio Navigation and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Todd; Seubert, Jill; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the on-orbit performance of a high-accuracy, high-stability miniaturized mercury ion atomic clock during a year-long experiment in Low Earth Orbit. DSAC's timing error requirement provides the frequency stability necessary to perform deep space navigation based solely on one-way radiometric tracking data. Compared to a two-way tracking paradigm, DSAC-enabled one-way tracking will benefit navigation and radio science by increasing the quantity and quality of tracking data. Additionally, DSAC also enables fully-autonomous onboard navigation useful for time-sensitive situations. The technology behind the mercury ion atomic clock and a DSAC mission overview are presented. Example deep space applications of DSAC, including navigation of a Mars orbiter and Europa flyby gravity science, highlight the benefits of DSAC-enabled one-way Doppler tracking.

  11. The Potential of Continuous, Local Atomic Clock Measurements for Earthquake Prediction and Volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Jetzer, Philippe; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  12. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  13. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10−9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10−11 τ−1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance

  14. Synchronization of Active Atomic Clocks via Quantum and Classical Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Superradiant lasers based on atomic ensembles exhibiting ultra-narrow optical transitions can emit light of unprecedented spectral purity and may serve as active atomic clocks. We consider two frequency-detuned active atomic clocks, which are coupled in a cascaded setup, i.e. as master & slave lasers, and study the synchronization of the slave to the master clock. In a setup where both atomic ensembles are coupled to a common cavity mode such synchronization phenomena have been predicted by Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 154101 (2014)] and experimentally observed by Weiner et al. [arXiv:1503.06464 (2015)]. Here we demonstrate that synchronization still occurs in cascaded setups but exhibits distinctly different phase diagrams. We study the characteristics of synchronization in comparison to the case of coupling through a common cavity. We also consider synchronization through a classical channel where light of the master laser is measured phase sensitively and the slave laser is injection locked by feed...

  15. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  16. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  17. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  18. Stability of a trapped atom clock on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Szmuk, Ramon; Maineult, Wilfried; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact atomic clock interrogating ultracold 87Rb magnetically trapped on an atom chip. Very long coherence times sustained by spin self-rephasing allow us to interrogate the atomic transition with 85% contrast at 5 s Ramsey time. The clock exhibits a fractional frequency stability of $5.8\\times 10^{-13}$ at 1 s and is likely to integrate into the $1\\times10^{-15}$ range in less than a day. A detailed analysis of 7 noise sources explains the measured frequency stability. Fluctuations in the atom temperature (0.4 nK shot-to-shot) and in the offset magnetic field ($5\\times10^{-6}$ relative fluctuations shot-to-shot) are the main noise sources together with the local oscillator, which is degraded by the 30% duty cycle. The analysis suggests technical improvements to be implemented in a future second generation set-up. The results demonstrate the remarkable degree of technical control that can be reached in an atom chip experiment.

  19. Ultra-stable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppo, M; McGrew, W F; Hinkley, N; Fasano, R J; Beloy, K; Yoon, T H; Milani, G; Nicolodi, D; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with dead time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise of the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited optical clock performance. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability of $6 \\times 10^{-17} / \\sqrt{\\tau}$ for an averaging time $\\tau$ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the stan...

  20. Resolved atomic interaction sidebands in an optical clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishof, Michael; Swallows, Matthew D; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    We report the observation of resolved atomic interaction sidebands (ISB) in the ${}^{87}$Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional (2D) optical lattice. The ISB are a manifestation of the strong interactions that occur between atoms confined in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry and disappear when the confinement is relaxed along one dimension. The emergence of ISB is linked to the recently observed suppression of collisional frequency shifts in [1]. At the current temperatures, the ISB can be resolved but are broad. At lower temperatures, ISB are predicted to be substantially narrower and usable as powerful spectroscopic tools in strongly interacting alkaline-earth gases.

  1. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  2. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  3. Precision Clock Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests and evaluates high-precision atomic clocks for spacecraft, ground, and mobile applications. Supports performance evaluation, environmental testing,...

  4. Atomic clocks: A brief history and current status of research in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poonam Arora; Amrita Awasthi; Vattikonda Bharath; Aishik Acharya; Suchi Yadav; Aashish Agarwal; Amitava Sen Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Frequency corresponding to the energy difference between designated levels of an atom provides precise reference for making a universally accurate clock. Since the middle of the 20th century till now, there have been tremendous efforts in the field of atomic clocks making time the most accurately measured physical quantity. National Physical Laboratory India (NPLI) is the nation’s timekeeper and is developing an atomic fountain clock which will be a primary frequency standard. The fountain is currently operational and is at the stage of complete frequency evaluation. In this paper, a brief review on atomic time along with some of the recent results from the fountain clock will be discussed.

  5. A mathematical model for the atomic clock error in case of jumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the mathematical model based on stochastic differential equations describing the error gained by an atomic clock to the cases of anomalous behavior including jumps and an increase of instability. We prove an exact iterative solution that can be useful for clock simulation, prediction, and interpretation, as well as for the understanding of the impact of clock error in the overall system in which clocks may be inserted as, for example, the Global Satellite Navigation Systems. (authors)

  6. Accelerating the averaging rate of atomic ensemble clock stability using atomic phase lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally demonstrated that the stability of an atomic clock improves at its fastest rate τ −1 (where τ is the averaging time) when the phase of a local oscillator is genuinely compared to the continuous phase of many atoms in a single trap (an atomic phase lock). For this demonstration, we developed a simple method that repeatedly monitors the atomic phase while retaining its coherence by observing only a portion of the whole ion cloud. Using this new method, we measured the continuous phase over three measurement cycles, and thereby improved the stability scaling from τ−1/2 to τ −1 during the three measurement cycles. This simple method provides a path by which atomic clocks can approach a quantum projection noise limit, even when the measurement noise is dominated by the technical noise. (paper)

  7. Development of an atomic clock on an atom chip: Optimisation of the coherence time and preliminary characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the construction and preliminary characterization of an atomic clock on an atom chip. A sample of magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms is cooled below 1 μK, close to Bose- Einstein condensation temperature. The trapped states |F = 1; mF = -1> and |F = 2;mF = 1> define our two-photon clock transition. Atoms are trapped around a field B0 = 3.23 G, where the clock frequency is first-order insensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. We have designed an atom chip that includes a microwave coplanar waveguide which drives the 6.835 GHz transition. The whole clock cycle is performed in the vicinity of the chip surface, making the physics package compact (5 cm)3. We first describe the experimental setup of the clock, and the optical bench that has been developed and characterized during this thesis. We then give the results obtained for atom cooling, which led to obtaining a 3 104 atoms Bose-Einstein condensate. We finally present the results obtained by Ramsey spectroscopy of the clock transition. We measure coherence times exceeding 10 seconds with our setup, dominated by atom losses. A preliminary measurement shows that the clock relative frequency stability is of 6 10-12 at 1 s, limited by technical noise. Our goal is to reach a stability in the low 10-13 at 1 s, i.e. better than commercial clocks and competitive with today's best compact clocks. (author)

  8. Microwave interrogation cavity for the rubidium space cold atom clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ren; Yuan-Ci, Gao; Tang, Li; De-Sheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    The performance of space cold atom clocks (SCACs) should be improved thanks to the microgravity environment in space. The microwave interrogation cavity is a key element in a SCAC. In this paper, we develop a microwave interrogation cavity especially for the rubidium SCAC. The interrogation cavity has two microwave interaction zones with a single feed-in source, which is located at the center of the cavity for symmetric coupling excitation and to ensure that the two interaction zones are in phase. The interrogation cavity has a measured resonance frequency of 6.835056471 GHz with a loaded quality factor of nearly 4200, which shows good agreement with simulation results. We measure the Rabi frequency of the clock transition of the rubidium atom in each microwave interaction zone, and subsequently demonstrate that the distributions of the magnetic field in the two interaction zones are the same and meet all requirements of the rubidium SCAC. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11034008), the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094304), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. The potential of continuous, local atomic clock measurements for earthquake prediction and volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  10. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D1 line of 87Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to ≅25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Towards a Re-definition of the Second Based on Optical Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in accuracy and stability of optical atomic clocks compared to the caesium atomic clock as primary standard of time and frequency asks for a future re-definition of the second in the International System of Units (SI). The status of the optical clocks based on either single ions in radio-frequency traps or on neutral atoms stored in an optical lattice is described with special emphasis of the current work at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Besides the development and operation of different optical clocks with estimated fractional uncertainties in the 10^-18 range, the supporting work on ultra-stable lasers as core elements and the means to compare remote optical clocks via transportable standards, optical fibers, or transportable clocks is reported. Finally, the conditions, methods and next steps are discussed that are the prerequisites for a future re-definition of the second.

  12. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  13. Decreasing the uncertainty of atomic clocks via real-time noise distinguish

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Richang; Wei, Rong; Wang, Wenli; Zou, Fan; Du, Yuanbo; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental perturbation on atoms is the key factor restricting the performance of atomic frequency standards, especially in long term scale. In this letter, we demonstrate a real-time noise distinguish operation of atomic clocks. The operation improves the statistical uncertainty by about an order of magnitude of our fountain clock which is deteriorated previously by extra noises. The frequency offset bring by the extra noise is also corrected. The experiment proves the real-time noise distinguish operation can reduce the contribution of ambient noises and improve the uncertainty limit of atomic clocks.

  14. Clock-transition spectrum of 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical atomic clock with 171Yb atoms is devised and tested. By using a two-stage Doppler cooling technique, the 171Yb atoms are cooled down to a temperature of 6±3 μK, which is close to the Doppler limit. Then, the cold 171Yb atoms are loaded into a one-dimensional optical lattice with a wavelength of 759 nm in the Lamb—Dicke regime. Furthermore, these cold 171Yb atoms are excited from the ground-state 1S0 to the excited-state 3P0 by a clock laser with a wavelength of 578 nm. Finally, the 1S0–3P0 clock-transition spectrum of these 171Yb atoms is obtained by measuring the dependence of the population of the ground-state 1S0 upon the clock-laser detuning. (general)

  15. Enhancing coherence in molecular spin qubits via atomic clock transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Muhandis; Komijani, Dorsa; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Hill, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Quantum computing is an emerging area within the information sciences revolving around the concept of quantum bits (qubits). A major obstacle is the extreme fragility of these qubits due to interactions with their environment that destroy their quantumness. This phenomenon, known as decoherence, is of fundamental interest. There are many competing candidates for qubits, including superconducting circuits, quantum optical cavities, ultracold atoms and spin qubits, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. When dealing with spin qubits, the strongest source of decoherence is the magnetic dipolar interaction. To minimize it, spins are typically diluted in a diamagnetic matrix. For example, this dilution can be taken to the extreme of a single phosphorus atom in silicon, whereas in molecular matrices a typical ratio is one magnetic molecule per 10,000 matrix molecules. However, there is a fundamental contradiction between reducing decoherence by dilution and allowing quantum operations via the interaction between spin qubits. To resolve this contradiction, the design and engineering of quantum hardware can benefit from a ‘bottom-up’ approach whereby the electronic structure of magnetic molecules is chemically tailored to give the desired physical behaviour. Here we present a way of enhancing coherence in solid-state molecular spin qubits without resorting to extreme dilution. It is based on the design of molecular structures with crystal field ground states possessing large tunnelling gaps that give rise to optimal operating points, or atomic clock transitions, at which the quantum spin dynamics become protected against dipolar decoherence. This approach is illustrated with a holmium molecular nanomagnet in which long coherence times (up to 8.4 microseconds at 5 kelvin) are obtained at unusually high concentrations. This finding opens new avenues for quantum computing based on molecular spin qubits.

  16. Enhancing coherence in molecular spin qubits via atomic clock transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Muhandis; Komijani, Dorsa; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Hill, Stephen

    2016-03-17

    Quantum computing is an emerging area within the information sciences revolving around the concept of quantum bits (qubits). A major obstacle is the extreme fragility of these qubits due to interactions with their environment that destroy their quantumness. This phenomenon, known as decoherence, is of fundamental interest. There are many competing candidates for qubits, including superconducting circuits, quantum optical cavities, ultracold atoms and spin qubits, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. When dealing with spin qubits, the strongest source of decoherence is the magnetic dipolar interaction. To minimize it, spins are typically diluted in a diamagnetic matrix. For example, this dilution can be taken to the extreme of a single phosphorus atom in silicon, whereas in molecular matrices a typical ratio is one magnetic molecule per 10,000 matrix molecules. However, there is a fundamental contradiction between reducing decoherence by dilution and allowing quantum operations via the interaction between spin qubits. To resolve this contradiction, the design and engineering of quantum hardware can benefit from a 'bottom-up' approach whereby the electronic structure of magnetic molecules is chemically tailored to give the desired physical behaviour. Here we present a way of enhancing coherence in solid-state molecular spin qubits without resorting to extreme dilution. It is based on the design of molecular structures with crystal field ground states possessing large tunnelling gaps that give rise to optimal operating points, or atomic clock transitions, at which the quantum spin dynamics become protected against dipolar decoherence. This approach is illustrated with a holmium molecular nanomagnet in which long coherence times (up to 8.4 microseconds at 5 kelvin) are obtained at unusually high concentrations. This finding opens new avenues for quantum computing based on molecular spin qubits. PMID:26983539

  17. Invited Review Article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed.

  18. Stable clocks and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Will, C M

    1995-01-01

    We survey the role of stable clocks in general relativity. Clock comparisons have provided important tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle, which underlies metric gravity. These include tests of the isotropy of clock comparisons (verification of local Lorentz invariance) and tests of the homogeneity of clock comparisons (verification of local position invariance). Comparisons of atomic clocks with gravitational clocks test the Strong Equivalence Principle by bounding cosmological variations in Newton's constant. Stable clocks also play a role in the search for gravitational radiation: comparision of atomic clocks with the binary pulsar's orbital clock has verified gravitational-wave damping, and phase-sensitive detection of waves from inspiralling compact binaries using laser interferometric gravitational observatories will facilitate extraction of useful source information from the data. Stable clocks together with general relativity have found important practical applications in navigational systems s...

  19. Integrated physics package of a chip-scale atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics package of a chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) has been successfully realized by integrating vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), neutral density (ND) filter, λ/4 wave plate, 87Rb vapor cell, photodiode (PD), and magnetic coil into a cuboid metal package with a volume of about 2.8 cm3. In this physics package, the critical component, 87Rb vapor cell, is batch-fabricated based on MEMS technology and in-situ chemical reaction method. Pt heater and thermistors are integrated in the physics package. A PTFE pillar is used to support the optical elements in the physics package, in order to reduce the power dissipation. The optical absorption spectrum of 87Rb D1 line and the microwave frequency correction signal are successfully observed while connecting the package with the servo circuit system. Using the above mentioned packaging solution, a CSAC with short-term frequency stability of about 7 × 10−10 τ−1/2 has been successfully achieved, which demonstrates that this physics package would become one promising solution for the CSAC. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Bondarescu Ruxandra; Schärer Andreas; Jetzer Philippe; Angélil Raymond; Saha Prasenjit; Lundgren Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gra...

  1. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Devenoges; André, Stefanov; Antoine, Jallageas; Jacques, Morel; Thomas, Südmeyer; Pierre, Thomann

    2016-01-01

    We report the evaluation of the second order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of the continuous operation and its geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountain are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. The pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to measure the Zeeman frequency with spatial resolution and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with an uncertainty smaller than 10E-16 in relative units.

  2. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant. PMID:18352368

  3. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hachisu, H; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  4. Effects of getters on hermetically sealed micromachined cesium–neon cells for atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wafer-level integration technique of PageWafer® (SAES Getters’ solution for getter film integration into wafer to wafer bonded devices) has been tested in hermetically sealed miniature glass-Si-glass cells filled with Cs and Ne, e.g. for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) atomic clock applications. Getter effects on the cell atmosphere are analyzed by quadruple mass spectroscopy and coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The quadruple mass spectroscopy revealed that the residual gases (H2, O2, N2 and CO2) that are attributed to anodic bonding process are drastically reduced by the getter films while desirable gases such as Ne seem to remain unaffected. The impurity pressure in the getter-integrated cells was measured to be less than 4 × 10−2 mbar, i.e. pressure 50 times lower than the one measured in the cells without getter (2 mbar). Consequently, the atmosphere of the getter-integrated cells is much more pure than that of the getter-free cells. CPT signals obtained from the getter-integrated cells are stable and are, in addition, similar to each other within a cell batch, suggesting the strong potential of applications of this getter film and especially for its wafer-level integration to MEMS atomic clocks and magnetometers. (paper)

  5. Improvement in medium-long term frequency stability of integrating sphere cold atom clock

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peng; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Xiao, Ling; Cheng, Huadong; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  6. Study on the clock-transition spectrum of cold 171Yb ytterbium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a detailed study of the clock-transition spectrum of cold 171Yb ytterbium atoms in a 1D optical lattice. A typical clock-transition spectrum with a carrier-sideband structure is observed. After minimizing the power broadening effect and compensating the stray magnetic field, the carrier linewidth is narrowed to about 16 Hz for a 60 ms interrogation time. By increasing the interrogation time to 150 ms, the linewidth is further reduced to 6.8 Hz. By applying the bias magnetic field parallel to the clock-laser polarization, a two-peak spectrum corresponding to two π transitions is obtained. Finally, spin polarization of atoms to a single desired Zeeman sublevel of the ground state is also demonstrated. The presented results will be very useful for developing better optical lattice clocks. (letter)

  7. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe. (authors)

  8. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berengut J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe.

  9. An atomic clock with $1\\times 10^{-18}$ room-temperature blackbody Stark uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Beloy, K; Phillips, N B; Sherman, J A; Schioppo, M; Lehman, J; Feldman, A; Hanssen, L M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2014-01-01

    The Stark shift due to blackbody radiation (BBR) is the key factor limiting the performance of many atomic frequency standards, with the BBR environment inside the clock apparatus being difficult to characterize at a high level of precision. Here we demonstrate an in-vacuum radiation shield that furnishes a uniform, well-characterized BBR environment for the atoms in an ytterbium optical lattice clock. Operated at room temperature, this shield enables specification of the BBR environment to a corresponding fractional clock uncertainty contribution of $5.5 \\times 10^{-19}$. Combined with uncertainty in the atomic response, the total uncertainty of the BBR Stark shift is now $1\\times10^{-18}$. Further operation of the shield at elevated temperatures enables a direct measure of the BBR shift temperature dependence and demonstrates consistency between our evaluated BBR environment and the expected atomic response.

  10. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  11. Loading of a fountain clock with an enhanced Low-Velocity Intense Source of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrev, Georgi; Weyers, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a caesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms (LVIS) [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3331 (1996)], which we modified by adding a "dark" state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of $4 \\times 10^{8}$ atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of $8.6$ m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieved a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms $N_{\\mathrm{at}}=2.9 \\times 10^6$ in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability $\\sigma_y\\left(1\\text{s}\\right)=2.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ was demonstrated.

  12. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  13. Testing General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity with Space-based Atomic Clocks and Atom Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Jetzer, Philippe; Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of $\\Delta f/f \\sim 10^{-16}$ in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters $|\\beta -1|, |\\gamma-1| \\lesssim 10^{-6}$. We also briefly revi...

  14. Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions to the electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2016-01-01

    Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions may significantly increase probabilities of otherwise very weak electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions (e.g. transitions between $s$ and $f$ electron orbitals). These transitions can be used for exceptionally accurate atomic clocks, quantum information processing and search for dark matter. They are very sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model, such as temporal variation of the fine structure constant, the Lorentz invariance and Einstein equivalence principle violation. We formulate conditions under which the hyperfine-induced electric dipole contribution dominates. Due to the hyperfine quenching the electric octupole clock transition in $^{173}$Yb$^+$ is two orders of magnitude stronger than that in currently used $^{171}$Yb$^+$. Some enhancement is found in $^{143}$Nd$^{13+}$, $^{149}$Pm$^{14+}$, $^{147}$Sm$^{14+}$, and $^{147}$Sm$^{15+}$ ions.

  15. Reliability characteristics of microfabricated Rb mini-lamps for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; de Rooij, Nico; Shea, Herbert

    2013-03-01

    With the rising need for microfabricated chip-scale atomic clocks to enable high precision timekeeping in portable applications, there has been active interest in developing miniature (pumping in double-resonance clocks. We reported in 2012 a first microfabricated chip-scale Rubidium dielectric barrier discharge lamp. The device's preliminary results indicated its high potential for optical pumping applications and wafer-scale batch fabrication. The chip-scale plasma light sources were observed to be robust with no obvious performance change after thousands of plasma ignitions, and with no electrode erosion from plasma discharges since the electrodes are external. However, as atomic clocks have strict lamp performance requirements including less than 0.1% sub-second optical power fluctuations, power consumption less than 20 mW and a device lifetime of at least several years, it is important to understand the long-term reliability of these Rb planar mini-lamps, and identify the operating conditions where these devices can be most reliable and stable. In this paper, we report on the reliability of such microfabricated lamps including a continuous several month run of the lamp where the optical power, electrical power consumption and temperature stability were continuously monitored. We also report on the effects of temperature, rf-power and the lamp-drive parasitics on the optical power stability and discuss steps that could be taken to further improve the device's performance and reliability.

  16. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability

  17. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on ...

  18. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  19. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin||lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2009-01-01

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin||lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of rf modulation power, and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2*10^{-11} tau^{-1/2} for observation times 1sclock with environmental impacts minimized.

  20. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Topcu, T

    2016-01-01

    We predict the possibility of "triply-magic" optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the ${^1}\\!S_{0}$ and ${^3}\\!P_{0}$ clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  1. Proposal of a dual-ball atomic fountain clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Shi; Rong Wei; Zichao Zhou; Tang Li; Yuzhu Wang

    2011-01-01

    @@ A simple improved structure is designed to trap and launch two cold atomic balls vertically at the same time, which works like "two fountains", but is more compact since most components of the "two fountains"are shared.It is expected to improve the stability of the fountain markedly.%A simple improved structure is designed to trap and launch two cold atomic balls vertically at the same time, which works like “two fountains”, but is more compact since most components of the “two fountains”are shared. It is expected to improve the stability of the fountain markedly.

  2. Microwave lensing frequency shift of the PHARAO laser-cooled microgravity atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Phillip; Gibble, Kurt; Laurent, Phillipe; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the microwave lensing frequency shift of the microgravity laser-cooled caesium clock PHARAO. We find microwave lensing frequency shifts of δν/ν  =  11  ×  10-17 to 13  ×  10-17, larger than the shift of typical fountain clocks. The shift has a weak dependence on PHARAO parameters, including the atomic temperature, size of the atomic cloud, detection laser intensities, and the launch velocity. We also find the lensing frequency shift to be insensitive to selection and detection spatial inhomogeneities and the expected low-frequency vibrations. We conservatively assign a nominal microwave lensing frequency uncertainty of  ±4  ×  10-17.

  3. Limits on gravitational Einstein Equivalence Principle violation from monitoring atomic clock frequencies during a year

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2016-01-01

    Sun's gravitation potential at earth varies during a year due to varying Earth-Sun distance. Comparing the results of very accurate measurements of atomic clock transitions performed at different time in the year allows us to study the dependence of the atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential. We examine the measurement data for the ratio of the frequencies in Hg$^+$ and Al$^+$ clock transitions and absolute frequency measurements (with respect to caesium frequency standard) for Dy, Sr, H, hyperfine transitions in Rb and H, and obtain significantly improved limits on the values of the gravity related parameter of the Einstein Equivalence Principle violating term in the Standard Model Extension Hamiltonian $c_{00} = (3.0 \\pm 5.7) \\times 10^{-7}$ and the parameter for the gravity-related variation of the fine structure constant $\\kappa_{\\alpha} = (-5.3 \\pm 10) \\times 10^{-8}$.

  4. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft’s reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth’s gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ∼ 10−16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β − 1|, |γ − 1| ≲ 10−6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  5. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Berengut J. C.; Flambaum V. V.; Ong A.

    2013-01-01

    We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be re...

  6. Distinguishing between evidence and its explanations in the steering of atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum theory reflects within itself a separation of evidence from explanations. This separation leads to a known proof that: (1) no wave function can be determined uniquely by evidence, and (2) any chosen wave function requires a guess reaching beyond logic to things unforeseeable. Chosen wave functions are encoded into computer-mediated feedback essential to atomic clocks, including clocks that step computers through their phases of computation and clocks in space vehicles that supply evidence of signal propagation explained by hypotheses of spacetimes with metric tensor fields. The propagation of logical symbols from one computer to another requires a shared rhythm—like a bucket brigade. Here we show how hypothesized metric tensors, dependent on guesswork, take part in the logical synchronization by which clocks are steered in rate and position toward aiming points that satisfy phase constraints, thereby linking the physics of signal propagation with the sharing of logical symbols among computers. Recognizing the dependence of the phasing of symbol arrivals on guesses about signal propagation transports logical synchronization from the engineering of digital communications to a discipline essential to physics. Within this discipline we begin to explore questions invisible under any concept of time that fails to acknowledge unforeseeable events. In particular, variation of spacetime curvature is shown to limit the bit rate of logical communication. - Highlights: • Atomic clocks are steered in frequency toward an aiming point. • The aiming point depends on a chosen wave function. • No evidence alone can determine the wave function. • The unknowability of the wave function has implications for spacetime curvature. • Variability in spacetime curvature limits the bit rate of communications

  7. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10−11/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10−22 m2 s−1 Pa−1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases

  8. Distinguishing between evidence and its explanations in the steering of atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, John M., E-mail: myers@seas.harvard.edu [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hadi Madjid, F., E-mail: gmadjid@aol.com [82 Powers Road, Concord, MA 01742 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Quantum theory reflects within itself a separation of evidence from explanations. This separation leads to a known proof that: (1) no wave function can be determined uniquely by evidence, and (2) any chosen wave function requires a guess reaching beyond logic to things unforeseeable. Chosen wave functions are encoded into computer-mediated feedback essential to atomic clocks, including clocks that step computers through their phases of computation and clocks in space vehicles that supply evidence of signal propagation explained by hypotheses of spacetimes with metric tensor fields. The propagation of logical symbols from one computer to another requires a shared rhythm—like a bucket brigade. Here we show how hypothesized metric tensors, dependent on guesswork, take part in the logical synchronization by which clocks are steered in rate and position toward aiming points that satisfy phase constraints, thereby linking the physics of signal propagation with the sharing of logical symbols among computers. Recognizing the dependence of the phasing of symbol arrivals on guesses about signal propagation transports logical synchronization from the engineering of digital communications to a discipline essential to physics. Within this discipline we begin to explore questions invisible under any concept of time that fails to acknowledge unforeseeable events. In particular, variation of spacetime curvature is shown to limit the bit rate of logical communication. - Highlights: • Atomic clocks are steered in frequency toward an aiming point. • The aiming point depends on a chosen wave function. • No evidence alone can determine the wave function. • The unknowability of the wave function has implications for spacetime curvature. • Variability in spacetime curvature limits the bit rate of communications.

  9. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence, Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel CH-2000 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  10. Frequency ratios of Sr, Yb and Hg based optical lattice clocks and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Masao; Das, Manoj; Nemitz, Nils; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Takano, Tetsushi; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the recent progress of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium ($^{87}$Sr), ytterbium ($^{171}$Yb) and mercury ($^{199}$Hg) atoms. In particular, we present frequency comparison between the clocks locally via an optical frequency comb and between two Sr clocks at remote sites using a phase-stabilized fibre link. We first review cryogenic Sr optical lattice clocks that reduce the room-temperature blackbody radiation shift by two orders of magnitude and serve as a reference in the following clock comparisons. Similar physical properties of Sr and Yb atoms, such as transition wavelengths and vapour pressure, have allowed our development of a compatible clock for both species. A cryogenic Yb clock is evaluated by referencing a Sr clock. We also report on a Hg clock, which shows one order of magnitude less sensitivity to blackbody radiation, while its large nuclear charge makes the clock sensitive to the variation of fine-structure constant. Connecting all three types of clocks by an o...

  11. Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions to the electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions may significantly increase probabilities of otherwise very weak electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions (e.g., transitions between s and f electron orbitals). These transitions can be used for exceptionally accurate atomic clocks, quantum information processing, and the search for dark matter. They are very sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model, such as temporal variation of the fine-structure constant, the Lorentz invariance, and Einstein equivalence principle violation. We formulate conditions under which the hyperfine-induced electric dipole contribution dominates and perform calculations of the hyperfine structure and E3, M2 and the hyperfine-induced E1 transition rates for a large number of atoms and ions of experimental interest. Due to the hyperfine quenching the electric octupole clock transition in +173Yb is 2 orders of magnitude stronger than that in currently used +171Yb. Some enhancement is found in 13+143Nd, 14+149Pm, 14+147Sm, and 15+147Sm ions.

  12. Quantum projection noise limited stability of a 88Sr+ atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, B.; Dubé, P.; Madej, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluated accuracy of a single trapped 88Sr+ ion clock referenced to the 5s2 S 1/2 - 4d 2 D 5/2 transition at 445 THz at the National Research Council of Canada has reached 1.2 x 10-17 over recent years. On the other hand, the stability of an atomic clock determines how long the signals from two similar clocks have to be compared to reach a given level of uncertainty. Here, we report on the improvement of the stability of NRC's 88Sr+ single ion clock by reducing the Allan deviation from 1 x 10-14 to 3 x 10-15 at 1 second averaging time. This is done by the implementation of a clear out laser that transfers the ion from the metastable state to the ground state at each cycle, followed by a state-preparation step that transfers the ion to the desired ground state magnetic sublevel of the probed transition.

  13. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hachisu, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based ...

  14. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  15. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Y b+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11/τ1/2.

  16. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atom as a candidate for optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Tolstikhina, I; Kalganova, E; Vishnyakova, G; Khabarova, K; Tregubov, D; Golovizin, A; Sorokin, V; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-01-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the $^{169}$Tm atom at the wavelength of $1.14\\,\\mu$m as a candidate for a 2D optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=7/2)$ and $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=5/2)$ in the spectral range from $250\\,$nm to $1200\\,$nm, we suggest the "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at $807\\,$nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at $1.14\\,\\mu$m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to $8\\times10^{-17}$ in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ in fractional units. By direct excitation of the $1.14\\,\\mu$m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole ...

  17. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10-18 fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  18. Status of the atomic fountain clock at the National Research Council of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, S.; Alcock, J.; Jian, B.; Gertsvolf, M.; Bernard, J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the rapid advances in optical frequency standards, caesium fountain clocks retain a critical role as the most accurate primary frequency standards available. At the National Research Council Canada, we are working to develop a second generation caesium fountain clock. Work is currently underway to improve several systems of FCs1, such as the laser system and microwave local oscillator, which will be incorporated into its refurbished version, FCs2. In addition, we have added an optical pumping stage which has increased the detected atom number by over a factor of six. In collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), we are planning on replacing the physics package of FCs1. We will report on several recent improvements to FCs1, along with our progress in the development of FCs2.

