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Sample records for atomic carbon nanowires

  1. Theoretical studies of the stretching behavior of carbon nanowires and their superplasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Sun, F.W.; Li, Y.F. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Liu, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2008-09-15

    The tensile deformation of carbon nanowire (CNW) is examined by molecular dynamics method. Results indicate that the carbon nanowire undergoes superplastic deformation. The maximum tensile strain of the carbon nanowire could increase to nearly 245% before tensile failure. The maximum stress for a CNW is 16.65 GPa which is lower than carbon nanotube. During the deformation, the carbon nanowire is found to be drawn a single atomic chain.

  2. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong; Hellstrom, Sondra; Bao, Zhenan; Boyanov, Boyan; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Atomic-Resolution Spectrum Imaging of Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Reza R; Hage, Fredrik S; Lehmann, Sebastian; Ramasse, Quentin M; Dick, Kimberly A

    2018-03-14

    Over the past decade, III-V heterostructure nanowires have attracted a surge of attention for their application in novel semiconductor devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs). The functionality of such devices critically depends on the specific atomic arrangement at the semiconductor heterointerfaces. However, most of the currently available characterization techniques lack sufficient spatial resolution to provide local information on the atomic structure and composition of these interfaces. Atomic-resolution spectrum imaging by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is a powerful technique with the potential to resolve structure and chemical composition with sub-angstrom spatial resolution and to provide localized information about the physical properties of the material at the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic-resolution EELS to understand the interface atomic arrangement in three-dimensional heterostructures in semiconductor nanowires. We observed that the radial interfaces of GaSb-InAs heterostructure nanowires are atomically abrupt, while the axial interface in contrast consists of an interfacial region where intermixing of the two compounds occurs over an extended spatial region. The local atomic configuration affects the band alignment at the interface and, hence, the charge transport properties of devices such as GaSb-InAs nanowire TFETs. STEM-EELS thus represents a very promising technique for understanding nanowire physical properties, such as differing electrical behavior across the radial and axial heterointerfaces of GaSb-InAs nanowires for TFET applications.

  4. Looking into meta-atoms of plasmonic nanowire metamaterial

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Kuntong

    2014-09-10

    Nanowire-based plasmonic metamaterials exhibit many intriguing properties related to the hyperbolic dispersion, negative refraction, epsilon-near-zero behavior, strong Purcell effect, and nonlinearities. We have experimentally and numerically studied the electromagnetic modes of individual nanowires (meta-atoms) forming the metamaterial. High-resolution, scattering-type near-field optical microscopy has been used to visualize the intensity and phase of the modes. Numerical and analytical modeling of the mode structure is in agreement with the experimental observations and indicates the presence of the nonlocal response associated with cylindrical surface plasmons of nanowires.

  5. Functionalization of lanthanum hydroxide nanowires by atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mi; Yuan Jinying; Yuan Weizhong; Yin Yingwu; Hong Xiaoyin

    2007-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been used to prepare a core-shell hybrid nanostructure successfully: a hard core of single-crystalline lanthanum hydroxide nanowires and a soft shell of polystyrene (PS) brushes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated that the resulting products presented special structures and different thicknesses of polymer layers. The chemical components and grafted PS quantities of the samples were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The polymers showed narrow polydispersity, which proved that the lanthanum hydroxide nanowires initiated the 'living'/controlled polymerization of styrene. With the modifiability of lanthanum hydroxide nanowires, the solubility increased, which affords a new way to functionalize nanowires

  6. Pseudo-topotactic conversion of carbon nanotubes to T-carbon nanowires under picosecond laser irradiation in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinying; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Xi; Pan, Aifei; Han, Chenxiao; Li, Xin; Dan Zhao; Ma, Chuansheng; Wang, Wenjun; Su, Haibin; Niu, Chunming

    2017-09-25

    Pseudo-topotactic conversion of carbon nanotubes into one-dimensional carbon nanowires is a challenging but feasible path to obtain desired diameters and morphologies. Here, a previously predicted but experimentally unobserved carbon allotrope, T-carbon, has been produced from pseudo-topotactic conversion of a multi-walled carbon nanotube suspension in methanol by picosecond pulsed-laser irradiation. The as-grown T-carbon nanowires have the same diameter distribution as pristine carbon nanotubes, and have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transform, electron energy loss, ultraviolet-visible, and photoluminescence spectroscopies to possess a diamond-like lattice, where each carbon is replaced by a carbon tetrahedron, and a lattice constant of 7.80 Å. The change in entropy from carbon nanotubes to T-carbon reveals the phase transformation to be first order in nature. The computed electronic band structures and projected density of states are in good agreement with the optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the T-carbon nanowires.T-carbon is a previously predicted but so far unobserved allotrope of carbon, with a crystal structure similar to diamond, but with each atomic lattice position replaced by a carbon tetrahedron. Here, the authors produce T-carbon nanowires via laser-irradiating a suspension of carbon nanotubes in methanol.

  7. Atomic-scale nanowires: physical and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, D R

    2004-01-01

    The technology to build and study nanowires with sizes ranging from individual atoms to tens of nanometres has been developing rapidly over the last few years. We survey the motivation behind these developments, and summarize the basics behind quantized conduction. Several of the different experimental techniques and materials systems used in the creation of nanowires are examined, and the range of theoretical methods developed both for examining open systems (especially their conduction properties) and for modelling large systems are considered. We present various noteworthy example results from the field, before concluding with a look at future directions. (topical review)

  8. Hot atom chemistry of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    The chemistry of energetic carbon atoms is discussed. The experimental approach to studies that have been carried out is described and the mechanistic framework of hot carbon atom reactions is considered in some detail. Finally, the direction that future work might take is examined, including the relationship of experimental to theoretical work. (author)

  9. Atomic characterization of Au clusters in vapor-liquid-solid grown silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wanghua; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Pareige, Philippe; Castro, Celia; Xu, Tao; Grandidier, Bruno; Stiévenard, Didier

    2015-01-01

    By correlating atom probe tomography with other conventional microscope techniques (scanning electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, and scanning tunneling microscopy), the distribution and composition of Au clusters in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Si nanowires is investigated. Taking advantage of the characteristics of atom probe tomography, we have developed a sample preparation method by inclining the sample at certain angle to characterize the nanowire sidewall without using focused ion beam. With three-dimensional atomic scale reconstruction, we provide direct evidence of Au clusters tending to remain on the nanowire sidewall rather than being incorporated into the Si nanowires. Based on the composition measurement of Au clusters (28% ± 1%), we have demonstrated the supersaturation of Si atoms in Au clusters, which supports the hypothesis that Au clusters are formed simultaneously during nanowire growth rather than during the cooling process

  10. Atomic characterization of Au clusters in vapor-liquid-solid grown silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanghua; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (LPICM), UMR 7647, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pareige, Philippe; Castro, Celia [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux (GPM), Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6634, CNRS, Av. de l' Université, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Xu, Tao; Grandidier, Bruno; Stiévenard, Didier [Institut d' Electronique et de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies (IEMN), UMR 8520, CNRS, Département ISEN, 41 bd Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France)

    2015-09-14

    By correlating atom probe tomography with other conventional microscope techniques (scanning electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, and scanning tunneling microscopy), the distribution and composition of Au clusters in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Si nanowires is investigated. Taking advantage of the characteristics of atom probe tomography, we have developed a sample preparation method by inclining the sample at certain angle to characterize the nanowire sidewall without using focused ion beam. With three-dimensional atomic scale reconstruction, we provide direct evidence of Au clusters tending to remain on the nanowire sidewall rather than being incorporated into the Si nanowires. Based on the composition measurement of Au clusters (28% ± 1%), we have demonstrated the supersaturation of Si atoms in Au clusters, which supports the hypothesis that Au clusters are formed simultaneously during nanowire growth rather than during the cooling process.

  11. The mechanism of transforming diamond nanowires to carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorkin, Anastassia; Su, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of diamond nanowires (DNWs) with different diameters and geometries upon heating is investigated with density-functional-based tight-binding molecular dynamics. DNWs of 〈100〉 and 〈111〉 oriented cross-section with projected average line density between 7 and 20 atoms Å −1 transform into carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under gradual heating up to 3500–4000 K. DNWs with projected average line density larger than 25 atoms Å −1 transform into double-wall CNTs. The route of transformation into CNTs clearly exhibits three stages, with the intriguing intermediate structural motif of a carbon nanoscroll (CNS). Moreover, the morphology plays an important role in the transformation involving the CNS as one important intermediate motif to form CNTs. When starting with 〈 2-bar 11〉 oriented DNWs with a square cross-section consisting of two {111} facets facing each other, one interesting structure with ‘nano-bookshelf’ shape emerges: a number of graphene ‘shelves’ located inside the CNT, bonding to the CNT walls with sp 3 hybridized atoms. The nano-bookshelf structures exist in a wide range of temperatures up to 3000 K. The further transformation from nano-bookshelf structures depends on the strength of the joints connecting shelves with CNT walls. Notably, the nano-bookshelf structure can evolve into two end products: one is CNT via the CNS pathway, the other is graphene transformed directly from the nano-bookshelf structure at high temperature. This work sheds light on the microscopic insight of carbon nanostructure formation mechanisms with the featured motifs highlighted in the pathways. (paper)

  12. Investigation on the effect of atomic defects on the breaking behaviors of gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fenying; Sun Wei; Wang Hongbo; Zhao Jianwei; Kiguchi, Manabu; Sun Changqing

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties and breaking behaviors of the [100]-oriented single-crystal gold nanowires containing a set of defect ratios have been studied at different temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations. The size of the nanowire is 10a × 10a × 30a (a stands for lattice constant, 0.408 nm for gold). The mechanical strengths of the nanowires decrease with the increasing temperature. However, the defects that enhance the local thermal energy have improved the nanowire mechanical strength under a wide range of temperature. Comparing to the single-crystal nanowire, the existence of the atomic defects extends the elastic deformation showing a larger yield strain. By summarizing 300 samples at each temperature, the statistical breaking position distribution shows that the nanowire breaking behavior is sensitive to the atomic defects when the defect ratio is 5 % at 100 K, whereas the ratio is 1 % when temperatures are 300 and 500 K.

  13. Nanomanipulation and nanofabrication with multi-probe scanning tunneling microscope: from individual atoms to nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wang, Zhouhang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-06-01

    The wide variety of nanoscale structures and devices demands novel tools for handling, assembly, and fabrication at nanoscopic positioning precision. The manipulation tools should allow for in situ characterization and testing of fundamental building blocks, such as nanotubes and nanowires, as they are built into functional devices. In this paper, a bottom-up technique for nanomanipulation and nanofabrication is reported by using a 4-probe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The applications of this technique are demonstrated in a variety of nanosystems, from manipulating individual atoms to bending, cutting, breaking carbon nanofibers, and constructing nanodevices for electrical characterizations. The combination of the wide field of view of SEM, the atomic position resolution of STM, and the flexibility of multiple scanning probes is expected to be a valuable tool for rapid prototyping in the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  14. Atomic structure of self-organizing iridium induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, N.S., E-mail: n.kabanov@utwente.nl [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation); Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Heimbuch, R.; Zandvliet, H.J.W. [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Saletsky, A.M.; Klavsyuk, A.L. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Ir/Ge(001) structure has been studied with DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy. • Ir/Ge(001) nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and Ir atoms are located in subsurface positions. • The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. - Abstract: The atomic structure of self-organizing iridium (Ir) induced nanowires on Ge(001) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Ir induced nanowires are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the Ge(001) substrate dimer rows, have a width of two atoms and are completely kink-less. Density functional theory calculations show that the Ir atoms prefer to dive into the Ge(001) substrate and push up the neighboring Ge substrate atoms. The nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and not Ir atoms as previously assumed. The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that this dynamics is caused by buckled Ge substrate dimers that flip back and forth between their two buckled configurations.

  15. Nanowire modified carbon fibers for enhanced electrical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvo, Mohammad Arif Ishtiaque; (Bill) Tseng, Tzu-Liang; Ashiqur Rahaman Khan, Md.; Karim, Hasanul; Morton, Philip; Delfin, Diego; Lin, Yirong

    2013-09-01

    The study of electrochemical super-capacitors has become one of the most attractive topics in both academia and industry as energy storage devices because of their high power density, long life cycles, and high charge/discharge efficiency. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development of multifunctional structural energy storage devices such as structural super-capacitors for applications in aerospace, automobiles, and portable electronics. These multifunctional structural super-capacitors provide structures combining energy storage and load bearing functionalities, leading to material systems with reduced volume and/or weight. Due to their superior materials properties, carbon fiber composites have been widely used in structural applications for aerospace and automotive industries. Besides, carbon fiber has good electrical conductivity which will provide lower equivalent series resistance; therefore, it can be an excellent candidate for structural energy storage applications. Hence, this paper is focused on performing a pilot study for using nanowire/carbon fiber hybrids as building materials for structural energy storage materials; aiming at enhancing the charge/discharge rate and energy density. This hybrid material combines the high specific surface area of carbon fiber and pseudo-capacitive effect of metal oxide nanowires, which were grown hydrothermally in an aligned fashion on carbon fibers. The aligned nanowire array could provide a higher specific surface area that leads to high electrode-electrolyte contact area thus fast ion diffusion rates. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction measurements are used for the initial characterization of this nanowire/carbon fiber hybrid material system. Electrochemical testing is performed using a potentio-galvanostat. The results show that gold sputtered nanowire carbon fiber hybrid provides 65.9% higher energy density than bare carbon fiber cloth as super-capacitor.

  16. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of carbon doped boron nitride nanowire: Ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilian, Jaafar, E-mail: JaafarJalilian@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Br anch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box: 6718997551, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kanjouri, Faramarz, E-mail: kanjouri@khu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kharazmi University, University Square, P.O. Box: 3197937551, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated that carbon doped boron nitride nanowire (C-doped BNNW) has diverse electronic and magnetic properties depending on position of carbon atoms and their percentages. Our results show that only when one carbon atom is situated on the edge of the nanowire, C-doped BNNW is transformed into half-metal. The calculated electronic structure of the C-doped BNNW suggests that doping carbon can induce localized edge states around the Fermi level, and the interaction among localized edge states leads to semiconductor to half-metal transition. Overall, the bond reconstruction causes of appearance of different electronic behavior such as semiconducting, half-metallicity, nonmagnetic metallic, and ferromagnetic metallic characters. The formation energy of the system shows that when a C atom is doped on surface boron site, system is more stable than the other positions of carbon impurity. Our calculations show that C-doped BNNW may offer unique opportunities for developing nanoscale spintronic materials.

  17. Two-dimensional nanowires on homoepitaxial interfaces: Atomic-scale mechanism of breakdown and disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailov, Michail; Ranguelov, Bogdan

    2018-03-01

    We present a model for hole-mediated spontaneous breakdown of ahomoepitaxial two-dimensional (2D) flat nanowire based exclusively on random, thermally-activated motion of atoms. The model suggests a consecutive three-step mechanism driving the rupture and complete disintegration of the nanowire on a crystalline surface. The breakdown scenario includes: (i) local narrowing of a part of the stripe to a monatomic chain, (ii) formation of a recoverable single vacancy or a 2D vacancy cluster that causes temporary nanowire rupture, (iii) formation of a non-recoverable 2D hole leading to permanent nanowire breakdown. These successive events in the temporal evolution of the nanowire morphology bring the nanowire stripe into an irreversible unstable state, leading to a dramatic change in its peculiar physical properties and conductivity. The atomistic simulations also reveal a strong increase of the nanowire lifetime with an enlargement of its width and open up a way for a fine atomic-scale control of the nanowire lifetime and structural, morphological and thermodynamic stability.

  18. Au nanowire junction breakup through surface atom diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonski, Simon; Jansson, Ville; Vlassov, Sergei; Polyakov, Boris; Baibuz, Ekaterina; Oras, Sven; Aabloo, Alvo; Djurabekova, Flyura; Zadin, Vahur

    2018-01-01

    Metallic nanowires are known to break into shorter fragments due to the Rayleigh instability mechanism. This process is strongly accelerated at elevated temperatures and can completely hinder the functioning of nanowire-based devices like e.g. transparent conductive and flexible coatings. At the same time, arranged gold nanodots have important applications in electrochemical sensors. In this paper we perform a series of annealing experiments of gold and silver nanowires and nanowire junctions at fixed temperatures 473, 673, 873 and 973 K (200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C) during a time period of 10 min. We show that nanowires are especially prone to fragmentation around junctions and crossing points even at comparatively low temperatures. The fragmentation process is highly temperature dependent and the junction region breaks up at a lower temperature than a single nanowire. We develop a gold parametrization for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrate the surface diffusion origin of the nanowire junction fragmentation. We show that nanowire fragmentation starts at the junctions with high reliability and propose that aligning nanowires in a regular grid could be used as a technique for fabricating arrays of nanodots.

  19. Scattering cross section of metal catalyst atoms in silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, R.; Cartoixa, X.

    2010-01-01

    A common technique to fabricate silicon nanowires is to use metal particles (e.g., Au, Ag, Cu, Al) to catalyze the growth reaction. As a consequence, the fabricated nanowires contain small concentrations of these metals as impurities. In this work we investigate the effect of the metallic impurit...

  20. Nanoparticle Stability in Axial InAs-InP Nanowire Heterostructures with Atomically Sharp Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannier, Valentina; Rossi, Francesca; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G; Ercolani, Daniele; Battiato, Sergio; Sorba, Lucia

    2018-01-10

    The possibility to expand the range of material combinations in defect-free heterostructures is one of the main motivations for the great interest in semiconductor nanowires. However, most axial nanowire heterostructures suffer from interface compositional gradients and kink formation, as a consequence of nanoparticle-nanowire interactions during the metal-assisted growth. Understanding such interactions and how they affect the growth mode is fundamental to achieve a full control over the morphology and the properties of nanowire heterostructures for device applications. Here we demonstrate that the sole parameter affecting the growth mode (straight or kinked) of InP segments on InAs nanowire stems by the Au-assisted method is the nanoparticle composition. Indeed, straight InAs-InP nanowire heterostructures are obtained only when the In/Au ratio in the nanoparticles is low, typically smaller than 1.5. For higher In content, the InP segments tend to kink. Tailoring the In/Au ratio by the precursor fluxes at a fixed growth temperature enables us to obtain straight and radius-uniform InAs-InP nanowire heterostructures (single and double) with atomically sharp interfaces. We present a model that is capable of describing all the experimentally observed phenomena: straight growth versus kinking, the stationary nanoparticle compositions in pure InAs and InAs-InP nanowires, the crystal phase trends, and the interfacial abruptness. By taking into account different nanowire/nanoparticle interfacial configurations (forming wetting or nonwetting monolayers in vertical or tapered geometry), our generalized model provides the conditions of nanoparticle stability and abrupt heterointerfaces for a rich variety of growth scenarios. Therefore, our results provide a powerful tool for obtaining high quality InAs-InP nanowire heterostructures with well-controlled properties and can be extended to other material combinations based on the group V interchange.

  1. Construction of carbon nanoflakes shell on CuO nanowires core as enhanced core/shell arrays anode of lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, F.; Xia, X.H.; Pan, G.X.; Chen, J.; Zhang, Y.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CuO/C core/shell nanowire arrays are prepared by electro-deposition + ALD method. • Carbon shell is favorable for structural stability. • CuO/C core/shell arrays show enhanced cycle stability and high capacity. - Abstract: Tailored metal oxide/carbon composite structures have attracted great attention due to potential synergistic effects and enhanced properties. In this work, novel CuO/C core/shell nanowire arrays are prepared by the combination of electro-deposition of CuO and atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes shell. The CuO nanowires with diameters of ∼200 nm are homogenously coated by carbon nanoflakes shell. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), compared to the unmodified CuO nanowire arrays, the CuO/C core/shell nanowire arrays exhibit improved electrochemical performances with higher capacity, better electrochemical reactivity and high-rate capability as well as superior cycling life (610 mAh g"−"1 at 0.5C after 290 cycles). The enhanced electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the introduction of carbon flake shell in the core/shell nanowire arrays structure, which provides higher active material-electrolyte contact area, improved electrical conductivity, and better accommodation of volume change. The proposed method provides a new way for fabrication of high-performance metal oxides anodes of LIBs.

  2. Controlled dielectrophoretic nanowire self-assembly using atomic layer deposition and suspended microfabricated electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baca, Alicia I; Brown, Joseph J; Bright, Victor M; Bertness, Kris A

    2012-01-01

    Effects of design and materials on the dielectrophoretic self-assembly of individual gallium nitride nanowires (GaN NWs) onto microfabricated electrodes have been experimentally investigated. The use of TiO 2 surface coating generated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) improves dielectrophoretic assembly yield of individual GaN nanowires on microfabricated structures by as much as 67%. With a titanium dioxide coating, individual nanowires were placed across suspended electrode pairs in 46% of tests (147 out of 320 total), versus 28% of tests (88 out of 320 total tests) that used uncoated GaN NWs. An additional result from these tests was that suspending the electrodes 2.75 μm above the substrate corresponded with up to 15.8% improvement in overall assembly yield over that of electrodes fabricated directly on the substrate. (paper)

  3. On-chip microplasma reactors using carbon nanofibres and tungsten oxide nanowires as electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agiral, A.; Groenland, A.W.; Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Kumar Chinthaginjala, J.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and tungsten oxide (W18O49) nanowires have been incorporated into a continuous flow type microplasma reactor to increase the reactivity and efficiency of the barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure. CNFs and tungsten oxide nanowires were characterized by high-resolution

  4. In situ-growth of silica nanowires in ceramic carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the processing and microstructure of ceramic–carbon composites is critical to development of these composites for applications needing electrically conducting, thermal shock resistant ceramic materials. In the present study green compacts of carbon ceramic composites were prepared either by slurry processing or dry powder blending of one or more of the three — clay, glass, alumina and carbon black or graphite. The dried green compacts were sintered at 1400 °C in flowing argon. The ceramic carbon composites except the ones without clay addition showed formation of silica nanowires. The silica nanowire formation was observed in both samples prepared by slip casting and dry powder compaction containing either carbon black or graphite. TEM micrographs showed presence of carbon at the core of the silica nanowires indicating that carbon served the role of a catalyst. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED suggested that the silica nanowires are amorphous. Prior studies have reported formation of silica nanowires from silicon, silica, silicon carbide but this is the first report ever on formation of silica nanowires from clay.

  5. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leilei, Zhang; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na + and CO 3 2− were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement

  6. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leilei, Zhang, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement.

  7. Highly conductive interwoven carbon nanotube and silver nanowire transparent electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Stapleton, Rakesh A Afre, Amanda V Ellis, Joe G Shapter, Gunther G Andersson, Jamie S Quinton and David A Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes fabricated using commercially available silver nanowires (AgNWs and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced sheet resistances in the range 4–24 Ω squ−1 with specular transparencies up to 82 %. Increasing the aqueous dispersibility of SWCNTs decreased the bundle size present in the film resulting in improved SWCNT surface dispersion in the films without compromising transparency or sheet resistance. In addition to providing conduction pathways between the AgNW network, the SWCNTs also provide structural support, creating stable self-supporting films. Entanglement of the AgNWs and SWCNTs was demonstrated to occur in solution prior to deposition by monitoring the transverse plasmon resonance mode of the AgNWs during processing. The interwoven AgNW/SWCNT structures show potential for use in optoelectronic applications as transparent electrodes and as an ITO replacement.

  8. A supercritical carbon dioxide plasma process for preparing tungsten oxide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Ayato; Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Takemori, Toshihiko; Mukasa, Shinobu; Maehara, Tsunehiro

    2007-01-01

    A supercritical carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) plasma process for fabricating one-dimensional tungsten oxide nanowires coated with amorphous carbon is presented. High-frequency plasma was generated in supercritical carbon dioxide at 20 MPa by using tungsten electrodes mounted in a supercritical cell, and subsequently an organic solvent was introduced with supercritical carbon dioxide into the plasma. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy investigations of the deposited materials showed the production of tungsten oxide nanowires with or without an outer layer. The nanowires with an outer layer exhibited a coaxial structure with an outer concentric layer of amorphous carbon and an inner layer of tungsten oxide with a thickness and diameter of 20-30 and 10-20 nm, respectively

  9. Urea route to coat inorganic nanowires, carbon fibers and nanotubes by boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomathi, A.; Ramya Harika, M.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2008-01-01

    A simple route involving urea as the nitrogen source has been employed to carry out boron nitride coating on carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanowires. The process involves heating the carbon fibers and nanotubes or inorganic nanowires in a mixture of H 3 BO 3 and urea, followed by a heat treatment at 1000 deg. C in a N 2 atmosphere. We have been able to characterize the BN coating by transmission electron microscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The urea decomposition route affords a simple method to coat boron nitride on one-dimensional nanostructures

  10. Thermal diffusivity of diamond nanowires studied by laser assisted atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, L.; Spies, M.; Houard, J.; Blum, I.; Etienne, A.; Ismagilov, R.; Obraztsov, A.; Vella, A.

    2018-04-01

    The thermal properties of single-crystal diamond nanowires (NWs) have been calculated from first principles but have never been measured experimentally. Taking advantage of the sharp geometry of samples analyzed in a laser assisted atom probe, this technique is used to measure the thermal diffusivity of a single NW at low temperature (ab-initio calculations and confirms that thermal diffusivity in nanoscale samples is lower than in bulk samples. The results impact the design and integration of diamond NWs and nanoneedles in nanoscale devices for heat dissipation.

  11. Self-supported supercapacitor membrane through incorporating MnO2 nanowires into carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yueping; Liu, Jianwei; Li, Jun

    2010-08-01

    We report on a study on the development of a self-supported membrane of carbon nanotube (CNT) mixed with MnO2 nanowires as supercapacitors. Both single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) have been explored to serve as the electrically conductive networks to connect redox active MnO2 nanowires. High-quality alpha-MnO2 nanowires were synthesized using bulk alpha-MnO2 crystals as the precursor by a facile hydrothermal method. The morphology and structure of the as-prepared alpha-MnO2 nanowires were characterized by X-ray and electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Supercapacitor membranes were prepared by filtration of mixture solutions of MnO2 nanowires and CNTs at various ratios, forming entangled networks which are self-supported and directly used as supercapacitor electrodes without binders or backing metals. Cyclic voltammetry at various scan rates and charge--discharging measurements are used to characterize the supercapacitance of the CNT-MnO2 nanowire membranes. The specific capacitance has been found to be increased by several times over that of pure CNT membranes after incorporation of MnO2 nanowires.

  12. W18O49 nanowires assembled on carbon felt for application to supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinjoo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2018-03-01

    For supercapacitor applications, W18O49 nanowires have been extensively grown on graphitic carbon felt using a facile solvothermal method. The diameter and length of the nanowires are about 7 and 300 nm, respectively. The nanowires consist of monoclinic W18O49 grown along the [010] direction, as shown by TEM and XRD analyses. The W18O49 nanowires, assembled on carbon felt, exhibit a high capacity of 588.33 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g together with an excellent cycle performance, and a low internal resistance during the electrochemical tests. This outstanding performance may originate from the three-dimensional porous nanostructure of these W18O49 nanowires, which leads to a reduction in the resistance and fast reaction kinetics due to the high specific surface area and electrolyte accessibility. Furthermore, sufficient oxygen deficiencies of the substoichiometric tungsten oxide can also contribute to the electrochemical activity, which can be confirmed by comparison of CV and EIS data with WO3 nanowires.

  13. Self-formation of a nanonet of fluorinated carbon nanowires on the Si surface by combined etching in fluorine-containing plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, I. I.; Gorlachev, E. S.; Mazaletskiy, L. A.; Izyumov, M. O.; Alov, N. V.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we report a technique of the self-formation of a nanonet of fluorinated carbon nanowires on the Si surface using a combined etching in fluorine-containing C4F8/Ar and SF6 plasmas. Using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that after the etching of Si in the C4F8/Ar plasma, a fluorinated carbon film of nanometer-scale thickness is formed on its surface and its formation accelerates at elevated temperatures. After a subsequent short-term etching in the SF6 plasma, the film is modified into a nanonet of self-formed fluorinated carbon nanowires.

  14. Solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires promoted by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Congxiang [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Wen-wen; Wang, Xingli [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Xiaocheng [Laboratory of clean energy chemistry and materials, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tan, Chong Wei [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tay, Beng Kang, E-mail: ebktay@ntu.edu.sg [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Coquet, Philippe [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • An array of well aligned and uniform CNTs is successfully fabricated by PECVD. • SiONW growth utilizes Si substrate as the source, ruling out the usage of silane. • With CNT array on the substrate, SiONW growth is improved significantly. • CNTs help dispersion of the catalysts and diffusion of the Si atoms. - Abstract: We report a method to promote solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires (SiONWs) by using an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It starts with the fabrication of CNT array by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on Si wafers, followed by growth of SiONWs. Herein, CNTs serve as a scaffold, which helps the dispersion of catalysts for SiONWs and also provides space for hydrogen which boosts the diffusion of Si atoms and hence formation of SiONWs. As the result, a three dimensional (3D) hybrid network of densely packed SiONWs and CNTs can be produced rapidly.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of ZnS/Diamond-Like Carbon Core-Shell Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Han Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated ZnS/diamond-like carbon (DLC core-shell heterostructure nanowire using a simple two-step process: the vapor-liquid-solid method combined with radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf PECVD. As a core nanowire, ZnS nanowires with face-centered cubic structure were synthesized with a sputtered Au thin film, which exhibit a length and a diameter of ~10 μm and ~30–120 nm . After rf PECVD for DLC coating, The length and width of the dense ZnS/DLC core-shell nanowires were a range of ~10 μm  and 50–150 nm , respectively. In addition, ZnS/DLC core-shell nanowires were characterized with scanning transmission electron microscopy. From the results, the products have flat and uniform DLC coating layer on ZnS nanowire in spite of high residual stress induced by the high sp3 fraction. To further understanding of the DLC coating layer, Raman spectroscopy was employed with ZnS/DLC core-shell nanowires, which reveals two Raman bands at 1550 cm−1 (G peak and 1330 cm−1 (D peak. Finally, we investigated the optical properties from ultraviolet to infrared wavelength region using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrometry. Related to optical properties, ZnS/DLC core-shell nanowires exhibit relatively lower absorbance and higher IR transmittance than that of ZnS nanowires.

  16. Atomistic simulations on the axial nanowelding configuration and contact behavior between Ag nanowire and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Jianlei; Zhang, Jianwei; He, Xiaoqiao; Yang, Xinjun; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Kedian; Yang, Lijun; Xie, Hui

    2017-01-01

    As for the interesting new building blocks, the Ag nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the interesting new building blocks are viewed as the promising candidates for the next-generation interconnects due to their most remarkable electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, and other properties. The axial nanowelding of head-to-head style and side-to-side style is relatively simulated with the molecular dynamics method. As for the head-to-head structural style, SWNTs will move toward the AgNWs and contact with the head of AgNWs. And, the part of the Ag nanowire may be subsequently encapsulated in SWNT with the core-filling Ag atom chain as the final atomic contact configuration during nanowelding, which is related to the nanowelding temperature. When the SWNTs and AgNWs are arranged by the side-to-side contact style, the SWNTs will move along the SWNT surface and may eventually catch up with the AgNW being neck and neck. Aiming at the final axial atomic configurations and the contact behavior during nanowelding process, the related dominant mechanism is revealed in this paper.

  17. Atomistic simulations on the axial nanowelding configuration and contact behavior between Ag nanowire and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jianlei, E-mail: cjlxjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jianwei [Xi’an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering (China); He, Xiaoqiao, E-mail: bcxqhe@cityu.edu.hk [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering (Hong Kong); Yang, Xinjun [Fudan University, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics (China); Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Kedian [Xi’an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering (China); Yang, Lijun; Xie, Hui [Harbin Institute of Technology, State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems (China)

    2017-03-15

    As for the interesting new building blocks, the Ag nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the interesting new building blocks are viewed as the promising candidates for the next-generation interconnects due to their most remarkable electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, and other properties. The axial nanowelding of head-to-head style and side-to-side style is relatively simulated with the molecular dynamics method. As for the head-to-head structural style, SWNTs will move toward the AgNWs and contact with the head of AgNWs. And, the part of the Ag nanowire may be subsequently encapsulated in SWNT with the core-filling Ag atom chain as the final atomic contact configuration during nanowelding, which is related to the nanowelding temperature. When the SWNTs and AgNWs are arranged by the side-to-side contact style, the SWNTs will move along the SWNT surface and may eventually catch up with the AgNW being neck and neck. Aiming at the final axial atomic configurations and the contact behavior during nanowelding process, the related dominant mechanism is revealed in this paper.

  18. Nitrogen and Fluorine-Codoped Carbon Nanowire Aerogels as Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 USA; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Xiao, Biwei [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 USA

    2017-07-11

    The development of active, durable, and low-cost catalysts to replace noble metal-based materials is highly desirable to promote the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Herein, nitrogen and fluorine-codoped three-dimensional carbon nanowire aerogels, composed of interconnected carbon nanowires, were synthesized for the first time by a hydrothermal carbonization process. Owing to their porous nanostructures and heteroatom-doping, the as-prepared carbon nanowire aerogels, with optimized composition, present excellent electrocatalytic activity that is comparable to commercial Pt/C. Remarkably, the aerogels also exhibit superior stability and methanol tolerance. This synthesis procedure paves a new way to design novel heteroatomdoped catalysts.

  19. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  20. Ultrafast Carbon Dioxide Sorption Kinetics Using Lithium Silicate Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambo, Apolo; He, Juan; Nguyen, Tu Quang; Atla, Veerendra; Druffel, Thad; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, the Li 4 SiO 4 nanowires (NWs) were shown to be promising for CO 2 capture with ultrafast kinetics. Specifically, the nanowire powders exhibited an uptake of 0.35 g g -1 of CO 2 at an ultrafast adsorption rate of 0.22 g g -1 min -1 at 650-700 °C. Lithium silicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) nanowires and nanopowders were synthesized using a "solvo-plasma" technique involving plasma oxidation of silicon precursors mixed with lithium hydroxide. The kinetic parameter values (k) extracted from sorption kinetics obtained using NW powders are 1 order of magnitude higher than those previously reported for the Li 4 SiO 4 -CO 2 reaction system. The time scales for CO 2 sorption using nanowires are approximately 3 min and two orders magnitude faster compared to those obtained using lithium silicate powders with spherical morphologies and aggregates. Furthermore, Li 4 SiO 4 nanowire powders showed reversibility through sorption-desorption cycles indicating their suitability for CO 2 capture applications. All of the morphologies of Li 4 SiO 4 powders exhibited a double exponential behavior in the adsorption kinetics indicating two distinct time constants for kinetic and the mass transfer limited regimes.

  1. Quantum Interference Control of Ballistic Magneto- resistance in a Magnetic Nanowire Containing Two Atomic- Size Domain Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fallahi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetoresistance of a one-dimensional electron gas in a metallic ferromagnetic nanowire containing two atomic-size domain walls has been investigated in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. The magnetoresistance is calculated in the ballistic regime, within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. It has been demonstrated that the conductance of a magnetic nanowire with double domain walls can be controlled through the domain walls separation. Also, we have represented another alternative way that enables us to handle easily the magnetoresistance of such a system as well as its conductance by utilizing the Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction induced by the external gates.

  2. Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...... atomic force microscopy and from polarized far-field optical microscopy for various prototypical molecules are reproduced by electrostatic and Monte Carlo calculations. Based on the crystal structure, predictions on the growth habit from other conjugated molecules become in reach....

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy for the fabrication of copper nanowires: Atomic contacts with quantized conductance, and molecular adsorption effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, Marion; Ghilane, Jalal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Electrochemistry and SECM to generate copper nanowires with quantized conductance. ► Stable atomic contacts lasting for several hundreds of seconds have been obtained. ► The quantized conductances are independent of the tip and gap size. ► The method allows contacts to be generated in the presence of chosen molecules. ► Four-electrode configuration opens the route to redox gated atomic contact. - Abstract: Scanning electrochemical microscopy, SECM, is proposed as a tool for the fabrication of copper nanowires. In a first step, configuration based on two electrodes, a platinum UME (cathode) and a copper substrate (anode), operating in the SECM configuration was employed. For nanowires generated in water the conductance changes stepwise and varies by integer values of the conductance quantum G 0 . The formation of atomic contacts is supported by the ohmic behavior of the I–V curve. It depends neither on the UME tip radius nor on the initial gap size between tip and substrate. Atomic contacts generated in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) below the critical micellar concentration (CMC) have conductances below 1G 0 attributed to molecular adsorption on the contact. In some cases, the nanowires have low conductance, 0.01G 0 . The corresponding I–V curve shows tunneling rather than ohmic behavior, suggesting that molecular junctions are formed with a few surfactant molecules trapped between the two electrodes. Finally, copper nanowires with quantized conductance have been generated using the SECM operating in a four-electrode setup. Thanks to the reference electrode, this configuration leads to better control of the potential of each working electrode; this setup will make it possible to evaluate the conductance variation and/or modulation upon electrochemical stimuli.

  4. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using Ge doped GaN nanowire photoanodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the direct conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2 in a photoelectrochemical cell consisting of germanium doped gallium nitride nanowire anode and copper (Cu cathode. Various products including methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, and formic acid (HCOOH were observed under light illumination. A Faradaic efficiency of ∼10% was measured for HCOOH. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical system showed enhanced stability for 6 h CO2 reduction reaction on low cost, large area Si substrates.

  6. Carbon-layer-protected cuprous oxide nanowire arrays for efficient water reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhonghai

    2013-02-26

    In this work, we propose a solution-based carbon precursor coating and subsequent carbonization strategy to form a thin protective carbon layer on unstable semiconductor nanostructures as a solution to the commonly occurring photocorrosion problem of many semiconductors. A proof-of-concept is provided by using glucose as the carbon precursor to form a protective carbon coating onto cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanowire arrays which were synthesized from copper mesh. The carbon-layer-protected Cu2O nanowire arrays exhibited remarkably improved photostability as well as considerably enhanced photocurrent density. The Cu2O nanowire arrays coated with a carbon layer of 20 nm thickness were found to give an optimal water splitting performance, producing a photocurrent density of -3.95 mA cm-2 and an optimal photocathode efficiency of 0.56% under illumination of AM 1.5G (100 mW cm-2). This is the highest value ever reported for a Cu 2O-based electrode coated with a metal/co-catalyst-free protective layer. The photostability, measured as the percentage of the photocurrent density at the end of 20 min measurement period relative to that at the beginning of the measurement, improved from 12.6% on the bare, nonprotected Cu2O nanowire arrays to 80.7% on the continuous carbon coating protected ones, more than a 6-fold increase. We believe that the facile strategy presented in this work is a general approach that can address the stability issue of many nonstable photoelectrodes and thus has the potential to make a meaningful contribution in the general field of energy conversion. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Dissolution-Induced Nanowire Synthesis on Hot-Dip Galvanized Surface in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaretti Kaleva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate a rapid treatment method for producing a needle-like nanowire structure on a hot-dip galvanized sheet at a temperature of 50 °C. The processing method involved only supercritical carbon dioxide and water to induce a reaction on the zinc surface, which resulted in growth of zinc hydroxycarbonate nanowires into flower-like shapes. This artificial patina nanostructure predicts high surface area and offers interesting opportunities for its use in industrial high-end applications. The nanowires can significantly improve paint adhesion and promote electrochemical stability for organic coatings, or be converted to ZnO nanostructures by calcining to be used in various semiconductor applications.

  8. High-Performance Carbon Dioxide Electrocatalytic Reduction by Easily Fabricated Large-Scale Silver Nanowire Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Chuhao; Shao, Yang; Lu, Qi; Gao, Shenghan; Huang, Kai; Wu, Hui; Yao, Kefu

    2018-05-17

    An efficient and selective catalyst is in urgent need for carbon dioxide electroreduction and silver is one of the promising candidates with affordable costs. Here we fabricated large-scale vertically standing Ag nanowire arrays with high crystallinity and electrical conductivity as carbon dioxide electroreduction catalysts by a simple nanomolding method that was usually considered not feasible for metallic crystalline materials. A great enhancement of current densities and selectivity for CO at moderate potentials was achieved. The current density for CO ( j co ) of Ag nanowire array with 200 nm in diameter was more than 2500 times larger than that of Ag foil at an overpotential of 0.49 V with an efficiency over 90%. The origin of enhanced performances are attributed to greatly increased electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and higher intrinsic activity compared to those of polycrystalline Ag foil. More low-coordinated sites on the nanowires which can stabilize the CO 2 intermediate better are responsible for the high intrinsic activity. In addition, the impact of surface morphology that induces limited mass transportation on reaction selectivity and efficiency of nanowire arrays with different diameters was also discussed.

  9. Surfactant-assisted carbon doping in ZnO nanowires using Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanullah, Malik; Javed, Qurat-ul-Ain, E-mail: Quratulain@sns.nust.edu.pk; Rizwan, Syed

    2016-09-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) provides unique properties owing to its wide bandgap, large resistivity range and possibility to tune the physical properties. The surfactant assisted carbon doping was made possible due to the lowering of surface energy. The ZnO and carbon doped ZnO (C-ZnO) nanowires fabricated by hydrothermal process, Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG) is used as surfactant in hydrothermal synthesis followed by post growth annealing treatment at 600 °C–700 °C. At 5%–10% of diluted PEG carbon is doped in ZnO. The crystallinity, structural morphology and elemental composition analysis for ZnO and C-ZnO nanowires were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques respectively. Carbon doping in ZnO nanowires in the presence of different percentage of surfactant is explained by calculating the change in surface energy with respect to change in PEG molecule concentration. It was found that the surface energy per molecule modulates from 3.92 × 10{sup −8} J/m{sup 2} to 8.16 × 10{sup −7} J/m{sup 2} in the PEG concentration range between 5% and 10%. Our results provides a new theoretical calculations, implemented on real system, to observe the details of PEG-assisted Carbon doping in II-VI semiconductor nanowires. - Highlights: • ZnO and C-ZnO was synthesized by PEG assisted post growth annealing process. • At 5% and 10% of PEG successful synthesis of C-ZnO was found. • XRD, SEM and EDX characterizations confirm the successful synthesis of ZnO and C-ZnO. • Change in surface energy with respect to PEG molecule concentration was calculated.

  10. First-principles calculations of GaN:Gd nanowires: Carbon-dopants-induced room-temperature ferromagnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruikuan Xie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available First-principle calculations of the electronic structure and magnetic interaction of C-Gd co-doped GaN nanowires have been performed. The room-temperature ferromagnetism in GaN:Gd nanowires is observed after the substitution of N atoms by C atoms. A p-d coupling is considered as the reason of the observed ferromagnetism. The striking feature is that such coupling is effected greatly by the position where the C atoms dope in. As the C-Gd distance increases this coupling decreases and the system won’t gain enough energy to stabilize the ferromagnetism.

  11. Magnetic and transport properties of Fe nanowires encapsulated in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Sandoval, E.; Lopez-Urias, F.; Diaz-Ortiz, A.; Terrones, M.; Reyes-Reyes, M.; Moran-Lopez, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetization reversal and magnetoresistance of two-dimensional arrays of aligned Fe-filled carbon nanotubes have been investigated. Our results show a linear temperature dependence of the coercivity above 10 K and a relative large hysteresis for the applied field perpendicular to the nanowires axes. A continuous decrease of the magnetoresistance for both field directions is observed. We attribute this behavior to the anisotropic nature of the system

  12. Alignment control and atomically-scaled heteroepitaxial interface study of GaN nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyun; Liu, Baodan; Yang, Wenjin; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Xinglai; Labbé, Christophe; Portier, Xavier; An, Vladimir; Jiang, Xin

    2017-04-20

    Well-aligned GaN nanowires are promising candidates for building high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices. In this work, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of well-aligned GaN nanowires on a [0001]-oriented sapphire substrate in a simple catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition process and their alignment control. It is found that the ammonia flux plays a key role in dominating the initial nucleation of GaN nanocrystals and their orientation. Typically, significant improvement of the GaN nanowire alignment can be realized at a low NH 3 flow rate. X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy studies further verified the preferential orientation of GaN nanowires along the [0001] direction. The growth mechanism of GaN nanowire arrays is also well studied based on cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization and it is observed that GaN nanowires have good epitaxial growth on the sapphire substrate following the crystallographic relationship between (0001) GaN ∥(0001) sapphire and (101[combining macron]0) GaN ∥(112[combining macron]0) sapphire . Most importantly, periodic misfit dislocations are also experimentally observed in the interface region due to the large lattice mismatch between the GaN nanowire and the sapphire substrate, and the formation of such dislocations will favor the release of structural strain in GaN nanowires. HRTEM analysis also finds the existence of "type I" stacking faults and voids inside the GaN nanowires. Optical investigation suggests that the GaN nanowire arrays have strong emission in the UV range, suggesting their crystalline nature and chemical purity. The achievement of aligned GaN nanowires will further promote the wide applications of GaN nanostructures toward diverse high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices including nano-LEDs, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors etc.

  13. Atomic Origins of Monoclinic-Tetragonal (Rutile) Phase Transition in Doped VO 2 Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti

    2015-10-12

    There has been long-standing interest in tuning the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO) via the addition of chemical dopants. However, the underlying mechanisms by which doping elements regulate the phase transition in VO are poorly understood. Taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we reveal the atomistic origins by which tungsten (W) dopants influence the phase transition in single crystalline WVO nanowires. Our atomically resolved strain maps clearly show the localized strain normal to the (122¯) lattice planes of the low W-doped monoclinic structure (insulator). These strain maps demonstrate how anisotropic localized stress created by dopants in the monoclinic structure accelerates the phase transition and lead to relaxation of structure in tetragonal form. In contrast, the strain distribution in the high W-doped VO structure is relatively uniform as a result of transition to tetragonal (metallic) phase. The directional strain gradients are furthermore corroborated by density functional theory calculations that show the energetic consequences of distortions to the local structure. These findings pave the roadmap for lattice-stress engineering of the MIT behavior in strongly correlated materials for specific applications such as ultrafast electronic switches and electro-optical sensors.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition of Nickel on ZnO Nanowire Arrays for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Yong-Ping; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ji, Xin-Ming; Devi, Anjana; Jiang, An-Quan; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-10

    A novel hybrid core-shell structure of ZnO nanowires (NWs)/Ni as a pseudocapacitor electrode was successfully fabricated by atomic layer deposition of a nickel shell, and its capacitive performance was systemically investigated. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the NiO was formed at the interface between ZnO and Ni where the Ni was oxidized by ZnO during the ALD of the Ni layer. Electrochemical measurement results revealed that the Ti/ZnO NWs/Ni (1500 cycles) electrode with a 30 nm thick Ni-NiO shell layer had the best supercapacitor properties including ultrahigh specific capacitance (∼2440 F g -1 ), good rate capability (80.5%) under high current charge-discharge conditions, and a relatively better cycling stability (86.7% of the initial value remained after 750 cycles at 10 A g -1 ). These attractive capacitive behaviors are mainly attributed to the unique core-shell structure and the combined effect of ZnO NW arrays as short charge transfer pathways for ion diffusion and electron transfer as well as conductive Ni serving as channel for the fast electron transport to Ti substrate. This high-performance Ti/ZnO NWs/Ni hybrid structure is expected to be one of a promising electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications.

