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Sample records for atomic bomb health

  1. Health risks of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Y.; Soda, M.; Mabuchi, K.

    1992-01-01

    At the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor organization, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, mortality and morbidity surveys have been continually carried out on about 1,800 persons exposed in utero to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Although the effect of radiation exposure was marked enough to permit observation of a dose-response relationship in the 30 known cases of severe mental retardation among the in utero-exposed, the association between in utero exposure and cancer risk is still uncertain. Based on data for all cancers from 1950 through 1984 for the in utero-exposed, the excess risk per 10,000 person-year-Gy was 6.57 and the relative risk at 1 Gy was 3.77. For the recent years 1985-89, there was no evident excess of cancer risk. During the remaining lifetime, it seems unlikely that any great excess of leukemia will appear. As for the risk of solid tumors, further follow up is in progress. The 1950-89 findings for cancer risk among the in utero-exposed will be compared with cancer risk among A-bomb survivors who were less than 10 years old at the time of the bombings. (author)

  2. Health effects of atomic-bomb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori

    2000-01-01

    This review described carcinogenic and genetic effects of A-bomb radiation. Effects have been investigated on 120,000 exposed people for their life span, 20,000 for health examinations, 3,000 people exposed in the womb and 80,000 second-generations of the exposed people. Epidemiological data revealed the presence of carcinogenic effects: Cancer death amounted to 9% from 1950 to 1990. However, carcinogenic mechanism is unknown yet. Genetic effects have been studied from the points of lesion at birth, sex ratio, chromosome aberration, biochemical test and mortality rate of children of exposed people and, although the effects have been experimentally shown in animals, are not observed in those children. This may be derived from the fact that there are few people who were exposed to such a high dose as used experimentally (0.2 Sv exposure to people within 2.5 km diameter-area from the explosion point vs >3 Sv in animals). Data are presented in Research Foundation home page. (K.H.)

  3. The mental health state of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Yoshibumi; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Yoshitake, Kazuyasu; Honda, Sumihisa; Mine, Mariko; Hatada, Keiko; Tomonaga, Masao; Tagawa, Masuko

    1997-01-01

    Our department of Neuropsychiatry has clarified the clinical features of several mental disorders and surveyed the causes of those disorders from the psychosocial aspect using the methodology of epidemiological psychiatric approach. Using this previous research experience, we began a long-planned study to examine the mental health state of atomic bomb survivors. Fifty-one years have passed since the atomic bombing, and the survivors must have suffered various psychosocial stresses, other than any direct effect on the central nervous system from exposure to radiation, and it is assumed that victims' mental state has been affected in various ways as a result. The subjects of the survey were 7,670 people who had regular health examinations for atomic bomb survivors during the study period of three years and who consented to participate in the study. Of the total, 226 subjects were selected for a second phase according to the results of the General Health Questionnaire 12-item Version which was used in the first phase of the survey. The results were as follows: 1. The distance from the hypocenter was related to the degree of ill health, and the percentage of people with a high score was greater among those exposed to the atomic bomb in proximity to the hypocenter. 2. 14.6% of the subjects were diagnosed as having some kind of mental disorders according to clinical interviews by trained psychiatrists. These results had not expected prior to the study. On the based of the study, we will try to establish a mental health support system for atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  4. The mental health state of atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshibumi; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Yoshitake, Kazuyasu; Honda, Sumihisa; Mine, Mariko; Hatada, Keiko; Tomonaga, Masao [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Tagawa, Masuko

    1997-03-01

    Our department of Neuropsychiatry has clarified the clinical features of several mental disorders and surveyed the causes of those disorders from the psychosocial aspect using the methodology of epidemiological psychiatric approach. Using this previous research experience, we began a long-planned study to examine the mental health state of atomic bomb survivors. Fifty-one years have passed since the atomic bombing, and the survivors must have suffered various psychosocial stresses, other than any direct effect on the central nervous system from exposure to radiation, and it is assumed that victims` mental state has been affected in various ways as a result. The subjects of the survey were 7,670 people who had regular health examinations for atomic bomb survivors during the study period of three years and who consented to participate in the study. Of the total, 226 subjects were selected for a second phase according to the results of the General Health Questionnaire 12-item Version which was used in the first phase of the survey. The results were as follows: 1. The distance from the hypocenter was related to the degree of ill health, and the percentage of people with a high score was greater among those exposed to the atomic bomb in proximity to the hypocenter. 2. 14.6% of the subjects were diagnosed as having some kind of mental disorders according to clinical interviews by trained psychiatrists. These results had not expected prior to the study. On the based of the study, we will try to establish a mental health support system for atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  5. Health survey of atomic bomb survivors in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arita, Ken-ichi; Iwamori, Hiroshi; Kishi, Akihiro; Koutoku, Michiya

    1988-05-01

    Health survey was undertaken among Korea survivors exposed to atomic bomb in Japan who now reside in South Korea. Of 232 A-bomb survivors on whom raditation exposure information was available, all were exposed to atomic bomb in Hiroshima. According to the distance from the hypocenter, one (0.4 %) A-bomb survior was exposed at < 1,000 m, 60 (25.9 %) at 1,000 - 2,000 m, 124 (53.4 %) at > 2,000 - 3,000 m, and 43 (18.5 %) at < 3,000 m. In the four remaining, it was unknown. According to age, 14.7 % were in their forties, 33.6 % in their fifties, 32.6 % in their sixties, 16.0 % in their severties, and 3.1 % in their eighties, indicating the tendency for the aging of older persons. Common subjective symptoms were lumbar pain and joint pain, which seemed atributable to osteoarthritis. Other diseases included hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sequelae of cerebral stroke, eczema, and mycosis. (Namekawa, K.).

  6. Cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors

  7. Mental health conditions in Korean atomic bomb survivors. A survey in Seoul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimoto, Rika; Nakane, Hideyuki; Kim, Hyen

    2011-01-01

    More than 60 years have elapsed since the atomic bombings to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and since all of the atomic bomb survivors have become old, the importance of caring their mental health has become increasing in Japan. Although approximately 70% of overseas atomic bomb are living in Korea, there have been quite few studies on their mental health. The objectives of the present study were to elucidate whether the mental health conditions of atomic bomb survivor in Korea are similar to those in Japan. The subjects were 181 Korean atomic bomb survivors living in Korea (cases) and 209 outpatients of a hospital in Seoul who were not exposed to atomic bombs (controls). Interviewers administered them at the hospital a questionnaire with Impact of Event Scale-Revised, General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12), Korean version of short form Geriatric Depression Scale and the K scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Excluding subjects with incomplete responses we analyzed 162 cases and 189 controls. The proportion of subjects with high score of GHQ-12 (≥4) was significantly higher in cases (78/162 or 48.1%) than in controls (42/189 or 22.2%) (p<0.0001, Fisher's exact test). The present results, though preliminary, indicate that atomic bomb survivors in Korea have also mental health problems similar to those observed in Japanese atomic bomb survivors, indicating the necessity of a larger study. (author)

  8. Health status of atomic bomb survivors in South Korea, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Sadamu; Kawamura, Torataro; Kurihara, Minoru; Watanabe, Masaharu; Cheong, Chang-Saeng.

    1980-01-01

    Investigation was made on 405 A-bomb survivors in Hap Cheon Gun who received health examinations from December 1973 to December 1977. Excepting 16 exposed in Nagasaki, they were exposed in Hiroshima. The distribution of their age at the time of exposure showed its peak at the age between 25 and 29 years, and it decreased before and after that age. The percentage of A-bomb survivors exposed directly was 93.3%, and that of A-bomb survivors exposed within 2 km from the center of explosion was 51.8%. Seventeen A-bomb survivors were exposed within 1 km. Acute disturbances such as loss of hair (over one second loss), tiredness, fever, vomiting on the day of exposure, and diarrhea were found with high incidence, but incidences of lesions in the oral cavity and the pharynx were low. Incidences of burn and bruise were high, but those of wound and injuries were low. Loss of hair, vomiting, hemorrhage, tiredness, and dairrhea appeared with high incidence in A-bomb survivors whose age advanced at the time of exposure. Most of A-bomb survivors who were young at the time of exposure had not these acute disturbances. These acute symptoms appeared frequently in a short-distance group, and burn, wound and injuries, and bruise also appeared frequently in A-bomb survivors exposed within 2 km. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Atomic bomb cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraeda, Kanji

    1992-01-01

    Eye disturbance caused by atomic bomb radiation can be divided into three groups: direct injury immediately after exposure, eye lesions associated with radiation syndrome, and delayed disturbance. The crystalline lens of the eye is the most radiosensitive. Atomic bomb cataract has been investigated in a number of studies. The first section of this chapter discusses radiation cataract in terms of the incidence and characteristics. The second section deals with atomic bomb cataract, which can be diagnosed based on the four criteria: (1) opacity of the crystalline lens, (2) a history of proximal exposure, (3) lack of eye disease complicating cataract, and (4) non-exposure to radiation other than atomic bombing. The prevalence of cataract and severity of opacity are found to correlate with exposure doses and age at the time of exposure. Furthermore, it is found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter, the condition of shielding, epilation, and the presence or absence or degree of radiation syndrome. (N.K.)

  10. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M; Tomonaga, M; Amenomori, T; Matsuo, T [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  11. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5∼0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  12. Availability of ultrasonography in health examination of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masafumi; Mito, Kazuyo; Ishibashi, Shinzo; Takayama, Sadamatsu; Ito, Chikako

    1989-01-01

    A total of 1424 A-bomb survivors, consisting of 596 men and 827 women, participated in the health screening during the period from August 1985 through March 1988. Abnormal findings of ultrasonography were observed in 64% for men and 53% for women. According to age groups, the incidence of abnormal findings tended to increase with aging in men. In women, it was independent of aging. The most common abnormal finding was billiary calculus (13%), followed by renal cyst, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and liver disturbance. Suspected hepatic tumor, hepatomegaly, liver disturbance, fatty liver, and liver cirrhosis were more frequent in men than women. The incidence of billiary or gallbladder calculus was significantly higher in women than men. Among 56 survivors (13%) with suspected malignancy, it was confirmed in 25 survivors (19 with primary or metastatic liver carcinoma, 3 with renal cell carcinoma, 2 with cholangiocarcinoma, and one with pancreatic carcinoma). Of 9 hepatoma patients, 8 had an increased alpha-fetoprotein. Hematologic findings were normal in all of the patients with renal cell carcinoma. (N.K.)

  13. Atomic bomb injury: radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, C L; Cronkite, E P; Le Roy, G V; Warren, S

    1959-01-01

    This document contains 3 reports. In the first report, the clinical diagnosis and treatment of radiation syndrome in survivors of the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are described. The syndrome of acute radiation injury is applied to the symptom complex, or diseased state, which results from exposure of the whole body to the initial nuclear radiation of an atomic bomb. It is applied to injuries of the skin and subcutaneous tissues resulting from x-radiation or from contact with radioactive material. Internal radiation injury may result from the selective deposition, such as in bone or thyroid, of radioactive material that has been inhaled or absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract or wounds. Radiation syndrome is classified as very severe, severe, and mild. In the second report, a brief discussion is presented on the question of genetic effects in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the third report, a study was carried out on 205 4-1/2 year old children who had been exposed to the atomic bomb blast during the first half of intra-uterine life. Correlation between head size and mental development of the child with distance from the hypocenter, symptoms of radiation effect and type of shielding of the mother is discussed. The conclusion drawn from the present study is that central nervous system defects can be produced in the fetus by atomic bomb radiation, provided that exposure occurs within approximately 1200 meters of the hypocenter and that no effective shielding, such as concrete, protects the fetus from direct irradiation.

  14. Thyroid disorders in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshikiyo; Inoue, Keisuke; Sugihara, Toru; Oshima, Tetuya; Matsueda, Kazuhiro

    1984-01-01

    There was no difference in blood levels of thyroid stimulating hormones among atomic bomb survivors having normal thyroid function, irrespective of the exposure distance from the explosion. Of 336 atomic bomb survivors admitted to the hospital for health examinations, hyperthyroidism was seen in one patient, hypothyroidism in four, malignant struma in three, and benign tumor in one. The incidence of struma associated with positive antithyroidglobulin antibody tended to be high in atomic bomb survivors living within 1.0 km from the explosion. The overall study in patients visiting the department of internal medicine, in addition to the 336 survivors, revealed that the incidence of thyroid disorders, especially hypothyroidism, was high in survivors directly exposed to atomic bomb. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Public health nutritional studies on the atomic bomb female survivors living in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munaka, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Ohtaki, Megu; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Kishida, Noriko; Ishigai, Keiko.

    1982-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a long distance (LDG) was found to take a great quantity of soybean curd, miso and fruit except citrus, while the atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a short distance (SDG) was found to take a significant amount of fish paste product. SDG tends to ingest processed food and in nutrient supply rate the percentage of calcium, iron and vitamin A is low. Judging from a state of food group without a meal rate, we got the result that SDG has a few kinds of ingestion food and takes them partially in each meal. In terms of socio-economic status, the rate of living alone, supporting oneself and living an empty life is high and the rate of living with a partner is low. On the other hand, we analysed the relations of three factors on physique-physical fitness and living status, and then got the following results. (1) ''Volume capacity'', in the cases of ''be married at present'', ''have a large family'', ''ingest a lot of protein and iron'', tends to be large, while in the cases of ''have no disease'', ''don't go without a meal'', ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', and ''nutritional balance is good'', it tends to be small. (2) ''Height'', in the case of ''socio-economical status was good before exposure to the atomic bomb'', tends to increase. (3) ''Synthetic physical fitness'', in the cases of ''health condition is good at present'', ''have no disease at present'', ''ingest a lot of vitamin A'' and ''nutritional balance is good'', tends to be superior; in the cases of ''food cost is high'' and ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', it tends to be low. The significant difference was observed in ''synthetic physical fitness'' between the two age groups of 50-59 years and beyond 70 years. (J.P.N.)

  16. Public health nutritional studies on the atomic bomb female survivors living in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munaka, Masaki

    1983-01-01

    The dietary life and socio-economic status of atomic bomb female survivors living in Hiroshima were investigated. The atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a long distance (LDG) was found to take a great quantity of soybean curd, miso and fruit except citrus, while the atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a short distance (SDG) was found to take a significant amount of fish paste products. SDG tends to ingest processed food and in nutrient supply rate the percentage of calcium, iron and vitamin A is low. Judging from a state of food group without a meal rate, we got the result that SDG has a few kinds of ingestion food and takes them partially in each meal. In terms of socio-economic status, the rate of living alone, supporting oneself and living an empty life is high and the rate of living with a partner is low. On the other hand, we analysed the relations of three factors on physique.physical fitness and living status, and then got the following results. (1) ''Volume capacity'', in the cases of ''be married at present'', ''have a large family'', ''ingest a lot of protein and iron'', tends to be large, while in the cases of ''have no dis ease'', ''don't go without a meal'', ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', and ''nutr itional balance is good'', it tends to be small. (2) ''Height'', in the case of ''socio-economical status was good before exposure to the atomic bomb'', tends to increase. (3) ''Synthetic physical fitness'', in the cases of ''health condition is good at present'', ''have no disease at present'', ''ingest a lot of vitamin A'' and ''nutritional balance is good'', tends to be superior; in the cases of ''food cost is high'' and ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', it tends to be low. The significant difference was observed in ''synthetic physical fitness'' between the two age groups of 50-59 years and beyond 70 years. (author)

  17. Public health nutritional studies on the atomic bomb female survivors living in Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munaka, Masaki (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology)

    1983-08-01

    The dietary life and socio-economic status of atomic bomb female survivors living in Hiroshima were investigated. The atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a long distance (LDG) was found to take a great quantity of soybean curd, miso and fruit except citrus, while the atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a short distance (SDG) was found to take a significant amount of fish paste products. SDG tends to ingest processed food and in nutrient supply rate the percentage of calcium, iron and vitamin A is low. Judging from a state of food group without a meal rate, we got the result that SDG has a few kinds of ingestion food and takes them partially in each meal. In terms of socio-economic status, the rate of living alone, supporting oneself and living an empty life is high and the rate of living with a partner is low. On the other hand, we analysed the relations of three factors on physique.physical fitness and living status, and then got the following results. (1) ''Volume capacity'', in the cases of ''be married at present'', ''have a large family'', ''ingest a lot of protein and iron'', tends to be large, while in the cases of ''have no dis ease'', ''don't go without a meal'', ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', and ''nutr itional balance is good'', it tends to be small. (2) ''Height'', in the case of ''socio-economical status was good before exposure to the atomic bomb'', tends to increase. (3) ''Synthetic physical fitness'', in the cases of ''health condition is good at present'', ''have no disease at present'', ''ingest a lot of vitamin A'' and ''nutritional balance is good'', tends to be superior; in the cases of ''food cost is high

  18. Public health nutritional studies on the atomic bomb female survivors living in Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munaka, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Ohtaki, Megu; Ueoka, Hiroshi (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology); Kishida, Noriko; Ishigai, Keiko

    1982-09-01

    The atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a long distance (LDG) was found to take a great quantity of soybean curd, miso and fruit except citrus, while the atomic bomb survivors group exposed at a short distance (SDG) was found to take a significant amount of fish paste product. SDG tends to ingest processed food and in nutrient supply rate the percentage of calcium, iron and vitamin A is low. Judging from a state of food group without a meal rate, we got the result that SDG has a few kinds of ingestion food and takes them partially in each meal. In terms of socio-economic status, the rate of living alone, supporting oneself and living an empty life is high and the rate of living with a partner is low. On the other hand, we analysed the relations of three factors on physique-physical fitness and living status, and then got the following results. (1) ''Volume capacity'', in the cases of ''be married at present'', ''have a large family'', ''ingest a lot of protein and iron'', tends to be large, while in the cases of ''have no disease'', ''don't go without a meal'', ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', and ''nutritional balance is good'', it tends to be small. (2) ''Height'', in the case of ''socio-economical status was good before exposure to the atomic bomb'', tends to increase. (3) ''Synthetic physical fitness'', in the cases of ''health condition is good at present'', ''have no disease at present'', ''ingest a lot of vitamin A'' and ''nutritional balance is good'', tends to be superior; in the cases of ''food cost is high'' and ''ingest a lot of carbohydrates (non-fibrous)'', it tends to be low. The significant

  19. Tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of atomic bomb on tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors necropsied after 1956 when Atomic Bomb Hospital was opened were observed statistically and the following results were obtained. The morbidity of tuberculosis in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter was higher than that of the control group, but there was not a significant difference between the both groups. The morbidity of all types of tuberculosis was significantly higher in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter than in the control group. The morbidity of tuberculosis tended to decrease in both exposed and non-exposed groups with time. However, the morbidity of miliary or active tuberculosis has tended to rise in the exposed since 1975. The morbidity in young a-bomb survivors exposed within 2 km was higher than that in those of other groups, but there was not a difference in the morbidity among the aged. The higher the rate of complication of active tuberculosis with stomach cancer or acute myelocytic leukemia or liver cirrhosis, the nearer the places of exposure were to the hypocenter. Out of 26 patients with miliary tuberculosis, 6 were suspected to have leukemia while they were alive and were suggested to have leukemoid reaction by autopsy. They all were a-bomb survivors, and 4 of them were exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. (Tsunoda, M.)