  19. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2015-01-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf$^{12+}$ to U$^{34+}$, which have the $4f^{12}$ configuration of valence electrons, the Ir$^{17+}$ ion, which has a hole in almost filled $4f$ subshell, the Ho$^{14+}$, Cf$^{15+}$, Es$^{17+}$ and Es$^{16+}$ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, $\\alpha$ ($\\alpha = e^2/\\hbar c$). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to $\\alpha$-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  20. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with the current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10-11τ-1/2 for observation times 1 s≤τ≤20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  1. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, T; Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  2. Role of the multipolar black-body radiation shifts in the atomic clocks at the 10-18 uncertainty level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    We present here an overview of the role of the multipolar black-body radiation (BBR) shifts in the single ion atomic clocks to appraise the anticipated 10-18 uncertainty level. With an attempt to use the advanced technologies for reducing the instrumental uncertainties at the unprecedented low, it is essential to investigate contributions from the higher-order systematics to achieve the ambitious goal of securing the most precise clock frequency standard. In this context, we have analysed contributions to the BBR shifts from the multipolar polarizabilities in a few ion clocks.

  3. δ-electron spectroscopy and the atomic clock effect in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of strongly bound electrons in superheavy quasimolecular systems with combined nuclear charge numbers Z = ZP + ZT ≥ 110 are investigated. The emission of δ-electrons may serve as an atomic clock for nuclear reactions which is associated with the large overlap of the electron probability density with the nuclear interior. Excitation and emission rates of inner-shell electrons in collisions of very heavy ions with beam energies at or above the nuclear Coulomb barrier depend explicitly on details of the nuclear dynamics. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed. (orig.)

  4. Some theoretical aspects of the group-IIIA-ion atomic clocks: Intercombination transition probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main focus of this paper is the theoretical study of the 3P1→1S0 intercombination transition probabilities of the group-IIIA ions that are excellent candidates for high-accuracy atomic clocks. The importance of relativistic effects on the intercombination transition probabilities is made apparent by comparing their calculated values with those of the allowed 1P1→1S0 transition probabilities. In striking contrast to the allowed transition probabilities, the intercombination transition probabilities exhibit a strong Z dependence

  5. High-precision atomic clocks with highly charged ions: nuclear spin-zero $f^{12}$-shell ions

    OpenAIRE

    Dzuba, V. A.; Derevianko, A; Flambaum, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    Optical atomic clocks using highly-charged ions hold an intriguing promise of metrology at the 19th significant figure. Here we study transitions within the $4f^{12}$ ground-state electronic configuration of highly charged ions. We consider isotopes lacking hyperfine structure and show that the detrimental effects of coupling of electronic quadrupole moments to gradients of trapping electric field can be effectively reduced by using specially chosen virtual clock transitions. The estimated sy...

  6. Frequency shift due to blackbody radiation in a cesium atomic fountain and improvement of the clock performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FO1 was the first caesium fountain primary frequency standard in the world. The most recent evaluation in 2002 before improvement reached an accuracy of 1*10-15 when operated with optical molasses. Working as an extremely precise and stable instrument, FO1 has contributed to fundamental physics and technical measurements: - Frequency comparison between Cs and Rb fountains over an interval of 5 years sets an upper limit for a possible variation of the fine structure constant as |alpha/alpha| -15/y. The resolution is about 5 times better than the previous test in our laboratory. The projected accuracy of the space clock PHARAO is 1*10-16. We confirmed its Ramsey cavity performance by testing the phase difference between the two interaction zones in FO1. The measured temperature T dependent frequency shift of the Cs clock induced by the blackbody radiation field is given as nu(T)=154(6)*10-6*(T/300)4[1+ε(T/300)2] Hz with the theoretical value ε = 0,014. The obtained accuracy represents a 3 times improvement over the previous measurement by the PTB group. Some improvements have been carried out on FO1. The new FO1 version works directly with optical molasses loaded by a laser slowed atomic beam. The application of the adiabatic passage method to perform the state selection allows us to determine the atom number dependent frequency shifts due to the cold collision and cavity pulling effects at a level of of 10-16. Recently, the obtained frequency stability is 2,8*10-14*τ-1/2 for about 4*106 detected atoms. The accuracy is currently under evaluation, the expected value is a few times 10-16. (author)

  7. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  8. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  9. Effects of variation of fundamental constants from big bang to atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental 'constants' in expanding Universe. I discuss effects of variation of the fine structure constant alpha=e2/h c, strong interaction and quark mass. The measurements of these variations cover lifespan of the Universe from few minutes after Big Bang to the present time and give controversial results. There are some hints for the variation in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, quasar absorption spectra and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. A billion times enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic energy levels. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  10. Review of chip-scale atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on chip-scale atomic clocks (CSACs) based on coherent population trapping (CPT) is reviewed. The background and the inspiration for the research are described, including the important schemes proposed to improve the CPT signal quality, the selection of atoms and buffer gases, and the development of micro-cell fabrication. With regard to the reliability, stability, and service life of the CSACs, the research regarding the sensitivity of the CPT resonance to temperature and laser power changes is also reviewed, as well as the CPT resonance's collision and light of frequency shifts. The first generation CSACs have already been developed but its characters are still far from our expectations. Our conclusion is that miniaturization and power reduction are the most important aspects calling for further research. (review)

  11. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  12. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  13. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10−14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10−14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10−15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards

  14. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  15. Design and implementation of a clock recovery circuit for fast Ethernet applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱全庆; 邹雪城; 沈绪榜

    2004-01-01

    A circuit architechure to realize clock recovery for fast Ethernet applications is presented, whick includies system architecture, modified Mueller Muller algorithm for 100BASE-TX, phase detector for 100BASE-TX and multiple output charge pump PLL. The clock recovery circuit is verified by TSMC 0.35um 1P5M CMOS process. The results show that this clock recovery circuit exactly extracts the timing information. It has advantages over others for simple and easy implementation.

  16. 0.75 atoms improve the clock signal of 10,000 atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, I.; Lange, K; Peise, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Ramsey, atom interferometers are employed for precision metrology, in particular to measure time and to realize the second. In a classical interferometer, an ensemble of atoms is prepared in one of the two input states, whereas the second one is left empty. In this ca...

  17. Explaining atomic clock behavior in a gravitational field with only 1905 Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hidalgo-Gato, Rafael A Valls

    2010-01-01

    Supported only in the two 1905 Einstein's papers on Relativity and a very rigid respect for the historical context, an analysis is done of the derivation of the universal mass-energy relationship. It is found, contrary to the today accepted Physics knowledge, that a body's Rest Mass measures its Potential Energy in the 1905 context. After emphasizing the difference between 1905 Relativity (1905R) and Special Relativity (SR), the developing of a 1905R relativistic gravity is started for a small mass m material point moving in the central gravitational field of a great mass M one. A formula for the rest mass m_0 as a function of its distance r from M is obtained. Finally, those results are applied to an atomic clock in a gravitational field, reaching a factor to obtain the clock time rate change very close to the GR one. The factors from 1905R and GR are compared, emphasizing the absent of a singularity in 1905R. In the conclusions, a new road for the development of a 1905R relativistic mechanics is declared, r...

  18. Atom interferometers and optical atomic clocks: New quantum sensors for fundamental physics experiments in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present projects for future space missions using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms. They will enable fundamental physics experiments testing quantum physics, physics beyond the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions, special relativity, gravitation and general relativity

  19. Two-step pulse observation for Raman-Ramsey coherent population trapping atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, Yuichiro; Kajita, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a two-step pulse observation method to enhance frequency stability for coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clocks. The proposed method is a Raman-Ramsey scheme with low light intensity at resonance observation, and provides a Ramsey-CPT resonance with both reduced frequency sensitivity to the light intensity and a high signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the repumping into a steady dark state. The resonance characteristics were calculated based on density matrix analysis of a $\\Lambda$-type three level system that was modeled on the $^{133}$Cs-D$_1$ line, and the characteristics were also measured using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and a Cs vapor cell.

  20. Towards development of the lamp-based 113Cd+ ion atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We review the development of the microwave frequency standard based on trapped Cd+ ions. The purpose of this development is to test for a possible variation of the fine structure constant by measuring differences of fractional frequency shifts of two (or three) atomic clocks in strong gravitational potential near the sun. The 113Cd+ ions are trapped in the linear quadrupole rf ion trap, similar to one described elsewhere. The trap region was not shielded from an ambient magnetic field. Approximately 105 Torr of He as a buffer gas is used to cool ions to near room temperature and increase loading efficiency. The ions are optically pumped into the S1/2, F=0 hyperfine level of the ground state by a UV light from the Cd rf discharge lamp. The 106Cd lamp has about 1 Torr of Ar and about 1 mg of 106Cd. With 10 W of rf power, the lamp substantially pumps 113Cd+ ions in the F=0 hyperfine level in one second. The ions are interrogated by one Rabi pulse using microwave radiation tuned to a clock transition ∼ 15.2 GHz that couples 52S1/2 hyperfine levels, F=1, mf=0 - F=0, mf=0. The microwave signal was referenced to a hydrogen maser. Detection, i.e., measurements of how many ions made the microwave transition, was performed using the light from the same 106Cd lamp. The UV light-microwave double-resonance spectrum is at 15.199862903 GHz, 45 Hz higher then the high precision measurement of Cd hyperfine splitting at zero magnetic field. The obtained resonance width of ∼ 0.17 Hz when interrogating for 5 sec and high signal to background light ratio gives an estimated short-term stability below 5x10-13. (author)

  1. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition 1S0 - 3P0 in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the 1S0-1P1 transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in 87Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10-3 Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  2. 原子钟、原子弹哪个更重要%Which one is more important, Atomic Bomb or Atomic Clock?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李滚; 蔡成林; 袁海波

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1945年原子弹(Atomic Bomb)在广岛长崎爆炸之前,一般人很难理解原子弹的威力,原子钟(Atomic Clock)也不是大家都能一睹为快的;但是,原子弹和原子钟的概念的确已是家喻户晓.

  3. Reference clock parameters for digital communications systems applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartaschoff, P.

    1981-01-01

    The basic parameters relevant to the design of network timing systems describe the random and systematic time departures of the system elements, i.e., master (or reference) clocks, transmission links, and other clocks controlled over the links. The quantitative relations between these parameters were established and illustrated by means of numerical examples based on available measured data. The examples were limited to a simple PLL control system but the analysis can eventually be applied to more sophisticated systems at the cost of increased computational effort.

  4. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad2/Hz and −129 dB rad2/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10−14 at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out

  5. Accurate measurement of the quadratic Zeeman coefficient of 87Rb clock transition based on the Ramsey atom interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quadratic Zeeman coefficient was previously measured by using the single pulse spectroscopy method, in which the experimental resolution is limited by the line width of the spectrum of the clock transition. In this paper, an accurate measurement of the quadratic Zeeman coefficient is presented by using the Ramsey atom interferometer. The line width of the central Ramsey fringe of the 87Rb clock transition, which depends on the interrogation time, is much narrower than that of the single pulse spectroscopy method. The measurement uncertainty of less than 1 Hz G−2 is realized, which is much better than the other current existing results. The measured quadratic Zeeman coefficient of the 87Rb clock transition is 575.33±0.36 Hz G−2 by the Raman Ramsey atom interferometer, and 575.48 ± 0.30 Hz G−2 by the microwave Ramsey atom interferometer, which coincides well with the theoretical result of 575.15 Hz G−2 calculated by the Breit–Rabi formula. (paper)

  6. Stability Analysis of the In-Orbit Satellite Atomic Clocks%GPS在轨卫星原子钟的稳定性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长会; 闫国锋

    2012-01-01

    导航卫星星载原子钟的相位或频率数据,作为导航系统应用研究的基础,将直接影响导航系统时间尺度建立以及定位的精度和准确性.本文针对由IGS官网提供的四种GPS卫星钟的钟差数据,采用修正阿伦方差进行了稳定性分析,得到了一些有益的结论.%As the application research basis of navigation system, the phase or frequency data of in - orbit satellite atomic clocks directly affect the precision and accuracy of navigation system. This paper analyzes the stability of four types of data of GPS satellite a-tomic clocks which is provided by the official website of IGS using Allan variance method and reaches some beneficial conclusions.

  7. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10-16 accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10-18.

  8. Design and implementation of fast bipolar clock drivers for CCD imaging systems in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajan, Jayesh; Kumar, Nishant; Verma, Amarnath; Thaker, Ramkrishna

    2016-05-01

    Drive electronics for generating fast, bipolar clocks, which can drive capacitive loads of the order of 5-10nF are indispensable for present day Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs). Design of these high speed bipolar clocks is challenging because of the capacitive loads that have to be driven and a strict constraint on the rise and fall times. Designing drive electronics circuits for space applications becomes even more challenging due to limited number of available discrete devices, which can survive in the harsh radiation prone space environment. This paper presents the design, simulations and test results of a set of such high speed, bipolar clock drivers. The design has been tested under a thermal cycle of -15 deg C to +55 deg C under vacuum conditions and has been designed using radiation hardened components. The test results show that the design meets the stringent rise/fall time requirements of 50+/-10ns for Multiple Vertical CCD (VCCD) clocks and 20+/-5ns for Horizontal CCD (HCCD) clocks with sufficient design margins across full temperature range, with a pixel readout rate of 6.6MHz. The full design has been realized in flexi-rigid PCB with package volume of 140x160x50 mm3.

  9. Interim results from the characterization testing of the Engineering Development (EDM) rubidium clocks for satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Edward D., Jr.; Danzy, Fredrick

    1990-01-01

    Some interim results from the environmental testing program to evaluate the Engineering Design Model (EDM) of the EG and G Spaceborne Rubidium Clock are presented. This effort is in support of the Global Positioning System (GPS) BLOCK IIR program and is intended to characterize the performance of EG and G design for BLOCK IIR satellite applications. Two EG and G EDM units are currently under test at NRL's Clock Test Facility to measure the long-term frequency stability, drift, and frequency versus temperature characteristics.

  10. High-precision high-sensitivity clock recovery circuit for a mobile payment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a fully integrated carrier clock recovery circuit for a mobile payment application. The architecture is based on a sampling-detection module and a charge pump phase locked loop. Compared with clock recovery in conventional 13.56 MHz transponders, this circuit can recover a high-precision consecutive carrier clock from the on/off keying (OOK) signal sent by interrogators. Fabricated by a SMIC 0.18-μm EEPROM CMOS process, this chip works from a single power supply as low as 1.5 V Measurement results show that this circuit provides 0.34% frequency deviation and 8 mV sensitivity. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  11. ECL gate array with integrated PLL-based clock recovery and synthesis for high-speed data and telecom applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosky, David S.; Coy, Bruce H.; Friedmann, Marc D.

    1992-03-01

    A 2500 gate mixed signal gate array has been developed that integrates custom PLL-based clock recovery and clock synthesis functions with 2500 gates of configurable logic cells to provide a single chip solution for 200 - 1244 MHz fiber based digital interface applications. By customizing the digital logic cells, any of the popular telecom and datacom standards may be implemented.

  12. A CPT-based Cs vapor cell atomic clock with a short-term fractional frequency stability of 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Liu, Xiaochi; Guérandel, Stéphane; De Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on the development and short-term fractional frequency stability of a continuous-regime (CW) Cs vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The push-pull optical pumping technique is used to increase the number of atoms that participate to the clock transition, yielding a typical CPT resonance contrast of 25% for a CPT linewidth of about 450 Hz. The clock short-term fractional frequency stability is measured to be 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2 up to 100 seconds averaging time, in correct agreement with the signal-to-noise ratio limit. The mid-term frequency stability results are currently mainly limited by laser power effects. The detection of high-contrast narrow Raman-Ramsey fringes is demonstrated with this setup by making the atoms interact with a light pulse sequence.

  13. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  14. Selection and amplification of a single optical frequency comb mode for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the active filtering and amplification of a single mode from an optical femtosecond laser comb with mode spacing of 250 MHz by optical injection of two external-cavity diode lasers operating in cascade to build a narrow linewidth laser for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical lattice clock. Despite the low injection of individual comb mode of approximately 50 nW, a single comb line at 689 nm could be filtered and amplified to reach as high as 10 mW with 37 dB side mode suppression and a linewidth of 240 Hz. This method could be applied over a broad spectral band to build narrow linewidth lasers for various applications

  15. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  16. Active optical clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JingBiao

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the principles and techniques of active optical clock, a special laser combining the laser physics of one-atom laser, bad-cavity gas laser, super-cavity stabilized laser and optical atomic clock together. As a simple example, an active optical clock based on thermal strontium atomic beam shows a quantum-limited linewidth of 0.51 Hz, which is insensitive to laser cavity-length noise, and may surpass the recorded narrowest 6.7 Hz of Hg ion optical clock and 1.5 Hz of very recent optical lattice clock. The estimated 0.1 Hz one-second instability and 0.27 Hz uncertainty are limited only by the rela-tivistic Doppler effect, and can be improved by cold atoms.

  17. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  18. Compact Yb$^+$ optical atomic clock project: design principle and current status

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroûte, Clément; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Millo, Jacques; Saleh, Khaldoun; Bigler, Emmanuel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Giordano, Vincent; Kersalé, Yann

    2016-01-01

    We present the design of a compact optical clock based on the $^2S_{1/2} \\rightarrow ^2D_{3/2}$ 435.5 nm transition in $^{171}$Yb$^+$. The ion trap will be based on a micro-fabricated circuit, with surface electrodes generating a trapping potential to localize a single Yb ion a few hundred $\\mu$m from the electrodes. We present our trap design as well as simulations of the resulting trapping pseudo-potential. We also present a compact, multi-channel wavelength meter that will permit the frequency stabilization of the cooling, repumping and clear-out lasers at 369.5 nm, 935.2 nm and 638.6 nm needed to cool the ion. We use this wavelength meter to characterize and stabilize the frequency of extended cavity diode lasers at 369.5 nm and 638.6 nm.

  19. 欧洲空间原子钟组ACES 与超高精度时频传递技术新进展%Advances in Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space of Europe and Ultraprecise Time and Frequency Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文可; 孟文东; 韩文标; 谢勇辉; 任晓乾; 胡小工; 董文丽

    2016-01-01

    高精度时间频率的产生和超高精度时频信号的传递是现代物理学、天文学和计量科学的基础。空间原子钟组计划(Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space, ACES)是由欧洲空间局实施的基于国际空间站(International Space Station, ISS)微重力环境下的新型空间微波原子钟实验验证项目。概要介绍ACES项目基本情况,重点介绍ACES项目的主要科学和技术目标,围绕科学目标而形成的ACES 组成结构,并梳理涉及的关键技术,特别介绍了ACES 将应用的超高精度时频传递技术,为我国自主研究并实现相关空间时间频率系统及其应用提供参考。最后简述了我国正在建设的空间站时频系统主要情况和实施计划。%One of the foundations for the development of modern physics, astronomy and metrology is the generation, transfer and measurement of high precision time frequency signals. As a space mission for the study of high precision time frequency signals, Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space, or ACES, sponsored by European Space Agency to launch in 2017 or later, will take advantage of the excellent stability performance of microwave atomic clocks in a microgravity environment. One clock using laser-cooled Cs atoms working together with one hydrogen maser clock are planned to be placed onboard the International Space Station in hope to produce a frequency standard with both accuracy and stability reaching the level of 10−16. A microwave link along with a laser link will be set up between ACES and ground atomic clocks distributed around the world for high precision comparison and transfer. Various basic researches will benefit from a high precision space atomic clock such as the verification of Einstein’s general relativity, detection of possible time variability of certain fundamental constants in physics, as well as brand new applications such as relativistic gravity and GNSS remote sensing. This paper reviews and summarizes the

  20. Atomic Fresnel images and possible applications in atom lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Janicke, U.; M. Wilkens

    1994-01-01

    In the near field regime of diffractive atom optics, amplitude corrugations of the de Broglie wave front are important and can lead to interesting effects. One class of near field phenomena is the formation of Fresnel images. We study this effect and possible applications in atom lithography using wave packet simulations.

  1. Performances evaluation of the PHARAO atomic fountain: participation to the study of the PHARAO space clock; Evaluation des performances de la fontaine atomique PHARAO, participation a l'etude de l'horloge spatiale PHARAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, M

    2003-01-01

    The performances of an atomic frequency standard depend drastically on the observation time of the atoms. The interrogation of laser cooled atoms allows to obtain about half a second interaction time in a fountain geometry. This duration could be much more varied in absence of gravity, and would allow a better trade-off between stability and accuracy. The application of this principle is the aim of the PHARAO project, that should attend to the ACES mission planned in 2006 onboard the International Space Station. The first part of this thesis deals with the cold Cs{sup 133} PHARAO fountain. This clock stems from the transformation of a space clock prototype previously tested in microgravity. A detailed evaluation of the whole frequency shifts has been carried out, reaching a 7.7 10{sup -16} accuracy and a 1.7 10{sup -13}{tau}{sup -1/2} short term stability. These values are obtained for 4 10{sup 5} detected atoms, that provides a good stability-accuracy trade-off. This transportable fountain, built at BNM-SYRTE, has been operating at MPQ in Munich (Germany). The collaboration between the 2 laboratories gave a {approx} 10 improvement factor on the measurement accuracy (1.8 10{sup -14}) for the 1S - 2S two photons hydrogen transition. In a second part of this thesis, we present the characterisation of 2 elements of the PHARAO space clock: the construction of a standard extended cavity laser and the test of the phase symmetry between the two interrogating areas of the space cavity. (author)

  2. Low-jitter on-chip clock for RSFQ circuit applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultra-narrow linewidth of a long Josephson junction (LJJ) oscillator offers low timing jitter as a clock source. In this paper, we will discuss the improvement of an LJJ clock by using an annular geometry. We demonstrate the integration of an annular LJJ with a clock decimator which consists of a serial chain of toggle-flip-flops (TFFs). Each TFF divides its input frequency by a factor of 2. We have also developed a clock frequency selector. The clock selector circuit can choose either the master clock fm or one of its sub-harmonics (fm/2m, m=1 to n), based on the select inputs. The generation of a set of clocks will enable us to integrate the on-chip LJJ clock with a flash analogue-to-digital converter. (author)

  3. Limits on the temporal variation of the fine structure constant, quark masses and strong interaction from quasar absorption spectra and atomic clock experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V; Thomas, A W; Young, R D

    2004-01-01

    We perform calculations of the dependence of nuclear magnetic moments on quark masses and obtain limits on the variation of $(m_q/\\Lambda_{QCD})$ from recent measurements of hydrogen hyperfine (21 cm) and molecular rotational transitions in quasar absorption systems, atomic clock experiments with hyperfine transitions in H, Rb, Cs, Yb$^+$, Hg$^+$ and optical transition in Hg$^+$. Experiments with Cd$^+$, deuterium/hydrogen, molecular SF$_6$ and Zeeman transitions in $^3$He/Xe are also discussed.

  4. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  5. Identifying Nonstationary Clock Noises in Navigation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia Tavella; Lorenzo Galleani

    2008-01-01

    The stability of the atomic clocks on board the satellites of a navigation system should remain constant with time. In reality there are numerous physical phenomena that make the behavior of the clocks a function of time, and for this reason we have recently introduced the dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR), a measure of the time-varying stability of an atomic clock. In this paper we discuss the dynamic Allan variance for phase and frequency jumps, two common nonstationarities of atomic clocks. T...

  6. Phase Coherent Link of an Atomic Clock to a Self-Referenced Microresonator Frequency Comb

    CERN Document Server

    Del'Haye, Pascal; Fortier, Tara; Beha, Katja; Cole, Daniel C; Yang, Ki Youl; Lee, Hansuek; Vahala, Kerry J; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    The counting and control of optical cycles of light has become common with modelocked laser frequency combs. But even with advances in laser technology, modelocked laser combs remain bulk-component devices that are hand-assembled. In contrast, a frequency comb based on the Kerr-nonlinearity in a dielectric microresonator will enable frequency comb functionality in a micro-fabricated and chip-integrated package suitable for use in a wide-range of environments. Such an advance will significantly impact fields ranging from spectroscopy and trace gas sensing, to astronomy, communications, atomic time keeping and photonic data processing. Yet in spite of the remarkable progress shown over the past years, microresonator frequency combs ("microcombs") have still been without the key function of direct f-2f self-referencing and phase-coherent frequency control that will be critical for enabling their full potential. Here we realize these missing elements using a low-noise 16.4 GHz silicon chip microcomb that is coher...

  7. A quantum network of clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Peter; Kessler, Eric; Bishof, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Sorensen, Anders; Ye, Jun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Shared timing information constitutes a key resource for positioning and navigation with a direct correspondence between timing accuracy and precision in applications such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). By combining precision metrology and quantum networks, we propose here a quantum, cooperative protocol for the operation of a network consisting of geographically remote optical atomic clocks. Using non-local entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of the global network resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental limit set by quantum theory yielding an ultra-precise clock signal. Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with basic techniques from quantum communication, guarantees security both from internal and external threats. Realization of such a global quantum network of clocks may allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy. See also: Komar et al. arXiv:1310.6045 (2013) and Kessler et al. arXiv:1310.6043 (2013).

  8. Applications of Bayesian filtering in wireless networks: Clock synchronization, localization, and RF tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Benjamin Russell

    In this work, we investigate the application of Bayesian filtering techniques such as Kalman Filtering and Particle filtering to the problems of network time synchronization, self-localization and radio-frequency (RF) tomography in wireless networks. Networks of large numbers of small, cheap, mobile wireless devices have shown enormous potential in applications ranging from intrusion detection to environmental monitoring. These applications require the devices to have accurate time and position estimates, however traditional techniques may not be available. Additionally RF tomography offers a new paradigm to sense the network environment and could greatly enhance existing network capabilities. While there are some existing works addressing these problems, they all suffer from limitations. Current time synchronization methods are not energy efficient on small wireless devices with low quality oscillators. Existing localization methods do not consider additional sources of information available to nodes in the network such as measurements from accelerometers or models of the shadowing environment in the network. RF tomography has only been examined briefly in such networks, and current algorithms can not handle node mobility and rely on shadowing models that have not been experimentally verified. We address the time synchronization problem by analyzing the characteristics of the clocks in small wireless devices, developing a model for it, and then applying a Kalman filter to track both clock offset and skew. In our investigation into RF tomography, we present a method using a Kalman filter which jointly estimates and tracks static and dynamic objects in the environment. We also use channel measurements collected from a field test of our RF tomography testbed to compare RF shadowing models. For the localization problem, we present two algorithms incorporating additional information for improved localization: one based on a distributed extended Kalman filter that

  9. Hanle detection for optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with 423 nm electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. And the potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. This Hanle detection configur...

  10. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  11. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard. PMID:25734183

  12. Clocking in the face of unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2015-05-01

    In earlier papers we showed unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty in atomic clocks, ensuing from a proven gap between given evidence and explanations of that evidence. Here we reconceive a clock, not as an isolated entity, but as enmeshed in a self-adjusting communications network adapted to one or another particular investigation, in contact with an unpredictable environment. From the practical uses of clocks, we abstract a clock enlivened with the computational capacity of a Turing machine, modified to transmit and to receive numerical communications. Such "live clocks" phase the steps of their computations to mesh with the arrival of transmitted numbers. We lift this phasing, known in digital communications, to a principle of logical synchronization, distinct from the synchronization defined by Einstein in special relativity. Logical synchronization elevates digital communication to a topic in physics, including applications to biology. One explores how feedback loops in clocking affect numerical signaling among entities functioning in the face of unpredictable influences, making the influences themselves into subjects of investigation. The formulation of communications networks in terms of live clocks extends information theory by expressing the need to actively maintain communications channels, and potentially, to create or drop them. We show how networks of live clocks are presupposed by the concept of coordinates in a spacetime. A network serves as an organizing principle, even when the concept of the rigid body that anchors a special-relativistic coordinate system is inapplicable, as is the case, for example, in a generic curved spacetime.

  13. Mercury Ion Clock for a NASA Technology Demonstration Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, Robert L; Prestage, John D; Burt, Eric A; Chen, Pin; Chong, Yong J; Chung, Sang K; Diener, William; Ely, Todd; Enzer, Daphna G; Mojaradi, Hadi; Okino, Clay; Pauken, Mike; Robison, David; Swenson, Bradford L; Tucker, Blake; Wang, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    There are many different atomic frequency standard technologies but only few meet the demanding performance, reliability, size, mass, and power constraints required for space operation. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a linear ion-trap-based mercury ion clock, referred to as DSAC (Deep-Space Atomic Clock) under NASA's Technology Demonstration Mission program. This clock is expected to provide a new capability with broad application to space-based navigation and science. A one-year flight demonstration is planned as a hosted payload following an early 2017 launch. This first-generation mercury ion clock for space demonstration has a volume, mass, and power of 17 L, 16 kg, and 47 W, respectively, with further reductions planned for follow-on applications. Clock performance with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)*Q limited stability of 1.5E-13/τ(1/2) has been observed and a fractional frequency stability of 2E-15 at one day measured (no drift removed). Such a space-based stability enables autonomous timekeeping of with a technology capable of even higher stability, if desired. To date, the demonstration clock has been successfully subjected to mechanical vibration testing at the 14 grms level, thermal-vacuum operation over a range of 42(°)C, and electromagnetic susceptibility tests. PMID:27019481

  14. Human Peripheral Clocks: Applications for Studying Circadian Phenotypes in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Camille; Brown, Steven A.; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Most light-sensitive organisms on earth have acquired an internal system of circadian clocks allowing the anticipation of light or darkness. In humans, the circadian system governs nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. Circadian phenotypes, including chronotype, vary dramatically among individuals and over individual lifespan. Recent studies have revealed that the characteristics of human skin fibroblast clocks correlate with donor chronotype. Given the complexity of circadian phenot...

  15. KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS BASED ON SW ATOM

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Burita; Pavel Gardavsky

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the knowledge systems developed by using the software AToM and the experience with their application for teaching and universities cooperation. The theoretical bases of the solution are Topic Maps; the software AToM is described and individual cases of the knowledge systems are introduced. The article reflects the years of experience in the cooperation of the knowledge systems development with the AION CS Company. Two examples are presented in detail: “Conferences” – know...

  16. Application of satellite time transfer in autonomous spacecraft clocks. [binary time code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The conceptual design of a spacecraft clock that will provide a standard time scale for experimenters in future spacecraft., and can be sychronized to a time scale without the need for additional calibration and validation is described. The time distribution to the users is handled through onboard computers, without human intervention for extended periods. A group parallel binary code, under consideration for onboard use, is discussed. Each group in the code can easily be truncated. The autonomously operated clock not only achieves simpler procedures and shorter lead times for data processing, but also contributes to spacecraft autonomy for onboard navigation and data packetization. The clock can be used to control the sensor in a spacecraft, compare another time signal such as that from the global positioning system, and, if the cost is not a consideration, can be used on the ground in remote sites for timekeeping and control.

  17. A Study of clocking techniques to reduce Simultaneous Switching Noise (SSN) in on-chip application

    OpenAIRE

    Kashfolayat, Sahar

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous Switching Noise (SSN) is one of the major problems in today highspeed circuits. Power-Ground voltage fluctuation is significantly increasing due to L ∗ (di/dt)) noise known as Power-Ground bounce and can be one major noise source in modern and mixed-signal circuit design. In this thesis first SSN and its sources are studied followed by some theoretical analysis, then we present some clock shapes that cause in SSN reduction. In this thesis, we investigate different clocking techni...

  18. KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS BASED ON SW ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Burita

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the knowledge systems developed by using the software AToM and the experience with their application for teaching and universities cooperation. The theoretical bases of the solution are Topic Maps; the software AToM is described and individual cases of the knowledge systems are introduced. The article reflects the years of experience in the cooperation of the knowledge systems development with the AION CS Company. Two examples are presented in detail: “Conferences” – knowledge system used for education and “MilUNI” –system for military universities cooperation.