  15. Atomic Origins of Monoclinic-Tetragonal (Rutile) Phase Transition in Doped VO2 Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Nie, Anmin; Marley, Peter M; Zhu, Yihan; Phillips, Patrick J; Singh, Sujay; Mashayek, Farzad; Sambandamurthy, Ganapathy; Low, Ke-Bin; Klie, Robert F; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Odegard, Gregory M; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2015-11-11

    There has been long-standing interest in tuning the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) via the addition of chemical dopants. However, the underlying mechanisms by which doping elements regulate the phase transition in VO2 are poorly understood. Taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we reveal the atomistic origins by which tungsten (W) dopants influence the phase transition in single crystalline WxV1-xO2 nanowires. Our atomically resolved strain maps clearly show the localized strain normal to the (122̅) lattice planes of the low W-doped monoclinic structure (insulator). These strain maps demonstrate how anisotropic localized stress created by dopants in the monoclinic structure accelerates the phase transition and lead to relaxation of structure in tetragonal form. In contrast, the strain distribution in the high W-doped VO2 structure is relatively uniform as a result of transition to tetragonal (metallic) phase. The directional strain gradients are furthermore corroborated by density functional theory calculations that show the energetic consequences of distortions to the local structure. These findings pave the roadmap for lattice-stress engineering of the MIT behavior in strongly correlated materials for specific applications such as ultrafast electronic switches and electro-optical sensors.

  16. Atomic Origins of Monoclinic-Tetragonal (Rutile) Phase Transition in Doped VO 2 Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Nie, Anmin; Marley, Peter M.; Zhu, Yihan; Phillips, Patrick J.; Singh, Sujay; Mashayek, Farzad; Sambandamurthy, Ganapathy; Low, Ke Bin; Klie, Robert F.; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Odegard, Gregory M.; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    There has been long-standing interest in tuning the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO) via the addition of chemical dopants. However, the underlying mechanisms by which doping elements regulate the phase transition in VO are poorly understood. Taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we reveal the atomistic origins by which tungsten (W) dopants influence the phase transition in single crystalline WVO nanowires. Our atomically resolved strain maps clearly show the localized strain normal to the (122¯) lattice planes of the low W-doped monoclinic structure (insulator). These strain maps demonstrate how anisotropic localized stress created by dopants in the monoclinic structure accelerates the phase transition and lead to relaxation of structure in tetragonal form. In contrast, the strain distribution in the high W-doped VO structure is relatively uniform as a result of transition to tetragonal (metallic) phase. The directional strain gradients are furthermore corroborated by density functional theory calculations that show the energetic consequences of distortions to the local structure. These findings pave the roadmap for lattice-stress engineering of the MIT behavior in strongly correlated materials for specific applications such as ultrafast electronic switches and electro-optical sensors.

  17. Nanomechanical properties of lithiated Si nanowires probed with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Shin, Weonho; Choi, Jang Wook; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-01-01

    The nanomechanical properties of fully lithiated and pristine Si nanowires (NWs) deposited on a Si substrate were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Si NWs were synthesized using the vapour-liquid-solid process on stainless-steel substrates using an Au catalyst. Fully lithiated Si NWs were obtained using the electrochemical method, followed by drop-casting on a Si substrate. The roughness of the Si NWs, which was derived from AFM images, is greater for the lithiated Si NWs than for the pristine Si NWs. Force spectroscopy was used to study the influence of lithiation on the tip-surface adhesion force. The lithiated Si NWs revealed a smaller tip-surface adhesion force than the Si substrate by a factor of two, while the adhesion force of the Si NWs is similar to that of the Si substrate. Young's modulus, obtained from the force-distance curve, also shows that the pristine Si NWs have a relatively higher value than the lithiated Si NWs due to the elastically soft and amorphous structures of the lithiated region. These results suggest that force spectroscopy can be used to probe the degree of lithiation at nanometer scale during the charging and discharging processes. (paper)

  18. Special structures and properties of hydrogen nanowire confined in a single walled carbon nanotube at extreme high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyuan Xia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen can be confined in single walled carbon nanotubes to form high density and high pressure H2 molecular lattice, which has peculiar shell and axial structures depending on the density or pressure. The band gap of the confined H2 lattice is sensitive to the pressure. Heating the system at 2000K, the H2 lattice is firstly melted to form H2 molecular liquid, and then some of the H2 molecules dissociate accompanied by drastic molecular and atomic reactions, which have essential effect on the electronic structure of the hydrogen system. The liquid hydrogen system at 2000K is found to be a particular mixed liquid, which consists of H2 molecules, H atoms, and H-H-H trimers. The dissociated H atoms and the trimers in the liquid contribute resonance electron states at the Fermi energy to change the material properties substantially. Rapidly cooling the system from 2000K to 0.01 K, the mixed liquid is frozen to form a mixed solid melt with a clear trend of band gap closure. It indicates that this solid melt may become a superconducting nanowire when it is further compressed.

  19. Shape anisotropy and hybridization enhanced magnetization in nanowires of Fe/MgO/Fe encapsulated in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryee, Dennis [Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251 (United States); Seifu, Dereje, E-mail: dereje.seifu@morgan.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21251 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Arrays of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) nanowires were synthesized for the first time by filling Fe/MgO/Fe inside vertically grown and substrate supported carbon nanotubes. The magnetic properties of nanowires and planar nanoscale thin films of Fe/MgO/Fe showed several similarities, such as two-fold magnetic symmetry and ratio of orbital moment to spin moment. Nanowires of Fe/MgO/Fe showed higher saturation magnetization by a factor of 2.7 compared to planar thin films of Fe/MgO/Fe at 1.5 kOe. The enhanced magnetic properties likely resulted from shape anisotropy of the nanowires and as well as the hybridization that occur between the π- electronic states of carbon and 3d-bands of the Fe-surface.

  20. Carbon nanotube Schottky diode: an atomic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, P; Li, E; Kurniawan, O; Koh, W S; Lam, K T

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport properties of semiconducting carbon nanotube (SCNT) Schottky diodes are investigated with atomic models using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. We model the SCNT Schottky diode as a SCNT embedded in the metal electrode, which resembles the experimental set-up. Our study reveals that the rectification behaviour of the diode is mainly due to the asymmetric electron transmission function distribution in the conduction and valence bands and can be improved by changing metal-SCNT contact geometries. The threshold voltage of the diode depends on the electron Schottky barrier height which can be tuned by altering the diameter of the SCNT. Contrary to the traditional perception, the metal-SCNT contact region exhibits better conductivity than the other parts of the diode

  1. Investigation on single carbon atom transporting through the single-walled carbon nanotube by MD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yinfeng; Zhang Zhibin; Ke Xuezhi; Zhu Zhiyuan; Zhu Dezhang; Wang Zhenxia; Xu Hongjie

    2005-01-01

    The single carbon atom transporting through the single-walled carbon nanotube has been studied by molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. We got different trajectories of the carbon atom by changing the input parameters. The simulation results indicate that the single carbon atom with low energy can transport through the carbon nanotube under some input conditions and result in different trajectories being straight line or 'rosette' or circular. (authors)

  2. Electrochemical behavior of cysteine at a CuGeO3 nanowires modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yongping; Pei Lizhai; Chu Xiangfeng; Zhang Wangbing; Zhang Qianfeng

    2010-01-01

    A CuGeO 3 nanowire modified glassy carbon electrode was fabricated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveal that electron transfer through nanowire film is facile compared with that of bare glassy carbon electrode. The modified electrode exhibited a novel electrocatalytic behavior to the electrochemical reactions of L-cysteine in neutral solution, which was not reported previously. Two pairs of semi-reversible electrochemical peaks were observed and assigned to the processes of oxidation/reduction and adsorption/desorption of cysteine at the modified electrode, respectively. The electrochemical response of cysteine is poor in alkaline condition and is enhanced greatly in acidic solution, suggesting that hydrogen ions participate in the electrochemical oxidation process of cysteine. The intensities of two anodic peaks varied linearly with the concentration of cysteine in the range of 1 x 10 -6 to 1 x 10 -3 mol L -1 , which make it possible to sensitive detection of cysteine with the CuGeO 3 nanowire modified electrode. Furthermore, the modified electrode exhibited good reproducibility and stability.

  3. Structurally uniform and atomically precise carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Yasutomo; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon materials consisting of benzene units oriented in unique geometric patterns, hereafter named nanocarbons, conduct electricity, absorb and emit light, and exhibit interesting magnetic properties. Spherical fullerene C60, cylindrical carbon nanotubes and sheet-like graphene are representative forms of nanocarbons, and theoretical simulations have predicted several exotic 3D nanocarbon structures. At present, synthetic routes to nanocarbons mainly lead to mixtures of molecules with a range of different structures and properties, which cannot be easily separated or refined into pure forms. Some researchers believe that it is impossible to synthesize these materials in a precise manner. Obtaining ‘pure’ nanocarbons is a great challenge in the field of nanocarbon science, and the construction of structurally uniform nanocarbons, ideally as single molecules, is crucial for the development of functional materials in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and biomedical applications. This Review highlights the organic chemistry approach — more specifically, bottom-up construction with atomic precision — that is currently the most promising strategy towards this end.

  4. Carbon based thirty six atom spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskoti, Charles R.; Zettl, Alex K.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Cote, Michel; Grossman, Jeffrey C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2005-09-06

    A solid phase or form of carbon is based on fullerenes with thirty six carbon atoms (C.sub.36). The C.sub.36 structure with D.sub.6h symmetry is one of the two most energetically favorable, and is conducive to forming a periodic system. The lowest energy crystal is a highly bonded network of hexagonal planes of C.sub.36 subunits with AB stacking. The C.sub.36 solid is not a purely van der Waals solid, but has covalent-like bonding, leading to a solid with enhanced structural rigidity. The solid C.sub.36 material is made by synthesizing and selecting out C.sub.36 fullerenes in relatively large quantities. A C.sub.36 rich fullerene soot is produced in a helium environment arc discharge chamber by operating at an optimum helium pressure (400 torr). The C.sub.36 is separated from the soot by a two step process. The soot is first treated with a first solvent, e.g. toluene, to remove the higher order fullerenes but leave the C.sub.36. The soot is then treated with a second solvent, e.g. pyridine, which is more polarizable than the first solvent used for the larger fullerenes. The second solvent extracts the C.sub.36 from the soot. Thin films and powders can then be produced from the extracted C.sub.36. Other materials are based on C.sub.36 fullerenes, providing for different properties.

  5. Polyaniline nanowire arrays aligned on nitrogen-doped carbon fabric for high-performance flexible supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pingping; Li, Yingzhi; Yu, Xinyi; Zhao, Xin; Wu, Lihao; Zhang, Qinghua

    2013-09-24

    A combination of vertical polyaniline (PANI) nanowire arrays and nitrogen plasma etched carbon fiber cloths (eCFC) was fabricated to create 3D nanostructured PANI/eCFC composites. The small size of the highly ordered PANI nanowires can greatly reduce the scale of the diffusion length, allowing for the improved utilization of electrode materials. A two-electrode flexible supercapacitor based on PANI/eCFC demonstrates a high specific capacitance (1035 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1)), good rate capability (88% capacity retention at 8 A g(-1)), and long-term cycle life (10% capacity loss after 5000 cycles). The lightweight, low-cost, flexible composites are promising candidates for use in energy storage device applications.

  6. On-chip microplasma reactors using carbon nanofibres and tungsten oxide nanowires as electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agiral, Anil; Groenland, Alfons W; Han Gardeniers, J G E; Chinthaginjala, J Kumar; Seshan, K; Lefferts, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and tungsten oxide (W 18 O 49 ) nanowires have been incorporated into a continuous flow type microplasma reactor to increase the reactivity and efficiency of the barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure. CNFs and tungsten oxide nanowires were characterized by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction methods. Field emission of electrons from those nanostructures supplies free electrons and ions during microplasma production. Reduction in breakdown voltage, higher number of microdischarges and higher energy deposition were observed at the same applied voltage when compared with plane electrodes at atmospheric pressure in air. Rate coefficients of electron impact reaction channels to decompose CO 2 were calculated and it was shown that CO 2 consumption increased using CNFs compared with plane electrode in the microplasma reactor.

  7. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes over vertically aligned silicon nanowire bundles for achieving uniform field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Huang, Yung-Jui; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lee, San-Liang

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication strategy is proposed to enable precise coverage of as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) mats atop vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) bundles in order to realize a uniform bundle array of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions over a large sample area. No obvious electrical degradation of as-fabricated SiNWs is observed according to the measured current-voltage characteristic of a two-terminal single-nanowire device. Bundle arrangement of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions is optimized to relax the electrostatic screening effect and to maximize the field enhancement factor. As a result, superior field emission performance and relatively stable emission current over 12 h is obtained. A bright and uniform fluorescent radiation is observed from CNT-SiNW-based field emitters regardless of its bundle periodicity, verifying the existence of high-density and efficient field emitters on the proposed CNT-SiNW bundle arrays.

  8. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Dhaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (∼200 °C grown atomic layer deposition (ALD films of AlN, TiN, Al2O3, GaN, and TiO2 were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP nanowires (NWs, and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL at low temperatures (15K, and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al2O3. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al2O3 provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  9. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhaka, Veer, E-mail: veer.dhaka@aalto.fi; Perros, Alexander; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Haggren, Tuomas; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 (Finland); Naureen, Shagufta; Shahid, Naeem [Research School of Physics & Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko [Department of Applied Physics and Nanomicroscopy Center, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 (Finland); Srinivasan, Anand [School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature (∼200 °C) grown atomic layer deposition (ALD) films of AlN, TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaN, and TiO{sub 2} were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP) nanowires (NWs), and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL) at low temperatures (15K), and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å) film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL) was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars) to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  10. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms? This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs

  11. Structural and optical properties of silicon-carbide nanowires produced by the high-temperature carbonization of silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlikov, A. V., E-mail: pavlikov@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Latukhina, N. V.; Chepurnov, V. I. [Samara National Researh University (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Silicon-carbide (SiC) nanowire structures 40–50 nm in diameter are produced by the high-temperature carbonization of porous silicon and silicon nanowires. The SiC nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The X-ray structural and Raman data suggest that the cubic 3C-SiC polytype is dominant in the samples under study. The shape of the infrared reflectance spectrum in the region of the reststrahlen band 800–900 cm{sup –1} is indicative of the presence of free charge carriers. The possibility of using SiC nanowires in microelectronic, photonic, and gas-sensing devices is discussed.

  12. Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation by GaAs Nanowire Arrays Protected with Atomic Layer Deposited NiO x Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Joy; Xu, Xiaoqing; Parameshwaran, Vijay; Baker, Jon; Bent, Stacey; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Clemens, Bruce

    2018-02-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production makes possible the direct conversion of solar energy into chemical fuel. In this work, PEC photoanodes consisting of GaAs nanowire (NW) arrays were fabricated, characterized, and then demonstrated for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Uniform and periodic GaAs nanowire arrays were grown on a heavily n-doped GaAs substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition selective area growth. The nanowire arrays were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in a non-aqueous electrochemical system using ferrocene/ferrocenium (Fc/Fc+) as a redox couple, and a maximum oxidation photocurrent of 11.1 mA/cm2 was measured. GaAs NW arrays with a 36 nm layer of nickel oxide (NiO x ) synthesized by atomic layer deposition were then used as photoanodes to drive the OER. In addition to acting as an electrocatalyst, the NiO x layer served to protect the GaAs NWs from oxidative corrosion. Using this strategy, GaAs NW photoanodes were successfully used for the oxygen evolution reaction. This is the first demonstration of GaAs NW arrays for effective OER, and the fabrication and protection strategy developed in this work can be extended to study any other nanostructured semiconductor materials systems for electrochemical solar energy conversion.

  13. Effect of atomic layer deposition temperature on the performance of top-down ZnO nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of atomic layer deposition (ALD) temperature on the performance of top-down ZnO nanowire transistors. Electrical characteristics are presented for 10-μm ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) and for deposition temperatures in the range 120°C to 210°C. Well-behaved transistor output characteristics are obtained for all deposition temperatures. It is shown that the maximum field-effect mobility occurs for an ALD temperature of 190°C. This maximum field-effect mobility corresponds with a maximum Hall effect bulk mobility and with a ZnO film that is stoichiometric. The optimized transistors have a field-effect mobility of 10 cm2/V.s, which is approximately ten times higher than can typically be achieved in thin-film amorphous silicon transistors. Furthermore, simulations indicate that the drain current and field-effect mobility extraction are limited by the contact resistance. When the effects of contact resistance are de-embedded, a field-effect mobility of 129 cm2/V.s is obtained. This excellent result demonstrates the promise of top-down ZnO nanowire technology for a wide variety of applications such as high-performance thin-film electronics, flexible electronics, and biosensing. PMID:25276107

  14. Unusual electrochemical response of ZnO nanowires-decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Guangquan; Ye Jianshan; Zhang Weide

    2009-01-01

    A novel type of ZnO nanowires-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposite (ZnO-NWs/MWCNTs) has been prepared by a hydrothermal process. The ZnO-NWs/MWCNTs nanocomposite has a uniform surface distribution and large coverage of ZnO nanowires onto MWCNTs with 3D configuration, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were applied to investigate the electrochemical properties of ZnO-NWs/MWCNTs nanocomposite. Surprisingly, unlike the conventional n-type semiconducting ZnO nanowires grown on Ta substrate, the ZnO-NWs/MWCNTs nanocomposite exhibits excellent electron transfer capability and gives a pair of well-defined symmetric redox peaks towards ferricyanide probe. What's more, the ZnO-NWs/MWCNTs nanocomposite shows remarkable electrocatalytic activity (current response increased 4 folds at 0.3 V) towards H 2 O 2 by comparing with bare MWCNTs. The ZnO-NWs/MWCNTs nanocomposite could find applications in novel biosensors and other electronic devices.

  15. ATOMIC CARBON IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF TITAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.; Yung, Y. L.; Ajello, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The atomic carbon emission C I line feature at 1657 A ( 3 P 0 J - 3 P J ) in the upper atmosphere of Titan is first identified from the airglow spectra obtained by the Cassini Ultra-violet Imaging Spectrograph. A one-dimensional photochemical model of Titan is used to study the photochemistry of atomic carbon on Titan. Reaction between CH and atomic hydrogen is the major source of atomic carbon, and reactions with hydrocarbons (C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 4 ) are the most important loss processes. Resonance scattering of sunlight by atomic carbon is the dominant emission mechanism. The emission intensity calculations based on model results show good agreement with the observations.

  16. Catalytic growth of carbon nanowires on composite diamond/silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellam, Amine [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département CP2S (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Miska, Patrice [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département P2M (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Ghanbaja, Jaafar [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département CP2S (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Barrat, Silvère, E-mail: Silvere.Barrat@ijl.nancy-universite.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département CP2S (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films and carbon nanowires (CNWs) provide individually highly attractive properties for science and technology applications. The possibility of carbon composite materials made from a combination of these materials remains a potential approach widely discussed in literature but modestly investigated. We report in this work an early attempt to explore this opportunity in the light of some specific experimental considerations. Carbon nanowires (CNWs) are grown at low temperature without the conventional use of external hydrocarbon vapor source on silicon substrates partially covered by a thin film of coalesced micrometric CVD diamond. Composite substrates constituted by PCD on silicon were first cleaned with H{sub 2} plasma then used for the PVD deposition of 5 nm Ni thin films. Then, samples were heat treated in a CVD reactor at 580 °C in the presence of pure H{sub 2} pressure of 60 hPa at different annealing times. Comparative effect of annealing time on the dewetting of Ni thin films and the subsequent CNWs growth process was considered in this work using systematic observations by SEM. Possible mechanisms underlying CNWs growth in pure H{sub 2} gas were proposed. The nature and structure of these CNWs have been investigated by TEM microscopy and by Raman spectroscopy on the sample showing the highest CNWs density.

  17. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Yazdani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD. Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  18. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  19. Study of removal of Direct Yellow 12 by cadmium oxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang, E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghian, Batuol [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokhdan, Syamak Nasiri, E-mail: syamak.nasiri@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pebdani, Arezou Amiri [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahraei, Reza; Daneshfar, Ali; Mihandoost, Asma [Department of Chemistry, University of Ilam, P.O. Box: 65315-516, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    In this research, cadmium oxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon (CdO-NW-AC) has been synthesized by a simple procedure and characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and UV–vis spectrometry. This new adsorbent has been efficiently utilized for the removal of the Direct Yellow 12 (DY-12) from wastewater. To obtain maximum DY-12 removal efficiency, the influences of variables such as pH, DY-12 concentration, amount of CdO-NW-AC, contact time, and temperature have been examined and optimized in a batch method. Following the variable optimization, the experimental equilibrium data (at different concentration of DY-12) was fitted to conventional isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin. The applicability of each method is based on the R{sup 2} and error analysis for each model. It was found that the experimental equilibrium data well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The dependency of removal process to time and the experimental data follow second order kinetic model with involvement of intraparticle diffusion model. The negative value of Gibbs's free energy and positive value of adsorption enthalpy show the spontaneous and endothermic nature of adsorption process. - Graphical abstract: Typical FE-SEM image of the CdO nanowires. Highlights: ► Cadmium oxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon was utilized as an adsorbent. ► It was used for the removal of Direct Yellow 12 from aqueous solutions. ► The adsorption of Direct Yellow 12 on this adsorbent is endothermic in nature. ► The adsorption equilibrium data was well described by the Langmuir isotherm model.

  20. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Wako, K; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-25

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C(60) and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  1. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Wako, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Xiong Qihua

    2010-01-01

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C 60 and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  2. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Senami

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12,0 single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsive force between lithium atoms destabilizes a system for the large number of lithium atoms.

  3. Protein Biosensors Based on Polymer Nanowires, Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeksoo Ji

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of biosensors using electrochemical methods is a promising application in the field of biotechnology. High sensitivity sensors for the bio-detection of proteins have been developed using several kinds of nanomaterials. The performance of the sensors depends on the type of nanostructures with which the biomaterials interact. One dimensional (1-D structures such as nanowires, nanotubes and nanorods are proven to have high potential for bio-applications. In this paper we review these three different kinds of nanostructures that have attracted much attention at recent times with their great performance as biosensors. Materials such as polymers, carbon and zinc oxide have been widely used for the fabrication of nanostructures because of their enhanced performance in terms of sensitivity, biocompatibility, and ease of preparation. Thus we consider polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanorods for discussion in this paper. We consider three stages in the development of biosensors: (a fabrication of biomaterials into nanostructures, (b alignment of the nanostructures and (c immobilization of proteins. Two different methods by which the biosensors can be developed at each stage for all the three nanostructures are examined. Finally, we conclude by mentioning some of the major challenges faced by many researchers who seek to fabricate biosensors for real time applications.

  4. [INFLUENCE OF NANODIAMONDS AND CARBON NANOWIRES ON SURVIVAL AND CELLS STRUCTURE IN CHICKEN EMBRYO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrinenko, V; Zinabadinova, S; Chaikovsky, Yu; Sokurenko, L; Shobat, L

    2016-06-01

    Aim - to determine the effect of nanodiamonds and carbon nanowires on the survival and ultrastructure of chicken embryo cells. The experiment was carried out on chicken embryos, incubated from eggs of Hy-Line breed. Control and two experimental groups were formed (total number of embryos - 100). Diamond nanoparticles and carbon nanowires were administered on day 3 of incubation as a suspension of a biocompatible dextran. Ultrastructural analysis and general study of embryos state were carried out. The most expressed pathological effects were observed in the group with the introduction of the CNW, which caused visual impairment of embryogenesis that started from the early incubation periods. As for ND we can claim their prolonged impact on the development of embryos, manifested in the gradual deterioration of the embryos condition with the manifestations of the pathology in the provisory organs and the body of embryos. The results of our study demonstrate that both types of nanostructures can cause sublethal and irreversible morphologic changes. Detection of morphological evidence of the impact of nanomaterials at significant distances from the site of administration of nanoparticles shows highly penetrating ability of nanomaterials. The presence of damages specific for each type of nanoparticles shows affinity to various tissues and cellular structures. It is demonstrated that similar, at first glance, impact of nanomaterials, such as the induction of oxidative stress might be caused by specific structural transformations. So, ND cause vacuolization of mitochondria, and the CNW - deformation of their shape and appearance of dark inclusions in them.

  5. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    OpenAIRE

    Senami, Masato; Ikeda, Yuji; Fukushima, Akinori; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12, 0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsiv...

  6. Fabrication of Te and Te-Au Nanowires-Based Carbon Fiber Fabrics for Antibacterial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Mao Chou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria that give rise to diseases every year remain a major health concern. In recent years, tellurium-based nanomaterials have been approved as new and efficient antibacterial agents. In this paper, we developed the approach to directly grow tellurium nanowires (Te NWs onto commercial carbon fiber fabrics and demonstrated their antibacterial activity. Those Te NWs can serve as templates and reducing agents for gold nanoparticles (Au NPs to deposit. Three different Te-Au NWs with varied concentration of Au NPs were synthesized and showed superior antibacterial activity and biocompability. These results indicate that the as-prepared carbon fiber fabrics with Te and Te-Au NWs can become antimicrobial clothing products in the near future.

  7. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. ... By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal ..... The use of activated carbon in place of ..... required for the complete removal of the carbon template.

  8. Implementing and Quantifying the Shape-Memory Effect of Single Polymeric Micro/Nanowires with an Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liang; Gould, Oliver E C; Lysyakova, Liudmila; Jiang, Yi; Sauter, Tilman; Frank, Oliver; Becker, Tino; Schossig, Michael; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas

    2018-04-23

    The implementation of shape-memory effects (SME) in polymeric micro- or nano-objects currently relies on the application of indirect macroscopic manipulation techniques, for example, stretchable molds or phantoms, to ensembles of small objects. Here, we introduce a method capable of the controlled manipulation and SME quantification of individual micro- and nano-objects in analogy to macroscopic thermomechanical test procedures. An atomic force microscope was utilized to address individual electro-spun poly(ether urethane) (PEU) micro- or nanowires freely suspended between two micropillars on a micro-structured silicon substrate. In this way, programming strains of 10±1% or 21±1% were realized, which could be successfully fixed. An almost complete restoration of the original free-suspended shape during heating confirmed the excellent shape-memory performance of the PEU wires. Apparent recovery stresses of σ max,app =1.2±0.1 and 33.3±0.1 MPa were obtained for a single microwire and nanowire, respectively. The universal AFM test platform described here enables the implementation and quantification of a thermomechanically induced function for individual polymeric micro- and nanosystems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High-performance asymmetric supercapacitors based on core/shell cobalt oxide/carbon nanowire arrays with enhanced electrochemical energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, G.X.; Xia, X.H.; Cao, F.; Chen, J.; Tang, P.S.; Zhang, Y.J.; Chen, H.F.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared a self-supported porous Co 3 O 4 /C core/shell nanowire array. • Core/shell nanowire array showed high pseudo-capacitive properties. • Core/shell array structure was favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. - Abstract: High-reactivity electrode materials are indispensible for developing high-performance electrochemical energy storage devices. Herein, we report self-supported core/shell Co 3 O 4 /C nanowire arrays by using hydrothermal synthesis and chemical vapor deposition methods. A uniform and thin carbon shell is coated on the surface of Co 3 O 4 nanowire forming core/shell nanowires with diameters of ∼100 nm. Asymmetric supercapacitors have been assembled with the core/shell Co 3 O 4 /C nanowire arrays as the positive electrode and activated carbon (AC) as the negative electrode. The core/shell Co 3 O 4 /C nanowire arrays exhibit a specific capacity of 116 mAh g −1 at the working current of 100 mA (4 A g −1 ), and a long cycle life along with ∼ 92% retention after 8000 cycles at 4 A g −1 , higher than the unmodified Co 3 O 4 nanowire arrays (81 mAh g −1 at 4 A g −1 ). The introduction of uniform carbon layer into the core/shell structure is favorable for the enhancement of supercapacitor due to the improved electrical conductivity and reaction kinetics

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition Alumina-Passivated Silicon Nanowires: Probing the Transition from Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor to Electrolytic Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriau, Dorian; Boniface, Maxime; Valero, Anthony; Aldakov, Dmitry; Brousse, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Sadki, Said

    2017-04-19

    Silicon nanowires were coated by a 1-5 nm thin alumina layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to replace poorly reproducible and unstable native silicon oxide by a highly conformal passivating alumina layer. The surface coating enabled probing the behavior of symmetric devices using such electrodes in the EMI-TFSI electrolyte, allowing us to attain a large cell voltage up to 6 V in ionic liquid, together with very high cyclability with less than 4% capacitance fade after 10 6 charge/discharge cycles. These results yielded fruitful insights into the transition between an electrochemical double-layer capacitor behavior and an electrolytic capacitor behavior. Ultimately, thin ALD dielectric coatings can be used to obtain hybrid devices exhibiting large cell voltage and excellent cycle life of dielectric capacitors, while retaining energy and power densities close to the ones displayed by supercapacitors.

  11. Study of Cu2O\\ZnO nanowires heterojunction designed by combining electrodeposition and atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Houssin; Weber, Matthieu; Messaoudi, Olfa; Tingry, Sophie; Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Chtoutou, Radhouane; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-12-01

    Cu2O/ZnO nanowires (NWs) heterojunctions were successfully prepared by combining Atomic layer Deposition (ALD) and Electrochemical Deposition (ECD) processes. The crystallinity, morphology and photoconductivity properties of the Cu2O/ZnO nanostructures have been investigated. The properties of the Cu2O absorber layer and the nanostructured heterojunction were studied in order to understand the mechanisms lying behind the low photoconductivity measured. It has been found that the interface state defects and the high resistivity of Cu2O film were limiting the photovoltaic properties of the prepared devices. The understanding presented in this work is expected to enable the optimization of solar cell devices based on Cu2O/ZnO nanomaterials and improve their overall performance.

  12. Highly transparent and thermal-stable silver nanowire conductive film covered with ZnMgO by atomic-layer-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Dongchen; Li, Min; Xu, Hua; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Peng, Junbiao; Xu, Miao

    2017-12-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been considered as a promising material for next generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. However AgNWs films have several intrinsic drawbacks, such as thermal stability and storage stability. Herein, we demonstrate a laminated ZnO/MgO (ZnMgO, ZMO) as a protective layer on the AgNWs films using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The fabricated films exhibited a low sheet resistance of 16 Ω/sq with high transmittance of 91% at 550 nm, an excellent thermal stability and bending property. The ZMO film grows perpendicularly on the surface of the AgNWs, making a perfect coverage of bulk silver nanowires and junction, which can effectively prompt the electrical transport behavior and enhance stability of the silver nanowires network.

  13. Ultrafine MnO2 Nanowire Arrays Grown on Carbon Fibers for High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiyu; Qian, Feng; Song, Guosheng; Li, Wenyao; Wang, Linlin

    2016-10-01

    Large-area ultrafine MnO2 nanowire arrays (NWA) directly grew on a carbon fiber (CF, used as a substrate) by a simple electrochemical method, forming three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructures of a CF@MnO2 NWA composite. As an electrode for supercapacitors, the CF@MnO2 NWA composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performances including high specific capacitance (321.3 F g-1 at 1000 mA g-1) and good rate capability. Further, the overall capacitance retention is 99.7 % capacitance after 3000 cycles. These outstanding electrochemical performances attribute to a large number of transport channels for the penetration of electrolyte and the transportation of ions and electrons of electrodes. The as-prepared CF@MnO2 NWA composite may be a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  14. Ultrafine MnO2 Nanowire Arrays Grown on Carbon Fibers for High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large-area ultrafine MnO2 nanowire arrays (NWA directly grew on a carbon fiber (CF, used as a substrate by a simple electrochemical method, forming three-dimensional (3D hierarchical heterostructures of a CF@MnO2 NWA composite. As an electrode for supercapacitors, the CF@MnO2 NWA composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performances including high specific capacitance (321.3 F g−1 at 1000 mA g−1 and good rate capability. Further, the overall capacitance retention is ~99.7 % capacitance after 3000 cycles. These outstanding electrochemical performances attribute to a large number of transport channels for the penetration of electrolyte and the transportation of ions and electrons of electrodes. The as-prepared CF@MnO2 NWA composite may be a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  15. Planar silver nanowire, carbon nanotube and PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Andrew J.; Yambem, Soniya D.; Johns, Ashley H.; Afre, Rakesh A.; Ellis, Amanda V.; Shapter, Joe G.; Andersson, Gunther G.; Quinton, Jamie S.; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Lewis, David A.

    2015-04-01

    Highly conductive, transparent and flexible planar electrodes were fabricated using interwoven silver nanowires and single-walled carbon nanotubes (AgNW:SWCNT) in a PEDOT:PSS matrix via an epoxy transfer method from a silicon template. The planar electrodes achieved a sheet resistance of 6.6 ± 0.0 Ω/□ and an average transmission of 86% between 400 and 800 nm. A high figure of merit of 367 Ω-1 is reported for the electrodes, which is much higher than that measured for indium tin oxide and reported for other AgNW composites. The AgNW:SWCNT:PEDOT:PSS electrode was used to fabricate low temperature (annealing free) devices demonstrating their potential to function with a range of organic semiconducting polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction blend systems.

  16. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  17. Carbon Quantum Dot Surface-Engineered VO2 Interwoven Nanowires: A Flexible Cathode Material for Lithium and Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Muhammad-Sadeeq; Luo, Yang; Lyu, Feiyi; Wang, Fuxin; Yang, Hao; Li, Haibo; Liang, Chaolun; Huang, Miao; Huang, Yongchao; Tong, Yexiang

    2016-04-20

    The use of electrode materials in their powdery form requires binders and conductive additives for the fabrication of the cells, which leads to unsatisfactory energy storage performance. Recently, a new strategy to design flexible, binder-, and additive-free three-dimensional electrodes with nanoscale surface engineering has been exploited in boosting the storage performance of electrode materials. In this paper, we design a new type of free-standing carbon quantum dot coated VO2 interwoven nanowires through a simple fabrication process and demonstrate its potential to be used as cathode material for lithium and sodium ion batteries. The versatile carbon quantum dots that are vastly flexible for surface engineering serve the function of protecting the nanowire surface and play an important role in the diffusion of electrons. Also, the three-dimensional carbon cloth coated with VO2 interwoven nanowires assisted in the diffusion of ions through the inner and the outer surface. With this unique architecture, the carbon quantum dot nanosurface engineered VO2 electrode exhibited capacities of 420 and 328 mAh g(-1) at current density rate of 0.3 C for lithium and sodium storage, respectively. This work serves as a milestone for the potential replacement of lithium ion batteries and next generation postbatteries.

  18. Carbon nanotori as traps for atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yue; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotori surely represent an ideal location to trap both charged and uncharged atoms, since they are open, accessible and possess strong attractive energy. In this paper, we investigate the plausibility of carbon nanotori as atomic traps and we use the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential to model the encapsulation of an atom or ion by a nanotorus. The critical geometric factors such as the minor and major radii, i.e. r and R of the nanotorus, for which the maximum interaction between the atom and the nanotorus occurs, are determined. For various atoms, assumed situated along the axis of the torus, the minimum potential energy between the atom and the nanotorus is calculated and compared, and shown to be approximately kηεσ 2 , where η is the uniform atomic density, ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones well depth and the van der Waals radius, respectively, and k is a universal non-dimensional constant with the approximate value -12.42. The results given in this paper might be used for future drug delivery and biosensing design.

  19. Effective Surface Passivation of InP Nanowires by Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3 with POx Interlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, L E; Cavalli, A; Verheijen, M A; Haverkort, J E M; Bakkers, E P A M; Kessels, W M M

    2017-10-11

    III/V semiconductor nanostructures have significant potential in device applications, but effective surface passivation is critical due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. For InP such passivation has proven particularly difficult, with substantial depassivation generally observed following dielectric deposition on InP surfaces. We present a novel approach based on passivation with a phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide deposited using a low-temperature process, which is critical to avoid P-desorption. For this purpose we have chosen a PO x layer deposited in a plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) system at room temperature. Since PO x is known to be hygroscopic and therefore unstable in atmosphere, we encapsulate this layer with a thin ALD Al 2 O 3 capping layer to form a PO x /Al 2 O 3 stack. This passivation scheme is capable of improving the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of our state-of-the-art wurtzite (WZ) InP nanowires by a factor of ∼20 at low excitation. If we apply the rate equation analysis advocated by some authors, we derive a PL internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 75% for our passivated wires at high excitation. Our results indicate that it is more reliable to calculate the IQE as the ratio of the integrated PL intensity at room temperature to that at 10 K. By this means we derive an IQE of 27% for the passivated wires at high excitation (>10 kW cm -2 ), which constitutes an unprecedented level of performance for undoped InP nanowires. This conclusion is supported by time-resolved PL decay lifetimes, which are also shown to be significantly higher than previously reported for similar wires. The passivation scheme displays excellent long-term stability (>7 months) and is additionally shown to substantially improve the thermal stability of InP surfaces (>300 °C), significantly expanding the temperature window for device processing. Such effective surface passivation is a key enabling technology for InP nanowire devices such as

  20. Ionized carbon atomic ISM explorer (ICE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.R.; Watson, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    An Explorer-class satellite for an all-sky survey in the forbidden C II 157.7-micron line at low angular resolution (4 arcmin) and high spectral resolution (0.3 km/s) with complete Galactic velocity coverage (+ or - 300 km/s) is proposed. The C II line is as ubiquitous as the H I 21-cm line and the 2.6-mm line of CO and in addition provides crucial information complementary to the 21-cm and 2.6-mm data. Such a survey will map the large-scale Galactic distribution of the three phases of the atomic component as well as identify photoionized edges of star-forming regions. In particular, it will cleanly separate the cold, diffuse clouds and the intercloud H I along every line of sight. It will map the large-scale distribution of the warm, ionized medium, as well as the pressure in diffuse clouds. 15 references

  1. Gas sensing properties of zinc stannate (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) nanowires prepared by carbon assisted thermal evaporation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharsika, T., E-mail: tharsika@siswa.um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haseeb, A.S.M.A., E-mail: haseeb@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Akbar, S.A., E-mail: akbar.1@osu.edu [Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements (CISM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Sabri, M.F.M., E-mail: faizul@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Wong, Y.H., E-mail: yhwong@um.edu.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires are grown on Au/alumina substrate by a carbon assisted thermal evaporation process. • Optimum growth conditions for Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires are determined. • Ethanol gas is selectively sensed with high sensitivity. - Abstract: Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires are successfully synthesized by a carbon assisted thermal evaporation process with the help of a gold catalyst under ambient pressure. The as-synthesized nanowires are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The XRD patterns and elemental mapping via TEM–EDS clearly indicate that the nanowires are Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} with face centered spinel structure. HRTEM image confirms that Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires are single crystalline with an interplanar spacing of 0.26 nm, which is ascribed to the d-spacing of (3 1 1) planes of Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. The optimum processing condition and a possible formation mechanism of these Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires are discussed. Additionally, sensor performance of Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires based sensor is studied for various test gases such as ethanol, methane and hydrogen. The results reveal that Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires exhibit excellent sensitivity and selectivity toward ethanol with quick response and recovery times. The response of the Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires based sensors to 50 ppm ethanol at an optimum operating temperature of 500 °C is about 21.6 with response and recovery times of about 116 s and 182 s, respectively.

  2. A palladium-doped ceria@carbon core-sheath nanowire network: a promising catalyst support for alcohol electrooxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2015-08-01

    A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique interconnected one-dimensional core-sheath structure is revealed to facilitate immobilization of the metal catalysts, leading to the improved durability. This core-sheath nanowire network opens up a new strategy for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells.A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique

  3. First principles investigation of interaction between impurity atom (Si, Ge, Sn) and carbon atom in diamond-like carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Aiying; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between impurity atom (Si, Ge, and Sn) and carbon atom in diamond-like carbon (DLC) system was investigated by the first principles simulation method based on the density functional theory. The tetrahedral configuration was selected as the calculation model for simplicity. When the bond angle varied in a range of 90°–130° from the equivalent state of 109.471°, the distortion energy and the electronic structures including charge density of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and partial density of state (PDOS) in the different systems were calculated. The results showed that the addition of Si, Ge and Sn atom into amorphous carbon matrix significantly decreased the distortion energy of the system as the bond angles deviated from the equilibrium one. Further studies of the HOMO and PDOS indicated that the weak covalent bond between Si(Ge, Sn) and C atoms was formed with the decreased strength and directionality, which were influenced by the electronegative difference. These results implied that the electron transfer behavior at the junction of carbon nano-devices could be tailored by the impurity element, and the compressive stress in DLC films could be reduced by the incorporation of Si, Ge and Sn because of the formation of weaker covalent bonds. - Highlights: ►Distortion energy after bond angle distortion was decreased comparing with C-C unit. ►The weak covalent bond was formed between impurity atoms and corner carbon atoms. ►Observed electron transfer behavior affected the strength and directionality of bond. ►Reduction of strength and directionality of bond contributed to small energy change.

  4. Ab-initio study of thermodynamic properties of boron nanowire at atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Prabal D.; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Y.; Gajjar, P. N.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, we have optimized ribbon like zigzag structure of boron (B) nanowire (NW) and investigated vibrational and thermodynamic properties using quasi-harmonic approximations (QHA). All positive phonon in the phonon dispersive curve have confirmed dynamical stability of ribbon B-NW. The thermodynamic properties, like Debye temperature, internal energy and specific heat, are calculated as a function of temperature. The variation of specific heat is proportional to T3 Debye law at lower temperature for B-NW, while it becomes constant above room temperature at 1200K; obeys Dulong-Petit's law. The high Debye temperature of 1120K is observed at ambient temperature, which can be attributed to high thermal conductivity. Our study shows that B-NW with high thermal conductivity could be the next generation electron connector for nanoscale electronic devices.

  5. Vanadium oxide nanowire-carbon nanotube binder-free flexible electrodes for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Sanjaya D.; Patel, Bijal; Seitz, Oliver; Ferraris, John P.; Balkus, Kenneth J. Jr. [Department of Chemistry and the Alan G. MacDiarmid Nanotech Institute, 800 West Campbell Rd, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Nijem, Nour; Roodenko, Katy; Chabal, Yves J. [Laboratory for Surface and Nanostructure Modification, Department of Material Science and Engineering, 800 West Campbell Rd, University of Texas Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) layered nanostructures are known to have very stable crystal structures and high faradaic activity. The low electronic conductivity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} greatly limits the application of vanadium oxide as electrode materials and requires combining with conducting materials using binders. It is well known that the organic binders can degrade the overall performance of electrode materials and need carefully controlled compositions. In this study, we develop a simple method for preparing freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT)-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowire (VNW) composite paper electrodes without using binders. Coin cell type (CR2032) supercapacitors are assembled using the nanocomposite paper electrode as the anode and high surface area carbon fiber electrode (Spectracarb 2225) as the cathode. The supercapacitor with CNT-VNW composite paper electrode exhibits a power density of 5.26 kW Kg{sup -1} and an energy density of 46.3 Wh Kg{sup -1}. (Li)VNWs and CNT composite paper electrodes can be fabricated in similar manner and show improved overall performance with a power density of 8.32 kW Kg{sup -1} and an energy density of 65.9 Wh Kg{sup -1}. The power and energy density values suggest that such flexible hybrid nanocomposite paper electrodes may be useful for high performance electrochemical supercapacitors. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp2 carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-04-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp2 carbon structures.

  7. A sensitive DNA biosensor fabricated from gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and zinc oxide nanowires on a glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Li Shuping; Zhang Yuzhong

    2010-01-01

    We outline here the fabrication of a sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of sequence-specific target DNA. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnONWs) were first immobilized on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl groups were then dropped onto the surface of the ZnONWs. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were subsequently introduced to the surface of the MWNTs/ZnONWs by electrochemical deposition. A single-stranded DNA probe with a thiol group at the end (HS-ssDNA) was covalently immobilized on the surface of the AuNPs by forming an Au-S bond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to investigate the film assembly process. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor DNA hybridization by measuring the electrochemical signals of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ bounding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The incorporation of ZnONWs and MWCNTs in this sensor design significantly enhances the sensitivity and the selectivity. This DNA biosensor can detect the target DNA quantitatively in the range of 1.0 x 10 -13 to 1.0 x 10 -7 M, with a detection limit of 3.5 x 10 -14 M (S/N = 3). In addition, the DNA biosensor exhibits excellent selectivity, even for single-mismatched DNA detection.

  8. Fabrication of SiC Composites with Synergistic Toughening of Carbon Whisker and In Situ 3C-SiC Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SiC composites with synergistic toughening of carbon whisker and in situ 3C-SiC nanowire have been fabricated by hot press sinter technology and annealed treatment technology. Effect of annealed time on the morphology of SiC nanowires and mechanical properties of the Cw/SiC composites was surveyed in detail. The appropriate annealed time improved mechanical properties of the Cw/SiC composites. The synergistic effect of carbon whisker and SiC nanowire can improve the fracture toughness for Cw/SiC composites. The vapor-liquid-solid growth (VLS mechanism was proposed. TEM photo showed that 3C-SiC nanowire can be obtained with preferential growth plane ({111}, which corresponded to interplanar spacing about 0.25 nm.

  9. Role of carbon atoms in the remote plasma deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedikt, J.; Wisse, M.; Woen, R.V.; Engeln, R.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine the role of carbon atoms in the growth of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films by means of an argon/acetylene expanding thermal plasma. Cavity ring down absorption spectroscopy is used to detect metastable carbon atoms by probing the 1s 2 2s 2 2p 3s 1 P 1 2 2s 2 2p 2 1 S 0 electronic transition. In addition to absorption measurements, the emission of the same transition is monitored by means of optical emission spectroscopy. These two measurements provide information about the local production of the C atoms and about their reactivity in the gas phase. It will be shown that under growth conditions in an Ar/C 2 H 2 expanding thermal plasma, the metastable carbon density is also representative for the ground state carbon density. From obtained results it is concluded that the carbon atoms react rapidly with acetylene in the gas phase and therefore their contribution to the growth of hard diamond-like a-C:H films can be neglected. Only at low acetylene flows, the condition when soft polymer-like films are deposited, carbon atoms are detected close to the substrate and can possibly contribute to the film growth

  10. Novel mechanical behaviors of wurtzite CdSe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Bing [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics (China); Chen, Li [MCPHS University, School of Arts and Sciences (United States); Xie, Yiqun; Feng, Jie; Ye, Xiang, E-mail: yexiang@shnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics (China)

    2015-09-15

    As an important semiconducting nanomaterial, CdSe nanowires have attracted much attention. Although many studies have been conducted in the electronic and optical properties of CdSe NWs, the mechanical properties of Wurtzite (WZ) CdSe nanowires remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the tensile mechanical properties and behaviors of [0001]-oriented Wurtzite CdSe nanowires. By monitoring the stretching processes of CdSe nanowires, three distinct structures are found: the WZ wire, a body-centered tetragonal structure with four-atom rings (denoted as BCT-4), and a structure that consists of ten-atom rings with two four-atom rings (denoted as TAR-4) which is observed for the first time. Not only the elastic tensile characteristics are highly reversible under unloading, but a reverse transition between TAR-4 and BCT-4 is also observed. The stretching processes also have a strong dependence on temperature. A tubular structure similar to carbon nanotubes is observed at 150 K, a single-atom chain is formed at 300, 350 and 450 K, and a double-atom chain is found at 600 K. Our findings on tensile mechanical properties of WZ CdSe nanowires does not only provide inspiration to future study on other properties of CdSe nanomaterials but also help design and build efficient nanoscale devices.