  20. Atom bombs and genetic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Comments are made on a 1981 review on genetic damage in the off-spring of the atom bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The main criticisms of the review concerned, 1) the 'minimal' doubling dose value for radiation-induced mutation in man, 2) the gametic doubling dose value for sex chromosome aneuploidy and 3) the validity of trebling an observed acute doubling dose to measure the effect of chronic irradiation. The firmest conclusion which may be deduced from the studies on A-bomb survivors is that humans are fairly resistant to genetic damage from radiation. (U.K.)

  1. Cardiovascular disease among atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Kotaro; Takahashi, Ikuno; Grant, Eric J; Kodama, Kazunori

    2017-10-01

    The profile of cardiovascular disease in Japan has been different from that in Western countries. Hypertension was the major cause not only for hemorrhagic stroke but also for ischemic stroke and heart disease in the past, and the influence of hypertension has decreased with calendar years because of reduced salt intake and westernization of lifestyle, and also improved medical care. The health status of atomic bomb survivors has reflected this profile as well as radiation effects. It is also likely that this cohort has been affected by the difficult conditions experienced in the aftermath of the war and atomic bombings. In this article, we tried to make a consistent interpretation of epidemiological findings of atomic bomb radiation effects on cardiovascular disease. Among the atomic bomb survivors, radiation exposure was associated with some cardiovascular diseases that are often associated with hypertension, and dose response appeared to be primarily non-linear among those who were exposed at younger ages. These effects are thought to reflect the nature of whole body irradiation. But, some findings remain inconsistent, possibly because of possible misclassification in death certificate diagnoses in the Life Span Study as well as selected information from the Adult Health Study which was limited to participants, focused on specific outcomes, and gathered in selected periods of follow-up. Therefore, a comprehensive and balanced interpretation of the results from both groups is necessary.

  2. Radiation risk of individual multifactorial diseases in offspring of the atomic-bomb survivors: a clinical health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Yamada, Michiko; Ohishi, Waka; Hida, Ayumi; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John B; Hsu, Wan-Ling; Furukawa, Kyoji; Takahashi, Norio; Nakamura, Nori; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy

    2013-01-01

    There is no convincing evidence regarding radiation-induced heritable risks of adult-onset multifactorial diseases in humans, although it is important from the standpoint of protection and management of populations exposed to radiation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether parental exposure to atomic-bomb (A-bomb) radiation led to an increased risk of common polygenic, multifactorial diseases—hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction or stroke—in the first-generation (F 1 ) offspring of A-bomb survivors. A total of 11 951 F 1 offspring of survivors in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, conceived after the bombing, underwent health examinations to assess disease prevalence. We found no evidence that paternal or maternal A-bomb radiation dose, or the sum of their doses, was associated with an increased risk of any multifactorial diseases in either male or female offspring. None of the 18 radiation dose–response slopes, adjusted for other risk factors for the diseases, was statistically significantly elevated. However, the study population is still in mid-life (mean age 48.6 years), and will express much of its multifactorial disease incidence in the future, so ongoing longitudinal follow-up will provide increasingly informative risk estimates regarding hereditary genetic effects for incidence of adult-onset multifactorial disease. (paper)

  3. Prejudice and Health Anxiety about Radiation Exposure from Second-Generation Atomic Bomb Survivors: Results from a Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kamite

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atomic bomb radiation exposure on the survivors and their children has been a worrisome problem since soon after the 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Researchers have examined physical and genetic effects; however, no research has focused on second-generation survivors’ (SGS psychological effects. Consequently, this study shed light on the SGS’ experience of discrimination and prejudice and their anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure. This study utilized semi-structured interviews with 14 SGS (10 women, mean age = 56 ± 6.25 years, range = 46–68 years. Data were analyzed using a modified version of the grounded theory approach. Three categories were extracted: low awareness as an SGS, no health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation, and health anxiety regarding the effect of radiation. The results did not reveal that SGS who grew up in the bombed areas experienced discrimination or prejudice. They had little health anxiety from childhood to adolescence. In this study, some of the SGS developed health anxiety about their third-generation children, but only among female participants. Perhaps the transgenerational transmission of anxiety concerning the genetic effects of radiation exposure causes stress, particularly among women with children. However, a change was seen in adulthood health anxiety regarding the effects of radiation, suggesting the possibility that changes in the psychological experiences of SGS can be observed throughout their lifetimes and that their own health status, and that of their children, the third-generation survivors, affects their health anxiety regarding radiation.

  4. Nagasaki and radiation. Health effects of radiation: atomic bomb, Chernobyl and JCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagataki, Shigenobu

    2005-01-01

    Under the title of Nagasaki and Radiation, this presentation will include the significance of the investigation of health of radiation on A-bomb survivors, dissociation between the scientific results and the public impression at the Chernobyl accident and problems in health control of the people in the regions surrounding JCO, Tokaimura. It is proposed that in the area of the low-dose radiation, economic, ethical, psychological, environmental, and scientific factors are all essential in the policy and regulatory decision-making process to assure public health and well-being. (author)

  5. Atomic bombs and conspiracy theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnie, A.

    2001-01-01

    There have been a number of articles in the press concerning Australia's bid to get the atomic bomb. These articles are based on the recent publication of a book, 'Australia's Bid for the Bomb' by Wayne Reynolds. The book at first sight appears to be very well researched, with many archival references from a number of countries, and the hypotheses appear to be well supported and argued. Its major shortcoming is the way that the science and technology involved is presented. The author seems to have a complete lack of understanding of basic science and engineering principles, and the manner in which scientists and politicians communicate with each other. This paper will attempt to redress these shortcomings, I shall look at the way communities of scientists and politicians present their ideas to each other and to the public at large. By investigating the backgrounds to the establishment of the Snowy Mountains Scheme and the later establishment of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, the author is able to explain how such a hypothesis ever saw the light of day

  6. Foreign bodies radiographically-demonstrated in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Shozo; Onitsuka, Hideo; Lee, K.; Shimizu, Yukiko; Russell, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    The prevalence of roentgenologically-detected foreign bodies among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors was studied as an indicator of the A-bomb blast effects. Acupuncture was studied as an indicator of A-bomb-related abnormalities for which it was administered. All Adult Health Study subjects' roentgenograms demonstrating foreign bodies were reviewed. The frequency of glass and metal, and acupuncture needles were analyzed by distance from hypocenters, sex, age, body sites involved; and the subjects' shielding at the times of the A-bombs. The presence of glass fragments correlated closely with distance from hypocenter, heavy shielding from the A-bombs, and with adulthood, and they were more frequent in the chest than hand and wrist. Metal foreign bodies were more frequent in the hand and wrist than in the chest, and not associated with distance from hypocenter or heavy shielding. The prevalence of acupuncture needles increased with age, but did not correlate with A-bomb dose. (author)

  7. Re-evaluation of atomic bomb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo

    1984-01-01

    The background and current status of the re-evaluation of atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation doses are presented. Problems in re-evaluating radiation doses are discussed: spectra of gamma-rays and neutrons emitted in the air, A-bomb structures, and meterological elements should be taken into account. In Japan, in an attempt to estimate A-bomb radiation doses, radioactive residues contained in roof tiles, bricks, rocks, and teeth and shell button of clothes are being actually measured. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Yale and the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.Z.

    1983-01-01

    This is a description, based largely on personal discussions, of the contributions of men from the Yale University School of Medicine to the saga of the immediate and long-term studies on the medical effects of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They played key roles in the immediate studies of bomb effects, in the creation of long-term studies of delayed effects, and in elevating the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission after 1955 to a position of excellence in its studies and relations with the Japanese. The accumulation of the information presented in this paper derives from research for the preparation of the history of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. In 1975, the commission was passed to Japanese leadership as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

  9. The birth of the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, Louis

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes an overview of fifty years of researches and works which resulted in the fabrication and use of an atomic bomb. Thus, he evokes the discovery of radioactivity, experiments made by Rutherford, the discovery of nuclear fission induced uranium bombardment by slow neutrons, the discovery of a possibility of chain reaction with a very low critical mass, the first works on the development of a bomb in the USA and United-Kingdom, and finally the Manhattan project and the realisation of the first bombs, tests, and their use in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  10. Accident in science history. Hitler's atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Up to now the historical explanation for the fact that NS Germany did not develop an atomic bomb was that there was enough scientific and technical knowledge but not enough resources. Recent historical research showed that the German scientists in the ''Uranverein'' did not know the cross section of U-235 and had no possibility to measure these cross sections. There exist only very few documents dealing with the bomb. The bomb was treated as a special case of a reactor. Obviously the German scientists did not know he bomb technology. It seems that the project was not success-oriented because the scientists expected to be sent to the front in case of a project stop.

  11. Gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Odan, Hideki; Hinoi, Takao; Inagaki, Kazuo; Tanaka, Issei

    1992-01-01

    During 22 years from 1968 through 1989, 538 A-bomb survivors were operated on for gastric cancer, accounting for 30.9% of 1,741 surgical cases of gastric cancer during that period. To determine whether age at the time of exposure to A-bombing might influenced the occurrrence of gastric cancer, these A-bomb survivors were compared with 1,138 other non-exposed gastric cancer patients. According to age at the time of exposure, the 538 A-bomb survivors were divided into those under the age of 19 (118), those in their twenties (134), those in their thirties (178), and those over the age of 40 (108). The largest number of gastric cancer was those in their thirties at the time of exposure, followed by the twenties, 19 years or less, and 40 years or more in the exposed group. The younger A-bomb survivors were at the time of exposure, the earlier gastric cancer occurred. These findings were common to the non-exposed group. Postoperative 5-year survival rate was 72.0% in A-bomb survivors aged 19 years or less at the time of exposure, which was better than the other age groups. This may be explained by active participation in health examination for A-bomb survivors. (N.K.)

  12. Chromosome abnormalities in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomonaga, Y [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells were recognized in 6 cases which consisted of one case of chronic myelogenous leukemia, two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia, one case of sideroblastic anemia, and two cases of myelodysplasis. Frequency of stable type chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells was investigated in 45 atomic bomb survivors without hematologic disorders and 15 controls. It was 1.4% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 1 km from the hypocenter, which was significantly higher as compared with 0.1% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb over 2.5 km from the hypocenter and 0.2% in normal controls. Examination of chromosome was also made on 2 of 3 cases which were the seconds born of female with high chromosome abnormality, who was exposed to within 1 km from the hypocenter, and healthy male exposed 3 km from the hypocenter. These two cases showed chromosome of normal male type, and balanced translocation was not recognized. There was not a significant difference in chromosome abnormalities between the seconds of atomic bomb survivors and controls.

  13. Hurricane Ike versus an Atomic Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Earl F.

    2013-01-01

    The destructive potential of one of nature's most destructive forces, the hurricane, is compared to one of human's most destructive devices, an atomic bomb. Both can create near absolute devastation at "ground zero". However, how do they really compare in terms of destructive energy? This discussion compares the energy, the…

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomonaga, Yu

    1976-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells were recognized in 6 cases which consisted of one case of chronic myelogenous leukemia, two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia, one case of sideroblastic anemia, and two cases of myelodysplasis. Frequency of stable type chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells was investigated in 45 atomic bomb survivors without hematologic disorders and 15 controls. It was 1.4% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 1 km from the hypocenter, which was significantly higher as compared with 0.1% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb over 2.5 km from the hypocenter and 0.2% in normal controls. Examination of chromosome was also made on 2 of 3 cases which were the seconds born of female with high chromosome abnormality, who was exposed to within 1 km from the hypocenter, and healthy male exposed 3 km from the hypocenter. These two cases showed chromosome of normal male type, and balanced translocation was not recognized. There was not a significant difference in chromosome abnormalities between the seconds of atomic bomb survivors and controls. (Kanao, N.)

  15. Statistical investigation into historical health examination records and cause of death among Atomic-bomb survivors in Nagasaki city, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Fukahori, Miyako; Okajima, Syunzo

    1984-01-01

    Changes in clinical laboratory findings before death were investigated based on the data in 621 patients (323 males and 298 females) extracted from the Scientific Data Center of Atomic-Bomb Disasters, Nagasaki University School of Medicine. A decrease in hemoglobin level and an increase in erythrocyte sedimentation rate began to occur 2 years before death in many of the patients with cancer, cerebrovascular disease or heart disease. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Foreign bodies radiographically-demonstrated in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, S.; Onitsuka, H.; Lee, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Russell, W.J.

    1978-08-25

    The prevalence of roentgenologically-detected foreign bodies among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors was studied as an indicator of the A-bomb blast effects. Acupuncture was studied as an indicator of A-bomb-related abnormalities for which it was administered. All Adult Health Study subjects' roentgenograms demonstrating foreign bodies were reviewed. The frequency of glass and metal, and acupuncture needles were analyzed by distance from hypocenters, sex, age, body sites involved; and the subjects' shielding at the times of the A-bombs. The presence of glass fragments correlated closely with distance from hypocenter, heavy shielding from the A-bombs, and with adulthood, and they were more frequent in the chest than hand and wrist. Metal foreign bodies were more frequent in the hand and wrist than in the chest, and not associated with distance from hypocenter or heavy shielding. The prevalence of acupuncture needles increased with age, but did not correlate with A-bomb dose.

  17. Colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, H.; Ezaki, H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on autopsied and surgical cases of colorectal cancer in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have not shown a relationship to radiation. In a recent epidemiologic study made on a fixed population at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), the risk of colon cancer was found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and also in both males and females. The dose effect for the cities and sexes combined was especially pronounced for cancer of the sigmoid colon. The effect of radiation was found to vary by age at the time of the bomb (ATB) and the effect was remarkable among those under age 20 ATB. The risk of rectal cancer was not found to increase significantly with radiation and the distribution of histological types for cancer of either the colon or rectum was unrelated to radiation dose. The effect of A-bomb exposure on the postoperative survival rate for colorectal cancer patients was studied. No difference by radiation dose could be demonstrated. In Japan, the incidence of colorectal cancer, and of colon cancer in particular, has been increasing. Therefore, close attention should be paid to changes occuring in A-bomb survivors

  18. Colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Hirofumi; Ezaki, Haruo.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on autopsied and surgical cases of colorectal cancer in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have not shown a relationship to radiation. In a recent epidemiologic study made on a fixed population at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), the risk of colon cancer was found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and also in both males and females. The dose effect for the cities and sexes combined was especially pronounced for cancer of the sigmoid colon. The effect of radiation was found to vary by age at the time of the bomb (ATB) and the effect was remarkable among those under age 20 ATB. The risk of rectal cancer was not found to increase significantly with radiation and the distribution of histological types for cancer of either the colon or rectum was unrelated to radiation dose. The effect of A-bomb exposure on the postoperative survival rate for colorectal cancer patients was studied. No difference by radiation dose could be demonstrated. In Japan, the incidence of colorectal cancer, and of colon cancer in particular, has been increasing. Therefore, close attention should be paid to changes occurring in A-bomb survivors. (author)

  19. The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosling, F.G.

    1994-09-01

    This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  20. Foreign bodies radiographically demonstrated in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, S.; Onitsuka, H.; Lee, K.K.; Shimizu, Y.; Russell, W.J.

    1978-02-01

    The prevalence of roentgenologically-detected foregin bodies among atomic bomb survivors was studied as an indicator of the A-bomb blast effects. Acupuncture was studied as an indicator of possible A-bomb-related abnormalities for which it was administered. All available roentgenograms of Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects which demonstrated foreign bodies were reviewed. The frequency of glass and metal foreign bodies and of acupuncture needles was analyzed in detail. Analyses were made by distance from the hypocenter, sex, age, body sites involved, and shielding at the time of the A-bomb (ATB). The presence of glass fragments correlated closely with distance from the hypocenter, with heavy shielding from the A-bombs, and with adulthood, and they were more frequent in the chest than in the hand and wrist. On the contrary, metal foreign bodies were more frequent in the hand and wrist than in the chest, and were not associated with distance from hypocenter or heavy shielding. The prevalence of acupuncture needles increased with age, but did not correlate with A-bomb dose.