  19. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Jonathan D.; Beloy, Kyle; Derevianko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a ``magic'' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency -- to maintain clock accuracy -- while an open-shell J=1/2 ``head'' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent ``Archimedes' screw'' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of th...

  20. Progress of the ~(87)Rb Fountain Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zi-Chao; WEI Rong; SHI Chun-Yan; LV De-Sheng; LI Tang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A fountain atomic clock based on cold ~(87)Rb atoms has been in operation in our laboratory for several months.We therefore report the design of the rubidium fountain clock including its physical package,optical system and daily operation.Ramsey fringes have been attained with the signal to noise ratio of about 100.

  1. Progress of the 87Rb Fountain Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fountain atomic clock based on cold 87 Rb atoms has been in operation in our laboratory for several months. We therefore report the design of the rubidium fountain clock including its physical package, optical system and daily operation. Ramsey fringes have been attained with the signal to noise ratio of about 100

  2. Atomic coherence and its potential applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Jin-Yue; Zhu, Yifu

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive text describes the phenomenon of atomic coherence and the applications in several processes. Various sections have been written by eminent authors who have made extensive contributions in the field of quantum interference. Discussions are on microscopic nano-resolution techniques, lithography, photonic band gap control and much more. The Ebook is unique in its approach with experimental demonstrations and it should be a particularly useful reference for aspiring theoretical physicists, looking for a comprehensive review of applications in this active research field within a

  3. Dual cesium and rubidium atomic fountain with a 10-16 level accuracy and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic fountains are the most accomplished development of the atomic clocks based on the cesium atom whose hyperfine resonance defines the SI second since 1967. Today these systems are among those which realize the second with the best accuracy. We present the last developments of the cold cesium and rubidium atom dual fountain experiment at LNE-SYRTE. This unique dual setup would allow to obtain an outstanding resolution in fundamental physics tests based on atomic transition frequency comparisons. In order to enable operation with both atomic species simultaneously, we designed, tested and implemented on the fountain new collimators which combine the laser lights corresponding to each atom. By comparing our rubidium fountain to another cesium fountain over a decade, we performed a test of the stability of the fine structure constant at the level of 5 * 10-16 per year. We carried on the work on the clock accuracy and we focused on the phase gradients effects in the interrogation cavity and on the microwave leakage. The fountain accuracy has been evaluated to 4 * 10-16 for the cesium clock and to 5 * 10-16 for the refurbished rubidium clock. As a powerful instrument of metrology, our fountain was implicated in many clock comparisons and contributed many times to calibrate the International Atomic Time. Furthermore, we used the fountain to perform a new test of Lorentz local invariance. (author)

  4. Advancing differential atom interferometry for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Williams, Jason; Yu, Nan

    2016-05-01

    Atom interferometer (AI) based sensors exhibit precision and accuracy unattainable with classical sensors, thanks to the inherent stability of atomic properties. Dual atomic sensors operating in a differential mode further extend AI applicability beyond environmental disturbances. Extraction of the phase difference between dual AIs, however, typically introduces uncertainty and systematic in excess of that warranted by each AI's intrinsic noise characteristics, especially in practical applications and real time measurements. In this presentation, we report our efforts in developing practical schemes for reducing noises and enhancing sensitivities in the differential AI measurement implementations. We will describe an active phase extraction method that eliminates the noise overhead and demonstrates a performance boost of a gravity gradiometer by a factor of 3. We will also describe a new long-baseline approach for differential AI measurements in a laser ranging assisted AI configuration. The approach uses well-developed AIs for local measurements but leverage the mature schemes of space laser interferometry for LISA and GRACE. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a Contract with NASA.

  5. Prediction of GNSS satellite clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    interval 2-3 ns are obtained. This represents a distance-error of 60-90 cm. A comparison of the results from GNSS-VC/static to the predicted Ultra-Rapid-clocks of the ACs of the IGS confirms the very good quality of our clock solution which is at the level of the best AC solutions. The use of GNSS-VC/static for GLONASS-satellite-clocks is problematic. The GLONASS satellite clocks show a hard to characterize behaviour covering a number of jumps and breaks in the time-series within just a few hours. Therefore the prediction of GLONASS-satellite-clocks seems not reasonable at this time. In view of more stable clocks upcoming with the new GLONASS satellite generation K a similar model as used to characterize the GPS Rubidium clock might be applicable. The results of GNSS-VC/static are affected by a three-hours-delay. Thus an almost real-time solution to obtain high quality clock predictions has been established in parallel. The programme GNSS-VC/kalman enables to evaluate the parameters of the prediction-model by a Kalman-filter approach. Because of the short prediction-interval of just six hours the model is reduced to a simple quadratic polynomial. Input-data are RT-clock-corrections evaluated with the programme RTR-Control [Opitz, 2010] based on the observation data provided by the IGS-RT project. The clock correction polynomial coefficients are estimated every minute. After an initialization period of the filter (about 30 minutes) the mean error of the polynomial parameters as well as the evaluated clock corrections is below 2 ns for most of the satellite clock (author)

  6. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Jonathan D; Derevianko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a ``magic'' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency -- to maintain clock accuracy -- while an open-shell J=1/2 ``head'' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent ``Archimedes' screw'' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of the vanishing vector polarizability of the scalar, J=0, clock states of bosonic isotopes of divalent atoms. The on-site interactions between the clock atoms and the head atom are used to engineer entanglement and for clock readout.

  7. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  8. Accurate atomic data for industrial plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesmann, U.; Bridges, J.M.; Roberts, J.R.; Wiese, W.L.; Fuhr, J.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reliable branching fraction, transition probability and transition wavelength data for radiative dipole transitions of atoms and ions in plasma are important in many industrial applications. Optical plasma diagnostics and modeling of the radiation transport in electrical discharge plasmas (e.g. in electrical lighting) depend on accurate basic atomic data. NIST has an ongoing experimental research program to provide accurate atomic data for radiative transitions. The new NIST UV-vis-IR high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer has become an excellent tool for accurate and efficient measurements of numerous transition wavelengths and branching fractions in a wide wavelength range. Recently, the authors have also begun to employ photon counting techniques for very accurate measurements of branching fractions of weaker spectral lines with the intent to improve the overall accuracy for experimental branching fractions to better than 5%. They have now completed their studies of transition probabilities of Ne I and Ne II. The results agree well with recent calculations and for the first time provide reliable transition probabilities for many weak intercombination lines.

  9. Heaviside revisited: Distortionless signal transmission through lossy media with application to precision clock synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flake, Robert H.

    2016-02-01

    A recently discovered non-sinusoidal, non-periodic electrical signal in the form of an exponentially rising pulse achieves distortionless propagation at constant velocity through lossy, passive transmission media. This unique property is derived theoretically in the framework of the telegrapher's equation analyzed by Heaviside and confirmed experimentally in propagation of such a pulse along serially connected sections of telephone cable. The utility of the distortion-free pulse within the field of time-domain reflectometry is demonstrated in precise time-of-flight measurement of the reflected signal, with the prospect of enhancing the accuracy of protocols for synchronization of spatially separated clocks.

  10. Femtosecond Er3+ fiber laser for application in an optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubin, M. A.; Kireev, A. N.; Tausenev, A. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Tyurikov, D. A.; Shelkovikov, A. S.

    2007-11-01

    The main elements needed for the realization of a compact femtosecond methane optical clock are developed and studied. A femtosecond laser system on an Er3+ fiber ( λ = 1.55 μm) contains an oscillator, an amplifier, and a fiber with a relatively high nonlinearity in which the supercontinuum radiation is generated in the range 1 2 μm. In the supercontinuum spectrum, the fragments separated by an interval that is close to the methane-optical reference frequency ( λ = 3.39 μm) exhibit an increase in intensity. The supercontinuum radiation is converted into the difference frequency in a nonlinear crystal to the range of the methane-reference frequency ( λ = 3.3 3.5 μm), so that the frequency components of the transformed spectrum have sufficient intensities for the subsequent frequency-phase stabilization with respect to the methane reference. A system that stabilizes the pulse repetition rate of the femtosecond Er3+ laser is also employed. Thus, the repetition rate of the ultrashort pulses of the femtosecond fiber laser is locked to the methane reference. The pulse repetition rate is compared with the standard second. Thus, the scheme of an optical clock is realized.

  11. A Two-Photon E1-M1 Optical Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Alden, E A; Leanhardt, A E

    2014-01-01

    An allowed E1-M1 excitation scheme creates optical access to the ${^1S_0} \\rightarrow {^3P_0}$ clock transition in group II type atoms. This method does not require the hyperfine mixing or application of an external magnetic field of other optical clock systems. The advantages of this technique include a Doppler-free excitation scheme and increased portability with the use of vapor cells. We will discuss technical mechanisms of a monochromatic excitation scheme for a hot E1-M1 clock and briefly discuss a bichromatic scheme to eliminate light shifts. We determine the optimal experimental parameters for Hg, Yb, Ra, Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg, and Be and calculate that neutral Hg has ideal properties for a hot, portable frequency standard.

  12. Constructive polarization modulation for coherent population trapping clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a constructive polarization modulation scheme for atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT). In this scheme, the polarization of a bichromatic laser beam is modulated between two opposite circular polarizations to avoid trapping the atomic populations in the extreme Zeeman sublevels. We show that if an appropriate phase modulation between the two optical components of the bichromatic laser is applied synchronously, the two CPT dark states which are produced successively by the alternate polarizations add constructively. Measured CPT resonance contrasts up to 20% in one-pulse CPT and 12% in two-pulse Ramsey-CPT experiments are reported, demonstrating the potential of this scheme for applications to high performance atomic clocks

  13. Body Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2000-01-01

    “Body clocks” are biological methods of controling body activities.Every living thing has one. In humans, a body clock controls normal periods of sleeping and waking. It controls the time swhen you are most likely to feel pain.Eating, sleeping and exercising at about the same time each day will help keep body activities normal. But changes in your life, a new job, for example, destroy the balance and thus cause health problems.

  14. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  15. Resolving all-order method convergence problems for atomic physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory led to many important results for the study of fundamental symmetries, development of atomic clocks, ultracold atom physics, and others, as well as provided recommended values of many atomic properties critically evaluated for their accuracy for a large number of monovalent systems. This approach requires iterative solutions of the linearized coupled-cluster equations leading to convergence issues in some cases where correlation corrections are particularly large or lead to an oscillating pattern. Moreover, these issues also lead to similar problems in the configuration-interaction (CI)+all-order method for many-particle systems. In this work, we have resolved most of the known convergence problems by applying two different convergence stabilizer methods, namely, reduced linear equation and direct inversion of iterative subspace. Examples are presented for B, Al, Zn+, and Yb+. Solving these convergence problems greatly expands the number of atomic species that can be treated with the all-order methods and is anticipated to facilitate many interesting future applications.

  16. Cold atom interferometers and their applications in precision measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin WANG; Lin ZHO; Run-bing LI; Min LIU; Ming-sheng ZHAN

    2009-01-01

    Experimental realization of cold 85Rb atom interferometers and their applications in precision meademonstrated: Detailed descriptions of the interferometers are given including manipulation of cold atoms, Rabi oscillation, stimulated Raman transitions, and optical pumping. As an example of using atom interferometers in precision measurements, the quadratic Zeeman shift of hyperfine sublevels of 85Rb was determined.

  17. Automated Synthesis of Skew-Based Clock Distribution Networks

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Neves; Eby G. Friedman

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a top-down methodology is presented for synthesizing clock distribution networks based on application-dependent localized clock skew. The methodology is divided into four phases: 1) determination of an optimal clock skew schedule for improving circuit performance and reliability; 2) design of the topology of the clock tree based on the circuit hierarchy and minimum clock path delays; 3) design of circuit structures to implement the delay values associated with the branches of th...

  18. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  19. R-Matrix Theory of Atomic Collisions Application to Atomic, Molecular and Optical Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Philip George

    2011-01-01

    Commencing with a self-contained overview of atomic collision theory, this monograph presents recent developments of R-matrix theory and its applications to a wide-range of atomic molecular and optical processes. These developments include electron and photon collisions with atoms, ions and molecules required in the analysis of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, multiphoton processes required in the analysis of superintense laser interactions with atoms and molecules and positron collisions with atoms and molecules required in antimatter studies of scientific and technologial importance. Basic mathematical results and general and widely used R-matrix computer programs are summarized in the appendices.

  20. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 0} in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms; Premiere observation de la transition fortement interdite {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 0} du strontium, pour une horloge optique a atomes pieges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtillot, I

    2003-11-01

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition in {sup 87}Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10{sup -3} Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  1. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  2. Frequency ratio of Yb and Sr clocks with $5 \\times 10^{-17}$ uncertainty at 150 s averaging time

    CERN Document Server

    Nemitz, Nils; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transition frequencies of atoms and ions are among the most accurately accessible quantities in nature, playing important roles in pushing the frontiers of science by testing fundamental laws of physics, in addition to a wide range of applications such as satellite navigation systems. Atomic clocks based on optical transitions approach uncertainties of $10^{-18}$, where full frequency descriptions are far beyond the reach of the SI second. Frequency ratios of such super clocks, on the other hand, are not subject to this limitation. They can therefore verify consistency and overall accuracy for an ensemble of super clocks, an essential step towards a redefinition of the second. However, with the measurement stabilities so far reported for such frequency ratios, a confirmation to $1 \\times 10^{-18}$ uncertainty would require an averaging time $\\tau$ of multiple months. Here we report a measurement of the frequency ratio of neutral ytterbium and strontium clocks with a much improved stability of $4 \\times 10^{-1...

  3. Bloch oscillations: atom optical interpretation, realizations, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Marzlin, Karl-Peter; Audretsch, Juergen

    1996-01-01

    The cyclic motion of particles in a periodic potential under the influence of a constant external force is analyzed in an atom optical approach based on Landau-Zener transitions between two resonant states. The resulting complex picture of population transfers can be interpreted in an intuitive diagrammatic way. The model is also applied to genuine atom optical systems and its applicability is discussed.

  4. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitroy, J [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Safronova, M S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Clark, Charles W, E-mail: jxm107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a, E-mail: msafrono@udel.ed, E-mail: charles.clark@nist.go [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8410 (United States)

    2010-10-28

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  5. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroy, J.; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards.

  7. S-Wave Collisional Frequency Shift of a Fermion Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hazlett, Eric L; Stites, Ronald W; Gibble, Kurt; O'Hara, Kenneth M

    2012-01-01

    We report an s-wave collisional frequency shift of an atomic clock based on fermions. In contrast to bosons, the fermion clock shift is insensitive to the population difference of the clock states, set by the first pulse area in Ramsey spectroscopy, \\theta_1. The fermion shift instead depends strongly on the second pulse area \\theta_2. It allows the shift to be canceled, nominally at \\theta_2 = \\pi/2, but correlations shift the null to slightly larger \\theta_2. The shift applies to optical lattice clocks and increases with the spatial inhomogeneity of the clock excitation field, naturally large at optical frequencies.

  8. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  9. Frequency shift due to blackbody radiation in a cesium atomic fountain and improvement of the clock performances; Deplacement de frequence du au rayonnement du corps noir dans une fontaine atomique a cesium et amelioration des performances de l'horloge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S

    2004-07-01

    FO1 was the first caesium fountain primary frequency standard in the world. The most recent evaluation in 2002 before improvement reached an accuracy of 1*10{sup -15} when operated with optical molasses. Working as an extremely precise and stable instrument, FO1 has contributed to fundamental physics and technical measurements: - Frequency comparison between Cs and Rb fountains over an interval of 5 years sets an upper limit for a possible variation of the fine structure constant as |alpha/alpha| < 2*10{sup -15}/y. The resolution is about 5 times better than the previous test in our laboratory. The projected accuracy of the space clock PHARAO is 1*10{sup -16}. We confirmed its Ramsey cavity performance by testing the phase difference between the two interaction zones in FO1. The measured temperature T dependent frequency shift of the Cs clock induced by the blackbody radiation field is given as nu(T)=154(6)*10{sup -6}*(T/300){sup 4}[1+{epsilon}(T/300){sup 2}] Hz with the theoretical value {epsilon} = 0,014. The obtained accuracy represents a 3 times improvement over the previous measurement by the PTB group. Some improvements have been carried out on FO1. The new FO1 version works directly with optical molasses loaded by a laser slowed atomic beam. The application of the adiabatic passage method to perform the state selection allows us to determine the atom number dependent frequency shifts due to the cold collision and cavity pulling effects at a level of of 10{sup -16}. Recently, the obtained frequency stability is 2,8*10{sup -14}*{tau}{sup -1/2} for about 4*10{sup 6} detected atoms. The accuracy is currently under evaluation, the expected value is a few times 10{sup -16}. (author)

  10. The JPL near-real-time VLBI system and its application to clock synchronization and earth orientation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, P. S.; Eubanks, T. M.; Roth, M. G.; Steppe, J. A.; Esposito, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    The JPL near-real-time VLBI system called Block I is discussed. The hardware and software of the system are described, and the Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations (TEMPO) which utilize Block I are discussed. These observations are designed to provide interstation clock synchronization to 10 nsec and to determine earth orientation (UT1 and polar motion - UTPM) to 30 cm or better in each component. TEMPO results for clock synchronization and UTPM are presented with data from the July 1980-August 1981 analyzed using the most recent JPL solution software and source catalog. Future plans for TEMPO and Block I are discussed.

  11. A study of ultra-stable optical clocks, frequency sources and standards for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical or laser-based communication systems are expected to supplement microwave based systems for satellite-to-satellite and spacecraft-to-satellite communications early in the next millennium. Optical systems can carry far more traffic than microwave and address the need to increase communication bandwidths to meet the demands of commerce and the entertainment industry. There is already significant research and commercial interest in this area (now driven particularly by the multi-media and Internet services delivery sector) and there is a strong need to establish which are the best choices of optical sources to develop for space based optical communications. In addition to communication requirements there are strong arguments for developing ultra-stable optical frequency sources and detectors in space for at least two other purposes. At present the microwave radiation that is used for communications is also used for other purposes, for example navigation or tracking, and 'space science' experiments. With the switch from the microwave to the optical for communications it may well be convenient to switch to the optical for these and other functions. This study has examined the potential stable laser requirements for a range of space applications. An interim report was presented in the form of a conference paper summarising our initial findings (see Appendix 5). This final report gives our conclusions in more detail and recommends areas for further study

  12. Lego clocks : building a clock from parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Michael; Simons, Mirre J. P.; Merrow, Martha

    2008-01-01

    A new finding opens up speculation that the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks in Synechococcus elongatus is composed of multiple oscillator systems (Kitayama and colleagues, this issue, pp. 1513-1521), as has been described in many eukaryotic clock model systems. However, an alternative intepr

  13. Optical Clocks in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, S; Nevsky, A; Koelemeij, J C J; Wicht, A; Gill, P; Klein, H A; Margolis, H S; Mileti, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Peik, E; Tamm, C; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Klein, V; Salomon, C; Tino, G M; Lemonde, P; Holzwarth, R; Hänsch, T W; Tamm, Chr.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of optical clocks has strongly progressed in recent years, and accuracies and instabilities of 1 part in 10^18 are expected in the near future. The operation of optical clocks in space provides new scientific and technological opportunities. In particular, an earth-orbiting satellite containing an ensemble of optical clocks would allow a precision measurement of the gravitational redshift, navigation with improved precision, mapping of the earth's gravitational potential by relativistic geodesy, and comparisons between ground clocks.

  14. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  15. New trends in atomic and molecular physics advanced technological applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The field of Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMP) has reached significant advances in high–precision experimental measurement techniques. The area covers a wide spectrum ranging from conventional to new emerging multi-disciplinary areas like physics of highly charged ions (HCI), molecular physics, optical science, ultrafast laser technology etc. This book includes the important topics of atomic structure, physics of atomic collision, photoexcitation, photoionization processes, Laser cooling and trapping, Bose Einstein condensation and advanced technology applications of AMP in the fields of astronomy , astrophysics , fusion, biology and nanotechnology. This book is useful for researchers, professors, graduate, post graduate and PhD students dealing with atomic and molecular physics. The book has a wide scope with applications in neighbouring fields like plasma physics, astrophysics, cold collisions, nanotechnology and future fusion energy sources like ITER (international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) To...

  16. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition with Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates ranging from glass, polymers, aerogels, and metals to high aspect ratio geometries. This talk will focus on the utilization of ALD for engineering applications.

  17. Atomic Properties of Lu$^+$

    OpenAIRE

    Paez, Eduardo; Arnold, K. J.; Hajiyev, Elnur; Porsev, S. G.; Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M.S.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Singly ionised Lutetium has recently been suggested as a potential clock candidate. Here we report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of \\ce{Lu^+}. Measurements relevant to practical clock operation are made and compared to atomic structure calculations. Calculations of scalar and tensor polarizabilities for clock states over a range of wavelengths are also given. These results will be useful for future work with this clock candidate.

  18. Atomic properties of Lu+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Eduardo; Arnold, K. J.; Hajiyev, Elnur; Porsev, S. G.; Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    Singly ionized lutetium has recently been suggested as a potential clock candidate. Here we report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of Lu+. Measurements relevant to practical clock operation are made and compared to atomic structure calculations. Calculations of scalar and tensor polarizabilities for clock states over a range of wavelengths are also given. These results will be useful for future work with this clock candidate.

  19. Recent progress of neutral mercury lattice clock in SIOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R. C.; Fu, X. H.; Liu, K. K.; Gou, W.; Sun, J. F.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Neutral mercury atom is one of good candidates of optical lattice clock. Due to its large atomic number, mercury atom is insensitive to black body radiation, which is the severe limitation for the development of optical clocks. However, the challenge of neutral mercury lattice clock is the requirement of high power deep-UV lasers, especially for both the cooling laser and the lattice laser. Here, we report the recent progress of neutral mercury lattice clock in SIOM, including the development for laser cooling of mercury atom and the cooling laser system with fiber laser amplifier. We have realized the magneto-optical trap of mercury atoms and measured the parameters of cold mercury atoms. A home-made external cavity diode laser works as a seed laser for a room temperature 1014.8 nm fiber laser amplifier. A new efficient frequency-doubling cavity from 1015 nm to 507 nm has been developed.

  20. Application of atomic energy in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual report 1974 of the Association EURATOM-ITAL describes the results obtained in 1974 in the following sections: Radiation effects; Genetic studies; Soil-plants studies; Methodology; Practical applications, services, courses. The radiation effects studies are concerned with: primary radiation effects, mutation breeding, preservation of food by means of radiation, radiation genetics of insect pests. In the soil-plant studies, the following topics are dealt with: uptake of specific elements by plants, behavior of specific elements in the soil and water environment, heavy metals in plants and soils. The methodology part of the programme is concerned with: methodology related to dosimetric, other physical and instrumental studies; methodology related to studies on biological material; methodology related to soil-studies. Practical applications, services, courses include: mutation breeding of economically important crops, food preservation by irradiation, services to other institutions mainly in the Netherlands, courses, newsletters. The report also lists publications issued and not yet issued

  1. AtomPy: An Open Atomic Data Curation Environment for Astrophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Mendoza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a cloud-computing environment, referred to as AtomPy, based on Google-Drive Sheets and Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library DataFrames to promote community-driven curation of atomic data for astrophysical applications, a stage beyond database development. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet workbook, tabulating representative sets of energy levels, A-values and electron impact effective collision strengths from different sources. The relevant issues that AtomPy intends to address are: (i data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users; (ii comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessments; (iii downloading to local data structures (i.e., Pandas DataFrames for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets. Data processing workflows are implemented by means of IPython Notebooks, and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed within the GitHub social network. The facilities of AtomPy are illustrated with the critical assessment of the transition probabilities for ions in the hydrogen and helium isoelectronic sequences with atomic number Z ≤ 10.

  2. Cold-collision-shift cancellation and inelastic scattering in a Yb optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, p-wave cold collisions were shown to dominate the density-dependent shift of the clock transition frequency in a 171Yb optical lattice clock. Here we demonstrate that by operating such a system at the proper excitation fraction, the cold-collision shift is canceled below the 5x10-18 fractional frequency level. We report inelastic two-body loss rates for 3 P0 -3 P0 and 1 S0 -3 P0 scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2 171Yb system are relevant for high-performance optical clocks as well as strongly interacting systems for quantum information and quantum simulation applications.

  3. Application of atomic energy in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Association EURATOM-ITAL gives, in its annual report 1973, a detailed description of the work carried out during 1973, under the following headings: -radiation effects: primary radiation effects, mutation breeding, preservation of food by means of radiation, radiation genetics of insect pests; genetic studies: related studies on plant material; soil-plant studies: uptake of specific elements by plants, behaviour of specific elements in the soil and water environment, heavy metals in plants and soils; methodology: related to dosimetric, other physical and instrumental studies, related to studies on biological material, related to soil-studies; practical applications, services, courses: mutation breeding of economically important crops, food preservation by irradiation, services to other institutions, mainly in the Netherlands, courses, newsletters; publications in press, internal reports 1973, external reports 1973

  4. Advanced atomic cogenerator for industrial applications (ACACIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until now, nuclear power has been successful in the market of large-scale electricity generation. Other markets, like heat and power cogeneration or distributed electricity generation still await penetration by the uranium-based energy source. For these applications, the power level required per location is much smaller than for the existing nuclear plants however, traditionally, nuclear plants need economy of scale to become economically viable. Therefore, small nuclear plants must use other mechanisms to compete in a market. One way is modularization: multiple small, identical units are built on a site instead of one large unit. This has several advantages: capital cost per unit (and therefore financial risk) is low and therefore decisions to build further units are less fraught with risk and complication. Series production of the components brings cost reduction. Maintenance outages can be spread over the year and will not fully interrupt power production on the site. However, if the power demand on the site is small, only one small power plant will be needed. In that case, series production is still possible through application of identical units on many different sites but economic power production should not be fully dependent on this. Also, the first few plants should be attractive enough to apply in market circumstances, i.e. the first-of-a- kind capital costs and risks should be acceptable for a non-government-owned company in a deregulated market. To reach this goal, the plants must not only have as few components as possible but these components should carry a minimal technical risk. The small power level (compared to traditional nuclear plants) offers opportunities for this

  5. Magic Wavelength of an Optical Clock Transition of Barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar to most of the other alkaline earth elements, barium atoms can be candidates for optical clocks, thus the magic wavelength for an optical lattice is important for the clock transition. We calculate the magic wavelength of a possible clock transition between 6s21S0 and 6s5d3 D2 states of barium atoms. Our theoretical result shows that there are three magic wavelengths 615.9nm, 641.2nm and 678.8nm for a linearly polarized optical lattice laser for barium. (atomic and molecular physics)

  6. Superradiance on the milliHertz linewidth strontium clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Norcia, Matthew A; Cline, Julia R K; Thompson, James K

    2016-01-01

    Today's best atomic clocks are limited by frequency noise on the lasers used to interrogate the atoms. A proposed solution to this problem is to create a superradiant laser using an optical clock transition as its gain medium. This laser would act as an active atomic clock, and would be highly immune to the fluctuations in reference cavity length that limit today's best lasers. Here, we demonstrate and characterize superradiant emission from the mHz linewidth clock transition in an ensemble of laser-cooled $^{87}$Sr atoms trapped within a high-finesse optical cavity. We measure a collective enhancement of the emission rate into the cavity mode by a factor of more than 10,000 compared to independently radiating atoms. We also demonstrate a method for seeding superradiant emission and observe interference between two independent transitions lasing simultaneously. We use this interference to characterize the relative spectral properties of the two lasing sub-ensembles.

  7. Application of new method to single-electron atom problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New relativistic method of one-component wave functions applicable to description of fields with arbitrary spins is suggested. The method is used for the problem of energy states of hydrogen-like atoms depending on required accuracy and under different conditions: rough estimate, relativistic correction, fine structure, Zeeman effect in a magnetic field, hyperfine splitting with account of nucleus spin

  8. New trends in atomic and molecular physics. Advanced technological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Represents an up-to-date scientific status report on new trends in atomic and molecular physics. Multi-disciplinary approach. Also of interest to researchers in astrophysics and fusion plasma physics. Contains material important for nano- and laser technology. The field of Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMP) has reached significant advances in high-precision experimental measurement techniques. The area covers a wide spectrum ranging from conventional to new emerging multi-disciplinary areas like physics of highly charged ions (HCI), molecular physics, optical science, ultrafast laser technology etc. This book includes the important topics of atomic structure, physics of atomic collision, photoexcitation, photoionization processes, Laser cooling and trapping, Bose Einstein condensation and advanced technology applications of AMP in the fields of astronomy, astrophysics, fusion, biology and nanotechnology. This book is useful for researchers, professors, graduate, post graduate and PhD students dealing with atomic and molecular physics. The book has a wide scope with applications in neighbouring fields like plasma physics, astrophysics, cold collisions, nanotechnology and future fusion energy sources like ITER (international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Tokomak plasma machine which need accurate AMP data.

  9. Iterative quantum algorithm for distributed clock synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clock synchronization is a well-studied problem with many practical and scientific applications. We propose an arbitrary accuracy iterative quantum algorithm for distributed clock synchronization using only three qubits. The n bits of the time difference Δ between two spatially separated clocks can be deterministically extracted by communicating only O(n) messages and executing the quantum iteration process n times based on the classical feedback and measurement operations. Finally, we also give the algorithm using only two qubits and discuss the success probability of the algorithm

  10. Frequency Ratio of ${}^{199}$Hg and ${}^{87}$Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a ${}^{199}$Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a ${}^{87}$Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of $7.2 \\times 10^{-17}$ for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be $\

  11. Realization of a time-scale with an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Grebing, C; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Lipphardt, B; Riehle, F; Sterr, U; Lisdat, C

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks are not only powerful tools for prime fundamental research, but are also deemed for the re-definition of the SI base unit second as they surpass the performance of caesium atomic clocks in both accuracy and stability by more than an order of magnitude. However, an important obstacle in this transition has so far been the limited reliability of the optical clocks that made a continuous realization of a time-scale impractical. In this paper, we demonstrate how this dilemma can be resolved and that a time-scale based on an optical clock can be established that is superior to one based on even the best caesium fountain clocks. The paper also gives further proof of the international consistency of strontium lattice clocks on the $10^{-16}$ accuracy level, which is another prerequisite for a change in the definition of the second.

  12. Atomic and Molecular Data and Their Applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain papers based on invited talks at the First International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and Their Applications held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (INIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland in October, 1997. The invited presentations addressed four major areas of importance to atomic and molecular data activities: Global trends affecting scientific data, collisions and spectral radiation data, date assessment and database and data management activities and lastly, data needs of the main user communities such as the magnetic and inertial fusion research communities, semiconductor-related plasma processing, the atmospheric research community and the space astronomy community, etc. These proceedings are expected to be of interest to both producers and users of data and provide up-to-date surveys on atomic and molecular data. A wide range of data has been presented including X-ray transition energies, atomic transition probabilities, atomic collisions data, data for cosmology and X-ray astronomy, data for fusion plasma diagnostics, etc. There were 27 invited talks and consequently 27 articles in these Proceedings. Out of these, 9 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  13. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  14. Design of Alarm Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Budík, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to create alarm clock, which respect the functional, technical and aesthetic requirements of this device and attain an attractive design of this product. The final draft should be innovative, original and user attractive alarm clock.