  11. Physics and performances of III-V nanowire broken-gap heterojunction TFETs using an efficient tight-binding mode-space NEGF model enabling million-atom nanowire simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalian, A; Vasen, T; Ramvall, P; Shen, T-M; Wu, J; Passlack, M

    2018-06-27

    We report the capability to simulate in a quantum-mechanical atomistic fashion record-large nanowire devices, featuring several hundred to millions of atoms and a diameter up to 18.2 nm. We have employed a tight-binding mode-space NEGF technique demonstrating by far the fastest (up to 10 000  ×  faster) but accurate (error  <  1%) atomistic simulations to date. Such technique and capability opens new avenues to explore and understand the physics of nanoscale and mesoscopic devices dominated by quantum effects. In particular, our method addresses in an unprecedented way the technologically-relevant case of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in III-V nanowire broken-gap heterojunction tunnel-FETs (HTFETs). We demonstrate an accurate match of simulated BTBT currents to experimental measurements in a 12 nm diameter InAs NW and in an InAs/GaSb Esaki tunneling diode. We apply our TB MS simulations and report the first in-depth atomistic study of the scaling potential of III-V GAA nanowire HTFETs including the effect of electron-phonon scattering and discrete dopant impurity band tails, quantifying the benefits of this technology for low-power low-voltage CMOS applications.

  12. Negative Differential Resistance in Atomic Carbon Chain-Graphene Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Liping; Liu Chunmei; Liu Nianhua

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of atomic carbon chain-graphene junctions by using the density-functional theory combining with the non-equilibrium Green's functions. The results show that the transport properties are sensitively dependent on the contact geometry of carbon chain. From the calculated I-V curve we find negative differential resistance (NDR) in the two types of junctions. The NDR can be considered as a result of molecular orbitals moving related to the bias window. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  14. Cadmium hydroxide nanowire loaded on activated carbon as efficient adsorbent for removal of Bromocresol Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Khajesharifi, Habibollah; Hemmati Yadkuri, Amin; Roosta, Mostafa; Sahraei, Reza; Daneshfar, Ali

    2012-02-01

    In the present research, cadmium hydroxide nanowire loaded on activated carbon (Cd(OH) 2-NW-AC) was synthesized and characterized. This new adsorbent was applied for the removal of Bromocresol Green (BCG) molecules from aqueous solutions. The influence of effective variables such as solution pH, contact time, initial BCG concentration, amount of Cd(OH) 2-NW-AC and temperature on the adsorption efficiency of BCG in batch system was examined. During all experiments BCG contents were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Fitting the experimental data to different kinetic models including pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models show the suitability of the pseudo-second-order kinetic model to interpret in the experimental data. Equilibrium isotherm studies were examined by application of different conventional models such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin models to explain the experimental data. Based on considering R2 value as criterion the adsorption data well fitted to Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 108.7 mg g -1. Thermodynamic parameters (Gibb's free energy, entropy and enthalpy) of adsorption were calculated according to general procedure to take some information about the on-going adsorption process. The high negative value of Gibb's free energy and positive value of enthalpy show the feasibility and endothermic nature of adsorption process.

  15. Oriented Polyaniline Nanowire Arrays Grown on Dendrimer (PAMAM) Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes as Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Mengjie; Li, Honglong; Xiao, Linghan; Li, Ming; Ao, Yuhui

    2018-04-19

    At present, PANI/MWNT composites have been paid more attention as promising electrode materials in supercapacitors. Yet some shortcomings still limit the widely application of PANI/MWNT electrolytes. In this work, in order to improve capacitance ability and long-term stability of electrode, a multi-amino dendrimer (PAMAM) had been covalently linked onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as a bridge to facilitating covalent graft of polyaniline (PANI), affording P-MWNT/PANI electrode composites for supercapacitor. Surprisingly, ordered arrays of PANI nanowires on MWNT (setaria-like morphology) had been observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical properties of P-MWNT/PANI electrode had been characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge technique. The specific capacitance and long cycle life of P-MWNT-PANI electrode material were both much higher than MWNT/PANI. These interesting results indicate that multi-amino dendrimer, PAMAM, covalently linked on MWNT provides more reaction sites for in-situ polymerization of ordered PANI, which could efficiently shorten the ion diffusion length in electrolytes and lead to making fully use of conducting materials.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Networks Reinforced by Silver Nanowires with Improved Optical Transparency and Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martine, Patricia; Fakhimi, Azin; Lin, Ling; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2015-03-01

    We have fabricated highly transparent and conductive free-standing nanocomposite thin film electrodes by adding silver nanowires (AgNWs) to dry-spun Multiwall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) aerogels. This nanocomposite exhibits desirable properties such as high optical transmittance, excellent flexibility and enhanced electrical conductivity. The incorporation of the AgNWs to the MWNT aerogels was accomplished by using a spray coating method. The optical transparency and sheet resistance of the nanocomposite was tuned by adjusting the concentration of AgNWs, back pressure and nozzle distance of the spray gun to the MWNT aerogel during deposition. As the solvent evaporated, the aerogel MWNT bundles densified via surface tension which caused the MWNT bundles to collapse. This adjustable process was responsible in forming well defined apertures that increased the nanocomposite's transmittance up to 90 percent. Via AgNWs percolation and random interconnections between separate MWNT bundles in the aerogel matrix, the sheet resistance decreased from 1 K ohm/sq to less than 100 ohm/sq. Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute

  17. Observation of linear I-V curves on vertical GaAs nanowires with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geydt, P.; Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskiy, M.; Lähderanta, E.; Haggrén, T.; Kakko, J.-P.; Lipsanen, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate the possibility of studying the current-voltage characteristics for single vertically standing semiconductor nanowires on standard AFM equipped by current measuring module in PeakForce Tapping mode. On the basis of research of eight different samples of p-doped GaAs nanowires grown on different GaAs substrates, peculiar electrical effects were revealed. It was found how covering of substrate surface by SiOx layer increases the current, as well as phosphorous passivation of the grown nanowires. Elimination of the Schottky barrier between golden cap and the top parts of nanowires was observed. It was additionally studied that charge accumulation on the shell of single nanowires affects its resistivity and causes the hysteresis loops on I-V curves.

  18. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-07

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics for carbon-based electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J., E-mail: jiyoung.kim@utdallas.edu; Jandhyala, S.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon based nanomaterials like nanotubes and graphene have emerged as future generation electronic materials for device applications because of their interesting properties such as high-mobility and ability to carry high-current densities compared to conventional semiconductor materials like silicon. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to integrate robust gate dielectrics with high-quality interfaces for these materials in order to attain maximum performance. To date, a variety of methods including physical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition (ALD), physical assembly among others have been employed in order to integrate dielectrics for carbon nanotube and graphene based field-effect transistors. Owing to the difficulty in wetting pristine surfaces of nanotubes and graphene, most of the ALD methods require a seeding technique involving non-covalent functionalization of their surfaces in order to nucleate dielectric growth while maintaining their intrinsic properties. A comprehensive review regarding the various dielectric integration schemes for emerging devices and their limitations with respect to ALD based methods along with a future outlook is provided. - Highlights: • We introduce various dielectric integration schemes for carbon-based devices. • Physical vapor deposition methods tend to degrade device performance. • Atomic layer deposition on pristine surfaces of graphene and nanotube is difficult. • We review different seeding techniques for atomic layer deposition of dielectrics. • Compare the performance of graphene top-gate devices with different dielectrics.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics for carbon-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Jandhyala, S.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon based nanomaterials like nanotubes and graphene have emerged as future generation electronic materials for device applications because of their interesting properties such as high-mobility and ability to carry high-current densities compared to conventional semiconductor materials like silicon. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to integrate robust gate dielectrics with high-quality interfaces for these materials in order to attain maximum performance. To date, a variety of methods including physical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition (ALD), physical assembly among others have been employed in order to integrate dielectrics for carbon nanotube and graphene based field-effect transistors. Owing to the difficulty in wetting pristine surfaces of nanotubes and graphene, most of the ALD methods require a seeding technique involving non-covalent functionalization of their surfaces in order to nucleate dielectric growth while maintaining their intrinsic properties. A comprehensive review regarding the various dielectric integration schemes for emerging devices and their limitations with respect to ALD based methods along with a future outlook is provided. - Highlights: • We introduce various dielectric integration schemes for carbon-based devices. • Physical vapor deposition methods tend to degrade device performance. • Atomic layer deposition on pristine surfaces of graphene and nanotube is difficult. • We review different seeding techniques for atomic layer deposition of dielectrics. • Compare the performance of graphene top-gate devices with different dielectrics

  1. Surface effects on the mechanical elongation of AuCu nanowires: De-alloying and the formation of mixed suspended atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Autreto, P. A. S.; Galvao, D. S.; Ugarte, D.; Bettini, J.; Sato, F.; Dantas, S. O.

    2015-01-01

    We report here an atomistic study of the mechanical deformation of Au x Cu (1−x) atomic-size wires (nanowires (NWs)) by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to obtain deeper insights on the dynamical properties of stretched NWs. The mechanical properties are significantly dependent on the chemical composition that evolves in time at the junction; some structures exhibit a remarkable de-alloying behavior. Also, our results represent the first experimental realization of mixed linear atomic chains (LACs) among transition and noble metals; in particular, surface energies induce chemical gradients on NW surfaces that can be exploited to control the relative LAC compositions (different number of gold and copper atoms). The implications of these results for nanocatalysis and spin transport of one-atom-thick metal wires are addressed

  2. Surface effects on the mechanical elongation of AuCu nanowires: De-alloying and the formation of mixed suspended atomic chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, M. J. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, R. Sergio B. de Holanda 777, 13083-859 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia-LNNANO, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Autreto, P. A. S.; Galvao, D. S., E-mail: galvao@ifi.unicamp.br; Ugarte, D. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, R. Sergio B. de Holanda 777, 13083-859 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Bettini, J. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia-LNNANO, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sato, F.; Dantas, S. O. [Departamento de Física, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora-MG (Brazil)

    2015-03-07

    We report here an atomistic study of the mechanical deformation of Au{sub x}Cu{sub (1−x)} atomic-size wires (nanowires (NWs)) by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to obtain deeper insights on the dynamical properties of stretched NWs. The mechanical properties are significantly dependent on the chemical composition that evolves in time at the junction; some structures exhibit a remarkable de-alloying behavior. Also, our results represent the first experimental realization of mixed linear atomic chains (LACs) among transition and noble metals; in particular, surface energies induce chemical gradients on NW surfaces that can be exploited to control the relative LAC compositions (different number of gold and copper atoms). The implications of these results for nanocatalysis and spin transport of one-atom-thick metal wires are addressed.

  3. From nanodiamond to nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, A.; Materials Science Division

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication and characterization of semiconductor and metallic nanowires are proving very successful in meeting the high expectations of nanotechnologists. Although the nanoscience surrounding sp{sup 3} bonded carbon nanotubes has continued to flourish over recent years the successful synthesis of the sp{sup 3} analogue, diamond nanowires, has been limited. This prompts questions as to whether diamond nanowires are fundamentally unstable. By applying knowledge obtained from examining the structural transformations in nanodiamond, a framework for analyzing the structure and stability of diamond nanowires may be established. One possible framework will be discussed here, supported by results of ab initio density functional theory calculations used to study the structural relaxation of nanodiamond and diamond nanowires. The results show that the structural stability and electronic properties of diamond nanowires are dependent on the surface morphology, crystallographic direction of the principal axis, and the degree of surface hydrogenation.

  4. Hierarchical shell/core CuO nanowire/carbon fiber composites as binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Wei; Luo, Jian; Pan, Baoyou; Qiu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Shimin; Tang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The composite anode is composed of CuO nanowire shell and carbon fiber core. •The composite anode avoids completely the use of binders. •Synergistic effect of carbon fibers and CuO nanowires enhances performance. •Carbon fibers improve electrical conductivity and buffer volume change. •CuO nanowires shorten diffusion length and alleviate structural strain. -- Abstract: Developing high-performance electrode structures is of great importance for advanced lithium-ion batteries. This study reports an efficient method to fabricate hierarchical shell/core CuO nanowire/carbon fiber composites via electroless plating and thermal oxidation processes. With this method, a binder-free CuO nanowire/carbon fiber shell/core hierarchical network composite anode for lithium-ion batteries is successfully fabricated. The morphology and chemical composition of the anode are characterized, and the electrochemical performance of the anode is investigated by standard electrochemical tests. Owing to the superior properties of carbon fibers and the morphological advantages of CuO nanowires, this composite anode still retains an excellent reversible capacity of 598.2 mAh g −1 with a capacity retention rate above 86%, even after 50 cycles, which is much higher than the CuO anode without carbon fibers. Compared to the typical CuO/C electrode systems, the novel binder-free anode yields a performance close to that of the typical core/shell electrode systems and a much higher reversible capacity and capacity retention than the similar shell/core patterns as well as the anodes with binders. It is believed that this novel anode will pave the way to the development of binder-free anodes in response to the increasing demands for high-power energy storage.

  5. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  6. Nanoscale current spreading analysis in solution-processed graphene oxide/silver nanowire transparent electrodes via conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Joseph E.; Perumal, Ajay; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D., E-mail: t.anthopoulos@ic.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-21

    We use conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) to study the origin of long-range conductivity in model transparent conductive electrodes composed of networks of reduced graphene oxide (rGO{sub X}) and silver nanowires (AgNWs), with nanoscale spatial resolution. Pristine networks of rGO{sub X} (1–3 monolayers-thick) and AgNWs exhibit sheet resistances of ∼100–1000 kΩ/□ and 100–900 Ω/□, respectively. When the materials are deposited sequentially to form bilayer rGO{sub X}/AgNW electrodes and thermally annealed at 200 °C, the sheet resistance reduces by up to 36% as compared to pristine AgNW networks. CAFM was used to analyze the current spreading in both systems in order to identify the nanoscale phenomena responsible for this effect. For rGO{sub X} networks, the low intra-flake conductivity and the inter-flake contact resistance is found to dominate the macroscopic sheet resistance, while for AgNW networks the latter is determined by the density of the inter-AgNW junctions and their associated resistance. In the case of the bilayer rGO{sub X}/AgNWs' networks, rGO{sub X} flakes are found to form conductive “bridges” between AgNWs. We show that these additional nanoscopic electrical connections are responsible for the enhanced macroscopic conductivity of the bilayer rGO{sub X}/AgNW electrodes. Finally, the critical role of thermal annealing on the formation of these nanoscopic connections is discussed.

  7. Carbon-Free CoO Mesoporous Nanowire Array Cathode for High-Performance Aprotic Li-O2 Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoshan; Zhang, Hongzhang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Meiri; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2015-10-21

    Although various kinds of catalysts have been developed for aprotic Li-O2 battery application, the carbon-based cathodes are still vulnerable to attacks from the discharge intermediates or products, as well as the accompanying electrolyte decomposition. To ameliorate this problem, the free-standing and carbon-free CoO nanowire array cathode was purposely designed for Li-O2 batteries. The single CoO nanowire formed as a special mesoporous structure, owing even comparable specific surface area and pore volume to the typical Super-P carbon particles. In addition to the highly selective oxygen reduction/evolution reactions catalytic activity of CoO cathodes, both excellent discharge specific capacity and cycling efficiency of Li-O2 batteries were obtained, with 4888 mAh gCoO(-1) and 50 cycles during 500 h period. Owing to the synergistic effect between elaborate porous structure and selective intermediate absorption on CoO crystal, a unique bimodal growth phenomenon of discharge products was occasionally observed, which further offers a novel mechanism to control the formation/decomposition morphology of discharge products in nanoscale. This research work is believed to shed light on the future development of high-performance aprotic Li-O2 batteries.

  8. Synthesis of triaxial LiFePO4 nanowire with a VGCF core column and a carbon shell through the electrospinning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Eiji; Wang, Yonggang; Kida, Noriyuki; Enomoto, Masaya; Kojima, Norimichi; Okubo, Masashi; Matsuda, Hirofumi; Saito, Yoshiyasu; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Honma, Itaru; Zhou, Haoshen

    2010-01-01

    A triaxial LiFePO4 nanowire with a multi wall carbon nanotube (VGCF:Vapor-grown carbon fiber) core column and an outer shell of amorphous carbon was successfully synthesized through the electrospinning method. The carbon nanotube core oriented in the direction of the wire played an important role in the conduction of electrons during the charge-discharge process, whereas the outer amorphous carbon shell suppressed the oxidation of Fe2+. An electrode with uniformly dispersed carbon and active materials was easily fabricated via a single process by heating after the electrospinning method is applied. Mossbauer spectroscopy for the nanowire showed a broadening of the line width, indicating a disordered coordination environment of the Fe ion near the surface. The electrospinning method was proven to be suitable for the fabrication of a triaxial nanostructure.

  9. Electronic and transport properties of a carbon-atom chain in the core of semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiangwei; Yang Linfeng; Yang Huatong; Dong Jinming

    2003-01-01

    Using the tight-binding calculations, we have studied electronic and transport properties of the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SSWNTs) doped by a chain of carbon-atoms, which can be well controlled by density of the encapsulated carbon atoms. When it is lower, weak coupling between the chain atoms and the tube produces flat bands near the Fermi level, which means a great possibility of superconductivity and ferromagnetism for the combined system. The weak coupling also leads to a significant conductance at the Fermi level, which is contributed by both of the tube and the encapsulated carbon-atom chain. Increasing density of the chain carbon atoms, the flat bands near the Fermi level disappear, and the current may be carried only by the carbon-atom chain, thus making the system become an ideal one-dimensional quantum wire with its conducting chain enclosed by a SWNT insulator

  10. Manipulation and soldering of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwase, Yuta; Ikeda, Takayuki; Oya, Takahide; Ogino, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and soldering of CNTs using Fe oxide nanoparticles are described. We succeeded to separate a CNT bundle into two CNTs or CNT bundles, to move the separated CNT to a desirable position, and to bind it to another bundle. For the accurate manipulation, load of the AFM cantilever and frequency of the scan were carefully selected. We soldered two CNTs using an Fe oxide nanoparticle prepared from a ferritin molecule. The adhesion forces between the soldered CNTs were examined by an AFM and it was found that the CNTs were bound, though the binding force was not strong

  11. 1-D Metal Nanobead Arrays within Encapsulated Nanowires via a Red-Ox-Induced Dewetting: Mechanism Study by Atom-Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Tzaguy, Avra; Hazut, Ori; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Yerushalmi, Roie; Seidman, David N

    2017-12-13

    Metal nanoparticle arrays are excellent candidates for a variety of applications due to the versatility of their morphology and structure at the nanoscale. Bottom-up self-assembly of metal nanoparticles provides an important complementary alternative to the traditional top-down lithography method and makes it possible to assemble structures with higher-order complexity, for example, nanospheres, nanocubes, and core-shell nanostructures. Here we present a mechanism study of the self-assembly process of 1-D noble metal nanoparticles arrays, composed of Au, Ag, and AuAg alloy nanoparticles. These are prepared within an encapsulated germanium nanowire, obtained by the oxidation of a metal-germanium nanowire hybrid structure. The resulting structure is a 1-D array of equidistant metal nanoparticles with the same diameter, the so-called nanobead (NB) array structure. Atom-probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to investigate the details of the morphological and chemical evolution during the oxidation of the encapsulated metal-germanium nanowire hybrid-structures. The self-assembly of nanoparticles relies on the formation of a metal-germanium liquid alloy and the migration of the liquid alloy into the nanowire, followed by dewetting of the liquid during shape-confined oxidation where the liquid column breaks-up into nanoparticles due to the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Our results demonstrate that the encapsulating oxide layer serves as a structural scaffold, retaining the overall shape during the eutectic liquid formation and demonstrates the relationship between the oxide mechanical properties and the final structural characteristics of the 1-D arrays. The mechanistic details revealed here provide a versatile tool-box for the bottom-up fabrication of 1-D arrays nanopatterning that can be modified for multiple applications according to the RedOx properties of the material system components.

  12. Chemical analysis of carbonates and carbonate rocks by atomic absorption analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardon, S

    1981-01-01

    Evaluates methods of determining chemical composition of rocks surrounding black coal seams. Carbonate rock samples were collected in the Ostrava-Karvina coal mines. Sampling methods are described. Determination of the following elements and compounds in carbonate rocks is discussed: calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, barium, silicon, aluminium, titanium, sodium, potassium, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, water and carbon dioxide. Proportion of compounds insoluble in water in the investigated rocks is also determined. Most of the elements are determined by means of atomic absorption analysis. Phosphorus is also determined by atomic absorption analysis. Other compounds are determined gravimetrically. The described procedure permits weight of a rock sample to be reduced to 0.5 g without reducing analysis accuracy. The results of determining carbonate rock components by X-ray analysis and by chemical analysis are compared. Equipment used for atomic absorption analysis is characterized (the 503 Perkin-Elmer and the CF-4 Optica-Milano spectrophotometers). The analyzed method for determining carbonate rock permits more accurate classification of rocks surrounding coal seams and rock impurities in run-of-mine coal. (22 refs.) (In Czech)

  13. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao; Li, Kun; Zhang, Xixiang; Yu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge

  14. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingfeng; Li, Meicheng; Gu, TianSheng; Bai, Fan; Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya; Yu, Yangxin

    2013-01-01

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon–copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  15. The Unique Hoyle State of the Carbon Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The famous astronomer Fred Hoyle (1915-2001 started his research career as an atheist. Hoyle’s most important contribution to astrophysics is the theory of nucleosynthesis, i.e. the idea that chemical elements such as carbon can form in stars on the basis of hydrogen and helium. Essentially here was his prediction that the carbon core has a state with a specific energy which is precisely adapted to the basic fusion process. This result was one of the most important breakthroughs in modern astrophysics, and the so called Hoyle state has become a cornerstone for state-ofthe- art nuclear theory. The calculations he made, eventually revealed a fine-tuning of the universe. Hoyle’s work in this area supported the anthropic principle that the universe was fine-tuned so that intelligent life would be possible. It is said that what really made him conclude that creation demanded intelligence, were his calculations of the special properties of the carbon atom. This shook his atheism fundamentally [1, p. 57]. In this paper we describe this discovery.

  16. Three-dimensional cross-linked carbon network wrapped with ordered polyaniline nanowires for high-performance pseudo-supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huan; Liu, Shuwu; Hanif, Muddasir; Chen, Shuiliang; Hou, Haoqing

    2014-12-01

    The polyaniline (PANI)-based pseudo-supercapacitor has been extensively studied due to its good conductivity, ease of synthesis, low-cost monomer, tunable properties and remarkable specific capacitance. In this work, a three-dimensional cross-linked carbon network (3D-CCN) was used as a contact-resistance-free substrate for PANI-based pseudo-supercapacitors. The ordered PANI nanowires (PaNWs) were grown on the 3D-CCN to form PaNWs/3D-CCN composites by in-situ polymerization. The PaNWs/3D-CCN composites exhibited a specific capacitance (Cs) of 1191.8 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 and a superior rate capability with 66.4% capacitance retention at 100.0 A g-1. The high specific capacitance is attributed to the thin PaNW coating and the spaced PANI nanowire array, which ensure a higher utilization of PANI due to the ease of diffusion of protons through/on the PANI nanowires. In addition, the unique 3D-CCN was used as a high-conductivity platform (or skeleton) with no contact resistance for fast electron transfer and facile charge transport within the composites. Therefore, the binder-free composites can process rapid gains or losses of electrons and ions, even at a high current density. As a result, the specific capacitance and rate capability of our composites are remarkably higher than those of other PANI composites.

  17. Charged Nanowire-Directed Growth of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Nanosheets in a Mixed Solvent for Biomimetic Composite Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyi; Liu, Lei; Chen, Si-Ming; Chang, Fu-Jia; Mao, Li-Bo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Ma, Tao; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2018-04-19

    Bio-inspired mineralization is an effective way for fabricating complicated inorganic materials, which inspires us to develop new methods to synthesize materials with fascinating properties. In this article, we report that the charged tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) can be used as bio-macromolecule analogues to direct the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanosheets (ACCNs) in a mixed solvent. The effects of surface charges and the concentration of the TeNWs on the formation of ACCNs have been investigated. Particularly, the produced ACCNs can be functionalized by Fe3O4 nanoparticles to produce magnetic ACC/Fe3O4 hybrid nanosheets, which can be used to construct ACC/Fe3O4 composite films through a self-evaporation process. Moreover, sodium alginate-ACC nanocomposite films with remarkable toughness and good transmittance can also be fabricated by using such ACCNs as nanoscale building blocks. This mineralization approach in a mixed solvent using charged tellurium nanowires as bio-macromolecule analogues provides a new way for the synthesis of ACCNs, which can be used as nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of biomimetic composite films.

  18. Nondestructive sensing and stress transferring evaluation of carbon nanotube, nanofiber, and Ni nanowire strands/polymer composites using an electro-micromechanical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Sung-Ju; Jung, Jin-Gyu; Hansen, George; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2006-03-01

    Nondestructive damage sensing and load transfer mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT), nanofiber (CNF), and Ni nanowire strands/epoxy composites were investigated using electro-micromechanical technique. Electrospun PVDF nanofiber was also prepared as a piezoelectric sensor. High volume% CNT/epoxy composites showed significantly higher tensile properties than neat and low volume% CNT/epoxy composites. CNF /epoxy composites with smaller aspect ratio showed higher apparent modulus due to high volume content in case of shorter aspect ratio. Using Ni nanowire strands/silicone composites with different content, load sensing response of electrical contact resistivity was investigated under tensile and compression condition. The mechanical properties of Ni nanowire strands with different type and content/epoxy composites were indirectly measured apparent modulus using uniformed cyclic loading and electro-pullout test. CNT or Ni nanowire strands/epoxy composites showed humidity and temperature sensing within limited ranges, 20 vol% reinforcement. Thermal treated electrospun PVDF nanofiber showed higher mechanical properties than the untreated case due to increased crystallization, whereas load sensing decreased in heat treated case. Electrospun PVDF nanofiber web also responded the sensing effect on humidity and temperature. Nanocomposites using CNT, CNF, Ni nanowire strands, and electrospun PVDF nanofiber web can be applicable practically for multifunctional applications nondestructively.

  19. Direct synthesis of pure single-crystalline Magnéli phase Ti8O15 nanowires as conductive carbon-free materials for electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunyong; Chang, Shiyong; Huang, Xiangdong; Wang, Qingquan; Mei, Ao; Shen, Pei Kang

    2015-02-01

    The Magnéli phase Ti8O15 nanowires (NWs) have been grown directly on a Ti substrate by a facile one-step evaporation-deposition synthesis method under a hydrogen atmosphere. The Ti8O15 NWs exhibit an outstanding electrical conductivity at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of a single Ti8O15 nanowire is 20.6 S cm-1 at 300 K. Theoretical calculations manifest that the existence of a large number of oxygen vacancies changes the band structure, resulting in the reduction of the electronic resistance. The Magnéli phase Ti8O15 nanowires have been used as conductive carbon-free supports to load Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The Pt/Ti8O15 NWs show an enhanced activity and extremely high durability compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts.The Magnéli phase Ti8O15 nanowires (NWs) have been grown directly on a Ti substrate by a facile one-step evaporation-deposition synthesis method under a hydrogen atmosphere. The Ti8O15 NWs exhibit an outstanding electrical conductivity at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of a single Ti8O15 nanowire is 20.6 S cm-1 at 300 K. Theoretical calculations manifest that the existence of a large number of oxygen vacancies changes the band structure, resulting in the reduction of the electronic resistance. The Magnéli phase Ti8O15 nanowires have been used as conductive carbon-free supports to load Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The Pt/Ti8O15 NWs show an enhanced activity and extremely high durability compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data for the characterization and experimental details see DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05806b

  20. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia; Jia, Nana; Yang, Lijun; Su, Dong; Park, Jinseong; Choi, YongMan; Gong, Kuanping

    2014-01-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1

  1. Determination of Diclofenac on a Dysprosium Nanowire- Modified Carbon Paste Electrode Accomplished in a Flow Injection System by Advanced Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new detection technique called Fast Fourier Transform Square-Wave Voltammetry (FFT SWV is based on measurements of electrode admittance as a function of potential. The response of the detector (microelectrode, which is generated by a redox processes, is fast, which makes the method suitable for most applications involving flowing electrolytes. The carbon paste electrode was modified by nanostructures to improve sensitivity. Synthesized dysprosium nanowires provide a more effective nanotube-like surface [1-4] so they are good candidates for use as a modifier for electrochemical reactions. The redox properties of diclofenac were used for its determination in human serum and urine samples. The support electrolyte that provided a more defined and intense peak current for diclofenac determination was a 0.05 mol L−1 acetate buffer pH = 4.0. The drug presented an irreversible oxidation peak at 850 mV vs. Ag/AgCl on a modified nanowire carbon paste electrode which produced high current and reduced the oxidation potential by about 100 mV. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio was significantly increased by application of a discrete Fast Fourier Transform (FFT method, background subtraction and two-dimensional integration of the electrode response over a selected potential range and time window. To obtain the much sensivity the effective parameters such as frequency, amplitude and pH was optimized. As a result, CDL of 2.0 × 10−9 M and an LOQ of 5.0 × 10−9 M were found for the determination for diclofenac. A good recovery was obtained for assay spiked urine samples and a good quantification of diclofenac was achieved in a commercial formulation.

  2. Surface Reduced CeO2 Nanowires for Direct Conversion of CO2 and Methanol to Dimethyl Carbonate: Catalytic Performance and Role of Oxygen Vacancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Fu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultralong 1D CeO2 nanowires were synthesized via an advanced solvothermal method, surface reduced under H2 atmosphere, and first applied in direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC from CO2 and CH3OH. The micro morphologies, physical parameters of nanowires were fully investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS, and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia/carbon dioxide (NH3-TPD/CO2-TPD. The effects of surface oxygen vacancy and acidic/alkaline sites on the catalytic activity was explored. After reduction, the acidic/alkaline sites of CeO2 nanowires can be dramatically improved and evidently raised the catalytic performance. CeO2 nanowires reduced at 500 °C (CeO2_NW_500 exhibited notably superior activity with DMC yield of 16.85 mmol gcat−1. Furthermore, kinetic insights of initial rate were carried out and the apparent activation energy barrier of CeO2_NW_500 catalyst was found to be 41.9 kJ/mol, much tiny than that of CeO2_NW catalyst (74.7 KJ/mol.

  3. Enhanced Performance of Nanowire-Based All-TiO2 Solar Cells using Subnanometer-Thick Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO Embedded Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghobadi, Amir; Yavuz, Halil I.; Ulusoy, T. Gamze; Icli, K. Cagatay; Ozenbas, Macit; Okyay, Ali K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of angstrom-thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) ZnO embedded layer on photovoltaic (PV) performance of Nanowire-Based All-TiO 2 solar cells has been systematically investigated. Our results indicate that by varying the thickness of ZnO layer the efficiency of the solar cell can be significantly changed. It is shown that the efficiency has its maximum for optimal thickness of 1 ALD cycle in which this ultrathin ZnO layer improves device performance through passivation of surface traps without hampering injection efficiency of photogenerated electrons. The mechanisms contributing to this unprecedented change in PV performance of the cell have been scrutinized and discussed

  4. Surface diffusion of carbon atom and carbon dimer on Si(0 0 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.; Pan, Z.Y.; Wang, Y.X.; Wei, Q.; Zang, L.K.; Zhou, L.; Liu, T.J.; Jiang, X.M.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon (C) atom and carbon dimer (C2) are known to be the main projectiles in the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. The adsorption and diffusion of the C adatom and addimer (C2) on the fully relaxed Si(0 0 1)-(2 x 1) surface was studied by a combination of the molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The adsorption sites of the C and C2 on the surface and the potential barriers between these sites were first determined using the semi-empirical many-body Brenner and Tersoff potential. We then estimated their hopping rates and traced their pathways. It is found that the diffusion of both C and C2 is strongly anisotropic in nature. In addition, the C adatom can diffuse a long distance on the surface while the adsorbed C2 is more likely to be confined in a local region. Thus we can expect that smoother films will be formed on the Si(0 0 1) surface with single C atoms as projectile at moderate temperature, while with C2 the films will grow in two-dimensional islands. In addition, relatively higher kinetic energy of the projectile, say, a few tens of eV, is needed to grow DLC films of higher quality. This is consistent with experimental findings

  5. Vertically oriented CoO@FeOOH nanowire arrays anchored on carbon cloth as a highly efficient electrode for oxygen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yin; Ni, Yuanman; Liu, Bing; Shang, Shuxia; Yang, Song; Cao, Minhua; Hu, Changwen

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional CoO@FeOOH nanowire arrays grown on carbon cloth were constructed, which exhibit good electrocatalytic activity towards OER in alkaline solution. Display Omitted -- Abstract: Developing high efficiency electrocatalysts for electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a key to water splitting. In this work, we demonstrate the preparation of CoO@FeOOH core-shell nanowire (NWs) grown on three-dimensional (3D) carbon cloth (CC@CoO@FeOOH-NWAs) by hydrothermal method followed by electrodeposition process as well as its highly efficient activity for water oxidation. In this hybrid structure, CoO@FeOOH-NWs with an average diameter of 100 nm is vertically grown on the surface of carbon fibers of the carbon cloth. The combination of CoO@FeOOH catalyst with good electron transfer substrate exhibits exceptionally good electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solution. It needs an overpotential as low as 255 mV to achieve the current density of 10 mA cm −2 , with a Tafel slope of 82 mV dec −1 and also exhibits a good stability in 20 h. In addition, the nanowire array structure is well retained after the durability test with high current density of 50 mA cm −2 . Our strategy provides a guide to rational design of micro-structures of the materials to achieve their high performance.

  6. Attachment of carbon nanotubes to atomic force microscope probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Christopher T.; Carnally, Stewart; Roberts, Clive J.

    2007-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) the accuracy of data is often limited by the tip geometry and the effect on this geometry of wear. One way to improve the tip geometry is to attach carbon nanotubes (CNT) to AFM tips. CNTs are ideal because they have a small diameter (typically between 1 and 20 nm), high aspect ratio, high strength, good conductivity, and almost no wear. A number of methods for CNT attachment have been proposed and explored including chemical vapour deposition (CVD), dielectrophoresis, arc discharge and mechanical attachment. In this work we will use CVD to deposit nanotubes onto a silicon surface and then investigate improved methods to pick-up and attach CNTs to tapping mode probes. Conventional pick-up methods involve using standard tapping mode or non-contact mode so as to attach only those CNTs that are aligned vertically on the surface. We have developed improved methods to attach CNTs using contact mode and reduced set-point tapping mode imaging. Using these techniques the AFM tip is in contact with a greater number of CNTs and the rate and stability of CNT pick-up is improved. The presence of CNTs on the modified AFM tips was confirmed by high-resolution AFM imaging, analysis of the tips dynamic force curves and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  7. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zope, Rajendra R., E-mail: rzope@utep.edu; Baruah, Tunna [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States); Computational Science Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States); Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States); Jackson, Koblar [Physics Department and Science of Advanced Materials Ph.D. Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C{sub 60}@C{sub 240} and C{sub 60}@C{sub 180} onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C{sub 60} fullerene, the encapsulation of the C{sub 60} in C{sub 240} and C{sub 180} fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C{sub 60} in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability.

  8. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C 60 @C 240 and C 60 @C 180 onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C 60 fullerene, the encapsulation of the C 60 in C 240 and C 180 fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C 60 in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability

  9. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Rajendra R.; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Baruah, Tunna; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C60@C240 and C60@C180 onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C60 fullerene, the encapsulation of the C60 in C240 and C180 fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C60 in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability.

  10. Nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide anchored zinc oxide nanowires grown on carbon fiber cloth for high-performance flexible pseudocapacitive energy storage devices

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Imran; Shahid, Muhammad; Rana, Usman Ali; Nashef, Inas M Al; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2014-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide (Ni-Co LDH) nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array has been directly synthesized on a carbon cloth substrate by a facile cost-effective two-step hydrothermal route. As electrode materials for flexible pseudocapacitors, Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array exhibits a significantly enhanced specific capacitance of 1927 Fg-1, which is a ∼1.8 time greater than pristine Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes. The synthesized Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array shows a maximum energy density of 45.55 Whkg-1 at a power density of 46.15 kWkg -1, which is 35% higher than the pristine Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes electrode. Moreover, Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array exhibit excellent excellent rate capability (80.3% capacity retention at 30 Ag -1) and cycling stability (only 3.98% loss after 3000 cycles), due to the significantly improved faradaic redox reaction. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Preparation and characterization of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on transition-metal-oxide nanowire/single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid thin-film electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Chiang; Shen, Guozhen; Shi, Yi; Chen, Haitian; Zhou, Chongwu

    2010-08-24

    In the work described in this paper, we have successfully fabricated flexible asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) based on transition-metal-oxide nanowire/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrid thin-film electrodes. These hybrid nanostructured films, with advantages of mechanical flexibility, uniform layered structures, and mesoporous surface morphology, were produced by using a filtration method. Here, manganese dioxide nanowire/SWNT hybrid films worked as the positive electrode, and indium oxide nanowire/SWNT hybrid films served as the negative electrode in a designed ASC. In our design, charges can be stored not only via electrochemical double-layer capacitance from SWNT films but also through a reversible faradic process from transition-metal-oxide nanowires. In addition, to obtain stable electrochemical behavior during charging/discharging cycles in a 2 V potential window, the mass balance between two electrodes has been optimized. Our optimized hybrid nanostructured ASCs exhibited a superior device performance with specific capacitance of 184 F/g, energy density of 25.5 Wh/kg, and columbic efficiency of approximately 90%. In addition, our ASCs exhibited a power density of 50.3 kW/kg, which is 10-fold higher than obtained in early reported ASC work. The high-performance hybrid nanostructured ASCs can find applications in conformal electrics, portable electronics, and electrical vehicles.

  12. High temperature in-situ observations of multi-segmented metal nanowires encapsulated within carbon nanotubes by in-situ filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Iijima, Toru; Iwata, Takuya; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Kuroda, Kotaro

    2012-08-08

    Multi-segmented one-dimensional metal nanowires were encapsulated within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through in-situ filling technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and environmental TEM were employed to characterize the as-prepared sample at room temperature and high temperature. The selected area electron diffractions revealed that the Pd4Si nanowire and face-centered-cubic Co nanowire on top of the Pd nanowire were encapsulated within the bottom and tip parts of the multiwall CNT, respectively. Although the strain-induced deformation of graphite walls was observed, the solid-state phases of Pd4Si and Co-Pd remain even at above their expected melting temperatures and up to 1,550 ± 50°C. Finally, the encapsulated metals were melted and flowed out from the tip of the CNT after 2 h at the same temperature due to the increase of internal pressure of the CNT.

  13. Nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide anchored zinc oxide nanowires grown on carbon fiber cloth for high-performance flexible pseudocapacitive energy storage devices

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Imran

    2014-05-01

    Nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide (Ni-Co LDH) nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array has been directly synthesized on a carbon cloth substrate by a facile cost-effective two-step hydrothermal route. As electrode materials for flexible pseudocapacitors, Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array exhibits a significantly enhanced specific capacitance of 1927 Fg-1, which is a ∼1.8 time greater than pristine Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes. The synthesized Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array shows a maximum energy density of 45.55 Whkg-1 at a power density of 46.15 kWkg -1, which is 35% higher than the pristine Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes electrode. Moreover, Ni-Co LDH nanoflakes-ZnO nanowires hybrid array exhibit excellent excellent rate capability (80.3% capacity retention at 30 Ag -1) and cycling stability (only 3.98% loss after 3000 cycles), due to the significantly improved faradaic redox reaction. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Peapod-like Li3 VO4 /N-Doped Carbon Nanowires with Pseudocapacitive Properties as Advanced Materials for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Laifa; Lv, Haifeng; Chen, Shuangqiang; Kopold, Peter; van Aken, Peter A; Wu, Xiaojun; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Lithium ion capacitors are new energy storage devices combining the complementary features of both electric double-layer capacitors and lithium ion batteries. A key limitation to this technology is the kinetic imbalance between the Faradaic insertion electrode and capacitive electrode. Here, we demonstrate that the Li 3 VO 4 with low Li-ion insertion voltage and fast kinetics can be favorably used for lithium ion capacitors. N-doped carbon-encapsulated Li 3 VO 4 nanowires are synthesized through a morphology-inheritance route, displaying a low insertion voltage between 0.2 and 1.0 V, a high reversible capacity of ≈400 mAh g -1 at 0.1 A g -1 , excellent rate capability, and long-term cycling stability. Benefiting from the small nanoparticles, low energy diffusion barrier and highly localized charge-transfer, the Li 3 VO 4 /N-doped carbon nanowires exhibit a high-rate pseudocapacitive behavior. A lithium ion capacitor device based on these Li 3 VO 4 /N-doped carbon nanowires delivers a high energy density of 136.4 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 532 W kg -1 , revealing the potential for application in high-performance and long life energy storage devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Gold nanowires and the effect of impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaes Frederico

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMetal nanowires and in particular gold nanowires have received a great deal of attention in the past few years. Experiments on gold nanowires have prompted theory and simulation to help answer questions posed by these studies. Here we present results of computer simulations for the formation, evolution and breaking of very thin Au nanowires. We also discuss the influence of contaminants, such as atoms and small molecules, and their effect on the structural and mechanical properties of these nanowires.

  16. Displacement per atom profile in carbon nanotube bulk material under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Leyva, D.; Cruz, C.; Abreu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the physical properties and the displacement threshold energy values reported in literature for C atoms in single and multiple walled carbon nanotubes, the effective atomic displacement cross-section in carbon nanotube bulk materials exposed to the gamma rays were calculated. Then, using the mathematical simulation of photons and particles transport in the matter, energy fluxes distribution of electrons and positrons within the irradiated object were also calculated. Finally, considering both results, the atomic displacement damage profiles inside the analyzed carbon nanotube bulk materials were determined. (Author)

  17. A high energy and power sodium-ion hybrid capacitor based on nitrogen-doped hollow carbon nanowires anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Ye, Chao; Chen, Xinzhi; Wang, Suqing; Wang, Haihui

    2018-04-01

    The sodium ion hybrid capacitor (SHC) has been attracting much attention. However, the SHC's power density is significantly confined to a low level due to the sluggish ion diffusion in the anode. Herein, we propose to use an electrode with a high double layer capacitance as the anode in the SHC instead of insertion anodes. To this aim, nitrogen doped hollow carbon nanowires (N-HCNWs) with a high specific surface area are prepared, and the high capacitive contribution during the sodium ion storage process is confirmed by a series of electrochemical measurements. A new SHC consisting of a N-HCNW anode and a commercial active carbon (AC) cathode is fabricated for the first time. Due to the hybrid charge storage mechanism combining ion insertion and capacitive process, the as-fabricated SHC strikes a balance between the energy density and power density, a energy density of 108 Wh kg-1 and a power density of 9 kW kg-1 can be achieved, which overwhelms the electrochemical performances of most reported AC-based SHCs.

  18. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    , by the purpose to integrate the carbon nanostructures in the carbon fibers by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, in order to develop the basic substrate of advanced carbon-based nanocomposite for atomic oxygen protection. The nanostructures grown onto the carbon fibers can be used to create multiscale hybrid carbon nanotube/carbon fiber composites where individual carbon fibers, which are several microns in diameter, are surrounded by nanotubes. The present objective is the setting-up of the CVD parameters for a reliable growth of carbon nanostructures on carbon fiber surface; after that, the results of a preliminary characterization related to atomic oxygen effects testing by means of a ground LEO simulation facility are reported and discussed.

  19. Solution-Grown Silicon Nanowires for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Candace K.; Patel, Reken N.; O’ Connell, Michael J.; Korgel, Brian A.; Cui, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Composite electrodes composed of silicon nanowires synthesized using the supercritical fluid-liquid-solid (SFLS) method mixed with amorphous carbon or carbon nanotubes were evaluated as Li-ion battery anodes. Carbon coating of the silicon nanowires

  20. Carbon monoxide sensing properties of B-, Al- and Ga-doped Si nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santiago, F.; Trejo, A.; Miranda, A.; Salazar, F.; Carvajal, E.; Pérez, L. A.; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2018-05-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are considered as potential chemical sensors due to their large surface-to-volume ratio and their possible integration into arrays for nanotechnological applications. Detection of harmful gases like CO has been experimentally demonstrated, however, the influence of doping on the sensing capacity of SiNWs has not yet been reported. For this work, we theoretically studied the surface adsorption of a CO molecule on hydrogen-passivated SiNWs grown along the [111] crystallographic direction and compared it with the adsorption of other molecules such as NO, and O2. Three nanowire diameters and three dopant elements (B, Al and Ga) were considered, and calculations were done within the density functional theory framework. The results indicate that CO molecules are more strongly adsorbed on the doped SiNW than on the pristine SiNW. The following trend was observed for the CO adsorption energies: E A[B-doped] > E A[Al-doped] > E A[Ga-doped] > E A[undoped], for all diameters. The electronic charge transfers between the SiNWs and the adsorbed CO were estimated by using a Voronoi population analysis. The CO adsorbed onto the undoped SiNWs has an electron-acceptor character, while the CO adsorbed onto the B-, Al-, and Ga-doped SiNWs exhibits an electron-donor character. Comparing these results with the ones obtained for the NO and O2 adsorption, the larger CO adsorption energy on B-doped SiNWs indicates their good selectivity towards CO. These results suggest that SiNW-based sensors of toxic gases could represent a clear and advantageous application of nanotechnology in the improvement of human quality of life.

  1. An ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a copper oxide nanowires/single-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mei; Hou, Changjun; Huo, Danqun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huanbao

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor based on hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH) was first developed for the detection of the specific-sequence target DNA. This schematic represents the fabrication procedure of our DNA biosensor. - Highlights: • An ultrasensitive DNA electrochemical biosensor was developed. • CuO NWs entangled with the SWCNTs formed a mesh structure with good conductivity. • It is the first time use of CuONWs-SWCNTs hybrid nanocomposite for DNA detection. • The biosensor is simple, selective, stable, and sensitive. • The biosensor has great potential for use in analysis of real samples. - Abstract: Here, we developed a novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor to detect specific-sequence target DNA. The biosensor was based on a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH). The resulting CuO NWs/SWCNTs layers exhibited a good differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current response for the target DNA sequences, which we attributed to the properties of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. CuO NWs and SWCNTs hybrid composites with highly conductive and biocompatible nanostructure were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Immobilization of the probe DNA on the electrode surface was largely improved due to the unique synergetic effect of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. DPV was applied to monitor the DNA hybridization event, using adriamycin as an electrochemical indicator. Under optimal conditions, the peak currents of adriamycin were linear with the logarithm of target DNA concentrations (ranging from 1.0 × 10"−"1"4 to 1.0 × 10"−"8 M), with a detection limit of 3.5 × 10"−"1"5 M (signal/noise ratio of 3). The biosensor also showed high selectivity to

  2. An ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a copper oxide nanowires/single-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mei [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hou, Changjun, E-mail: houcj@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Device and System Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Huo, Danqun [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Device and System Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Mei [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Fa, Huanbao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: A novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor based on hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH) was first developed for the detection of the specific-sequence target DNA. This schematic represents the fabrication procedure of our DNA biosensor. - Highlights: • An ultrasensitive DNA electrochemical biosensor was developed. • CuO NWs entangled with the SWCNTs formed a mesh structure with good conductivity. • It is the first time use of CuONWs-SWCNTs hybrid nanocomposite for DNA detection. • The biosensor is simple, selective, stable, and sensitive. • The biosensor has great potential for use in analysis of real samples. - Abstract: Here, we developed a novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor to detect specific-sequence target DNA. The biosensor was based on a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH). The resulting CuO NWs/SWCNTs layers exhibited a good differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current response for the target DNA sequences, which we attributed to the properties of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. CuO NWs and SWCNTs hybrid composites with highly conductive and biocompatible nanostructure were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Immobilization of the probe DNA on the electrode surface was largely improved due to the unique synergetic effect of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. DPV was applied to monitor the DNA hybridization event, using adriamycin as an electrochemical indicator. Under optimal conditions, the peak currents of adriamycin were linear with the logarithm of target DNA concentrations (ranging from 1.0 × 10{sup −14} to 1.0 × 10{sup −8} M), with a detection limit of 3.5 × 10{sup −15} M (signal/noise ratio of 3). The biosensor also showed high

  3. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  4. Diameter-dependent coloration of silver nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Mindy S; Qiu Chao; Jiang Chaoyang; Kattumenu, Ramesh; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanowires were synthesized with a green method and characterized with microscopic and diffractometric methods. The correlation between the colors of the nanowires deposited on a solid substrate and their diameters was explored. Silver nanowires that appear similar in color in the optical micrographs have very similar diameters as determined by atomic force microscopy. We have summarized the diameter-dependent coloration for these silver nanowires. An optical interference model was applied to explain such correlation. In addition, microreflectance spectra were obtained from individual nanowires and the observed spectra can be explained with the optical interference theory. This work provides a cheap, quick and simple screening method for studying the diameter distribution of silver nanowires, as well as the diameter variations of individual silver nanowires, without complicated sample preparation.