  1. Lung cancer among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Akamizu, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    Patho-statistical study of the relationship between lung cancer and the atomic-bomb (A-bomb) was made on 259 lung cancer cases autopsied in Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital between 1956 and 1983. These autopsy cases were divided into 3 groups; those exposed at 2000 m from the hypocenter or those entering the city after the bombing (group B), and non-exposed group. The incidence of lung cancer was high irrespective of sex in the group A, being 1.8 times higher than in the non-exposed group. It tended to increase rapidly since 1975 in women of the group A, and the ratio of women to men was high, as compared with the other groups. In the group B and the non-exposed group, the incidence of lung cancer tended to increase year by year, particularly in men. Grip-sized adenocarcinoma was seen more frequently in the group A than in the other groups. Squamous cell carcinoma and undifferentiated cancer occurred more frequently than adenocarcinoma in older women of the exposed groups. This seemed to be due to the fact that older patients tended to have squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated cancer more frequently than adenocarcinoma. The incidence of lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma, tended to increase in the exposed groups. There was no great difference in the incidence of organ metastasis between the exposed groups and non-exposed group. Twenty-one of 24 cases of multiple cancer were A-bomb victims, although the incidence of complications was independent of exposure status. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Hiroshima - the effects of the atom bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, M.

    1977-01-01

    The author, a nurse, describes her personal impressions of a visit to Hiroshima in 1977 and of the medical and nursing facilities available for atomic bomb survivors in Japan. The findings of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation are briefly summarized. Hiroshima's Red Cross Hospital, recently re-built, cares for some of the survivors. The problems of discrimination against the survivors in employment and in society are discussed. (U.K.)

  3. Material for 258 atom bombs disappeared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.

    1988-01-01

    In a report published in the news magazine, 'Der Spiegel', it was said that IAEA safeguards obviously had failed, for large amounts of fissile material had disappeared, which could be turned into 258 atomic bombs. The article in this issue of atw by the former Deputy Director General with the IAEA Safeguards Division sketches the background to the assertions made by 'Der Spiegel' and presents an overview of the inspection and verification methods employed by IAEA. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Atomic bomb survivor data: utilization and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prentice, R.L.; Thompson, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    There were several motivations for organizing the SIMS Conference reported in this monograph. Risk assessment and its methods have been subjects of several SIMS Conferences in the recent past, and focusing these newer, more powerful methods on the largest human experience of exposure to ionizing radiation seemed an appropriate sequel. There was also the conviction that the data resources of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), generated through the mortality and medical follow-up of large samples of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, were being under utilized, and that a conference and its proceedings would create interest in exploiting this resource. The time seemed ripe for gathering a small group of current RERF scientists, veteran US statisticians and epidemiologists, and others with more recent entry into the field of radiation biology to consider long range plans for maximizing the output of information not only on the long term effects of ionizing radiation on man but on new knowledge of the determinants of health and disease that can be learned by study of the records of this cohort. This seemed particularly appropriate at this time while intensive joint Japanese-US efforts are underway to provide a new, more accurate dosimetry for use in these studies. Finally, there was a hope that an ad hoc forum of this type would provide not only a summary of current statistical and epidemiologic activities at RERF, but a useful critique of their scope and quality

  5. Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Continued mortality surveillance and incidence studies have revealed the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki to increase with increasing dose. Among the sites where the frequency of cancer can be clearly shown to be dose-related are the following: female breast, colon, esophagus, lung, ovary, stomach, thyroid, urinary bladder and leukemia. Although the evidence is less compelling, cancers of the liver, salivary glands, and skin as well as multiple myeloma appear increased too. This increase generally manifests itself when the survivors reach those ages where the natural incidence of cancer begins to rise. Risk is, however, related to the age of the individual at the time of the bombing; the highest risks are associated with individuals who were exposed in the first two decades of life. Current evidence suggests these higher risks decline with increasing time since exposure

  6. Mortality of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yokota, Kenichi; Tomonaga, Masao; Okumura, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the risk in 2,743 atomic bomb survivors by using a new dosimetry system. From the database, we selected 2,743 exposed persons and a total of three times 2,743 age-matched controls who were living far from the center of the A-bomb radiation in Nagasaki at the time of the explosion and who were still alive in 1971. The mortalities from all causes for male subjects exposed were slightly lower than, or almost equal to, those of unexposed persons. Death from cancer, however, increased in both sexes after all levels of irradiation except in males exposed to 0.01-0.49 Gy. In males, the risk was showed significant reduction in death from all diseases other than cancer classified according to 0.31-0.40 Gy. (author)

  7. Thermal analysis of pyrotechnic mixture-fireworks, atom-bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, Jeya; Thanulingam, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    Sound level produced from two varieties of sound producing fireworks of atom-bomb, cake bomb and thunder bomb were measured. The pyrotechnic mixture, KNO 3 /S/Al(H 3 BO 3 ) of compositions 57.5/19.9/22.1(0.5)% very much similar to commercial atom-bomb were taken and five cake bomb and seven thunder bomb with different net weight of chemicals were manufactured specifically for analysis. Cake bomb with 1g pyrotechnic mixture and thunder bomb with 2g pyrotechnic mixture produce -3 . Ignition temperature of the mixture is above the melting point of the metallic fuel, Al (660 deg C) and self propagating decomposition occurred at high temperature. The pyrotechnic mixture, KNO 3 /S/Al(H 3 BO 3 ) is a safe mixture from accidental factor, static electricity. DSC studies indicate slight formation of potassium nitrite with evolution of NO above 400 deg C. (author)

  8. Breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi

    1978-10-01

    Three hundred and sixty cases of breast cancer were collected from among the 63,000 female members of the RERF extended Life Span Study sample which includes atomic bomb exposed women and controls of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The relationship of these breast cancer cases to A-bomb radiation was sought, and in studying 5-year survival, the following conclusions were obtained concerning its relationship to histopathological findings: 1) The prognosis of the 50 + rad high dose group is the best, followed by the nonexposed group and the low dose group; 2) The apparently better survival may be due, at least in part, to the fact that this group is heavily weighted in favor of those who were younger at the time of the bomb; 3) There is no specificity of the histologic type of breast cancer in the survivors by dose; 4) Nor, is any significant difference observed in the distribution of tumor size and histological grade; 5) Cellular reaction is significantly marked at the stroma of carcinoma tissue in the high dose group; 6) Immune reaction is considered to be strong at the affected site of breast cancer in the high dose group and this can be regarded as a finding suggestive of good prognosis; 7) Further extended studies are therefore warranted. (author)

  9. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  10. Risk of cancer among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroo; Schull, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the risk of cancer and in particular cancers other than leukemia among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Attention focuses primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effect Research Foundation in the period 1950-1985 based on the recently revised dosimetry, termed the DS86 doses. Mortality from malignant tumors is increased among A-bomb survivors as a late effect of A-bomb radiation. Basides the well-known increase of leukemia, there also has been demonstrated increase of cancer of the lung, breast, esophagus, stomach, colon, ovary, urinary bladder, thyroid, and of multiple myeloma, but no increase has yet been observed in mortality from cancer of the rectum, gallbladder, pancreases, prostate and uterus, and of malignant lymphoma. The pattern of appearance over time of radiation-induced cancer other than leukemia differs from that of leukemia. In general, radiation-induced solid cancer begins to appear after attaining the age at which the cancer is normally prone to develop (so-called cancer age), and countinues to increase proportionally with the increase in mortality of the control group as it ages. Sensitivity to radiation, in terms of cancer induction, is higher for persons who were young at the time of the bomb (ATB) in general than for those who were older ATB. Furthermore, susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer tends to be higher in pre- than in post-natally exposed survivors (at least those exposed as adults). Other radiation effect modifiers and the shape of the dose response curve will also be discussed. (author)

  11. Sister chromatoid exchanges in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Mimako; Awa, Akio

    1980-01-01

    Sister chromatoid exchange (SCE) frequencies in the peripheral lymphocyte with and without mitomycin-C (MMC) were studied, in the age of tens and thirties for an atomic-bomb survivor group and in thirties, fifties, and seventies for an unexposed group. The observation of 100 cells showed no statistically significant difference of SCE frequencies with aging or irradiation. The increasing rates of SCE frequencies by MMC showed no difference among the groups. The average increasing ratio by MMC was 3.6. (Nakanishi, T.)

  12. Thyroid disorders in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, M.; Neriishi, K.; Akahoshi, M.; Suzuki, G.; Nakashima, E.; Nagataki, S.; Eguchi, K.

    2003-01-01

    It is known from several studies, including those from RERF that radiation exposure can cause thyroid tumors (Socolow, N Engl J Med. 1963;268:406, Parker, Ann Intern Med. 1974;80:600). Effects of radiation on autoimmune thyroid disease are not well understood. We have conducted thyroid disease screening on a population of 2856 individuals from the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort of atomic-bomb survivors for the period of 1984-1987. This study, which for logistical reasons involved survivors only from Nagasaki, revealed a statistically significant relationship between radiation dose and prevalence of solid nodules, including cancer, and that of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Nagataki, JAMA. 1994;272:364). Because the previous thyroid study was conducted only in Nagasaki, the new comprehensive thyroid disease screening study has been ongoing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki AHS participants since March 2000. For about 4,000 participants in Hiroshima and Nagasaki AHS cohort, thyroid ultrasonography, aspiration biopsy of nodules, thyroid function test, thyroid autoantibody (thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody) test by highly sensitive assay using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were performed for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. Analysis of data from the 1874 people examined through July 2001 (915 people from Hiroshima, 959 people from Nagasaki) provides evidence that thyroid cancer increases with radiation dose. The prevalence of positive result for thyroid autoantibody test is increased in the people exposed to relative low dose of radiation (0.01-0.99 Sv). Examination and measurements was completed in February 2003 for all patients. The analysis of these data is providing new and more complete insights into relationships between thyroid diseases and low doses of radiation

  13. Aging studies in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsky, J.L.; Moriyama, I.M.; Fujita, Seiichiro; Kawamoto, Sadahisa.

    1980-01-01

    Though acceleration of aging induced by radiation could not be demonstrated in many investigations on delayed effects of ionizing radiation on a-bomb survivors, studies on acceleration of aging after the exposure to ionizing radiation in human and animals have been carried out. To investigate whether physiological function was related to the exposure to ionizing radiation, a series of examinations concerning age was carried out at the time of general health examinations at ABCC. Simple examinations concerning aging were carried out on 11,351 a-bomb survivors, but the result was essentially negative. If biological or physiological age was defined clearly, the results of functional test would be used as criterion of aging. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Hot spring therapy of atomic bomb exposed patients, (9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, O [Balneogic Sanatorium for the Atomic Bomb Injured Beppu, Oita (Japan); Tsuji, H

    1978-03-01

    The following description shows the statistics and the results of medical examinatin concerning the patients utilized Beppu Atomic Bomb Center from April, 1977, to March, 1978. Number of persons utilized the center was 3904, and 20285 man-days in total. Number of case treated there was 268. Number of diseases amounted to 442 of 66 sorts, excluding temporary of acute diseases such as acute entergastritis and cold diseases, etc. According to the report by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, atomic bomb-exposed persons show twice as much rate of incidence as normal persons, and owing to aging, many of them have more than two kinds of diseases. Among the diseases, 60 cases were hypertension, 32 heart disease, 30 knee-arthritis, 26 diabetes, 25 hepatitis, 23 spondylosis deformans, etc. Among 268 cases treated by hot spring therapy, 6 were totally cured, and 252 showed alleviation, while 10 showed no change.

  15. Influence on social life of atomic bomb, chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Atomic bombs, for the first time in human history, were dropped on Hiroshima in August 6, and on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. Though the powers of these bombs were far small as compared with those of present day nuclear weapons, the atomic bombs claimed many lives instantaneously, damaged human bodies, and destroyed all objects, annihilating the urban areas. Even today, the dreadful consequences of the bombings still remain in both body and mind of the victims. Meanwhile, the experiences of atomic bomb disasters are fading constantly. In order to maintain the vivid information, in Part 3 ''Influence on social life'', the following matters are described: relations of the atomic bombings to society; destroyed societies such as disruption of regional societies and loss of wealth; life of the sufferers such as occupation, marriage, hardships of life, orphans, livelihood variation, and suffering of foreigners; and mental process of the sufferers. (J.P.N.)

  16. Long-term Radiation-Related Health Effects in a Unique Human Population: Lessons Learned from the Atomic Bomb Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douple, Evan B.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Cullings, Harry M.; Preston, Dale L.; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Fujiwara, Saeko; Shore, Roy E.

    2014-01-01

    For 63 years scientists in the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have been assessing the long-term health effects in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and in their children. The identification and follow-up of a large population (approximately a total of 200 000, of whom more than 40% are alive today) that includes a broad range of ages and radiation exposure doses, and healthy representatives of both sexes; establishment of well-defined cohorts whose members have been studied longitudinally, including some with biennial health examinations and a high survivor participation rate; and careful reconstructions of individual radiation doses have resulted in reliable excess relative risk estimates for radiation-related health effects, including cancer and noncancer effects in humans, for the benefit of the survivors and for all humankind. This article reviews those risk estimates and summarizes what has been learned from this historic and unique study. PMID:21402804

  17. Cancer developing among atom-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T [Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1975-12-01

    Cancer (with the exception of leukemia) which had often been observed among atom bomb survivors was discussed. Prevalence of thyroid carcinoma was high in the people who had been exposed to more than 50 rad of the atomic radiation. A great difference in prevalence of cancer was seen between irradiated people whose age had been under 20 years at the time of exposure and non-irradiated. More women than men had papillary adenocarcinoma. The highest prevalence was seen 16 to 20 years after exposure to atomic radiation, but there was no difference in prevalence between those from Hiroshima and from Nagasaki. Lung cancer comprised 89% of all cancers of the people whose age was 50 years and over. Most of them had been exposed to atomic radiation of more than 300 rad. The type was cellular retrograde cancer. The prevalence of gastric carcinoma was low, and breast cancer occurred at an early age before menopause. The occurrence of cancer in juvenile survivors was several times higher in the patients who had been exposed to atomic radiation of more than 100 rad than in non-irradiated. These values indicate that cancer occurs more frequently than leukemia does in such survivors.

  18. Profiles of non-cancer diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunori Kodama; Saeko Fujiwara; Michiko Yamada; Fumiyoshi Kasagi; Yukiko Shimizu; Itsuzo Shigematsu

    1996-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a recent study of atomic bomb radiation and non-cancer diseases in the AHS (Adult Health Study) population by the RERF (Radiation Effects Research Foundation) along with a general discussion of previous studies. Recent studies have demonstrated almost certainly that uterine myoma is more frequent among atomic bomb survivors. It cannot, at present, be concluded that uterine myoma is caused by radiation, because there are no reported studies of other exposed populations. Further analyses including the role of confounding factors as well as molecular approaches are needed to verify this radiation effect. The relationship between atomic bomb radiation exposure and hyperparathyroidism can now be said to have been established in view of the strong dose response, the agreement with results of studies of other populations, the high risk in the younger survivors, and the biological plausibility. Future studies by molecular approaches, etc., are needed to determine the pathogenic mechanism. Among other benign tumours, a dose response has been demonstrated for tumours of the thyroid, stomach and ovary. Although fewer studies have been conducted than for cancer, a clear association between radiation and various benign tumours is emerging. 79 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  19. The genetic effects of the atomic bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    Studies on the genetic effects of the atomic bombs detonated over Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been in progress since 1946. The indicators of potential genetic damage in the children of exposees which have been employed are: (1) untoward pregnancy outcomes (major congenital defect and/or stillbirth and/or neonatal death), (2) death of liveborn infants prior to average age 28.8 years, (3) cancer of onset prior to age 20, (4) sex chromosome aneuploidy, (5) mutations affecting protein electrophoretic mobility and/or activity, (6) chromosomal reciprocal translocations, (7) sex-ratio in the children of exposed mothers, and (8) physical development at birth, at 9-months, and at school age. There is no statistically significant effect of parental exposure to the bombs on any of these indicators. The net regression of indicator(s) on dose is, however, positive. On the basis of these regressions and assumptions concerning the contribution of spontaneous mutation to the indicator values in the controls, the gametic doubling dose of acute ionizing radiation under these circumstances is estimated to be 2 Sv. With a dose rate factor of 2, which seems appropriate to these circumstances, the doubling dose for chronic radiation is placed at 4 Sv. This is a substantially higher estimate than previous extrapolations to man from murine experiments

  20. Clinical studies of 44 cases of monoclonal gamma-pathy which were detected at atomic bomb health examination in the past 3 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Kingo; Kimura, Akiro; Iwato, Koji; Kawano, Michio; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Oguma, Nobuo (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology); Itoh, Chikako; Dohi, Hiroo; Neriishi, Kazuo

    1989-01-01

    Among participants in periodic health examinations for A-bomb survivors done from January 1985 through March 1988, monoclonal proteinemia (M proteinemia) was detected in 44 A-bomb survivors. A simple classification method for M proteinemia was proposed by detecting anemia and inhibited immunoglobulins as indicators. M proteinemia consisted of benign monoclonal gamma-globulinemia (9), premyeloma (15), stage I myeloma (12), stage II or III myeloma (5), and IgM type globulinemia (3). Myeloma tended to be more common in A-bomb survivors who had been directly exposed to A-bombing than in those who had entered the city after A-bombing. It was higher in A-bomb survivors aged 30 years or less at the time of A-bombing than those aged more than 30 years. Monoclonal benign gamma-globulinemia was observed in A-bomb survivors exposed at the age of 31 years or more. The latency period required from pre-myeloma to the development of myeloma was usually 4 years or more, and sometimes 7 or 8 years. Some A-bomb survivors with stage I myeloma have a stable course without any treatment (4-8 years). Other survivors sometimes developed stage II within 4 years. Introducing protein fraction analysis into the health examination may allow early detection and management of M proteinemia. (N.K.).