  15. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  16. Application of atomic absorption in molecular analysis (spectrophotometry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus of atomic absorption has been considered by all the experts in chemical analysis as one of the most important equipments in actual utilization in such field. Among its several applications one should emphasize direct and indirect metals analyses using flame, graphite furnace, cold vapor generator,... Besides such known applications, the authors have developed at the R and D Center of CSN a patent pendent method for the utilization of such equipment for molecular analysis, in substitution of a sophisticated and specific apparatus. (Author)

  17. Stimulated Raman clock transition without a differential ac Stark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We considered a stimulated Raman clock transition between the ground hyperfine states of an alkali atom by using the second-order perturbation theory and the spherical tensor formalism. When the light fields are circularly polarized and properly detuned, the differential ac Stark shift of the clock transition vanishes with non-vanishing transition amplitude. With a two-zone Raman Ramsey method and a slow atomic beam, the proposed scheme should result in a clock with a systematic shift of the order of a few mHz for the case of cesium. (author)

  18. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  19. A Stable, Extreme Temperature, High Radiation, Compact. Low Power Clock Oscillator for Space, Geothermal, Down-Hole & other High Reliability Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Efficient and stable clock signal generation requirements at extreme temperatures and high radiation are not met with the current solutions. Chronos Technology...

  20. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  1. On-chip clock error characterization for clock distribution system

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Chuan; Galayko, Dimitri; Anceau, François

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a test strategy for characterization of clock error statistics between two clock domains in high-speed clocking systems (gigahertz and more). The method allows an indirect measurement (not based on time interval measurement) of clock error distribution by observing the integrity of a periodic sequence transmitted between two clocking domains. The method is compatible with fully on-chip implementation, and the readout of result to off-chip signals is cadenced at l...

  2. Entanglement of atomic beams: Tests of complementarity and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that distinct atomic beams can be entangled when they interact with quantum superpositions of macroscopically separated micromaser fields. Experimentally feasible tests of complementarity are proposed, detecting Ramsey interference (or not) in one and open-quote open-quote Welcher Weg close-quote close-quote information (or not) in the other entangled beam. Available information and fringe contrast can be manipulated using classical and quantum fields. The open-quote open-quote quantum eraser close-quote close-quote is realized in the former case, while it is only a special feature in the latter one. Other applications of entangled atoms are also suggested. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Gated Clock Implementation of Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU)

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Neelam R. Prakash; Akash

    2013-01-01

    Low power design has emerged as one of the challenging area in today’s ASIC (Application specific integrated circuit) design. With continuous decrease in transistor size, power density is increasing and there is an urgent need for reduction in total power consumption. Clock gating is one most effective technique for low power synchronous circuit design. Clock gating technique in low power design is used to reduce the dynamic power consumption. Clock signal in a synchronous circuit is used for...

  4. Some applications of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations to the cold-atom physics; Quelques applications des equations de Faddeev-Yakubovsky a la physique des atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, J. [Laboratoire physique subatomique et cosmologie, universite Jospeh-Fourier, CNRS/IN2P3, 53, avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble cedex (France); Deltuva, A. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Lazauskas, R. [IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS/universite Louis-Pasteur, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France)

    2011-01-15

    We present some recent applications of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations in describing atomic bound and scattering problems. We consider the scattering of a charged particle X by atomic hydrogen with special interest in X = p,e{sup {+-},} systems of cold bosonic molecules and the bound and scattering properties of N=3 and N=4 atomic {sup 4}He multimers. (authors)

  5. Subtleties of the clock retardation

    OpenAIRE

    Redzic, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    For a simple electromagnetic model of a clock introduced by Jefimenko (clock $\\#$ 1 in 1996 {\\it Am. J. Phys.} {\\bf 64} 812), a change of the rate of the clock when it is set in uniform motion is calculated exactly, employing the correct equation of motion of a charged particle in the electromagnetic field and the universal boostability assumption. Thus, for the clock under consideration, a dynamical content of the clock retardation is demonstrated. Somewhat surprisingly, the analysis present...

  6. Test of the gravitational redshift with stable clocks in eccentric orbits: application to Galileo satellites 5 and 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, P.; Hees, A.; Bertone, S.; Richard, E.; Wolf, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) is one of the foundations of the theory of General Relativity and several alternative theories of gravitation predict violations of the EEP. Experimental constraints on this fundamental principle of nature are therefore of paramount importance. The EEP can be split into three sub-principles: the universality of free fall (UFF), the local Lorentz invariance (LLI) and the local position invariance (LPI). In this paper we propose to use stable clocks in eccentric orbits to perform a test of the gravitational redshift, a consequence of the LPI. The best test to date was performed with the Gravity Probe A (GP-A) experiment in 1976 with an uncertainty of 1.4× {10}-4. Our proposal considers the opportunity of using Galileo satellites 5 and 6 to improve on the GP-A test uncertainty. We show that considering realistic noise and systematic effects, and thanks to a highly eccentric orbit, it is possible to improve on the GP-A limit to an uncertainty around (3-4)× {10}-5 after one year of integration of Galileo 5 and 6 data.

  7. Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimanis, M.P.; Breault, R.W. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)); Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. (AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This project investigated the properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different CWFs (coal water fuels) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques as well as consideration for bulk storage and distribution. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation.

  8. Using the neutrons that got away from atoms to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogge, R.; Katsaras, J.; Sur, B.; Gharghouri, M.A.; Donaberger, R.L.; Root, J.H. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A parasitic symbiotic use of small reactors is neutron scattering. Beam ports in the reactor vessel and shielding allow some neutrons to escape the reactor. For over more than six decades the neutron beam ports at the NRX and NRU reactors have been put to good use to study materials on all levels and by many science and engineering disciplines. Examples where neutron scattering was used to determine structure at atomic resolution, to study the microscopic response of materials to external fields and to examine industrial components for the nuclear industry will illustrate the breadth of applications for this use of small reactors.

  9. A Compact, High Performance Atomic Magnetometer for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Vishal K

    2013-01-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2x2x5 cm^3 and it is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT/sqrt(Hz), which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  10. Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, S; Donaldson, M H; Pines, A; Rochester, S M; Yashchuk, V V

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the detection of magnetic particles carried by water in a continuous flow using an atomic magnetic gradiometer. Studies on three types of magnetic particles are presented: a single cobalt particle (diameter ~150 um, multi-domain), a suspension of superparamagnetic magnetite particles (diameter \\~1 um), and ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles (diameter ~10 nm, 120 kA/m magnetization). Estimated detection limits are 20 um diameter for a single cobalt particle at a water flow rate 30 ml/min, 5x10^3 magnetite particles at 160 ml/min, and 50 pl for the specific ferromagnetic fluid at 130 ml/min. Possible applications of our method are discussed.

  11. Study on Atomization Characteristics for Power Generation Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world is dependent on two common basic needs which is electricity and water supply. Thus, power generation is the pulse of a country's econmony. However, most of today's power is generated from fossil fuel which is non sustainable. This research aims to study the feasibility of biodiesel to substitute diesel fuel for gas turbine application. The objective is to investigate the atomization characteristics using various blend of biodiesel derived from transesterification of palm oil. There are five types of fuels tested which are pure Diesel, B20, B50, B80 and B100 which were experimentally tested in a spray atomizer to evaluate the relationship of the of the fuel blend ratio with atomization characteristics such as spray cone angle, spray tip penetration and Sauter Mean Diameter. Besides that, fuel chemical properties testing were conducted to ensure the fuel chemical properties for tested fuel meet the standard requirements for gas turbine fuel oil. Result shows that the higher blend of biodiesel will give larger SMD, longer spray tip penetration, and a smaller spray cone angle. The SMD was calculated based on a general equation. Meanwhile, spray angle and spray tip was obtained from photos captured and anlayzed using software.

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy Application in Biological Research: A Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surena Vahabi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a three-dimensional topographic technique with a high atomic resolution to measure surface roughness. AFM is a kind of scanning probe microscope, and its near-field technique is based on the interaction between a sharp tip and the atoms of the sample surface. There are several methods and many ways to modify the tip of the AFM to investigate surface properties, including measuring friction, adhesion forces and viscoelastic properties as well as determining the Young modulus and imaging magnetic or electrostatic properties. The AFM technique can analyze any kind of samples such as polymers, adsorbed molecules, films or fibers, and powders in the air whether in a controlled atmosphere or in a liquid medium. In the past decade, the AFM has emerged as a powerful tool to obtain the nanostructural details and biomechanical properties of biological samples, including biomolecules and cells. The AFM applications, techniques, and -in particular- its ability to measure forces, are not still familiar to most clinicians. This paper reviews the literature on the main principles of the AFM modality and highlights the advantages of this technique in biology, medicine, and- especially- dentistry. This literature review was performed through E-resources, including Science Direct, PubMed, Blackwell Synergy, Embase, Elsevier, and Scholar Google for the references published between 1985 and 2010.

  13. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science

    CERN Document Server

    Lisdat, C; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J -L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Coq, Y Le; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Leveraging the unrivaled performance of optical clocks in applications in fundamental physics beyond the standard model, in geo-sciences, and in astronomy requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks truthfully. Meeting this requirement, we report on the first comparison and agreement of fully independent optical clocks separated by 700 km being only limited by the uncertainties of the clocks themselves. This is achieved by a phase-coherent optical frequency transfer via a 1415 km long telecom fiber link that enables substantially better precision than classical means of frequency transfer. The fractional precision in comparing the optical clocks of three parts in $10^{17}$ was reached after only 1000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than with any other existing frequency transfer method. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optic...

  14. Toward A Neutral Mercury Optical Lattice Clock: Determination of the Magic Wavelength for the Ultraviolet clock Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lattice clock combines the advantages of ion and neutral atom based clocks, namely the recoil and first order Doppler free spectroscopy allowed by the Lamb-Dicke regime. This lattice light field shifts the energy levels of the clock transition. However a wavelength can be found where the light-shift of the clock states cancelled to first order. In this thesis, we present the latest advances in optical lattice clock with mercury atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the current performances of different optical clock are currently under development, we focus on the concept of optical lattice clock and the features of the mercury that make him an excellent candidate for the realization of an optical lattice clock achievement the uncertainty of the level of 10-17. The second part is devoted to the characterization of the mercury MOT, using a sensitive detection system, which allowed us to evaluate the temperature of different isotopes present in the MOT and have a good evidence of sub-Doppler cooling for the fermionic isotopes. The third part of this these, present the experimental aspects of the implementation and the development of the laser source required for trapping mercury atoms operating near the predicted magic wavelength. Finally, we report on the Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of the 1S0 →3 P0 clock transition in the 199Hg atoms confined in lattice trap. With use of the ultra-stable laser system, linked to LNE-SYRTE primary frequency reference, we have determined the center frequency of the transition for a range of lattice wavelengths and different lattice depths. Analyzing these measurement, we have carried out the first experimental determination of the magic wavelength, which is the crucial step towards achieving a highly accurate frequency standard using mercury. (author)

  15. A self-interfering clock as a "which path" witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-11

    In Einstein's general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global-all clocks "tick" uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets "tick" at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields "which path" information, degrading the pattern's visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield "which path" information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world. PMID:26249229

  16. Light scattering from dense cold atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Bihui; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study the propagation of light through a cold atomic medium, where the effects of motion, laser intensity, atomic density, and polarization can all modify the properties of the scattered light. We present two different microscopic models: the "coherent dipole model" and the "random walk model", both suitable for modeling recent experimental work done in large atomic arrays in the low light intensity regime. We use them to compute relevant observables such as the linewidth, peak intensity and line center of the emitted light. We further develop generalized models that explicitly take into account atomic motion. Those are relevant for hotter atoms and beyond the low intensity regime. We show that atomic motion can lead to drastic dephasing and to a reduction of collective effects, together with a distortion of the lineshape. Our results are applicable to model a full gamut of quantum systems that rely on atom-light interactions including atomic clocks, quantum simulators and nanophotonic system...

  17. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  18. A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, D.; Rohringer, W.; Fischer, D.; Wilzbach, M.; Raub, T.; Loziczky, S.; Liu, XiYuan; Groth, S.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2010-09-01

    We describe a robust and reliable fluorescence detector for single atoms that is fully integrated on an atom chip. The detector allows spectrally and spatially selective detection of atoms, reaching a single-atom detection efficiency of 66%. It consists of a tapered lensed single-mode fiber for precise delivery of excitation light and a multi-mode fiber to collect the fluorescence. The fibers are mounted in lithographically defined holding structures on the atom chip. Neutral 87Rb atoms propagating freely in a magnetic guide are detected and the noise of their fluorescence emission is analyzed. The variance of the photon distribution allows us to determine the number of detected photons per atom and from there the atom detection efficiency. The second-order intensity correlation function of the fluorescence shows near-perfect photon anti-bunching and signs of damped Rabi oscillations. With simple improvements, one can increase the detection efficiency to 95%.

  19. Near relativistic study of bound levels in atoms. Application to alkaline atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varade, A.; Delgado-Barrio, G.; Villarreal, P. (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia)

    1985-01-01

    A model is described for the calculation of the atomic binding energies. The Pauli equation has been solved with a local potential. The results for alkaline atoms are reported here and compared with the perturbative calculation and experimental data.

  20. On clocks and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Witte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cumulus clouds exhibit a life cycle that consists of: (a the growth phase (increasing size, most notably in the vertical direction; (b the mature phase (growth ceases; any precipitation that develops is strongest during this period; and (c the dissipation phase (cloud dissipates because of precipitation and/or entrainment; no more dynamical support. Although radar can track clouds over time and give some sense of the age of a cloud, most aircraft in situ measurements lack temporal context. We use large eddy simulations of trade wind cumulus cloud fields from cases during the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX and Rain In Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO campaigns to demonstrate a potential cumulus cloud "clock". We find that the volume-averaged total water mixing ratio rt is a useful cloud clock for the 12 clouds studied. A cloud's initial rt is set by the subcloud mixed-layer mean rt and decreases monotonically from the initial value due primarily to entrainment. The clock is insensitive to aerosol loading, environmental sounding and extrinsic cloud properties such as lifetime and volume. In some cases (more commonly for larger clouds, multiple pulses of buoyancy occur, which complicate the cumulus clock by replenishing rt. The clock is most effectively used to classify clouds by life phase.

  1. Topics in atomic hydrogen standard research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Hydrogen maser based frequency and time standards have been in continuous use at NASA tracking stations since February 1970, while laboratory work at Goddard has continued in the further development and improvement of hydrogen masers. Concurrently, experimental work has been in progress with a new frequency standard based upon the hydrogen atom using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. Much of the hydrogen maser technology is directly applicable to the new hydrogen beam standard, and calculations based upon realistic data indicate that the accuracy potential of the hydrogen atomic beam exceeds that of either the cesium beam tube or the hydrogen maser, possibly by several orders of magnitude. In addition, with successful development, the hydrogen beam standard will have several other performance advantages over other devices, particularly exceptional stability and long continuous operating life. Experimental work with a new laboratory hydrogen beam device has recently resulted in the first resonance transition curves, measurements of relative state populations, beam intensities, etc. The most important aspects of both the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen beam work are covered.

  2. A mercury optical lattice clock at LNE-SYRTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarlo, L.; Favier, M.; Tyumenev, R.; Bize, S.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the development of an optical lattice clock based on mercury and the results obtained since the 7 th SFSM. We briefly present a new solution for the cooling laser system and an improved lattice trap that allows us to interrogate a few thousand atoms in parallel. This translates into a fractional short term stability of 1.2 x 10-15 at the clock frequency of 1.129 PHz.

  3. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of "clocks"

    CERN Document Server

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of "clocks", which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. "Clock" interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  4. Stable, Extreme Temperature, High Radiation, Compact. Low Power Clock Oscillator for Space, Geothermal, Down-Hole & other High Reliability Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Efficient and stable clock signal generation requirements at extreme temperatures (-180C to +450C)and radiation (>250 Krad TID) are not met with the current...

  5. Nanodot deposition and its application with atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zenglei, E-mail: liuzenglei@sia.cn; Jiao Niandong, E-mail: ndjiao@sia.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation (China); Xu Ke [Shenyang Jianzhu University (China); Wang, Zhidong [Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan); Dong Zaili; Liu Lianqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation (China)

    2013-06-15

    Nanodot deposition using atomic force microscope (AFM) is investigated. To realize repeatable and precise deposition of nanodots, the detailed control method is discussed. The electric field between AFM tip and substrate is analyzed, and a convenient method to control tip-substrate separation is proposed. In experiments, two nanodot matrixes are fabricated and the heights of the nanodots are analyzed. Experimental results testify that the control method can lead to repeatable and precise fabrication of deposited nanodots. As an application of deposited nanodots, a carbon nanotube (CNT) is soldered on gold electrodes with deposited Au nanodots. After soldering, the contact resistances between the CNT and the electrodes decrease greatly. AFM-based nanodot deposition can be used to fabricate special nanopatterns; also it can be used to solder nanomaterials on substrates to improve the electrical connection, which has a promising future for nanodevice fabrication.

  6. Study of laser-pumped double-resonance clock signals using a microfabricated cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our microwave spectroscopic studies on laser-microwave double-resonance (DR) signals obtained from a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell. This study focuses on the characteristics and systematic shifts of the ground-state 'clock transition' in 87Rb (| Fg = 1,mF = 0) → | Fg = 2, mF = 0)) used in Rb atomic clocks, and represents a first step toward a miniature atomic clock based on the DR scheme. A short-term clock instability below 2 × 1011τ-1/2 is demonstrated, staying below 10-11 up to τ = 104 s.

  7. Collisional Losses, Decoherence, and Frequency Shifts in Optical Lattice Clocks with Bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have quantified collisional losses, decoherence and the collision shift in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock on the highly forbidden transition 1S0-3P0 at 698 nm with bosonic 88Sr. We were able to distinguish two loss channels: inelastic collisions between atoms in the upper and lower clock state and atoms in the upper clock state only. Based on the measured coefficients, we determine the operation parameters at which a 1D-lattice clock with 88Sr shows no degradation due to collisions on the fractional uncertainty level of 10-16.

  8. The circadian clock goes genomic

    OpenAIRE

    Staiger, D; Shin, J; Johansson, M; Davis, S

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale biology among plant species, as well as comparative genomics of circadian clock architecture and clock-regulated output processes, have greatly advanced our understanding of the endogenous timing system in plants.

  9. The Space Optical Clocks Project: Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and advanced subsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, S; Nevsky, A; Alighanbari, S; Vasilyev, S; Abou-Jaoudeh, C; Mura, G; Franzen, T; Sterr, U; Falke, S; Lisdat, Ch; Rasel, E; Kulosa, A; Bize, S; Lodewyck, J; Tino, G M; Poli, N; Schioppo, M; Bongs, K; Singh, Y; Gill, P; Barwood, G; Ovchinnikov, Y; Stuhler, J; Kaenders, W; Braxmaier, C; Holzwarth, R; Donati, A; Lecomte, S; Calonico, D; Levi, F

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultra-precise optical clocks in space ("master clocks") will allow for a range of new applications in the fields of fundamental physics (tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, time and frequency metrology by means of the comparison of distant terrestrial clocks), geophysics (mapping of the gravitational potential of Earth), and astronomy (providing local oscillators for radio ranging and interferometry in space). Within the ELIPS-3 program of ESA, the "Space Optical Clocks" (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the ISS towards the end of this decade, as a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Undertaking a necessary step towards optical clocks in space, the EU-FP7-SPACE-2...

  10. An Integrated Architectural Clock Implemented Memory Design Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Khatwal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently Low power consumption and Custom Memory design is major issue for embedded designer. Micro wind and Xilinx simulator implements SRAM design architecture and performs efficient simulation. These simulators implements high performances and low power consumption of SRAM design. SRAM efficiency analyzed with 6-T architecture design and row/column based architectural design. We have analyzed clock implemented memory design and simulated with specific application. We have implemented clock based SRAM architecture that improves the internal clock efficiency of SRAM. Architectural Clock implemented memory design reduces the propagation delay and access time. Internal semiconductor material design implemented technique also improves the SRAM data transitions scheme. Semiconductor material and clock implemented design improve simulation performance of SRAM and these design implements for recently developed Application Specific Memory Design Architecture and mobile devices.

  11. Development of windows based application for the calculation of atomic hyperfine spectrum of odd isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windows based application has been developed for the calculation of atomic hyperfine spectrum of odd isotopes keeping in view of the needs of the atomic spectroscopists. The application can also calculate the hyperfine spectrum of another odd isotope if hyperfine structure constants of one isotope are known. Various features of the developed application are discussed. (author)

  12. The eCDR-PLL, a radiation-tolerant ASIC for clock and data recovery and deterministic phase clock synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation-tolerant CDR/PLL ASIC has been developed for the upcoming LHC upgrades, featuring clock Frequency Multiplication (FM) and Clock and Data Recovery (CDR), showing deterministic phase and low jitter. Two FM modes have been implemented: either generating 40, 60, 120 and 240 MHz clock outputs for GBT-FPGA applications or providing 40, 80, 160 and 320 MHz clocks for TTC and e-link applications. The CDR operates with 40, 80, 160 or 320 Mbit/s data rates while always generating clocks at 40, 80, 160 and 320 MHz, regardless of the data rate. All the outputs are phase programmable with a resolution of 195 ps or 260 ps, depending on the selected mode. The ASIC has been designed using radiation-tolerant techniques in a 130 nm CMOS technology and operates at a 1.2 V supply voltage

  13. Clock Synchronization for Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Robles, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, more so generally than in other types of distributed systems, clock synchronization is crucial since by having this service available, several applications such as media access protocols, object tracking, or data fusion, would improve their performance. In this dissertation, we propose a set of algorithms to achieve…

  14. A Novel Method of Clock Synchronization in Distributed System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Niu, M. J.; Cai, Y. S.; Chen, X.; Ren, Y. Q.

    2016-03-01

    Time synchronization plays an important role in application of aircraft flying formation and constellation autonomous navigation, etc. In application of clock synchronization in the network system, it is not always true that each observed node may be interconnected, therefore, it is difficult to achieve time synchronization of network system with high precision in the condition that a certain node can only obtain the measurement information of clock from one of its corresponding neighbors, and cannot obtain from other nodes. According to this special problem, a novel method of high precision time synchronization of network system has been proposed. In this paper, we regard each clock as a node in the network system, and based on different distributed topology definition, the following three control algorithms of time synchronization under three circumstances have been designed: without a master clock (reference clock), with a master clock (reference clock), and with a fixed communication delay in the network system. The validity of the designed clock synchronization protocol has been proved both theoretically and through numerical simulation.

  15. Atom interferometry with lithium atoms: theoretical analysis and design of an interferometer, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to studies which prepared the construction of an atom Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In such an interferometer, the propagating waves are spatially separated, and the internal state of the atom is not modified. The beam-splitters are diffraction gratings, consisting of standing optical waves near-resonant with an atomic transition. We use the Bloch functions to define the atom wave inside the standing wave grating and thus explain the diffraction process in different cases. We developed a nearly all-analytical model for the propagation of an atom wave inside a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The contrast of the signal is studied for many cases: phase or amplitude gratings, effects of extra paths, effects of the main mismatches, monochromatic or lightly polychromatic sources. Finally, we discuss three interferometric measurements we think very interesting. The first, the index of refraction of gas for atomic waves, is studied in detail, with numerical simulations. The other measures we propose deal with the electrical properties of lithium. We discuss the ultimate limit for the measure of the static electric polarizability of lithium by atomic interferometry. Then, we discuss how one could measure the possible charge of the lithium atom. We conclude that an optically cooled and collimated atom beam would improve precision. (author)

  16. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs

  17. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  18. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-09-27

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs.

  19. Atom probe microanalysis: Principles and applications to materials problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical background and general introduction to field emission and field-ionization, field-ion microscopy, and the atom probe is given. Physical principles of field ion microscopy are explained, followed by interpretation of images. Types of atom probes are discussed, as well as the instrumentation used in atomic probe microanalysis. Methods of atom probe analysis and data representation are covered, along with factors affecting performance and statistical analysis of atom probe data. Finally, some case studies and special types of analyses are presented

  20. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-06-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  1. Atomic processes and application in honour of David R. Bates' 60th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, P G

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Processes and Applications is a collection of review articles that discusses major atomic and molecular processes and their applications to upper atmospheric physics and to astrophysics. The book also serves as a 60th birthday tribute to Dr. David R. Bates. The coverage of the text includes the overview of stratospheric aeronomy; upper atmosphere of the earth; and problems in atmospheric pollution. The book also deals with technical and highly specialized issues including photoionization of atomic systems; atomic structure and oscillator strengths; and atomic scattering computations. Th

  2. Application of cold beam of atoms and molecules for studying luminescence of oxygen atoms stimulated by metastable helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a method for creating a high flux beam of cold atoms and molecules. By using this beam method, spectroscopic studies of the afterglow of oxygen-helium gas mixtures at cryogenic temperatures were performed. The cooling by helium vapor of a helium jet containing trace amounts of oxygen after passing through a radiofrequency discharge zone led to the observation of strong emissions from atomic oxygen. The effect results from the increased efficiency of energy transfer from metastable helium atoms and molecules to the atomic oxygen in the cold dense helium vapor. The effect might find application for the detection of small quantities of impurities in helium gas as well as possible laser action

  3. Progress Towards a Compact Optical Clock at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Scott; Rellergert, Wade; Grudinin, Ivan; Baumgartel, Lukas; Yu, Nan

    2014-05-01

    The unprecedented stability and accuracy provided by optical clocks allows improved navigation and planetary science in space applications as well as more precise tests of fundamental laws of physics. However, technological advances towards the miniaturization of the physical volume and reduced power consumption of these clocks must be made to suit space-based application. We will describe JPL's effort towards the development of a compact, low-power optical clock based on 171Yb+. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Partial support from NASA Fundamental Physics Program is acknowledged.

  4. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: application to Rayleigh scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Safari, L; Amaro, P; Jänkälä, K; Fratini, F

    2014-01-01

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wavefunctions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  5. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: Application to Rayleigh scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, L., E-mail: laleh.safari@ist.ac.at [IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria), Am Campus 1, 3400 Klosterneuburg (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Santos, J. P. [Laboratório de Instrumentação, Engenharia Biomédica e Física da Radiação (LIBPhys-UNL), Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Amaro, P. [Laboratório de Instrumentação, Engenharia Biomédica e Física da Radiação (LIBPhys-UNL), Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jänkälä, K. [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Fratini, F. [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria); Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wave functions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  6. Science 101: How Do Atomic Clocks Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 2008

    2008-01-01

    You might be wondering why in the world we need such precise measures of time. Well, many systems we use everyday, such as Global Positioning Systems, require precise synchronization of time. This comes into play in telecommunications and wireless communications, also. For purely scientific reasons, we can use precise measurement of time to…

  7. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Prof.S. Chu presents "the manipulation of atoms and bio-molecules by laser light" : a brief history of the laser cooling and trapping of atoms developed over the past 15 years will be presented. The cooling and trapping technology is already being applied in numerous areas of science and engineering. Applications to be discussed include atomic clocks, atom interferometers, as well as studies in polymer dynamics and protein motion.

  8. Application of an open information on atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of atomic energy, 'Gray literature' problem is not significant. Because literatures are translated as soon as possible into English and delivered to related organizations of the world. A field of atomic energy is a specific field about open literature. It is important to continue to open information both at home and abroad. (author)

  9. Conveyor belt clock synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannetti, V; Maccone, L; Shapiro, J H; Wong, F N C; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2004-01-01

    A protocol for synchronizing distant clocks is proposed that does not rely on the arrival times of the signals which are exchanged, and an optical implementation based on coherent-state pulses is described. This protocol is not limited by any dispersion that may be present in the propagation medium through which the light signals are exchanged. Possible improvements deriving from the use of quantum-mechanical effects are also addressed.

  10. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Mitroy, J; Clark, Charles W

    2010-01-01

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initi...

  11. Defining statistical relative complexity measure: Application to diversity in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistical relative complexity measure, based on the Kullback-Leibler distance measure defining the relative information and the Carbo quantum similarity index defining the relative disequilibrium is proposed. It is shown that with the specific choice of prior density corresponding to the atom at the beginning of the subshell, this measure reveals the diversity of atoms as the subshells are filled across the periodic table. Numerical tests are reported using the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Dirac-Fock density for all atoms in the periodic table. -- Highlights: → A statistical relative complexity measure is introduced. → Numerator as Kullback-Leibler relative information. → Denominator as Carbo quantum similarity as relative disequilibrium is proposed. → Prior density set as atom at the beginning of the subshell in the periodic table. → The diversity of atoms as the subshells are filled is revealed.

  12. Synchronization of clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we recall the famous Huygens’ experiment which gave the first evidence of the synchronization phenomenon. We consider the synchronization of two clocks which are accurate (show the same time) but have pendula with different masses. It has been shown that such clocks hanging on the same beam can show the almost complete (in-phase) and almost antiphase synchronizations. By almost complete and almost antiphase synchronization we defined the periodic motion of the pendula in which the phase shift between the displacements of the pendula is respectively close (but not equal) to 0 or π. We give evidence that almost antiphase synchronization was the phenomenon observed by Huygens in XVII century. We support our numerical studies by considering the energy balance in the system and showing how the energy is transferred between the pendula via oscillating beam allowing the pendula’s synchronization. Additionally we discuss the synchronization of a number of different pendulum clocks hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. It has been shown that after a transient, different types of synchronization between pendula can be observed; (i) the complete synchronization in which all pendula behave identically, (ii) pendula create three or five clusters of synchronized pendula. We derive the equations for the estimation of the phase differences between phase synchronized clusters. The evidence, why other configurations with a different number of clusters are not observed, is given.

  13. Analysis of inhomogeneous-excitation frequency shifts of ytterbium optical lattice clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the frequency shifts caused by inhomogeneous excitation in a 171Yb optical lattice clock. The dependences of the inhomogeneity on the temperature of the cold ytterbium atoms and the misaligning angle between the lattice laser and the clock laser are analyzed by numerical calculations. The dependence of the fractional collisional frequency shift on the ground state fraction under different cold atom temperatures, atom numbers, lattice trap depths and unequal transverse and longitudinal temperatures are also shown. The results show that the uncertainty of the ytterbium clocks, contributed by the inhomogeneous excitation, can be reduced to be 10−19 or even lower with certain conditions. (letter)

  14. Frequency ratios of optical lattice clocks at the 17th decimal place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-05-01

    Optical lattice clocks benefit from a low quantum-projection noise by simultaneously interrogating a large number of atoms, which are trapped in an optical lattice tuned to the ``magic wavelength'' to largely cancel out light shift perturbation in the clock transition. About a thousand atoms enable the clocks to achieve 10-18 instability in a few hours of operation, allowing intensive investigation and control of systematic uncertainties. As optical lattice clocks have reached inaccuracies approaching 10-18, it is now the uncertainty of the SI second (~ 10-16) itself that restricts the measurement of the absolute frequencies of such optical clocks. Direct comparisons of optical clocks are, therefore, the only way to investigate and utilize their superb performance beyond the SI second. In this presentation, we report on frequency comparisons of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium (87 Sr), ytterbium (171 Yb) and mercury (199 Hg) atoms. By referencing cryogenic Sr clocks, we determine frequency ratios, νYb/νSr and νHg/νSr, of a cryogenic Yb clock and a Hg clock with uncertainty at the mid 10-17 level. Such ratios provide an access to search for temporal variation of the fundamental constants. We also present remote comparisons between cryogenic Sr clocks located at RIKEN and the University of Tokyo over a 30-km-long phase-stabilized fiber link. The gravitational red shift Δν /ν0 ~ 1.1× 10-18 Δh cm-1 reads out the height difference of Δh ~ 15 m between the two clocks with uncertainty of 5 cm, which demonstrates a step towards relativistic geodesy. ERATO, JST.