  5. Application of Nanoparticles/Nanowires and Carbon Nanotubes for Breast Cancer Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2005-01-01

    .... Variety of techniques such as fabrication of single wall carbon nanotubes, functionalization of nanotubes with antibodies, interaction of cells with antibodies on nanotube surfaces, and finally cell...

  6. Core-shell heterojunction of silicon nanowire arrays and carbon quantum dots for photovoltaic devices and self-driven photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chao; Nie, Biao; Zeng, Longhui; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Ming-Zheng; Luo, Linbao; Feng, Mei; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yucheng; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-22

    Silicon nanostructure-based solar cells have lately intrigued intensive interest because of their promising potential in next-generation solar energy conversion devices. Herein, we report a silicon nanowire (SiNW) array/carbon quantum dot (CQD) core-shell heterojunction photovoltaic device by directly coating Ag-assisted chemical-etched SiNW arrays with CQDs. The heterojunction with a barrier height of 0.75 eV exhibited excellent rectifying behavior with a rectification ratio of 10(3) at ±0.8 V in the dark and power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 9.10% under AM 1.5G irradiation. It is believed that such a high PCE comes from the improved optical absorption as well as the optimized carrier transfer and collection capability. Furthermore, the heterojunction could function as a high-performance self-driven visible light photodetector operating in a wide switching wavelength with good stability, high sensitivity, and fast response speed. It is expected that the present SiNW array/CQD core-shell heterojunction device could find potential applications in future high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  7. Dye-sensitized solar cells with vertically aligned TiO2 nanowire arrays grown on carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Hongwei; Hou, Shaocong; Peng, Ming; Yu, Xiao; Zou, Dechun

    2014-02-01

    One-dimensional semiconductor TiO2 nanowires (TNWs) have received widespread attention from solar cell and related optoelectronics scientists. The controllable synthesis of ordered TNW arrays on arbitrary substrates would benefit both fundamental research and practical applications. Herein, vertically aligned TNW arrays in situ grown on carbon fiber (CF) substrates through a facile, controllable, and seed-assisted thermal process is presented. Also, hierarchical TiO2 -nanoparticle/TNW arrays were prepared that favor both the dye loading and depressed charge recombination of the CF/TNW photoanode. An impressive conversion efficiency of 2.48 % (under air mass 1.5 global illumination) and an apparent efficiency of 4.18 % (with a diffuse board) due to the 3D light harvesting of the wire solar cell were achieved. Moreover, efficient and inexpensive wire solar cells made from all-CF electrodes and completely flexible CF-based wire solar cells were demonstrated, taking into account actual application requirements. This work may provide an intriguing avenue for the pursuit of lightweight, cost-effective, and high-performance flexible/wearable solar cells. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Atomic carbon emission from photodissociation of CO2. [planetary atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Phillips, E.; Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atomic carbon fluorescence, C I 1561, 1657, and 1931 A, has been observed from photodissociation of CO2, and the production cross sections have been measured. A line emission source provided the primary photons at wavelengths from threshold to 420 A. The present results suggest that the excited carbon atoms are produced by total dissociation of CO2 into three atoms. The cross sections for producing the O I 1304-A fluorescence through photodissociation of CO2 are found to be less than 0.01 Mb in the wavelength region from 420 to 835 A. The present data have implications with respect to photochemical processes in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  9. Atomic scale mass delivery driven by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Biao; Ding Jianning; Ling Zhiyong; Yuan Ningyi; Cheng Guanggui

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of atomic scale mass delivery by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube was investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics simulation. By keeping the bending angle while moving the tube end, the encapsulated atomic scale mass such as atom, molecule and atom group were successfully delivered through the nanotube. The van der Waals interaction between the encapsulated mass and the tube wall provided the driving force for the delivery. There were no dramatic changes in the van der Waals interaction, and a smooth and steady delivery was achieved when constant loading rate was applied. The influence of temperature on the atom group delivery was also analyzed. It is found raising temperature is harmful to the smooth movement of the atom group. However, the delivery rate can be promoted under higher temperature when the atom group is situated before the kink during the delivery.

  10. Phase analysis of Fe-nanowires encapsulated into multi-walled carbon nanotubes via 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskov, T.; Spirov, I.; Ritschel, M.; Mueller, C.; Leonhardt, A.; Ruskov, R.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed morphological analysis of samples of Fe-nanowires encapsulated into aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe-MWCNT) via 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The aligned Fe-MWCNTs were obtained by pyrolysis of ferrocene onto an oxidized Si substrate. Transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and back scattered conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) were applied in order to distinguish different Fe-phases and their spatial distribution within the whole sample and along the tubes' height. A characterization (on a large spatial scale) of the aligned CNT samples were performed by obtaining TMS spectra for selected spots positioned at different locations of the sample. While the total Fe content changes considerably from one location to another, the γ-Fe/α-Fe phase ratio is constant onto a relatively large area. Using TMS and CEMS for all aligned Fe-MWCNTs samples it is also shown that along the CNT axes, going to the top of the nanotube the relative content of the γ-Fe phase increases. Going to the opposite direction, i.e. towards the silicon substrate, the relative content of the Fe 3 C phase increases, that is in agreement with our previous works. The results of an additional Moessbauer spectroscopy experiment in TMS and CEMS modes performed on a non-aligned sample support the conclusion that in our case the iron phases in the channels of carbon nanotubes are spatially separated as individual nanoparticles. The relative intensity ratio of the α-Fe phase Moessbauer sextets show good magnetic texture along nanotubes axis for one of the aligned samples and the lack of such orientation for the others. (authors)

  11. Synthetic Strategies toward Natural Products Containing Contiguous Stereogenic Quaternary Carbon Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büschleb, Martin; Dorich, Stéphane; Hanessian, Stephen; Tao, Daniel; Schenthal, Kyle B; Overman, Larry E

    2016-03-18

    Strategies for the total synthesis of complex natural products that contain two or more contiguous stereogenic quaternary carbon atoms in their intricate structures are reviewed with 12 representative examples. Emphasis has been put on methods to create quaternary carbon stereocenters, including syntheses of the same natural product by different groups, thereby showcasing the diversity of thought and individual creativity. A compendium of selected natural products containing two or more contiguous stereogenic quaternary carbon atoms and key reactions in their total or partial syntheses is provided in the Supporting Information. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Silicon nanowires: structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhdanov, A.V.; Mashin, A.I.; Razuvaev, A.G.; Ershov, A.V.; Ignatov, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt to grow silicon nanowires has been made by electron beam evaporation on highly oriented pyrolytic substrate. Needle-like objects are located along the normal to a substrate (density 2 x 10 11 cm -2 ). For modeling quasi-one-dimensional objects calculations of nuclear structure and energy spectra have been accomplished. A fullerene-like structure Si 24 is proposed as a basic atomic configuration of silicon nanowires [ru

  13. Locations of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon atoms in vanadium determined by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraga, K.; Onozuka, T.; Hirabayashi, M.

    1977-01-01

    The occupation sites of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon atoms dissolved interstitially in vanadium have been determined by means of neutron diffraction with use of single crystals of VOsub(0.032), VNsub(0.013) and VCsub(0.006). It is revealed that the interstitial atoms occupy, randomly, the octahedral sites in the b.c.c. host lattice of the three crystals. Neutron diffraction is advantageous for the present purpose, since the coherent scattering amplitudes of the solute atoms are much larger than that of the vanadium atom. (Auth.)

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  15. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  16. Growth and Destruction of PAH Molecules in Reactions with Carbon Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    A very high abundance of atomic carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and the high reactivity of these species toward different hydrocarbon molecules including benzene, raise questions regarding the stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in space. To test the efficiency of destruction of PAH molecules via reactions with atomic carbon, we performed a set of laboratory and computational studies of the reactions of naphthalene, anthracene, and coronene molecules with carbon atoms in the ground state. The reactions were investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K and by quantum chemical computations. Our studies suggest that all small and all large catacondensed PAHs react barrierlessly with atomic carbon, and therefore should be efficiently destroyed by such reactions in a broad temperature range. At the same time, large compact pericondensed PAHs should be more inert toward such a reaction. In addition, taking into account their higher photostability, much higher abundances of pericondensed PAHs should be expected in various astrophysical environments. The barrierless reactions between carbon atoms and small PAHs also suggest that, in the ISM, these reactions could lead to the bottom-up formation of PAH molecules.

  17. WO{sub 3-x} rate at Au rate at MnO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires on carbon fabric for high-performance flexible supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xihong; Zhai, Teng [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianghui; Shen, Yongqi; Yuan, Longyan; Hu, Bin; Gao, Yihua; Zhou, Jun [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan (China); Gong, Li; Chen, Jian [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Tong, Yexiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Zhong Lin [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2012-02-14

    WO{sub 3-x} rate at Au rate at MnO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on a flexible carbon fabric and show outstanding electrochemical performance in supercapacitors such as high specific capacitance, good cyclic stability, high energy density, and high power density. These results suggest that the WO{sub 3-x} rate at Au rate at MnO{sub 2} NWs have promising potential for use in high-performance flexible supercapacitors. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. WO{sub 3-x}/MoO{sub 3-x} core/shell nanowires on carbon fabric as an anode for all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xu; Ding, Tianpeng; Yuan, Longyan; Shen, Yongqi; Zhong, Qize; Zhang, Xianghui; Cao, Yuanzhi; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Jun [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan (China); Zhai, Teng; Tong, Yexiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gong, Li; Chen, Jian [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Flexible all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) are fabricated from a novel anode - WO{sub 3-x}/MoO{sub 3-x} core/shell nanowires on carbon fabric - and a polyaniline cathode (figure). In addition to the high electrochemical performance of the devices, other characteristics, such as low toxicity, flexibility, environmental compatibility, light weight, and low requirements for packaging, make the all-solid-state ASCs potential candidates for applications in energy storage, flexible electronics, and other consumer electronics. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. WO3–x@Au@MnO2 core–shell nanowires on carbon fabric for high-performance flexible supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xihong; Zhai, Teng; Zhang, Xianghui; Shen, Yongqi; Yuan, Longyan; Hu, Bin; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Gao, Yihua; Zhou, Jun; Tong, Yexiang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-02-14

    WO3–x@Au@MnO2 core–shell nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on a flexible carbon fabric and show outstanding electrochemical performance in supercapacitors such as high specific capacitance, good cyclic stability, high energy density, and high power density. These results suggest that the WO3–x@Au@MnO2 NWs have promising potential for use in high-performance flexible supercapacitors. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...... be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system. © 2011 Lü et al....... carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...

  1. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  2. High performance current and spin diode of atomic carbon chain between transversely symmetric ribbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yao-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Wu, Xue-Mei

    2014-08-21

    We demonstrate that giant current and high spin rectification ratios can be achieved in atomic carbon chain devices connected between two symmetric ferromagnetic zigzag-graphene-nanoribbon electrodes. The spin dependent transport simulation is carried out by density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the transverse symmetries of the electronic wave functions in the nanoribbons and the carbon chain are critical to the spin transport modes. In the parallel magnetization configuration of two electrodes, pure spin current is observed in both linear and nonlinear regions. However, in the antiparallel configuration, the spin-up (down) current is prohibited under the positive (negative) voltage bias, which results in a spin rectification ratio of order 10(4). When edge carbon atoms are substituted with boron atoms to suppress the edge magnetization in one of the electrodes, we obtain a diode with current rectification ratio over 10(6).

  3. Anomalous I-V curve for mono-atomic carbon chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Bo; Fang Haiping; Sanvito, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of mono-atomic carbon chains were studied theoretically using a combination of density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's functions method. The I-V curves for the chains composed of an even number of atoms and attached to gold electrodes through sulfur exhibit two plateaus where the current becomes bias independent. In contrast, when the number of carbon atoms in the chain is odd, the electric current simply increases monotonically with bias. This peculiar behavior is attributed to dimerization of the chains, directly resulting from their one-dimensional nature. The finding is expected to be helpful in designing molecular devices, such as carbon-chain-based transistors and sensors, for nanoscale and biological applications.

  4. Observation of isolated carbon atoms and the study of their mobility on Pt clusters by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.; Ansermet, J.; Slichter, C.P.; Sinfelt, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have used NMR to determine the structure of surface species after the C-C bond scission of adsorbed acetylene and ethylene on Pt clusters produced by heating the samples to 690 K. They have found the species to be predominantly isolated carbon atoms adsorbed on Pt surfaces. They have studied the mobility of adsorbed carbon atoms from motional narrowing of the 13 C line shapes and motion-induced shortening of the spin-lattice relaxation times. They have found that the carbon atoms on Pt clusters are very mobile, their activation energy of 7 +- 1 kcal/mole for translational motion being less than half that of CO on Pt clusters

  5. Copper@carbon coaxial nanowires synthesized by hydrothermal carbonization process from electroplating wastewater and their use as an enzyme-free glucose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuxin; He, Zhaoyang; Yan, Zifeng

    2013-01-21

    In the pursuit of electrocatalysts with great economic and ecological values for non-enzymatic glucose sensors, one-dimensional copper@carbon (Cu@C) core-shell coaxial nanowires (NWs) have been successfully prepared via a simple continuous flow wet-chemistry approach from electroplating wastewater. The as-obtained products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrocatalytic activity of the modified electrodes by Cu@C NWs towards glucose oxidation was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. It was found that the as-obtained Cu@C NWs showed good electrochemical properties and could be used as an electrochemical sensor for the detection of glucose molecules. Compared to the other electrodes including the bare Nafion/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and several hot hybrid nanostructures modified GCE, a substantial decrease in the overvoltage of the glucose oxidation was observed at the Cu@C NWs electrodes with oxidation starting at ca. 0.20 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3 M KCl). At an applied potential of 0.65 V, Cu@C NWs electrodes had a high and reproducible sensitivity of 437.8 µA cm(-2) mM(-1) to glucose. Linear responses were obtained with a detection limit of 50 nM. More importantly, the proposed electrode also had good stability, high resistance against poisoning by chloride ion and commonly interfering species. These good analytical performances make Cu@C NWs promising for the future development of enzyme-free glucose sensors.

  6. Enhanced ionized impurity scattering in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hyun; Lee, Seok-Hee; Shin, Mincheol

    2013-06-01

    The electronic resistivity in silicon nanowires is investigated by taking into account scattering as well as the donor deactivation from the dielectric mismatch. The effects of poorly screened dopant atoms from the dielectric mismatch and variable carrier density in nanowires are found to play a crucial role in determining the nanowire resistivity. Using Green's function method within the self-consistent Born approximation, it is shown that donor deactivation and ionized impurity scattering combined with the charged interface traps successfully to explain the increase in the resistivity of Si nanowires while reducing the radius, measured by Björk et al. [Nature Nanotech. 4, 103 (2009)].

  7. Quantum decoherence in electronic current flowing through carbon nanotubes induced by thermal atomic vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum decoherence in electronic currents flowing through metallic carbon nanotubes caused by thermal atomic vibrations using the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for an open system. We reveal that the quantum coherence of conduction electrons decays exponentially with tube length at a fixed temperature, and that the decay rate increases with temperature. We also find that the phase relaxation length due to the thermal atomic vibrations is inversely proportional to temperature.

  8. Preparation of PtRu/Carbon hybrid materials by hydrothermal carbonization: A study of the Pt:Ru atomic ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusi, Marcelo Marques; Brandalise, Michele; Correa, Olandir Vercino; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Villalba, Juan Carlo

    2009-01-01

    PtRu/Carbon materials with different Pt:Ru atomic ratios (30:70, 50:50, 60:40, 80:20 and 90:10) and 5 wt% of nominal metal load were prepared by hydrothermal carbonization using H 2 PtCl 6.6 H 2 O and RuCl 3. xH 2 O as metals sources and catalysts of the carbonization process and starch as carbon source and reducing agent. The obtained materials were treated at 900 deg C under argon and characterized by EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammetry. The electro-oxidation of methanol was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry using thin porous coating technique. The PtRu/Carbon materials showed Pt:Ru atomic ratios obtained by EDX similar to the nominal ones. XRD analysis showed that Pt face-cubic centered (FCC) and Ru hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phases coexist in the obtained materials. The average crystallite sizes of the Pt (FCC) phase were in the range of 8-12 nm. The material prepared with Pt:Ru atomic ratio of 50:50 showed the best performance for methanol electro-oxidation. (author)

  9. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  10. Atomic carbon chains as spin-transmitters: An ab initio transport study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    An atomic carbon chain joining two graphene flakes was recently realized in a ground-breaking experiment by Jin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 205501). We present ab initio results for the electron transport properties of such chains and demonstrate complete spin-polarization of the transmi......An atomic carbon chain joining two graphene flakes was recently realized in a ground-breaking experiment by Jin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 205501). We present ab initio results for the electron transport properties of such chains and demonstrate complete spin...

  11. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2018-04-17

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  12. The Unique Hoyle State of the Carbon Atom

    OpenAIRE

    Thorvaldsen, Steinar

    2014-01-01

    Paper from the proceedings of The 1st Virtual International Conference on the Dialogue between Science and Theology. Cosmology, Life & Anthropology,at the Ovidius University of Constanta, Romania held from 6 to 11 November, 2014 The famous astronomer Fred Hoyle (1915-2001) started his research career as an atheist. Hoyle's most important contribution to astrophysics is the theory of nucleosynthesis, i.e. the idea that chemical elements such as carbon can form in stars on t...

  13. Simultaneous Determination of Copper, Lead, and Cadmium Ions at a Mo6S9-xIx Nanowires Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode Using Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hong; Li, Meixian; Mihailovič, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An electrochemical sensor based on Mo 6 S 9-x I x nanowires was constructed. • Mo 6 S 9-x I x nanowires can amplify electrochemical responses of heavy metal ions. • Mo 6 S 9-x I x nanowires can promote electron transfer. • Mo 6 S 9-x I x nanowires can accumulate metal ions due to large surface area. • The preparation of the sensor is simple, short-time and it does not require a special apparatus. -- ABSTRACT: A novel electrochemical sensor based on a new kind of nanomaterials Mo 6 S 9-x I x nanowires modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was constructed for simultaneous determination of cadmium(II), lead(II) and copper(II) using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). Various experimental parameters such as the modified amount, pH, deposition time and deposition potential were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the stripping peak currents increase linearly with increasing concentrations of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions in the ranges of 0.5∼150 μg · L −1 , 1.5∼450 μg · L −1 and 0.8~240 μg · μg·L −1 , 1.5∼450 μg·L −1 and 0.8∼240 μg·L −1 , respectively. And the limits of detection (S/N = 3) are estimated to be 0.10 μg · L −1 for Cd (II), 0.45 μg·L −1 for Pb(II) and 0.20 μg·L −1 for Cu(II), which are two orders of magnitude lower than those obtained at the unmodified electrodes. Most importantly, the sensor has been successfully applied to the determination of trace metal ions in the tap water samples. This developed electrochemical sensor exhibits high sensitivity, good stability and reproducibility

  14. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    catalyzed germanium nanowires, a small process window has been determined where high aspect-ratio nanowires show single crystalline structure. Compositional analysis has been performed via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to monitor the presence of indium and bismuth in the nanowires. Both catalysts could be identified, validating their role as catalysts. A combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy characterization on single core-shell nanowires gives clear evidence of finite-size effects on the electron-phonon coupling, as well as the presence of strain. Field effect transistors were fabricated using gold, bismuth and indium catalyzed germanium nanowires. Initial room-temperature and temperature dependent transport measurements on gold and bismuth catalyzed nanowires show field effects. Indium catalyzed germanium nanowires show insulating behavior. (orig.)

  15. Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura Butler

    2009-09-01

    A few of the many applications for nanowires are high-aspect ratio conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tips, force and mass sensors, and high-frequency resonators. Reliable estimates for the elastic modulus of nanowires and the quality factor of their oscillations are of interest to help enable these applications. Furthermore, a real-time, non-destructive technique to measure the vibrational spectra of nanowires will help enable sensor applications based on nanowires and the use of nanowires as AFM cantilevers (rather than as tips for AFM cantilevers). Laser Doppler vibrometry is used to measure the vibration spectra of individual cantilevered nanowires, specifically multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and silver gallium nanoneedles. Since the entire vibration spectrum is measured with high frequency resolution (100 Hz for a 10 MHz frequency scan), the resonant frequencies and quality factors of the nanowires are accurately determined. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the elastic modulus and spring constant can be calculated from the resonance frequencies of the oscillation spectrum and the dimensions of the nanowires, which are obtained from parallel SEM studies. Because the diameters of the nanowires studied are smaller than the wavelength of the vibrometer's laser, Mie scattering is used to estimate the lower diameter limit for nanowires whose vibration can be measured in this way. The techniques developed in this thesis can be used to measure the vibrational spectra of any suspended nanowire with high frequency resolution Two different nanowires were measured - MWNTs and Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles. Measurements of the thermal vibration spectra of MWNTs under ambient conditions showed that the elastic modulus, E, of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) MWNTs is 37 {+-} 26 GPa, well within the range of E previously reported for CVD-grown MWNTs. Since the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles have a greater optical scattering efficiency than

  16. Carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Hee

    2017-11-01

    ZnO has had little consideration as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries compared with other transition-metal oxides due to its inherent poor electrical conductivity and large volume expansion upon cycling and pulverization of ZnO-based electrodes. A logical design and facile synthesis of ZnO with well-controlled particle sizes and a specific morphology is essential to improving the performance of ZnO in lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, a simple approach is reported that uses a cation surfactant and a chelating agent to synthesize three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructured carbon-coated ZnO mats, in which the ZnO mats are composed of stacked individual ZnO nanowires and form well-defined nanoporous structures with high surface areas. In order to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries, HfO 2 is deposited on the carbon-coated ZnO mat electrode via atomic layer deposition. Lithium-ion battery devices based on the carbon-coated ZnO mat passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO 2 exhibit an excellent initial discharge and charge capacities of 2684.01 and 963.21mAhg -1 , respectively, at a current density of 100mAg -1 in the voltage range of 0.01-3V. They also exhibit cycle stability after 125 cycles with a capacity of 740mAhg -1 and a remarkable rate capability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt-Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, A.-C.; Larsen, J.V.; Verheijen, M.A.; Haugshøj, K.B.; Clausen, H.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Christensen, L.H.; Thomsen, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Pt-Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100 at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and

  18. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinet, G.

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  19. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due to t...

  20. The effect of carbon nanotube chirality on the spiral flow of copper atoms in their cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, M.C.G.; Zhong, Z.W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) chirality on the flow of copper atoms along its core has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The investigation is conducted using CNTs of different chirality, and different flow conditions such as temperatures, bias voltages and the initial positions of the copper atoms. The results show that the atoms flow in a spiral fashion along the CNT channels. The effect is most evident in the CNT channel with zigzag CNTs. The movement of the copper atoms is more erratic when the temperature is increased at a low biased voltage, regardless of the types of channel used. The initial positions of the copper atoms affect the way they converge as they move downstream along the channel. A bias voltage of 4 V favours the initiation of a spiral flow, especially when the position of the copper atoms is far from the central axis of the channel. -- Highlights: ► We model the transportation of copper atoms in armchair and zigzag CNT channels. ► The spiral flow of copper atoms occurs in a semiconductor–semiconductor CNT. ► The compact copper mass is predicted to occur at 673 K with a 4 V bias voltage.

  1. The effect of atomic hydrogen adsorption on single-walled carbon nano tubes properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, S.; Majidi, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the adsorption of hydrogen atoms on metallic single-walled carbon nano tubes using ab initio molecular dynamics method. It was found that the geometric structures and the electronic properties of hydrogenated SWNTs can be strongly changed by varying hydrogen coverage. The circular cross sections of the CNTs were changed with different hydrogen coverage. When hydrogen is chemisorbed on the surface of the carbon nano tube, the energy gap will be appeared. This is due to the degree of the Sp 3 hybridization, and the hydrogen coverage can control the band gap of the carbon nano tube

  2. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing-Xiang, Zhang; Hui, Li; Xue-Qing, Zhang; Kim-Meow, Liew

    2009-01-01

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them, the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I – V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  3. Highly aligned vertical GaN nanowires using submonolayer metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T [Albuquerque, NM; Li, Qiming [Albuquerque, NM; Creighton, J Randall [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-06-29

    A method for forming vertically oriented, crystallographically aligned nanowires (nanocolumns) using monolayer or submonolayer quantities of metal atoms to form uniformly sized metal islands that serve as catalysts for MOCVD growth of Group III nitride nanowires.

  4. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  5. Ground state energy of an hydrogen atom confined in carbon nano-structures: a diffusion quantum Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molayem, M.; Tayebi-Rad, Gh.; Esmaeli, L.; Namiranian, A.; Fouladvand, M. E.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Using the diffusion quantum monte Carlo method, the ground state energy of an Hydrogen atom confined in a carbon nano tube and a C60 molecule is calculated. For Hydrogen atom confined in small diameter tubes, the ground state energy shows significant deviation from a free Hydrogen atom, while with increasing the diameter this deviation tends to zero.

  6. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp² carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-04-16

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp(2) carbon structures.

  7. Analysis of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties at Atomic Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at developing a mathematic model to characterize the mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. The carbon-carbon (C–C bonds between two adjacent atoms are modeled as Euler beams. According to the relationship of Tersoff-Brenner force theory and potential energy acting on C–C bonds, material constants of beam element are determined at the atomic scale. Based on the elastic deformation energy and mechanical equilibrium of a unit in graphite sheet, simply form ED equations of calculating Young's modulus of armchair and zigzag graphite sheets are derived. Following with the geometrical relationship of SWCNTs in cylindrical coordinates and the structure mechanics approach, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of armchair and zigzag SWCNTs are also investigated. The results show that the approach to research mechanical properties of SWCNTs is a concise and valid method. We consider that it will be useful technique to progress on this type of investigation.

  8. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Beevi, Akbar Sait Hameedha; Priya, Radhakrishnan Jeeva; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices. (paper)

  9. Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes and Their Composites: Design at the Atomic Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Sheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation focuses on the design of functionalization configuration at the atomic level to determine the influence of atomic structure on the mechanical properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs and their composites. Tension and compressive buckling behaviors of different configurations of CNTs functionalized by H atoms are studied by a molecular dynamics (MD method. It is shown that H-atom functionalization reduces Young’s modulus of CNTs, but Young’s modulus is not sensitive to the functionalization configuration. The configuration does, however, affect the tensile strength and critical buckling stress of CNTs. Further, the stress-strain relations of composites reinforced by nonfunctionalized and various functionalized CNTs are analyzed.

  10. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  11. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  12. Moessbauer study of Fe-Co nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China)]. E-mail: chenzy@lzu.edu.cn; Zhan Qingfeng; Xue Desheng; Li Fashen [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Zhou Xuezhi; Kunkel, Henry; Williams, Gwyn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, the University of Manitoba (Canada)

    2002-01-28

    Arrays of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} (0.0{<=}x{<=}0.92) nanowires have been prepared by an electrochemical process, co-depositing Fe and Co atoms into the pores of anodic aluminium; their compositions were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscope results show that the nanowires are regularly spaced and uniform in shape with lengths of about 7.5 {mu}m and diameters of 20 nm. The x-ray diffraction indicates a texture in the deposited nanowires. For the composition below 82 at.% cobalt, the nanowires had a body-centred-cubic structure with a [110] preferred orientation. For the 92 at.% cobalt sample, the alloy exhibited a mixture of bcc and face-centred-cubic structure. The room temperature {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra of the arrays of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} nanowires have second and fifth absorption lines of the six-line pattern with almost zero intensity, indicating that the internal magnetic field in the nanowires lies along the long axis of the nanowire. The maximum values of the hyperfine field (B{sub hf} 36.6{+-}0.1 T) and isomer shift (IS=0.06{+-}0.01 mm s-1) occur for 44 at.% cobalt. The variations of the isomer shift and the linewidths with composition indicate that the Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} alloy nanowires around the equiatomic composition are in an atomistic disordered state. (author)

  13. Atomization in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Peak-height method vs. integration method of measuring absorbance: carbon rod atomizer 63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturgeon, R.E.; Chakrabarti, C.L.; Maines, I.S.; Bertels, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    Oscilloscopic traces of transient atomic absorption signals generated during continuous heating of a Carbon Rod Atomizer model 63 show features which are characteristic of the element being atomized. This research was undertaken to determine the significance and usefulness of the two analytically significant parameters, absorbance maximum and integrated absorbance. For measuring integrated absorbance, an electronic integrating control unit consisting of a timing circuit, a lock-in amplifier, and a digital voltmeter, which functions as a direct absorbance x second readout, has been designed, developed, and successfully tested. Oscilloscopic and recorder traces of the absorbance maximum and digital display of the integrated absorbance are simultaneously obtained. For the elements studied, Cd, Zn, Cu, Al, Sn, Mo, and V, the detection limits and the precision obtained are practically identical for both methods of measurements. The sensitivities by the integration method are about the same as, or less than, those obtained by the peak-height method, whereas the calibration curves by the former are generally linear over wider ranges of concentrations. (U.S.)

  14. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  15. Theoretical realization of cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Guo, Ling-Ju; Zeng, Zhi; Ju, Xin

    2011-01-14

    The capacity of carbon atomic chains with different terminations for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Unlike the physisorption of H(2) on the H-terminated chain, we show that two Li (Na) atoms each capping one end of the odd- or even-numbered carbon chain can hold ten H(2) molecules with optimal binding energies for room temperature storage. The hybridization of the Li 2p states with the H(2)σ orbitals contributes to the H(2) adsorption. However, the binding mechanism of the H(2) molecules on Na arises only from the polarization interaction between the charged Na atom and the H(2). Interestingly, additional H(2) molecules can be bound to the carbon atoms at the chain ends due to the charge transfer between Li 2s2p (Na 3s) and C 2p states. More importantly, dimerization of these isolated metal-capped chains does not affect the hydrogen binding energy significantly. In addition, a single chain can be stabilized effectively by the C(60) fullerenes termination. With a hydrogen uptake of ∼10 wt.% on Li-coated C(60)-C(n)-C(60) (n = 5, 8), the Li(12)C(60)-C(n)-Li(12)C(60) complex, keeping the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules per Li and stabilizing the dispersion of individual Li atoms, can serve as better building blocks of polymers than the (Li(12)C(60))(2) dimer. These findings suggest a new route to design cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated sp carbon chains.

  16. Aging of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Osadnik, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Organic semiconductors formed by epitaxial growth from small molecules such as the para-phenylenes or squaraines promise a vast application potential as the active ingredient in electric and optoelectronic devices. Their self-organization into organic nanowires or "nanofibers" adds a peculiar...... attribute, making them especially interesting for light generation in OLEDs and for light-harvesting devices such as solar cells. Functionalization of the molecules allows the customization of optical and electrical properties. However, aging of the wires might lead to a considerable decrease in device...... performance over time. In this study the morphological stability of organic nanoclusters and nanowires from the methoxy functionalized quaterphenylene, 4,4'''dimethoxy-1,1':4',1''4'',1'''-quaterphenylene (MOP4), is investigated in detail. Aging experiments conducted by atomic force microscopy under ambient...

  17. Functionalizing carbon nitride with heavy atom-free spin converters for enhanced 1 O 2 generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Han, Congcong; Zhang, Qinhua; Zhang, Qinggang; Li, Zhongtao; Gosztola, David J.; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wu, Mingbo

    2018-05-01

    advanced photosensitizers for singlet oxygen (1O2) generation. However, the intersystem crossing (ISC) process is quite insufficient in carbon nitride, limiting the 1O2 generation. Here, we report a facile and general strategy to confined benzophenone as a heavy atom-free spin converter dopant in carbon nitride via the facile copolymerization. With proper energy level matching between the heavy atom-free spin converter and various ligands based on carbon nitride precursors, the proper combination can decrease the singlet-triplet energy gap (DEST) and hence generate 1O2 effectively. Due to its significant and selectivity for 1O2 generation, the as-prepared carbon nitride-based photosensitizer shows a high selective photooxidation activity for 1,5-dihydroxy-naphthalene (1,5-DHN). The product yield reached 71.8% after irradiation for 60 min, which was higher than that of cyclometalated PtII complexes (53.6%) in homogeneous photooxidation. This study can broaden the application of carbon nitride in the field of selective heterogeneous photooxidation due to simple operation, low cost, and high efficiency, making it a strong candidate for future industrialization.

  18. Enhancing Catalyzed Decomposition of Na2CO3 with Co2MnO x Nanowire-Decorated Carbon Fibers for Advanced Na-CO2 Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cong; Luo, Jianmin; Jin, Chengbin; Yuan, Huadong; Sheng, Ouwei; Huang, Hui; Gan, Yongping; Xia, Yang; Liang, Chu; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Wenkui; Tao, Xinyong

    2018-05-23

    The metal-CO 2 batteries, especially Na-CO 2 , batteries come into sight owing to their high energy density, ability for CO 2 capture, and the abundance of sodium resource. Besides the sluggish electrochemical reactions at the gas cathodes and the instability of the electrolyte at a high voltage, the final discharge product Na 2 CO 3 is a solid and poor conductor of electricity, which may cause the high overpotential and poor cycle performance for the Na-CO 2 batteries. The promotion of decomposition of Na 2 CO 3 should be an efficient strategy to enhance the electrochemical performance. Here, we design a facile Na 2 CO 3 activation experiment to screen the efficient cathode catalyst for the Na-CO 2 batteries. It is found that the Co 2 MnO x nanowire-decorated carbon fibers (CMO@CF) can promote the Na 2 CO 3 decomposition at the lowest voltage among all these metal oxide-decorated carbon fiber structures. After assembling the Na-CO 2 batteries, the electrodes based on CMO@CF show lower overpotential and better cycling performance compared with the electrodes based on pristine carbon fibers and other metal oxide-modified carbon fibers. We believe this catalyst screening method and the freestanding structure of the CMO@CF electrode may provide an important reference for the development of advanced Na-CO 2 batteries.

  19. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  20. Influence of supersaturated carbon on the diffusion of Ni in ferrite determined by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kresse, T.; Li, Yujiao; Boll, Torben; Borchers, Christine; Choi, Pyuckpa; Al-Kassab, Talaat; Raabe, Dierk; Kirchheim, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    In patented and cold-drawn pearlitic steel wires dissociation of cementite occurs during mechanical deformation. In this study the influence of the carbon decomposition on the diffusion of nickel in ferrite is investigated by means of atom probe tomography. In the temperature range 423-523 K we observed a much smaller activation energy of Ni diffusion than for self-diffusion in body-centered cubic iron, indicating an increased vacancy density owing to enhanced formation of vacancy-carbon complexes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of supersaturated carbon on the diffusion of Ni in ferrite determined by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kresse, T.

    2013-09-01

    In patented and cold-drawn pearlitic steel wires dissociation of cementite occurs during mechanical deformation. In this study the influence of the carbon decomposition on the diffusion of nickel in ferrite is investigated by means of atom probe tomography. In the temperature range 423-523 K we observed a much smaller activation energy of Ni diffusion than for self-diffusion in body-centered cubic iron, indicating an increased vacancy density owing to enhanced formation of vacancy-carbon complexes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  3. Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires grown on carbon cloth as integrated electrode for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jinwei; Xu, Henghui; Li, Guolong; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-08-01

    Hierarchical core-shell NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 nanowires were grown on carbon cloth (CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4) by a two-step hydrothermal route to fabricate a flexible binder-free electrode. The prepared CC@NiCo2O4@NiMoO4 integrated electrode was directly used as an electrode for faradaic supercapacitor. It shows a high areal capacitance of 2.917 F cm-2 at 2 mA cm-2 and excellent cycling stability with 90.6% retention over 2000 cycles at a high current density of 20 mA cm-2. The superior specific capacitance, rate and cycling performance can be ascribed to the fast transferring path for electrons and ions, synergic effect and the stability of the hierarchical core-shell structure.

  4. Hierarchical silicon nanowires-carbon textiles matrix as a binder-free anode for high-performance advanced lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Xianfu; Chen, Haitian; Wang, Zhuoran; Chen, Di; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Zhou, Chongwu; Shen, Guozhen

    2013-01-01

    Toward the increasing demands of portable energy storage and electric vehicle applications, the widely used graphite anodes with significant drawbacks become more and more unsuitable. Herein, we report a novel scaffold of hierarchical silicon nanowires-carbon textiles anodes fabricated via a facile method. Further, complete lithium-ion batteries based on Si and commercial LiCoO2 materials were assembled to investigate their corresponding across-the-aboard performances, demonstrating their enhanced specific capacity (2950 mAh g−1 at 0.2 C), good repeatability/rate capability (even >900 mAh g−1 at high rate of 5 C), long cycling life, and excellent stability in various external conditions (curvature, temperature, and humidity). Above results light the way to principally replacing graphite anodes with silicon-based electrodes which was confirmed to have better comprehensive performances. PMID:23572030

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Nanowire Heterojunction Solar Cells with Gas-Dependent Photovoltaic Performances and Their Application in Self-Powered NO2 Detecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Zhang, Zexia; Xiao, Lin; Lv, Ruitao

    2016-12-01

    A multifunctional device combining photovoltaic conversion and toxic gas sensitivity is reported. In this device, carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes are used to cover onto silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form heterojunction. The porous structure and large specific surface area in the heterojunction structure are both benefits for gas adsorption. In virtue of these merits, gas doping is a feasible method to improve cell's performance and the device can also work as a self-powered gas sensor beyond a solar cell. It shows a significant improvement in cell efficiency (more than 200 times) after NO2 molecules doping (device working as a solar cell) and a fast, reversible response property for NO2 detection (device working as a gas sensor). Such multifunctional CNT-SiNW structure can be expected to open a new avenue for developing self-powered, efficient toxic gas-sensing devices in the future.

  6. Molecular precursor derived silicon boron carbonitride/carbon nanotube and silicon oxycarbide/carbon nanotube composite nanowires for energy based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil

    Molecular precursor derived ceramics (also known as polymer-derived ceramics or PDCs) are high temperature glasses that have been studied for applications involving operation at elevated temperatures. Prepared from controlled thermal degradation of liquid-phase organosilicon precursors, these ceramics offer remarkable engineering properties such as resistance to crystallization up to 1400 °C, semiconductor behavior at high temperatures and intense photoluminescence. These properties are a direct result of their covalent bonded amorphous network and free (-sp2) carbon along with mixed Si/B/C/N/O bonds, which otherwise can not be obtained through conventional ceramic processing techniques. This thesis demonstrates synthesis of a unique core/shell type nanowire structure involving either siliconboroncarbonitride (SiBCN) or siliconoxycarbide (SiOC) as the shell with carbon nanotube (CNT) acting as the core. This was made possible by liquid phase functionalization of CNT surfaces with respective polymeric precursor (e.g., home-made boron-modified polyureamethylvinylsilazane for SiBCN/CNT and commercially obtained polysiloxane for SiOC/CNT), followed by controlled pyrolysis in inert conditions. This unique architecture has several benefits such as high temperature oxidation resistance (provided by the ceramic shell), improved electrical conductivity and mechanical toughness (attributed to the CNT core) that allowed us to explore its use in energy conversion and storage devices. The first application involved use of SiBCN/CNT composite as a high temperature radiation absorbant material for laser thermal calorimeter. SiBCN/CNT spray coatings on copper substrate were exposed to high energy laser beams (continuous wave at 10.6 mum 2.5 kW CO2 laser, 10 seconds) and resulting change in its microstructure was studied ex-situ. With the aid of multiple techniques we ascertained the thermal damage resistance to be 15 kW/cm -2 with optical absorbance exceeding 97%. This represents

  7. Interaction of scandium and titanium atoms with a carbon surface containing five- and seven-membered rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, P. O.; Eliseeva, N. S.; Kuzubov, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of carbon nanotubes coated by atoms of transition metals to store molecular hydrogen is associated with the problem of the aggregation of these atoms, which leads to the formation of metal clusters. The quantum-chemical simulation of cluster models of the carbon surface of a graphene type with scandium and titanium atoms has been performed. It has been shown that the presence of five- and seven-membered rings, in addition to six-membered rings, in these structures makes it possible to strongly suppress the processes of the migration of metal atoms over the surface, preventing their clustering.

  8. Localised quantum states of atomic and molecular particles physisorbed on carbon-based nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Trachta, Michal; Bludský, Ota; Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 11 (2014), "114702-1"-"114702-10" ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/11/0436; GA ČR GAP208/10/0725 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic structure * carbon nanostructures * graphene * quantum mechanics * physisorbed Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  9. Influence of substitutional atoms on the solubility limit of carbon in bcc iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Hajime; Ushioda, Kohsaku; Yoshinaga, Naoki; Yamada, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    The influence of substitutional atoms (Mn, Cr, Si, P, and Al) on the solubility limit of C in body-centered cubic iron in equilibrium with cementite was investigated in low-carbon steels at a temperature of 700 o C. The C solubility limit was determined from internal friction measurements combined with infrared analysis of C using a high-frequency combustion technique. Experiments clarified that Mn, Cr and Al hardly change the C solubility limit, whereas P and Si increase it.

  10. Facile one-step direct electrodeposition of bismuth nanowires on glassy carbon electrode for selective determination of folic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthi, Arjunan; Kumar, Shanmugam Senthil; Phani, Kanala Lakshminarasimha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • BiNWs prepared through simple, fast one step electrochemical route. • BiNWs showed more catalytic activity and sensitivity than GC towards FA reduction. • Selective detection of FA was achieved with low limit of detection (9.53 × 10 −9 mol L −1 ). • Real sample analysis was successfully demonstrated using FA pharmaceutical tablets. • BiNWs based sensor matrix is inexpensive, and more suitable for FA real application. - Abstract: In the present work, we have developed a facile one step route to electrodeposition of stabilizer-free bismuth nanowires (BiNWs) on glassy carbon (GC) substrates by using a simple potentiostatic method. Formation of BiNWs on GC substrate was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The growth of BiNWs on the GC substrate was monitored by cyclic voltammetry and found that continuous in-situ generation of hydrogen bubbles during electrodeposition provides a stagnant template for the formation of BiNWs on the GC substrate. Phase-purity of the deposited BiNWs on GC substrate studied by XRD indicates no other oxide formation. The electrodeposited BiNWs on GC substrate was used for electro-reduction of folic acid (FA) and its quantitative determination in Britton-Robinson buffer of pH 4.5 solutions. The observed cyclic voltammetric reduction current of FA on BiNWs/GC is almost 15 times higher with 0.015 V less negative overpotential compared to bare GC substrate alone. This result clearly reveals the electrocatalytic activity of the deposited BiNWs. In addition, square wave voltammetry (SWV) showed a perfectly linear response in the concentration range of 1 × 10 −8 –15 × 10 −8 mol L −1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9956. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) are determined to be 9.53 × 10 −9 and 31.68 × 10 −9 mol L −1 respectively. The response of the BiNWs/GC sensor matrix is not affected by any usual interference from excess concentrations of

  11. Nb2O5 nanowires in-situ grown on carbon fiber: A high-efficiency material for the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yucheng; Zhang, Shihao; Wang, Jinshu; Wu, Junshu; Dai, Hongxing

    2018-04-01

    Niobium oxide nanowire-deposited carbon fiber (CF) samples were prepared using a hydrothermal method with amorphous Nb 2 O 5 ·nH 2 O as precursor. The physical properties of the samples were characterized by means of numerous techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), N 2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The efficiency for the removal of Cr(VI) was determined. Parameters such as pH value and initial Cr(VI) concentration could influence the Cr(VI) removal efficiency or adsorption capacity of the Nb 2 O 5 /carbon fiber sample obtained after hydrothermal treatment at 160°C for 14hr. The maximal Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of the Nb 2 O 5 nanowire/CF sample was 115mg/g. This Nb 2 O 5 /CF sample also showed excellent photocatalytic activity and stability for the reduction of Cr(VI) under UV-light irradiation: the Cr(VI) removal efficiency reached 99.9% after UV-light irradiation for 1hr and there was no significant decrease in photocatalytic performance after the use of the sample for 10 repeated cycles. Such excellent Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and photocatalytic performance was related to its high surface area, abundant surface hydroxyl groups, and good UV-light absorption ability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Electronic transport in large systems through a QUAMBO-NEGF approach: Application to atomic carbon chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, X.W.; Zhang, G.P.; Yao, Y.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ding, Z.J.; Ho, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    The conductance of single-atom carbon chain (SACC) between two zigzag graphene nanoribbons (GNR) is studied by an efficient scheme utilizing tight-binding (TB) parameters generated via quasi-atomic minimal basis set orbitals (QUAMBOs) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF). Large systems (SACC contains more than 50 atoms) are investigated and the electronic transport properties are found to correlate with SACC's parity. The SACCs provide a stable off or on state in broad energy region (0.1-1 eV) around Fermi energy. The off state is not sensitive to the length of SACC while the corresponding energy region decreases with the increase of the width of GNR. -- Highlights: → Graphene has many superior electronic properties. → First-principles calculation are accurate but limited to system size. → QUAMBOs construct tight-binding parameters with spatial localization, and then use divide-and-conquer method. → SACC (single carbon atom chain): structure and transport show even-odd parity, and long chains are studied.

  13. Vertically aligned nanowires from boron-doped diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nianjun; Uetsuka, Hiroshi; Osawa, Eiji; Nebel, Christoph E

    2008-11-01

    Vertically aligned diamond nanowires with controlled geometrical properties like length and distance between wires were fabricated by use of nanodiamond particles as a hard mask and by use of reactive ion etching. The surface structure, electronic properties, and electrochemical functionalization of diamond nanowires were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as electrochemical techniques. AFM and STM experiments show that diamond nanowire etched for 10 s have wire-typed structures with 3-10 nm in length and with typically 11 nm spacing in between. The electrode active area of diamond nanowires is enhanced by a factor of 2. The functionalization of nanowire tips with nitrophenyl molecules is characterized by STM on clean and on nitrophenyl molecule-modified diamond nanowires. Tip-modified diamond nanowires are promising with respect to biosensor applications where controlled biomolecule bonding is required to improve chemical stability and sensing significantly.