  1. Clinical studies of 44 cases of monoclonal γ-pathy which were detected at atomic bomb health examination in the past 3 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Kingo; Kimura, Akiro; Iwato, Koji; Kawano, Michio; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Oguma, Nobuo; Itoh, Chikako; Dohi, Hiroo; Neriishi, Kazuo.

    1989-01-01

    Among participants in periodic health examinations for A-bomb survivors done from January 1985 through March 1988, monoclonal proteinemia (M proteinemia) was detected in 44 A-bomb survivors. A simple classification method for M proteinemia was proposed by detecting anemia and inhibited immunoglobulins as indicators. M proteinemia consisted of benign monoclonal gamma-globulinemia (9), premyeloma (15), stage I myeloma (12), stage II or III myeloma (5), and IgM type globulinemia (3). Myeloma tended to be more common in A-bomb survivors who had been directly exposed to A-bombing than in those who had entered the city after A-bombing. It was higher in A-bomb survivors aged 30 years or less at the time of A-bombing than those aged more than 30 years. Monoclonal benign gamma-globulinemia was observed in A-bomb survivors exposed at the age of 31 years or more. The latency period required from pre-myeloma to the development of myeloma was usually 4 years or more, and sometimes 7 or 8 years. Some A-bomb survivors with stage I myeloma have a stable course without any treatment (4-8 years). Other survivors sometimes developed stage II within 4 years. Introducing protein fraction analysis into the health examination may allow early detection and management of M proteinemia. (N.K.)

  2. Aging studies in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsky, J.L.; Moriyama, I.M.; Fujita, Shoichiro; Kawamoto, Sadahisa.

    1979-07-01

    Although the studies of the effect of ionizing radiation on atomic bomb survivors have not produced any evidence of radiation-induced aging, there have been studies on experimental animals and man which suggest accelerated aging after exposure to ionizing radiation. To determine if certain physiologic functions could be related to exposure to ionizing radiation, a battery of age-related tests was given at the time of the physical examinations at ABCC. Some 11,351 persons were given these non-invasive age-related tests. The results were essentially negative. Until a satisfactory operational definition of biologic or physiologic age is developed, the administration of functional tests as a measure of aging does not seem justified. (author)

  3. The Potentialities of the Atomic Bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-07

    In January 1949, Norris Bradbury gave a lecture at the National War College which summarized the progress Los Alamos had made since the end of the war. The transcript of the talk was filed and forgotten until it surfaced fifty years later. It is, perhaps, one of the best summaries of the state of the United States nuclear weapons program in 1949. It is also evidence of how Bradbury saw the future of atomic weapons. It is presented in full, with minor editing, and begins as follows: Since the first use of an atomic bomb on August 5 [sic], 1945, over the city of Hiroshima, Japan, there has been a continual flood of speculation and discussion concerning the effect of this new weapon on military technology. Much of this speculation and discussion has been intelligent and fruitful; much, I regret to say, has had neither of these characteristics. The enormity of the device, in terms of potential destruction and loss of life, and the practical necessity to surround the technical facts with full security restrictions have only combined to make the problem more difficult. At the same time, it is imperative that policymaking personnel in charge of long range national planning know the basic facts concerning atomic weapons and have these facts in a reasonable perspective. This document describes these potentialities in detail.

  4. Radiation injuries in atomic bomb survivors, chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Atomic bombs, for the first time in human history, were dropped on Hiroshima in August 6, and on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. Though the powers of these bombs were small as compared with those of present day nuclear weapons, the atomic bombs claimed many lives instantaneously, damaged human bodies, and destroyed all objects, annihilating the urban areas. Even today, the dreadful consequences of the bombings still remain in both body and mind of the victims. Meanwhile, the experiences of atomic bomb disasters are fading constantly. In order to maintain the vivid information, in Part 2 ''Bodily injuries'', the following matters are described: early bodily injuries such as burns, (blast) external wounds, radiation injuries, and pathology in bodily injuries; later bodily injuries such as keloids, injuries to blood and eyes, injuries in exposed women, injuries in growth, aging and life, injuries in mental/nervous system, malignant tumors, and changes in chromosomes; and genetic effects. (J.P.N.)

  5. Aging study on atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo; Aoyama, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nishimori, Issei; Shiomi, Toshio

    1976-01-01

    This is an ad interim report on the survey which is being performed at the Atomic Disease Institute, Nagasaki University School of Medicine for the acceleration of aging in atomic bomb survivors. The survivors group consisted of 50 females between 40 and 49 years of age who were exposed somewhere within 1.4 km where exposure dose could be estimated accurately and whose mean estimated exposure dose was 225.9+-176.8 rads. The control group consisted of females of the same age group who were exposed at sites more than 2.5 km apart (atmospheric dose 2.9 rads). The items for the judgement of aging included physical measurements, external findings, functional findings, and special tests (urine, blood, pattern of serum protein fraction, and chromosome aberrations). As far as chromosome aberrations were concerned, the number of cells with stable aberrations, Cs, showed differences between the two groups, and the number of cells with exchange-type aberrations was large in the survivors group. No significant differences were observed in the other tests. (Serizawa, K.)

  6. Pancreatic exocrine secretion in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masataka; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Ohtaki, Megu

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of A-bombing on pancreatic exocrine secretion in 6 A-bomb survivors (an average age of 57 years) and the age- and sex-matched non-exposed 6 persons (an average age of 58 years). Six A-bomb survivors consisted of: three who had been directly exposed to A-bombing, one who had entered the city within 3 days after bombing, one who had worked in caring for A-bomb survivors, and one who had later entered the city. Caerulein-Secretin test revealed no significant difference in the total secretion of lipase, maximum bicarbonate, amylase output, or lipase output between the exposed and non-exposed groups. The concentration of lipase ten min after stimulation was significantly decreased in the exposed group than the control group. This suggests that radiation may be responsible for abnormality in the ability of pancreatic exocrine secretion. (N.K.)

  7. Why the USA dropped atomic bombs on Japanese cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, B.

    1997-01-01

    Why did the USA use atomic bombs on Japanese cities? Because, by summer 1945, the earlier morality that said you should not kill non-combatants had been chipped away, then eroded, and ultimately destroyed by World War II. After Hitler's viciousness, after the Japanese rape of Nanjing, after the killings in Manila, after the savagery through Asia, after Dresden, after Hamburg, after Tokyo, Osaka, Kobe, Nagoya - over sixty Japanese cities had been bombed before Hiroshima, Hiroshima was inevitable, easy, comfortable, virtually automatic. The transformation was not the use of bomb, but the bombing of non-combatants - massively, intentionally. There was probably a desire to revenge, as well. In addition, there was an expectation that the bombs used on japan would also intimidate the Soviet Union but that was not crucial. Any nation that had the capacity would have used the bomb in righteousness and comfort, self-conceived dignity, amid popular applause from its electorate people

  8. Teaching and Learning Multiple Perspectives: The Atomic Bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppen, Frans H.

    2000-01-01

    Explores how historical empathy can give students a richer understanding of the past, focusing on the development of the students' historical understanding through an analysis of 18 documents on President Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan. (CMK)

  9. Incidence of skin cancer among Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    Among a total of 65,268 Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 140 cases with skin cancer were collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City from 1961 through 1987. Subsequently, these cases of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors were statistically analyzed in relation to the estimated distance from the hypocenter by age, sex, histology and latent period. The results were as follows: (1) A high correlation was observed between the incidence of skin cancer and the distance from the hypocenter. (2) The incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors now appears to be increasing in relation to exposure distance. (3) Among 140 cases, basal cell epithelioma was observed in 67 cases (47.9%) and squamous cell carcinoma in 43 cases (30.7%). (author)

  10. Detection at a distance of atomic bomb tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahmias, M E

    1954-01-01

    Nahmias describes the radioassay of air, rain, and snowfall as the basis for detecting atomic bomb tests. Tables and graphs give time vs. Ra equivalents, distance vs Roentgens/h of radiation, and distribution of radioelements which can be expected.

  11. Radiation therapy among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkston, J.A.; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.

    1980-10-01

    In the continuing evaluations of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects, not only doses from the A-bombs but those from other radiation sources must be considered, for the latter may be concomitantly acting factors causing bias among these investigations. In the present study, among 73 Hiroshima and 22 Nagasaki Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects who reported receiving radiation therapy, from 1970 through 1979, the medical records of 72 and 20, respectively, were reviewed, and 41 Hiroshima and 14 Nagasaki subjects were confirmed to have received radiation therapy. The data obtained in the present study were pooled with those of the previous investigation on radiation therapy exposures of AHS subjects prior to 1970. A total of 190 subjects have been documented as receiving radiation therapy and their doses were estimated. Energies used in treatments and diseases treated are discussed. Malignancies developed subsequent to radiation therapy in seven cases; five after treatment for malignancies and two after treatment for benign diseases. Neoplasms of 12 AHS subjects may have been induced by earlier radiation therapy; 5 in the earlier study and 7 in the present one. These investigations underscore the need for continued documentation of exposures to ionizing radiation for medical reasons, especially from sources incurring relatively high doses. Bias in assessments of late radiation effects among A-bomb survivors can thus be avoided. (author)

  12. Breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunga, M.; Land, C.E.; Tokuoka, S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty eight years after the atomic bombings, studies of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) on the extended Life Span Study (LSS) sample have continued to provide important information on radiation carcinogenesis. The third breast cancer survey among this sample revealed 564 cases during the period 1950-80, of which 412 were reviewed microscopically. The following statements reflect the conclusions from the current investigation; 1) the relationship between radiation dose and breast cancer incidence was consistent with linearity and did not differ markedly between the Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors, 2) a dose-related breast cancer risk was observed among women who were in their first decade of life at the time of exposure, 3) the relative risk of radiationinduced breast cancer decreased with increasing age at exposure, 4) the pattern over time of age-specific breast cancer incidence is similar for exposed and control women (that is, exposed women have more breast cancer than control women but the excess risk closely follows normal risk as expressed by age-specific population rates), and 5) radiation-induced breast cancer appears to be morphologically similar to other breast cancer

  13. Leukemia in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, A B; Heyssel, R; Itoga, T; Tomonaga, M

    1960-08-01

    In the 13.5 years following the detonation of the atomic bomb, 95 cases of leukemia have been observed in the Nagasaki survivors. This increase is highly significant statistically. The increased leukemia risk apparently started 1.5 to 2.5 years following radiation exposure, and has lasted through 1958. Acute leukemias of all types and chronic granulocytic leukemia are increased, (with the possible exception of the Schilling type of acute monocytic leukemia). Males in general, and individuals in the younger ages (0 to 09), are apparently most sensitive. The risk of radiation induction of leukemia is related to the size of the dose. The shape of the curve does not differ greatly from a linear model, but is consistent with a variety of hypotheses. The data in the low dose region are too limited to be of significance in evaluating the risk of low doses of radiation. The data suggest that high radiation doses may be associated with a decrease in the latent period to leukemia induction. 43 references, 2 figures, 31 tables.

  14. Breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Tokuoka, Shoji; Land, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty eight years after the atomic bombings, studies of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) on the extended Life Span Study (LSS) sample have continued to provide important information on radiation carcinogenesis. The third breast cancer survey among this sample revealed 564 cases during the period 1950 - 80, of which 412 were reviewed microscopically. The following statements reflect the conclusions from the current investigation; 1) the relationship between radiation dose and breast cancer incidence was consistent with linearity and did not differ markedly between the Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors, 2) a dose-related breast cancer risk was observed among women who were in their first decade of life at the time of exposure, 3) the relative risk of radiation-induced breast cancer decreased with increasing age at exposure, 4) the pattern over time of age-specific breast cancer incidence is similar for exposed and control women (that is, exposed women have more breast cancer than control women but the excess risk closely follows normal risk as expressed by age-specific population rates), and 5) radiation-induced breast cancer appears to be morphologically similar to other breast cancer. (author)

  15. Infectious diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Ishida, Sadamu; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Incidences of various infectious diseases in 986 autopsy cases at Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital and Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital from 1965 to 1975 were compared according to the distance from the explosion place, and the following results were obtained. There was not a significant difference at incidences of most infectious diseases between each exposured group and not-exposured group. Incidence of old tuberculosis focus was a little higher in exposured groups, but incidences of main lesions such as tuberculosis, active tuberculosis, and miliary tuberculosis were lower in exposured groups and effect of exposure was negative. Out of urinary tract infections, the nearer the distance to the explosion place was, the higher incidence of cistitis in female was. Incidence of cystitis of female was higher than that of male in the group exposured near to the explosion place. With respect to stomach cancer, leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and cerebrovascular disorder, the nearer the distance to the explosion place was, the higher incidences of various infectious diseases were. (Tsunoda, M.)

  16. Leukemia in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyssel, R; Brill, A B; Woodbury, L A; Nishimura, Edwin T; Ghose, Tarunendu; Hoshino, Takashi; Yamasaki, Mitsuru

    1959-03-01

    This report is intended to provide the basic data pertinent to the leukemia experience observed in the survivors of the Hiroshima atomic explosion. Many of the conclusions in this report are tentative. The one clear fact to emerge is that radiation increases the occurrence rate of leukemia and that the magnitude of increase is dependent on dose received. Additional observations can be made, which, while not definitive in themselves, seem to complement each other, and are corroborated by other experiences in radiation biology. From the data a linear relationship between dose and incidence of leukemia is found. The shape of the relation in the lower dose range is not known with certainty. An approximate minimum time for the appearance of leukemia following radiation is 3 years or less. The data suggest that the time of maximum risk of leukemia may be dependent on the dose of radiation received. In this group the mean latent period is found to lie in the interval between 4 and 8 years following exposure. The length of time during which the increased incidence of leukemia persists is not known. The incidence of the acute leukemias and of chronic granulocytic leukemia is increased in the exposed survivors. The chronic granulocytic variety is disproportionately increased in Japanese survivors of the atomic bomb. No effect of radiation on monocytic or chronic lymphatic leukemia incidence is noted. Aplastic anemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis have been investigated. Myelofibrosis is the only one of this group of diseases in which a suggestive relation to radiation exposure is apparent. The natural history of leukemia following radiation does not seem to differ from that of the spontaneously occurring variety. 17 references, 5 figures, 38 tables.

  17. Carcinoma of the stomach in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Shinichi; Ogawa, Yuichiro; Nagasue, Naofumi; Abe, Shunichi; Sasaki, Yukiharu.

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective study of 135 atomic bomb survivors (A-bomb group) and 377 non-atomic bomb survivors (control group) who had carcinoma of the stomach was made with respect to surgical and pathological findings of carcinoma. An average age was significantly older in the A-bomb group (65 years) than in the control group (57 years). The number of female patients was significantly larger in the A-bomb group than in the control group. Although there was no difference of incidence in liver and peritoneal metastases, lymph node metastases along the left gastric artery, common hepatic artery and splenic artery, around the celiac artery, and at the splenic hilus occurred less frequently in the A-bomb group than in the control group. When carcinoma of the stomach was histologically classified as differentiated and undifferentiated, the incidence of differentiated type was higher than that of undifferentiated type in the A-bomb group. Regarding postoperative complications and follow-up results, there was no significant difference between the groups, synchronous or heterochronous multiple cancer occurred more frequently in the A-bomb group than in the control group. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Smoking habits among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori; Kimura, Masafumi

    1992-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation made a research through mailing, the smoking habits among the A-bomb survivors in 1978-79. Statistic analysis was made on the smoking habits and radiation doses. (J.P.N.)

  19. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. 1999 edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosling, F.G.

    1999-01-01

    ``The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb`` is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of the United States government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  20. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. 1999 edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, F. G.

    1999-01-01

    "The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb" is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of the United States government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  1. Mental health status of A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    The most survivors of disaster usually recover with few or no lasting effects on their mental health. However, in some portions of survivors, distress lasts long. The atomic bomb detonated to Nagasaki in August 1945 instantaneously destroyed almost all areas of the city, resulting in a total of ca. 73,884 deaths by the end of 1945 and about 74,909 injured people. Since the A-bomb survivors reached over 60 years of age, their mental health as well as physical health has become of great concern. Some studies on their mental health conditions have been carried out in Japan. I give an outline about a precedent study on mental health of the A-bomb survivors in this report. The mental health studies of the A-bomb survivors who paid attention to a being bombed experience, stigmatization, long-term outcome, recovery are necessary. The improvement of wide appropriate support system for the A-bomb survivors is expected in future. (author)

  2. Noncancer disease mortality among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Pierce, D.A.; Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, K

    2000-01-01

    We examined the noncancer disease mortality for 86,572 atomic bomb survivors with dose estimates in the Radiation Effect Research Foundation's Life Span Study cohort between 1950 and 1990. There are 27,000 noncancer disease deaths and show a statistically significant increase in noncancer disease death rates with radiation dose. Increasing trends are observed for diseases of the circulatory, digestive, and respiratory systems. Rates for those exposed to 1 Sv are elevated about 10%, a relative increase that is considerably smaller than that for cancer. However, because noncancer deaths are much more common than cancer deaths, the absolute increase in noncancer rates is large. The estimates of the number of radiation-related noncancer deaths in the cohort to date are 50% to 100% of the number for solid cancer. There remains uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response. In particular, there is considerable uncertainty regarding risks in the range below 0.2 Sv of primary interest for radiation protection. The data are statistically consistent with curvilinear dose response functions that posit essentially zero risk for doses below 0.5 Sv, but there is no significant evidence against linearity. While the ERR for those exposed as children tends to increase with attained age, there is no statistically significant dependence of ERR on age at exposure or attained age. We also tried to estimate the lifetime risk, allowing for competing risks of cancer mortality. Especially we considered the impact of competing radiation risks since both cancer and noncancer mortality are in part radiation-related. These findings, as they are based on death certificates, have their limitation. However, the present findings can not be explained by biases due to misclassification of the cause of death and confounding factors. In the future, it will be necessary not only to continue mortality follow-up, but also to conduct a clinical study as well as animal experiments and biological

  3. Study of apoprotein among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Sadamatsu; Tokunaga, Yutaka; Ishibashi, Shinzo; Mito, Kazuyo; Ito, Chikako; Kato, Masafumi.