  15. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  16. Low-power, miniature 171Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped 171Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm3 ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes + clock reaches the 10−14 range after a few days of integration.

  17. Atom trapping: application to electron collision studies of metastable helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We report on the first measurements of electron scattering from metastable helium atoms (He) confined in a magneto-optic trap (MOT). Using conventional crossed beam techniques, measurement of electron scattering cross sections for He is experimentally very difficult, due the intrinsically low atomic densities produced by nozzle discharge sources, and the need to locate the interaction region well away from stray electric and magnetic fields. Electron interactions with excited state atoms are fundamentally important to many naturally processes in atmospheric and astrophysical chemistry, gas lasers and plasma processing. Until these experiments, no data for He existed in the intermediate (10-100 eV) range to verify theoretical predictions. Our MOT contains up to 108 atoms at temperatures of ∼1mK that act as a high (∼109 cm-3) density target for a pulsed electron beam. We employ optical molasses to reduce the atomic velocity, and hence the trap decay time when released from the optical and magnetic fields. The total cross section is determined using phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the fractional loss rate of the trapped atoms with the electron gun on, and the electron current density is measured using scanning wire techniques to yield the absolute total cross section

  18. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  19. Applications of atom interferometry - from ground to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Atom interferometry is utilized for the measurement of rotations [1], accelerations [2] and for tests of fundamental physics [3]. In these devices, three laser light pulses separated by a free evolution time coherently manipulate the matter waves which resembles the Mach-Zehnder geometry in optics. Atom gravimeters demonstrated an accuracy of few microgal [2,4], and atom gradiometers showed a noise floor of 30 E Hz^{-1/2} [5]. Further enhancements of atom interferometers are anticipated by the integration of novel source concepts providing ultracold atoms, extending the free fall time of the atoms, and enhanced techniques for coherent manipulation. Sources providing Bose-Einstein condensates recently demontrated a flux compatible with precision experiments [6]. All of these aspects are studied in the transportable quantum gravimeter QG-1 and the very long baseline atom interferometry teststand in Hannover [7] with the goal of surpassing the microgal regime. Going beyond ground based setups, the QUANTUS collaboration exploits the unique features of a microgravity environment in drop tower experiments [8] and in a sounding rocket mission. The payloads are compact and robust atom optics experiments based on atom chips [6], enabling technology for transportable sensors on ground as a byproduct. More prominently, they are pathfinders for proposed satellite missions as tests of the universality of free fall [9] and gradiometry based on atom interferometers [10]. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm) and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the SFB 1128 geo-Q. [1] PRL 114 063002 2015 [2] Nature 400 849 1999 [3] PRL 112 203002 2014 [4] NJP 13 065026 2011 [5] PRA 65 033608 2002 [6] NJP 17 065001 2015 [7] NJP 17 035011 2015 [8] PRL 110 093602 2013 [9

  20. A Light Clock Satisfying the Clock Hypothesis of Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The design of the FMEL, a floor-mirrored Einstein-Langevin "light clock", is introduced. The clock provides a physically intuitive manner to calculate and visualize the time dilation effects for a spatially extended set of observers (an accelerated "frame") undergoing unidirectional acceleration or observers on a rotating cylinder of constant…

  1. Frequency noise processes in a strontium ion optical clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent comparison of the frequencies of a pair of optical clocks based on the 674 nm 2S1/2–2D5/2 optical clock transition in 88Sr+ has highlighted the need to understand factors affecting frequency instability. We have developed statistical models to show that our clock is capable of reaching the quantum projection noise limit; for our clock using 100 ms probe pulses, this is ∼3 × 10−15/√τ. However, this optical clock uses atomic transitions with a linear Zeeman shift, which can lead to a degradation in stability in the presence of magnetic field noise. We show that this generally leads to an increase in white frequency noise, even in cases dominated by magnetic field flicker or random walk noise. By taking into account both the quantum projection and magnetic field noise we are able to explain our observed frequency instabilities. This analysis will relate to any optical clock with a linear Zeeman shift where cancellation of this shift is achieved by interrogating pairs of components. Furthermore, implementing automatic control of lasers and minimization of micromotion requires pausing of the frequency servo occasionally; this leads to only a small degradation of frequency stability. (paper)

  2. Ab initio atom-atom potentials using CamCASP: Application to pyridine

    CERN Document Server

    Misquitta, Alston J

    2015-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation we described a methodology for the development of robust, analytic, many-body atom-atom potentials for small organic molecules from first principles. Here we demonstrate how these theoretical ideas, which are implemented in the CamCASP suite of programs, can be used to develop a series of many-body potentials for the pyridine system. Even the simplest of these potentials exhibit r.m.s. errors of only about 0.5kJ mol$^{-1}$, significantly surpassing the best empirical potentials. Further, the functional form can be made systematically more elaborate so as to improve the accuracy without a significant increase in the human-time spent in their generation. We investigate the effects of anisotropy, rank of multipoles, and choice of polarizability and dispersion models.

  3. Novel Applications of Buffer-Gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    2016-01-01

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In thi...

  4. Automatic minimisation of micromotion in a 88Sr+ optical clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical clocks based on narrow linewidth transitions in single cold ions confined in RF traps are being developed at a number of laboratories worldwide. For these ion clock systems, excess micromotion can cause both Stark and Doppler frequency shifts and also a degradation of frequency stability as a result of a reduced excitation rate to the clock transition. At NPL, we detect micromotion in our 88Sr+ optical clocks by observing the correlation between photon arrival times and the zero crossing of the RF trap drive signal. Recently, two nominally identical 88Sr+ optical clocks have been operated over several days and their frequencies compared against one another. During this time the dc voltages on the endcap and compensation voltage electrodes required to minimise the micromotion can change significantly, particularly following the loading of an ion. This paper describes an automatic method to monitor and minimise micromotion applicable to single ion clocks and which we demonstrate using our two NPL 88Sr+ ion clocks. (paper)

  5. Automatic minimisation of micromotion in a 88Sr+ optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.

    2015-07-01

    Optical clocks based on narrow linewidth transitions in single cold ions confined in RF traps are being developed at a number of laboratories worldwide. For these ion clock systems, excess micromotion can cause both Stark and Doppler frequency shifts and also a degradation of frequency stability as a result of a reduced excitation rate to the clock transition. At NPL, we detect micromotion in our 88Sr+ optical clocks by observing the correlation between photon arrival times and the zero crossing of the RF trap drive signal. Recently, two nominally identical 88Sr+ optical clocks have been operated over several days and their frequencies compared against one another. During this time the dc voltages on the endcap and compensation voltage electrodes required to minimise the micromotion can change significantly, particularly following the loading of an ion. This paper describes an automatic method to monitor and minimise micromotion applicable to single ion clocks and which we demonstrate using our two NPL 88Sr+ ion clocks.

  6. Atomic norm denoising with applications to line spectral estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhaskar, Badri Narayan; Recht, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The sub-Nyquist estimation of line spectra is a classical problem in signal processing, but currently popular subspace-based techniques have few guarantees in the presence of noise and rely on a priori knowledge about system model order. Motivated by recent work on atomic norms in inverse problems, we propose a new approach to line spectral estimation that provides theoretical guarantees for the mean-squared-error performance in the presence of noise and without advance knowledge of the model order. We propose an abstract theory of denoising with atomic norms and specialize this theory to provide a convex optimization problem for estimating the frequencies and phases of a mixture of complex exponentials with guaranteed bounds on the mean-squared error. We show that the associated convex optimization problem, called "Atomic norm Soft Thresholding" (AST), can be solved in polynomial time via semidefinite programming. For very large scale problems we provide an alternative, efficient algorithm, called "Discretiz...

  7. An Integrated Architectural Clock Implemented Memory Design Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Khatwal; Manoj Kumar Jain

    2015-01-01

    Recently Low power consumption and Custom Memory design is major issue for embedded designer. Micro wind and Xilinx simulator implements SRAM design architecture and performs efficient simulation. These simulators implements high performances and low power consumption of SRAM design. SRAM efficiency analyzed with 6-T architecture design and row/column based architectural design. We have analyzed clock implemented memory design and simulated with specific application. We have implemented clock...

  8. Improving prediction accuracy of GPS satellite clocks with periodic variation behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broadcast ephemeris and IGS ultra-rapid predicted (IGU-P) products are primarily available for use in real-time GPS applications. The IGU orbit precision has been remarkably improved since late 2007, but its clock products have not shown acceptably high-quality prediction performance. One reason for this fact is that satellite atomic clocks in space can be easily influenced by various factors such as temperature and environment and this leads to complicated aspects like periodic variations, which are not sufficiently described by conventional models. A more reliable prediction model is thus proposed in this paper in order to be utilized particularly in describing the periodic variation behaviour satisfactorily. The proposed prediction model for satellite clocks adds cyclic terms to overcome the periodic effects and adopts delay coordinate embedding, which offers the possibility of accessing linear or nonlinear coupling characteristics like satellite behaviour. The simulation results have shown that the proposed prediction model outperforms the IGU-P solutions at least on a daily basis. (rapid communication)

  9. Clock Synchronisation in the Vicinity of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Goy, Francois

    1997-01-01

    The transmission time of an electromagnetic signal in the vicinity of the earth is calculated to c-2 and contains an orbital Sagnac term. On earth, the synchronisation of the Barycentric Coordinate Time (TCB) can be realised by atomic clocks, but not the one of Geocentric Coordinate Time (TCG). The principle of equivalence is discussed.

  10. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  11. Polarizabilities of the beryllium clock transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarizabilities of the three lowest states of the beryllium atom are determined from a large basis configuration interaction calculation. The polarizabilities of the 2s21Se ground state (37.73a03) and the 2s2p 3P0o metastable state (39.04a03) are found to be very similar in size and magnitude. This leads to an anomalously small blackbody radiation shift at 300 K of -0.018(4) Hz for the 2s21Se-2s2p 3P0o clock transition. Magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of the ground and metastable states are also computed.

  12. Strontium Optical Lattice Clock: In Quest of the Ultimate Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the Sr optical lattice clock experiment at LNESYRTE, Observatoire de Paris. After having described the general principles for optical lattice clocks and the operation of the clock in question, the emphasis is put on the features that have been added to the experiment since 2007. The most important new elements are an ultra-stable reference cavity for the clock laser, the development of a non-destructive detection technique, and the construction of a second Sr lattice clock. The ultra-stable cavity is constructed from a ULE spacer and fused silica mirrors and has shown a thermal noise floor at 6.5 * 10-16, placing it among the best in the world. The non-destructive detection is effectuated by a phase measurement of a weak probe beam that traverses the atoms placed in one arm of a Mach-Zender interferometer. The non-destructive aspect enables a recycling of the atoms from cycle to cycle which consequently increases the duty cycle, allowing for an increase of the stability of the clock. With these new tools the frequency stability is expected to be 2.2 * 10-16/√τ for an optimized sequence. The most recent comparisons between the two Sr clocks reach an accuracy level of 10-16 after about 1000 s, and this way we have been able to characterize lattice related frequency shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. The measurements ensure a control of lattice related effects at the 10-18 level even for trap depths as large as 50Er. (authors)

  13. Entanglement and spin squeezing in a network of distant optical lattice clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzik, Eugene S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-02-01

    We propose an approach for the collective enhancement of precision for remote optical lattice clocks and a way of generating the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) state of remote clocks. In the first scenario, a distributed spin-squeezed state (SSS) of M clocks is generated by a collective optical quantum nondemolition measurement on clocks with parallel Bloch vectors. Surprisingly, optical losses, which usually present the main limitation to SSS, can be overcome by an optimal network design which provides close to Heisenberg scaling of the time precision with the number of clocks M . We provide an optimal network solution for distant clocks as well as for clocks positioned within close proximity of each other. In the second scenario, we employ collective dissipation to drive two clocks with oppositely oriented Bloch vectors into a steady-state entanglement. The corresponding EPR state provides secret time sharing beyond the projection noise limit between the two quantum synchronized clocks protected from eavesdropping. An important application of the EPR-entangled clock pair is the remote sensing of, for example, gravitational effects and other disturbances to which clock synchronization is sensitive.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    techniques. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), on the other hand, is a highly suitable and still relatively unexplored approach for the synthesis of noble metal catalysts. It is a vapor phase growth method, primarily used to deposit thin lms. ALD is based on self-limiting chemical reactions of alternately...

  15. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  16. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a compact, high-precision single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Based on...

  17. Differences between application of some basic principles of quantum mechanics on atomic and mesoscopic levels

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulov, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Formalism of the quantum mechanics developed for microscopic (atomic) level comes into collision with some logical difficulties on mesoscopic level. Some fundamental differences between application of its basic principles on microscopic and mesoscopic levels are accentuated.

  18. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a compact, high-precision, single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Our...

  19. Frequency ratio of Yb and Sr clocks with 5 × 10‑17 uncertainty at 150 seconds averaging time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Nils; Ohkubo, Takuya; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Transition frequencies of atoms and ions are among the most accurately accessible quantities in nature, playing important roles in pushing the frontiers of science by testing fundamental laws of physics, in addition to a wide range of applications such as satellite navigation systems. Atomic clocks based on optical transitions approach uncertainties of 10‑18 (refs 1–3), where full frequency descriptions are far beyond the reach of the SI second. Direct measurements of the frequency ratios of such super clocks, on the other hand, are not subject to this limitation. They can verify consistency and overall accuracy for an ensemble of super clocks, an essential step towards a redefinition of the second. Here we report a measurement that finds the frequency ratio of neutral ytterbium and strontium clocks to be ℛ = 1.207507039343337749(55), with a fractional uncertainty of 4.6 × 10‑17 and a measurement instability as low as 4 × 10‑16 (τ/s)‑1/2.

  20. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  1. Spectroscopy of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms for applications in quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B; Entin, V M; Yakshina, E A

    2016-01-01

    Atoms in highly excited (Rydberg) states have a number of unique properties which make them attractive for applications in quantum information. These are large dipole moments, lifetimes and polarizabilities, as well as strong long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Experimental methods of laser cooling and precision spectroscopy enable the trapping and manipulation of single Rydberg atoms and applying them for practical implementation of quantum gates over qubits of a quantum computer based on single neutral atoms in optical traps. In this paper, we give a review of the experimental and theoretical work performed by the authors at the Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University on laser and microwave spectroscopy of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap and on their possible applications in quantum information. We also give a brief review of studies done by other groups in this area.

  2. Python GUI Scripting Interface for Running Atomic Physics Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tahat, Amani; Tahat, Mofleh

    2011-01-01

    We create a Python GUI scripting interface working under Windows in addition to (UNIX/Linux). The GUI has been built around the Python open-source programming language. We use the Python's GUI library that so called Python Mega Widgets (PMW) and based on Tkinter Python module (http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld/tutgui.htm). The new GUI was motivated primarily by the desire of more updated operations, more flexibility incorporating future and current improvements in producing atomic d...

  3. A Simple Loop for Simultaneous OTDM Demultiplexing and Clock Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and stable loop consisting of a pair of concatenated electroabsorption modulators (EAMs) and 10 GHz clock recovery module is presented and demonstrated experimentally for simultaneous demultiplexing and clock recovery for OTDM networks. The 10Gb/s demultiplexed signal and 10 GHz recovered clock are successfully implemented from 80 Gbit/s and 160 Gbit/s OTDM signals utilizing the loop. The loop based on EAM-PLL can provide excellent tolerance range (> 5 dB) of the OSCR of the source laser, and the recovered clock signal exhibits low rms jitter over a dynamic input optical power range of 15 dB. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  4. Suppression of collisional shifts in a strongly interacting lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Swallows, Matthew D; Lin, Yige; Blatt, Sebastian; Martin, Michael J; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined in optical lattices provide a unique opportunity for precise studies of quantum many-body systems. The 87Sr optical lattice clock at JILA has reached an overall fractional frequency uncertainty of 1x10^-16 [1, 2]. This uncertainty is dominated by two contributions: atomic collisions and frequency shifts due to room-temperature blackbody radiation. The density-dependent frequency shift arises from collisions between fermionic atoms that are subject to slightly inhomogeneous optical excitation [3, 4]. Several theories of the underlying frequency shift mechanism have been proposed [5-7]. A three-dimensional optical lattice clock, where each lattice site contains at most one atom, has been reported [8], and its collisional shift has been characterized with an uncertainty of 7x10^-16. Here we present a different and seemingly paradoxical solution to the problem: by strongly confining atoms in an array of quasi-one-dimensional potentials formed by a two-dimensional opti...

  5. Accuracy Evaluation of NIM5 Cesium Fountain Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NIM5 fountain clock is the second fountain clock built at NIM (National Institute of Metrology, China), and has been operating stably and sub-continually since 2008. The fountain operates with a simple one-stage optical molasses to collect cold atoms, which reduces the collisional frequency shift dramatically. The fractional frequency uncertainty is estimated to be 2 × 10−15. The typical frequency instability of 2.5 × 10−14 is obtained at 10 s. Comparisons with other fountain frequency standards worldwide demonstrate agreement within the stated uncertainties

  6. Application of Density Functional Theory to Systems Containing Metal Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of density functional theory (DFT) for problems involving metal atoms is considered. The DFT results are compared with experiment as well as results obtained using the coupled cluster approach. The comparisons include geometries, frequencies, and bond energies. The systems considered include MO2, M(OH)+n, MNO+, and MCO+2. The DFT works well for frequencies and geometries, even in case with symmetry breaking; however, some examples have been found where the symmetry breaking is quite severe and the DFT methods do not work well. The calculation of bond energies is more difficult and examples of successes as well as failures of DFT will be given.

  7. Expansion of the USDA ARS Aerial Application spray atomization models

    Science.gov (United States)

    An effort is underway to update the USDA ARS aerial spray nozzle models using new droplet sizing instrumen-tation and measurement techniques. As part of this effort, the applicable maximum airspeed is being increased from 72 to 80 m/s to provide guidance to applicators when using new high speed air...

  8. Systematic heavy element atomic data production for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation summarises and illustrates a series of steps which have been implemented for handling heavy elements in magnetic confinement fusion plasma models and spectroscopic diagnostics. The primary objective of establishing an adequate complete baseline of data, within the constraints of available computer systems, has been achieved by semi-automatic scripted operation of atomic structure codes, making use of promotional rules and exploiting resolution levels. The whole is optimised for available distributed computer resources with respect to total radiated power. These methods are used for the three key production steps of specific ion data for emissivity calculation, electron impact ionisation data and di-electronic recombination data, the delivery being to standard ADAS data formats. Assembly in terms of emissivity coefficients, feature emissivity coefficients, effective recombination and ionisation coefficients follows, enabling the ionisation state and radiation emission characteristics of any heavy element in fusion plasma to be generated. In a further step, techniques using superstages, combined with extension of collisional-radiative coefficient types, deliver atomic data in a compressed form which is allowing progress with current generation 2-D plasma transport models. (author)

  9. Influence Factors of an All-Optical Recovered Clock from Two-Section DFB Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All-optical clock recovery by a two-section DFB laser with different injection wavelengths is demonstrated experimentally at 38.5 GHz. An optical clock with a root-mean-square timing jitter of 250 fs and an extinction ratio of 12.1 dB is obtained with 1551 nm injection. The timing jitter of the recovered clock is further investigated for various intensity ratios of the two DFB emission modes. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  10. Controllable clock circuit design in PEM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-precision synchronized clock circuit design will be presented, which can supply steady, reliable and anti-jamming clock signal for the data acquirement (DAQ) system of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). This circuit design is based on the Single-Chip Microcomputer and high-precision clock chip, and can achieve multiple controllable clock signals. The jamming between the clock signals can be reduced greatly with the differential transmission. Meanwhile, the adoption of CAN bus control in the clock circuit can prompt the clock signals to be transmitted or masked simultaneously when needed. (authors)

  11. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations...... have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed...

  12. The Kitaev–Feynman clock for open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that Kitaev's construction of Feynman's clock, in which the time-evolution of a closed quantum system is encoded as a ground state problem, can be extended to open quantum systems. In our formalism, the ground states of an ensemble of non-Hermitian Kitaev–Feynman clock Hamiltonians yield stochastic trajectories, which unravel the evolution of a Lindblad master equation. In this way, one can use the Kitaev–Feynman clock not only to simulate the evolution of a quantum system, but also its interaction with an environment such as a heat bath or measuring apparatus. A simple numerical example of a two-level atom undergoing spontaneous emission is presented and analyzed. (paper)

  13. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  14. Clock synchronization design and evaluation for trigger-less data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For modern particle physics experiments, trigger-less data acquisition (DAQ) system has been put into practice because of the need of reaction multiplicity and trigger flexibility. In such new DAQ systems, global synchronized clock plays an important role because it affects the granularity of time slice and precision of reference clock. In this paper, a novel synchronized clock distribution method is proposed. With the help of modulation technique, master clock module distributes system clock to each slave module. To synchronize slave clocks, the propagation delay is adjusted and the clock phase is aligned by an FPGA chip automatically. Furthermore, an ADC- based method is proposed to evaluate the performance of multi-module clock synchronization simultaneously. The experiments of a prototype system show that slave clocks can be synchronized less than 100 ps over 150 m range. The proposed method is simple and flexible, and it can be used in trigger-less DAQ system and other applications of clock distribution preciously. (authors)

  15. Highly-charged ions as a basis of optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Derevianko, Andrei; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel class of atomic clocks based on highly charged ions. We consider highly-forbidden laser-accessible transitions within the $4f^{12}$ ground-state configurations of highly charged ions. Our evaluation of systematic effects demonstrates that these transitions may be used for building exceptionally accurate atomic clocks which may compete in accuracy with recently proposed nuclear clock.

  16. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  17. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cansu Özbayer; İrfan Değirmenci

    2011-01-01

    There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome ...

  18. Gravitomagnetism and Relative Observer Clock Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Jantzen, Robert T; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2000-01-01

    The gravitomagnetic clock effect and the Sagnac effect for circularly rotating orbits in stationary axisymmetric spacetimes are studied from a relative observer point of view, clarifying their relationships and the roles played by special observer families. In particular Semer\\'ak's recent characterization of extremely accelerated observers in terms of the two-clock clock effect is shown to be complemented by a similarly special property of the single-clock clock effect.

  19. Variable molecular clocks in hominoids

    OpenAIRE

    Elango, Navin; Thomas, James W.; Yi, Soojin V.

    2006-01-01

    Generation time is an important determinant of a neutral molecular clock. There are several human-specific life history traits that led to a substantially longer generation time in humans than in other hominoids. Indeed, a long generation time is considered an important trait that distinguishes humans from their closest relatives. Therefore, humans may exhibit a significantly slower molecular clock as compared to other hominoids. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed a large-scale anal...

  20. The circadian clock in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, Mauro; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2000-01-01

    The basic physiological and anatomical basis for circadian rhythms in mammalian behaviour and physiology is introduced. The pathways involved in photic entrainment of the circadian clock are discussed in relation of new findings that identify the molecules that are involved in signalling between the environment and the clock. The molecular basis of endogenous cycles is described in the mouse, and compared to the mechanism that is present in the fly. Finally we speculate on the relationship be...

  1. The circadian clock in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, M. A.; Kyriacou, C P

    2005-01-01

    The basic physiological and anatomical basis for circadian rhythms in mammalian behaviour and physiology is introduced. The pathways involved in photic entrainment of the circadian clock are discussed in relation of new findings that identify the molecules that are involved in signalling between the environment and the clock. The molecular basis of endogenous cycles is described in the mouse, and compared to the mechanism that is present in the fly. Finally we speculate on the relationship be...

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of Atomization Characteristics of Improved Biodiesel for Gas Turbine Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel is one of the clean burning alternative fuels derived from natural resources and animal fats which is promising fuel for gas turbine application. However, inferior properties of biodiesel such as high viscosity, density and surface tension results in inferior atomization and high emission, hence impedes the fuel compatible for gas turbine application and emits slightly higher emission pollutants due to inferior atomization. This research work focuses on preliminary evaluation of the atomization characteristics of derived from Malaysian waste cooking oil which is the physical properties are subsequently improved by a microwave assisted post treatment scheme. The results shows with improvement in physical properties achieved through the post treatment, biodiesel exhibits significantly better atomization characteristics in terms of spray angle, spray length, sauter mean diameter and shorter evaporation time compared to the biodiesel before improvement and fossil diesel.

  3. Polarizable atomic multipole X-ray refinement: application to peptide crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Fenn, Timothy D.; Pande, Vijay S.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in computational chemistry have produced force fields based on a polarizable atomic multipole description of biomolecular electrostatics. In this work, the Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field is applied to restrained refinement of molecular models against X-ray diffraction data from peptide crystals. A new formalism is also developed to compute anisotropic and aspherical structure factors using fast Fourier transformation (F...

  4. Applications of Group Theory to Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Thomas; Ellialtıǧlu, Şinasi

    2014-01-01

    Preface; 1. Introductory example: squarene; 2. Molecular vibrations of isotopically substituted AB2 molecules; 3. Spherical symmetry and the full rotation group; 4. Crystal field theory; 5. Electron spin and angular momentum; 6. Molecular electronic structure: the LCAO model; 7. Electronic states of diatomic molecules; 8. Transition metal complexes; 9. Space groups and crystalline solids; 10. Application of space group theory: energy bands for the perovskite structure; 11. Applications of space group theory: lattice vibrations; 12. Time reversal and magnetic groups; 13. Graphene; 14. Carbon nanotubes; Appendixes; Index.

  5. Metrology with Atom Interferometry: Inertial Sensors from Laboratory to Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Bess; Gillot, Pierre; Savoie, Denis; Lautier, Jean; Cheng, Bing; Alzar, Carlos L Garrido; Geiger, Remi; Merlet, Sebastien; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Landragin, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Developments in atom interferometry have led to atomic inertial sensors with extremely high sensitivity. Their performances are for the moment limited by the ground vibrations, the impact of which is exacerbated by the sequential operation, resulting in aliasing and dead time. We discuss several experiments performed at LNE-SYRTE in order to reduce these problems and achieve the intrinsic limit of atomic inertial sensors. These techniques have resulted in transportable and high-performance instruments that participate in gravity measurements, and pave the way to applications in inertial navigation.

  6. Metrology with Atom Interferometry: Inertial Sensors from Laboratory to Field Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, B.; Dutta, I.; Gillot, P.; Savoie, D.; Lautier, J.; Cheng, B.; Garrido Alzar, C. L.; Geiger, R.; Merlet, S.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2016-06-01

    Developments in atom interferometry have led to atomic inertial sensors with extremely high sensitivity. Their performances are for the moment limited by the ground vibrations, the impact of which is exacerbated by the sequential operation, resulting in aliasing and dead time. We discuss several experiments performed at LNE-SYRTE in order to reduce these problems and achieve the intrinsic limit of atomic inertial sensors. These techniques have resulted in transportable and high-performance instruments that participate in gravity measurements, and pave the way to applications in inertial navigation.

  7. Application of atomic force microscopy in blood research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Long Ji; Ya-Min Ma; Tong Yin; Ming-Shi Shen; Xin Xu; Wei Guan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To find suitable solutions having lesser granules and keeping erythrocytes in normal shapes under atomic force microscopy (AFM).METHODS: Eight kinds of solutions, 1% formaldehyde,PBS buffer (pH7.2), citrate buffer (pH6,0), 0.9% NaCl,5% dextrose, TAE, 1640 medium and 5% EDTA-K2, were selected from commonly used laboratory solutions, and venous blood from a healthy human volunteer was drawn and anticoagulated with EDTA-K2. Before scanned by AFM (NanoScopeⅢa SPM, Digital Instruments, Santa Barbara,CA), a kind of intermixture was deposited on freshly cleaved mica and then dried in the constant temperature cabinet (37 ℃).RESULTS: One percent formaldehyde, citrate buffer, 5%dextrose, TAE, were found to keep human erythrocytes in normal shape with few particles. Processed by these solutions, fine structures of human erythrocyte membrane were obtained.CONCLUSION: One percent formaldehyde, citrate buffer,5% dextrose and TAE may be applied to disposeerythrocytes in AFM. The results may offer meaningful data for clinical diagnosis of blood by AFM.