  14. A Hierarchical Phosphorus Nanobarbed Nanowire Hybrid: Its Structure and Electrochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Li, Beibei; Zhang, Jinying; Li, Xin; Xiao, Dingbin; Fu, Chengcheng; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Zhihui; Li, Jun; Cao, Daxian; Niu, Chunming

    2017-06-14

    Nanostructured phosphorus-carbon composites are promising materials for Li-ion and Na-ion battery anodes. A hierarchical phosphorus hybrid, SiC@graphene@P, has been synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition of phosphorus on the surfaces of barbed nanowires, where the barbs are vertically grown graphene nanosheets and the cores are SiC nanowires. A temperature-gradient vaporization-condensation method has been used to remove the unhybridized phosphorus particles formed by homogeneous nucleation. The vertically grown barb shaped graphene nanosheets and a high concentration of edge carbon atoms induced a fibrous red phosphorus (f-RP) growth with its {001} planes in parallel to {002} planes of nanographene sheets and led to a strong interpenetrated interface interaction between phosphorus and the surfaces of graphene nanosheets. This hybridization has been demonstrated to significantly enhance the electrochemical performances of phosphorus.

  15. The Kinetics of Oxygen Atom Recombination in the Presence of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, C. S.; Garcia, R. M.; Pejakovic, D.; Kalogerakis, K.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding processes involving atomic oxygen is crucial for the study and modeling of composition, energy transfer, airglow, and transport dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Significant gaps and uncertainties exist in the understanding of these processes and often the relevant input from laboratory measurements is missing or outdated. We are conducting laboratory experiments to measure the rate coefficient for O + O + CO2 recombination and investigating the O2 excited states produced following the recombination. These measurements will provide key input for a quantitative understanding and reliable modeling of the atmospheres of the CO2 planets and their airglow. An excimer laser providing pulsed output at either 193 nm or 248 nm is employed to produce O atoms by dissociating carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, or ozone. In an ambient-pressure background of CO2, O atoms recombine in a time scale of a few milliseconds. Detection of laser-induced fluorescence at 845 nm following two-photon excitation near 226 nm monitors the decay of the oxygen atom population. From the temporal evolution of the signal the recombination rate coefficient is extracted. Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to detect the products of O-atom recombination and subsequent relaxation in CO2. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Planetary Astronomy Program. Rosanne Garcia’s participation was funded by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program.

  16. Adsorption and manipulation of carbon onions on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite studied with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianfeng; Shen Ziyong; Hou Shimin; Zhao Xingyu; Xue Zengquan; Shi Zujin; Gu Zhennan

    2007-01-01

    Carbon onions produced by DC arc discharge method were deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and their adsorption and manipulation was studied using an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Well-dispersed adsorption of carbon onions on HOPG surface was obtained and aggregations of onions were not observed. The van der Waals interaction between the onion and HOPG surface and that between two onions, were calculated and discussed using Hamaker's theory. The manipulation of adsorbed onions on HOPG surface was realized using the AFM in both the raster mode and the vector mode. The controllability and precision of two manipulation modes were compared and the vector mode manipulation was found superior, and is a useful technique for the construction of nano-scale devices based on carbon onions

  17. Carbon Co-Deposition During Gas Reduction of Water-Atomized Fe-Cr-Mo Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The water atomization of iron powder with a composition of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo (wt.% at 1600°C and 150 bar creates an oxide layer, which in this study was reduced using a mixture of methane (CH4 and argon (Ar gas. The lowest oxygen content was achieved with a 100 cc/min flow rate of CH4, but this also resulted in a co-deposition of carbon due to the cracking of CH4. This carbon can be used directly to create high-quality, sinter hardenable steel, thereby eliminating the need for an additional mixing step prior to sintering. An exponential relationship was found to exist between the CH4 gas flow rate and carbon content of the powder, meaning that its composition can be easily controlled to suit a variety of different applications.

  18. Diamond nanowires: fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Wu, Liangzhuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2014-12-22

    C(sp(3) )C-bonded diamond nanowires are wide band gap semiconductors that exhibit a combination of superior properties such as negative electron affinity, chemical inertness, high Young's modulus, the highest hardness, and room-temperature thermal conductivity. The creation of 1D diamond nanowires with their giant surface-to-volume ratio enhancements makes it possible to control and enhance the fundamental properties of diamond. Although theoretical comparisons with carbon nanotubes have shown that diamond nanowires are energetically and mechanically viable structures, reproducibly synthesizing the crystalline diamond nanowires has remained challenging. We present a comprehensive, up-to-date review of diamond nanowires, including a discussion of their synthesis along with their structures, properties, and applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Direct observation of nanowire growth and decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Shandakov, Sergey D; Jiang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    knowledge, so far this has been only postulated, but never observed at the atomic level. By means of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy we monitored and examined the atomic layer transformation at the conditions of the crystal growth and its decomposition using CuO nanowires selected...

  20. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erikat, I. A., E-mail: ihsanas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Jerash University, Jerash-26150 (Jordan); Hamad, B. A. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  1. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  2. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule

  3. Carbon-hydrogen defects with a neighboring oxygen atom in n-type Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwozdz, K.; Stübner, R.; Kolkovsky, Vl.; Weber, J.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the electrical activation of neutral carbon-oxygen complexes in Si by wet-chemical etching at room temperature. Two deep levels, E65 and E75, are observed by deep level transient spectroscopy in n-type Czochralski Si. The activation enthalpies of E65 and E75 are obtained as EC-0.11 eV (E65) and EC-0.13 eV (E75). The electric field dependence of their emission rates relates both levels to single acceptor states. From the analysis of the depth profiles, we conclude that the levels belong to two different defects, which contain only one hydrogen atom. A configuration is proposed, where the CH1BC defect, with hydrogen in the bond-centered position between neighboring C and Si atoms, is disturbed by interstitial oxygen in the second nearest neighbor position to substitutional carbon. The significant reduction of the CH1BC concentration in samples with high oxygen concentrations limits the use of this defect for the determination of low concentrations of substitutional carbon in Si samples.

  4. Ferromagnetism in Cr-doped passivated AlN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We apply first principles calculations to predict the effect of Cr doping on the electronic and magnetic properties of passivated AlN nanowires. We compare the energetics of the possible dopant sites and demonstrate the favorable configuration ferromagnetic ordering. The charge density of the pristine passivated AlN nanowires is used to elucidate the bonding character. Spin density maps demonstrate an induced spin polarization for N atoms next to dopant atoms, though most of the magnetism is carried by the Cr atoms. Cr-doped AlN nanowires turn out to be interesting for spintronic devices. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  5. Hierarchical Ni0.54Co0.46O2 nanowire and nanosheet arrays grown on carbon fiber cloth for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanzhi; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Cui; Liu, Shuangxi

    2016-10-01

    Hierarchical Ni0.54Co0.46O2 architectures composed by nanowires or nanosheets were successfully grown on bio-mass carbon fiber cloth (CFC) by hydrothermal method. The morphology of Ni0.54Co0.46O2 can be effectively controlled by using different precipitators. The structural effects of the two kinds of morphologies were researched. the results suggest that the Ni0.54Co0.46O2 nanosheet arrays grown on CFC (NCO-NSs/CFC) shows a higher Faradaic areal capacity of 438 μAh cm-2 (238.1 mAh g-1) at a current density of 1 mA cm-2 and still about 90.3% initial capacity retention even at the high current density of 50 mA cm-2. Moreover, an all-solid-state flexible symmetric supercapacitor device has been successfully assembled. The optimized device delivers superior electrochemical performance with an outstanding energy density of 92.4 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 207.2 W kg-1. Such hierarchical nanostructure composed by well-aligned uniform Ni0.54Co0.46O2 nanosheet arrays grown on bio-mass carbon fiber cloth might hold great promise as battery-type electrode material for high-performance supercapacitor.

  6. First-principles study of structural & electronic properties of pyramidal silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jariwala, Pinank; Thakor, P. B. [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India); Singh, Deobrat; Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yasonvane@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007 (India); Gupta, Sanjeev K. [Department of Physics, St. Xavier’s College, Ahmedabad 38 0009 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We have investigated the stable structural and electronic properties of Silicon (Si) nanowires having different cross-sections with 5-7 Si atoms per unit cell. These properties of the studied Si nanowires were significantly changed from those of diamond bulk Si structure. The binding energy increases as increasing atoms number per unit cell in different SiNWs structures. All the nanowires structures are behave like metallic rather than semiconductor in bulk systems. In general, the number of conduction channels increases when the nanowire becomes thicker. The density of charge revealed delocalized metallic bonding for all studied Si nanowires.

  7. Robust operation and performance of integrated carbon nanotubes atomic force microscopy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, G; Clark, I T; Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a complete characterization of carbon nanotubes-atomic force microscopy (CNT-AFM) probes to evaluate the cantilever operation and advanced properties originating from the CNTs. The fabrication consists of silicon probes tip-functionalized with multiwalled CNTs by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A dedicated methodology has been defined to evaluate the effect of CNT integration into the Si cantilevers. The presence of the CNTs provides enhanced capability for sensing and durability, as demonstrated using dynamic and static modes, e.g. imaging, indentation and force/current characterization.

  8. Artificial atom and quantum terahertz response in carbon nanotube quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, K; Moriyama, S; Fuse, T; Kawano, Y; Toyokawa, S; Yamaguchi, T

    2008-01-01

    Artificial atom behaviours have been observed in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) quantum dots (QDs). Two-electron shell structures and the Zeeman splitting of single-particle states were revealed in single-electron transport measurements in low temperatures. To demonstrate that the charging energy of the dot lies in a terahertz (THz) range, the THz photon-assisted tunnelling was tested, and was really observed as a satellite Coulomb peak. Some satellite peaks moved as a frequency was changed, but other peaks did not move. We give possible models to explain the existence of two different satellite peaks.

  9. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  10. Pore-Width-Dependent Preferential Interaction of sp2 Carbon Atoms in Cyclohexene with Graphitic Slit Pores by GCMC Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Kojima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of cyclohexene with two sp2 and four sp3 carbon atoms in graphitic slit pores was studied by performing grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The molecular arrangement of the cyclohexene on the graphitic carbon wall depends on the pore width. The distribution peak of the sp2 carbon is closer to the pore wall than that of the sp3 carbon except for the pore width of 0.7 nm, even though the Lennard-Jones size of the sp2 carbon is larger than that of the sp3 carbon. Thus, the difference in the interactions of the sp2 and sp3 carbon atoms of cyclohexene with the carbon pore walls is clearly observed in this study. The preferential interaction of sp2 carbon gives rise to a slight tilting of the cyclohexene molecule against the graphitic wall. This is suggestive of a π-π interaction between the sp2 carbon in the cyclohexene molecule and graphitic carbon.

  11. Bending and tensile deformation of metallic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, Matthew T; Leach, Austin M; Gall, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Using molecular statics simulations and the embedded atom method, a technique for bending silver nanowires and calculating Young's modulus via continuum mechanics has been developed. The measured Young's modulus values extracted from bending simulations were compared with modulus values calculated from uniaxial tension simulations for a range of nanowire sizes, orientations and geometries. Depending on axial orientation, the nanowires exhibit stiffening or softening under tension and bending as size decreases. Bending simulations typically result in a greater variation of Young's modulus values with nanowire size compared with tensile deformation, which indicates a loading-method-dependent size effect on elastic properties at sub-5 nm wire diameters. Since the axial stress is maximized at the lateral surfaces in bending, the loading-method-dependent size effect is postulated to be primarily a result of differences in nanowire surface and core elastic modulus. The divergence of Young's modulus from the bulk modulus in these simulations occurs at sizes below the range in which experiments have demonstrated a size scale effect on elastic properties of metallic nanowires. This difference indicates that other factors beyond native metallic surface properties play a role in experimentally observed nanowire elastic modulus size effects

  12. Cluster protein structures using recurrence quantification analysis on coordinates of alpha-carbon atoms of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu; Yu Zuguo; Anh, Vo

    2007-01-01

    The 3-dimensional coordinates of alpha-carbon atoms of proteins are used to distinguish the protein structural classes based on recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). We consider two independent variables from RQA of coordinates of alpha-carbon atoms, %determ1 and %determ2, which were defined by Webber et al. [C.L. Webber Jr., A. Giuliani, J.P. Zbilut, A. Colosimo, Proteins Struct. Funct. Genet. 44 (2001) 292]. The variable %determ2 is used to define two new variables, %determ2 1 and %determ2 2 . Then three variables %determ1, %determ2 1 and %determ2 2 are used to construct a 3-dimensional variable space. Each protein is represented by a point in this variable space. The points corresponding to proteins from the α, β, α+β and α/β structural classes position into different areas in this variable space. In order to give a quantitative assessment of our clustering on the selected proteins, Fisher's discriminant algorithm is used. Numerical results indicate that the discriminant accuracies are very high and satisfactory

  13. Competition of elastic and adhesive properties of carbon nanotubes anchored to atomic force microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Charlotte; Marsaudon, Sophie; Boisgard, Rodolphe; Aime, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we address the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes anchored to atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips in a detailed analysis of experimental results and exhaustive description of a simple model. We show that volume elastic and surface adhesive forces both contribute to the dynamical AFM experimental signals. Their respective weights depend on the nanotube properties and on an experimental parameter: the oscillation amplitude. To quantify the elastic and adhesive contributions, a simple analytical model is used. It enables analytical expressions of the resonance frequency shift and dissipation that can be measured in the atomic force microscopy dynamical frequency modulation mode. It includes the nanotube adhesive contribution to the frequency shift. Experimental data for single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes compare well to the model predictions for different oscillation amplitudes. Three parameters can be extracted: the distance necessary to unstick the nanotube from the surface and two spring constants corresponding to tube compression and to the elastic force required to overcome the adhesion force

  14. Study of absorption spectra for alkali and alkaline earth metal salts in flameless atomic absorption spectrometry using a carbon tube atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Seiji; Kakiyama, Hitoo

    1975-01-01

    Absorption spectra of various salts such as alkali metal salts, alkaline earth dichlorides, and ammonium halides were investigated and absorptions of some molecular species produced in the carbon tube were identified. The aqueous solution (20 μl) containing 1.0 mg/ml of each salt was placed in the carbon tube atomizer and heated in a similar manner to usual flameless atomic absorption method. D 2 -lamp was used as a continuous light source and argon gas was employed as an inert sheath gas. The spectra were obtained over the range of wavelength 200 to 350 nm. When alkali halides were feeded, the absorption spectra agreed with those of alkali halide vapors. Therefore, in such cases vapors of the alkali halides were probably produced by the sublimation or vaporization in the atomizer. The spectra of alkali perchlorates were considered to be those of alkali chlorides produced by the pyrolysis of the perchlorates in the atomizer. The absorptions of alkaline earth chlorides below 250 nm were probably due to their gaseous states. Sulfur dioxide was found to be produced by the pyrolysis of alkali sulfates, bisulfates and sulfites in the atomizer, Alkali phosphates and pyrophosphates gave almost identical spectra below 300 nm. Gamma band spectrum of nitrogen monoxide was observed from 200 to 240 nm during ashing at bout 330 0 C for alkali nitrates and nitrites. Ammonia vapor was produced from ammonium halides during drying at about 170 0 C. Although the absorptions of alkali carbonates and hydroxides were almost undetectable, the same spectra as those of alkali halides were observed by the addition of ammonium halides to the solutions of alkali compounds. This shows that alkali halides are produced in the atomizer by the addition of halide ions. (auth.)

  15. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alvarez Mendez, J.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes - due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities - have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  16. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero Latorre, C.; Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. ► Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. ► Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes – due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities – have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  17. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-04-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1-cyclohexyl-pyrrolidone (CHP) of the two components. The FePc/SWNT nanowires have a higher Fermi level compared to pure FePc (d-band center, DFT. =. -0.69. eV versus -0.87. eV, respectively). Consequently, an efficient channel for transferring electron to the FePc surface is readily created, facilitating the interaction between FePc and oxygen, so enhancing the ORR kinetics. This heterojunction-determined activity in ORR illustrates a new stratagem to preparing non-noble ORR electrocatalysts of significant importance in constructing real-world fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Microspheres for the Growth of Silicon Nanowires via Vapor-Liquid-Solid Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Gómez-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires have been synthesized by a simple process using a suitable support containing silica and carbon microspheres. Nanowires were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition via a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism with only the substrate as silicon source. The curved surface of the microsized spheres allows arranging the gold catalyst as nanoparticles with appropriate dimensions to catalyze the growth of nanowires. The resulting material is composed of the microspheres with the silicon nanowires attached on their surface.

  19. Ultrasensitive NO2 gas sensors using hybrid heterojunctions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and on-chip grown SnO2 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyet, Quan Thi Minh; Van Duy, Nguyen; Manh Hung, Chu; Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Van Hieu, Nguyen

    2018-04-01

    Hybrid heterojunction devices are designed for ultrahigh response to NO2 toxic gas. The devices were constructed by assembling multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a microelectrode chip bridged bare Pt-electrode and a Pt-electrode with pre-grown SnO2 nanowires (NWs). All heterojunction devices were realized using different types of MWCNTs, which exhibit ultrahigh response to sub-ppm NO2 gas at 50 °C operated in the reverse bias mode. The response to 1 ppm NO2 gas reaches 11300, which is about 100 times higher than that of a back-to-back heterojunction device fabricated from SnO2 NWs and MWCNTs. In addition, the present device exhibits an ultralow detection limit of about 0.68 ppt. The modulation of trap-assisted tunneling current under reverse bias is the main gas-sensing mechanism. This principle device presents a concept for developing gas sensors made of a hybrid between semiconductor metal oxide NWs and CNTs.

  20. A facile one-step approach for the fabrication of polypyrrole nanowire/carbon fiber hybrid electrodes for flexible high performance solid-state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sanqing; Han, Yichuan; Lyu, Siwei; Lin, Wenzhen; Chen, Peishan; Fang, Shaoli

    2017-10-01

    Wearable electronics are in high demand, requiring that all the components are flexible. Here we report a facile approach for the fabrication of flexible polypyrrole nanowire (NPPy)/carbon fiber (CF) hybrid electrodes with high electrochemical activity using a low-cost, one-step electrodeposition method. The structure of the NPPy/CF electrodes can be easily controlled by the applied electrical potential and electrodeposition time. Our NPPy/CF-based electrodes showed high flexibility, conductivity, and stability, making them ideal for flexible all-solid-state fiber supercapacitors. The resulting NPPy/CF-based supercapacitors provided a high specific capacitance of 148.4 F g-1 at 0.128 A g-1, which is much higher than for supercapacitors based on polypyrrole film/CF (38.3 F g-1) and pure CF (0.6 F g-1) under the same conditions. The NPPy/CF-based supercapacitors also showed high bending and cycling stability, retaining 84% of the initial capacitance after 500 bending cycles, and 91% of the initial capacitance after 5000 charge/discharge cycles.

  1. A facile one-step approach for the fabrication of polypyrrole nanowire/carbon fiber hybrid electrodes for flexible high performance solid-state supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sanqing; Han, Yichuan; Lyu, Siwei; Lin, Wenzhen; Chen, Peishan; Fang, Shaoli

    2017-10-27

    Wearable electronics are in high demand, requiring that all the components are flexible. Here we report a facile approach for the fabrication of flexible polypyrrole nanowire (NPPy)/carbon fiber (CF) hybrid electrodes with high electrochemical activity using a low-cost, one-step electrodeposition method. The structure of the NPPy/CF electrodes can be easily controlled by the applied electrical potential and electrodeposition time. Our NPPy/CF-based electrodes showed high flexibility, conductivity, and stability, making them ideal for flexible all-solid-state fiber supercapacitors. The resulting NPPy/CF-based supercapacitors provided a high specific capacitance of 148.4 F g -1 at 0.128 A g -1 , which is much higher than for supercapacitors based on polypyrrole film/CF (38.3 F g -1 ) and pure CF (0.6 F g -1 ) under the same conditions. The NPPy/CF-based supercapacitors also showed high bending and cycling stability, retaining 84% of the initial capacitance after 500 bending cycles, and 91% of the initial capacitance after 5000 charge/discharge cycles.

  2. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  3. Thermogravimetric analysis of atomized ferromagnetic composites with multiwalled carbon nanotubes: an unusual behavior of nickel in nanospace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Gupta, S; Santhanam, K S V

    2014-03-01

    A spin polarization of atomized ferromagnetic atoms like cobalt or nickel in nano space results in the modification of the electron configuration in the ferromagnetic atom that changes its oxidative property. We have prepared cobalt and nickel composites with multiwalled carbon nanotubes using atomized cobalt and nickel particles, for investigating their thermal oxidative behavior by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The composites showed the absence of a thermal oxidation in the temperature range of ambient to the break down temperature of multiwalled carbon nanotubes at 800 degrees C. At this temperature while Co composite forms cobalt oxide, the Ni composite becomes volatile that results in the divergent behavior of the two ferromagnetic compounds with a weight gain observed in TGA for Co and a loss for Ni. The mechanisms operating in the two cases are discussed in this work.

  4. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang; Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the functionalization of carbon metal-containing nanotubes with phosphorus atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, I.N.; Terebova, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Carbon metal-containing nanotubes (Me–Cu, Ni, Fe) were functionalized with chemical groups containing different concentrations of phosphorous. •The C1s and Me3s spectra were measured by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. •The values of the atomic magnetic moment of the carbon metal-containing nanotubes were determined. -- Abstract: In the present paper, carbon metal-containing (Me: Cu, Ni, Fe) nanotubes functionalized with phosphorus atoms (ammonium polyphosphate) were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on an X-ray electron magnetic spectrometer. It is found that the functionalization leads to the change of the metal atomic magnetic moment, i.e. the value of the atomic magnetic moment in the functionalized carbon metal-containing (Cu, Ni, Fe) nanotubes increases and is higher than that in pristine nanotubes. It is shown that the covalent bond of Me and P atoms is formed. This leads to an increase in the activity of the nanostructure surface which is necessary for the modification of materials

  6. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction .This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  7. Optical trapping of cold neutral atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, Do Thi; Viet, Nguyen Ai; Nga, Dao Thi Thuy; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a new schema of trapping cold atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube. The two light fields circularly polarized sending through a carbon nanotube generates an evanescent wave around this nanotube. By evanescent effect, the wave decays away from the nanotube producing a set of trapping minima of the total potential in the transverse plane as a ring around the nanotube. This schema allows capture of atoms to a cylindrical shell around the nanotube. We consider some possible boundary conditions leading to the non-trivial bound state solution. Our result will be compared to some recent trapping models and our previous trapping models.

  8. Cyanide Ligand Assembly by Carbon Atom Transfer to an Iron Nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jorge L.; Pink, Maren

    2017-01-01

    The new iron(IV) nitride complex PhB( i Pr 2 Im) 3 Fe≡N reacts with two equivalents of bis(diisopropylamino)cyclopropenylidene (BAC) to provide PhB( i Pr 2 Im) 3 Fe(CN)(N 2 )(BAC). This unusual example of a four-electron reaction involves carbon atom transfer from BAC to create a cyanide ligand along with the alkyne i Pr 2 N-C≡C-N i Pr 2 . The iron complex is in equilibrium with an N 2 - free species. Further reaction with CO leads to formation of a CO analogue, which can be independently prepared using NaCN as the cyanide source, while reaction with B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 provides the cyanoborane derivative.

  9. Electrical tomography using atomic force microscopy and its application towards carbon nanotube-based interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, A; Hantschel, T; Dathe, A; Eyben, P; Vandervorst, W; Ke, X

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and integration of low-resistance carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for interconnects in future integrated circuits requires characterization techniques providing structural and electrical information at the nanometer scale. In this paper we present a slice-and-view approach based on electrical atomic force microscopy. Material removal achieved by successive scanning using doped ultra-sharp full-diamond probes, manufactured in-house, enables us to acquire two-dimensional (2D) resistance maps originating from different depths (equivalently different CNT lengths) on CNT-based interconnects. Stacking and interpolating these 2D resistance maps results in a three-dimensional (3D) representation (tomogram). This allows insight from a structural (e.g. size, density, distribution, straightness) and electrical point of view simultaneously. By extracting the resistance evolution over the length of an individual CNT we derive quantitative information about the resistivity and the contact resistance between the CNT and bottom electrode. (paper)

  10. Atomic force microscopy of silica nanoparticles and carbon nanohorns in macrophages and red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetard, L. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Passian, A., E-mail: passianan@ornl.gov [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Farahi, R.H. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Thundat, T. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The emerging interest in understanding the interactions of nanomaterial with biological systems necessitates imaging tools that capture the spatial and temporal distributions and attributes of the resulting nano-bio amalgam. Studies targeting organ specific response and/or nanoparticle-specific system toxicity would be profoundly benefited from tools that would allow imaging and tracking of in-vivo or in-vitro processes and particle-fate studies. Recently we demonstrated that mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) can provide subsurface nanoscale information on the mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale. However, the underlying mechanism of this imaging methodology is currently subject to theoretical and experimental investigation. In this paper we present further analysis by investigating tip-sample excitation forces associated with nanomechanical image formation. Images and force curves acquired under various operational frequencies and amplitudes are presented. We examine samples of mouse cells, where buried distributions of single-walled carbon nanohorns and silica nanoparticles are visualized.

  11. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Kuanhong [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China)], E-mail: khxue@njnu.edu.cn; Liu Jiamei [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China); Wei Ribing [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China); Chen Shaopeng [Chemistry Department, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Bio-medical Function Materials, 122 NingHai Road, Nanjing, JiangSu 210097 (China)

    2006-09-11

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials E {sub pa} and E {sub pc} shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k {sup 0} increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process.

  12. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kuan-Hong; Liu, Jia-Mei; Wei, Ri-Bing; Chen, Shao-Peng

    2006-09-01

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H 2SO 4, at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials Epa and Epc shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k0 increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process.

  13. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Kuanhong; Liu Jiamei; Wei Ribing; Chen Shaopeng

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H 2 SO 4 , at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials E pa and E pc shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k 0 increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process

  14. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-01-13

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi2Se3 material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi2Se5 nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi 2Se5 nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [1120] direction with a rectangular cross-section and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with ∼ 1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitais to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Quantifying the Hierarchical Order in Self-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Atomic to Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshot, Eric R; Zwissler, Darwin W; Bui, Ngoc; Kuykendall, Tevye R; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Wu, Kuang Jen J; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2017-06-27

    Fundamental understanding of structure-property relationships in hierarchically organized nanostructures is crucial for the development of new functionality, yet quantifying structure across multiple length scales is challenging. In this work, we used nondestructive X-ray scattering to quantitatively map the multiscale structure of hierarchically self-organized carbon nanotube (CNT) "forests" across 4 orders of magnitude in length scale, from 2.0 Å to 1.5 μm. Fully resolved structural features include the graphitic honeycomb lattice and interlayer walls (atomic), CNT diameter (nano), as well as the greater CNT ensemble (meso) and large corrugations (micro). Correlating orientational order across hierarchical levels revealed a cascading decrease as we probed finer structural feature sizes with enhanced sensitivity to small-scale disorder. Furthermore, we established qualitative relationships for single-, few-, and multiwall CNT forest characteristics, showing that multiscale orientational order is directly correlated with number density spanning 10 9 -10 12 cm -2 , yet order is inversely proportional to CNT diameter, number of walls, and atomic defects. Lastly, we captured and quantified ultralow-q meridional scattering features and built a phenomenological model of the large-scale CNT forest morphology, which predicted and confirmed that these features arise due to microscale corrugations along the vertical forest direction. Providing detailed structural information at multiple length scales is important for design and synthesis of CNT materials as well as other hierarchically organized nanostructures.

  16. Aligned carbon nanotube array functionalization for enhanced atomic layer deposition of platinum electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dameron, Arrelaine A., E-mail: arrelaine.dameron@nrel.gov [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Pylypenko, Svitlana; Bult, Justin B.; Neyerlin, K.C.; Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Bochert, Christopher; Leong, G. Jeremy; Frisco, Sarah L.; Simpson, Lin; Dinh, Huyen N.; Pivovar, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

  17. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  18. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  19. Vertical nanowire architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfl-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide ri...

  20. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  1. Experimental realization of suspended atomic chains composed of different atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettini, Jefferson; Ugarte, Daniel; Sato, Fernando; Galvao, Douglas Soares; Coura, Pablo Zimmerman; Dantas, Socrates de Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    We report high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular dynamics results of the first experimental test of suspended atomic chains composed of different atomic species formed from spontaneous stretching of metallic nanowires. (author)

  2. Ab initio vibrations in nonequilibrium nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Engelund, Mads; Markussen, T

    2010-01-01

    We review recent results on electronic and thermal transport in two different quasi one-dimensional systems: Silicon nanowires (SiNW) and atomic gold chains. For SiNW's we compute the ballistic electronic and thermal transport properties on equal footing, allowing us to make quantitative predicti...

  3. Isotherm and kinetics study of malachite green adsorption onto copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon: artificial neural network modeling and genetic algorithm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Shojaeipour, E; Ghaedi, A M; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-05-05

    In this study, copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon (Cu-NWs-AC) was used as novel efficient adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG) from aqueous solution. This new material was synthesized through simple protocol and its surface properties such as surface area, pore volume and functional groups were characterized with different techniques such XRD, BET and FESEM analysis. The relation between removal percentages with variables such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage (0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02 and 0.1g), contact time (1-40min) and initial MG concentration (5, 10, 20, 70 and 100mg/L) was investigated and optimized. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was utilized to predict the malachite green dye removal (%) by Cu-NWs-AC following conduction of 248 experiments. When the training of the ANN was performed, the parameters of ANN model were as follows: linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at the hidden layer with 11 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0017 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9658 were found for prediction and modeling of dye removal using testing data set. A good agreement between experimental data and predicted data using the ANN model was obtained. Fitting the experimental data on previously optimized condition confirm the suitability of Langmuir isotherm models for their explanation with maximum adsorption capacity of 434.8mg/g at 25°C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent mass and initial MG concentration show that the MG maximum removal percentage was achieved within 20min. The adsorption of MG follows the pseudo-second-order with a combination of intraparticle diffusion model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The atomic scale structure of CXV carbon: wide-angle x-ray scattering and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, J C; Honkimaki, V; Burian, A

    2013-11-13

    The disordered structure of commercially available CXV activated carbon produced from finely powdered wood-based carbon has been studied using the wide-angle x-ray scattering technique, molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations. The x-ray scattering data has been converted to the real space representation in the form of the pair correlation function via the Fourier transform. Geometry optimizations using classical molecular dynamics based on the reactive empirical bond order potential and density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31g* level have been performed to generate nanoscale models of CXV carbon consistent with the experimental data. The final model of the structure comprises four chain-like and buckled graphitic layers containing a small percentage of four-fold coordinated atoms (sp(3) defects) in each layer. The presence of non-hexagonal rings in the atomic arrangement has been also considered.

  5. Analysis of mechanism of carbon removal from GaAs(1 0 0) surface by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkiewicz, P.; Winkler, A.; Krzywiecki, M.; Chasse, Th.; Szuber, J.

    2008-01-01

    Etching of carbon contaminations from the GaAs(1 0 0) surface by irradiating with atomic hydrogen, which is one of the key reactions to promote high-quality thin films growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has been investigated by mass spectrometry (MS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is shown that during the cleaning process at room temperature a total reduction of the Auger carbon signal, accompanied by desorption of methane as major reaction product, can be observed. The reaction pathways as well as the processes responsible for the observed carbon removal are discussed in detail to give a support for etching and growth quality enhancement not only in thin films epitaxy but in all atomic hydrogen promoted gas-phase III-V semiconductor processes

  6. From dopyballs to nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalley, R E [Rice Quantum Inst. and Depts. of Chemistry and Physics, Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-04-19

    Consideration of the factors involved in the production of fullerene nanotubes in carbon arcs leads to the notion that a high electric field may be the critical factor that causes the tubes to grow. This thought then leads to a suggestion that it may be possible to grow continuous fullerene fibers many centimeters in length by an electric-field-and-laser induced pyrolysis of gas phase hydrocarbons of fullerenes on the tip of the growing fiber as it extends out from its place of attachment on a high voltage needle. Use of metal- or boron-doped fullerenes (dopyballs) in such an apparatus may lead to the production of doped fullerene fiber nanowires of high strength and conductivity. (orig.)

  7. Tribological improvements of carbon-carbon composites by infiltration of atomic layer deposited lubricious nanostructured ceramic oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Hamidreza

    A number of investigators have reported enhancement in oxidation and wear resistant of carbon-carbon composites (CCC) in the presence of protective coating layers. However, application of a surface and subsurface coating system that can preserve its oxidation and wear resistance along with maintaining lubricity at high temperature remains unsolved. To this end, thermodynamically stable protective oxides (ZnO/Al2O3/ZrO2) have been deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infiltrate porous CCC and graphite foams in order to improve the thermal stability and wear resistance in low and high speed sliding contacts. Characterization of microstructural evolution was achieved by using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping in scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with focused ion beam (FIB), x-ray tomography, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Evaluation of the tribological properties of CCC coated with abovementioned ALD thin films were performed by employing low speed pure sliding tribometer and a high speed/frequency reciprocating rig to simulate the fretting wear behavior at ambient temperature and elevated temperatures of 400°C. It was determined with x-ray tomography imaging and EDS mapping that ALD ZnO/Al2O3/ZrO2 nanolaminates and baseline ZrO2 coatings exhibited excellent conformality and pore-filling capabilities down to ˜100 microm and 1.5 mm in the porous CCC and graphite foam, respectively, which were dependent on the exposure time of the ALD precursors. XRD and HRTEM determined the crystalline phases of {0002} textured ZnO (wurtzite), amorphous Al2O3, and {101}-tetragonal ZrO2. Significant improvements up to ˜65% in the sliding and fretting wear factors were determined for the nanolaminates in comparison to the uncoated CCC. A tribochemical sliding-induced mechanically mixed layer (MML) was found to be responsible for these improvements

  8. Adsorption Energies of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Atoms on the Low-temperature Amorphous Water Ice: A Systematic Estimation from Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Nakatani, Naoki; Furuya, Kenji; Hama, Tetsuya

    2018-03-01

    We propose a new simple computational model to estimate the adsorption energies of atoms and molecules to low-temperature amorphous water ice, and we present the adsorption energies of carbon (3 P), nitrogen (4 S), and oxygen (3 P) atoms based on quantum chemistry calculations. The adsorption energies were estimated to be 14,100 ± 420 K for carbon, 400 ± 30 K for nitrogen, and 1440 ± 160 K for oxygen. The adsorption energy of oxygen is consistent with experimentally reported values. We found that the binding of a nitrogen atom is purely physisorption, while that of a carbon atom is chemisorption, in which a chemical bond to an O atom of a water molecule is formed. That of an oxygen atom has a dual character, with both physisorption and chemisorption. The chemisorption of atomic carbon also implies the possibility of further chemical reactions to produce molecules bearing a C–O bond, though this may hinder the formation of methane on water ice via sequential hydrogenation of carbon atoms. These properties would have a large impact on the chemical evolution of carbon species in interstellar environments. We also investigated the effects of newly calculated adsorption energies on the chemical compositions of cold dense molecular clouds with the aid of gas-ice astrochemical simulations. We found that abundances of major nitrogen-bearing molecules, such as N2 and NH3, are significantly altered by applying the calculated adsorption energy, because nitrogen atoms can thermally diffuse on surfaces, even at 10 K.

  9. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Jasveer, E-mail: kaurjasveer89@gmail.com; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder [Department of Physics, Punjabi University Patiala, 147002, Punjab (India); Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder, E-mail: raminder-k-saini@yahoo.com [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University Patiala, 147002, Punjab (India)

    2016-05-06

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  10. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Jasveer; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  11. Fabrication and morphology of uniaxially aligned perylenediimide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Shinjiro; Tanikatsu, Makoto; Itaya, Akira; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2017-06-01

    Uniaxial alignment of crystalline nanowires consisting of N,N‧-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) was achieved on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) layers prepared by friction transfer method on a glass substrate. The nanowires were formed by spin-coating a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution of PTCDI-C8 on the PTFE layers and were further grown under TFA vapor atmosphere. The morphology of the PTCDI-C8 nanowires were characterized using atomic force microscope (AFM) and fluorescence optical microscope with changing the dye concentration in the spin coating solution, annealing time in the TFA vapor, and substrate materials. The nanowires prepared on the PTFE layer on a silica-coated silicon or a mica substrate did not grow so well as those on the glass substrate. This result suggests that the surface roughness would affect the PTFE layer and the growth of the PTCDI nanowires.

  12. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-02

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  13. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods

  14. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalska-Szostko, B., E-mail: kalska@uwb.edu.pl; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods.

  15. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu; Yassitepe, Emre; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Janmohamed, Alyf; Lan, Xinzheng; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  16. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...... cells. Resonance effects between the light and nanowire causes an inherent concentration of the sunlight into the nanowires, and means that a sparse array of nanowires (less than 5% of the area) can absorb all the incoming light. The resonance effects, as well as a graded index of refraction, also traps...... the light. The concentration and light trapping means that single junction nanowire solar cells have a higher theoretical maximum efficiency than equivalent planar solar cells. We have demonstrated the built-in light concentration of nanowires, by growing, contacting and characterizing a solar cell...

  17. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  18. Study of adhesion of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes to a substrate by atomic-force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, O. A.; Blinov, Yu. F.; Il'ina, M. V.; Il'in, O. I.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2016-02-01

    The adhesion to a substrate of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA CNT) produced by plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally studied by atomic-force microscopy in the current spectroscopy mode. The longitudinal deformation of VA CNT by applying an external electric field has been simulated. Based on the results, a technique of determining VA CNT adhesion to a substrate has been developed that is used to measure the adhesion strength of connecting VA CNT to a substrate. The adhesion to a substrate of VA CNT 70-120 nm in diameter varies from 0.55 to 1.19 mJ/m2, and the adhesion force from 92.5 to 226.1 nN. When applying a mechanical load, the adhesion strength of the connecting VA CNT to a substrate is 714.1 ± 138.4 MPa, and the corresponding detachment force increases from 1.93 to 10.33 μN with an increase in the VA CNT diameter. As an external electric field is applied, the adhesion strength is almost doubled and is 1.43 ± 0.29 GPa, and the corresponding detachment force is changed from 3.83 to 20.02 μN. The results can be used in the design of technological processes of formation of emission structures, VA CNT-based elements for vacuum microelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering, and also the methods of probe nanodiagnostics of VA CNT.

  19. Controlled manipulation of flexible carbon nanotubes through shape-dependent pushing by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Cheol; Qian, Xiaoping

    2013-09-17

    A systematic approach to manipulating flexible carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed on the basis of atomic force microscope (AFM) based pushing. Pushing CNTs enables efficient transport and precise location of individual CNTs. A key issue for pushing CNTs is preventing defective distortion in repetitive bending and unbending deformation. The approach presented here controls lateral movement of an AFM tip to bend CNTs without permanent distortion. The approach investigates possible defects caused by tensile strain of the outer tube under uniform bending and radial distortion by kinking. Using the continuum beam model and experimental bending tests, dependency of maximum bending strain on the length of bent CNTs and radial distortion on bending angles at a bent point have been demonstrated. Individual CNTs are manipulated by limiting the length of bent CNTs and the bending angle. In our approach, multiwalled CNTs with 5-15 nm diameter subjected to bending deformation produce no outer tube breakage under uniform bending and reversible radial deformation with bending angles less than 110°. The lateral tip movement is determined by a simple geometric model that relies on the shape of multiwalled CNTs. The model effectively controls deforming CNT length and bending angle for given CNT shape. Experimental results demonstrate successful manipulation of randomly dispersed CNTs without visual defects. This approach to pushing can be extended to develop a wide range of CNT based nanodevice applications.

  20. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  1. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO 2 . Finally, author's comments for CO 2 electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  2. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  3. Hydrogen atom injection into carbon surfaces by comparison between Monte-Carlo, molecular dynamics and ab-initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Kenmotsu, T.; Kikuhara, Y.; Inai, K.; Ohya, K.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: To understand the plasma-wall interaction on divertor plates, we investigate the interaction of hydrogen atoms and carbon materials used in the high heat flux components by the use of the following simulations. Monte-Carlo (MC) method based on binary collision approximation can calculate the sputtering process of hydrogen atoms on the carbon material quickly. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) method employs multi-body potential models and can treat realistic structures of crystal and molecule. The ab-initio method can calculate electron energy in quantum mechanics, which is regarded as realistic potential for atoms. In the present paper, the interaction of the hydrogen and the carbon material is investigated using the multi-scale (MC, MD and ab-initio) methods. The bombardment of hydrogen atoms onto the carbon material is simulated by the ACAT-code of the MC method, which cannot represent the structure of crystal, and the MD method using modified reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential, which treats single crystal graphite and amorphous carbon. Consequently, we clarify that the sputtering yield and the reflection rate calculated by the ACAT-code agree with those on the amorphous carbon calculated by the MD. Moreover, there are many kinds of REBO potential for the MD. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface are calculated by the MD simulations using the two kinds of potential model. For the incident energy of less than 1 eV, the MD simulation using the modified REBO potential, which is based on Brenner's REBO potential in 2002, shows that reflection is dominant, while the most popular Brenner's REBO potential in 1990 shows that adsorption is dominant. This reflection of the low energy injection is caused by a small potential barrier for the hydrogen atom in the modified REBO potential. The small potential barrier is confirmed by the ab-initio calculations, which are hybrid DFT (B3LYP/cc-pVDZ), ab

  4. Carbon−Silicon Core−Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng; Yang, Yuan; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Cui, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel design of carbon-silicon core-shell nanowires for high power and long life lithium battery electrodes. Amorphous silicon was coated onto carbon nanofibers to form a core-shell structure and the resulted core-shell nanowires

  5. Electronic and magnetic properties of ultrathin rhodium nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Bao Lin; Ren-Yun; Sun Hou Qian; Chen Xiao Shuang; Zhao Ji Jun

    2003-01-01

    The structures of ultrathin rhodium nanowires are studied using empirical molecular dynamics simulations with a genetic algorithm. Helical multishell cylindrical and pentagonal packing structures are found. The electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires are calculated using an spd tight-binding Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The average magnetic moment and electronic density of states are obtained. Our results indicate that the electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires depend not only on the size of the wire but also on the atomic structure. In particular, centred pentagonal and hexagonal structures can be unusually ferromagnetic.

  6. Tunable electronic transport properties of silicon-fullerene-linked nanowires: Semiconductor, conducting wire, and tunnel diode

    OpenAIRE

    Nishio, Kengo; Ozaki, Taisuke; Morishita, Tetsuya; Mikami, Masuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We explore the possibility of controllable tuning of the electronic transport properties of silicon-fullerene-linked nanowires by encapsulating guest atoms into their cages. Our first-principles calculations demonstrate that the guest-free nanowires are semiconductors, and do not conduct electricity. The iodine or sodium doping improves the transport properties, and makes the nanowires metallic. In the junctions of I-doped and Na-doped NWs, the current travels through the boundary by quantum ...

  7. Size and temperature dependence of the tensile mechanical properties of zinc blende CdSe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Bing; Chen, Na; Xie, Yiqun; Ye, Xiang; Gu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    The effect of size and temperature on the tensile mechanical properties of zinc blende CdSe nanowires is investigated by all atoms molecular dynamic simulation. We found the ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus will decrease as the temperature and size of the nanowire increase. The size and temperature dependence are mainly attributed to surface effect and thermally elongation effect. High reversibility of tensile behavior will make zinc blende CdSe nanowires suitable for building efficient nanodevices.

  8. Nanowires and nanotubes of BN, GaN and Si3N4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepak, F.L.; Gundiah, G.; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.

    2002-01-01

    Simple methods of synthesizing nanotubes and nanowires of boron nitride, gallium nitride and silicon nitride have been investigated. The nanotubes and nanowires have been examined by electron microscopy and other techniques. In the case of BN, activated carbon or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was heated with boric acid in the presence of NH 3 . With activated carbon, BN nanowires constitute the primary products, but good yields of BN nanotubes are obtained with MWNTs. Aligned BN nanotubes are obtained when aligned MWNTs are employed as the starting material suggesting templating role of carbon nanotubes. Single crystal gallium nitride nanowires have been obtained by heating carbon nanotubes coated with gallium acetylacetonate in NH 3 vapor at 910 o C. Single walled carbon nanotubes were used as templated to reduce the diameter of the GaN nanowires. The growth direction of the GaN nanowires is nearly perpendicular to the [100] planes and the nanowires exhibit satisfactory photoluminescence spectra. Si 3 N 4 nanowires have been synthesized by heating multi-walled carbon nanotubes with silica gel at 1360 o C in an atmosphere of NH 3 . Si 3 N 4 nanotubes are found occasionally when aligned multi-walled nanotubes are employed as templates. (author)

  9. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO(sub 2) emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO(sub 2) capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO(sub 2) emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH)(sub 2) was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH)(sub 2) gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO(sub 2) mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO(sub 2) sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This report covers the third year progress of this grant, as well as providing an integrated overview of the progress in years 1-3, as we have been granted a one-year no-cost extension to wrap up a few studies and publications to optimize project impact

  10. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance, and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production o...

  11. Bond length and electric current oscillation of long linear carbon chains: Density functional theory, MpB model, and quantum spin transport studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeiras, R. Y.; Silva, E. Z. da

    2014-01-01

    Carbon linear atomic chains attached to graphene have experimentally been produced. Motivated by these results, we study the nature of the carbon bonds in these nanowires and how it affects their electrical properties. In the present study we investigate chains with different numbers of atoms and we observe that nanowires with odd number of atoms present a distinct behavior than the ones with even numbers. Using graphene nanoribbons as leads, we identify differences in the quantum transport of the chains with the consequence that even and odd numbered chains have low and high electrical conduction, respectively. We also noted a dependence of current with the wire size. We study this unexpected behavior using a combination of first principles calculations and simple models based on chemical bond theory. From our studies, the electrons of carbon nanowires present a quasi-free electron behavior and this explains qualitatively the high electrical conduction and the bond lengths with unexpected values for the case of odd nanowires. Our study also allows the understanding of the electric conduction dependence with the number of atoms and their parity in the chain. In the case of odd number chains a proposed π-bond (MpB) model describes unsaturated carbons that introduce a mobile π-bond that changes dramatically the structure and transport properties of these wires. Our results indicate that the nature of bonds plays the main role in the oscillation of quantum electrical conduction for chains with even and odd number of atoms and also that nanowires bonded to graphene nanoribbons behave as a quasi-free electron system, suggesting that this behavior is general and it could also remain if the chains are bonded to other materials

  12. Magnetic properties of a single iron atomic chain encapsulated in armchair carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, PB 63, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, PB 63, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Néel, CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes, 25 rue des Martyrs BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Magnetic properties of Fe atom chain wrapped in armchair carbon nanotubes have been studied. • Transition temperature of iron and carbon have been calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. • The multiples magnetic hysteresis have been found. - Abstract: The magnetic properties have been investigated of FeCu{sub x}C{sub 1−x} for a Fe atom chain wrapped in armchair (N,N) carbon nanotubes (N = 4,6,8,10,12) diluted by Cu{sup 2+} ions using Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal total magnetization and magnetic susceptibility are found. The reduced transition temperatures of iron and carbon have been calculated for different N and the exchange interactions. The total magnetization is obtained for different exchange interactions and crystal field. The Magnetic hysteresis cycles are obtained for different N, the reduced temperatures and exchange interactions. The multiple magnetic hysteresis is found. This system shows it can be used as magnetic nanostructure possessing potential current and future applications in permanent magnetism, magnetic recording and spintronics.