    1988-01-01

    In an effort to examine the relationship between A-bomb exposure and arteriosclerosis, the serum concentrations of apoproteins (Apo) were measured in a total of 192 A-bomb survivors, consisting of 28 A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤2,000 m from the hypocenter (the exposed group) and 110 A-bomb survivors exposed at ≥3,000 m and entering the city 9 days or later after A-bombing (the control group). No definitive difference in average serum concentrations of Apo A-I and A-II was found between the exposed and control groups; nor did average serum concentrations of Apo B and B/A-I differ between the groups. According to the age group, Apo A-I was significantly higher in men over the age of 70 in the exposed group than the control group. Apo B tended to be higher in men over the age of 50 in the exposed group than the control group. As for men in the control group, there was a significant negative correlation between age group and both Apo A-I and A-II; however, this tendency was not seen in the exposed group. For women, no correlation between Apo and age group was found in either the exposed or control group. There was a tendency among men towards a higher incidence of hypoapoproteinemia A-I in the exposed group than the control group. The incidence of hyperapoproteinemia B was significantly higher as well for men in the exposed group than the control group. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Skin cancer of Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto; Noda, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Naoko; Takahara, Osamu; Sadamori, Michiko; Nishimoto, Katsutaro; Ota, Hisahiro.

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported that there was a high correlation between the exposure dose and the incidence of skin cancer in A-bomb survivors using the data of the Nagasaki Life Span Study of Radiation Effects Research Foundation and Nagasaki Tumor Registry. In Report 3 of this series, we clarified that the correlation between the exposure distance and the incidence of skin cancer was statistically significant in 140 cases of skin cancer collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City and adjacent districts on the basis of the data of the total 66,276 A-bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, and that the correlation was the same even when the cases were divided by sex. In this report, we examined the chronological change of the incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, using the data of the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster. It is likely that the incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors has increased after 1962, especially after 1975 in those exposed within 2.5km from the hypocenter compared to those exposed at 3.0km or more. (author)

  5. Cold pressor test on atomic bomb survivors, Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tomoyoshi; Sweedler, D R; Okamoto, Akira

    1964-03-12

    Cold pressor test was performed on a sample of 1156 atomic bomb survivors and other persons (ages ranging between 15 to 81 years) residing in Nagasaki City. Response values differed according to such factors as age, sex, blood pressure and month of examination. The response in systolic pressure increased with age but no evidence was found to support an acceleration of aging by irradiation. The response in diastolic blood pressure showed no change with age, but differed between Comparison Groups during the summer months. However, this was apparently due to some other cause than exposure to the atomic bomb. 25 references, 8 tables.

  6. Tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors. Study of autopsy cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, T [H.ma Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Matsushita, Hiroshi

    1980-03-01

    Effects of atomic bomb on tuberculosis among atomic bomb survivors necropsied after 1956 when Atomic Bomb Hospital was opened were observed statistically and the following results were obtained. The morbidity of tuberculosis in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter was higher than that of the control group, but there was not a significant difference between the groups. The morbidity of all types of tuberculosis was significantly higher in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter than in the control group. The morbidity of tuberculosis tended to decrease in both exposed and non-exposed groups with time. However, the morbidity of miliary or active tuberculosis has tended to rise in the exposed since 1975. The morbidity in young a-bomb survivors exposed within 2 km was higher than that in those of other groups, but there was not a difference in the morbidity among the aged. The higher the rate of complication of active tuberculosis with stomach cancer or acute myelocytic leukemia or liver cirrhosis, the nearer the places of exposure were to the hypocenter. Out of 26 patients with miliary tuberculosis, 6 were suspected to have leukemia while they were alive and were suggested to have leukemoid reaction by autopsy. They all were a-bomb survivors, and 4 of them were exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter.

  7. Leukemia in atomic bomb survivors. 1. General observations. Leukemia in survivors of atomic bombing. Cytologic and biochemical studies on the granulocytes in early leukemia among atomic bomb survivors. Leukemogenic effects of ionizing radiation on atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, R D; Moloney, W C; Yamawaki, Tokuso; Kastenbaum, M A

    1959-01-01

    This document contains 4 separate reports on leukemia in survivals of the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the first report, observations on seventy-five established cases of leukemia occurring in people exposed to atomic bomb radiation are presented. These data indicate a great increase in the incidence of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors due to a single massive exposure to ionizing radiation. The leukemogenic effects of radiation are manifested equally in both sexes and at all age levels represented in this series. The striking preponderance of chronic myelogenous leukemia compared to chronic lymphatic leukemia has been noted in exposed individuals but it is pointed out that chronic lymphatic leukemia is comparatively rare among the Japanese. Cases of leukemia are still appearing in atomic bomb survivors. However, since 1950 there has been a steady decline in the number of cases. The second report consists of a review of all cases of leukemia referred to the ABCC from 1948 to April 1952, a total of 75 cases. In the third report, hematological and biochemical findings in separated leukocytes of four cases of preclinical myelogenous leukemia developing in atomic bomb survivors are described. The incidence of leukemia among survivors in Hiroshima is the topic of the fourth report. 38 references, 8 figures, 10 tables.

  8. Thyroid cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors, 1958-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori; Ezaki, Haruo; Ron, E.; Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroo; Lubin, J.; Asano, Masahide.

    1992-06-01

    One hundred and twelve cases of thyroid cancer diagnosed during the period 1958-79 among the extended Life Span Study cohort in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were studied. There was a statistically significant association between thyroid cancer incidence and exposure to atomic bomb radiation. The adjusted excess relative risk (ERR) per gray was 1.1 (95% confidence interval=0.3-2.5) and the adjusted absolute risk per 10 4 PYGy was 0.59 (95% confidence interval=0.2-1.7). Based on a comparison of the deviances obtained from relative and absolute risk models, a simple linear relative risk model appeared to fit the data better than an absolute risk model; however, it would not be appropriate to conclude that the data conform strictly to a relative risk pattern. The incidence of thyroid cancer among the members of the Adult Health Study (AHS) population, who have received biennial medical examinations at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, since 1958, was 70% higher than that among the rest of the extended LSS cohort after adjustments for city, sex, log age, calendar year, and Dosimetry System 1986 dose. There was no significant difference between the slope of the dose-response curve for AHS and non-AHS participants, although the estimated ERRs at 1 Gy for the AHS and non-AHS population were 1.6 and 0.3, respectively. The elevated risk appeared to be confined to women, and there was an increasing risk with decreasing attained age and age at exposure. (J.P.N.)

  9. A review of 40 years studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itsuzo Shigematsu

    1993-01-01

    The late health effects of ionizing radiation have been studied by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) based on a fixed population of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki which had been established in 1950. The results thus far obtained up to the present can be classified into the following three categories: (1) The effects for which a strong association with atomic bomb radiation has been found include malignant neoplasms, cataracts, chromosomal aberrations, small head size and mental retardation among the in utero exposed. (2) A weak association has been found in the several sites of cancers, some non-cancer mortalities and immunological abnormalities. (3) No association has been observed in some types of leukemia, osteosarcoma, accelerated aging, sterility and hereditary effects

  10. Report on the results of the fourth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Kenji (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Mukai, Hideaki; Suga, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Kunihara, Michitoshi; Ishida, Shigeki

    1991-08-01

    From October 21 through November 5, 1990, health examination was performed in atomic bomb survivors living in Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, and Paraguay. A total of 194 persons were recognized as having been exposed to A-bombing. Among them, 122 atomic-bomb survivors (62.9%) participated in the present health examination, consisting of 55 men and 67 women. An average age was 61.5{+-}9.0 years for men and 59.6{+-}8.6 years for women. The acquisition rate of health handbook for atomic bomb survivors was 35.2%. Past history for cancer resection was seen in 4 atomic bomb survivors. The presenting subjective symptoms were fatigue, heat intolerance, decreased physical fitness, and unintentional weight loss. Laboratory findings included: a decreased value of hemoglobin (5 atomic-bomb survivors), hypertension (26), noticeable ECG findings (5), abnormal values of GOT (28) and GPT (14), hypercholesteremia (43), hyperuricemia (19), and fasting hyperglycemia (8). Overall evaluation showed that 48 atomic bomb survivors need to receive detailed medical examination for hypertension, heart disease, liver disease, and hyperlipemia. (N.K.).

  11. Report on the results of the fourth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Mukai, Hideaki; Suga, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Kunihara, Michitoshi; Ishida, Shigeki.

    1991-01-01

    From October 21 through November 5, 1990, health examination was performed in atomic bomb survivors living in Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, and Paraguay. A total of 194 persons were recognized as having been exposed to A-bombing. Among them, 122 atomic-bomb survivors (62.9%) participated in the present health examination, consisting of 55 men and 67 women. An average age was 61.5±9.0 years for men and 59.6±8.6 years for women. The acquisition rate of health handbook for atomic bomb survivors was 35.2%. Past history for cancer resection was seen in 4 atomic bomb survivors. The presenting subjective symptoms were fatigue, heat intolerance, decreased physical fitness, and unintentional weight loss. Laboratory findings included: a decreased value of hemoglobin (5 atomic-bomb survivors), hypertension (26), noticeable ECG findings (5), abnormal values of GOT (28) and GPT (14), hypercholesteremia (43), hyperuricemia (19), and fasting hyperglycemia (8). Overall evaluation showed that 48 atomic bomb survivors need to receive detailed medical examination for hypertension, heart disease, liver disease, and hyperlipemia. (N.K.)

  12. Multiple primary cancer in cases of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tsuneo; Matsuda, Masahiro; Matsugu, Yasuhiro; Ishimoto, Tatsuro; Nakahara, Hideki; Kagawa, Naoki; Fukuda, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Multiple primary cancer was investigated in individual atomic bomb survivors more than 50 years after exposure. During the decade from 1995 to 2004, double cancer was detected in 275 individuals visiting our facility. These 275 patients with multiple primary cancer were divided into an atomic bomb-exposed group and a non-exposed group. In terms of age at the time of definite diagnosis of double cancer and age upon onset of the first cancer, there was no significant difference between the atomic bomb-exposed group and the non-exposed group. In both groups, the percentage of males was higher than that of females. However, the percentage of females was higher in the exposed group than in the non-exposed group. Synchronous double cancer (cases where a second cancer develops within one year after onset of the first cancer) was seen in 32 individuals from the exposed group. Triple cancer was seen in 3 cases. In the exposed group, the site affected by cancer was the stomach in 28% and the colon/rectum in 27% of cases. Thus, cancer affected the stomach or colon/rectum in the majority of cases. The most frequent combination of organs affected by double cancer was the stomach+colon/rectum (20 cases, 25%). In a study of multiple primary cancer patients, the percentage of females was higher in the atomic bomb exposed group compared to the non-exposed group. There was no other difference between the two groups. (author)

  13. Malignant Lymphoma in an Atomic-bomb Survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chia Lee

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomic bomb survivors outside of Japan are few and often hard to follow-up. Spinal malignant lymphoma among these survivors is rare in established studies from Japan or the United States. Here, we report an 81-year-old woman, who experienced the atomic bomb explosion in Nagasaki when she was 19 years old, who presented with papillary thyroid carcinoma when she was 70 years old. Both follicular lymphoma over the right elbow region and vertebral malignant lymphoma were found when she turned 81 years old. Bone scan did not show any increased uptake of isotope. However, thoracolumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple infiltrative soft tissue masses involving vertebral bodies at the T10–11 level. Computed tomography-guided biopsy further showed lymphocyte infiltration. Fortunately, the neurological deficit was improved after chemotherapy. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma in atomic bomb survivors should be more careful and aggressive, even when their bone scan results show negative findings. In addition, the authors suggest that atomic bomb survivors should be followed-up carefully throughout their entire life.

  14. Current trend of malignant neoplasms among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao

    1984-01-01

    A survey was made on 7,589 admitted patients and 1,965 autopsy cases. The overall incidence of malignant neoplasms tended to decrease in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 2 km in autopsy cases and to increase in admitted patients. The incidence of pulmonary cancer tended to increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients. The incidence of gastric cancer tended to increase up to 1975, and thereafter tended to decrease. The incidence of liver cancer tended to increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients, which was marked in males. The incidence of leukemia was high in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 2 km in autopsy cases, and in the group within 1 km and the group which entered the city after the explosion in admitted patients. The incidence of malignant lymphoma tended to decrease, and the incidence of carcinoma of the colon tended to gradually increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients. The incidence of multiple carcinomas tended to increase in both atomic bomb exposed group and non-exposed group, being higher in atomic bomb group than in non-exposed group. The incidence of breast cancer became constant since 1970. The incidence of carcinoma of the thyroid gland tended to decrease, although it was high in the group exposed near the explosion. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Aplastic anemia and related disorders in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Tomonaga, Yu; Matsunaga, Masako; Sadamori, Naoki; Ishimaru, Toranosuke.

    1978-01-01

    Whether the incidence of aplastic anemia significantly increases due to the later effect of atomic-bomb radiation was studied. After the data of aplastic anemia which occurred within 1950 - 1973 were evaluated and the diagnoses of the cases were certified, the incidence of aplastic anemia per 109,000 inhabitants of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was calculated and compared according to the dose of atomic-bomb radiation. There was no increase in the incidence according to an increase in radiation dose, and there was no fact that aplastic anemia increased in a certain period either. Most of the atomic-bomb survivors who were close to the epicenter and were clinically diagnosed as aplastic anemia had leukemia lesion or myeloid proliferating lesion, and it is likely to be that pathological changes resembling aplastic anemia may appear in a certain phase of myeloid proliferation or as a phenotype of myeloid proliferation. An evaluation was made on cases of aplastic anemia of other groups, but the doses of atomic-bomb radiation which they received were not so much to give effect on the bone marrow except only two cases. (Ueda, J.)

  16. Nutritional survey of atomic bomb survivors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Fumiyo; Tanigawa, Junko; Ito, Chikako

    1978-01-01

    136 cases in which mild anemia was recognized but stomach disease was not recognized by the examination for a-bomb survivors, were investigated concerning living conditions, the habit of food, and the intake amount of nutrition, and the following results were obtained. 1. The mean intake amount of nutritive substances in a-bomb survivors almost reached the level as compared to the necessary amount of nutritive substances in control. 2. Shortage in intake of protein and iron which seemed to be a factor of occurrence of anemia (protein: 50% in men and 19.7% in women, iron: 25% in men and 22.5% in women), much and frequent intake of confectioneries and luxuries, and the rate of going without meal (33.3% of men went without meal one to 6 times a week) were recongized in each case of anemia with high rate. These tendency was marked in men. 3. Anemia was recognized in some of women, although they took all nutritive substances. This seemed to be caused by physiological loss of iron. Accordingly, it was desirable to take an excess amount of iron. (Tsunoda, M.)

  17. High incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Takahiro; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Hoshi, Masaharu

    1999-01-01

    Since the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, high incidences of leukemia, thyroid cancer and other tumors have been reported as atomic bomb-induced tumors. We investigated the incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. Sixty-eight patients surgically treated for meningioma who had been within 2.0 km of the hypocenter of the explosion were identified. Six hundred and seven non-exposed patients with meningioma were also studied. Treatment dates were from 1975 to 1992. The incidences of meningioma among 68 subjects within 2.0 km and 607 non-exposed patients were 8.7 and 3.0 cases per 10 5 persons per year, respectively. The incidences of meningioma among the survivors of Hiroshima in 5-year intervals since 1975 were 5.3, 7.4, 10.1, and 14.9, respectively. The incidences of meningioma classified by distances from the hypocenter of 1.5-2.0 km, 1.0-1.5 km and less than 1.0 km were 6.3, 7.6 and 20.0, respectively. The incidences of meningioma classified by doses to the brain of 0-0.099 Sv, 0.1-0.99 Sv and more than 1.0 Sv were 7.7, 9.2 and 18.2, respectively. The incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors has increased since 1975. There was a significant correlation between the incidence and the dose of radiation to the brain. The present findings strongly suggest that meningioma is one of the tumors induced by atomic bombing in Hiroshima. (author)

  18. Leukemia and lymphoma in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemia has been observed to increase with increasing radiation dose in the A-bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first radiation-related cases occurred 3 to 5 years following exposure. The peak incidence years were about 7 to 8 years following exposure and the leukemogenic effect has decreased since that time, but it may last for 40 years or longer in the most heavily exposed persons. A bimodal susceptibility pattern was observed, with peaks following exposure during childhood and after age 50. Latent periods for the development of acute leukemia were shortest in the younger exposed persons. Both acute and chronic forms of leukemia occurred in exposed persons at younger ages in life than normally is expected. The most common types of radiation-induced leukemia were acute and chronic granulocytic in adults and children, and acute lymphocytic in children. The highest radiation-related leukemia risk was for chronic granulocytic leukemia following childhood exposure

  19. Preleukemic state in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Motoko

    1980-01-01

    Hematology data before onset of leukemia were available for 55 of the 1462 acute leukemia cases (as of the end of June 1976) collected by RERF. Among these, 8 showed preleukemic state and 2 were polycythemia. In content, preleukemic state comprised anemia, leukopenia and morphological abnormalities of RBC, platelets and WBC. Leukemia cases presenting preleukemic state were, by type, mostly erythroleukemia and monocytic leukemia. Preleukemic state was not necessarily frequent among cases of leukemia in A-bomb survivors exposed to high dose. The prevalence of the 5 items, prescribed as preleukemic state, i.e., anemia (female =50%), and relative monocytosis (>=10%), could not be said to be high in the survivors exposed to high dose. Anemia in males and leukopenia in males and females were increased significantly with age. Leukemia prevalence was significantly high especially in those cases that had presented leukopenia, relative neutropenia or relative lymphocytosis among the 5 items prescribed as preleukemic state. (author)

  20. Epidemiologic study of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-01-01

    Data from 140 A-bomb survivors with skin cancer were analyzed with the purpose of elucidating the relationship between atomic bombing and skin cancer. The incidence of skin cancer was significantly correlated with the distance from the hypocenter (p<0.01), regardless of sex. Basal cell epithelioma was the most predominant, followed by squamous cell carcinoma. Histology of skin cancer seemed independent of the distance. Since 1965, the incidence of skin cancer has been increased with aging in A-bomb survivors exposed at le2500 m from the hypocenter. It has been significantly higher since 1975 in the le2500 m group than in the ge3000 m group. (N.K.).