  8. Scanning probe – atomic force microscopy: new developments and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have widened the spectrum of possible investigations that can be performed at a nanometric level at the surfaces of materials. They range, for instance, from physical properties such as surface potential and electric field topological determination to chemical, nanomechanical, catalytic and spectroscopic analysis in air in liquid or in a gaseous environment. After a brief introduction to new SPM technological developments, we present recent achievements in the characterisation and application of nanomorphology, electrostatic surface potential, dielectric properties, shear force microscopy and radiofrequency measurements, scanning microwave microscopy, nanomechanical properties mapping, frequency modulation SPM in air, liquid, vacuum, and finally high-speed SPM

  9. Applications of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Applications of Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamical Systems is a reference on the new field of relativistic optics, examining topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles. Based on 30 years of research, this unique book connects the properties of quantum equations to corresponding classical equations used to calculate the energetic values and the symmetry properties of atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems. In addition, it examines applications for these methods, and for the calculation of

  10. High U-density nuclear fuel development with application of centrifugal atomization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to simplify the preparation process and improve the properties of uranium silicide fuels prepared by mechanical comminution, a fuel fabrication process applying rotating-disk centrifugal atomization technology was invented in KAERI in 1989. The major characteristic of atomized U3Si and U3Si2 powders have been examined. The out-pile properties, including the thermal compatibility between atomized particle and aluminum matrix in uranium silicide dispersion fuels, have generally showed a superiority to the comminuted fuels. Moreover, the RERTR (reduced enrichment for research and test reactors) program, which recently begins to develop very-high-density uranium alloy fuels, including U-Mo fuels, requires the centrifugal atomization process to overcome the contaminations of impurities and the difficulties of the comminution process. In addition, a cooperation with ANL in the U.S. has been performed to develop high-density fuels with an application of atomization technology since December 1996. If the microplate and miniplate irradiation tests of atomized fuels, which have been performed with ANL, demonstrated the stability and improvement of in-reactor behaviors, nuclear fuel fabrication technology by centrifugal atomization could be most-promising to the production method of very-high-uranium-loading fuels. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs

  11. High U-density nuclear fuel development with application of centrifugal atomization technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Don Bae [Korea Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In order to simplify the preparation process and improve the properties of uranium silicide fuels prepared by mechanical comminution, a fuel fabrication process applying rotating-disk centrifugal atomization technology was invented in KAERI in 1989. The major characteristic of atomized U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} powders have been examined. The out-pile properties, including the thermal compatibility between atomized particle and aluminum matrix in uranium silicide dispersion fuels, have generally showed a superiority to the comminuted fuels. Moreover, the RERTR (reduced enrichment for research and test reactors) program, which recently begins to develop very-high-density uranium alloy fuels, including U-Mo fuels, requires the centrifugal atomization process to overcome the contaminations of impurities and the difficulties of the comminution process. In addition, a cooperation with ANL in the U.S. has been performed to develop high-density fuels with an application of atomization technology since December 1996. If the microplate and miniplate irradiation tests of atomized fuels, which have been performed with ANL, demonstrated the stability and improvement of in-reactor behaviors, nuclear fuel fabrication technology by centrifugal atomization could be most-promising to the production method of very-high-uranium-loading fuels. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  12. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cylinder with application to nanosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces was extended for the case of an atom (molecule) interacting with a plane surface of a uniaxial crystal or with a long solid cylinder or cylindrical shell made of isotropic material or uniaxial crystal. The obtained results are applicable to nanosystems. In particular, we investigate the Casimir-Polder interaction between hydrogen atoms (molecules) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes. It is demonstrated that the hydrogen atoms located inside multiwall carbon nanotubes have a lower free energy compared to those located outside. We also perform comparison studies of the interaction of hydrogen atoms between themselves and with multi-wall carbon nanotube. The obtained results are important for the problem of hydrogen storage

  13. Rydberg Excitation of Single Atoms for Applications in Quantum Information and Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Aaron Michael

    With the advent of laser cooling and trapping, neutral atoms have become a foundational source of accuracy for applications in metrology and are showing great potential for their use as qubits in quantum information. In metrology, neutral atoms provide the most accurate references for the measurement of time and acceleration. The unsurpassed stability provided by these systems make neutral atoms an attractive avenue to explore applications in quantum information and computing. However, to fully investigate the field of quantum information, we require a method to generate entangling interactions between neutral-atom qubits. Recent progress in the use of highly-excited Rydberg states for strong dipolar interactions has shown great promise for controlled entanglement using the Rydberg blockade phenomenon. I report the use of singly-trapped cesium-133 atoms as qubits for applications in metrology and quantum information. Each atom provides a physical basis for a single qubit by encoding the required information into the ground-state hyperfine structure of cesium-133. Through the manipulation of these qubits with microwave and optical frequency sources, we demonstrate the capacity for arbitrary single-qubit control by driving qubit rotations in three orthogonal directions on the Bloch sphere. With this control, we develop an atom interferometer that far surpasses the force sensitivity of other approaches by applying the well-established technique of light-pulsed atom-matterwave interferometry to single atoms. Following this, we focus on two-qubit interactions using highly-excited Rydberg states. Through the development of a unique single-photon approach to Rydberg excitation using an ultraviolet laser at 319 nm, we observe the Rydberg blockade interaction between atoms separated by 6.6(3) μm. Motivated by the observation of Rydberg blockade, we study the application of Rydberg-dressed states for a quantum controlled-phase gate. Using a realistic simulation of the

  14. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  15. Progress on a Miniature Cold-Atom Frequency Standard

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, David R; Mescher, Mark; Stoner, Richard; Timmons, Brian; Rogomentich, Fran; Tepolt, Gary; Mahnkopf, Sven; Noble, Jay; Chang, Sheng; Taylor, Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    Atomic clocks play a crucial role in timekeeping, communications, and navigation systems. Recent efforts enabled by heterogeneous MEMS integration have led to the commercial introduction of Chip-Scale Atomic Clocks (CSAC) with a volume of 16 cm3, power consumption of 120 mW, and instability (Allan Deviation) of {\\sigma}({\\tau} = 1 sec) < 2e-10. In order to reduce the temperature sensitivity of next-generation CSACs for timing applications, the interaction of atoms with the environment must be minimized, which can be accomplished in an architecture based on trapped, laser-cooled atoms. In this paper, we present results describing the development of a miniature cold-atom apparatus for operation as a frequency standard. Our architecture is based on laser-cooling a sample of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) using a conical retro-reflector in a miniature vacuum chamber. Trapping the atoms in vacuum and performing microwave interrogation in the dark reduces the temperature sensitivity compared to va...

  16. Spin-orbit coupled fermions in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, S; Bothwell, T; Wall, M L; Marti, G E; Koller, A P; Zhang, X; Rey, A M; Ye, J

    2016-01-01

    Engineered spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in cold atom systems can aid in the study of novel synthetic materials and complex condensed matter phenomena. Despite great advances, alkali atom SOC systems are hindered by heating from spontaneous emission, which limits the observation of many-body effects. Here we demonstrate the use of optical lattice clocks (OLCs) to engineer and study SOC with metrological precision and negligible heating. We show that clock spectroscopy of the ultra-narrow transition in fermionic 87Sr represents a momentum- and spin-resolved in situ probe of the SOC band structure and eigenstates, providing direct access to the SOC dynamics and control over lattice band populations, internal electronic states, and quasimomenta. We utilize these capabilities to study Bloch oscillations, spin-momentum locking, and van Hove singularities in the transition density of states. Our results lay the groundwork for the use of OLCs to probe novel SOC phases including magnetic crystals, helical liquids, and to...

  17. A brief review of atomic layer deposition: from fundamentals to applications

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adam Hultqvist; Bent, Stacey F.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase technique capable of producing thin films of a variety of materials. Based on sequential, self-limiting reactions, ALD offers exceptional conformality on high-aspect ratio structures, thickness control at the Angstrom level, and tunable film composition. With these advantages, ALD has emerged as a powerful tool for many industrial and research applications. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to ALD and highlight select applications, ...

  18. 6th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research

    CERN Document Server

    Błaszczak, Z; Marinova, K; LASER 2004

    2006-01-01

    6th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research, LASER 2004, held in Poznan, Poland, 24-27 May, 2004 Researchers and graduate students interested in the Mössbauer Effect and its applications will find this volume indispensable. The volume presents the most recent developments in the methodology of Mössbauer spectroscopy. Reprinted from Hyperfine Interactions (HYPE) Volume 162, 1-4

  19. A scheme for implementing quantum clock synchronization algorithm in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Qin-Qin; Kuang Le-Man

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for implementing the quantum clock synchronization (QCS) algorithm in cavity quantum electrodynamic (QED) formalism. Our method is based on three-level ladder-type atoms interacting with classical and quantized cavity fields. Atom-qubit realizations of three-qubit and four-qubit QCS algorithms are explicitly presented.

  20. Acting with the Clock: Clocking Practices in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses intra-actions that take place among humans and non-human others--the physical world, the materials--in early childhood education's everyday practices. Her object of study is the clock. Specifically, she provides an example of what it might mean to account for the intra-activity of the material-discursive…

  1. Single-transistor-clocked flip-flop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peiyi; Darwish, Tarek; Bayoumi, Magdy

    2005-08-30

    The invention provides a low power, high performance flip-flop. The flip-flop uses only one clocked transistor. The single clocked transistor is shared by the first and second branches of the device. A pulse generator produces a clock pulse to trigger the flip-flop. In one preferred embodiment the device can be made as a static explicit pulsed flip-flop which employs only two clocked transistors.

  2. A high-precision synchronization circuit for clock distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel structure of a high-precision synchronization circuit, HPSC, using interleaved delay units and a dynamic compensation circuit is proposed. HPSCs are designed for synchronization of clock distribution networks in large-scale integrated circuits, where high-quality clocks are required. The application of a hybrid structure of a coarse delay line and dynamic compensation circuit performs roughly the alignment of the clock signal in two clock cycles, and finishes the fine tuning in the next three clock cycles with the phase error suppressed under 3.8 ps. The proposed circuit is implemented and fabricated using a SMIC 0.13 μm 1P6M process with a supply voltage at 1.2 V. The allowed operation frequency ranges from 200 to 800 MHz, and the duty cycle ranges between [20%, 80%]. The active area of the core circuits is 245 × 134 μm2, and the power consumption is 1.64 mW at 500 MHz. (paper)

  3. Energy Efficient Global Clock Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Namboodiri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Clock synchronization is critical to many sensor networks for the success of the application as well as energyefficiency. Achieving a global time frame through localized averaging of clock values for multiple rounds till convergenceis a promising approach to clock synchronization due to the decentralized nature of computation coupled withscalability. However, it is not clear what power levels for all nodes would make the synchronization process energyefficient.Large power levels lead to faster convergence but consume a lot of energy per round of synchronization.On the other hand, smaller powers consume little energy per round, but convergence is very slow requiring a lotof rounds to achieve synchronization. In this paper we look at the problem of finding a power assignment thatachieves global clock synchronization in the most energy-efficient manner possible. We look at the problem throughtwo dimensions; rate of convergence and energy consumed per round of synchronization. A centralized algorithm ispresented that uses the path congestion of the induced communication graph to estimate which power assignmentshave good convergence properties and find one that minimizes the total energy to achieve clock synchronization.Our evaluation demonstrates that the power assignment derived from this algorithm is very energy-efficient and isapplicable for wireless communication environments with various distance-power gradients. Further, we present asimple distributed algorithm which nodes can execute locally to derive energy-efficient power levels for global clocksynchronization, and is especially useful in large-scale deployments.

  4. FOREWORD: Fifty years of atomic time-keeping: 1955 to 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terry

    2005-06-01

    the commercial development of atomic clocks of various types and on some of their applications. At the beginning there is a deliberate emphasis on the history of the introduction of atomic time, including the technical problems to be resolved and the personalities involved. You will see that it includes one article based on notes left by Louis Essen himself, for which we are most grateful to his son, Mr Ray Essen, for permission to use them and to Dale Henderson of the NPL, who arranged them for publication here. I hope that this issue will stand as a reference for years to come and I am most grateful to all those who have contributed. I also wish to thank most particularly Norman Ramsey, whose name is indelibly associated with atomic clocks, for having contributed the first article to this special issue.

  5. Atom Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Folman, R; Cassettari, D; Hessmo, B; Maier, T; Schmiedmayer, J; Folman, Ron; Krüger, Peter; Cassettari, Donatella; Hessmo, Björn; Maier, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Atoms can be trapped and guided using nano-fabricated wires on surfaces, achieving the scales required by quantum information proposals. These Atom Chips form the basis for robust and widespread applications of cold atoms ranging from atom optics to fundamental questions in mesoscopic physics, and possibly quantum information systems.

  6. 47 CFR 80.935 - Station clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station clock. 80.935 Section 80.935... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.935 Station clock. Each station subject to this subpart must have a working clock or timepiece readily available to...

  7. Multiscale quantum-defect theory and its application to atomic spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Haixiang; Li, Mingzhe; Tey, Meng Khoon; You, Li; Gao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    We present a multiscale quantum-defect theory based on the first analytic solution for a two-scale long range potential consisting of a Coulomb potential and a polarization potential. In its application to atomic structure, the theory extends the systematic understanding of atomic Rydberg states, as afforded by the standard single-scale quantum-defect theory, to a much greater range of energies to include the first few excited states and even the ground state. Such a level of understanding ha...

  8. Microtraps and Atom Chips: Toolboxes for Cold Atom Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Feenstra, L.; Andersson, L. M.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic microtraps and Atom Chips are safe, small-scale, reliable and flexible tools to prepare ultra-cold and degenerate atom clouds as sources for various atom-optical experiments. We present an overview of the possibilities of the devices and indicate how a microtrap can be used to prepare and launch a Bose-Einstein condensate for use in an atom clock or an interferometer.

  9. CLOCK and NPAS2 have overlapping roles in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    DeBruyne, Jason P.; Weaver, David R.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1, bHLH-PAS transcription factors, are believed to be the major transcriptional regulators of the circadian clock mechanism in mammals. However, a recent study shows that CLOCK-deficient mice continue to exhibit robust behavioral and molecular rhythms. Here we report that the transcription factor NPAS2 (MOP4) is able to functionally substitute for CLOCK in the master brain clock in mice to regulate circadian rhythmicity.

  10. The NIST 27 Al+ quantum-logic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrandt, David; Brewer, Samuel; Chen, Jwo-Sy; Hume, David; Hankin, Aaron; Huang, Yao; Chou, Chin-Wen; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2016-05-01

    Optical atomic clocks based on quantum-logic spectroscopy of the 1 S0 3 P0 transition in 27 Al+ have reached a systematic fractional frequency uncertainty of 8 . 0 ×10-18 , enabling table-top tests of fundamental physics as well as measurements of gravitational potential differences. Currently, the largest limitations to the accuracy are second order time dilation shifts due to the driven motion (i.e., micromotion) and thermal motion of the trapped ions. In order to suppress these shifts, we have designed and built new ion traps based on gold-plated, laser-machined diamond wafers with differential RF drive, and we have operated one of our clocks with the ions laser cooled to near the six mode motional ground state. We present a characterization of the time dilation shifts in the new traps with uncertainties near 1 ×10-18 . Furthermore, we describe a new protocol for clock comparison measurements based on synchronous probing of the two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators, which allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time and avoids the Dick effect. This work is supported by ARO, DARPA, and ONR.

  11. Metrological characterization of the pulsed Rb clock with optical detection

    CERN Document Server

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Levi, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    We report on the implementation and the metrological characterization of a vapor-cell Rb frequency standard working in pulsed regime. The three main parts that compose the clock, physics package, optics and electronics, are described in detail in the paper. The prototype is designed and optimized to detect the clock transition in the optical domain. Specifically, the reference atomic transition, excited with a Ramsey scheme, is detected by observing the interference pattern on a laser absorption signal. \\ The metrological analysis includes the observation and characterization of the clock signal and the measurement of frequency stability and drift. In terms of Allan deviation, the measured frequency stability results as low as $1.7\\times 10^{-13} \\ \\tau^{-1/2}$, $\\tau$ being the averaging time, and reaches the value of few units of $10^{-15}$ for $\\tau=10^{4}$ s, an unprecedent achievement for a vapor cell clock. We discuss in the paper the physical effects leading to this result with particular care to laser...

  12. Clock Drawing in Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Guinevere F.; Wood, Frank B.; Stein, John F.

    2003-01-01

    A study involving 93 children (ages 10-12), 295 with poor reading skills, found many children with dyslexia and some garden-variety poor readers showed significant left neglect on the Clock Drawing Test. In poor readers with dyslexia, spatial construction deficits were observed like those of parents with acquired right-hemisphere lesions.…

  13. Clock gene expression during development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Bendová, Zdeňka; Sládek, Martin; Kováčiková, Zuzana; El-Hennamy, Rehab; Laurinová, Kristýna; Illnerová, Helena

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 191, Suppl.658 (2007), s. 18-18. ISSN 1748-1708. [Joint meeting of The Slovak Physiological Society, The Physiological Society and The Federation of European Physiological Societies. 11.09.2007-14.09.2007, Bratislava] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * clock genes * suprachiasmatic nucleus * rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  14. The Brazilian time and frequency atomic standards program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmed

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cesium atomic beam clocks have been the workhorse for many demanding applications in science and technology for the past four decades. Tests of the fundamental laws of physics and the search for minute changes in fundamental constants, the synchronization of telecommunication networks, and realization of the satellite-based global positioning system would not be possible without atomic clocks. The adoption of optical cooling and trapping techniques, has produced a major advance in atomic clock precision. Cold-atom fountain and compact cold-atom clocks have also been developed. Measurement precision of a few parts in 10(15 has been demonstrated for a cold-atom fountain clock. We present here an overview of the time and frequency metrology program based on cesium atoms under development at USP São Carlos. This activity consists of construction and characterization of atomic-beam, and several variations of cold-atom clocks. We discuss the basic working principles, construction, evaluation, and important applications of atomic clocks in the Brazilian program.Relógios atômicos de feixe de Césio têm sido a base para diversas aplicações em ciência e tecnologia nas últimas quatro décadas. Testes de leis fundamentais de física, buscas por mínimas variações em constantes fundamentais, sincronização de redes de telecomunicações e o funcionamento do sistema de posicionamento global, baseado em satélites de navegação, não seriam possíveis sem os relógios atômicos. A adoção de técnicas de aprisionamento e resfriamento ópticos tem permitido um grande avanço na precisão dos relógios atômicos. Chafarizes de átomos frios e relógios compactos de átomos frios também têm sido desenvolvidos. Precisões de medida de algumas partes em 1015 foram demonstradas para relógios do tipo chafariz de átomos frios. Apresentamos uma visão geral do programa de metrologia de tempo e freqüência baseado em átomos de césio, em

  15. Protocol Additional to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in France is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 22 September 1998. Pursuant to Article 16 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 30 April 2004, the date on which the Agency received written notification that the European Atomic Energy Community and France had met their respective internal requirements for entry into force

  16. Various applications of atomic physics and kinetics codes to plasma modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collection of computer codes developed at Los Alamos have been applied to a variety of plasma modeling problems. The CATS, RATS, ACE, and GIPPER codes are used to calculate a consistent set of atomic physics data for a given problem. The calculated data include atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, electron impact excitation and ionization cross sections, photoionization cross sections, and autoionization rates. The FINE and LINES codes access these data sets directly to perform plasma modeling calculations. Preliminary results of some of the current applications are presented, including, the calculation of holmium opacity, the modeling of plasma flat panel display devices, the analysis of some new results from the LANL TRIDENT laser and prediction of the radiative properties of the plasma wakefield light source for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). For the latter project, the simultaneous solution of atomic kinetics for the level populations and the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution is currently being implemented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Light scattering from dense cold atomic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bihui; Cooper, John; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the propagation of light through a cold atomic medium, where the effects of motion, laser intensity, atomic density, and polarization can all modify the properties of the scattered light. We present two different microscopic models: the "coherent dipole model" and the "random-walk model", both suitable for modeling recent experimental work done in large atomic arrays in the low-light-intensity regime. We use them to compute relevant observables such as the linewidth, peak intensity, and line center of the emitted light. We further develop generalized models that explicitly take into account atomic motion. Those are relevant for hotter atoms and beyond the low-intensity regime. We show that atomic motion can lead to drastic dephasing and to a reduction of collective effects, together with a distortion of the line shape. Our results are applicable to model a full gamut of quantum systems that rely on atom-light interactions, including atomic clocks, quantum simulators, and nanophotonic systems.

  18. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  19. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10-18 and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s21S0-5s5p 3P0 in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10-16. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10-18 to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states Δαdc = α(5s5p 3P0)-α(5s21S0) = 4.078 73(11) x 10-39 Cm2 /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference Δαdc corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using Δαdc and experimental data for other atomic properties. To interrogate the ultracold atoms in the electric field a novel transport technique has been developed, which uses the magic wavelength (813 nm) optical lattice

  20. Thermal-fluid assessment of multijet atomization for spray cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal management is a particularly difficult challenge to the miniaturization of electronic components because it requires high performance cooling systems capable of removing large heat loads at fast rates in order to keep the operating temperature low and controlled. To meet this challenge, the Intermittent Spray Cooling (ISC) concept has been suggested as a promising technology which uses a proper match between the frequency and duration of consecutive injection cycles to control heat transfer. This concept also depends on: the atomization strategy; a homogeneous dispersion of droplets impinging on the hot surface; and the quantitative control of the liquid deposited, avoiding excessive secondary atomization or pre-impingement-evaporation. In this work, the use of liquid atomization by multiple jets impact, also referred as multijet atomization, is the subject of a thermal-fluid assessment using heat transfer correlations previously derived for intermittent sprays. Simultaneous measurements of droplet size and velocity are provided as input for the correlations and the analysis explores the influence of the number of impinging jets on the heat removal pattern and magnitude. Emphasis is put on the promising applicability of multijet atomization for promoting an intelligent use of energy in the thermal management of electronic devices.

  1. Polarizable atomic multipole X-ray refinement: application to peptide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to accelerate the computation of structure factors from an electron density described by anisotropic and aspherical atomic form factors via fast Fourier transformation is described for the first time. Recent advances in computational chemistry have produced force fields based on a polarizable atomic multipole description of biomolecular electrostatics. In this work, the Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field is applied to restrained refinement of molecular models against X-ray diffraction data from peptide crystals. A new formalism is also developed to compute anisotropic and aspherical structure factors using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of Cartesian Gaussian multipoles. Relative to direct summation, the FFT approach can give a speedup of more than an order of magnitude for aspherical refinement of ultrahigh-resolution data sets. Use of a sublattice formalism makes the method highly parallelizable. Application of the Cartesian Gaussian multipole scattering model to a series of four peptide crystals using multipole coefficients from the AMOEBA force field demonstrates that AMOEBA systematically underestimates electron density at bond centers. For the trigonal and tetrahedral bonding geometries common in organic chemistry, an atomic multipole expansion through hexadecapole order is required to explain bond electron density. Alternatively, the addition of interatomic scattering (IAS) sites to the AMOEBA-based density captured bonding effects with fewer parameters. For a series of four peptide crystals, the AMOEBA–IAS model lowered Rfree by 20–40% relative to the original spherically symmetric scattering model

  2. Polarizable atomic multipole X-ray refinement: application to peptide crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnieders, Michael J. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Fenn, Timothy D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Pande, Vijay S., E-mail: pande@stanford.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Brunger, Axel T., E-mail: pande@stanford.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    A method to accelerate the computation of structure factors from an electron density described by anisotropic and aspherical atomic form factors via fast Fourier transformation is described for the first time. Recent advances in computational chemistry have produced force fields based on a polarizable atomic multipole description of biomolecular electrostatics. In this work, the Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field is applied to restrained refinement of molecular models against X-ray diffraction data from peptide crystals. A new formalism is also developed to compute anisotropic and aspherical structure factors using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of Cartesian Gaussian multipoles. Relative to direct summation, the FFT approach can give a speedup of more than an order of magnitude for aspherical refinement of ultrahigh-resolution data sets. Use of a sublattice formalism makes the method highly parallelizable. Application of the Cartesian Gaussian multipole scattering model to a series of four peptide crystals using multipole coefficients from the AMOEBA force field demonstrates that AMOEBA systematically underestimates electron density at bond centers. For the trigonal and tetrahedral bonding geometries common in organic chemistry, an atomic multipole expansion through hexadecapole order is required to explain bond electron density. Alternatively, the addition of interatomic scattering (IAS) sites to the AMOEBA-based density captured bonding effects with fewer parameters. For a series of four peptide crystals, the AMOEBA–IAS model lowered R{sub free} by 20–40% relative to the original spherically symmetric scattering model.

  3. Geometry-Induced Memory Effects in Isolated Quantum Systems: Cold-Atom Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chen-Yen; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Memory effects result from the history-dependent behavior of a system, are abundant in our daily life, and have broad applications. Here, we explore the possibilities of generating memory effects in simple isolated quantum systems. By utilizing geometrical effects from a class of lattices supporting flatbands consisting of localized states, memory effects could be observed in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. As the optical lattice continuously transforms from a triangular lattice into a kagome lattice with a flatband, history-dependent density distributions manifest quantum memory effects even in noninteracting systems, including fermionic as well as bosonic systems, in the proper ranges of temperatures. Rapid growth of ultracold technology predicts a bright future for quantum memory-effect systems, and here two prototypical applications of geometry-induced quantum memory effects are proposed: A cold-atom-based accelerometer using an atomic differentiator to record the mechanical change rate of a coupled probe, and an atomic quantum memory cell for storing information with write-in and readout schemes.

  4. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  5. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  6. Testing the Gravitational Redshift with Atomic Gravimeters?

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Bordé, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Atom interferometers allow the measurement of the acceleration of freely falling atoms with respect to an experimental platform at rest on Earth's surface. Such experiments have been used to test the universality of free fall by comparing the acceleration of the atoms to that of a classical freely falling object. In a recent paper, M\\"uller, Peters and Chu [Nature {\\bf 463}, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometers also provide a very accurate test of the gravitational redshift (or universality of clock rates). Considering the atom as a clock operating at the Compton frequency associated with the rest mass, they claimed that the interferometer measures the gravitational redshift between the atom-clocks in the two paths of the interferometer at different values of gravitational potentials. In the present paper we analyze this claim in the frame of general relativity and of different alternative theories, and conclude that the interpretation of atom interferometers as testing the gravitational redshift ...

  7. Cryogenic optical lattice clocks with a relative frequency difference of $1\\times 10^{-18}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohkubo, Takuya; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Time and frequency are the most accurately measurable quantities, providing foundations for science and modern technologies. The accuracy relies on the SI (Syst\\'eme International) second that refers to Cs microwave clocks with fractional uncertainties at $10^{-16}$. Recent revolutionary progress of optical clocks aims to achieve $1\\times 10^{-18}$ uncertainty, which however has been hindered by long averaging-times or by systematic uncertainties. Here, we demonstrate optical lattice clocks with $^{87}$Sr atoms interrogated in a cryogenic environment to address the blackbody radiation-induced frequency-shift, which remains the primary source of clocks' uncertainties and has initiated vigorous theoretical and experimental investigations. The quantum-limited stability for $N \\sim 1,000$ atoms allows investigation of the uncertainties at $2\\times 10^{-18}$ in two hours of clock operation. After 11 measurements performed over a month, the two cryo-clocks agree to within $(-1.1\\pm 1.6)\\times 10^{-18}$. Besides its...

  8. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Origlia, S; Pramod, M S; Smith, L; Singh, Y; He, W; Viswam, S; Świerad, D; Hughes, J; Bongs, K; Sterr, U; Lisdat, Ch; Vogt, S; Bize, S; Lodewyck, J; Targat, R Le; Holleville, D; Venon, B; Gill, P; Barwood, G; Hill, I R; Ovchinnikov, Y; Kulosa, A; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E -M; Stuhler, J; Kaenders, W

    2016-01-01

    The ESA mission "Space Optical Clock" project aims at operating an optical lattice clock on the ISS in approximately 2023. The scientific goals of the mission are to perform tests of fundamental physics, to enable space-assisted relativistic geodesy and to intercompare optical clocks on the ground using microwave and optical links. The performance goal of the space clock is less than $1 \\times 10^{-17}$ uncertainty and $1 \\times 10^{-15} {\\tau}^{-1/2}$ instability. Within an EU-FP7-funded project, a strontium optical lattice clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performances are instability below $1 \\times 10^{-15} {\\tau}^{-1/2}$ and fractional inaccuracy $5 \\times 10^{-17}$. For the design of the clock, techniques and approaches suitable for later space application are used, such as modular design, diode lasers, low power consumption subunits, and compact dimensions. The Sr clock apparatus is fully operational, and the clock transition in $^{88}$Sr was observed with linewidth as small as 9 Hz.

  9. Ultracold strontium clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludlow, A. D.; Blatt, S.; Zelevinsky, T.;

    2008-01-01

    We describe the application of high accuracy Srspectroscopy to the measurement of the variation of thefundamental constants of nature. We first describe recent progressof the JILA Sr optical frequency standard, with a systematicuncertainty evaluation at the 10-16 fractional frequencylevel. Using ...

  10. Operating experience of software in programmable equipment used in ABB atom nuclear I and C applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation gives an analysis of Software Reliability based on operation experience of the standard software product, ABB Master, used in the programmable equipment in ABB Atom Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Applications. The analysis comprises the operating experiences of ABB Master during the period of April 1, 1989 to December 31, 1991. With respect to the number of systems in operation during the period a total operation time of 11 000 years is considered in the analysis. (7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  11. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA 87Sr and NIST 171Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics

  12. Direct detection of the 229Th nuclear clock transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Wense, Lars; Seiferle, Benedict; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Neumayr, Jürgen B.; Maier, Hans-Jörg; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Mokry, Christoph; Runke, Jörg; Eberhardt, Klaus; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Trautmann, Norbert G.; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2016-05-01

    Today’s most precise time and frequency measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks. However, it has been proposed that they could potentially be outperformed by a nuclear clock, which employs a nuclear transition instead of an atomic shell transition. There is only one known nuclear state that could serve as a nuclear clock using currently available technology, namely, the isomeric first excited state of 229Th (denoted 229mTh). Here we report the direct detection of this nuclear state, which is further confirmation of the existence of the isomer and lays the foundation for precise studies of its decay parameters. On the basis of this direct detection, the isomeric energy is constrained to between 6.3 and 18.3 electronvolts, and the half-life is found to be longer than 60 seconds for 229mTh2+. More precise determinations appear to be within reach, and would pave the way to the development of a nuclear frequency standard.

  13. A Study on the Steering Strategy for the Master Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Hong; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Yin, Dong-Shan

    2015-01-01

    A physical realization of UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) by the master clock system in a time laboratory is named UTC(k). In order to make the deviation of UTC(k) from UTC as small as possible, and keep high short-term and long-term frequency stabilities as well, a new steering algorithm is proposed, and the detailed algorithm is as follows: Firstly, a stable reference time scale (TA) for real-time monitoring UTC(NTSC) is introduced. The time scale algorithm for generating TA, which is computed as a weighted average of about 22 free-running atomic clocks at the National Time Service Center (NTSC), is based on the ALGOS algorithm. And the weighting procedure is designed to optimize the short-term frequency stability of the scale. Secondly, the frequency offset is calculated. (1) The frequency of the master clock in the next time interval is calculated; (2) The phase difference between TA and UTC(NTSC) is deducted; (3) The final frequency offset is generated on the basis of above steps. A software is compiled according to this algorithm. The results calculated with the software are sent to the microphase stepper automatically, so that the time signal derived from the steered master clock can be accurate, meanwhile its stability is not influenced. Finally, the experimental result shows that the new master clock steering strategy can control the phase offset within ±15 ns, meanwhile it can also improve its short-term stability on the condition that its long-term one is not influenced.

  14. Two experiments with cold atoms: I. Application of Bessel beams for atom optics, and II. Spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg blockade effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Ilya

    In this dissertation we report the results of two experimental projects with laser-cooled rubidium atoms: I. Application of Bessel beams for atom optics, and II. Spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg blockade effect. The first part of the thesis is devoted to the development of new elements of atom optics based on blue-detuned high-order Bessel beams. Properties of a 4thorder Bessel beam as an atomic guide were investigated for various parameters of the hollow beam, such as the detuning from an atomic resonance, size and the order of the Bessel beam. We extended its application to create more complicated interferometer-type structures by demonstrating a tunnel lock, a novel device that can split an atomic cloud, transport it, delay, and switch its propagation direction between two guides. We reported a first-time demonstration of an atomic beam switch based on the combination of two crossed Bessel beams. We achieved the 30% efficiency of the switch limited by the geometrical overlap between the cloud and the intersection volume of the two tunnels, and investigate the heating processes induced by the switch. We also showed other applications of crossed Bessel beams, such as a 3-D optical trap for atoms confined in the intersection volume of two hollow beams and a splitter of the atomic density. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to the spectroscopic measurements of the Rydberg blockade effect, a conditional suppression of Rydberg excitations depending on the state of a control atom. We assembled a narrow-linewidth, tunable, frequency stabilized laser system at 480 nm to excite laser-cooled rubidium atoms to Rydberg states with a high principal quantum number n ˜ 50 through a two-photon transition. We applied the laser system to observe the Autler-Townes splitting of the intermediate 5p3/2 state and used the broadening of the resonance features to investigate the enhancement of Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in the presence of an external electric field.

  15. Recent progress in optically-pumped cesium beam clock at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Zhou, S.; Wan, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, long-life, and low-drift cesium beam clock is investigated at Peking University, where the atoms are magnetic-state selected and optically detected. Stability close to that of the best commercial cesium clocks has been achieved from 10 to 105 s. As previously shown, the short-term stability is determined by atomic shot noise or laser frequency noise. The stabilizations of microwave power and C-field improve the long-term stability, with the help of a digital servo system based on field-programmable gate array.

  16. Synthetic dimensions and spin-orbit coupling with an optical clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Livi, L F; Diem, M; Franchi, L; Clivati, C; Frittelli, M; Levi, F; Calonico, D; Catani, J; Inguscio, M; Fallani, L

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel way of synthesizing spin-orbit interactions in ultracold quantum gases, based on a single-photon optical clock transition coupling two long-lived electronic states of two-electron $^{173}$Yb atoms. By mapping the electronic states onto effective sites along a synthetic "electronic" dimension, we have engineered synthetic fermionic ladders with tunable magnetic fluxes. We have detected the spin-orbit coupling with fiber-link-enhanced clock spectroscopy and directly measured the emergence of chiral edge currents, probing them as a function of the magnetic field flux. These results open new directions for the investigation of topological states of matter with ultracold atomic gases.