  13. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  14. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N; Komvopoulos, K

    2014-01-01

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures

  15. Ultrastrong Carbon Thin Films from Diamond to Graphene under Extreme Conditions: Probing Atomic Scale Interfacial Mechanisms to Achieve Ultralow Friction and Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-08

    tribological behavior of hard carbon materials during initial sliding contact, in order to understand what controls and enables the transition from high to...publication. Our goal is to characterize and understand the atomic-scale mechanisms governing the tribological behavior (friction and wear) of hard carbon...affecting the sliding behavior of these materials, including: rehybridization from sp3 to sp2-bonding of the C atoms20, formation of bonds across the

  16. High yield polyol synthesis of round- and sharp-end silver nanowires with high aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekahi, A.; Marashi, S.P.H., E-mail: pmarashi@aut.ac.ir; Fatmesari, D. Haghshenas

    2016-12-01

    Long silver nanowires (average length of 28 μm, average aspect ratio of 130) with uniform diameter along their length were produced by polyol synthesis of AgNO{sub 3} in ethylene glycol in the presence of PVP as preferential growth agent. Nanowires were produced with no addition of chloride salts such as NaCl or CuCl{sub 2} (or other additives such as Na{sub 2}S) which are usually used for lowering reduction rate of Ag ions by additional etchant of O{sub 2}/Cl{sup −}. Lower reduction rate was obtained by increasing the injection time of PVP and AgNO{sub 3} solutions, which was the significant factor in the formation of nanowires. Therefore, there was enough time for reduced Ag atoms to be deposited preferentially in the direction of PVP chains, resulting in high yield (the fraction of nanowires in the products) of nanowires (more than 95%) with high aspect ratio. The produced nanowires had both round- and sharp-ends with pentagonal cross section. Higher energy level of Ag atoms in borders of MTPs, which increases the dissolution rate of precipitated atoms, in addition to partial melting of MTPs at high synthesis temperatures, leads to the curving of the surfaces of exposed (111) crystalline planes in some MTPs and the formation of round-end silver nanowires. - Highlights: • Long silver nanowires with high aspect ratio of 130 were produced. • More than 95% nanowires were produced in products. • The produced nanowires had round- and sharp-ends with pentagonal cross section. • Additives were needed neither for high yield synthesis nor for round-end nanowires. • Melting and etching of MTPs in high energy borders resulted to round-end nanowires.

  17. Confined-interface-directed synthesis of Palladium single-atom catalysts on graphene/amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Sun, Hongyu; Zhang, Zheye

    2018-01-01

    The maximized atomic efficiency of supported catalysts is highly desired in heterogeneous catalysis. Therefore, the design and development of active, stable, and atomic metal-based catalysts remains a formidable challenge. To tackle these problems, it is necessary to investigate the interaction b...

  18. Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardy, Melissa Anne

    Se nanowires allowed their thermoelectric properties to be controllably tuned by increasing their carrier concentration or hole mobility. After optimal annealing, single PbSe nanowires exhibited a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 0.12 at 300 K. In addition, using a field-effect gated device, the Seebeck coefficient of single PbSe nanowires could be tuned from 64 to 193 muV˙K-1. This direct electrical field control of the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient suggests a powerful strategy for optimizing ZT in thermoelectric devices and these results represent the first demonstration of field-effect modulation of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a single semiconductor nanowire. This novel strategy for thermoelectric property modulation could prove especially important in optimizing the thermoelectric properties of semiconductors where reproducible doping is difficult to achieve. Recent theoretical work has shown large enhancements in ZT for single-crystal nanowires containing nanoscale interfaces along their lengths. M2O3(ZnO) n ( M = In, Ga, Fe) superlattice nanowires were synthesized via a novel solid-state diffusion approach to investigate this possible enhancement. Using atomic resolution Z-contrast STEM imaging a detailed structural analysis was performed on In2-xGaxO3(ZnO) n nanowires, leading to the discovery that octahedral inclusions within the superlattice structure are likely generated through a defect-assisted process. Single-nanowire thermal and electrical measurements on In2-x GaxO3(ZnO)n reveal a simultaneous improvement in all contributing factors to the thermoelectric figure of merit, giving an order of magnitude enhancement over similar bulk materials at room temperature. This is the first report of enhancement of all three thermoelectric parameters (Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal resistivity) for a nanowire system. Photoelectrochemical water splitting is another exciting renewable energy application that can

  19. Fe Isolated Single Atoms on S, N Codoped Carbon by Copolymer Pyrolysis Strategy for Highly Efficient Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiheng; Chen, Wenxing; Xiao, Hai; Gong, Yue; Li, Zhi; Zheng, Lirong; Zheng, Xusheng; Yan, Wensheng; Cheong, Weng-Chon; Shen, Rongan; Fu, Ninghua; Gu, Lin; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dingsheng; Peng, Qing; Li, Jun; Li, Yadong

    2018-06-01

    Heteroatom-doped Fe-NC catalyst has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to replace noble metal-based catalysts for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, delicate controls over their structure parameters to optimize the catalytic efficiency and molecular-level understandings of the catalytic mechanism are still challenging. Herein, a novel pyrrole-thiophene copolymer pyrolysis strategy to synthesize Fe-isolated single atoms on sulfur and nitrogen-codoped carbon (Fe-ISA/SNC) with controllable S, N doping is rationally designed. The catalytic efficiency of Fe-ISA/SNC shows a volcano-type curve with the increase of sulfur doping. The optimized Fe-ISA/SNC exhibits a half-wave potential of 0.896 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), which is more positive than those of Fe-isolated single atoms on nitrogen codoped carbon (Fe-ISA/NC, 0.839 V), commercial Pt/C (0.841 V), and most reported nonprecious metal catalysts. Fe-ISA/SNC is methanol tolerable and shows negligible activity decay in alkaline condition during 15 000 voltage cycles. X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal that the incorporated sulfur engineers the charges on N atoms surrounding the Fe reactive center. The enriched charge facilitates the rate-limiting reductive release of OH* and therefore improved the overall ORR efficiency. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Rational Design of Single Molybdenum Atoms Anchored on N-Doped Carbon for Effective Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxing; Pei, Jiajing; He, Chun-Ting; Wan, Jiawei; Ren, Hanlin; Zhu, Youqi; Wang, Yu; Dong, Juncai; Tian, Shubo; Cheong, Weng-Chon; Lu, Siqi; Zheng, Lirong; Zheng, Xusheng; Yan, Wensheng; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Chen, Chen; Peng, Qing; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2017-12-11

    The highly efficient electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) provides a promising pathway to resolve energy and environment problems. An electrocatalyst was designed with single Mo atoms (Mo-SAs) supported on N-doped carbon having outstanding HER performance. The structure of the catalyst was probed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, indicating the formation of Mo-SAs anchored with one nitrogen atom and two carbon atoms (Mo 1 N 1 C 2 ). Importantly, the Mo 1 N 1 C 2 catalyst displayed much more excellent activity compared with Mo 2 C and MoN, and better stability than commercial Pt/C. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation revealed that the unique structure of Mo 1 N 1 C 2 moiety played a crucial effect to improve the HER performance. This work opens up new opportunities for the preparation and application of highly active and stable Mo-based HER catalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The solar photospheric abundance of carbon : Analysis of atomic carbon lines with the CO5BOLD solar model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Kamp, I.; Ayres, T. R.

    Context. The analysis of the solar spectra using hydrodynamical simulations, with a specific selection of lines, atomic data, and method for computing deviations from local thermodynamical equilibrium, has led to a downward revision of the solar metallicity, Z. We are using the latest simulations

  2. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  3. Functionalised Silver Nanowire Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, Piers; Ilie, Adelina

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline silver nanowires 60-100 nm in diameter and tens of micrometres in length have been fabricated using a low temperature, solution synthesis technique. We explore the potential of this method to produce functional nanowire structures using two different strategies to attach active molecules to the nanowires: adsorption and displacement. Initially, as-produced silver nanowires capped with a uniaxial-growth-inducing polymer layer were functionalised by solution adsorption of a semiconducting conjugated polymer to generate fluorescent nanowire structures. The influence of nanowire surface chemistry was investigated by displacing the capping polymer with an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer, followed by solution adsorption functionalisation. The success of molecular attachment was monitored by electron microscopy, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy. We examined how the optical properties of such adsorbed molecules are affected by the metallic nanowires, and observed transfer of excitation energy between dye molecules mediated by surface plasmons propagating on the nanowires. Non-contact dynamic force microscopy measurements were used to map the work-function of individual wires, revealing inhomogeneity of the polymer surface coverage

  4. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.

    2011-01-01

    The morphological stability of organic nanowires over time and under thermal load is of major importance for their use in any device. In this study the growth and stability of organic nanowires from a naphthyl end-capped thiophene grown by organic molecular beam deposition is investigated via ato...

  5. Polarity Control of Heteroepitaxial GaN Nanowires on Diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzl, Martin; Kraut, Max; Hoffmann, Theresa; Stutzmann, Martin

    2017-06-14

    Group III-nitride materials such as GaN nanowires are characterized by a spontaneous polarization within the crystal. The sign of the resulting sheet charge at the top and bottom facet of a GaN nanowire is determined by the orientation of the wurtzite bilayer of the different atomic species, called N and Ga polarity. We investigate the polarity distribution of heteroepitaxial GaN nanowires on different substrates and demonstrate polarity control of GaN nanowires on diamond. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy is used to determine the polarity of individual selective area-grown and self-assembled nanowires over a large scale. At standard growth conditions, mixed polarity occurs for selective GaN nanowires on various substrates, namely on silicon, on sapphire and on diamond. To obtain control over the growth orientation on diamond, the substrate surface is modified by nitrogen and oxygen plasma exposure prior to growth, and the growth parameters are adjusted simultaneously. We find that the surface chemistry and the substrate temperature are the decisive factors for obtaining control of up to 93% for both polarity types, whereas the growth mode, namely selective area or self-assembled growth, does not influence the polarity distribution significantly. The experimental results are discussed by a model based on the interfacial bonds between the GaN nanowires, the termination layer, and the substrate.

  6. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  7. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been studied using electron microscopy since the early days of nanowire growth, e.g. [1]. A common approach for analysing nanowires using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves removing them from their substrate and subsequently transferring them onto carbon...... with CBED and NBED [4,5] have shown a high degree of consistency. Strain has previously only been measured in nanowires removed from their substrate [6], or only using GPA [7]. The sample used for the present investigation was an InP nanowire grown on a Si substrate using metal organic vapor phase...

  8. Improved electroless plating method through ultrasonic spray atomization for depositing silver nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Qi; Xie, Ming; Liu, Yichun; Yi, Jianhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless plating method assisted by ultrasonic spray atomization was developed. • This method leads to much more uniform silver coatings on MWCNTs. • The plating parameters affect the layer morphologies a lot. - Abstract: A novel method was developed to deposit nanosized silver particles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The electroless plating of silver on MWCNTs accomplished in small solution drops generated by ultrasonic spray atomization, which inhibited excessive growth of silver particles and led to much more uniform nanometer grain-sized coatings. The results showed that pretreatment was essential for silver particles to deposit on the MWCNTs, and the electrolyte concentration and reaction temperature were important parameters which had a great influence on the morphology and structure of the silver coatings. Possible mechanisms of this method are also discussed in the paper.

  9. Improved electroless plating method through ultrasonic spray atomization for depositing silver nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Xie, Ming [Kunming Institute of Precious Metals, Kunming 650106 (China); Liu, Yichun, E-mail: liuyichun@kmust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yi, Jianhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Electroless plating method assisted by ultrasonic spray atomization was developed. • This method leads to much more uniform silver coatings on MWCNTs. • The plating parameters affect the layer morphologies a lot. - Abstract: A novel method was developed to deposit nanosized silver particles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The electroless plating of silver on MWCNTs accomplished in small solution drops generated by ultrasonic spray atomization, which inhibited excessive growth of silver particles and led to much more uniform nanometer grain-sized coatings. The results showed that pretreatment was essential for silver particles to deposit on the MWCNTs, and the electrolyte concentration and reaction temperature were important parameters which had a great influence on the morphology and structure of the silver coatings. Possible mechanisms of this method are also discussed in the paper.

  10. Effects of doping in 25-atom bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for carbon–carbon coupling reaction of iodoanisole and phenylacetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We here report the catalytic effects of foreign atoms (Cu, Ag, and Pt doped into well-defined 25-gold-atom nanoclusters. Using the carbon-carbon coupling reaction of p-iodoanisole and phenylacetylene as a model reaction, the gold-based bimetallic MxAu25−x(SR18 (–SR=–SCH2CH2Ph nanoclusters (supported on titania were found to exhibit distinct effects on the conversion of p-iodoanisole as well as the selectivity for the Sonogashira cross-coupling product, 1-methoxy-4-(2-phenylethynylbenzene. Compared to Au25(SR18, the centrally doped Pt1Au24(SR18 causes a drop in catalytic activity but with the selectivity retained, while the AgxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters gave an overall performance comparable to Au25(SR18. Interestingly, CuxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters prefer the Ullmann homo-coupling pathway and give rise to product 4,4′-dimethoxy-1,1′-biphenyl, which is in opposite to the other three nanocluster catalysts. Our overall conclusion is that the conversion of p-iodoanisole is largely affected by the electronic effect in the bimetallic nanoclusters’ 13-atom core (i.e., Pt1Au12, CuxAu13−x, and Au13, with the exception of Ag doping, and that the selectivity is primarily determined by the type of atoms on the MxAu12−x shell (M=Ag, Cu, and Au in the nanocluster catalysts.

  11. Molecular statics simulations of buckling and yielding of gold nanowires deformed in axial compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, W.; Batra, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    We use molecular statics simulations with the embedded atom method potential to delineate yielding (material instability) and buckling (structural instability) in gold nanowires deformed axially in compression. It is found that both local (stacking faults) and global instabilities occur when the gold nanowire yields but only global instabilities occur when the nanowire buckles. Furthermore strong surface effects reorient the lattice structure which significantly increases Young's modulus in the axial direction and cause a nanowire of relatively small slenderness ratio (e.g., 14) to buckle. Upon complete unloading of the nanowires, the average axial stress and the total potential energy revert to their values in the reference configuration for the nanowires that buckled but not for the one that yielded.

  12. Effects of surface atomistic modification on mechanical properties of gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Yuanjie; Wang, Gang-Feng; Gu, Yuantong; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulations of surface modification effect of Au nanowires. • Surface modification can greatly affect the mechanical properties of nanowires. • Core–shell model is used to elucidate the effect of residual surface stress. - Abstract: Modulation of the physical and mechanical properties of nanowires is a challenging issue for their technological applications. In this paper, we investigate the effects of surface modification on the mechanical properties of gold nanowires by performing molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that by modifying a small density of silver atoms to the surface of a gold nanowire, the residual surface stress state can be altered, rendering a great improvement of its plastic yield strength. This finding is in good agreement with experimental measurements. The underlying physical mechanisms are analyzed by a core–shell nanowire model. The results are helpful for the design and optimization of advanced nanomaterial with superior mechanical properties

  13. Diagnosis of phosphorus monolayer doping in silicon based on nanowire electrical characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ray; Ricchio, Alessio; Murphy, Ruaidhrí; Maxwell, Graeme; Murphy, Richard; Piaszenski, Guido; Petkov, Nikolay; Hydes, Alan; O'Connell, Dan; Lyons, Colin; Kennedy, Noel; Sheehan, Brendan; Schmidt, Michael; Crupi, Felice; Holmes, Justin D.; Hurley, Paul K.; Connolly, James; Hatem, Chris; Long, Brenda

    2018-03-01

    The advent of high surface-to-volume ratio devices has necessitated a revised approach to parameter extraction and process evaluation in field-effect transistor technologies. In this work, active doping concentrations are extracted from the electrical analysis of Si nanowire devices with high surface-to-volume ratios. Nanowire resistance and Si resistivity are extracted, by first extracting and subtracting out the contact resistance. Resistivity (ρ) is selected as the benchmark parameter to compare different doping processes with each other. The impacts of nanowire diameter scaling to 10 nm and of nanowire spacing scaling to resistivity and higher dopant activation, with dependencies on the nanowire width greater than on nanowire spacing. Limitations in ADP P monolayer doping with a SiO2 cap are due to the difficulties in dopant incorporation, as it is based on in-diffusion, and P atoms must overcome a potential barrier on the Si surface.

  14. Influence of disorder on localization and density of states in amorphous carbon nitride thin films systems rich in π-bonded carbon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alibart, F.; Lejeune, M.; Durand Drouhin, O.; Zellama, K.; Benlahsen, M.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss in this paper the evolution of both the density of states (DOS) located between the band-tail states and the DOS around the Fermi level N(E F ) in amorphous carbon nitride films (a-CN x ) as a function of the total nitrogen partial pressure ratio in the Ar/N 2 plasma mixture. The films were deposited by three different deposition techniques and their microstructure was characterized using a combination of infrared and Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission experiments, completed with electrical conductivity measurements, as a function of temperature. The observed changes in the optoelectronic properties are attributed to the modification in the atomic bonding structures, which were induced by N incorporation, accompanied by an increase in the sp 2 carbon bonding configurations and their relative disorder. The electrical conductivity variation was interpreted in terms of local effects on the nature and energy distribution of π and π* states.

  15. Inference on carbon atom arrangement in the turbostatic graphene layers in Tikak coal (India) by X-ray pair distribution function analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, Binoy K. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., West Bengal (India)

    2010-07-01

    This paper communicates the distribution of carbon atoms in a single poly-cyclic aromatic (PCA) layer (graphene) in Tikak coal from Assam, India. The pair distribution function (PDF) analysis performed indicates no evidence of any graphite like structure in this coal. The aromatic fraction is observed to be 74%; with the aliphatic fraction correspondingly estimated to be 26% in this coal. The average carbon atom has 2.5 nearest carbon atom neighbours at an average bond distance of 1.50{angstrom}. The average stacking height of the parallel aromatic layers (Lc) and the average diameter of the aromatic layers (La) are estimated to be 9.86 {angstrom} and 4.80 {angstrom} respectively. For this coal, the average number of stacking layers and the average number of atoms per layer are estimated to be four and eight respectively. In addition, the gamma band is observed at a d-value of 4.34{angstrom}. The comparison of the atom-pair correlation function to simulated one-dimensional structure function calculated for a model compound benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) also indicates that C{sub 6} unit is the major components in this coal. The average carbon atom has at least one and one nearest aryl and alkyl C-C atom pairs separated by 1.39 and 1.54{angstrom} respectively.

  16. Nanowires and nanobelts, v.2 nanowires and nanobelts of functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires, nanobelts, nanoribbons, nanorods ..., are a new class of quasi-one-dimensional materials that have been attracting a great research interest in the last few years. These non-carbon based materials have been demonstrated to exhibit superior electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties, and can be used as fundamental building blocks for nano-scale science and technology, ranging from chemical and biological sensors, field effect transistors to logic circuits. Nanocircuits built using semiconductor nanowires demonstrated were declared a ""breakthrough in science"" by Science

  17. Structural and electronic properties of AlX (X = P, As, Sb) nanowires: Ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Anurag; Tyagi, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Present paper discusses the structural stability and electronic properties of AlX (X = P, As and Sb) nanowires in its linear, zigzag, ladder, square and hexagonal type atomic configurations. The structural optimization has been performed in self consistence manner by using generalized gradient approximation with revised Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof type parameterization. The study observes that in all the three nanowires, the square shaped atomic configuration is the most stable one. The calculated electronic band structures and density of states profile confirms the semiconducting behaviour of linear and zigzag shaped nanowires of AlP, whereas for AlAs and AlSb nanowires are metallic. The ground state properties have also been analysed in terms of bond length, bulk modulus and pressure derivative for all the nanowires along with their bulk counterpart. The lower bulk modulus of all the linear shaped geometries of AlX nanowires in comparison to its bulk counterpart indicates softening of the material at reduced dimension. -- Graphical abstract: Figure-Electronic band structure of zigzag shaped AlP nanowire. The present electronic band structures of zigzag and linear shaped AlP nanowires are showing a clear band gap at Γ point, however others (AlAs and AlSb) in zigzag as well as in linear shape show metallic behaviour. Highlights: ► Stability analysis of five geometries of AlX (X = P, As and Sb) nanowires studied. ► Square shaped geometry of AlX nanowires is most stable. ► Linear and zigzag shaped AlP nanowires are semiconducting. ► Bulk moduli of all the linear nanowires are lower than their bulk counterpart. ► Lower bulk moduli defends the softening of material.

  18. Construct hierarchical electrode with NixCo3-xS4 nanosheet coated on NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays grown on carbon fiber paper for high-performance asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liujun; Tang, Gang; Mei, Jun; Liu, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In order to boost the energy density of supercapacitors, the strategy of using advanced pseudo-capacitive electrode and asymmetric device architecture is feasible and effective. Herein, we report a significant advance in the design and synthesis of a new hierarchically nanostructures with a series of controllable Ni/Co molar ratios of NixCo3-xS4 (i.e., NiCo2S4 and Ni2CoS4) nanosheets coatings have in situ grown on NiCo2O4 nanowires arrays on a flexible carbon fiber paper (CFP). Remarkably, the hybrid Ni2CoS4@NiCo2O4 composite electrode delivers the highest discharge gravimetric capacitance of 1501 F g-1, and areal capacitance of 1.86 F cm-2 at 1 mA cm-2. Furthermore, coupled with nitrogen-doped carbon xerogels anode, we have fabricated a 1.6 V asymmetric supercapacitor (Ni2CoS4@NiCo2O4//nitrogen-doped carbon xerogels), such device delivers a maximum energy and power densities of 32.2 Wh kg-1 and 2.5 kW kg-1 in 1.0 M KOH electrolyte, respectively, and an excellent cycling stability (∼87.6% retention after 10,000 cycles).

  19. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  20. Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Lin, Yue; Jiao, Xingchen; Sun, Yongfu; Luo, Qiquan; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dianqi; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels, especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially ‘clean’ strategy for replacing fossil feedstocks and dealing with increasing CO2 emissions and their adverse effects on climate. The critical bottleneck lies in activating CO2 into the CO2•- radical anion or other intermediates that can be converted further, as the activation usually requires impractically high overpotentials. Recently, electrocatalysts based on oxide-derived metal nanostructures have been shown to enable CO2 reduction at low overpotentials. However, it remains unclear how the electrocatalytic activity of these metals is influenced by their native oxides, mainly because microstructural features such as interfaces and defects influence CO2 reduction activity yet are difficult to control. To evaluate the role of the two different catalytic sites, here we fabricate two kinds of four-atom-thick layers: pure cobalt metal, and co-existing domains of cobalt metal and cobalt oxide. Cobalt mainly produces formate (HCOO-) during CO2 electroreduction; we find that surface cobalt atoms of the atomically thin layers have higher intrinsic activity and selectivity towards formate production, at lower overpotentials, than do surface cobalt atoms on bulk samples. Partial oxidation of the atomic layers further increases their intrinsic activity, allowing us to realize stable current densities of about 10 milliamperes per square centimetre over 40 hours, with approximately 90 per cent formate selectivity at an overpotential of only 0.24 volts, which outperforms previously reported metal or metal oxide electrodes evaluated under comparable conditions. The correct morphology and oxidation state can thus transform a material from one considered nearly non-catalytic for the CO2 electroreduction reaction into an active catalyst. These findings point to new opportunities for manipulating and improving the CO2 electroreduction properties of metal systems

  1. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.; Peters, Craig; Brongersma, Mark; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  2. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  3. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yeung, Kelvin W.K. [Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics & Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilin.wu@gmail.com [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  4. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  5. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt nanostructures on carbon paper and Ni foam; poster

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, EK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available characteristic of polycrystalline Pt electrodes. ECALD produced good quality deposits that uniformly covered the carbon paper support. The advantages of preparing nanoparticles with this method include ease, flexibility and cost effectiveness. This could provide...

  6. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    This project focused on the behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the electrophoresis cells and aligned growth of SWCNTs by thermal chemical vapor deposition on selectively deposited metallic nanoparticle...

  7. As-Grown Gallium Nitride Nanowire Electromechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Joshua R.

    Technological development in recent years has led to a ubiquity of micro- and nano-scale electromechanical devices. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pressure, mass, etc., are now found in nearly all electronic devices at both the industrial and consumer levels. As has been true for integrated circuit electronics, these electromechanical devices have continued to be scaled down in size. For many nanometer-scale structures with large surface-to-volume ratio, dissipation (energy loss) becomes prohibitively large causing a decreasing sensitivity with decreasing sensor size. In this work, gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires are investigated as singly-clamped (cantilever) mechanical resonators with typical mechanical quality factors, Q (equal to the ratio of resonance frequency to peak full-width-at-half-maximum-power) and resonance frequencies, respectively, at or above 30,000, and near 1 MHz. These Q values---in vacuum at room temperature---indicate very low levels of dissipation; they are essentially the same as those for bulk quartz crystal resonators that form the basis of simple clocks and mass sensors. The GaN nanowires have lengths and diameters, respectively, of approximately 15 micrometers and hundreds of nanometers. As-grown GaN nanowire Q values are larger than other similarly-sized, bottom-up, cantilever resonators and this property makes them very attractive for use as resonant sensors. We demonstrate the capability of detecting sub-monolayer levels of atomic layer deposited (ALD) films, and the robust nature of the GaN nanowires structure that allows for their 'reuse' after removal of such layers. In addition to electron microscope-based measurement techniques, we demonstrate the successful capacitive detection of a single nanowire using microwave homodyne reflectometry. This technique is then extended to allow for simultaneous measurements of large ensembles of GaN nanowires on a single sample, providing statistical information about the distribution of

  8. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  9. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  10. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Ravasi, Timothy; Contreras Gerenas, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  11. 3D scaffolds from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate) composites via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebikachew, Behabtu; Magina, Sandra [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Mata, Diogo; Oliveira, Filipe J.; Silva, Rui F. [CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Barros-Timmons, Ana, E-mail: anabarros@ua.pt [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) synthesized by Thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (TCVD) were modified using an Ar:O{sub 2} (97:3) plasma to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface for subsequent modification. X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman analyses confirmed the grafting of those functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes as well as the removal of amorphous carbon produced and deposited on the VACNT forests during the CVD process. The plasma treated VACNT forests were further modified with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionyl bromide, an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, to grow poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains from the forests via ATRP. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the ensuing VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed the coating of the nanotube forests with the PMMA polymer. 3D scaffolds of polymeric composites with honeycomb like structure were then obtained. Compressive tests have shown that the VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength than the pristine forest. - Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were synthesized and plasma modified. • X-ray photo-emission and Raman spectroscopies confirmed the VACNTs modification. • Poly(methyl methacrylate) chains were grown via ATRP from the VACNTs. • STEM of the VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed that PMMA surrounds the nanotubes. • VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength compared to the pristine forest.

  12. 3D scaffolds from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate) composites via atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebikachew, Behabtu; Magina, Sandra; Mata, Diogo; Oliveira, Filipe J.; Silva, Rui F.; Barros-Timmons, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) synthesized by Thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (TCVD) were modified using an Ar:O 2 (97:3) plasma to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface for subsequent modification. X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman analyses confirmed the grafting of those functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes as well as the removal of amorphous carbon produced and deposited on the VACNT forests during the CVD process. The plasma treated VACNT forests were further modified with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionyl bromide, an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, to grow poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains from the forests via ATRP. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the ensuing VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed the coating of the nanotube forests with the PMMA polymer. 3D scaffolds of polymeric composites with honeycomb like structure were then obtained. Compressive tests have shown that the VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength than the pristine forest. - Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were synthesized and plasma modified. • X-ray photo-emission and Raman spectroscopies confirmed the VACNTs modification. • Poly(methyl methacrylate) chains were grown via ATRP from the VACNTs. • STEM of the VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed that PMMA surrounds the nanotubes. • VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength compared to the pristine forest

  13. Carbon nanostructure formation driven by energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiyuan; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been envisaged to be the building blocks of a variety of nanoscale devices and materials. The inherent nanometer-size and ability of being either metallic or semiconductive of CNTs lead to their application in nanoelectronics. Excellent mechanical characteristics of CNTs suggest their use as structural reinforcements. However, to fully exploit the potential applications, effective means of tailoring CNT properties must be developed. Irradiation of materials with energetic particles beams (ions and electrons) is a standard and important tool for modifying material properties. Irradiation makes it possible to dope the samples, to create local amorphous region or vice versa, recrystallize the lattice and even drive a phase transition. In this paper, we report our results of (1) phase transfromation from carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond driven by hydrogen plasma, (2) onion-like nanostructure from carbon nanotubes driven by ion beams of several tens keV, and (3) amorphous carbon nanowire network formation by ion beam irradiation. Structural phase transformation from multiwalled carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond by hydrogen plasma post-treatment was carried out. Ultrahigh equivalent diamond nucleation density of more than 1011 nuclei/cm 2 was obtained. The diamond formation and growth mechanisms were proposed to be the consequence of the formation of sp3 bonded amorphous carbon clusters. The hydrogen chemisorption on curved graphite network and the energy deposited on CNTs by continuous impingement of activated molecular or atomic hydrogen are responsible for the formation of amorphous carbon matrix. Diamond nucleates and grows in the way similar to that of diamond chemical vapor deposition processes on amorphous carbon films. Furthermore, single crystalline diamond nanorods of 4-8 nm in diameter and up to 200 nm in length have been successfully synthesized by hydrogen plasma post

  14. A molecular dynamics simulation study of irradiation induced defects in gold nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenqiang; Chen, Piheng; Qiu, Ruizhi; Khan, Maaz; Liu, Jie; Hou, Mingdong; Duan, Jinglai

    2017-08-01

    Displacement cascade in gold nanowires was studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with different kinetic energies were initiated either at the surface or at the center of the nanowires. We found three kinds of defects that were induced by the cascade, including point defects, stacking faults and crater at the surface. The starting points of PKAs influence the number of residual point defects, and this consequently affect the boundary of anti-radiation window which was proposed by calculation of diffusion of point defects to the free surface of nanowires. Formation of stacking faults that expanded the whole cross-section of gold nanowires was observed when the PKA's kinetic energy was higher than 5 keV. Increasing the PKA's kinetic energy up to more than 10 keV may lead to the formation of crater at the surface of nanowires due to microexplosion of hot atoms. At this energy, PKAs started from the center of nanowires can also result in the creation of crater because length of cascade region is comparable to diameter of nanowires. Both the two factors, namely initial positions of PKAs as well as the craters induced by higher energy irradiation, would influence the ability of radiation resistance of metal nanowires.

  15. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  16. Effect of size on fracture and tensile manipulation of gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fenying; Dai, Yanfeng; Zhao, Jianwei; Li, Qianjin; Zhang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The fracture of metallic nanowires has attracted much attention owing to its reliability of application in nanoelectromechanical system. In this paper, we studied the fracture of [100] single-crystal gold nanowire subjected to uniaxial tension. The statistical breaking position distributions showed that the size effects had dominated the deformation and fracture of nanowires, and the quasi-static tensile deformations are insensitive to the styles of tensile rates. Furthermore, it was observed that the small-sized nanowire broke in the middle with disordered crystalline structure; for the middle-sized nanowire, although slippage plane had maintained the lattice degree, the fracture also happened in the middle due to symmetric tension; for the large-sized nanowire, the slippage was destroyed by symmetric tension, which induced the broken neck at one end of the nanowire. When the nanowire width is less than 5a (“a” means lattice constant, 0.408 nm for gold), the mechanical strength is relatively strong with obvious uncertainty, which can be attributed to the surface atom effect; when the width is larger than 5a, the influence of size on the mechanical property is more obvious at the constant strain rate than that at the absolute rate. Finally, the mechanical strength of the nanowire decreases with the size increasing

  17. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N

    2014-05-16

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures were simulated by varying the deposition energy of carbon atoms in the range of 1-120 eV. Intrinsic film characteristics (e.g. density and internal stress) were determined after the system reached equilibrium. Short- and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering is examined in the context of atomic hybridization and ring connectivity simulation results. It is shown that relatively high deposition energy (i.e., 80 eV) yields a multilayer film structure consisting of an intermixing layer, bulk film and surface layer, consistent with the classical subplantation model. The highest film density (3.3 g cm-3), sp3 fraction (∼43%), and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering correspond to a deposition energy of ∼80 eV, which is in good agreement with experimental findings. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  19. Phase diagrams of diluted transverse Ising nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhou, S.; Essaoudi, I. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux et Modélisation, des Systèmes, (LP2MS), Unité Associée au CNRST-URAC 08, University of Moulay Ismail, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, B.P. 11201 Meknes (Morocco); Ainane, A., E-mail: ainane@pks.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux et Modélisation, des Systèmes, (LP2MS), Unité Associée au CNRST-URAC 08, University of Moulay Ismail, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, B.P. 11201 Meknes (Morocco); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik Complexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Str. 38 D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Saber, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux et Modélisation, des Systèmes, (LP2MS), Unité Associée au CNRST-URAC 08, University of Moulay Ismail, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, B.P. 11201 Meknes (Morocco); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik Complexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Str. 38 D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Ahuja, R. [Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Dujardin, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique des Milieux Complexes (LCPMC), Institut de Chimie, Physique et Matériaux (ICPM), 1 Bd. Arago, 57070 Metz (France)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper, the phase diagrams of diluted Ising nanowire consisting of core and surface shell coupling by J{sub cs} exchange interaction are studied using the effective field theory with a probability distribution technique, in the presence of transverse fields in the core and in the surface shell. We find a number of characteristic phenomena. In particular, the effect of concentration c of magnetic atoms, the exchange interaction core/shell, the exchange in surface and the transverse fields in core and in surface shell of phase diagrams are investigated. - Highlights: ► We use the EFT to investigate the phase diagrams of Ising transverse nanowire. ► Ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic cases are investigated. ► The effects of the dilution and the transverse fields in core and shell are studied. ► Behavior of the transition temperature with the exchange interaction is given.

  20. Phase diagrams of diluted transverse Ising nanowire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhou, S.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Saber, M.; Ahuja, R.; Dujardin, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the phase diagrams of diluted Ising nanowire consisting of core and surface shell coupling by J cs exchange interaction are studied using the effective field theory with a probability distribution technique, in the presence of transverse fields in the core and in the surface shell. We find a number of characteristic phenomena. In particular, the effect of concentration c of magnetic atoms, the exchange interaction core/shell, the exchange in surface and the transverse fields in core and in surface shell of phase diagrams are investigated. - Highlights: ► We use the EFT to investigate the phase diagrams of Ising transverse nanowire. ► Ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic cases are investigated. ► The effects of the dilution and the transverse fields in core and shell are studied. ► Behavior of the transition temperature with the exchange interaction is given

  1. Phosphorus Doped Zn 1- x Mg x O Nanowire Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, S. S.; Hong, J. I.; Song, J. H.; Zhu, Y.; He, H. P.; Xu, Z.; Wei, Y. G.; Ding, Y.; Snyder, R. L.; Wang, Z. L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth of phosphorus doped Zn 1-xMg xO nanowire (NW) using pulsed laser deposition. For the first time, p-type Zn 0.92Mg 0.08O:P NWs are likely obtained In reference to atomic force microscopy based piezoelectric output

  2. The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped GaN nanowires from first-principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Nannan; Li, Enling; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yulong; Song, Sha; Lin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The P impurities tend to enrich at the surface of GaN nanowires. • The lattice parameters of GaN nanowires are changed by the P impurity. • Donor impurity level appears when the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom. • The band gap decreases slightly when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom. - Abstract: The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped unsaturated and saturated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires have been investigated from first-principles using the ultrasoft pseudopotential method. The results of these calculations indicate that the P impurities are enriched at the surface of gallium nitride nanowires, and that the structural symmetry of GaN nanowires is broken due to changes in the lattice parameters. When the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom, the width of band gap increases at the Γ point, a donor impurity level appears in the band gap, and the P impurity and adjacent N atoms exists covalent interaction. Moreover, when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom, the width of the band gap decreases slightly at the Γ point, there is no obvious impurity level in the band gap, and P–Ga covalent bonds are formed, including those composed of ionic bonds. These conclusions indicate that the incorporation of P impurities can improve the field emission performance of GaN nanowires, which is consistent with the experimental results

  3. The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped GaN nanowires from first-principle calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Nannan; Li, Enling, E-mail: Lienling@xaut.edu.cn; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yulong; Song, Sha; Lin, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The P impurities tend to enrich at the surface of GaN nanowires. • The lattice parameters of GaN nanowires are changed by the P impurity. • Donor impurity level appears when the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom. • The band gap decreases slightly when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom. - Abstract: The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped unsaturated and saturated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires have been investigated from first-principles using the ultrasoft pseudopotential method. The results of these calculations indicate that the P impurities are enriched at the surface of gallium nitride nanowires, and that the structural symmetry of GaN nanowires is broken due to changes in the lattice parameters. When the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom, the width of band gap increases at the Γ point, a donor impurity level appears in the band gap, and the P impurity and adjacent N atoms exists covalent interaction. Moreover, when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom, the width of the band gap decreases slightly at the Γ point, there is no obvious impurity level in the band gap, and P–Ga covalent bonds are formed, including those composed of ionic bonds. These conclusions indicate that the incorporation of P impurities can improve the field emission performance of GaN nanowires, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  4. Dimensional effects in semiconductor nanowires; Dimensionseffekte in Halbleiternanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stichtenoth, Daniel

    2008-06-23

    Nanomaterials show new physical properties, which are determined by their size and morphology. These new properties can be ascribed to the higher surface to volume ratio, to quantum size effects or to a form anisotropy. They may enable new technologies. The nanowires studied in this work have a diameter of 4 to 400 nm and a length up to 100 {mu}m. The semiconductor material used is mainly zinc oxide (ZnO), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). All nanowires were synthesized according to the vapor liquid solid mechanism, which was originally postulated for the growth of silicon whiskers. Respective modifications for the growth of compound semiconductor nanowires are discussed. Detailed luminescence studies on ZnO nanowires with different diameters show pronounced size effects which can be attributed to the origins given above. Similar to bulk material, a tuning of the material properties is often essential for a further functionalization of the nanowires. This is typical realized by doping the source material. It becomes apparent, that a controlled doping of nanowires during the growth process is not successful. Here an alternative method is chosen: the doping after the growth by ion implantation. However, the doping by ion implantation goes always along with the creation of crystal defects. The defects have to be annihilated in order to reach an activation of th introduced dopants. At high ion fluences and ion masses the sputtering of surface atoms becomes more important. This results in a characteristic change in the morphology of the nanowires. In detail, the doping of ZnO and ZnS nanowires with color centers (manganese and rare earth elements) is demonstrated. Especially, the intra 3d luminescence of manganese implanted ZnS nanostructures shows a strong dependence of the nanowire diameter and morphology. This dependence can be described by expanding Foersters model (which describes an energy transfer to the color centers) by a dimensional parameter

  5. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium on plasma-treated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for high-performance ultracapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Kim, Byungwoo; Park, Suk Won; Kim, Woong; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2014-10-31

    It is challenging to realize a conformal metal coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) because of the high surface energy of metals. In this study, ALD of ruthenium (Ru) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out. To activate the surface of CNTs that lack surface functional groups essential for ALD, oxygen plasma was applied ex situ before ALD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirmed surface activation of CNTs by the plasma pretreatment. Transmission electron microscopy analysis with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy composition mapping showed that ALD Ru grew conformally along CNTs walls. ALD Ru/CNTs were electrochemically oxidized to ruthenium oxide (RuOx) that can be a potentially useful candidate for use in the electrodes of ultracapacitors. Electrode performance of RuOx/CNTs was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements.

  6. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers of stainless steel and carbon steels with different energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fakarudin Abdul Rahman; Mohd Iqbal Saripan; Nor Paiza Mohamad Hasan; Ismail Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ ρ) of stainless steel (SS316L) and carbon steel (A516) that are widely used as petrochemical plant components, such as distillation column, heat exchanger, boiler and storage tank were measured at 662, 1073 and 1332 keV of photon energies. Measurements of radiation intensity for various thicknesses of steel were made by using transmission method. The γ-ray intensity were counted by using a Gamma spectrometer that contains a Hyper-pure Germanium (HPGe) detector connected with Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA). The effective numbers of atomic (Z eff ) and electron (N eff ) obtained experimentally were compared by those obtained through theoretical calculation. Both experimental and calculated values of Z eff and N eff were in good agreement. (author)

  7. Quantitative determination of Quarternary alicyclic carbon atoms in coal and oil using nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonina, T.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Randin, O.I.; Shishkov, V.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-09-01

    Possibility is indicated for utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantitative determination of Quarternary aliphatic carbon atoms in heavy hydrocarbon fractions of oil and coal extracts. C/sub n/, CH, CH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/ content in coal and oil samples are determined and corresponding resonance lines are referred to individual structural fragments (on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C spectra) of known saturated hydrocarbons. Tests were carried out on chloroform extracts of Irsha-Borodinsk coal, Mungunsk coal and paraffin and cycloparaffin of Sivinsk oil (b.p. over 550 C) fractions. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained using Burker WP 200 spectrometer (50.13 MHz frequency). Results of the tests are given. 11 references.

  8. Reconstruction of mono-vacancies in carbon nanotubes: Atomic relaxation vs. spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)]. E-mail: berber@comas.frsc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Oshiyama, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    We have investigated the reconstruction of mono-vacancies in carbon nanotubes using density functional theory (DFT) geometry optimization and electronic structure calculations, employing a numerical basis set. We considered mono-vacancies in achiral nanotubes with diameter range {approx}4-9A. Contrary to previous tight-binding calculations, our results indicate that mono-vacancies could have several metastable geometries, confirming the previous plane-wave DFT results. Formation energy of mono-vacancies is 4.5-5.5eV, increasing with increasing tube diameter. Net magnetic moment decreases from ideal mono-vacancy value after reconstruction, reflecting the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. In spite of the existence of a dangling bond, ground state of mono-vacancies in semiconducting tubes have no spin polarization. Metallic carbon nanotubes show net magnetic moment for most stable structure of mono-vacancy, except for very small diameter tubes.

  9. Reconstruction of mono-vacancies in carbon nanotubes: Atomic relaxation vs. spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berber, S.; Oshiyama, A.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the reconstruction of mono-vacancies in carbon nanotubes using density functional theory (DFT) geometry optimization and electronic structure calculations, employing a numerical basis set. We considered mono-vacancies in achiral nanotubes with diameter range ∼4-9A. Contrary to previous tight-binding calculations, our results indicate that mono-vacancies could have several metastable geometries, confirming the previous plane-wave DFT results. Formation energy of mono-vacancies is 4.5-5.5eV, increasing with increasing tube diameter. Net magnetic moment decreases from ideal mono-vacancy value after reconstruction, reflecting the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. In spite of the existence of a dangling bond, ground state of mono-vacancies in semiconducting tubes have no spin polarization. Metallic carbon nanotubes show net magnetic moment for most stable structure of mono-vacancy, except for very small diameter tubes

  10. Electronic structure effects on stability and quantum conductance in 2D gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashid, Vikas; Shah, Vaishali; Salunke, H. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the stability and conductivity of unsupported, two-dimensional infinite gold nanowires using ab initio density functional theory (DFT). Two-dimensional ribbon-like nanowires with 1–5 rows of gold atoms in the non-periodic direction and with different possible structures have been considered. The nanowires with >2 rows of atoms exhibit dimerization, similar to finite wires, along the non-periodic direction. Our results show that in these zero thickness nanowires, the parallelogram motif is the most stable. A comparison between parallelogram- and rectangular-shaped nanowires of increasing width indicates that zero thickness (111) oriented wires have a higher stability over (100). A detailed analysis of the electronic structure, reveals that the (111) oriented structures show increased delocalization of s and p electrons in addition to a stronger delocalization of the d electrons and hence are the most stable. The density of states show that the nanowires are metallic and conducting except for the double zigzag structure, which is semiconducting. Conductance calculations show transmission for a wide range of energies in all the stable nanowires with more than two rows of atoms. The conductance channels are not purely s and have strong contributions from the d levels, and weak contributions from the p levels.

  11. Homogeneous calcium carbonate coating obtained by electrodeposition: in situ atomic force microscope observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavez, Jorge; Silva, Juan F.; Melo, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the first stages of the crystallization of an electrochemically deposited calcium carbonate on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode has been investigated. The electrodeposition was driven applying a constant negative potential to a NaHCO 3 and CaCl 2 solution saturated with molecular oxygen. By this way, novel data about the kinetics of the crystal growth of CaCO 3 were collected from the AFM images. The results show that at the solution supersaturation levels used, the crystal growth occurred by a uniform surface nucleation mechanism. During the growth of the initial nuclei, the surface of the electrode was covered progressively by the growth of flat multilayers having triangular faces. The height of these structures ranged from one to several molecular layers of calcium carbonate. At the end of the crystallization process, the roughness of the electrode surface is reduced in average to two monolayers. Thus, our method provides a useful way to electrodeposit a nearly uniform layer of calcium carbonate on a variety of surfaces of potential applications

  12. The annealing of interstitial carbon atoms in high-resistivity n-type silicon after proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhnke, M; Lindström, G

    2002-01-01

    The annealing of interstitial carbon C sub i after 7-10 MeV and 23 GeV proton irradiations at room temperature in high-resistivity n-type silicon is investigated. Deep level transient spectroscopy is used to determine the defect parameters. The annealing characteristics of the impurity defects C sub i , C sub i C sub s , C sub i O sub i and VO sub i suggest that the mobile C sub i atoms are also captured at divacancy VV sites at the cluster peripheries and not only at C sub s and O sub i sites in the silicon bulk. The deviation of the electrical filling characteristic of C sub i from the characteristic of a homogeneously distributed defect can be explained by an aggregation of C sub i atoms in the environment of the clusters. The capture rate of electrons into defects located in the cluster environment is reduced due to a positive space charge region surrounding the negatively charged cluster core. The optical filling characteristic of C sub i suggests that the change of the triangle-shaped electric field dis...

  13. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation for the influence of incident angles of energetic carbon atoms on the structure and properties of diamond-like carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Ke, Peiling; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Wang, Aiying

    2014-01-01

    The influence of incident angles of energetic carbon atoms (0–60°) on the structure and properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was investigated by the molecular dynamics simulation using a Tersoff interatomic potential. The present simulation revealed that as the incident angles increased from 0 to 60°, the surface roughness of DLC films increased and the more porous structure was generated. Along the growth direction of DLC films, the whole system could be divided into four regions including substrate region, transition region, stable region and surface region except the case at the incident angle of 60°. When the incident angle was 45°, the residual stress was significantly reduced by 12% with little deterioration of mechanical behavior. The further structure analysis using both the bond angles and bond length distributions indicated that the compressive stress reduction mainly resulted from the relaxation of highly distorted C–C bond length. - Highlights: • The dependence of films properties on different incident angles was investigated. • The change of incident angles reduced the stress without obvious damage of density. • The stress reduction attributed to the relaxation of highly distorted bond length

  15. Surface and electron emission properties of hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon films investigated by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongping; Zhang, Sam; Ong, S.-E.; Benstetter, Guenther; Du Hejun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we have deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films by using DC magnetron sputtering of graphite target at various r.f. bias voltages. Surface and nanoscale emission properties of these DLC films have been investigated using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanowear tests and conducting-AFM, by simultaneously measuring the topography and the conductivity of the samples. Nanowear tests show that these DLC films are covered with the thin (1.5-2.0 nm) graphite-like layers at surfaces. Compared to the film bulk structure, the graphite-like surface layers are more conductive. The graphite-like surface layers significantly influence the electron emission properties of these films. Low-energy carbon species can be responsible for the formation of graphite-like surface layers. Nanoscale electron emission measurements have revealed the inhomogeneous emission nature of these films. The low-field emission from these films can be attributed to the existence of sp 2 -configured nanoclusters inside the films

  16. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  17. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiczak, Maguy; Otubo, Larissa; Alamarguy, David; Houzé, Frédéric; Volz, Sebastian; Noël, Sophie; Bai, Jinbo

    2011-04-14

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  18. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamarguy David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using an atomic force microscope (AFM at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated, individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as R tip-CNT, R CNT-substrate and R tip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism.