  1. Epidemiologic study of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko

    1989-01-01

    Data from 140 A-bomb survivors with skin cancer were analyzed with the purpose of elucidating the relationship between atomic bombing and skin cancer. The incidence of skin cancer was significantly correlated with the distance from the hypocenter (p<0.01), regardless of sex. Basal cell epithelioma was the most predominant, followed by squamous cell carcinoma. Histology of skin cancer seemed independent of the distance. Since 1965, the incidence of skin cancer has been increased with aging in A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤2500 m from the hypocenter. It has been significantly higher since 1975 in the ≤2500 m group than in the ≥3000 m group. (N.K.)

  2. A study on social life and mental health of middle-aged and elderly atomic bomb survivors. Analysis of general health questionnaire (GHQ-30)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Yasuyuki; Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Toriyama, Fumiko; Sugasaki, Hiroyuki.

    1996-01-01

    The psychological state of middle aged and elderly atomic bomb survivors was analyzed by GHQ, which had been done from September to November, 1992. Subjects were 1,399 Nagasaki survivors of the average age of 61.3 y and 1,054 non-irradiated people of 62.2 y living in the countryside of Nagasaki prefecture as the control. Analyses were performed with χ square method and t-test. When the subordinate measure derived from factor analysis of GHQ was compared with that of the control group, the score possibly attributable to anxiety reaction to the stress was significantly higher in the survivors. However, the two scores attributable to obstacle in personal relations and to avoidance of social activities were significantly lower, which suggested that the survivors are able to have rich personal and social interactions. Besides, it was suggested that the GHQ score was increased possibly by anxiety for the future in the essential part of life such as loss of feeling of healthiness and dissatisfaction for the present life conditions. It was confirmed that systematic and continuous examinations are necessary from the bio-psycho-social viewpoint. (H.O.)

  3. Skin cancer of Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto; Noda, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Naoko; Takahara, Osamu; Sadamori, Michiko; Nishimoto, Katsutaro; Ota, Hisahiro.

    1990-01-01

    We already reported that there was a high correlation between the exposure dose and the incidence of skin cancer in A-bomb survivors using the data of the Nagasaki Life Span Study of Radiation Effects Research Foundation and Nagasaki Tumor Registry. In Report 3 of this series, we confirmed that the correlation between the exposure distance and the incidence of skin cancer was statistically significant. In Report 4, we clarified that the incidence of skin cancer in proximally exposed Nagasaki A-bomb survivors when compared to distally exposed victims appears to be increasing since 1975. In this final report of the series, we examined the characteristics of skin cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors using 140 skin cancer cases collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City and adjacent districts on the basis of the data of a total of 66,276 A-bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine. Among the various items examined, the only item that showed a statistical significance was the age at exposure in the cases of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., those exposed within 2.5 km from the hypocenter were significantly younger than those exposed at 3.0 km or more. (author)

  4. Mortality statistics of major causes of death among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima Prefecture from 1968 to 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Norihiko; Ohtaki, Megu; Matsuura, Masaaki; Munaka, Masaki; Kurihara, Minoru (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology); Ueoka, Hiroshi

    1989-06-01

    A comparative study was made on mortality during a 15-year period from 1968 to 1982 between atomic bomb survivors resident in Hiroshima Prefecture and non-exposed controls. The mortality rate for all causes of death was lower in atomic bomb survivors than in the non-exposed, but the rate was higher among those directly exposed within about 1 km than in the non-exposed. The mortality rate for malignant neoplasms was higher in atomic bomb survivors than in the non-exposed, but that for cerebrovascular disease and heart disease was lower. In examining the rate for malignant neoplasms by site, the sites showing a high mortality rate among atomic bomb survivors were almost identical to the results of the Life Span Study. For these sites, the shorter the exposure distance the higher was the mortality rate. The rate for malignant neoplasms of the uterus and stomach, and leukemia was unnaturally high among early entrants whose period after issuance of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook was short. In observing the atomic bomb survivors by the level of family destruction due to the bombing as a socio-economic factor, a tendency was observed for the mortality rate for malignant neoplasms, diseases of blood and blood-forming organs, and peptic ulcer, to be higher among survivors with severe family destruction. (author).

  5. Mortality statistics of major causes of death among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima Prefecture from 1968 to 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Norihiko; Ohtaki, Megu; Matsuura, Masaaki; Munaka, Masaki; Kurihara, Minoru; Ueoka, Hiroshi.

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was made on mortality during a 15-year period from 1968 to 1982 between atomic bomb survivors resident in Hiroshima Prefecture and non-exposed controls. The mortality rate for all causes of death was lower in atomic bomb survivors than in the non-exposed, but the rate was higher among those directly exposed within about 1 km than in the non-exposed. The mortality rate for malignant neoplasms was higher in atomic bomb survivors than in the non-exposed, but that for cerebrovascular disease and heart disease was lower. In examining the rate for malignant neoplasms by site, the sites showing a high mortality rate among atomic bomb survivors were almost identical to the results of the Life Span Study. For these sites, the shorter the exposure distance the higher was the mortality rate. The rate for malignant neoplasms of the uterus and stomach, and leukemia was unnaturally high among early entrants whose period after issuance of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook was short. In observing the atomic bomb survivors by the level of family destruction due to the bombing as a socio-economic factor, a tendency was observed for the mortality rate for malignant neoplasms, diseases of blood and blood-forming organs, and peptic ulcer, to be higher among survivors with severe family destruction. (author)

  6. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. 2010 edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosling, F. G.

    2010-01-15

    This historical document is part of a planned 3-volume series. This volume, volume 1, provides a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of the United States government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  7. Impact on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors of radiation received from the bombs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullings, Harry M

    2014-02-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) studies various cohorts of Japanese atomic bomb survivors, the largest being the Life Span Study (LSS), which includes 93,741 persons who were in Hiroshima or Nagasaki at the times of the bombings; there are also cohorts of persons who were exposed in utero and survivors' children. This presentation attempts to summarize the total impact of the radiation from the bombs on the survivors from both an individual perspective (both age-specific and integrated lifetime risk, along with a measure of life expectancy that describes how the risk affects the individual given age at exposure) and a group perspective (estimated numbers of excess occurrences in the cohort), including both early and late effects. As survivors' doses ranged well into the acutely lethal range at closer distances, some of them experienced acute signs and symptoms of radiation exposure in addition to being at risk of late effects. Although cancer has always been a primary concern among late effects, estimated numbers of excess cancers and hematopoietic malignancies in the LSS are a small fraction of the total due to the highly skewed dose distribution, with most survivors receiving small doses. For example, in the latest report on cancer incidence, 853 of 17,448 incident solid cancers were estimated to be attributable to radiation from the bombs. RERF research indicates that risk of radiation-associated cancer varies among sites and that some benign tumors such as uterine myoma are also associated with radiation. Noncancer late effects appear to be in excess in proportion to radiation dose but with an excess relative risk about one-third that of solid cancer and a correspondingly small overall fraction of cases attributable to radiation. Specific risks were found for some subcategories, particularly circulatory disease, including stroke and precedent conditions such as hypertension. Radiation-related cataract in the atomic bomb survivors is well known

  8. Statistical investigation into historical health examination records and cause of death among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Mine, Mariko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okajima, Syunzo

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the annual health examination records were investigated and classified by cause of death. In males with cancer, there was noted an increased incidence of abnormal hemoglobin amount, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and traces of urinary proteins 1 year to 3 years before death. However, the incidence of urinary protein traces was low compared with that in other diseases. In males with cerebral vascular diseases, there was a high incidence of hypertension. Urinary protein traces appeared from 4 years to 5 years before death. In females with cardiovascular diseases including hypertensive diseases and valvular diseases, the incidence of urinary protein traces increased from 4 years to 5 years prior to their death. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was generally high in these cases. In males with liver cirrhosis, urinary urobilinogen amount was generally more than that in other diseases. This tendency also appeared in females with liver cirrhosis 6 years before death. The incidence of abnormal hemoglobin amount and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was high in males with liver cirrhosis, and that of abnormal erythrocyte sedimentation rate was high in females with liver corrhosis. (Ueda, J.)

  9. Smoking and serum proteins in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stram, D.O.; Akiba, Suminori; Neriishi, Kazuo; Hosoda, Yutaka; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-09-01

    Associations of smoking habit with serum levels of total protein as well as protein fractions were studied in a population consisting of 4,739 atomic bomb survivors and unexposed control subjects in Hiroshima who participated in the 1979-81 period of the Adult Health Study, an on-going health follow-up program of the RERF. Smoking was strongly related to serum protein concentration after correction for age, sex, and body mass index. Among current smokers as compared to nonsmokers, levels of total protein, β globulin, and γ globulin were significantly lower (p 1 and α 2 globulin were significantly higher (p 1 globulin. Duration of smoking (years) was related to increased α 1 and α 2 globulin. Smoking duration was also associated with albumin level but the trend was not monotonic. The radiation exposure effect on serum protein level was significant in several instances but was in general much smaller than the smoking effect. Its inclusion in the regression models did not noticeably affect the association between smoking and serum proteins. (author)

  10. A review of colorectal cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Susumu; Sawai, Terumitsu; Ishii, Toshiyo; Eida, Kazuyuki; Noguchi, Kyoichi; Takahara, Osamu

    1989-01-01

    Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with colorectal cancer amongst atomic bomb survivors, who had undergone operations from 1971∼1984, have been reviewed and compared with that of a control group. The survival rate of the atomic bomb survivors over the age of 60 years was statistically better than that of the same age group in the controls. In this age bracket, the control group were in a more advanced stage of the disease than were the survivors, this accounting for the reason why the survivors had better prognosis. Further, the fact that the survivors continually have received more medical attention than have the aged in the control group affects this statistic. (author)

  11. Increased relative risk of myelodysplastic syndrome in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Kenji; Kimura, Akiro; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Kodama, Kazunori; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    1998-01-01

    It was investigated what blood disorders except leukemia increased the relative risk with dose dependency in atomic bomb survivors. Subjects were 217 patients of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, who had blood disorders except leukemia and died between 1950 and 1990. Their medical records were analyzed and their diagnoses were reevaluated. Sixteen cases were diagnosed as the aplastic anemia and 12 as the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In the aplastic anemia, there was no correlation between the exposure dose and the mortality. In MDS, the excess relative risk (ERR)/bone marrow exposure dose of 1 Sv was very high (13.0). These results supports the hypothesis that MDS would be broken out by the clonal abnormality of the hematopoietic stem cell and radiation exposure could cause the appearance of the abnormal stem cell clone. (K.H.)

  12. Increased relative risk of myelodysplastic syndrome in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Kenji [Hiroshima City Hospital (Japan); Kimura, Akiro; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Kodama, Kazunori; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    1998-12-01

    It was investigated what blood disorders except leukemia increased the relative risk with dose dependency in atomic bomb survivors. Subjects were 217 patients of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, who had blood disorders except leukemia and died between 1950 and 1990. Their medical records were analyzed and their diagnoses were reevaluated. Sixteen cases were diagnosed as the aplastic anemia and 12 as the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In the aplastic anemia, there was no correlation between the exposure dose and the mortality. In MDS, the excess relative risk (ERR)/bone marrow exposure dose of 1 Sv was very high (13.0). These results supports the hypothesis that MDS would be broken out by the clonal abnormality of the hematopoietic stem cell and radiation exposure could cause the appearance of the abnormal stem cell clone. (K.H.)

  13. Food habits in atomic bomb survivors suffering from malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Kazue; Inoue, Hisako; Uchino, Chito

    1984-01-01

    Food habits were surveyed in patients admitted to 13 hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture and other prefectures to compare the incidence of malignant neoplasms according to the food intake between atomic bomb exposed group and non-exposed group. The incidence of malignant neoplasms was significantly higher in male patients having the low intake of milk and salted fish than in those having the high intake of them in atomic bomb exposed group, while it was significantly higher in male patients having the low intake of potatoes and milk and in female patients having the low intake of boiled fish paste than in those having the high intake of them in non-exposed group. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. The Rhetoric of "Unconditional Surrender" and the Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikins, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzes the decision to drop the atomic bomb from a rhetorical point of view, arguing that the bombs were launched because of an American commitment to a particular rhetoric that focused on the propaganda slogan "unconditional surrender." (PD)

  15. Surveys right after the atomic bombing and a relief squad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Mariko [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    An outline of four survey reports right after the atomic bombing in Nagasaki and Hiroshima is introduced. The report of Manhattan District Atomic Bomb Investigating Groups: The subjects of this survey were 900 inpatients in Nagasaki (for 16 days from September 20) and Hiroshima (for 5 days from October 3). Two hundreds and forty-nine patients (16%) died. In cases died without injury, the severe symptoms were alopecia, purpura, hemorrhage, oral cavity and pharynx lesion, vomiting, diarrhea and fever. The residual radioactivity measured at six weeks later was 6-25 roentgen in Hiroshima and 30-110 roentgen in Nagasaki (Nishiyama riverhead area). These values were lower than the predicted value from the clinical consequence. The report of Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Atomic Bomb: Following the above survey, about 6500 subjects were investigated both in Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Incidence of alopecia was investigated by shielded situation at a spot of 2.1 to 2.5 km from a blast center. It was 7.2% of outdoors (shielded: 7.3%, non-shielded: 17.4%) and 2.9% of indoors. The report of the Special Committee for Atomic Bomb Casualty Investigation and Research of the Scientific Research Council of Japan: General part of the report consists of medical part and physical part, and reports from each university were classified and listed in the supplement. Survey of Nagasaki Medical College (not in public): About 8000 subjects were investigated from October to December. Data were gathered up about lethality, time of death, injury and radiation sickness, etc. There was also autograph of a relief squad of the Nagasaki Medical College. (K.H.)

  16. Leukemia in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors from 1946 to 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkita, Takeshi

    1976-01-01

    In five recent years, 134 deaths from leukemia among Hiroshima citizen were recorded. Of these, 23 cases (17 acute and 6 chronic types) were atomic bomb survivors exposed within 2,000 m of the hypocenter. Fifteen of them (65%) were over 60 years of age. The frequency of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was still low. Although the risk of leukemia was greatly reduced after 1961, and the frequency of chronic granulocytic leukemia (one of the most characteristic type of Hiroshima atomic bomb-induced leukemia) was also decreased, the death rate from leukemia among survivors exposed within 2,000 m or 1,500 m from the hypocenter was about 3 to 4 times higher than the mean death rate in all Japan. Therefore, careful and long-range follow-up surveillance should be continued. A brief review was also made of relevant studies such as the influence of environmental and host factors in the epidemiology of leukemia, the incidence of leukemia in children exposed in utero, and leukemia in offspring of atomic bomb survivors. (Evans, J.)

  17. Einstein, Ethics and the Atomic Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, Patricia

    2005-03-01

    Einstein voiced his ethical views against war as well as fascism via venues and alliances with a variety of organizations still debated today. In 1939, he signed a letter to President Roosevelt (drafted by younger colleagues Szilard, Wigner and others) warning the U.S.government about the danger of Nazi Germany gaining control of uranium in the Belgian-controlled Congo in order to develop atomic weapons, based on the discovery of fission by Otto Hahn and Lise Meitner. In 1945, he became a member of the Princeton-based ``Emergency Committee for Atomic Scientists'' organized by Bethe, Condon, Bacher, Urey, Szilard and Weisskopf. Rare Einstein slides will illustrate Dr.Rife's presentation on Albert Einstein's philosophic and ethical convictions about peace, and public stance against war (1914-1950).