  17. Clocks, Quantum Oscillators and Gravity: A Rigorous Analysis and a New Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper is a comprehensive treatment of clocks in the presence of matter and gravity. With cold atom and single ion based ultra-precision clocks becoming available for research and metrology, a rigorous understanding of the influence of gravity on clocks is necessary, especially in the context of the ever-present cosmic gravity which in fact points to the necessity of a paradigm shift in thinking about time metrology. The phase of a stable oscillator is equivalent to physical time and this identification has enormous consequence in the context of quantum physics and gravity. Every quantum state is a superposition of abstract 'oscillators' and the phase shift induced by gravity is universal, independent of the nature of the oscillator, obeying the equivalence principle and the general principle of relativity. What constitutes a genuine clock and what is its ultimate precision in a measurement of gravitational time dilation is a hard problem in the context of the apparent universal behaviour of waves, quantum states and physical clocks in a gravitational field. In this paper I will establish two results: 1) the proper and the physical time of any clock is completely determined by the dominant cosmic gravitational potentials with small corrections induced by local gravitational potentials, and 2) atom interferometer gravimeters that measure relative phase shift of two stationary states in a gravitational field is not equivalent to two atomic clocks in a gravitational field. The first result provides a rigorous basis for all precision estimates of time accumulated by arbitrarily moving clocks with cosmic frame as the unambiguous decider of physical time, like GPS time, and solves all debates hitherto on clock comparisons. The second result is based on a rigorous treatment of the difference as well as the relation between the gravitational mass and the inertial mass. The result resolves the recent debate whether the measurement of the gravitational phase shift in

  18. Ultracold atomic collisions in tight harmonic traps: Perturbation theory, ionization losses and application to metastable helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Beams, T J; Whittingham, I B

    2004-01-01

    Collisions between tightly confined atoms can lead to ionization and hence to loss of atoms from the trap. We develop second-order perturbation theory for a tensorial perturbation of a spherically symmetric system and the theory is then applied to processes mediated by the spin-dipole interaction. Redistribution and loss mechanisms are studied for the case of spin-polarized metastable helium atoms and results obtained for the five lowest s states in the trap and trapping frequencies ranging from 1 kHz to 10 MHz.

  19. Signal processing in cellular clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Forger, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(...

  20. Gaming in Combinatorial Clock Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Maarten; Karamychev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, Combinatorial Clock Auctions (CCAs) have been used around the world to allocate frequency spectrum for mobile telecom licenses. CCAs are claimed to significantly reduce the scope for gaming or strategic bidding. In this paper, we show, however, that CCAs significantly enhance the possibilities for strategic bidding. Real bidders in telecom markets are not only interested in the spectrum they win themselves and the price they pay for that, but also in the price com...

  1. Design principles underlying circadian clocks.

    OpenAIRE

    Rand, D.A.; Shulgin, B. V.; D. Salazar; Millar, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental problem for regulatory networks is to understand the relation between form and function: to uncover the underlying design principles of the network. Circadian clocks present a particularly interesting instance, as recent work has shown that they have complex structures involving multiple interconnected feedback loops with both positive and negative feedback. While several authors have speculated on the reasons for this, a convincing explanation is still lacking.We analyse both t...

  2. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical method for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen atom system, is presented. The calculation of potentials and non-adiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wavefunctions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H, Na+H, and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20000 K.

  3. Polarizable atomic multipole X-ray refinement: application to peptide crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnieders, Michael J; Fenn, Timothy D; Pande, Vijay S; Brunger, Axel T

    2009-09-01

    Recent advances in computational chemistry have produced force fields based on a polarizable atomic multipole description of biomolecular electrostatics. In this work, the Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field is applied to restrained refinement of molecular models against X-ray diffraction data from peptide crystals. A new formalism is also developed to compute anisotropic and aspherical structure factors using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of Cartesian Gaussian multipoles. Relative to direct summation, the FFT approach can give a speedup of more than an order of magnitude for aspherical refinement of ultrahigh-resolution data sets. Use of a sublattice formalism makes the method highly parallelizable. Application of the Cartesian Gaussian multipole scattering model to a series of four peptide crystals using multipole coefficients from the AMOEBA force field demonstrates that AMOEBA systematically underestimates electron density at bond centers. For the trigonal and tetrahedral bonding geometries common in organic chemistry, an atomic multipole expansion through hexadecapole order is required to explain bond electron density. Alternatively, the addition of interatomic scattering (IAS) sites to the AMOEBA-based density captured bonding effects with fewer parameters. For a series of four peptide crystals, the AMOEBA-IAS model lowered R(free) by 20-40% relative to the original spherically symmetric scattering model. PMID:19690373

  4. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  5. Optical to microwave clock frequency ratios with a nearly continuous strontium optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Bookjans, Eva; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Shi, Chunyan; Vallet, Grégoire; Targat, Rodolphe Le; Nicolodi, Daniele; Coq, Yann Le; Guéna, Jocelyne; Abgrall, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Bize, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Optical lattice clocks are at the forefront of frequency metrology. Both the instability and systematic uncertainty of these clocks have been reported to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the best microwave clocks. For this reason, a redefinition of the SI second based on optical clocks seems possible in the near future. However, the operation of optical lattice clocks has not yet reached the reliability that microwave clocks have achieved so far. In this paper, we report on the operation of a strontium optical lattice clock that spans several weeks, with more than 80% uptime. We make use of this long integration time to demonstrate a reproducible measurement of frequency ratios between the strontium clock transition and microwave Cs primary and Rb secondary frequency standards.

  6. Dispersive response of atoms trapped near the surface of an optical nanofiber with applications to quantum nondemolition measurement and spin squeezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaodong; Baragiola, Ben Q.; Jessen, Poul S.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2016-02-01

    We study the strong coupling between photons and atoms that can be achieved in an optical nanofiber geometry when the interaction is dispersive. While the Purcell enhancement factor for spontaneous emission into the guided mode does not reach the strong-coupling regime for individual atoms, one can obtain high cooperativity for ensembles of a few thousand atoms due to the tight confinement of the guided modes and constructive interference over the entire chain of trapped atoms. We calculate the dyadic Green's function, which determines the scattering of light by atoms in the presence of the fiber, and thus the phase shift and polarization rotation induced on the guided light by the trapped atoms. The Green's function is related to a full Heisenberg-Langevin treatment of the dispersive response of the quantized field to tensor polarizable atoms. We apply our formalism to quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of the atoms via polarimetry. We study shot-noise-limited detection of atom number for atoms in a completely mixed spin state and the squeezing of projection noise for atoms in clock states. Compared with squeezing of atomic ensembles in free space, we capitalize on unique features that arise in the nanofiber geometry including anisotropy of both the intensity and polarization of the guided modes. We use a first-principles stochastic master equation to model the squeezing as a function of time in the presence of decoherence due to optical pumping. We find a peak metrological squeezing of ˜5 dB is achievable with current technology for ˜2500 atoms trapped 180 nm from the surface of a nanofiber with radius a =225 nm.

  7. 30. Anniversary: foment, promotion and peaceful applications of the atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of the technical attendance and the cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency, activities, programs and projects have been obtained that have achieved results and benefits in the field of the diverse applications of the nuclear technology, as well as in areas of great interest chords with the objectives of national development, such as environmental hydrology, physical and chemical sciences, industry and geologic sciences, health and animal production, biological sciences, agriculture and feeding, scientific and technical information; as well as achievements of scientists, investigators and national technicians mainly in the last five years have been exposed in the presentation of the Act of Celebration of the 30. Anniversary of the Commission of Atomic Energy in Costa Rica

  8. Variational average-atom in quantum plasmas (VAAQP) - Application to radiative properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an application of the Variational Average-Atom in Quantum Plasmas (VAAQP) model and numerical code to dense plasmas radiative properties. We propose an approximate Detailed Configuration Accounting (DCA) approach starting from the variational model of configurations in jellium. This leads to a simplified model which is qualitatively different from those which usually stem from the atom in cell approach. It is also shown that, with some additional approximations, the DCA calculation can be handled by use of the Gaussian approximation to perform a statistical approach to the spectrum. Our purpose here is to show that this model provides a simple way to calculate the radiative properties and is likely to give realistic results. (authors)

  9. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 thin films on nanoporous alumina templates: Medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Roger J.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Pellin, Michael J.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-06-01

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of a nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Neither the 20 nm nor the 100 nm TiO2-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exhibited statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for “smart” drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  10. Construction of the isocopalane skeleton: application of a desulfinylative 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiong; Xu, ZhongYu; Zeng, Qian-Ding; Chen, Xi-Bo; Ji, Wen-Hao; Han, Ying; Wu, PeiYing; Ren, Jiangmeng; Zeng, Bu-Bing

    2015-06-01

    Two attractive chirons, aldehyde 6 and chloride 7, exhibiting functionalized ent-spongiane-type tricyclic skeletons (ABC ring system), have been constructed and their absolute configurations have been studied by NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both of these chirons are derived from commercially available andrographolide in good yield. Aldehyde 6 is obtained through a novel K2 S2 O8 -catalyzed aquatic ring-closing reaction of allylic sodium sulfonate and intramolecular 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer process. Further mechanistic investigations demonstrate that the 1,7-hydrogen atom transfer is a free-radical process, whereby hydrogen migrates from C18 to C17, as evidenced by double-18- deuterium-labeled isotope experiments. Prospective applications of these two chiral sources are also discussed. PMID:25907201

  11. Photons, clocks, and consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, George C.; Hanifin, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Light profoundly impacts human consciousness through the stimulation of the visual system and powerfully regulates the human circadian system, which, in turn, has a broad regulatory impact on virtually all tissues in the body. For more than 25 years, the techniques of action spectroscopy have yielded insights into the wavelength sensitivity of circadian input in humans and other mammalian species. The seminal discovery of melanopsin, the photopigment in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, has provided a significant turning point for understanding human circadian phototransduction. Action spectra in humans show that the peak wavelength sensitivity for this newly discovered sensory system is within the blue portion of the spectrum. This is fundamentally different from the three-cone photopic visual system, as well as the individual rod and cone photoreceptor peaks. Studies on rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans indicate that despite having a different wavelength fingerprint, these classic visual photoreceptors still provide an element of input to the circadian system. These findings open the door to innovations in light therapy for circadian and affective disorders, as well as possible architectural light applications.

  12. Applications of Hubble Volume in Atomic Physics, Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Quantum Physics and Cosmic Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. V. S. Seshavatharam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt is made to emphasize the major shortcomings of standard cosmology. It can be suggested that, the current cosmological changes can be understood by studying the atom and the atomic nucleus through ground based experiments. If light is coming from the atoms of the gigantic galaxy, then redshift can be interpreted as an index of the galactic atomic ‘light emission mechanism’. In no way it seems to be connected with ‘galaxy receding’. With ‘cosmological increasing (emitted photon energy’, observed cosmic redshift can be considered as a measure of the age difference between our galaxy and any observed galaxy. If it is possible to show that, (from the observer older galaxy’s distance increases with its ‘age’, then ‘galaxy receding’ and ‘accelerating universe’ concepts can be put for a revision at fundamental level. At any given cosmic time, the product of ‘critical density’ and ‘Hubble volume’ gives a characteristic cosmic mass and it can be called as the ‘Hubble mass’. Interesting thing is that, Schwarzschild radius of the ‘Hubble mass’ again matches with the ‘Hubble length’. Most of the cosmologists believe that this is merely a coincidence. At any given cosmic time,’Hubble length’ can be considered as the gravitational or electromagnetic interaction range. If one is willing to think in this direction, by increasing the number of applications of Hubble mass and Hubble volume in other areas of fundamental physics like quantum physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and particle physics - slowly and gradually - in a progressive way, concepts of ‘Black hole Cosmology’ can be strengthened and can also be confirmed.

  13. Solder self-assembled, surface micromachined MEMS for micromirror applications and atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Brian

    Solder self-assembly can be used to expand the versatility of a commercial foundry, like MEMSCAP's PolyMUMPs process. These foundries are attractive for prototyping MEMS as they can offer consistent, low cost fabrication runs by sticking to a single process and integrating multiple customers on each wafer. However, this standardization limits the utility of the process for a given application. Solder self-assembly gives back some of this versatility and expands the envelope of surface micromachining capability in the form of a simple post-process step. Here it is used to create novel micromirrors and micromirror arrays as well as to delve into the field of ultracold atom optics where the utility of MEMS as an enabling technology for atom control is explored. Two types of torsional, electrostatic micromirrors are demonstrated, both of which can achieve +/-10° of rotation. The first is a novel out-of-plane micromirror that can be rotated to a desired angle from the substrate. This integrated, on-chip assembly allows much simpler packaging technology to be used for devices that require a laser beam to be steered off-chip. Planar micromirror arrays that use solder self-assembly to tailor the electrode gap height are also demonstrated. With these designs, no special fabrication techniques are required to achieve large gap heights, and micromirrors with a variety of gap heights can even be fabricated on the same chip. Finally, solder self-assembly is used to explore how complex micro-scale structures can be used to control ultracold atoms. For this study, a MEMS version of a magneto-optical trap, the basis for most ultracold atomic systems, is used to control Rb atoms. In doing so, it provides a path for the successful integration of a number of MEMS devices in these types of systems.

  14. The Square Light Clock and Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J. Ronald; Amiri, Farhang

    2012-01-01

    A thought experiment that includes a square light clock is similar to the traditional vertical light beam and mirror clock, except it is made up of four mirrors placed at a 45[degree] angle at each corner of a square of length L[subscript 0], shown in Fig. 1. Here we have shown the events as measured in the rest frame of the square light clock. By…

  15. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcri...

  16. Performance Evaluation of Clock Synchronization Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Anceaume, Emmanuelle; Puaut, Isabelle

    1998-01-01

    Clock synchronization algorithms ensure that physically dispersed processors have a common knowledge of time. This report proposes a survey of software fault-tolerant clock synchronization algorithms: deterministic, probabilistic and statistical ; internal and external ; and resilient from crash to Byzantine failures. Our survey is based on a classification of clock synchronization algorithms (according to their internal structure and to three orthogonal and independent basic building blocks ...

  17. Interaction of circadian clock proteins PER2 and CRY with BMAL1 and CLOCK

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon Alain; Tallone Tiziano; Langmesser Sonja; Rusconi Sandro; Albrecht Urs

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Circadian oscillation of clock-controlled gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 act as activators of target gene transcription; however, interactions of PER and CRY proteins with the heterodimer abolish its transcriptional activation capacity. PER and CRY are therefore referred to as negative regulators of the circadian clock. To further elucidate the mechanism how positive and negative components of the clock int...

  18. The Behaviour of Clocks and Rods in Special and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkinson, Barrie

    2009-01-01

    While adhering to the formalism of Special and General Relativity, this paper considers the interpretation of clock rates and the rating of clocks in detail. We also pay particular attention to the crucial requirement of reciprocity between inertial frames. Our overriding concern is to bring out a distinction between clocks which run slow (slowly) in the everyday sense and those which record a smaller time interval between specific event pairs - while running at the standard rate. The day by day application of relativistic formalism is not affected, but the underlying physics is changed.

  19. 77 FR 66911 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel FIVE O'CLOCK HERE; Invitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel FIVE O'CLOCK... the applicant the intended service of the vessel FIVE O'CLOCK HERE is: Intended Commercial Use...

  20. Search for Effects of an Electrostatic Potential on Clocks in the Frame of Reference of a Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Conradi, Mark S.; Cassenti, Brice

    2005-01-01

    Results of experiments to confirm a theory that links classical electromagnetism with the geometry of spacetime are described. The theory, based on the introduction of a Torsion tensor into Einstein s equations and following the approach of Schroedinger, predicts effects on clocks attached to charged particles, subject to intense electric fields, analogous to the effects on clocks in a gravitational field. We show that in order to interpret this theory, one must re-interpret all clock changes, both gravitational and electromagnetic, as arising from changes in potential energy and not merely potential. The clock is provided naturally by proton spins in hydrogen atoms subject to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance trials. No frequency change of clocks was observed to a resolution of 6310(exp -9). A new "Clock Principle" was postulated to explain the null result. There are two possible implications of the experiments: (a) The Clock Principle is invalid and, in fact, no metric theory incorporating electromagnetism is possible; (b) The Clock Principle is valid and it follows that a negative rest mass cannot exist.

  1. Effect of atomic diffusion on the Raman-Ramsey CPT resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchina, Elena; Novikova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the characteristics of two-photon transmission resonances in Rb vapor cells with different amount of buffer gas under the conditions of steady-state coherent population trapping (CPT) and pulsed Raman-Ramsey (RR-) CPT interrogation scheme. We particularly focused on the influence of the Rb atoms diffusing in and out of the laser beam. We showed that this effect modifies the shape of both CPT and Raman-Ramsey resonances, as well as their projected performance for CPT clock applications. In particular we found that at moderate buffer gas pressures RR-CPT did not improved the projected atomic clock stability compare to the regular steady-state CPT resonance.

  2. Doorway approximation of the optical potential: application to one-electron ion-atom scattering systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a first application of the recently proposed doorway approximation of the time dependent optical potential to ion-atom collisions. The new formalism is tested for the one particle systems H+-H(1s) and H+-He+(1s). Results for elastic scattering, excitation, electron loss and ionization are compared with those of other theoretical approaches and with experimental data in the range of impact energies of 10-1000 keV for H+-He+(1s) and 2-1000 keV for H+-H(1s). (author)

  3. Applications of Atomic Energy in African economic and social development plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes briefly the basic principles of nuclear techniques applied in: raw materials development, including resources inventory; power; food and agriculture, including preservation and conservation; industry; medicine and biology; water resources development; and education and training, including manpower resources. It relates these subjects to situations and problems as they are to be found in individual African countries or sub-regions of the Continent. It suggests relative priorities and reveals that applications of atomic energy can only be beneficial on an inter-sectoral basis. Certain conclusions are put forward which may be relevant to the preparation and implementation of development plans at the national level. (author)

  4. Torque and atomic forces for Cartesian tensor atomic multipoles with an application to crystal unit cell optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M

    2016-08-15

    New equations for torque and atomic force are derived for use in flexible molecule force fields with atomic multipoles. The expressions are based on Cartesian tensors with arbitrary multipole rank. The standard method for rotating Cartesian tensor multipoles and calculating torque is to first represent the tensor with n indexes and 3(n) redundant components. In this work, new expressions for directly rotating the unique (n + 1)(n + 2)/2 Cartesian tensor multipole components Θpqr are given by introducing Cartesian tensor rotation matrix elements X(R). A polynomial expression and a recursion relation for X(R) are derived. For comparison, the analogous rotation matrix for spherical tensor multipoles are the Wigner functions D(R). The expressions for X(R) are used to derive simple equations for torque and atomic force. The torque and atomic force equations are applied to the geometry optimization of small molecule crystal unit cells. In addition, a discussion of computational efficiency as a function of increasing multipole rank is given for Cartesian tensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349179

  5. Polarizable atomic multipole x-ray refinement: hydration geometry and application to macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Timothy D; Schnieders, Michael J; Brunger, Axel T; Pande, Vijay S

    2010-06-16

    We recently developed a polarizable atomic multipole refinement method assisted by the AMOEBA force field for macromolecular crystallography. Compared to standard refinement procedures, the method uses a more rigorous treatment of x-ray scattering and electrostatics that can significantly improve the resultant information contained in an atomic model. We applied this method to high-resolution lysozyme and trypsin data sets, and validated its utility for precisely describing biomolecular electron density, as indicated by a 0.4-0.6% decrease in the R- and R(free)-values, and a corresponding decrease in the relative energy of 0.4-0.8 Kcal/mol/residue. The re-refinements illustrate the ability of force-field electrostatics to orient water networks and catalytically relevant hydrogens, which can be used to make predictions regarding active site function, activity, and protein-ligand interaction energies. Re-refinement of a DNA crystal structure generates the zigzag spine pattern of hydrogen bonding in the minor groove without manual intervention. The polarizable atomic multipole electrostatics model implemented in the AMOEBA force field is applicable and informative for crystal structures solved at any resolution. PMID:20550911

  6. Introduction: Finding new clock components; past and future

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of circadian clocks has been unraveled primarily by the use of phenotype-driven (forward) genetic analysis in a number of model systems. We are now in a position to consider what constitutes a clock component, whether we can establish criteria for clock components, and whether we have found most of the primary clock components? This perspective discusses clock genes and how genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry have been used to find clock gene...

  7. Comparing a mercury optical lattice clock with microwave and optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Tyumenev, R; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Nicolodi, D; Coq, Y Le; Abgrall, M; Guéna, J; De Sarlo, L; Bize, S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the evaluation of an optical lattice clock based on neutral mercury down to a relative uncertainty of $1.7\\times 10^{-16}$. Comparing this characterized frequency standard to a Cs atomic fountain we determine the absolute frequency of the $^1S_0 \\rightarrow \\phantom{}^3P_0$ transition of $^{199}$Hg as $\

  8. Prospect for a compact strontium optical lattice clock

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; M. G. Tarallo; Tino, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on our progress toward the realization of a compact optical frequency standard referenced to strontium intercombination lines. Our current setup allows the production of ultracold Sr atoms in hundreds of ms. For high resolution spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 doubly forbidden transition we have prepared a 698 nm clock laser stabilized on a high finesse, symmetrically suspended cavity and a high power 813 nm light source for the optical lattice trap at the magic wavelength. Due to their ...

  9. Strontium optical lattice clock with all semiconductor sources

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; M. G. Tarallo; Tino, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on our progress toward the realization of an optical frequency standard referenced to strontium intercombination lines. Our current setup allows the production of ultracold Sr atoms in hundreds of ms. For high resolution spectroscopy of 1S0-3P0 doubly forbidden transition we have also prepared a 698 nm clock laser stabilized on high finesse symmetrically suspended cavity and a high power 813 nm light source for the optical lattice trap at the magic wavelength. All the laser source e...

  10. Influence of measuring parameters on the accuracy of atomic force microscope in industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Antico, Andrea; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a powerful technique providing 3D surface topographies with very high resolution in both lateral and vertical direction. Thanks to its relatively easy use, AFM can be well introduced in process control, gaining great advantage in research as well as in the...... evaluation of final product characteristics. The paper considers quantitative application of AFM measurements for industrial applications. In particular the influence and subsequent optimization of scanning parameters on the precision of AFM maps is discussed, with particular attention to scan speed and...... interaction force when measuring a one-dimensional grating with triangular profile. The aim is then maximization of information from collected data and minimization of measurement variability and scan time. Optimized scan setting is then applied to measure surface defects of micro injection moulded components...

  11. An all-optical vector atomic magnetometer for fundamental physics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, David; Mateos, Ignacio; Zhivun, Elena; Patton, Brian; Fierlinger, Peter; Beck, Douglas; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a laboratory prototype of a compact all-optical vector magnetometer. Due to their high precision and absolute accuracy, atomic magnetometers are crucial sensors in fundamental physics experiments which require extremely stable magnetic fields (e.g., neutron EDM searches). This all-optical sensor will allow high-resolution measurements of the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field without perturbing the magnetic environment. Moreover, its absolute accuracy makes it calibration-free, an advantage in space applications (e.g., space-based gravitational-wave detection). Magnetometry in precision experiments or space applications also demands long-term stability and well-understood noise characteristics at frequencies below 10-4 Hz. We have characterized the low-frequency noise floor of this sensor and will discuss methods to improve its long-time performance.

  12. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  13. Fast Clock Recovery for Digital Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit extracts clock signal from random non-return-to-zero data stream, locking onto clock within one bit period at 1-gigabitper-second data rate. Circuit used for synchronization in opticalfiber communications. Derives speed from very short response time of gallium arsenide metal/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's).

  14. Temperature influences in receiver clock modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kan; Meindl, Michael; Rothacher, Markus; Schoenemann, Erik; Enderle, Werner

    2016-04-01

    In Precise Point Positioning (PPP), hardware delays at the receiver site (receiver, cables, antenna, …) are always difficult to be separated from the estimated receiver clock parameters. As a result, they are partially or fully contained in the estimated "apparent" clocks and will influence the deterministic and stochastic modelling of the receiver clock behaviour. In this contribution, using three years of data, the receiver clock corrections of a set of high-precision Hydrogen Masers (H-Masers) connected to stations of the ESA/ESOC network and the International GNSS Service (IGS) are firstly characterized concerning clock offsets, drifts, modified Allan deviations and stochastic parameters. In a second step, the apparent behaviour of the clocks is modelled with the help of a low-order polynomial and a known temperature coefficient (Weinbach, 2013). The correlations between the temperature and the hardware delays generated by different types of antennae are then analysed looking at daily, 3-day and weekly time intervals. The outcome of these analyses is crucial, if we intend to model the receiver clocks in the ground station network to improve the estimation of station-related parameters like coordinates, troposphere zenith delays and ambiguities. References: Weinbach, U. (2013) Feasibility and impact of receiver clock modeling in precise GPS data analysis. Dissertation, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.

  15. "Molecular Clock" Analogs: A Relative Rates Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Although molecular clock theory is a commonly discussed facet of evolutionary biology, undergraduates are rarely presented with the underlying information of how this theory is examined relative to empirical data. Here a simple contextual exercise is presented that not only provides insight into molecular clocks, but is also a useful exercise for…

  16. Network properties of the mammalian circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohling, Johannes Hermanus Theodoor

    2009-01-01

    The biological clock regulates daily and seasonal rhythms in mammals. This clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), which are two small nuclei each consisting of 10,000 neurons. The neurons of the SCN endogenously generate a rhythm of approximately 24 hours. Under the influence of the l

  17. A colorful model of the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Steven M

    2006-01-27

    The migration of the colorful monarch butterfly provides biologists with a unique model system with which to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying a sophisticated circadian clock. The monarch circadian clock is involved in the induction of the migratory state and navigation over long distances, using the sun as a compass. PMID:16439193

  18. Tectonic blocks and molecular clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales have mainly used fossils for calibrating molecular clocks, though fossils only really provide minimum clade age constraints. In their place, phylogenetic trees can be calibrated by precisely dated geological events that have shaped biogeography. However, tectonic episodes are protracted, their role in vicariance is rarely justified, the biogeography of living clades and their antecedents may differ, and the impact of such events is contingent on ecology. Biogeographic calibrations are no panacea for the shortcomings of fossil calibrations, but their associated uncertainties can be accommodated. We provide examples of how biogeographic calibrations based on geological data can be established for the fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent: (i) for the uplift of the Isthmus of Panama, (ii) the separation of New Zealand from Gondwana, and (iii) for the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Biogeographic and fossil calibrations are complementary, not competing, approaches to constraining molecular clock analyses, providing alternative constraints on the age of clades that are vital to avoiding circularity in investigating the role of biogeographic mechanisms in shaping modern biodiversity. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325840

  19. Single electron relativistic clock interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bushev, Pavel; Sholokhov, Dmitry; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Zych, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Although time is one of the fundamental notions in physics, it does not have a unique description. In quantum theory time is a parameter ordering the succession of the probability amplitudes of a quantum system, while according to relativity theory each system experiences in general a different proper time, depending on the system's world line, due to time to time dilation. It is therefore of fundamental interest to test the notion of time in the regime where both quantum and relativistic effects play a role, for example, when different amplitudes of a single quantum clock experience different magnitudes of time dilation. Here we propose a realization of such an experiment with a single electron in a Penning trap. The clock can be implemented in the electronic spin precession and its time dilation then depends on the radial (cyclotron) state of the electron. We show that coherent manipulation and detection of the electron can be achieved already with present day technology. A single electron in a Penning trap...

  20. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, M J; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems are fundamentally compelling and ubiquitous in science. However, their complexity generally prevents exact solutions of their dynamics. Precisely engineered ultracold atomic gases are emerging as a powerful tool to unravel these challenging physical problems. Here we present a new laboratory for the study of many-body effects: strongly interacting two-level systems formed by the clock states in ${}^{87}$Sr, which are used to realize a neutral atom optical clock that performs at the highest level of optical-atomic coherence and with precision near the limit set by quantum fluctuations. Our measurements of the collective spin evolution reveal signatures of many-body dynamics, including beyond-mean-field effects. We derive a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of severely distorted lineshapes, atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, and correlated quantum spin noise. These investigations open the door to explori...

  1. Plasma jet desorption atomization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and its application to mercury speciation by coupling with thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifu; Zhu, Zhenli; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2012-12-01

    A novel plasma jet desorption atomization (PJDA) source was developed for atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) and coupled on line with thin layer chromatography (TLC) for mercury speciation. An argon dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, which is generated inside a 300 μm quartz capillary, interacts directly with the sample being analyzed and is found to desorb and atomize surface mercury species rapidly. The effectiveness of this PJDA surface sampling technique was demonstrated by measuring AFS signals of inorganic Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) deposited directly on TLC plate. The detection limits of the proposed PJDA-AFS method for inorganic Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg were 0.51, 0.29, and 0.34 pg, respectively, and repeatability was 4.7%, 2.2%, and 4.3% for 10 pg Hg(2+), MeHg, and PhHg. The proposed PJDA-AFS was also successfully coupled to TLC for mercury speciation. Under optimized conditions, the measurements of mercury dithizonate (Hg-D), methylmercury dithizonate (MeHg-D), and phenylmercury dithizonate (PhHg-D) could be achieved within 3 min with detection limits as low as 8.7 pg. The combination of TLC with PJDA-AFS provides a simple, cost-effective, relatively high-throughput way for mercury speciation. PMID:23153091

  2. A low maintenance Sr optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Ian R; Bowden, William; Bridge, Elizabeth M; Donnellan, Sean; Curtis, E Anne; Gill, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Sr optical lattice clock apparatus at NPL with particular emphasis on techniques used to increase reliability and minimise the human requirement in its operation. Central to this is a clock-referenced transfer cavity scheme for the stabilisation of cooling and trapping lasers. We highlight several measures to increase the reliability of the clock with a view towards the realisation of an optical time-scale. The clock contributed 502 hours of data over a 25 day period (84% uptime) in a recent measurement campaign with several uninterrupted periods of more than 48 hours. An instability of $2\\times10^{-17}$ was reached after $10^5$ s of averaging in an interleaved self-comparison of the clock.

  3. Exchanging the Context between OGC Geospatial Web clients and GIS applications using Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maso, Joan; Díaz, Paula; Riverola, Anna; Pons, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Currently, the discovery and sharing of geospatial information over the web still presents difficulties. News distribution through website content was simplified by the use of Really Simple Syndication (RSS) and Atom syndication formats. This communication exposes an extension of Atom to redistribute references to geospatial information in a Spatial Data Infrastructure distributed environment. A geospatial client can save the status of an application that involves several OGC services of different kind and direct data and share this status with other users that need the same information and use different client vendor products in an interoperable way. The extensibility of the Atom format was essential to define a format that could be used in RSS enabled web browser, Mass Market map viewers and emerging geospatial enable integrated clients that support Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services. Since OWS Context has been designed as an Atom extension, it is possible to see the document in common places where Atom documents are valid. Internet web browsers are able to present the document as a list of items with title, abstract, time, description and downloading features. OWS Context uses GeoRSS so that, the document can be to be interpreted by both Google maps and Bing Maps as items that have the extent represented in a dynamic map. Another way to explode a OWS Context is to develop an XSLT to transform the Atom feed into an HTML5 document that shows the exact status of the client view window that saved the context document. To accomplish so, we use the width and height of the client window, and the extent of the view in world (geographic) coordinates in order to calculate the scale of the map. Then, we can mix elements in world coordinates (such as CF-NetCDF files or GML) with elements in pixel coordinates (such as WMS maps, WMTS tiles and direct SVG content). A smarter map browser application called MiraMon Map Browser is able to write a context document and read

  4. The absolute frequency of the 87Sr optical clock transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian;

    2008-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the 1S0–3P0 clock transition of 87Sr has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.65 (37) Hz using lattice-confined atoms, where the fractional uncertainty of 8.6 × 10-16 represents one of the most accurate measurements of an atomic transition frequency to date. After a d...