  19. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  20. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  1. Theoretical investigation of structural and electronic properties of ultrathin nickle nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sing, Deobrat; Sonvane, Y. A. [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, 395007 (India)

    2016-04-13

    We have performed first principles calculations for structural and electronic properties of ultrathin Nickle nanowire. We have systematically investigated the equilibrium structure and electronic properties of 4-Ni square, 5-Ni pentagonal, 5- Ni Pyramidal, 6- Ni pentagonal, 6-Ni Hexagonal and 7-Ni Hexagonal structure nanowires having different cross-sections with 4-7 Ni atoms per unit cell. The structural properties of the studied Ni nanowires were greatly different from those of face centered cubic bulk Ni. For each wire the equilibrium lattice constant was obtained. In the present result all the nanowires are found to be metallic. The density of charge revealed delocalized metallic bonding for all studied Ni nanowires.

  2. Self-organized patterns along sidewalls of iron silicide nanowires on Si(110) and their origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debolina; Mahato, J. C.; Bisi, Bhaskar; Dev, B. N., E-mail: msbnd@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-11-10

    Iron silicide (cubic FeSi{sub 2}) nanowires have been grown on Si(110) by reactive deposition epitaxy and investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. On an otherwise uniform nanowire, a semi-periodic pattern along the edges of FeSi{sub 2} nanowires has been discovered. The origin of such growth patterns has been traced to initial growth of silicide nanodots with a pyramidal Si base at the chevron-like atomic arrangement of a clean reconstructed Si(110) surface. The pyramidal base evolves into a comb-like structure along the edges of the nanowires. This causes the semi-periodic structure of the iron silicide nanowires along their edges.

  3. Self-assembled epitaxial NiSi2 nanowires on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Chen, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial NiSi 2 nanowires have been fabricated on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE). The RDE method promoted nanowire growth since it provides deposited atoms sufficient kinetic energy for movement on the Si surface during the growth of silicide islands. The twin-related interface between NiSi 2 and Si is directly related to the nanowire formation since it breaks the symmetry of the surface and leads to the asymmetric growth. The temperature of RDE was found to greatly influence the formation of nanowires. By RDE at 750 deg. C, a high density of NiSi 2 nanowires was formed with an average aspect ratio of 30

  4. TRACING H2 COLUMN DENSITY WITH ATOMIC CARBON (C I) AND CO ISOTOPOLOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, N.; Bronfman, L.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Lowe, V.; Cortes, P. C.; Simon, R.; Fissel, L.; Novak, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of neutral carbon ([C I] 3 P 1 - 3 P 0 at 492 GHz) and carbon monoxide ( 13 CO, J = 1-0) mapping in the Vela Molecular Ridge cloud C (VMR-C) and the G333 giant molecular cloud complexes with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes. For the four regions mapped in this work, we find that [C I] has very similar spectral emission profiles to 13 CO, with comparable line widths. We find that [C I] has an opacity of 0.1-1.3 across the mapped region while the [C I]/ 13 CO peak brightness temperature ratio is between 0.2 and 0.8. The [C I] column density is an order of magnitude lower than that of 13 CO. The H 2 column density derived from [C I] is comparable to values obtained from 12 CO. Our maps show that C I is preferentially detected in gas with low temperatures (below 20 K), which possibly explains the comparable H 2 column density calculated from both tracers (both C I and 12 CO underestimate column density), as a significant amount of the C I in the warmer gas is likely in the higher energy state transition ([C I] 3 P 2 - 3 P 1 at 810 GHz), and thus it is likely that observations of both the above [C I] transitions are needed in order to recover the total H 2 column density

  5. Electron beam assisted field evaporation of insulating nanowires/tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, N. P., E-mail: nicholas.blanchard@univ-lyon1.fr; Niguès, A.; Choueib, M.; Perisanu, S.; Ayari, A.; Poncharal, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Siria, A.; Vincent, P. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate field evaporation of insulating materials, specifically BN nanotubes and undoped Si nanowires, assisted by a convergent electron beam. Electron irradiation leads to positive charging at the nano-object's apex and to an important increase of the local electric field thus inducing field evaporation. Experiments performed both in a transmission electron microscope and in a scanning electron microscope are presented. This technique permits the selective evaporation of individual nanowires in complex materials. Electron assisted field evaporation could be an interesting alternative or complementary to laser induced field desorption used in atom probe tomography of insulating materials.

  6. Towards an elastic model of wurtzite AlN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrushchenkov, A; Chambaud, G; Yvonnet, J; He, Q-C

    2010-01-01

    Starting with ab initio calculations of AlN wurtzite [0001] nanowires with diameters up to 4 nm, a finite element method is developed to deal with larger nanostructures/nanoparticles. The ab initio calculations show that the structure of the nanowires can be well represented by an internal part with AlN bulk elastic properties, and one atomic surface layer with its own elastic behavior. The proposed finite element method includes surface elements with their own elastic properties using surface elastic coefficients deduced from the ab initio calculations. The elastic properties obtained with the finite element model compare very well with those obtained with the full ab initio calculations.

  7. Transfer-free synthesis of graphene-like atomically thin carbon films on SiC by ion beam mixing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Fenghua; Wang, Jinbin; Fu, Dejun

    2018-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the synthesis of graphene directly on SiC substrates at 900 °C using ion beam mixing technique with energetic carbon cluster ions on Ni/SiC structures. The thickness of 7-8 nm Ni films was evaporated on the SiC substrates, followed by C cluster ion bombarding. Carbon cluster ions C4 were bombarded at 16 keV with the dosage of 4 × 1016 atoms/cm2. After thermal annealing process Ni silicides were formed, whereas C atoms either from the decomposition of the SiC substrates or the implanted contributes to the graphene synthesis by segregating and precipitating process. The limited solubility of carbon atoms in silicides, involving SiC, Ni2Si, Ni5Si2, Ni3Si, resulted in diffusion and precipitation of carbon atoms to form graphene on top of Ni and the interface of Ni/SiC. The ion beam mixing technique provides an attractive production method of a transfer-free graphene growth on SiC and be compatible with current device fabrication.

  8. Solution-Grown Silicon Nanowires for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Candace K.

    2010-03-23

    Composite electrodes composed of silicon nanowires synthesized using the supercritical fluid-liquid-solid (SFLS) method mixed with amorphous carbon or carbon nanotubes were evaluated as Li-ion battery anodes. Carbon coating of the silicon nanowires using the pyrolysis of sugar was found to be crucial for making good electronic contact to the material. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as the conducting additive was found to be more effective for obtaining good cycling behavior than using amorphous carbon. Reversible capacities of 1500 mAh/g were observed for 30 cycles. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Solution-grown silicon nanowires for lithium-ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Candace K; Patel, Reken N; O'Connell, Michael J; Korgel, Brian A; Cui, Yi

    2010-03-23

    Composite electrodes composed of silicon nanowires synthesized using the supercritical fluid-liquid-solid (SFLS) method mixed with amorphous carbon or carbon nanotubes were evaluated as Li-ion battery anodes. Carbon coating of the silicon nanowires using the pyrolysis of sugar was found to be crucial for making good electronic contact to the material. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as the conducting additive was found to be more effective for obtaining good cycling behavior than using amorphous carbon. Reversible capacities of 1500 mAh/g were observed for 30 cycles.

  10. Vibrational Relaxation of Ground-State Oxygen Molecules With Atomic Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, D. V.; Pejakovic, D. A.; Copeland, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    Vertical water vapor profiles are key to understanding the composition and energy budget in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The SABER instrument onboard NASA's TIMED satellite measures such profiles by detecting H2O(ν2) emission in the 6.8 μm region. Collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited O2, O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) + H2O ↔ O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 0) + H2O(ν2), is an important source of H2O(ν2). A recent study has identified two other processes involving excited O2 that control H2O(ν2) population in the MLT: (1) the vibrational-translational (V-T) relaxation of O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) level by atomic oxygen and (2) the V-V exchange between CO2 and excited O2 molecules [1]. Over the past few years SRI researchers have measured the atomic oxygen removal process mentioned above at room temperature [2] and 240 K [3]. These measurements have been incorporated into the models for H2O(ν2) emission [1]. Here we report laboratory studies of the collisional removal of O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) by O(3P) at room temperature and below, reaching temperatures relevant to mesopause and polar summer MLT (~150 K). Instead of directly detecting the O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) population, a technically simpler approach is used in which the υ = 1 level of the O2(a1Δg) state is monitored. A two-laser method is employed, in which the pulsed output of the first laser near 285 nm photodissociates ozone to produce atomic oxygen and O2(a1Δg, υ = 1), and the pulsed output of the second laser detects O2(a1Δg, υ = 1) via resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. With ground-state O2 present, owing to the rapid equilibration of the O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) and O2(a1Δg, υ = 1) populations via the processes O2(a1Δg, υ = 1) + O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 0) ↔ O2(a1Δg, υ = 0) + O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1), the information on the O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) kinetics is extracted from the O2(a1Δg, υ = 1) temporal evolution. In addition, measurements of the removal of O2(X3Σ-g, υ = 1) by CO2 at room temperature will also

  11. Doping process of p-type GaN nanowires: A first principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Diao, Yu; Feng, Shu

    2017-10-01

    The process of p-type doping for GaN nanowires is investigated using calculations starting from first principles. The influence of different doping elements, sites, types, and concentrations is discussed. Results suggest that Mg is an optimal dopant when compared to Be and Zn due to its stronger stability, whereas Be atoms are more inclined to exist in the interspace of a nanowire. Interstitially-doped GaN nanowires show notable n-type conductivity, and thus, Be is not a suitable dopant, which is to be expected since systems with inner substitutional dopants are more favorable than those with surface substitutions. Both interstitial and substitutional doping affect the atomic structure near dopants and induce charge transfer between the dopants and adjacent atoms. By altering doping sites and concentrations, nanowire atomic structures remain nearly constant. Substitutional doping models show p-type conductivity, and Mg-doped nanowires with doping concentrations of 4% showing the strongest p-type conductivity. All doping configurations are direct bandgap semiconductors. This study is expected to direct the preparation of high-quality GaN nanowires.

  12. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  13. Role of defects in the process of graphene growth on hexagonal boron nitride from atomic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowski, J., E-mail: Dabrowski@ihp-microelectronics.com; Lippert, G.; Schroeder, T.; Lupina, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2014-11-10

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an attractive substrate for graphene, as the interaction between these materials is weak enough for high carrier mobility to be retained in graphene but strong enough to allow for some epitaxial relationship. We deposited graphene on exfoliated h-BN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), we analyzed the atomistic details of the process by ab initio density functional theory (DFT), and we linked the DFT and MBE results by random walk theory. Graphene appears to nucleate around defects in virgin h-BN. The DFT analysis reveals that sticking of carbon to perfect h-BN is strongly reduced by desorption, so that pre-existing seeds are needed for the nucleation. The dominant nucleation seeds are C{sub N}C{sub B} and O{sub N}C{sub N} pairs and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} inclusions in the virgin substrate.

  14. Bismuth alloying properties in GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Lu, Pengfei, E-mail: photon.bupt@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Cao, Huawei; Cai, Ningning; Yu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Gao, Tao [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Shumin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Photonics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic and optical properties of bismuth alloying in GaAs nanowires. A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration and the band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states which contributes a lot around Fermi level. Scissor effect is involved. The optical properties are presented, including dielectric function, optical absorption spectra and reflectivity, which are also varied with the increasing of Bi concentrations. - Graphical abstract: Top view of Bi-doped GaAs nanowires. Ga, As, and Bi atoms are denoted with grey, purple and red balls, respectively. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. • The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration. • The band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. • The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states.

  15. Improved Long-Term Stability of Transparent Conducting Electrodes Based on Double-Laminated Electrosprayed Antimony Tin Oxides and Ag Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo B.-R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated double-laminated antimony tin oxide/Ag nanowire electrodes by spin-coating and electrospraying. Compared to pure Ag nanowire electrodes and single-laminated antimony tin oxide/Ag nanowire electrodes, the double-laminated antimony tin oxide/Ag nanowire electrodes had superior transparent conducting electrode performances with sheet resistance ~19.8 Ω/□ and optical transmittance ~81.9%; this was due to uniform distribution of the connected Ag nanowires because of double lamination of the metallic Ag nanowires without Ag aggregation despite subsequent microwave heating at 250°C. They also exhibited excellent and superior long-term chemical and thermal stabilities and adhesion to substrate because double-laminated antimony tin oxide thin films act as the protective layers between Ag nanowires, blocking Ag atoms penetration.

  16. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  17. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  18. The SERS and TERS effects obtained by gold droplets on top of Si nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M; Sivakov, V; Andrä, G; Geiger, R; Schreiber, J; Hoffmann, S; Michler, J; Milenin, A P; Werner, P; Christiansen, S H

    2007-01-01

    We show that hemispherical gold droplets on top of silicon nanowires when grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, can produce a significant enhancement of Raman scattered signals. Signal enhancement for a few or even just single gold droplets is demonstrated by analyzing the enhanced Raman signature of malachite green molecules. For this experiment, trenches (approximately 800 nm wide) were etched in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer along crystallographic directions that constitute sidewalls ({110} surfaces) suitable for the growth of silicon nanowires in directions with the intention that the gold droplets on the silicon nanowires can meet somewhere in the trench when growth time is carefully selected. Another way to realize gold nanostructures in close vicinity is to attach a silicon nanowire with a gold droplet onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and to bring this tip toward another gold-coated AFM tip where malachite green molecules were deposited prior to the measurements. In both experiments, signal enhancement of characteristic Raman bands of malachite green molecules was observed. This indicates that silicon nanowires with gold droplets atop can act as efficient probes for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). In our article, we show that a nanowire TERS probe can be fabricated by welding nanowires with gold droplets to AFM tips in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). TERS tips made from nanowires could improve the spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy so that measurements on the nanometer scale are possible.

  19. Nanoscale Electronic Conditioning for Improvement of Nanowire Light-Emitting-Diode Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Brelon J; Belz, Matthew R; Ahamed, Arshad; Sarwar, A T M G; Selcu, Camelia M; Myers, Roberto C

    2018-04-24

    Commercial III-Nitride LEDs and lasers spanning visible and ultraviolet wavelengths are based on epitaxial films. Alternatively, nanowire-based III-Nitride optoelectronics offer the advantage of strain compliance and high crystalline quality growth on a variety of inexpensive substrates. However, nanowire LEDs exhibit an inherent property distribution, resulting in uneven current spreading through macroscopic devices that consist of millions of individual nanowire diodes connected in parallel. Despite being electrically connected, only a small fraction of nanowires, sometimes current in the ensemble devices. Burn-in electronic conditioning is performed by applying a short-term overload voltage; the nanoshorts experience very high current density, sufficient to render them open circuits, thereby forcing a new current path through more nanowire LEDs in an ensemble device. Current-voltage measurements of individual nanowires are acquired using conductive atomic force microscopy to observe the removal of nanoshorts using burn-in. In macroscopic devices, this results in a 33× increase in peak EL and reduced leakage current. Burn-in conditioning of nanowire ensembles therefore provides a straightforward method to mitigate nonuniformities inherent to nanowire devices.

  20. Stable and Controllable Synthesis of Silver Nanowires for Transparent Conducting Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bitao; Yan, Hengqing; Chen, Shanyong; Guan, Youwei; Wu, Guoguo; Jin, Rong; Li, Lu

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanowires without particles are synthesized by a solvothermal method at temperature 150 °C. Silver nanowires are prepared via a reducing agent of glycerol and a capping agent of polyvinylpyrrolidone ( M w ≈ 1,300,000). Both of them can improve the purity of the as-prepared silver nanowires. With controllable shapes and sizes, silver nanowires are grown continuously up to 10-20 μm in length with 40-50 nm in diameter. To improve the yield of silver nanowires, the different concentrations of AgNO3 synthesis silver nanowires are discussed. The characterizations of the synthesized silver nanowires are analyzed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscope (AFM), and silver nanowires are pumped on the cellulose membrane and heated stress on the PET. Then, the cellulose membrane is dissolved by the steam of acetone to prepare flexible transparent conducting thin film, which is detected 89.9 of transmittance and 58 Ω/□. Additionally, there is a close loop connected by the thin film, a blue LED, a pair of batteries, and a number of wires, to determinate directly the film if conductive or not.

  1. Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Noriega, Rodrigo

    2009-08-18

    The use of ZnO nanowires has become a widespread topic of interest in optoelectronics. In order to correctly assess the quality, functionality, and possible applications of such nanostructures it is important to accurately understand their electrical and optical properties. Aluminum- and gallium-doped crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a low-temperature solution-based process, achieving dopant densities of the order of 1020 cm-3. A non-contact optical technique, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, is used to characterize ensembles of ZnO nanowires. By modeling the free charge carrier absorption as a Drude metal, we are able to calculate the free carrier density and mobility. Determining the location of the dopant atoms in the ZnO lattice is important to determine the doping mechanisms of the ZnO nanowires. Solid-state NMR is used to distinguish between coordination environments of the dopant atoms.

  2. Nanojoining of crossed Ag nanowires: a molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jianlei, E-mail: cjlxjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Xuewen; Barayavuga, Theogene; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun [Xi’an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering (China); He, Xiaoqiao, E-mail: bcxqhe@cityu.edu.hk [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering (Hong Kong)

    2016-07-15

    Ag nanowires are considered to be the promising candidates for future electronic circuit owing to the excellent electrical and thermal properties, with the miniaturization of electronics devices into nanometer scale. Though interconnect technology between Ag nanowires (Ag NWs) is essential for nanofunctional devices, it lacks sufficient experimental data. Besides, the determination of Ag NW interconnection configuration is experimentally difficult to do for lacking the sufficient investigation of atomic configuration evolution during nanojoining process. So the nanojoining between the crossed Ag NWs with the same diameter of 2 nm and different lengths was performed by molecular dynamics simulation to explain the unclear nanojoining mechanism based on thermal effect. As the simulation results present, when the nanojoining temperature is relatively high, though the Ag NWs are connected with the interpenetration effect of Ag atoms at the crossed nanojunction area, the nanostructures of Ag NWs have been seriously deformed with shorter length and larger diameter, showing relatively more obvious melting characteristics based on the chaotic atomic structures. If the temperature is reduced to 300 K as cold welding, the crossed Ag NWs can be partially contacted with the partial mixture of Ag atoms, and the interstices always exist between the Si surface and the upper Ag nanowire. In addition, the obvious dislocation phenomenon will appear and evolve as time goes on. Consequently, the dominant mechanism was revealed for providing a fundamental understanding of how ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ welding technology affects the atomic contact configuration, respectively.

  3. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  4. Young's modulus of individual ZnO nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Dayong; Tian, Chunguang; Liu, Qingfei; Zhao, Man; Qin, Jieming; Hou, Jianhua; Gao, Shang; Liang, Qingcheng; Zhao, Jianxun

    2014-01-01

    We used a contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the mechanical properties of an individual ZnO nanowire in the open air. It is noteworthy that the Young's modulus can be determined by an AFM tip compressing a single nanowire on a rigid substrate, which can bring more repeatability and accuracy for the measurements. In particular, the calculated radial Young's modulus of ZnO nanowires is consistent with the data of ZnO bulks and thin films. We also present the Young's modulus with different diameters, and all these are discussed deeply

  5. Development of highly transparent Pd-coated Ag nanowire electrode for display and catalysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canlier, Ali, E-mail: ali.canlier@agu.edu.tr [Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology Engineering, Abdullah Gul University, P.O. Box 38080, Kayseri (Turkey); Ucak, Umit Volkan, E-mail: sirvolkan@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology Engineering, Abdullah Gul University, P.O. Box 38080, Kayseri (Turkey); Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water, and Sustainability (EEWS), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), P.O. Box 305-701, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Usta, Hakan, E-mail: husta38@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology Engineering, Abdullah Gul University, P.O. Box 38080, Kayseri (Turkey); Cho, Changsoon, E-mail: cscho@kaist.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water, and Sustainability (EEWS), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), P.O. Box 305-701, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Yong, E-mail: jungyong.lee@kaist.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water, and Sustainability (EEWS), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), P.O. Box 305-701, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sen, Unal, E-mail: senunal@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Abdullah Gul University, P.O. Box 38080, Kayseri (Turkey); Citir, Murat, E-mail: muratcitir@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Abdullah Gul University, P.O. Box 38080, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2015-09-30

    Highlights: • Highly uniform thin-layer coating of Pd onto Ag nanowire surface was accomplished. • A transparent electrode of Pd-coated Ag nanowire was uniformly deposited on flexible substrate. • 95% of optical transmittance and 175 Ω/sq sheet resistance were obtained. • Extremely low haze of 1.9% and high oxidation stability proved an efficient transparent electrode. • This electrode can be used as Pd-catalyst for synthesis reactions and fuel cell electrode applications. - Abstract: Ag nanowire transparent electrode has excellent transmittance (90%) and sheet resistance (20 Ω/sq), yet there are slight drawbacks such as optical haze and chemical instability against aerial oxidation. Chemical stability of Ag nanowires needs to be improved in order for it to be suitable for electrode applications. In our recent article, we demonstrated that coating Ag nanowires with a thin layer of Au through galvanic exchange reactions enhances the chemical stability of Ag nanowire films highly and also helps to obtain lower haze. In this study, coating of a thin Pd layer has been applied successfully onto the surface of Ag nanowires. A mild Pd complex oxidant [Pd(en){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was prepared in order to oxidize Ag atoms partially on the surface via galvanic displacement. The mild galvanic exchange allowed for a thin layer (1–2 nm) of Pd coating on the Ag nanowires with minimal truncation of the nanowire, where the average length and the diameter were 12.5 μm and 59 nm, respectively. The Pd-coated Ag nanowires were suspended in methanol and then electrostatically sprayed on flexible polycarbonate substrates. It has been revealed that average total transmittance remain around 95% within visible spectrum region (400–800 nm) whereas sheet resistance rises up to 175 Ω/sq. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, Pd coating was employed on Ag nanowires in order to design transparent electrodes for high transparency and strong

  6. Atomistic simulations of the structures of Pd-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles and nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Kayoung; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Lee, Jaegab; Kim, Jiyoung; Nam, Ho-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoalloys such as nanoparticles and nanowires are attracting significant attention due to their vast potential applications such as in catalysis and nanoelectronics. Notably, Pd-Pt nanoparticles/nanowires are being widely recognized as catalysts and hydrogen sensors. Compared to unary systems, alloys present more structural complexity with various compositional configurations. Therefore, it is important to understand energetically preferred atomic structures of bimetallic nanoallo...

  7. Formation of Ag nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces. A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrusi, Rubén E.; García, Silvana G.; Pronsato, María E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining silver nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces theoretically, using density functional theory calculations. Three layer slabs are used to model graphite surfaces with and without defects. Adsorption energies for Ag atoms on graphite surfaces were calculated showing the preference of Ag adatoms to locate on the steps, forming linear structures like nanowires. An analysis of the charge densities and projected densities of states for different structures is also performed.

  8. Thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir; Muhammed, Mufasila Mumthaz; Li, Kuang-Hui; Janjua, Bilal; Aljefri, Renad A.; Sun, Haiding; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Roqan, Iman S.; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examine thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires through their steady-state and transient photoluminescence properties. We correlate the energy exchange during the photoexcitation and photoemission processes of the light–solid reaction and the generation of photoinduced entropy of the nanowires using temperature-dependent (6 K to 290 K) photoluminescence. We observed an oscillatory trend in the generated entropy of the system below 200 K, with an oscillation frequency that was significantly lower than what we have previously observed in InGaN/GaN nanowires. In contrast to the sharp increase in generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature in InGaN/GaN nanowires, an insignificant increase was observed in AlGaN nanowires, indicating lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty in the wider bandgap semiconductor. We conjecture that the enhanced atomic ordering in AlGaN caused lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty related to the energy of states involved in thermionic transitions; in keeping with this conjecture, we observed lower oscillation frequency below 200 K and a stable behavior in the generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature.

  9. Low temperature synthesis of Zn nanowires by physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Philipp; Kast, Michael; Brueckl, Hubert [Austrian Research Centers GmbH ARC, Nano- Systemtechnologies, Donau-City-Strasse 1, A-1220 Wien (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate catalytic growth of zinc nanowires by physical vapor deposition at modest temperatures of 125-175 C on various substrates. In contrast to conventional approaches using tube furnaces our home-built growth system allows to control the vapor sources and the substrate temperature separately. The silicon substrates were sputter coated with a thin gold layer as metal catalyst. The samples were heated to the growth temperature and subsequently exposed to the zinc vapor at high vacuum conditions. The work pressure was adjusted by the partial pressure of oxygen or argon flow gas. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterizations revealed that the nanowires exhibit straight, uniform morphology and have diameters in the range of 50-350 nm and lengths up to 70 {mu}m. The Zn nanowires grow independently of the substrates crystal orientation via a catalytic vapor-solid growth mechanism. Since no nanowire formation was observed without gold coating, we expect that the onedimensional growth is initiated by a surface reactive Au seed. ZnO nanowires can be produced in the same preparation chamber by oxidation at 500 C in 1atm (80% Ar, 20% O{sub 2}) for 1 hour. ZnO is highly attractive for sensor applications.

  10. Thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2017-12-13

    In this study, we examine thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires through their steady-state and transient photoluminescence properties. We correlate the energy exchange during the photoexcitation and photoemission processes of the light–solid reaction and the generation of photoinduced entropy of the nanowires using temperature-dependent (6 K to 290 K) photoluminescence. We observed an oscillatory trend in the generated entropy of the system below 200 K, with an oscillation frequency that was significantly lower than what we have previously observed in InGaN/GaN nanowires. In contrast to the sharp increase in generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature in InGaN/GaN nanowires, an insignificant increase was observed in AlGaN nanowires, indicating lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty in the wider bandgap semiconductor. We conjecture that the enhanced atomic ordering in AlGaN caused lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty related to the energy of states involved in thermionic transitions; in keeping with this conjecture, we observed lower oscillation frequency below 200 K and a stable behavior in the generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature.

  11. Insights into the Controllable Chemical Composition of Metal Oxide Nanowires and Graphene Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Anna Patrice

    The design and synthesis of materials that absorb visible light and create fuel to store solar energy is a pursuit that has captivated chemists for decades. In order to take part in solar water splitting, i.e. the production of hydrogen and oxygen gas from water and sunlight, electrode materials must fit specific requirements in terms of their electronic structure. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are both of interest for their ability to produce oxygen from photogenerated holes, but their band gaps are too large to capture a significant portion of the solar spectrum. We address this challenge by modifying the crystal structures of ZnO and TiO 2 to make lower band gap materials. Furthermore, we use nanowires as the synthetic template for these materials because they provide a large semiconductor-liquid interfacial area. ZnO nanowires can be alloyed with In3+, Fe3+ and other trivalent metal ions to form a unique structure with the formula M2O3(ZnO)n, also known as MZO. We synthesize indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium iron zinc oxide (IFZO) nanowires and study their crystal structure using atomically-resolved transmission electron microscopy (TEM), among other methods. We elucidate a structural model for MZO that resolves inconsistencies in the existing literature, based on the identification of the zigzag layer as an inversion domain boundary. These nanowires are shown to have a lower band gap than ZnO and produce photocurrent under visible light illumination. The solid-state diffusion reaction to form ternary titanates is also studied by TEM. TiO2 nanowires are coated with metal oxides by a variety of deposition methods, and then converted to MTiO3 at high temperatures, where M is a divalent transition metal ion such as Mn 2+, CO2+, or Ni2+. When Co3O 4 particles attached to TiO2 nanowires are annealed for a short time, we observe the formation of a CoO(111)/TiO2 (010) interface. If the nanowires are instead coated with Co(NO3)2 salt and then annealed

  12. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M; Tichelaar, F D

    2015-01-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al 2 O 3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm 2 to 2500 μm 2 ) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. (paper)

  13. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F. D.; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M.

    2015-02-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm2 to 2500 μm2) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  14. Subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube networks in polymers with DC-biased multifrequency dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hank T; Barroso-Bujans, Fabienne; Herrero, Julio Gomez; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-05

    The characterization of dispersion and connectivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks inside polymers is of great interest in polymer nanocomposites in new material systems, organic photovoltaics, and in electrodes for batteries and supercapacitors. We focus on a technique using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) in the attractive regime of operation, using both single and dual mode excitation, which upon the application of a DC tip bias voltage allows, via the phase channel, the in situ, nanoscale, subsurface imaging of CNT networks dispersed in a polymer matrix at depths of 10-100 nm. We present an in-depth study of the origins of phase contrast in this technique and demonstrate that an electrical energy dissipation mechanism in the Coulomb attractive regime is key to the formation of the phase contrast which maps the spatial variations in the local capacitance and resistance due to the CNT network. We also note that dual frequency excitation can, under some conditions, improve the contrast for such samples. These methods open up the possibility for DC-biased amplitude modulation AFM to be used for mapping the variations in local capacitance and resistance in nanocomposites with conducting networks.

  15. Long term investigations of carbon nanotube transistors encapsulated by atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 for sensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbling, T; Hierold, C; Roman, C; Durrer, L; Mattmann, M; Bright, V M

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) are promising functional structures in future micro- or nanoelectronic systems and sensor applications. Research on the fundamental device concepts includes the investigation of the conditions for stable long term CNFET operation. CNFET operation in ambient air leads to on-state current degradation and fluctuating signals due to the well-known sensitivity of the electronic properties of the CNT to many environmental condition changes. It is the goal of device and sensor research to understand various kinds of sensor-environment interactions and to overcome the environmental sensitivity. Here, we show that the encapsulation of CNFETs by a thermal atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) layer of approximately 100 nm leads to stable device operation for 260 days and reduces their sensitivity to the environment. The characteristics of CNFETs prior to and after Al 2 O 3 encapsulation are comparatively investigated. It is found that encapsulation improves the stability of the CNFET characteristics with respect to the gate threshold voltage, hysteresis width and the on-state current, while 1/f noise is lowered by up to a factor of 7. Finally, CNFETs embedded in a dielectric membrane are employed as pressure sensors to demonstrate sensor operation of CNFETs encapsulated by ALD as piezoresistive transducers.

  16. Construction of highly ordered polyaniline nanowires and their applications in DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuanqiang; Zhou, Binbin; Wang, Fangbin; Li, Juan; Deng, Liu; Liu, You-Nian

    2014-02-15

    A novel electrochemical active polyaniline (PANI) nanowire was fabricated and utilized for the construction of a highly sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor for hepatitis B virus gene. The uniform PANI nanowire was prepared by the enzymatic polymerization of aniline monomers on the amyloid-like nanofiber (AP nanowire), which was self-assembled from an aniline-attached nonapeptide, aniline-GGAAKLVFF (AP). The prepared PANI nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy, UV-vis absorption spectra, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). These ultra-thin nanowires displayed high electrochemical activity. Then the nucleic acid biosensor was constructed by modifying a glass carbon electrode with AP nanowires which were functionalized by a designed hair-pin loop DNA. Upon the presence of target nucleic acid and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled oligonucleotide, the HRP will catalyze the polymerization of aniline monomers conjugated in AP nanowires, leading to the formation of PANI nanowires which can bring about a dramatical increase in the current response of the biosensor. The dynamic range of the sensor for hepatitis B virus gene is 2.0-800.0 fM with a low detection limit of 1.0 fM (3σ, n=10). The biosensor also displayed highly selectivity and stability. All these excellent performances of the developed biosensor indicate that this platform can be easily extended to the detection of other nucleic acids. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Si nanowires/Cu nanowires bilayer fabric as a lithium ion capacitor anode with excellent performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chien-Ming; Kao, Tzu-Lun; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2018-03-01

    A light and binder-free bilayer fabric electrode composed of silicon nanowires and copper nanowires for lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) is reported. A lithium ion capacitor is proposed employing pre-lithiated silicon/copper nanowire fabric and activated carbon as the anode and the cathode, respectively. These LICs show remarkable performance with a specific capacitance of 156 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1, which is approximately twice of that of activated carbon in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), and still exhibit a fine specific capacitance of 68 F g-1 even at a high current density of 20 A g-1. At a low power density of 193 W kg-1, the Si/Cu fabric//AC LIC can achieve high energy density of 210 W h kg-1. As the power density is increased to 99 kW kg-1, the energy density still remains at 43 W h kg-1, showing the prominent rate performance.

  18. Unlocking the Origin of Superior Performance of a Si-Ge Core-Shell Nanowire Quantum Dot Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Jaishi, Meghnath; Pati, Ranjit

    2016-07-13

    The sustained advancement in semiconducting core-shell nanowire technology has unlocked a tantalizing route for making next generation field effect transistor (FET). Understanding how to control carrier mobility of these nanowire channels by applying a gate field is the key to developing a high performance FET. Herein, we have identified the switching mechanism responsible for the superior performance of a Si-Ge core-shell nanowire quantum dot FET over its homogeneous Si counterpart. A quantum transport approach is used to investigate the gate-field modulated switching behavior in electronic current for ultranarrow Si and Si-Ge core-shell nanowire quantum dot FETs. Our calculations reveal that for the ON state, the gate-field induced transverse localization of the wave function restricts the carrier transport to the outer (shell) layer with the pz orbitals providing the pathway for tunneling of electrons in the channels. The higher ON state current in the Si-Ge core-shell nanowire FET is attributed to the pz orbitals that are distributed over the entire channel; in the case of Si nanowire, the participating pz orbital is restricted to a few Si atoms in the channel resulting in a smaller tunneling current. Within the gate bias range considered here, the transconductance is found to be substantially higher in the case of a Si-Ge core-shell nanowire FET than in a Si nanowire FET, which suggests a much higher mobility in the Si-Ge nanowire device.

  19. CuO-In2O3 Core-Shell Nanowire Based Chemical Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The CuO-In2O3 core-shell nanowire was fabricated by a two-step method. The CuO nanowire core (NWs was firstly grown by the conventional thermal oxidation of Cu meshes at 500°C for 5 hours. Then, the CuO nanowires were immersed into the suspension of amorphous indium hydroxide deposited from the In(AC3 solution by ammonia. The CuO nanowires coated with In(OH3 were subsequently heated at 600°C to form the crystalline CuO-In2O3 core-shell structure, with In2O3 nanocrystals uniformly anchored on the CuO nanowires. The gas sensing properties of the formed CuO-In2O3 core-shell nanowires were investigated by various reducing gases such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and propane at elevated temperature. The sensors using the CuO-In2O3 nanowires show improved sensing performance to hydrogen and propane but a suppressed response to carbon monoxide, which could be attributed to the enhanced catalytic properties of CuO with the coated porous In2O3 shell and the p-n junction formed at the core-shell interface.

  20. Conducting polymer nanowire arrays for high performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Wu, Haiping; Meng, Yuena; Wei, Zhixiang

    2014-01-15

    This Review provides a brief summary of the most recent research developments in the fabrication and application of one-dimensional ordered conducting polymers nanostructure (especially nanowire arrays) and their composites as electrodes for supercapacitors. By controlling the nucleation and growth process of polymerization, aligned conducting polymer nanowire arrays and their composites with nano-carbon materials can be prepared by employing in situ chemical polymerization or electrochemical polymerization without a template. This kind of nanostructure (such as polypyrrole and polyaniline nanowire arrays) possesses high capacitance, superior rate capability ascribed to large electrochemical surface, and an optimal ion diffusion path in the ordered nanowire structure, which is proved to be an ideal electrode material for high performance supercapacitors. Furthermore, flexible, micro-scale, threadlike, and multifunctional supercapacitors are introduced based on conducting polyaniline nanowire arrays and their composites. These prototypes of supercapacitors utilize the high flexibility, good processability, and large capacitance of conducting polymers, which efficiently extend the usage of supercapacitors in various situations, and even for a complicated integration system of different electronic devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Strain analysis of nanowire interfaces in multiscale composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Zhou, Zhi; Spears, John H.; Shankwitz, Timothy J.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the reinforcement-matrix interface of fiber reinforced polymers has been modified through grafting nanostructures - particularly carbon nanotubes and ZnO nanowires - on to the fiber surface. This type of interface engineering has made a great impact on the development of multiscale composites that have high stiffness, interfacial strength, toughness, and vibrational damping - qualities that are mutually exclusive to a degree in most raw materials. Although the efficacy of such nanostructured interfaces has been established, the reinforcement mechanisms of these multiscale composites have not been explored. Here, strain transfer across a nanowire interphase is studied in order to gain a heightened understanding of the working principles of physical interface modification and the formation of a functional gradient. This problem is studied using a functionally graded piezoelectric interface composed of vertically aligned lead zirconate titanate nanowires, as their piezoelectric properties can be utilized to precisely control the strain on one side of the interface. The displacement and strain across the nanowire interface is captured using digital image correlation. It is demonstrated that the material gradient created through nanowires cause a smooth strain transfer from reinforcement phase into matrix phase that eliminates the stress concentration between these phases, which have highly mismatched elasticity.

  2. Lithium effects on the mechanical and electronic properties of germanium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Macías, A.; Salazar, F.; Miranda, A.; Trejo-Baños, A.; Pérez, L. A.; Carvajal, E.; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2018-04-01

    Semiconductor nanowire arrays promise rapid development of a new generation of lithium (Li) batteries because they can store more Li atoms than conventional crystals due to their large surface areas. During the charge-discharge process, the electrodes experience internal stresses that fatigue the material and limit the useful life of the battery. The theoretical study of electronic and mechanical properties of lithiated nanowire arrays allows the designing of electrode materials that could improve battery performance. In this work, we present a density functional theory study of the electronic band structure, formation energy, binding energy, and Young’s modulus (Y) of hydrogen passivated germanium nanowires (H-GeNWs) grown along the [111] and [001] crystallographic directions with surface and interstitial Li atoms. The results show that the germanium nanowires (GeNWs) with surface Li atoms maintain their semiconducting behavior but their energy gap size decreases when the Li concentration grows. In contrast, the GeNWs can have semiconductor or metallic behavior depending on the concentration of the interstitial Li atoms. On the other hand, Y is an indicator of the structural changes that GeNWs suffer due to the concentration of Li atoms. For surface Li atoms, Y stays almost constant, whereas for interstitial Li atoms, the Y values indicate important structural changes in the GeNWs.

  3. Line-emission cross sections for the charge-exchange reaction between fully stripped carbon and atomic hydrogen in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Kato, T.

    1992-01-01

    Line-emission cross sections of the charge-exchange reaction between fully stripped carbon and atomic hydrogen are measured in the energy range of 18 - 38 keV/amu in tokamak plasmas. The energy dependence of the emission cross sections for the transition of Δn = 8 - 7 and Δn = 7 - 6 and their ratios are compared with theoretical calculations. (author)

  4. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O 2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O 2 and co-adsorption of CO and O 2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O 2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O 2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O 2 . For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO 2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a

  5. Precise mass detector based on carbon nanooscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukashenko, S., E-mail: lukashenko13@mail.ru; Golubok, A. [Department of Nanotechnology and Material Science, ITMO University, Kronverskiy av. 49, 192000, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute for Analytical Instrumentation of RAS, Rizhsky pr 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Komissarenko, F. [Department of Nanotechnology and Material Science, ITMO University, Kronverskiy av. 49, 192000, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Khlopina 8/3, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mukhin, I. [Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Khlopina 8/3, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sapozhnikov, I. [Institute for Analytical Instrumentation of RAS, Rizhsky pr 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Veniaminov, A. [Centre for Information Optical Technologies, ITMO University, Birzhevaya ln. 14-16, 199034, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lysak, V. [Department of Nanotechnology and Material Science, ITMO University, Kronverskiy av. 49, 192000, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    Precise mass detectors based on an amorphous carbon nanowires, which localized on the top of a tungsten tip were fabricated and investigated. The nanowires were grown in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) chamber using focused electron beam technique. The movement trajectories and amplitude-frequency characteristics of the carbon nanowire oscillators were visualized at low and ambient pressure using SEM and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), respectevely. The SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} nanospheres were clamped on the top of the carbon nanowires. The manipulations of nanospheres were provided by means of dielectrophoretic force in SEM. The sensitivity of the mass detector based on the carbon nanowire oscillator was estimated.

  6. Long Silver Nanowires Synthesis by Pulsed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Batevandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanowires were pulse electrodeposited into nanopore anodic alumina oxide templates. The effects of continuous and pulse electrodeposition waveform on the microstructure properties of the nanowire arrays were studied. It is seen that the microstructure of nanowire is depend to pulse condition. The off time duration of pulse waveform enables to control the growth direction of Ag nanowires.

  7. Restricted access carbon nanotubes for direct extraction of cadmium from human serum samples followed by atomic absorption spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Adriano F; Barbosa, Valéria M P; Bettini, Jefferson; Luccas, Pedro O; Figueiredo, Eduardo C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new sorbent that is able to extract metal ions directly from untreated biological fluids, simultaneously excluding all proteins from these samples. The sorbent was obtained through the modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with an external bovine serum albumin (BSA) layer, resulting in restricted access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs). The BSA layer was fixed through the interconnection between the amine groups of the BSA using glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. When a protein sample is percolated through a cartridge containing RACNTs and the sample pH is higher than the isoelectric point of the proteins, both proteins from the sample and the BSA layer are negatively ionized. Thus, an electrostatic repulsion prevents the interaction between the proteins from the sample on the RACNTs surface. At the same time, metal ions are adsorbed in the CNTs (core) after their passage through the chains of proteins. The Cd(2+) ion was selected for a proof-of-principle case to test the suitability of the RACNTs due to its toxicological relevance. RACNTs were able to extract Cd(2+) and exclude almost 100% of the proteins from the human serum samples in an online solid-phase extraction system coupled with thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.24 and 0.80 μg L(-1), respectively. The sampling frequency was 8.6h(-1), and the intra- and inter-day precisions at the 0.80, 15.0, and 30.0 μg L(-1) Cd(2+) levels were all lower than 10.1% (RSD). The recoveries obtained for human blood serum samples fortified with Cd(2+) ranged from 85.0% to 112.0%. The method was successfully applied to analyze Cd(2+) directly from six human blood serum samples without any pretreatment, and the observed concentrations ranged from

  8. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Han, Lihao [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Brunschwig, Bruce S., E-mail: bsb@caltech.edu [Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lewis, Nathan S., E-mail: nslewis@caltech.edu [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films.

  9. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rui; Han, Lihao; Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M.; Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe 3 and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films

  10. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  11. Atomic force microscopy and tribology study of the adsorption of alcohols on diamond-like carbon coatings and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, M.; Simič, R.

    2013-01-01

    Polar molecules are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which represents one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. Since the basic chemical and physical effects of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been investigated only very rarely, it is important to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. In our study the adsorption of hexadecanol in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage, the size and the density of the adsorbed islands of alcohol molecules were analyzed. Tribological tests were also performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours with the adsorption of molecules on the surface. In this case, steel surfaces served as a reference. The AFM was successfully used to analyze the adsorption ability of polar molecules onto the DLC surfaces and a good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour of the DLC and the steel was found. We confirmed that alcohols can adsorb physically and chemically onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for the DLC coatings. The adsorption of alcohol onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction because of the already inherently low-friction properties of DLC. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include the environmental species effect, the temperature effect and the tribological rubbing effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces.

  12. Atomic force microscopy and tribology study of the adsorption of alcohols on diamond-like carbon coatings and steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalin, M., E-mail: mitjan.kalin@tint.fs.uni-lj.si [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Laboratory for Tribology and Interface Nanotechnology, Bogišićeva 8, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Simič, R. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Laboratory for Tribology and Interface Nanotechnology, Bogišićeva 8, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-04-15

    Polar molecules are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which represents one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. Since the basic chemical and physical effects of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been investigated only very rarely, it is important to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. In our study the adsorption of hexadecanol in various concentrations (2–20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage, the size and the density of the adsorbed islands of alcohol molecules were analyzed. Tribological tests were also performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours with the adsorption of molecules on the surface. In this case, steel surfaces served as a reference. The AFM was successfully used to analyze the adsorption ability of polar molecules onto the DLC surfaces and a good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour of the DLC and the steel was found. We confirmed that alcohols can adsorb physically and chemically onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for the DLC coatings. The adsorption of alcohol onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction because of the already inherently low-friction properties of DLC. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include the environmental species effect, the temperature effect and the tribological rubbing effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces.

  13. Characterization of Nanowire Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-28

    characterization system and picosecond pulsed laser source will be used to provide deeper insight into the fast charge carrier dynamics in the GaAsSb and...value of the current fluctuations for a particular frequency, f is the effective measurement bandwidth at the discrete frequency point, and IDS is...GaAsSb CS nanowires. The best fit of the spectra with the simulation carried out using Matlab revealed flicker noise at lower frequency having 1/f

  14. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  15. Fabrication of vertically aligned Pd nanowire array in AAO template by electrodeposition using neutral electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüzer Hayrettin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A vertically aligned Pd nanowire array was successfully fabricated on an Au/Ti substrate using an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO template by a direct voltage electrodeposition method at room temperature using diluted neutral electrolyte. The fabrication of Pd nanowires was controlled by analyzing the current–time transient during electrodeposition using potentiostat. The AAO template and the Pd nanowires were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX methods and X-Ray diffraction (XRD. It was observed that the Pd nanowire array was standing freely on an Au-coated Ti substrate after removing the AAO template in a relatively large area of about 5 cm2, approximately 50 nm in diameter and 2.5 μm in length with a high aspect ratio. The nucleation rate and the number of atoms in the critical nucleus were determined from the analysis of current transients. Pd nuclei density was calculated as 3.55 × 108 cm−2. Usage of diluted neutral electrolyte enables slower growing of Pd nanowires owing to increase in the electrodeposition potential and thus obtained Pd nanowires have higher crystallinity with lower dislocations. In fact, this high crystallinity of Pd nanowires provides them positive effect for sensor performances especially.

  16. Influence of ZnO encapsulation on the luminescence property of GeO2 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyunsu; Jin, Changhyun; Park, Sunghoon; Lee, Chongmu; Kwon, Youngjae; Lee, Sangmin

    2012-01-01

    GeO 2 -core/ZnO-shell nanowires were synthesized on (100) Si substrates by thermal evaporation of Ge powders, followed by atomic layer deposition of ZnO. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that the mean diameter and lengths of the core-shell nanowires were approximately 100 nm and from a few tens to a few hundreds of micrometers, respectively. Photoluminescence measurements showed that pure GeO 2 nanowires had a violet emission band centered at approximately 430 nm. In contrast, GeO 2 -core/ZnO-shell nanowires had both a sharp near-band edge (NBE) emission band centered at approximately 380 nm and a broad deep-level (DL) emission band centered at approximately 590 nm, which is characteristic of ZnO. GeO 2 -core/ZnO-shell nanowires showed a higher intensity ratio of NBE emission to DL emission than either GeO 2 or ZnO nanowires. In addition, the origin of the enhancement of luminescence in GeO 2 nanowires by ZnO encapsulation is discussed.