  18. The relationship of HBsub(s) antigen and antibody to atomic bomb radiation in the adult health study sample, 1975-77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroo; Mayumi, Makoto; Nishioka, Kusuya; Hamilton, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted on the frequency of HBsub(s) positive antigen and antibody reactions as an index for determining whether there is any change in the immune competence as a late observable effect of atomic bomb exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There was no difference between the two comparison groups in the occurrence of positive HBsub(s) antibody reactions (prevalence of HB virus). However, the frequency of positive HBsub(s) antigen reactions (79% remained persistently antigen-positive) was significantly higher in those exposed to 100 rad or more than in the controls. The same tendency was apparent for the two exposure groups when classified by sex, city, and age, though by age the difference between exposure groups among the younger age groups (age 20 or less at the time of the bomb) was more marked. On the other hand, contrary to expectation, there was no difference between exposure groups in the distribution by high vs low titers among the antigen-positive individuals. There is no difference in the prevalence of positive HBsub(s) antibody reactions between Nagasaki and Hiroshima, but the frequency of positive antigen reactions is higher in Nagasaki. With respect to HBsub(s) antigen subtypes, adr occurs in a higher and adw in a lower frequency in Nagasaki than in Hiroshima, corresponding to earlier reports for the Japan archipelago of reverse and complementary distributions of these two subtypes. (author)

  19. Skin cancer of Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto; Noda, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Naoko; Takahara, Osamu; Sadamori, Michiko; Nishimoto, Katsutaro; Ota, Hisahiro.

    1990-01-01

    In Report 1 of this series, we suspected that the incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors might have increased based on evidence of chromosomal aberrations and clonal formations in cultured skin cells. In Report 2, we described the results of a preliminary study using 110 cases of skin cancer collected from the three major hospitals in Nagasaki City (Nagasaki University Hospital, A-bomb Hospital and Citizens Hospital). In that study a high correlation was observed between the incidence of skin cancer and exposure distance in the analysis of all 110 cases and of the 50 male cases (p<0.01), but no such correlation was noted in a separate analysis of the 60 female cases. In this report, 140 cases of skin cancer collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City and adjacent districts were statistically analyzed in respect to the estimated distance from the hypocenter, using the data of a total of 66,276 A-bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of the Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine. The results disclosed a high correlation between the incidence of skin cancer and the exposure distance (p<0.01). In addition, this correlation was the same even when the cases were analyzed separately according to sex. (author)

  20. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Carter, R.L.; Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic-bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody, and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE) were measured among 2061 Adult Health Study participants in Hiroshima and Nagasaki from December 1987 to November 1989. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor increased in a statistically significant manner with increasing radiation dose. No radiation effect was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody. A statistically significant relationship was also found between radiation exposure and the IgA level in females and the IgM levels in both sexes-both levels increased as radiation dose increased. However, the effects of radiation exposure were not large and accounted for less than 10% of the total variation in each measurement. Levels of IgG and IgE were not affected by radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Exposure to Atomic Bomb Radiation and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Later Life: The Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Katsumasa; Takahashi, Ikuno; Nakashima, Eiji; Yanagi, Masahide; Kawasaki, Ryo; Neriishi, Kazuo; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Yin; Hida, Ayumi; Ohishi, Waka; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the association between radiation exposure from the atomic bombings and the prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among older residents of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Adult Health Study is a cohort study of atomic bomb survivors living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, comprising 2153 participants who underwent examinations with retinal fundus photographs in 2006-2008. The radiation dose to the eye for the analysis was estimated with the revised dosimetry system (DS02). The retinal photographs were graded according to the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System modified for nonstereoscopic retinal images. Early and late AMD were defined according to the type of lesion detected in the worse eye of the participants. Person-specific data were analyzed by using a logistic regression model to assess the association between radiation dose and AMD. Among the 1824 subjects with gradable retinal images (84.7% of the overall participants), the estimated eye dose was widely distributed, with a mean of 0.45 Gy and standard deviation of 0.74 Gy. The prevalence of early and late AMD was 10.5% and 0.3%, respectively. There were no significant associations between radiation dose and AMD, with each 1-Gy increase in exposure, adjusted odds ratio was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-1.15) for early AMD and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.21-2.94) for late AMD. No significant associations were found between atomic bomb irradiation early in life and the prevalence of early or late AMD later in life among Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

  2. Japanese Legacy Cohorts: The Life Span Study Atomic Bomb Survivor Cohort and Survivors’ Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Ozasa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cohorts of atomic bomb survivors—including those exposed in utero—and children conceived after parental exposure were established to investigate late health effects of atomic bomb radiation and its transgenerational effects by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC in the 1950s. ABCC was reorganized to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF in 1975, and all work has been continued at RERF. The Life Span Study, the cohort of survivors, consists of about 120,000 subjects and has been followed since 1950. Cohorts of in utero survivors and the survivors’ children include about 3,600 and 77,000 subjects, respectively, and have been followed since 1945. Atomic bomb radiation dose was estimated for each subject based on location at the time of the bombing and shielding conditions from exposure, which were obtained through enormous efforts of investigators and cooperation of subjects. Outcomes include vital status, cause of death, and cancer incidence. In addition, sub-cohorts of these three cohorts were constructed to examine clinical features of late health effects, and the subjects have been invited to periodic health examinations at clinics of ABCC and RERF. They were also asked to donate biosamples for biomedical investigations. Epidemiological studies have observed increased radiation risks for malignant diseases among survivors, including those exposed in utero, and possible risks for some non-cancer diseases. In children of survivors, no increased risks due to parental exposure to radiation have been observed for malignancies or other diseases, but investigations are continuing, as these cohorts are still relatively young.

  3. Japanese Legacy Cohorts: The Life Span Study Atomic Bomb Survivor Cohort and Survivors' Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Kotaro; Grant, Eric J; Kodama, Kazunori

    2018-04-05

    Cohorts of atomic bomb survivors-including those exposed in utero-and children conceived after parental exposure were established to investigate late health effects of atomic bomb radiation and its transgenerational effects by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in the 1950s. ABCC was reorganized to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in 1975, and all work has been continued at RERF. The Life Span Study, the cohort of survivors, consists of about 120,000 subjects and has been followed since 1950. Cohorts of in utero survivors and the survivors' children include about 3,600 and 77,000 subjects, respectively, and have been followed since 1945. Atomic bomb radiation dose was estimated for each subject based on location at the time of the bombing and shielding conditions from exposure, which were obtained through enormous efforts of investigators and cooperation of subjects. Outcomes include vital status, cause of death, and cancer incidence. In addition, sub-cohorts of these three cohorts were constructed to examine clinical features of late health effects, and the subjects have been invited to periodic health examinations at clinics of ABCC and RERF. They were also asked to donate biosamples for biomedical investigations. Epidemiological studies have observed increased radiation risks for malignant diseases among survivors, including those exposed in utero, and possible risks for some non-cancer diseases. In children of survivors, no increased risks due to parental exposure to radiation have been observed for malignancies or other diseases, but investigations are continuing, as these cohorts are still relatively young.

  4. Japanese Legacy Cohorts: The Life Span Study Atomic Bomb Survivor Cohort and Survivors’ Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eric J; Kodama, Kazunori

    2018-01-01

    Cohorts of atomic bomb survivors—including those exposed in utero—and children conceived after parental exposure were established to investigate late health effects of atomic bomb radiation and its transgenerational effects by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in the 1950s. ABCC was reorganized to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in 1975, and all work has been continued at RERF. The Life Span Study, the cohort of survivors, consists of about 120,000 subjects and has been followed since 1950. Cohorts of in utero survivors and the survivors’ children include about 3,600 and 77,000 subjects, respectively, and have been followed since 1945. Atomic bomb radiation dose was estimated for each subject based on location at the time of the bombing and shielding conditions from exposure, which were obtained through enormous efforts of investigators and cooperation of subjects. Outcomes include vital status, cause of death, and cancer incidence. In addition, sub-cohorts of these three cohorts were constructed to examine clinical features of late health effects, and the subjects have been invited to periodic health examinations at clinics of ABCC and RERF. They were also asked to donate biosamples for biomedical investigations. Epidemiological studies have observed increased radiation risks for malignant diseases among survivors, including those exposed in utero, and possible risks for some non-cancer diseases. In children of survivors, no increased risks due to parental exposure to radiation have been observed for malignancies or other diseases, but investigations are continuing, as these cohorts are still relatively young. PMID:29553058

  5. Mortality statistics of major causes of death among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima from 1968 to 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Norihiko; Kurihara, Minoru; Munaka, Masaki (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology) (and others)

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study was made on mortality during a 15-year period from 1968 to 1982 between atomic romb survivors resident in Hiroshima Prefecture and non-exposed controls. The mortality rate for all causes of death was lower in atomic bomb survivors than in the non-exposed, but the rate was higher among those directly exposed within about 1 km than in the non-exposed. The mortality rate for malignant neoplasms was higher in atomic bomb survivors than in the non-exposed, but that for cerebrovascular disease and heart disease was lower. In examining the rate for malignant neoplasms by site, the site showing a high mortality rate among atomic bomb survivors were almost identical to the results of the Life Span Study. For these sites, the shorter the exposure distance the higher was the mortality rate. The rate for malignant neoplasms of the uterus and stomach, and leukemia was unnaturally high among early entrants whose period after issuance of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook was short. In observing the atomic bomb survivors by the level of family destruction due to the bombing as a socio-economic factor, a tendency ws observed for the mortality rate for malignant neoplasms, diseases of blood-forming organs, and peptic ulcer, to be higher among survivors with severe family destruction. (author).

  6. Mass survey of lung cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Itoh, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Mishima, Yasuhiro; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1978-01-01

    Men atomic bomb survivors over the age of 40 years received a survey of lung cancer by questionnaire together with the general survey for atomic bomb survivors, and the following results were obtained. The survey by questionnaire was carried out on 29780 cases during one year 1977 to 1978, and 6 cases of lung cancer were discovered. The discovery rate was 20.1 persons against a hundred thousand persons. Lung cancer discovered during 2 years from April, 1976 was 14 cases, and the discovery rate was 23.9 persons against a hundred thousand persons. The discovery rate according to exposure conditions was higher in order of a group entering Hiroshima city after A-bomb explosion and other group (33.2 persons), a group directly exposed over 2 km from the center of explosion (20.0 persons), and a group directly exposed within 2 km (1.5 persons). Therefore, results that the discovery rate of lung cancer was higher in short-distance group could not be obtained. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. Organ doses to atomic bomb survivors from radiological examinations at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Sawada, Shozo; Russell, W.J.

    1990-04-01

    When estimating the risks of oncogenesis and cancer mortality as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure, medical X-ray doses received by the A-bomb survivors must also be estimated and considered. Using a phantom human, we estimated the X-ray doses received by A-bomb survivors during routine biennial medical examinations conducted at RERF as part of the long-term Adult Health Study (AHS), since these examinations may represent about 45 % of the survivors' total medical irradiations. Doses to the salivary glands, thyroid gland, lung, breast, stomach and colon were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results reported here will aid in estimating organ doses received by individual AHS participants. (author)

  8. Association of Acute Radiation Syndrome and Rain after the Bombings in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, K; Sakata, R; Cullings, H M; Grant, E J

    2016-06-01

    Acute radiation-induced symptoms reported in survivors after the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been suspected to be associated with rain that fell after the explosions, but this association has not been evaluated in an epidemiological study that considers the effects of the direct dose from the atomic bombs and other factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate this association using information from a fixed cohort, comprised of 93,741 members of the Life Span Study who were in the city at the time of the bombing. Information on acute symptoms and exposure to rain was collected in surveys conducted by interviewers, primarily in the 1950s. The proportion of survivors developing severe epilation was around 60% at levels of direct radiation doses of 3 Gy or higher and less than 0.2% at levels <0.005 Gy regardless of reported rain exposure status. The low prevalence of acute symptoms at low direct doses indicates that the reported fallout rain was not homogeneously radioactive at a level sufficient to cause a substantial probability of acute symptoms. We observed that the proportion of reported acute symptoms was slightly higher among those who reported rain exposure in some subgroups, however, suggestions that rain was the cause of these reported symptoms are not supported by analyses specific to the known areas of radioactive fallout. Misclassification of exposure and outcome, including symptoms due to other causes and recall bias, appears to be a more plausible explanation. However, the insufficient and retrospective nature of the available data limited our ability to quantify the attribution to those possible causes.

  9. Report on results of fourth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in the U. S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Tetsuo (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ito, Chikako; Tanaka, Yoshikiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Inamizu, Tsutomu

    1984-01-01

    Review was made of the fourth medical examination and the actual state of health of the U.S. atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors. The number of survivors registered with the Committee of A-bomb Survivors residing in the U.S. as of the end of June 1983 in 592 (males 154, females 438), of whom 58.8% possess U.S. citizenship. Survivor's health handbooks issued to survivors under the Japanese A-bomb Survivors Medical Treatment Law are possessed by 29.2%, with female holders being about twice as numerous as males. Responses to the health survey questionnaire were received from 306. Complaints of subjective symptoms tended to be higher in the early entrants, and by place of examination, those of Honolulu had the higher rate. Those who underwent health examination numbered 305 (73 males and 232 females). RBC and hemoglobin value were higher in the U.S. survivors than in Hiroshima survivors. No abnormality was observed in 47.5%. The main abnormalities noted were obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and liver disease. Comparison of those who had received examination on two consecutive occasions in 1981 and 1983 and those who were examined for the first time in 1983 showed a decrease in the frequency of obesity and hypertension.

  10. Report on results of fourth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in the U. S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Tetsuo [Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan); Ito, Chikako; Tanaka, Yoshikiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Inamizu, Tsutomu

    1984-01-01

    Review was made of the fourth medical examination and the actual state of health of the U.S. atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors. The number of survivors registered with the Committee of A-bomb Survivors residing in the U.S. as of the end of June 1983 in 592 (males 154, females 438), of whom 58.8% possess U.S. citizenship. Survivor's health handbooks issued to survivors under the Japanese A-bomb Survivors Medical Treatment Law are possessed by 29.2%, with female holders being about twice as numerous as males. Responses to the health survey questionnaire were received from 306. Complaints of subjective symptoms tended to be higher in the early entrants, and by place of examination, those of Honolulu had the higher rate. Those who underwent health examination numbered 305 (73 males and 232 females). RBC and hemoglobin value were higher in the U.S. survivors than in Hiroshima survivors. No abnormality was observed in 47.5%. The main abnormalities noted were obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and liver disease. Comparison of those who had received examination on two consecutive occasions in 1981 and 1983 and those who were examined for the first time in 1983 showed a decrease in the frequency of obesity and hypertension.

  11. Two cases of giant parathyroid adenoma in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Nobuo; Nishida, Toshihiro; Fujikura, Toshio

    1983-12-01

    In a study of parathyroid tumor among autopsy cases at RERF in Hiroshima, 16 cases of parathyroid adenoma were detected among 4,136 autopsies during 1961-77. Of these, two cases were giant adenoma (5 cm in diameter) accompanied by hyperparathyroidism. Both cases were atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima. One was exposed to 55 rad at age 51 and died at age 71, and the other was exposed to 28 rad at age 45 and died at age 71. These two cases will be reported together with a review of the literature on parathyroid tumors developed following irradiation on the head and neck. (author)

  12. Review of dosimetry for the atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes and discusses results of some 1980-1981 studies of neutron and γ-ray exposure to the atomic bomb survivors by W.E. Loewe and E. Mendelsohn of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, D.C. Kaul and W.H. Scott of Science Applications, Inc., and J.V. Pace of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Some other special studies which are now underway to complete the review will also be discussed. The expert assistance of others in these special studies is being supported in part by the US Department of Energy and in part by the US Defense Nuclear Agency

  13. Stomach cancer in atomic bomb survivors, 1950-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kuniomi.

    1978-04-01

    Stomach cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Life Span Study was studied using death certificates for the period 1950-73. A consistent increase in mortality with increasing radiation dose was observed in Hiroshima, the highest rate being in the dose region of 400 - 499 rad. For Nagasaki, however, the evidence of a radiation effect is very weak. An excess in stomach cancer mortality was found only at doses above 500 rad. More evidence is needed to establish radiation as a causative factor in stomach cancer. (author)

  14. Outcome and status of microsatellite stability in Japanese atomic bomb survivors with early gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Manabu; Taguchi, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Matsuyama, Ayumi; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Tsutsui, Shinichi; Ishida, Teruyoshi

    2013-03-01

    In the decade after the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, a high incidence of leukemia was observed among atomic bomb survivors. However, the incidence of other cancers gradually increased, while that of leukemia decreased after this period. We evaluated the clinical outcome of early gastric cancer and microsatellite stability over a long-term period in atomic bomb survivors. The results of surgical treatment for early gastric cancer were reviewed for 117 atomic bomb survivors and 394 control patients between 1995 and 2006. In addition, immunohistochemical staining for hMSH2 and hMLH1 expression was performed to evaluate the status of microsatellite stability in 57 atomic bomb survivors and 82 control patients. The long-term survival rate for early gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors was significantly lower than that in control patients (p bomb survivorship was related to defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression. The prognosis of early gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors was poor and was related to age and sex, rather than to being an atomic bomb survivor. Furthermore, a higher rate of defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression was observed in the survivors.

  15. Alterations of body mass index and body composition in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsukawa, Y; Misumi, M; Yamada, M; Masunari, N; Oyama, H; Nakanishi, S; Fukunaga, M; Fujiwara, S

    2013-08-01

    Obesity, underweight, sarcopenia and excess accumulation of abdominal fat are associated with a risk of death and adverse health outcomes. Our aim was to determine whether body mass index (BMI) and body composition, assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), are associated with radiation exposure among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the Adult Health Study of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. We examined 2686 subjects (834 men and 1852 women), aged 48-89 years (0-40 years at A-bomb exposure), for BMI analysis. Among them, 550 men and 1179 women underwent DXA in 1994-1996 and were eligible for a body composition study. After being adjusted for age and other potential confounding factors, A-bomb radiation dose was associated significantly and negatively with BMI in both sexes (P=0.01 in men, P=0.03 in women) and appendicular lean mass (Pbomb radiation exposure. We will need to conduct further studies to evaluate whether these alterations affect health status.