  5. Proceedings of fourth international conference on current developments in atomic, molecular, optical and nano-physics with applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of this symposium covered interdisciplinary subjects like atoms and molecular structure, collision processes and its applications in solar and stellar plasma, intense field, short pulse and atto-second physics, Bose-Einstein condensation, laser technology, quantum optics and applications, nanomaterials and nanoscience, electron/ion beam and electron microscopy with their use in various interdisciplinary branches of science, application of atomic, molecular, optical and nano physics in petroleum, renewable energy, environment sciences, information technology, health and education in developing countries. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  6. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  7. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  8. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  9. All-Optical Clock Recovery from NRZ-DPSK Signals at Flexible Bit Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose and demonstrate all-optical clock recovery (CR) from nonreturn-to-zero differential phase-shift-keying (NRZ-DPSK) signals at different bit rates theoretically and experimentally. By pre-processing with a single optical filter, clock component can be enhanced significantly and thus clock signal can be extracted from the preprocessed signals, by cascading a CR unit with a semiconductor optical amplifier based fibre ring laser. Compared with the previous preprocessing schemes, the single filter is simple and suitable for different bit rates. The clock signals can be achieved with extinction ratio over 10 dB and rms timing jitter of 0.86 and 0.9 at 10 and 20 Gb/s, respectively. The output performances related to the bandwidth and the detuning of the filter are analysed. By simply using a filter with larger bandwidth, much higher operation can be achieved easily. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  10. The clock system for LHAASO WCDA based on reduced White Rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the large scale of Water Cherenkov Detector Array in Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory, the front-end digitization is imperative. Thus a clock distribution system is desired, which broadcasts the synchronous clock signals with low jitter to the front-end electronics distributed in the field of 90000 m2. The White Rabbit protocol provides an option, which has been approved to achieve sub-ns accuracy and ps jitter in the synchronization of around 1000 nodes in the order of 10 km. But the hierarchy of the original is too complex for Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory application. Thus we proposed a reduced scheme based on the White Rabbit protocol. The validation circuit shows that the clock skew due to the fiber length difference can be adjusted to less than 25 ps and the clock jitter is less than 62 ps. (authors)

  11. Light-induced atomic desorption from PDMS films and porous glass: application and fundamental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light-induced desorption and diffusion of alkali atoms embedded in dielectric substrates are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The goal is to realize atomic dispensers fully controlled by light, to study the atom-dielectric interaction and to make spectroscopy of atoms confined in micro-nano structures. Very interesting results have been obtained with Rb and Cs in PDMS films and porous glasses

  12. Rydberg atoms in low-frequency fields : fundamental aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürtler, Andreas Stefan

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate highly excited atoms, so-called Rydberg atoms, in oscillating fields with frequencies from the megahertz to the terahertz domain. The strong interaction of Rydberg atoms with external fields is used to establish a connection between the ionization of Rydberg atoms by ra

  13. New method for gravitational wave detection with atomic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W; Hogan, Jason M; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2013-04-26

    Laser frequency noise is a dominant noise background for the detection of gravitational waves using long-baseline optical interferometry. Amelioration of this noise requires near simultaneous strain measurements on more than one interferometer baseline, necessitating, for example, more than two satellites for a space-based detector or two interferometer arms for a ground-based detector. We describe a new detection strategy based on recent advances in optical atomic clocks and atom interferometry which can operate at long baselines and which is immune to laser frequency noise. Laser frequency noise is suppressed because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This new class of sensor allows sensitive gravitational wave detection with only a single baseline. This approach also has practical applications in, for example, the development of ultrasensitive gravimeters and gravity gradiometers. PMID:23679702

  14. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  15. Dilatation effect of ''quantum clocks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relativistic dilatation effect of the life-time of unstable microparticles combined with quantum symmetry of their description results in the ''quantum-dilatation'' dilemma. It is due to the classical character of the relativity theory which here reveals itself in the classical world-line of the clock necessary in order to deduce the dilatation effect from the Lorentz transformation. It is shown how to solve this dilemma, basing on the relation continuum C4. Two types of measurements of time intervals, the direct and indirect one, are analyzed. The former type corresponds to the external space-time continuum, where any direct measurement takes place, and the latter, to the internal relation continuum C4, where the internal structures of isolated micro-systems are sunk. (author)

  16. Circadian clocks are designed optimally

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival by synchronizing to the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. Since both properties have been tuned through natural selection, their adaptation can be formalized in the framework of mathematical optimization. By using a succinct model, we found that simultaneous optimization of regularity and entrainability entails inherent features of the circadian mechanism irrespective of model details. At the behavioral level we discovered the existence of a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. At the molecular level we demonstrate the role-sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. We also reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments and predict molecular elements responsible for the clockwork...

  17. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A

    2016-01-28

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement--correlations in the properties of microscopic systems--to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million (87)Rb atoms in their 'clock' states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source. PMID:26751056

  18. Ozone-assisted atomic layer deposited ZnO thin films for multifunctional device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the growth temperature dependence of film thickness and surface roughness of ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition using ozone as an oxidizer. The significantly low growth rate of the film using O3 precursor is attributed to the recombinative surface loss of O3. The variation of the spatial uniformity inferred from the surface roughness of the ZnO films and the O3 concentration was explained by a transition from reaction- to recombination-limited growth. We have fabricated a metal–oxide–semiconductor device, consisting of an insulating ZnO layer using an O3 source, between metallic and semiconducting Al : ZnO layers. The device demonstrates a remarkable resistive switching behaviour. The electrochemical migration of oxygen vacancies, which is created in the vicinity of the interface of ZnO semiconductor–ZnO insulator, drives the resistive switching behaviour. This significant result produced on the all-oxide-based device fabricated by atomic layer deposited ZnO can have significant impact for multifunctional applications. (paper)

  19. ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.

    2009-05-05

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  20. Integration of atomic layer deposition-grown copper for advanced interconnect applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqi

    While copper damascene processes currently utilize physically vapor deposited (PVD) Cu seed layers, the continued scaling of interconnect feature sizes in advanced nanoelectronic devices requires the development of a more conformal, controllable Cu seed layer technology for use with electrochemically deposited (ECD) copper interconnects. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a promising alternative because of its excellent conformality and precise thickness control capability. In this research, a self-limiting plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) Cu process, employing Cu(II) acetylacetonate (Cu(acac)2) and atomic hydrogen, was employed to deposit high quality PEALD Cu films. In addition, substrate surface hydrogen plasma treatments prior to PEALD Cu growth were observed to enhance Cu nucleation, decrease Cu surface roughness, and reduce Cu resistivity. The performance characteristics of ECD/PEALD-grown Cu interconnects were compared with those of a conventional ECD/PVD Cu stack. Finally, void-free electroplated Cu was demonstrated on 60 and 35 nm patterned via structures using both ALD Ru/TaN and conventional PVD Ta/TaN liner/barrier structures coupled with PEALD Cu seed layers. The film properties and resulting integration characteristics suggest that PEALD Cu is a promising approach for advanced seed layer applications in CMOS metallization.

  1. Three errors in the article:" The OPERA neutrino velocity result and the synchronisation of clocks, "

    CERN Document Server

    Besida, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    We found three mistakes in the article " The OPERA neutrino velocity result and the synchronisation of clocks" by Contaldi \\cite{Contaldi}. First, the definition of the angle of the latitude in the geoid description leads to a prolate spheroid (rugby ball shape) instead of an oblate spheroid with the usual equatorial flattening. Second, Contaldi forgot a cosine of the latitude in the centripetal contribution term. And last but not least, a profound conceptual mistake was done in believing that an atomic clock or any timekeeper apparatus was carried in a journey by car or plane between CERN and Gran Sasso; instead of that atomic clocks are continuously resynchronized through a GPS device, and the variation of the potential term applies only for the neutrino travel itself. Thus instead of a $\\Delta t \\approx 30ns $ correction claimed by the author in a travel of 12 hours plus 4 days at rest for an atomic clock, we have found a time correction only for the neutrino itself $\\Delta t=3.88 \\, 10^{-16} s$! That mean...

  2. Lasing and suppressed cavity-pulling effect of Cesium active optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhichao; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the collective emission behavior and suppressed cavity-pulling effect of four-level active optical clock with Cesium atoms. Thermal Cesium atoms in a glass cell velocity selective pumped with a 455.5 nm laser operating at 6S$_{1/2}$ to 7P$_{3/2}$ transition are used as lasing medium. Population inverted Cesium atoms between 7S$_{1/2}$ and 6P$_{3/2}$ levels are optical weakly coupled by a pair cavity mirrors working at deep bad-cavity regime with a finesse of 4.3, and the ratio between cavity bandwidth and gain bandwidth is approximately 45. With increased 455.5 nm pumping laser intensity, the output power of cesium active optical clock at 1469.9 nm from 7S$_{1/2}$ level to 6P$_{3/2}$ level shows a threshold and reach a power of 13 $\\mu$W. Active optical clock would dramatically improve the optical clock stability since the lasing frequency does not follow the cavity length variation exactly, but in a form of suppressed cavity pulling effect. In this letter the cavity pulling effe...

  3. Quantum metrology with cold atomic ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Morgan W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum metrology uses quantum features such as entanglement and squeezing to improve the sensitivity of quantum-limited measurements. Long established as a valuable technique in optical measurements such as gravitational-wave detection, quantum metrology is increasingly being applied to atomic instruments such as matter-wave interferometers, atomic clocks, and atomic magnetometers. Several of these new applications involve dual optical/atomic quantum systems, presenting both new challenges and new opportunities. Here we describe an optical magnetometry system that achieves both shot-noise-limited and projection-noise-limited performance, allowing study of optical magnetometry in a fully-quantum regime [1]. By near-resonant Faraday rotation probing, we demonstrate measurement-based spin squeezing in a magnetically-sensitive atomic ensemble [2-4]. The versatility of this system allows us also to design metrologically-relevant optical nonlinearities, and to perform quantum-noise-limited measurements with interacting photons. As a first interaction-based measurement [5], we implement a non-linear metrology scheme proposed by Boixo et al. with the surprising feature of precision scaling better than the 1/N “Heisenberg limit” [6].

  4. Applications of Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Scattering to Problems in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1995-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the applications of quantum theory in atomic and molecular scattering problems in hypersonic flow is summarized. Abstracts of five articles and eleven full-length articles published or submitted for publication are included as attachments. The following topics are addressed in these articles: fragmentation of heavy ions (HZE particles); parameterization of absorption cross sections; light ion transport; emission of light fragments as an indicator of equilibrated populations; quantum mechanical, optical model methods for calculating cross sections for particle fragmentation by hydrogen; evaluation of NUCFRG2, the semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation database; investigation of the single- and double-ionization of He by proton and anti-proton collisions; Bose-Einstein condensation of nuclei; and a liquid drop model in HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen.

  5. Toward the Application of Three-Dimensional Approach to Few-body Atomic Bound States

    CERN Document Server

    Hadizadeh, M R

    2010-01-01

    The first step toward the application of an effective non partial wave (PW) numerical approach to few-body atomic bound states has been taken. The two-body transition amplitude which appears in the kernel of three-dimensional Faddeev-Yakubovsky integral equations is calculated as function of two-body Jacobi momentum vectors, i.e. as a function of the magnitude of initial and final momentum vectors and the angle between them. For numerical calculation the realistic interatomic interactions HFDHE2, HFD-B, LM2M2 and TTY are used. The angular and momentum dependence of the fully off-shell transition amplitude is studied at negative energies. It has been numerically shown that, similar to the nuclear case, the transition amplitude exhibits a characteristic angular behavior in the vicinity of 4He dimer pole.

  6. System design and new applications for atomic force microscope based on tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Liu, A. P.; Yang, X. H.

    2015-09-01

    The design of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with high resolution is introduced in this paper. Mainly, we have developed the system design of the apparatus based on tunneling. AFM.IPC-208B, this kind of apparatus combines scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) and AFM availability, and its lens body with original frame enhances the capability of the machine. In order to analyze the performance of AFM.IPC-208B, as a new tool in the field of Life Science, we make use of the system to study natural mica and molecular protein structures of Cattle-insulin and human antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) coupled with staphylococcus protein A (SPA). As the results of new applications, the resolution of AFM.IPC-208B is proved to be 0.1 nm, and these nanometer measurement results provide much valuable information for the study of small molecular proteins and HIV experiments.

  7. Toward the Application of Three-Dimensional Approach to Few-body Atomic Bound States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadizadeh M.R.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The first step toward the application of an effective non partial wave (PW numerical approach to few-body atomic bound states has been taken. The two-body transition amplitude which appears in the kernel of three-dimensional Faddeev-Yakubovsky integral equations is calculated as function of two-body Jacobi momentum vectors, i.e. as a function of the magnitude of initial and final momentum vectors and the angle between them. For numerical calculation the realistic interatomic interactions HFDHE2, HFD-B, LM2M2 and TTY are used. The angular and momentum dependence of the fully off-shell transition amplitude is studied at negative energies. It has been numerically shown that, similar to the nuclear case, the transition amplitude exhibits a characteristic angular behavior in the vicinity of 4He dimer pole.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  9. Optical coatings grown by atomic layer deposition for high-power laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prepared optical coatings with low (Al2O3) and high (TiO2) refractive index materials using the sequential chemical reaction process of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Also, we examined the laser damage thresholds of the films for high-power laser applications. The highest damage thresholds were obtained for amorphous films grown at room temperature. For TiO2 and Al2O3 films they equalled 5 and 5.2 J/cm2, respectively. Finally, we employed ALD for growing desired refractive index coatings consisting of alternating nanoscale Al2O3-TiO2 laminated layers. The refractive index of the stack of these layers could be varied linearly from 1.61 to 2.39 by adjusting the thickness of the component layers. (author)

  10. Raman transitions between hyperfine clock states in a magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Naber, J B; Hubert, T; Spreeuw, R J C

    2016-01-01

    We present our experimental investigation of an optical Raman transition between the magnetic clock states of $^{87}$Rb in an atom chip magnetic trap. The transfer of atomic population is induced by a pair of diode lasers which couple the two clock states off-resonantly to an intermediate state manifold. This transition is subject to destructive interference of two excitation paths, which leads to a reduction of the effective two-photon Rabi-frequency. Furthermore, we find that the transition frequency is highly sensitive to the intensity ratio of the diode lasers. Our results are well described in terms of light shifts in the multi-level structure of $^{87}$Rb. The differential light shifts vanish at an optimal intensity ratio, which we observe as a narrowing of the transition linewidth. We also observe the temporal dynamics of the population transfer and find good agreement with a model based on the system's master equation and a Gaussian laser beam profile. Finally, we identify several sources of decoheren...

  11. Synthetic Frequency Protocol in the Ramsey Spectroscopy of Clock Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Yudin, V I; Basalaev, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    We develop an universal method to significantly suppress probe-induced shifts in any types of atomic clocks using the Ramsey spectroscopy. Our approach is based on adaptation of the synthetic frequency concept [V. I. Yudin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 030801 (2011)] (previously developed for BBR shift suppression) to the Ramsey spectroscopy with the use of interrogations for different dark time intervals. Universality of the method consists in arbitrariness of the possible Ramsey schemes. However, most extremal results are obtained in combination with so-called hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy [V. I. Yudin, et al., Phys. Rev. A 82, 011804(R) (2010)]. In the latter case, the probe-induced frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10$^{-18}$ practically for any optical atomic clocks, where this shift previously was metrologically significant. The main advantage of our method in comparison with other radical hyper-Ramsey approaches [R. Hobson, et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 010501(R) (2016...

  12. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  13. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brand (Karl)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces pe

  14. Quantum control of d-dimensional quantum systems with application to alkali atomic spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Seth

    In this dissertation I analyze Hamiltonian control of d-dimensional quantum systems as realized in alkali atomic spins. Alkali atoms provide an ideal platform for studies of quantum control due to the extreme precision with which the control fields are characterized as well as their isolation from their environment. In many cases, studies into the control of atomic spins restrict attention to a 2-dimesional subspace in order to consider qubit control. The geometry of quantum 2-level systems is much simpler than for any larger dimensional Hilbert space, and so control techniques for qubits often are not applicable to larger systems. In reality, atoms have many internal levels. It seems a shame to throw away most of our Hilbert space when it could in principle be used for encoding information and performing error correction. This work develops some of the tools necessary to control these large atomic spins. Quantum control theory has some very generic properties that have previously been explored in the literature, notably in the work from the Rabitz group. I provide a review of this literature, showing that while the landscape topology of quantum control problems is relatively independent of physical platform, different optimization techniques are required to find optimal controls depending on the particular control task. To this end I have developed two optimal control algorithms for finding unitary maps for the problems of: "state preparation" where we require only that a single fiducial state us taken to a particular target state and "unitary construction" where the entire map is specified. State mapping turns out to be a simple problem to solve and is amenable to a gradient search method. This protocol is not feasible for the task of finding full unitary maps, but I show how we can weave state mappings together to form full unitary maps. This construction of unitary maps is efficient in the dimension of the Hilbert space. The particular system I have used for

  15. Atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will first present a development of the fundamental principles of atom interferometers. Next we will discuss a few of the various methods now available to split and recombine atomic De Broglie waves, with special emphasis on atom interferometers based on optical pulses. We will also be particularly concerned with high precision interferometers with long measurement times such those made with atomic fountains. The application of atom interferometry to the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity will be detailed. We will also develop the atom interferometry based on adiabatic transfer and we will apply it to the measurement of the photon recoil in the case of the Doppler shift of an atomic resonance caused by the momentum recoil from an absorbed photon. Finally the outlook of future developments will be given. (A.C.)

  16. Atom gravimeters and gravitational redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Borde, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; 10.1038/nature09340

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper, H. Mueller, A. Peters and S. Chu [A precision measurement of the gravitational redshift by the interference of matter waves, Nature 463, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometry experiments published a decade ago did in fact measure the gravitational redshift on the quantum clock operating at the very high Compton frequency associated with the rest mass of the Caesium atom. In the present Communication we show that this interpretation is incorrect.

  17. Analysis and application of the scale effect of flood discharge atomization model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of discharge atomization occurs as hydraulic structures discharging,which influences the safety of power station,electrical equipment and produces environmental pollution.A series of physical model tests and feedback analysis are adapted to preliminarily study the scale effect of discharge atomization model by use of the field observation data of discharge atomization.The effect of Re and We numbers of flow on the atomization intensity is analyzed.A conversion relationship of atomization intensity between prototype and model results and the similarity criteria of the atomization range are developed. The conclusion is that the surface tension of discharge atomization model could be ignored when the Weber number is larger than 500.Some case studies are given by use of the similitude criteria of the atomization model.

  18. A Byzantine-Fault Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded distributed systems have become an integral part of safety-critical computing applications, necessitating system designs that incorporate fault tolerant clock synchronization in order to achieve ultra-reliable assurance levels. Many efficient clock synchronization protocols do not, however, address Byzantine failures, and most protocols that do tolerate Byzantine failures do not self-stabilize. Of the Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization algorithms that exist in the literature, they are based on either unjustifiably strong assumptions about initial synchrony of the nodes or on the existence of a common pulse at the nodes. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol presented here does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The proposed protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period. Proofs of the correctness of the protocol as well as the results of formal verification efforts are reported.

  19. Draper Clock-Synchronization Protocol in SAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In 1973, Daly, Hpokins, and McKenna (from Draper Lab.) presented a fault-tolerant digital clocking system at the FTCS conference. This is probably one of the first...

  20. The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu

    2013-01-01

    "The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks" presents historical views and mathematical models of mechanical watches and clocks. Although now over six hundred years old, mechanical watches and clocks are still popular luxury items that fascinate many people around the world. However few have examined the theory of how they work as presented in this book. The illustrations and computer animations are unique and have never been published before. It will be of significant interest to researchers in mechanical engineering, watchmakers and clockmakers, as well as people who have an engineering background and are interested in mechanical watches and clocks. It will also inspire people in other fields of science and technology, such as mechanical engineering and electronics engineering, to advance their designs. Professor Ruxu Du works at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, China. Assistant Professor Longhan Xie works at the South China University of Technology, China.

  1. Entrainment of the Neurospora circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M; Boesl, C; Ricken, J; Messerschmitt, M; Goedel, M; Roenneberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been systematically investigated for circadian entrainment behavior. Many aspects of synchronization can be investigated in this simple, cellular system, ranging from systematic entrainment and drivenness to masking. Clock gene expression during entrainment and entrainment with

  2. Micro Mercury Ion Clock (MMIC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate micro clock based on trapped Hg ions with more than 10x size reduction and power; Fractional frequency stability at parts per 1014 level, adequate for...

  3. Working around the clock: circadian rhythms and skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, XIPING; Dube, Thomas J.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of the circadian molecular clock in skeletal muscle is in the very early stages. Initial research has demonstrated the presence of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle and that skeletal muscle of a clock-compromised mouse, Clock mutant, exhibits significant disruption in normal expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. In light of the growing association between the molecular clock, metabolism, and metabolic disease, it will also be important to ...

  4. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as Δ∫exp=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, Δ∫th=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r2 right angle d- left angle r2 right angle p=3.82007(65) fm2 and the deuteron structure radius rstr=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10-15. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c(TX)-0.29c(TY)-0.08 c(TZ)=(2.2±1.8) x 10-11 within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level (∂)/(∂t)ln (μCs)/(μB)=-(3.0±1.2) x 10-15 yr-1.

  5. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  6. STM Single Atom/Molecule Manipulation and Its Application to Nanoscience and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hla*, Saw-Wai

    2005-01-01

    Single atom/molecule manipulation with a scanning-tunneling-microscope (STM) tip is an innovative experimental technique of nanoscience. Using STM-tip as an engineering or analytical tool, artificial atomic-scale structures can be fabricated, novel quantum phenomena can be probed, and properties of single atoms and molecules can be studied at an atomic level. In thi sarticle, various STM manipulation procedures are described.

  7. An atomic clockwork using phase dependent energy shifts

    CERN Document Server

    De Munshi, D; Mukherjee, M

    2011-01-01

    A frequency stabilized laser referenced to an unperturbed atomic two level system acts as the most accurate clock with femtosecond clock ticks. For any meaningful use, a Femtosecond Laser Frequency Comb (FLFC) is used to transfer the atomic clock accuracy to electronically countable nanosecond clock ticks. Here we propose an alternative clockwork based on the phenomenon that when an atomic system is slowly evolved in a cyclic path, the atomic energy levels gather some phase called the geometric phase. This geometric phase dependent energy shift has been used here to couple the two frequency regimes in a phase coherent manner. It has also been shown that such a technique can be implemented experimentally, bypassing the highly involved setup of a FLFC.

  8. Clock genes, hair growth and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Geyfman, Mikhail; Andersen, Bogi

    2010-01-01

    Hair follicles undergo continuous cycles of growth, involution and rest. This process, referred to as the hair growth cycle, has a periodicity of weeks to months. At the same time, skin and hair follicles harbor a functional circadian clock that regulates gene expression with a periodicity of approximately twenty four hours. In our recent study we found that circadian clock genes play a role in regulation of the hair growth cycle during synchronized hair follicle cycling, uncovering an unexpe...

  9. Expression of Clock Proteins in Developing Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Li; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago D.; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Papagerakis, Petros

    2010-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation suggest that enamel and dentin formation is under circadian control. Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with periods of 24 hours that control diverse physiological and metabolic processes. Mammalian clock genes play a key role in synchronizing circadian functions in many organs. However, close to nothing is known on clock genes expression during tooth development. In this work, we ...

  10. Circadian Clock Proteins in Mood Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Partonen, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Mood regulation is known to be affected by the change of seasons. Recent research findings have suggested that mood regulation may be influenced by the function of circadian clocks. In addition, the activity of brown adipocytes has been hypothesized to contribute to mood regulation. Here, the overarching link to mood disorders might be the circadian clock protein nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1.

  11. Circadian clock proteins in mood regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo ePartonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood regulation is known to be affected by the change of seasons. Recent research findings have suggested that mood regulation may be influenced by the function of circadian clocks. In addition, the activity of brown adipocytes has been hypothesized to contribute to mood regulation. Here, the overarching link to mood disorders might be the circadian clock protein NR1D1 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1.

  12. Reduced Kalman Filters for Clock Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the author's work ontimescales based on Kalman filters that act upon the clock comparisons. The natural Kalman timescale algorithm tends to optimize long-term timescale stability at the expense of short-term stability. By subjecting each post-measurement error covariance matrix to a non-transparent reduction operation, one obtains corrected clocks with improved short-term stability and little sacrifice of long-term stability.

  13. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Cassone, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to...

  14. Adsorption of chitosan onto carbonaceous surfaces and its application: atomic force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of chitosan onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite(HOPG) surfaces and its applications have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that chitosan topography formed on the HOPG surface significantly depends on the pH conditions and its concentration for the incubation. Under strongly acidic conditions (pH -1, chitosan formed into uniform network structures composed of fine chains. When the solution pH was changed from 3.5 to 6.5, chitosan tends to form a thicker film. Under neutral and basic conditions, chitosan changed into spherical nanoparticles, and their sizes were increased with increasing pH. Dendritic structures have been observed when the chitosan concentration was increased up to 5 mg ml-1. In addition, the chitosan topography can also be influenced by ionic strength and the addition of different metal ions. When 0.1 M metal ions Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Cu2+ were added into the chitosan solution at pH 3.0 for the incubation, network structures, branched chains, block structures and dense networks attached with many small particles were observed, respectively. The potential applications of these chitosan structures on HOPG have been explored. Preliminary results characterized by AFM and XPS indicated that the chitosan network formed on the HOPG surface can be used for AFM lithography, selective adsorption of gold nanoparticles and DNA molecules.

  15. A brief review of atomic layer deposition: from fundamentals to applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a vapor phase technique capable of producing thin films of a variety of materials. Based on sequential, self-limiting reactions, ALD offers exceptional conformality on high-aspect ratio structures, thickness control at the Angstrom level, and tunable film composition. With these advantages, ALD has emerged as a powerful tool for many industrial and research applications. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to ALD and highlight select applications, including Cu(In,GaSe2 solar cell devices, high-k transistors, and solid oxide fuel cells. These examples are chosen to illustrate the variety of technologies that are impacted by ALD, the range of materials that ALD can deposit – from metal oxides such as Zn1−xSnxOy, ZrO2, Y2O3, to noble metals such as Pt – and the way in which the unique features of ALD can enable new levels of performance and deeper fundamental understanding to be achieved.

  16. From Sundials to Atomic Clocks: Understanding Time and Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, James; Fitz-Randolph, Jane

    An introduction to time, timekeeping, and the uses of time information, especially in the scientific and technical areas, are offered in this book for laymen. Historical and philosophical aspects of time and timekeeping are included. The scientific thought on time has been simplified. Contents include: the nature of time, time and frequency, early…

  17. Initial Tests of a Rubidium Space Cold Atom Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Qiu-Zhi, Qu; Bin, Wang; Tang, Li; Jian-Bo, Zhao; Jing-Wei, Ji; Wei, Ren; Xin, Zhao; Mei-Feng, Ye; Yuan-Yuan, Yao; De-Sheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China under Grant No 2013YQ09094304, the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11034008 and 11274324.

  18. The Chemical and Educational Appeal of the Orange Juice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.; Johnson, Tanya; Mauricio Castro-Acuña, Carlos

    1996-12-01

    characterized by seeing educational possibilities in so many things, created a modified version of the clock, with the atomic numbers of the elements representing the hours in the day (see Fig. 2) in his internationally popular workshops. Due largely to Talesnick's efforts, the orange juice clock is a standard demonstration in many chemistry programs and presentations. Figure 2.Irwin Talesnick represents the hours of the day by the corresponding elements in his clock. The Procedure This can be done as a demonstration or as an activity, although at about 10 per clock, expense does become an issue. There are no unusual safety precautions with this demonstration. We know of no accidents that have occurred with the orange juice clock. The demonstration requires: a single AA-cell battery-operated wall clock with a sweep-second hand a medium-sized beaker (600 mL is fine) enough orange juice or other electrolyte mixture or solution to fill the beaker about 2/3 full (tap water often works fine!) a 20-30-cm magnesium strip, coiled at one end or wrapped around a popsicle stick a 20-30-cm copper strip, coiled at one end alligator clips to connect the strips to the battery terminals on the clock a stand against which to lean the setup The demonstration is put together as shown in Figure 3. Connect the magnesium to the "-" contact of the clock and the copper to the "+" contact. Immerse the other ends of the strips into the solution. The clock will start to tick within a few seconds. If it does not work within a short period of time, check that the strips are well connected to the battery terminals, are hooked to the proper poles, and are not touching each other. The clock should keep reasonably close time (in orange juice) for a couple of days, or until the magnesium is nearly completely oxidized. Figure 3.A schematic of the orange juice clock seup. Video of orange juice clock. In video, the copper electrode is on the left and the magnesium electrode is on the right. Video was filmed and

  19. Schroedinger atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Features of an electrodynamical interpretation suggested by Schroedinger for the wave function are discribed. According to this conception electron charges are continuously distributed all over the volume of an atomic system. The proof is given that classical electrodynamics keeps its action inside atom. Schroedinger's atom has been shown to be the only model in which electrones do not lose their energy for emission when they move around nucleus. A significance of the distributed electron charge self-field is estimated. Practical applications of this conception have been noted including the new trend in quantum electrodynamics. Experimental and theoretical corroborations of the atom model with a continuous electron charge are adduced

  20. Atom interferometry with lithium atoms: theoretical analysis and design of an interferometer, applications; Interferometrie atomique avec l'atome de lithium: analyse theorique et construction d'un interferometre, applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champenois, C

    1999-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to studies which prepared the construction of an atom Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In such an interferometer, the propagating waves are spatially separated, and the internal state of the atom is not modified. The beam-splitters are diffraction gratings, consisting of standing optical waves near-resonant with an atomic transition. We use the Bloch functions to define the atom wave inside the standing wave grating and thus explain the diffraction process in different cases. We developed a nearly all-analytical model for the propagation of an atom wave inside a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The contrast of the signal is studied for many cases: phase or amplitude gratings, effects of extra paths, effects of the main mismatches, monochromatic or lightly polychromatic sources. Finally, we discuss three interferometric measurements we think very interesting. The first, the index of refraction of gas for atomic waves, is studied in detail, with numerical simulations. The other measures we propose deal with the electrical properties of lithium. We discuss the ultimate limit for the measure of the static electric polarizability of lithium by atomic interferometry. Then, we discuss how one could measure the possible charge of the lithium atom. We conclude that an optically cooled and collimated atom beam would improve precision. (author)