  17. Synthesis and cathodoluminescence of Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zaien; Liu, Baodan; Yuan, Fang; Hu, Tao; Zhang, Guifeng; Dierre, Benjamin; Hirosaki, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Jiang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Sb/P co-doped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowires were synthesized via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process by heating Ga 2 O 3 and Sb powders in NH 3 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirmed the as-synthesized products were Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires with rough morphology and hexagonal wurtzite structure. Room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) demonstrated that an obvious band shift of GaN nanowires can be observed due to Sb/P co-doping. Possible explanation for the growth and luminescence mechanism of Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires was discussed. Highlight: • Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires were synthesized through a well-designed multi-channel chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. • Sb/P co-doping leads to the crystallinity deterioration of GaN nanowires. • Sb/P co-doping caused the red-shift of GaN nanowires band-gap in UV range. • Compared with Sb doping, P atoms are more easy to incorporate into the GaN lattice

  18. Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane-Assisted Fabrication of β-In2S3Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chih-Jung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, β-In2S3nanowires were first synthesized by sulfurizing the pure Indium (In nanowires in an AAO membrane. As FE-SEM results, β-In2S3nanowires are highly ordered, arranged tightly corresponding to the high porosity of the AAO membrane used. The diameter of the β-In2S3nanowires is about 60 nm with the length of about 6–8 μm. Moreover, the aspect ratio of β-In2S3nanowires is up to 117. An EDS analysis revealed the β-In2S3nanowires with an atomic ratio of nearly S/In = 1.5. X-ray diffraction and corresponding selected area electron diffraction patterns demonstrated that the β-In2S3nanowire is tetragonal polycrystalline. The direct band gap energy (Eg is 2.40 eV from the optical measurement, and it is reasonable with literature.

  19. Room-temperature solution synthesis of Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowires and their catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wenjun; Huang Huandi; Zhu Yanjun; Li Xiaoyun; Wang Xuebin; Li Chaorong; Chen Benyong; Wang Ge; Shi Zhan

    2012-01-01

    A simple chemical solution route for the synthesis of large-scale high-quality Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowire at room temperature has been developed. In the synthesis, the protonated amine was intercalated into the molybdenum bronze layers to reduce the electrostatic force of the lamellar structures, and then the Ag nanoparticle functionalized long nanowires could be easily induced by a redox reaction between a molybdenum oxide–amine intermediate and Ag + at room temperature. The intercalation lamellar structures improved the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles, with the result that uniform Ag nanoparticles occurred on the surface of the MoO 3 nanowire. In this way Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of around 6 nm, and high-purity nanowires with mean diameter of around 50 nm and with typical lengths of several tens to hundreds of micrometers were produced. The heteronanostructured nanowires were intricately and inseparably connected to each other with hydrogen bonds and/or bridge oxygen atoms and packed together, forming a paper-like porous network film. The Ag–MoO 3 nanowire film performs a promoted catalytic property for the epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene, and the heteronanostructured nanowire film sensor shows excellent sensing performance to hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature. (paper)

  20. Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane-Assisted Fabrication of beta-In(2)S(3) Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jen-Bin; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Wen-Chia; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Po-Feng

    2009-06-06

    In this study, beta-In(2)S(3) nanowires were first synthesized by sulfurizing the pure Indium (In) nanowires in an AAO membrane. As FE-SEM results, beta-In(2)S(3) nanowires are highly ordered, arranged tightly corresponding to the high porosity of the AAO membrane used. The diameter of the beta-In(2)S(3) nanowires is about 60 nm with the length of about 6-8 mum. Moreover, the aspect ratio of beta-In(2)S(3) nanowires is up to 117. An EDS analysis revealed the beta-In(2)S(3) nanowires with an atomic ratio of nearly S/In = 1.5. X-ray diffraction and corresponding selected area electron diffraction patterns demonstrated that the beta-In(2)S(3) nanowire is tetragonal polycrystalline. The direct band gap energy (E(g)) is 2.40 eV from the optical measurement, and it is reasonable with literature.

  1. Room-temperature solution synthesis of Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowires and their catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjun; Huang, Huandi; Zhu, Yanjun; Li, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xuebin; Li, Chaorong; Chen, Benyong; Wang, Ge; Shi, Zhan

    2012-10-26

    A simple chemical solution route for the synthesis of large-scale high-quality Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowire at room temperature has been developed. In the synthesis, the protonated amine was intercalated into the molybdenum bronze layers to reduce the electrostatic force of the lamellar structures, and then the Ag nanoparticle functionalized long nanowires could be easily induced by a redox reaction between a molybdenum oxide-amine intermediate and Ag(+) at room temperature. The intercalation lamellar structures improved the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles, with the result that uniform Ag nanoparticles occurred on the surface of the MoO(3) nanowire. In this way Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of around 6 nm, and high-purity nanowires with mean diameter of around 50 nm and with typical lengths of several tens to hundreds of micrometers were produced. The heteronanostructured nanowires were intricately and inseparably connected to each other with hydrogen bonds and/or bridge oxygen atoms and packed together, forming a paper-like porous network film. The Ag-MoO(3) nanowire film performs a promoted catalytic property for the epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene, and the heteronanostructured nanowire film sensor shows excellent sensing performance to hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature.

  2. Amorphous molecular junctions produced by ion irradiation on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenxia; Yu Liping; Zhang Wei; Ding Yinfeng; Li Yulan; Han Jiaguang; Zhu Zhiyuan; Xu Hongjie; He Guowei; Chen Yi; Hu Gang

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and molecular dynamics have demonstrated that electron irradiation could create molecular junctions between crossed single-wall carbon nanotubes. Recently molecular dynamics computation predicted that ion irradiation could also join single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing carbon ion irradiation on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that these nanotubes evolve into amorphous carbon nanowires, more importantly, during the process of which various molecular junctions of amorphous nanowires are formed by welding from crossed carbon nanotubes. It demonstrates that ion-beam irradiation could be an effective way not only for the welding of nanotubes but also for the formation of nanowire junctions

  3. Quantum emitters coupled to surface plasmons of an nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzsotjan, David; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a system consisting of a single, as well as two emitters strongly coupled to surface plasmon modes of a nanowire using a Green's function approach. Explicit expressions are derived for the spontaneous decay rate into the plasmon modes and for the atom-plasmon coupling as well......-qubit quantum gate. We also discuss a possible realization of interesting many-body Hamiltonians, such as the spin-boson model, using strong emitter-plasmon coupling. Udgivelsesdato: 27 August...

  4. Evaluation of an improved atomic data basis for carbon in UEDGE emission modeling for L-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz Burgos, J.M., E-mail: munozj@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 (United States); Leonard, A.W. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Loch, S.D.; Ballance, C.P. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    New scaled carbon atomic electron-impact excitation data is utilized to evaluate comparisons between experimental measurements and fluid emission modeling of detached plasmas at DIII-D. The C I and C II modeled emission lines for 909.8 and 514.7 nm were overestimated by a factor of 10–20 than observed experimentally for the inner leg, while the outer leg was within a factor of 2. Due to higher modeled emissions, a previous study using the UEDGE code predicted that a higher amount of carbon was required to achieve a detached outboard divertor plasma in L-mode at DIII-D. The line emission predicted by using the new scaled carbon data yields closer results when compared against experiment. We also compare modeling and measurements of D{sub α} emission from neutral deuterium against predictions from newly calculated R-Matrix with pseudostates data available at the ADAS database.

  5. Formation of tungsten oxide nanowires by ion irradiation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Dong; Ren, Feng; Wu, Heng-Yi; Qin, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Chang-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Here we reported the fabrication of tungsten oxide (WO3-x ) nanowires by Ar+ ion irradiation of WO3 thin films followed by annealing in vacuum. The nanowire length increases with increasing irradiation fluence and with decreasing ion energy. We propose that the stress-driven diffusion of the irradiation-induced W interstitial atoms is responsible for the formation of the nanowires. Comparing to the pristine film, the fabricated nanowire film shows a 106-fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, resulting from the high-density irradiation-induced vacancies on the oxygen sublattice. The nanostructure exhibits largely enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect due to the oxygen vacancy. Thus, ion irradiation provides a powerful approach for fabricating and tailoring the surface nanostructures of semiconductors.

  6. David Adler Lectureship Award Talk: III-V Semiconductor Nanowires on Silicon for Future Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riel, Heike

    Bottom-up grown nanowires are very attractive materials for direct integration of III-V semiconductors on silicon thus opening up new possibilities for the design and fabrication of nanoscale devices for electronic, optoelectronic as well as quantum information applications. Template-Assisted Selective Epitaxy (TASE) allows the well-defined and monolithic integration of complex III-V nanostructures and devices on silicon. Achieving atomically abrupt heterointerfaces, high crystal quality and control of dimension down to 1D nanowires enabled the demonstration of FETs and tunnel devices based on In(Ga)As and GaSb. Furthermore, the strong influence of strain on nanowires as well as results on quantum transport studies of InAs nanowires with well-defined geometry will be presented.

  7. Mechanical response of CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćirić, L.; Ashby, K.; Abadie, T.; Spina, M.; Duchamp, M.; Náfrádi, B.; Kollár, M.; Forró, L.; Horváth, E.

    2018-03-01

    We report a systematic study of the mechanical response of methylammonium lead triiodide CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires by employing bending measurements using atomic force microscope on suspended wires over photo-lithographically patterned channels. Force-deflection curves measured at room temperature give a Young's modulus between 2 and 14 GPa. This broad range of values is attributed to the variations in the microcrystalline texture of halide perovskite nanowires. The mechanical response of a highly crystalline nanowire is linear with force and has a brittle character. The braking modulus of 48 ± 20 MPa corresponds to 100 μm of radius of curvature of the nanowires, rendering them much better structures for flexible devices than spin coated films. The measured moduli decrease rapidly if the NW is exposed to water vapor.

  8. Carbon−Silicon Core−Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2009-09-09

    We introduce a novel design of carbon-silicon core-shell nanowires for high power and long life lithium battery electrodes. Amorphous silicon was coated onto carbon nanofibers to form a core-shell structure and the resulted core-shell nanowires showed great performance as anode material. Since carbon has a much smaller capacity compared to silicon, the carbon core experiences less structural stress or damage during lithium cycling and can function as a mechanical support and an efficient electron conducting pathway. These nanowires have a high charge storage capacity of ∼2000 mAh/g and good cycling life. They also have a high Coulmbic efficiency of 90% for the first cycle and 98-99.6% for the following cycles. A full cell composed of LiCoO2 cathode and carbon-silicon core-shell nanowire anode is also demonstrated. Significantly, using these core-shell nanowires we have obtained high mass loading and an area capacity of ∼4 mAh/cm2, which is comparable to commercial battery values. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Substrate dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires with remarkable pseudocapacitance

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2012-05-09

    A scheme of current collector dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires has been used to create unique supercapacitor electrodes, with each nanowire making direct contact with the current collector. The fabricated electrodes offer the desired properties of macroporosity to allow facile electrolyte flow, thereby reducing device resistance and nanoporosity with large surface area to allow faster reaction kinetics. Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on carbon fiber paper collectors self-organize into a brush-like morphology with the nanowires completely surrounding the carbon microfiber cores. In comparison, Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on planar graphitized carbon paper collectors self-organize into a flower-like morphology. In three electrode configuration, brush-like and flower-like morphologies exhibited specific capacitance values of 1525 and 1199 F/g, respectively, at a constant current density of 1 A/g. In two electrode configuration, the brush-like nanowire morphology resulted in a superior supercapacitor performance with high specific capacitances of 911 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 784 F/g at 40 A/g. In comparison, the flower-like morphology exhibited lower specific capacitance values of 620 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 423 F/g at 40 A/g. The Co 3O 4 nanowires with brush-like morphology exhibited high values of specific power (71 kW/kg) and specific energy (81 Wh/kg). Maximum energy and power densities calculated for Co 3O 4 nanowires with flower-like morphology were 55 Wh/kg and 37 kW/kg respectively. Both electrode designs exhibited excellent cycling stability by retaining ∼91-94% of their maximum capacitance after 5000 cycles of continuous charge-discharge. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolfsson, Karl; Hammarin, Greger; Prinz, Christelle N; Schneider, Martina; Häcker, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III–V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate. (paper)

  11. Electron and positron contributions to the displacement per atom profile in bulk multi-walled carbon nanotube material irradiated with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Leyva Pernia, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The electron and positron contributions to the effective atom displacement cross-section in multi-walled carbon nanotube bulk materials exposed to gamma rays were calculated. The physical properties and the displacement threshold energy value reported in literature for this material were taken into account. Then, using the mathematical simulation of photon and particle transport in matter, the electron and positron energy flux distributions within the irradiated object were also calculated. Finally, considering both results, the atom displacement damage profiles inside the analyzed bulk carbon nanotube material were determined. The individual contribution from each type of secondary particles generated by the photon interactions was specified. An increasing behavior of the displacement cross-sections for all the studied particles energy range was observed. The particles minimum kinetic energy values that make probabilistically possible the single and multiple atom displacement processes were determined. The positrons contribution importance to the total number of point defects generated during the interaction of gamma rays with the studied materials was confirmed

  12. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go eKawamura

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanowires (NWs have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed.

  13. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-11-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed.

  14. Hydrothermal growth of titania nanowires for SAW device sensing area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Mohd Rosydi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of titania or titanium dioxide (TiO2 is attracted to energy and environmental applications. Here, the growth of nanostructure TiO2 nanowires on Si (100 substrates by using the two-step method. Different seed layers of TiO2 were deposited by spin coating and annealing, followed by the growth of TiO2 nanowires by using the hydrothermal method. The sol-gel technique was used in preparing the TiO2 solution for the thin film deposition purpose. Acetic acid, hydrochloric acid and tris (2-aminoethyl amine were used as a stabilizer to synthesize three different TiO2 seed layers. The aim of this study was to understand the role of polycrystalline size on thin film towards the diameter of nanowires grown as a sensing area in Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Biosensor. The morphology and structure of the thin film and TiO2 nanowires were characterized using X-Ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM.

  15. Ferromagnetic resonance in low interacting permalloy nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raposo, V.; Zazo, M.; Flores, A. G.; Iñiguez, J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, University of Salamanca, E-37071 Salamanca (Spain); Garcia, J.; Vega, V.; Prida, V. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-04-14

    Dipolar interactions on magnetic nanowire arrays have been investigated by various techniques. One of the most powerful techniques is the ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy, because the resonance field depends directly on the anisotropy field strength and its frequency dependence. In order to evaluate the influence of magnetostatic dipolar interactions among ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, several densely packed hexagonal arrays of NiFe nanowires have been prepared by electrochemical deposition filling self-ordered nanopores of alumina membranes with different pore sizes but keeping the same interpore distance. Nanowires’ diameter was changed from 90 to 160 nm, while the lattice parameter was fixed to 300 nm, which was achieved by carefully reducing the pore diameter by means of Atomic Layer Deposition of conformal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers on the nanoporous alumina templates. Field and frequency dependence of ferromagnetic resonance have been studied in order to obtain the dispersion diagram which gives information about anisotropy, damping factor, and gyromagnetic ratio. The relationship between resonance frequency and magnetic field can be explained by the roles played by the shape anisotropy and dipolar interactions among the ferromagnetic nanowires.

  16. Effects of polymer surface energy on morphology and properties of silver nanowire fabricated via nanoimprint and E-beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Hwang, Soon Hyoung; Jeon, Sohee; Jung, Joo-Yun; Lee, Jihye; Choi, Dae-Geun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Park, Sang-Hu; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that use of different nanoimprint resins as a polymer pattern has a significant effect on the morphology of silver (Ag) nanowires deposited via an E-beam evaporator. RM-311 and Ormo-stamp resins are chosen as a polymer pattern to form a line with dimensions of width (100 nm) × space (100 nm) × height (120 nm) by using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Their contact angles are then measured to evaluate their surface energies. In order to compare the properties of the Ag nanowires deposited on the various polymer patterns with different surface energies, hydrophobic surface treatment of the polymer pattern surface is implemented using self-assembled monolayers. In addition, gold and aluminum nanowires are fabricated for comparison with the Ag nanowires, with the differences in the nanowire morphologies being determined by the different atomic properties. The monocrystalline and polycrystalline structures of the various Ag nanowire formations are observed using transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the melting temperatures and optical properties of four kinds of Ag nanowire morphologies deposited on various polymer patterns are evaluated using a hot plate and an ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometer, respectively. The results indicate that the morphology of the Ag nanowire determines the melting temperature and the transmission. We believe that these findings will greatly aid the development of NIL, along with physical evaporation and chemical deposition techniques, and will be widely employed in optics, biology, and surface wettability applications.

  17. SnO2Nanowire Arrays and Electrical Properties Synthesized by Fast Heating a Mixture of SnO2and CNTs Waste Soot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhi-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SnO2nanowire arrays were synthesized by fast heating a mixture of SnO2and the carbon nanotubes waste soot by high-frequency induction heating. The resultant SnO2nanowires possess diameters from 50 to 100 nm and lengths up to tens of mircrometers. The field-effect transistors based on single SnO2nanowire exhibit that as-synthesized nanowires have better transistor performance in terms of transconductance and on/off ratio. This work demonstrates a simple technique to the growth of nanomaterials for application in future nanoelectronic devices.

  18. Surface sensitization mechanism on negative electron affinity p-GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Feng, Shu; Lu, Feifei

    2018-03-01

    The surface sensitization is the key to prepare negative electron affinity photocathode. The thesis emphasizes on the study of surface sensitization mechanism of p-type doping GaN nanowires utilizing first principles based on density function theory. The adsorption energy, work function, dipole moment, geometry structure, electronic structure and optical properties of Mg-doped GaN nanowires surfaces with various coverages of Cs atoms are investigated. The GaN nanowire with Mg doped in core position is taken as the sensitization base. At the initial stage of sensitization, the best adsorption site for Cs atom on GaN nanowire surface is BN, the bridge site of two adjacent N atoms. Surface sensitization generates a p-type internal surface with an n-type surface state, introducing a band bending region which can help reduce surface barrier and work function. With increasing Cs coverage, work functions decrease monotonously and the "Cs-kill" phenomenon disappears. For Cs coverage of 0.75 ML and 1 ML, the corresponding sensitization systems reach negative electron affinity state. Through surface sensitization, the absorption curves are red shifted and the absorption coefficient is cut down. All theoretical calculations can guide the design of negative electron affinity Mg doped GaN nanowires photocathode.

  19. Density functional calculations of hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules with a 48-atom framework: Hydrides and oxides of boron, carbon, nitrogen, aluminum, and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaViolette, Randall A. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States); Benson, Michael T. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    We computed via first-principles density functional theory calculations (employing both the local density and generalized gradient approximations) the dimensions, bond lengths and angles, binding energy, and HOMO-LUMO gap of the following hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules: B{sub 48}H{sub 24}, C{sub 48}H{sub 48}, C{sub 96}H{sub 80} (formed by bonding two C{sub 48}H{sub 48} molecules), N{sub 48}H{sub 24}, Al{sub 48}H{sub 24}, and Si{sub 48}H{sub 48}; B{sub 24}O{sub 24}, C{sub 24}O{sub 24}, N{sub 24}O{sub 24}, Al{sub 24}O{sub 24}, and Si{sub 24}O{sub 24}. Each molecule consists of a large hollow framework of six puckered eight-membered rings whose planes are either mutually perpendicular or parallel, so that each molecule possesses only eight- and nine-membered rings. The hydrides have their hydrogen atoms attached only to the two-atom bridging sites on the framework. The oxides have their oxygen atoms occupying exclusively the two-atom bridging sites of the framework alternating with the (B, C, N, Al, Si) atoms exclusively occupying the three-atom bridging sites. We also calculated the infrared spectra of the C{sub 48}H{sub 48} and the C{sub 24}O{sub 24} molecules. For the sake of comparison, we also examined the hypothetical octahedral C{sub 48} fullerene cuboctohedron (possessing four-, six-, and eight-membered rings) studied by Dunlap and Taylor. The molecules based on carbon would be the most stable; those based on nitrogen would be the least stable, if at all. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Density functional calculations of hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules with a 48-atom framework: Hydrides and oxides of boron, carbon, nitrogen, aluminum, and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaViolette, Randall A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    We computed via first-principles density functional theory calculations (employing both the local density and generalized gradient approximations) the dimensions, bond lengths and angles, binding energy, and HOMO-LUMO gap of the following hypothetical neutral hollow octahedral molecules: B 48 H 24 , C 48 H 48 , C 96 H 80 (formed by bonding two C 48 H 48 molecules), N 48 H 24 , Al 48 H 24 , and Si 48 H 48 ; B 24 O 24 , C 24 O 24 , N 24 O 24 , Al 24 O 24 , and Si 24 O 24 . Each molecule consists of a large hollow framework of six puckered eight-membered rings whose planes are either mutually perpendicular or parallel, so that each molecule possesses only eight- and nine-membered rings. The hydrides have their hydrogen atoms attached only to the two-atom bridging sites on the framework. The oxides have their oxygen atoms occupying exclusively the two-atom bridging sites of the framework alternating with the (B, C, N, Al, Si) atoms exclusively occupying the three-atom bridging sites. We also calculated the infrared spectra of the C 48 H 48 and the C 24 O 24 molecules. For the sake of comparison, we also examined the hypothetical octahedral C 48 fullerene cuboctohedron (possessing four-, six-, and eight-membered rings) studied by Dunlap and Taylor. The molecules based on carbon would be the most stable; those based on nitrogen would be the least stable, if at all. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. Proposal for Testing and Validation of Vacuum Ultra-Violet Atomic Laser-Induced Fluorescence as a Method to Analyze Carbon Grid Erosion in Ion Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Previous investigation under award NAG3-25 10 sought to determine the best method of LIF to determine the carbon density in a thruster plume. Initial reports from other groups were ambiguous as to the number of carbon clusters that might be present in the plume of a thruster. Carbon clusters would certainly affect the ability to LIF; if they were the dominant species, then perhaps the LIF method should target clusters. The results of quadrupole mass spectroscopy on sputtered carbon determined that minimal numbers of clusters were sputtered from graphite under impact from keV Krypton. There were some investigations in the keV range by other groups that hinted at clusters, but at the time the proposal was presented to NASA, there was no data from low-energy sputtering available. Thus, the proposal sought to develop a method to characterize the population only of atoms sputtered from a graphite target in a test cell. Most of the ground work had been established by the previous two years of investigation. The proposal covering 2003 sought to develop an anti-Stokes Raman shifting cell to generate VUW light and test this cell on two different laser systems, ArF and YAG- pumped dye. The second goal was to measure the lowest detectable amounts of carbon atoms by 156.1 nm and 165.7 nm LIF. If equipment was functioning properly, it was expected that these goals would be met easily during the timeframe of the proposal, and that is the reason only modest funding was requested. The PI was only funded at half- time by Glenn during the summer months. All other work time was paid for by Whitworth College. The college also funded a student, Charles Shawley, who worked on the project during the spring.

  2. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  3. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self-organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  4. Atomic resolution structural insights into PdPt nanoparticle–carbon interactions for the design of highly active and stable electrocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slanac, Daniel A.; Li Lin; Mayoral, Alvaro; Yacaman, Miguel José; Manthiram, Arumugam; Stevenson, Keith J.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Interfacial interactions between sub-4 nm metal alloy nanoparticles and carbon supports, although not well understood at the atomic level, may be expected to have a profound influence on catalytic properties. Pd 3 Pt 2 alloy particles comprised of a disordered surface layer over a corrugated crystalline core are shown to exhibit strong interfacial interactions with a ∼20–50 nm spherical carbon support, as characterized by probe aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (pcSTEM). The disordered shells were formed from defects introduced by Pd during arrested growth synthesis of the alloy nanoparticles. The chemical and morphological changes in the catalyst, before and after cyclic stability testing (1000 cycles, 0.5–1.2 V), were probed with cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pcSTEM. The strong metal–support interaction, along with the uniform alloy structure raised the mass activity by a factor of 1.8 versus pure Pt. The metal–support interactions also mitigated nanoparticle coalescence, dissolution, and ripening, resulting in only a 20% loss in mass activity (versus 60% for pure Pt on carbon) after the cyclic stability test. The design of alloy structure, guided by insight from atomic scale pcSTEM, for enhanced catalytic activity and stability, resulting from strong wetting with a deformable disordered shell, has the potential to be a general paradigm for improving catalytic performance.

  5. Contact planarization of ensemble nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2011-06-01

    The viability of four organic polymers (S1808, SC200, SU8 and Cyclotene) as filling materials to achieve planarization of ensemble nanowire arrays is reported. Analysis of the porosity, surface roughness and thermal stability of each filling material was performed. Sonication was used as an effective method to remove the tops of the nanowires (NWs) to achieve complete planarization. Ensemble nanowire devices were fully fabricated and I-V measurements confirmed that Cyclotene effectively planarizes the NWs while still serving the role as an insulating layer between the top and bottom contacts. These processes and analysis can be easily implemented into future characterization and fabrication of ensemble NWs for optoelectronic device applications.

  6. Chiral gold nanowires with boerdijk-coxeter-bernal structure

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2014-09-10

    A Boerdijk-Coxeter-Bernal (BCB) helix is made of linearly stacked regular tetrahedra (tetrahelix). As such, it is chiral without nontrivial translational or rotational symmetries. We demonstrate here an example of the chiral BCB structure made of totally symmetrical gold atoms, created in nanowires by direct chemical synthesis. Detailed study by high-resolution electron microscopy illustrates their elegant chiral structure and the unique one-dimensional "pseudo-periodicity". The BCB-type atomic packing mode is proposed to be a result of the competition and compromise between the lattice and surface energy.

  7. RF/microwave properties of nanotubes and nanowires : LDRD Project 105876 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrymgeour, David; Lee, Mark; Hsu, Julia W. P.; Highstrete, Clark

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 105876 was a research project whose primary goal was to discover the currently unknown science underlying the basic linear and nonlinear electrodynamic response of nanotubes and nanowires in a manner that will support future efforts aimed at converting forefront nanoscience into innovative new high-frequency nanodevices. The project involved experimental and theoretical efforts to discover and understand high frequency (MHz through tens of GHz) electrodynamic response properties of nanomaterials, emphasizing nanowires of silicon, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes. While there is much research on DC electrical properties of nanowires, electrodynamic characteristics still represent a major new frontier in nanotechnology. We generated world-leading insight into how the low dimensionality of these nanomaterials yields sometimes desirable and sometimes problematic high-frequency properties that are outside standard model electron dynamics. In the cases of silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes, evidence of strong disorder or glass-like charge dynamics was measured, indicating that these materials still suffer from serious inhomogeneities that limit there high frequency performance. Zinc oxide nanowires were found to obey conventional Drude dynamics. In all cases, a significant practical problem involving large impedance mismatch between the high intrinsic impedance of all nanowires and nanotubes and high-frequency test equipment had to be overcome.

  8. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  9. Mechanics of nanowire/nanotube in-surface buckling on elastomeric substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, J; Huang, Y [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ryu, S Y; Paik, U [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Hangdang-dong, Sungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, K-C [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Rogers, J A, E-mail: y-huang@northwestern.edu, E-mail: jrogers@uiuc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick-Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2010-02-26

    A continuum mechanics theory is established for the in-surface buckling of one-dimensional nanomaterials on compliant substrates, such as silicon nanowires on elastomeric substrates observed in experiments. Simple analytical expressions are obtained for the buckling wavelength, amplitude and critical buckling strain in terms of the bending and tension stiffness of the nanomaterial and the substrate elastic properties. The analysis is applied to silicon nanowires, single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanotube bundles. For silicon nanowires, the measured buckling wavelength gives Young's modulus to be 140 GPa, which agrees well with the prior experimental studies. It is shown that the energy for in-surface buckling is lower than that for normal (out-of-surface) buckling, and is therefore energetically favorable.

  10. Mechanics of nanowire/nanotube in-surface buckling on elastomeric substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J; Huang, Y; Ryu, S Y; Paik, U; Hwang, K-C; Rogers, J A

    2010-01-01

    A continuum mechanics theory is established for the in-surface buckling of one-dimensional nanomaterials on compliant substrates, such as silicon nanowires on elastomeric substrates observed in experiments. Simple analytical expressions are obtained for the buckling wavelength, amplitude and critical buckling strain in terms of the bending and tension stiffness of the nanomaterial and the substrate elastic properties. The analysis is applied to silicon nanowires, single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanotube bundles. For silicon nanowires, the measured buckling wavelength gives Young's modulus to be 140 GPa, which agrees well with the prior experimental studies. It is shown that the energy for in-surface buckling is lower than that for normal (out-of-surface) buckling, and is therefore energetically favorable.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanowires via pulsed laser deposition accompanied by N{sub 2} annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Guan, Leilei; Xu, Zhuoqi; Zhao, Yu; Sun, Jian; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning, E-mail: ningxu@fudan.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The SiO{sub 2} nanowires were synthesized by PLD accompanied by N{sub 2} annealing. • The as-grown SiO{sub 2} nanowires were analyzed by HRTEM, SAED and EDS. • The grown SiO{sub 2} nanowire films are transparent in the range of 350–800 nm. • The SiO{sub 2} nanowire films can emit stable ultraviolet emission. - Abstract: Amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanowires are successfully fabricated on fused silica substrates covered by nickel/carbon catalyst bilayers via a method of pulsed laser deposition accompanied by annealing in ambient N{sub 2}. The field emission scanning electron microscopy images show that the optimum annealing temperature for the growth of SiO{sub 2} nanowires is about 1200 °C and the grown SiO{sub 2} nanowires become denser, longer and more uniform with the increment of annealing duration. The results of transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the grown nanowires are amorphous and have dark spheres on their tops. The analyses of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal that the nanowires are composed of SiO{sub 2} and the dark spheres on their tops contain little nickel. It is inferred that nickel, carbon and CO are the key elements to promote the SiO{sub 2} nanowire growth in the solid-liquid-solid mode. Transmission spectra demonstrate that the as-grown nanowire thin films can have about 94% average transmittance in the range of 350–800 nm, meanwhile the photoluminescence spectra of the as-grown SiO{sub 2} nanowire samples show stable ultraviolet emission centered at about 363 nm with a shoulder at about 393 nm.

  12. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we

  13. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro [University of California, Santa Cruz (United States). Baskin School of Engineering; NASA Ames Research Center, Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, Univ. of California Santa Cruz, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S. [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S. [University of California Davis, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  14. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro; Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S.; Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  15. Flow injection analysis-flame atomic absorption spectrometry system for indirect determination of cyanide using cadmium carbonate as a new solid-phase reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noroozifar, M.; Khorasani-Motlagh, M.; Hosseini, S.-N.

    2005-01-01

    A new and simple flow injection system procedure has been developed for the indirect determination of cyanide. The method is based on insertion of aqueous cyanide solutions into an on-line cadmium carbonate packed column (25% m/m suspended on silica gel beads) and a sodium hydroxide with pH 10 is used as the carrier stream. The eluent containing the analyte as cadmiumcyanide complexes, produced from reaction between cadmium carbonate and cyanide, measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The absorbance is proportional to the concentration of cyanide in the sample. The linear range of the system is up to 15 mg L -1 with a detection limit 0.2 mg L -1 and sampling rate 72 h -1 . The method is suitable for determination of cyanide in industrial waste waters with a relative standard deviation better than 1.22%

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNT–ZnO Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, direct coating of ZnO on PECVD-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD. Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the deposited ZnO shell is continuous and uniform, in contrast to the previously reported particle morphology. The ZnO layer has a good crystalline quality as indicated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL measurements. We also show that such ZnO layer can be used as seed layer for subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods, resulting in branched CNT–inorganic hybrid nanostructures. Potentially, this method can also apply to the fabrication of ZnO-based hybrid nanostructures on other carbon nanomaterials.

  17. Carbon nanotubes : their synthesis and integration into nanofabricated structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druzhinina, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The field of nanotechnology has experienced constantly increasing interest over the past decades both from industry and academy. Commonly used nanomaterials include: nanoparticles, nanowires, quantum dots, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes, in particular, are promising building

  18. Biotemplated Synthesis of PZT Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    electromechanical coupling coefficient , Y is the Young’s modulus, and Ri is intrinsic resistance. The PZT nanowire- based film is taken to have negligible...robotic actuation, and bioMEMS. Lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ), in particular, has attracted significant attention, owing to its superior...electromechanical conversion performance. Yet, the ability to synthesize crystalline PZT nanowires with reproducible and well-controlled properties remains a

  19. The first investigation of Wilms' tumour atomic structure-nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition as a novel biomarker for the most individual approach in cancer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Tomasz; Sikora-Szubert, Anita; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kobos, Józef; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a novel approach to investigating Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) biology at the atomic level. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) was used to directly assess the isotope ratios of nitrogen and carbon in 84 Wilms' tumour tissue samples from 28 cases representing the histological spectrum of nephroblastoma. Marked differences in nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios were found between nephroblastoma histological types and along the course of cancer disease, with a breakout in isotope ratio of the examined elements in tumour tissue found between stages 2 and 3. Different isotopic compositions with regard to nitrogen and carbon content were observed in blastemal Wilms' tumour, with and without focal anaplasia, and in poorly- and well-differentiated epithelial nephroblastoma. This first assessment of nitrogen and carbon isotope ratio reveals the previously unknown part of Wilms' tumour biology and represents a potential novel biomarker, allowing for a highly individual approach to treating cancer. Furthermore, this method of estimating isotopic composition appears to be the most sensitive tool yet for cancer tissue evaluation, and a valuable complement to established cancer study methods with prospective clinical impact. PMID:27732932

  20. Electrochemically grown rough-textured nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Postetter, David; Saragnese, Daniel; Papadakis, Stergios J.; Gracias, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires with a rough surface texture show unusual electronic, optical, and chemical properties; however, there are only a few existing methods for producing these nanowires. Here, we describe two methods for growing both free standing and lithographically patterned gold (Au) nanowires with a rough surface texture. The first strategy is based on the deposition of nanowires from a silver (Ag)-Au plating solution mixture that precipitates an Ag-Au cyanide complex during electrodeposition at low current densities. This complex disperses in the plating solution, thereby altering the nanowire growth to yield a rough surface texture. These nanowires are mass produced in alumina membranes. The second strategy produces long and rough Au nanowires on lithographically patternable nickel edge templates with corrugations formed by partial etching. These rough nanowires can be easily arrayed and integrated with microscale devices.

  1. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  2. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Gkionis, Konstantinos; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  3. A silicon nanowire heater and thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyan; Dan, Yaping

    2017-07-01

    In the thermal conductivity measurements of thermoelectric materials, heaters and thermometers made of the same semiconducting materials under test, forming a homogeneous system, will significantly simplify fabrication and integration. In this work, we demonstrate a high-performance heater and thermometer made of single silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The SiNWs are patterned out of a silicon-on-insulator wafer by CMOS-compatible fabrication processes. The electronic properties of the nanowires are characterized by four-probe and low temperature Hall effect measurements. The I-V curves of the nanowires are linear at small voltage bias. The temperature dependence of the nanowire resistance allows the nanowire to be used as a highly sensitive thermometer. At high voltage bias, the I-V curves of the nanowire become nonlinear due to the effect of Joule heating. The temperature of the nanowire heater can be accurately monitored by the nanowire itself as a thermometer.

  4. Controlling nanowire emission profile using conical taper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics....

  5. Is the molecular statics method suitable for the study of nanomaterials? A study case of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I-L; Chen, Y-C

    2007-01-01

    Both molecular statics and molecular dynamics methods were employed to study the mechanical properties of copper nanowires. The size effect on both elastic and plastic properties of square cross-sectional nanowire was examined and compared systematically using two molecular approaches. It was found consistently from both molecular methods that the elastic and plastic properties of nanowires depend on the lateral size of nanowires. As the lateral size of nanowires decreases, the values of Young's modulus decrease and dislocation nucleation stresses increase. However, it was shown that the dislocation nucleation stress would be significantly influenced by the axial periodic length of the nanowire model using the molecular statics method while molecular dynamics simulations at two distinct temperatures (0.01 and 300 K) did not show the same dependence. It was concluded that molecular statics as an energy minimization numerical scheme is quite insensitive to the instability of atomic structure especially without thermal fluctuation and might not be a suitable tool for studying the behaviour of nanomaterials beyond the elastic limit

  6. Oxidation of InP nanowires: a first principles molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwanger, Mailing; Schoenhalz, Aline L; Dos Santos, Cláudia L; Piquini, Paulo

    2016-11-16

    InP nanowires are candidates for optoelectronic applications, and as protective capping layers of III-V core-shell nanowires. Their surfaces are oxidized under ambient conditions which affects the nanowire physical properties. The majority of theoretical studies of InP nanowires, however, do not take into account the oxide layer at their surfaces. In this work we use first principles molecular dynamics electronic structure calculations to study the first steps in the oxidation process of a non-saturated InP nanowire surface as well as the properties of an already oxidized surface of an InP nanowire. Our calculations show that the O 2 molecules dissociate through several mechanisms, resulting in incorporation of O atoms into the surface layers. The results confirm the experimental observation that the oxidized layers become amorphous but the non-oxidized core layers remain crystalline. Oxygen related bonds at the oxidized layers introduce defective levels at the band gap region, with greater contributions from defects involving In-O and P-O bonds.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystalline zinc tin oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jen-Bin; Wu, Po-Feng; Lin, Hsien-Sheng; Lin, Ya-Ting; Lee, Hsuan-Wei; Kao, Chia-Tze; Liao, Wei-Hsiang; Young, San-Lin

    2014-05-01

    Crystalline zinc tin oxide (ZTO; zinc oxide with heavy tin doping of 33 at.%) nanowires were first synthesized using the electrodeposition and heat treatment method based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane, which has an average diameter of about 60 nm. According to the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) results, the synthesized ZTO nanowires are highly ordered and have high wire packing densities. The length of ZTO nanowires is about 4 μm, and the aspect ratio is around 67. ZTO nanowires with a Zn/(Zn + Sn) atomic ratio of 0.67 (approximately 2/3) were observed from an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and corresponding selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns demonstrated that the ZTO nanowire is hexagonal single-crystalline. The study of ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared (UV/Vis/NIR) absorption showed that the ZTO nanowire is a wide-band semiconductor with a band gap energy of 3.7 eV.

  8. UV-assisted room temperature gas sensing of GaN-core/ZnO-shell nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sunghoon; Ko, Hyunsung; Kim, Soohyun; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-01-01

    GaN is highly sensitive to low concentrations of H 2 in ambient air and is almost insensitive to most other common gases. However, enhancing the sensing performance and the detection limit of GaN is a challenge. This study examined the H 2 -gas-sensing properties of GaN nanowires encapsulated with ZnO. GaN-core/ZnO-shell nanowires were fabricated by using a two-step process comprising the thermal evaporation of GaN powders and the atomic layer deposition of ZnO. The core-shell nanowires ranged from 80 to 120 nm in diameter and from a few tens to a few hundreds of micrometers in length, with a mean shell layer thickness of ∼8 nm. Multiple-networked pristine GaN nanowire and ZnO-encapsulated GaN (or GaN-core/ZnO-shell) nanowire sensors showed responses of 120 - 147% and 179 - 389%, respectively, to 500 - 2,500 ppm of H 2 at room temperature under UV (254 nm) illumination. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced response of the GaN nanowire to H 2 gas when using ZnO encapsulation and UV irradiation is discussed.

  9. The fracture behavior of twinned Cu nanowires: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiapeng, E-mail: sun.jiap@gmail.com [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Fang, Liang [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Ma, Aibin, E-mail: aibin-ma@hhu.edu.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Jiang, Jinghua [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Han, Ying [Key Laboratory of Advanced Structural Materials, Ministry of Education, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012, Jilin Province (China); Chen, Huawei [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Han, Jing [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-05-14

    The molecular dynamics simulations are performed to explore the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned Cu nanowires containing orthogonally oriented growth CTBs due to the uniaxial tensile deformation. The results reveal that, the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned nanowires are not related to the length of the nanowires but also intensively related to the twin boundary spacing. When the twin boundary space is changed, the twinned nanowires undergo three distinct failure modes which include ductile fracture, brittle fracture and ductile-to-brittle transition depending on the length of the nanowires. We also find a reduction in the ductility of the twinned nanowires, which is ascribed to the deformation localization induced by the Lomer dislocation and the rapid necking resulted from the twinning partial slipping. Finally, the atomic-level process that occurs during deformation until final fracture are examined in detail, and a new formation mechanism of the Lomer dislocation is observed when a 90° partial dislocation transmits across a coherent twin boundary.

  10. The fracture behavior of twinned Cu nanowires: A molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jiapeng; Fang, Liang; Ma, Aibin; Jiang, Jinghua; Han, Ying; Chen, Huawei; Han, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulations are performed to explore the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned Cu nanowires containing orthogonally oriented growth CTBs due to the uniaxial tensile deformation. The results reveal that, the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned nanowires are not related to the length of the nanowires but also intensively related to the twin boundary spacing. When the twin boundary space is changed, the twinned nanowires undergo three distinct failure modes which include ductile fracture, brittle fracture and ductile-to-brittle transition depending on the length of the nanowires. We also find a reduction in the ductility of the twinned nanowires, which is ascribed to the deformation localization induced by the Lomer dislocation and the rapid necking resulted from the twinning partial slipping. Finally, the atomic-level process that occurs during deformation until final fracture are examined in detail, and a new formation mechanism of the Lomer dislocation is observed when a 90° partial dislocation transmits across a coherent twin boundary

  11. Coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowires extended-gate field-effect transistor as pH sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hung-Hsien; Yang, Chi-En; Kei, Chi-Chung; Su, Chung-Yi; Dai, Wei-Syuan; Tseng, Jung-Kuei; Yang, Po-Yu; Chou, Jung-Chuan; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2013-01-01

    An extended-gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) of coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowires as pH sensor was demonstrated in this paper. The oriented 1-μm-long silicon nanowires with the diameter of about 50 nm were vertically synthesized by the electroless metal deposition method at room temperature and were sequentially capped with the ZnO films using atomic layer deposition at 50 °C. The transfer characteristics (I DS –V REF ) of such ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor exhibited the sensitivity and linearity of 46.25 mV/pH and 0.9902, respectively for the different pH solutions (pH 1–pH 13). In contrast to the ZnO thin-film ones, the ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor achieved much better sensitivity and superior linearity. It was attributed to a high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanowire structures, reflecting a larger effective sensing area. The output voltage and time characteristics were also measured to indicate good reliability and durability for the ZnO/silicon nanowires sensor. Furthermore, the hysteresis was 9.74 mV after the solution was changed as pH 7 → pH 3 → pH 7 → pH 11 → pH 7. - Highlights: ► Coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET was demonstrated as pH sensor. ► EMD and ALD methods were proposed to fabricate ZnO/silicon nanowires. ► ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor achieved better sensitivity and linearity. ► ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor had good reliability and durability

  12. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  13. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, Karamjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits

  14. ZnO based nanowires grown by chemical vapour deposition for selective hydrogenation of acetylene alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Protasova, L.N.; Rebrov, E.; Choy, K.L.; Pung, S.Y.; Engels, V.; Cabaj, M.; Wheatley, A.E.H.; Schouten, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Vertically aligned ZnO nanowires (NWs) with a length of 1.5–10 µm and a mean diameter of ca. 150 nm were grown by chemical vapour deposition onto a c-oriented ZnO seed layer which was deposited by atomic layer deposition on Si substrates. The substrates were then spin-coated with an ethanol solution

  15. All-(111) surface silicon nanowire field effect transistor devices: Effects of surface preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masood, M.N.; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Etching/hydrogen termination of All-(111) surface silicon nanowire field effect (SiNW-FET) devices developed by conventional photolithography and plane dependent wet etchings is studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and

  16. Fabrication and magnetic investigations of highly uniform CoNiGa alloy nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-Jing; Khan, U.; Irfan, Muhammad [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Javed, K. [Department of Physics, Forman Christian College, Lahore 5400 (Pakistan); Liu, P. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Ban, S.L. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Han, X.F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Highly ordered CoNiGa alloy nanowires with different compositions were fabricated by DC electrodeposition. • The magnetic properties of CoNiGa nanowires can be easily tailored by varying its components. • Magnetostatic interactions plays an important role in the magnetization reversal process. • A linear dependence of coercivity on temperature was found for Co{sub 55}Ni{sub 28}Ga{sub 17} samples. - Abstract: CoNiGa ternary alloy nanowire arrays were successfully fabricated by simple DC electrodeposition into the anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. A systematic study of the potential and components of the electrolyte were conducted to obtain different components of CoNiGa nanowires. The largest Ga content in the prepared alloy nanowires was about 17%, while for Co and Ni contents which can be controlled in a wide range by adjusting the composition and pH value of the electrolyte appropriately. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the as-grown CoNiGa nanowire arrays were polycrystal with fcc phase of Co where Co atoms partially substituted by Ni and Ga. Magnetization curves of samples with different composition were measured at room temperature as well as low temperature. The results showed that the components of the alloy nanowires have a great impact on its magnetic properties. For Co{sub 55}Ni{sub 28}Ga{sub 17} nanowires, the magnetization reversal mode changes from curling mode to coherent rotation as the angle increases, and the temperature dependence of coercivity can be well described by the thermal activation effect.

  17. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    -ray diffraction. InAs NWs can be used in a broad range of applications, including detectors, high speed electronics and low temperature transport measurements, but in this thesis focus will be put on biological experiments on living cells. Good control of Au-assisted InAs NW growth has been achieved......This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x...... by a systematic study to optimize the growth conditions; first the Au deposition, then the growth temperature and finally the beam fluxes. For further control of the growth, Au droplets have been positioned with electron beam lithography and large scale arrays with a > 99 % yield have been made on 2 inch...

  18. Resonance of curved nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabri, L [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pugno, N [Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Ding, W [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States); Ruoff, R S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States)

    2006-08-23

    The effects of non-ideal experimental configuration on the mechanical resonance of boron (B) nanowires (NWs) were studied to obtain the corrected value for the Young's modulus. The following effects have been theoretically considered: (i) the presence of intrinsic curvature (ii) non-ideal clamps (iii) spurious masses (iv) coating layer, and (v) large displacements. An energy-based analytical analysis was developed to treat such effects and their interactions. Here, we focus on treating the effect of the intrinsic curvature on the mechanical resonance. The analytical approach has been confirmed by numerical FEM analysis. A parallax method was used to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the NW.

  19. Modal analysis of the thermal conductivity of nanowires: examining unique thermal transport features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaraweera, Nalaka; Larkin, Jason M.; Chan, Kin L.; Mithraratne, Kumar

    2018-06-01

    In this study, unique thermal transport features of nanowires over bulk materials are investigated using a combined analysis based on lattice dynamics and equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD). The evaluation of the thermal conductivity (TC) of Lenard–Jones nanowires becomes feasible due to the multi-step normal mode decomposition (NMD) procedure implemented in the study. A convergence issue of the TC of nanowires is addressed by the NMD implementation for two case studies, which employ pristine nanowires (PNW) and superlattice nanowires. Interestingly, mode relaxation times at low frequencies of acoustic branches exhibit signs of approaching constant values, thus indicating the convergence of TC. The TC evaluation procedure is further verified by implementing EMD-based Green–Kubo analysis, which is based on a fundamentally different physical perspective. Having verified the NMD procedure, the non-monotonic trend of the TC of nanowires is addressed. It is shown that the principal cause for the observed trend is due to the competing effects of long wavelength phonons and phonon–surface scatterings as the nanowire’s cross-sectional width is changed. A computational procedure is developed to decompose the different modal contribution to the TC of shell alloy nanowires (SANWs) using virtual crystal NMD and the Allen–Feldman theory. Several important conclusions can be drawn from the results. A propagons to non-propagons boundary appeared, resulting in a cut-off frequency (ω cut); moreover, as alloy atomic mass is increased, ω cut shifts to lower frequencies. The existence of non-propagons partly causes the low TC of SANWs. It can be seen that modes with low frequencies demonstrate a similar behavior to corresponding modes of PNWs. Moreover, lower group velocities associated with higher alloy atomic mass resulted in a lower TC of SANWs.

  20. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Amara, Selma; Ivanov, Iurii; Blanco, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.