  16. Axial length of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakiyama, Harumi; Kishikawa, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Naoki; Amemiya, Tsugio

    2002-01-01

    We reviewed a series of 778 patients who had cataract surgery during the past 4 years at the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Memorial Hospital. We evaluated the history of exposure to radiation by atomic bomb in 1945, axial length and state of refraction. All were born before 1945. The series comprised 263 males and 515 females. Their ages averaged 76.5±8.6 years. History of exposure to radiation was present in 356 patients. The remaining 422 patients served as control. There was no difference in the type of cataract between the two groups. High myopia was present in 11 irradiated patients (3.2%) and in 24 patients in the control group (6.0%). The difference was not significant (p=0.083). There was no high myopia among 24 patients who were aged 18 years or less at the time of radiation and who were within 2 km from the epicenter. No difference was present regarding the axial length between the two groups or between both sexes. The present result is not definitive because ''irradiated group'' would include those with little or no exposure and because precise data has not been available about the dosis of radiation. (author)

  17. Genetic radiation effects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srsen, S.

    1984-01-01

    A group of researchers examined persons who had survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs and were irradiated and their progeny with the aim of getting an idea of the genetic effects of these explosions. Teratogenic effects are not discussed. In the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood of persons who had been exposed to high dose irradiation the researchers found a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations by conventional and more recent methods of chromosomal analysis. In parents who had survived the atomic holocaust there were no significant deviations as against the rest of the population in still births, neonatal defects, infant mortality, and mortality of first generation progeny, in neonate weight, the sex ratio, increased occurence of leukosis and chromosomal aberrations in their children. These negative findings in the first generation do not signify that there is no danger from atomic bomb blasts for human kind. They only indicate that the effects of radiation were to small to be found by routine methods or that the methods used were not suitable

  18. Genetic radiation effects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srsen, S. (Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta)

    1984-05-01

    A group of researchers examined persons who had survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs and were irradiated and their progeny with the aim of getting an idea of the genetic effects of these explosions. Teratogenic effects are not discussed. In the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood of persons who had been exposed to high dose irradiation the researchers found a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations by conventional and more recent methods of chromosomal analysis. In parents who had survived the atomic holocaust there were no significant deviations as against the rest of the population in still births, neonatal defects, infant mortality, and mortality of first generation progeny, in neonate weight, the sex ratio, increased occurence of leukosis and chromosomal aberrations in their children. These negative findings in the first generation do not signify that there is no danger from atomic bomb blasts for human kind. They only indicate that the effects of radiation were too small to be found by routine methods or that the methods used were not suitable.

  19. Organ dose estimates for the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1978-10-01

    Recent studies concerning radiation risks to man by the Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation have emphasized the need for estimates of dose to organs of the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. Shielding of internal organs by the body has been investigated for fission-weapon gamma rays and neutrons, and ratios of mean absorbed dose in a number of organs to survivors' T65D assignments of tissue kerma in air are provided for adults. Ratios of mean absorbed dose to tissue kerma in air are provided also for the thyroid and active bone marrow of juveniles. These organ dose estimates for juveniles are of interest in studies of radiation risks due to an elevated incidence of leukemia and thyroid cancer in survivors exposed as children compared to survivors exposed as adults

  20. Mass survey of lung cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Itoh, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Mishima, Yasuhiro; Ohmura, Toshio.

    1980-01-01

    Mass survey of lung cancer was performed only by questionnaire together with general health examinations of a-bomb survivors during 3 years between April 1976 and March 1979, and the following results were obtained. The number of men aged more than 40 years old who had questionnaire was 89,778, and those who were required to have detailed examinations because they had bloody sputum and paroxysmal cough + a history of smoking were 1,453. Out of them, 861 a-bomb survivors had detailed examinations. The performance rate of detailed examinations was 59.3%. Lung cancer was found in 23 a-bomb survivors. The discovery rate was 25.6 per 100,000 persons, and it was a little higher than discovery rates reported by many researchers. It was low in men aged more than 40 years old. There was a straight line relationship between logarithm values of the discovery rate of lung cancer and age, and the discovery rate increased markedly with aging. Cytodiagnosis of sputum by Saccomanno method showed a positive test which was 20% higher than that by 3 days serial smear method. To discover lung cancer at an early stage, it is advisable to perform the first screening by chest x-ray examination and questionnaire on men aged over 40 years old, and to perform cytodiagnosis by Saccomanno method on men who were required to have detailed examinations. (Tsunoda, M.)

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of leukemia recognized in atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-05-01

    Out of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 256 patients which were diagnosed as having leukemia by 1975 and of which exposure dose was estimated as over 1 rad were described. Chronic myelocytic leukemia (CGL) was plentiful in Hiroshima, and acute myelocytic leukemia (AGL) was comparatively plentiful in Nagasaki. Chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) was not recognized in the atomic bomb survivors exposed at places near the center of the explosion, but CLL was recognized plentifully in the atomic bomb survivors exposed to radiation of under 1 rad. The incidence of leukemia according to the total dose was higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. When RBE of neutron on the occurrence of leukemia was considered to be five times that of gamma-ray, the occurrence curves in both cities were consistent well. As to a relationship between leukemia in the atomic bomb survivors and the age at the exposure time, CGL occurred early in the atomic bomb survivors exposed at an early age. A specific lesion of leukemia in the atomic bomb survivors was not recognized, but cases of which leukemia cells were negative to peroxidase and were very difficult to be identified were plentiful in the atomic bomb survivors exposed within 2 km from the explosion center. The treatment of leukemia in atomic bomb survivors does not differ from that of general leukemia, but a method of treatment, administration dosage, a method and a kind of supportive care must be discussed according to each case.

  2. Medical examination of ''Minashi'' atomic bomb survivor in Hiroshima-city, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, Toshihiko

    1978-01-01

    As it is about one year (three examination terms) since health examinations for ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors has been carried out, conditions of these examinations are described. ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors can receive an a-bomb survivor's health notebook when they suffer from 10 damages designated by the Ministry of Public Welfare, and the number of ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors changes frequently. ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors who received a certificate of a recipient of the examination were 2363 at the end of 1977, and by that time, 665 of them (28.1%) also received an a-bomb survivor's health notebook instead of the certificate. Accordingly, the number of persons recognized as ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors at the end of the year was 1703 (688 men and 1015 women). ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors underwent health examinations at the same time and under the same way as a-bomb survivors. There were no great differences in the undergoing rate of general health examinations, the necessity rate for detailed examinations, the undergoing rate of detailed examinations, the necessity rate for treatment, and kinds of diseases requiring treatment between ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors and those in a-bomb survivors. The undergoing rate of general health examinations was 67.6%, (45.6% in a-bomb survivors), the necessity rate for detailed examinations, 43.1% (50.1%), the undergoing rate of detailed examinations, 91.3% (93.3%), and the necessity rate for treatment, 20.3% (29.0%). The undergoing rate of general health examinations in ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors was higher than that in a-bomb survivors, but the necessity rate for detailed examinations, the undergoing rate of detailed examination, and the necessity rate for treatment in ''Minashi'' a-bomb survivors were lower than those in a-bomb survivors. (Tsunoda, M.)

  3. Mental retardation occurring in embryo exposed in utero to the atomic bomb (Hiroshima)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroya; Shimasaki, Akira; Fujiwara, Koichi; Harada, Masazumi; Minami, Ryuichi.

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with a long term follow-up study on psychological symptoms in four patients with microscopically microcephaly induced by prenatal exposed to atomic bomb. They were exposed to atomic bomb at 8- and 12-week-embryos. The distance from the center of the explosion was 780 - 1180 m. All their mothers had acute radiation hazards. Their growths in the uterus were markedly damaged. Postnatal body weight ranged between 1,300 and 2,000 g. They were commonly characterized by microcephaly, physiological and mental retardation, stigmata of degeneracy, and skin symptoms, who were diagnosed as ''microcephaly induced by early prenatal exposure to atomic bomb'' by the research group for microcephaly in the Ministry of Health and Welfare. These common symptoms such as microcephaly, stigmata of degeneracy, and disturbed growth, but neurological symptoms such as motor aphasia were slighter in these patients than in those having congenital Minamata disease prenatal. These results suggested that the prognosis of these patients in whom 30 years have passed is unexpectedly serious. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Proliferative and nonproliferative breast disease in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Land, C.E.; Aoki, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Asano, Masahide; Sato, Eiichi; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sakamoto, Goi; Page, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    The risk of female breast cancer in association with radiation exposure is well established, on the basis of follow-up studies of the atomic-bomb survivors and other exposed populations. This association is especially strong for women exposed before age 20 yr and appears to be much weaker among women exposed after age 40 yr. In this study, breast-tissue autopsy samples from high-dose and low-dose individuals in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study sample were examined in detail to determine whether nonproliferative or proliferative breast lesions are associated with radiation exposure. The results suggest that proliferative disease in general and atypical hyperplasia in particular are associated with radiation exposure and that the risk is strongest for subjects who were ages 40-49 yr at the time of the bombings. It is hypothesized that this finding may be related to the age dependence of radiation-induced breast cancer, in the sense that potential cancers reflecting early-stage changes induced at these ages by radiation exposure may receive too little hormonal promotion to progress to frank cancers. (author)

  5. Noncancer mortality among the Japanese atomic bomb survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, R.

    1999-01-01

    Yukiko Shimizu and her colleagues from the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima have recently published the results of the updated analysis of deaths from causes other than cancer among the Japanese survivors of the atomic bomb explosions, covering the period 1950-1990 (Shimizu Y, Pierce D A, Preston D L and Mabuchi K 1999 Studies of the mortality of atomic bomb survivors. Report 12, Part II. Noncancer mortality: 1950-1990 Radiat. Res. 152 374-389). The primary analyses are based on 27 000 deaths, 30% more than in the previous report on this subject. These latest findings confirm a statistically significant trend of an increasing rate of noncancer mortality with increasing dose, due to trends for diseases of circulatory, digestive and respiratory systems. At 1 Sv, the proportional increase is about 10%, much smaller than for cancer (at around 50%), but the numbers of excess deaths are more comparable. The all-important question of the dose-response relationship remains unresolved: linearity is possible, but the data are also consistent with a threshold at 0.5 Sv. The authors conclude that misclassification, confounding or selection effects are unlikely to fully explain the findings. Enhanced knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying these epidemiological observations would enable the nature of the dose-response to be better understood. Also reported is a statistically significant trend of an increasing rate of noncancer blood diseases with dose, which cannot be accounted for by misclassification. This paper also confirms that suicide rates tend to decrease with increasing dose. Clearly, the impact of these latest results for noncancer mortality upon risk estimates for low dose exposures is going to be much discussed by the radiological protection community. (author)

  6. Studies on the life spans of atom-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroo

    1975-01-01

    A shortening of whole life as late injuries of atom-bomb survivors was discussed from the aspects of aging and the studies on the causes of leukemia and cancers. Twenty-one thousands four hundreds and forty-seven of 109000 subjects died during the period between 1950 and 1970. Mortality by exposure doses presented a high value with exposure doses. Mortality of subjects which had received exposure doses of more than 200 rads rose to a level which was 1.27 times in all causes of deaths of the control which had received exposure doses of 0 to 9 rads, and it showed 1.32 times in all deaths of sickness, 18.3 times in leukemia, and 1.48 times in death from cancer. Mortality due to leukemia decreases after 1950-1954, but in the group which had received exposure doses over 100 rads, the mortality was significantly higher than that in all districts in Japan. The shape of dose-reaction curve in Hiroshima was different from that in Nagasaki. In the same dose, mortality due to leukemia in Hiroshima was higher than that in Nagasaki. The younger the age at exposure was, the higher the risk rate of occurring cancer was. Especially, the risk rate of cancer was high in the patients who were exposed to atomic bomb during the age of 0 to 9 years old. Mortality due to cancer increased with the dose. Cancers which statistically showed higher mortality than that in the control group are lung cancer, cancer of the breast (100-199 rad), carcinoma of the esophagus, cancer of the urinary organ (200-299 rad) and gastric cancer (over 300 rads). There are not so clear difference in the mortality due to cancer between Hiroshima and Nagasaki, comparing with the mortality due to leukemia. (Kanao, N.)

  7. Studies on the life spans of atom-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, H [Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1975-12-01

    A shortening of whole life as late injuries of atom-bomb survivors was discussed from the aspects of aging and the studies on the causes of leukemia and cancers. Twenty-one thousands four hundreds and forty-seven of 109000 subjects died during the period between 1950 and 1970. Mortality by exposure doses presented a high value with exposure doses. Mortality of subjects which had received exposure doses of more than 200 rads rose to a level which was 1.27 times in all causes of deaths of the control which had received exposure doses of 0 to 9 rads, and it showed 1.32 times in all deaths of sickness, 18.3 times in leukemia, and 1.48 times in death from cancer. Mortality due to leukemia decreases after 1950-1954, but in the group which had received exposure doses over 100 rads, the mortality was significantly higher than that in all districts in Japan. The shape of dose-reaction curve in Hiroshima was different from that in Nagasaki. In the same dose, mortality due to leukemia in Hiroshima was higher than that in Nagasaki. The younger the age at exposure was, the higher the risk rate of occurring cancer was. Especially, the risk rate of cancer was high in the patients who were exposed to atomic bomb during the age of 0 to 9 years old. Mortality due to cancer increased with the dose. Cancers which statistically showed higher mortality than that in the control group are lung cancer, cancer of the breast (100-199 rad), carcinoma of the esophagus, cancer of the urinary organ (200-299 rad) and gastric cancer (over 300 rads). There are not so clear difference in the mortality due to cancer between Hiroshima and Nagasaki, comparing with the mortality due to leukemia.

  8. Effects of radiation on the incidence of prostate cancer among Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hisayoshi; Soda, Midori; Mine, Mariko; Yokota, Kenichi

    2013-10-01

    Atomic bomb survivors have been reported to have an increased risk of some cancers, especially leukemia. However, the risk of prostate cancer in atomic bomb survivors is not known to have been examined previously. This study examined the association between atomic bomb radiation and the incidence of prostate cancer among male Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The subjects were classified by distance from the hypocenter into a proximal group (bomb survivors who were alive in 1996. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the risk of prostate cancer development, with adjustment for age at atomic bomb explosion, attained age, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Compared with the distal group, the proximal group had significant increased risks of total, localized, and high-grade prostate cancer (relative risk and 95% confidence interval: 1.51 [1.21-1.89]; 1.80 [1.26-2.57]; and 1.88 [1.20-2.94], respectively). This report is the first known to reveal a significant relationship between atomic bomb radiation and prostate cancer. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Clinico-pathological investigation of resectable gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takashi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Hirai, Toshihiro; Toge, Tetuya; Niimoto, Minoru; Hattori, Takao; Ootaki, Megu; Munaka, Masaki

    1989-01-01

    This is a review of 1074 patients with resectable gastric cancer who have satisfied the following criteria: primary cancer, histological confirmation, the description of exposed or non-exposed patients, and certification of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook in exposed patients. There were 250 men and 162 women in the exposed group, and 460 men and 203 women in the non-exposed group. Gastric cancer was detected in 29.6% for the exposed group and 7.4% for the non-exposed group, although the patients had not complained of any symptoms. These figures tended to increase annually, probably benefiting from health examination. The difference between the exposed and non-exposed patients tended to be smaller when preoperative stages and the percentage of macroscopic early cancer were adjusted by age and the presence of complaints. The difference in histology between the groups also tended to be smaller. In the exposed group, however, men and women tended to have well differentiated cancer and poorly differentiated cancer, respectively. Since A-bomb survivors consist of radiation exposed population and are managed under intensive medical care, adjustment of some factors is necessary in comparing A-bomb survivors with general population. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Yukiko

    1984-01-01

    Of 108,739 atomic-bomb (A-bomb) victims enrolled in the population of life span survey by Radiation Effects Research Foundation, 730 victims from October 1950 to December 1980 were selected as subjects of colorectal cancer based on death certificates, autopsy and operative findings, and clinicopathological reconfirmation of colorectal cancer. Tentative dose decided in 1965 (T65D) was used to estimate radiation doses of A-bomb victims. Although the incidence of colon cancer was found to be related to radiation, the relation of the incidence of rectal cancer to radiation was not confirmed. Radiation effects were dependent on the age of A-bomb victims at the time of the bombing, which was noted in A-bomb victims aged less than twenty years at that time. Dose-response relationship was found in cases of cancer of the sigmoid colon. Histological types of cancer were independent of radiation doses. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Report on the results of the third medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitsuna, Akimitsu; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Noguchi, Kyoichi; Inoue, Nobuhisa; Yokoyama, Yutaka; Oishi, Akinori.

    1989-01-01

    The third medical examination was performed among A-bomb survivors residing in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru during the period October 17- November 4, 1988. One hundred and eighty-five A-bomb survivors were comfirmed to reside in the five countries. One hundred and eighteen A-bomb survivors (64%) participated in the examination, consisting of 50 men and 68 women. Seventy seven (35 men and 42 women) and 41 (15 men and 26 women) A-bomb survivors came from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. An average age of participants was 56.1±9.7 years for men and 58.4±9.6 years for women. The acquisition rate of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook was 28.8%. A questionnaire survey for subjective symptoms revealed a high frequency of fatigue, decreased physical fitness, numbness, and dizziness. Fifty-four A-bomb survivors (47%) were needed to receive detailed examinations. Predominant diseases were hypertension, obesity, and urinary tract disease. (N.K.)

  12. Report on the results of the third medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitsuna, Akimitsu (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Noguchi, Kyoichi; Inoue, Nobuhisa; Yokoyama, Yutaka; Oishi, Akinori

    1989-08-01

    The third medical examination was performed among A-bomb survivors residing in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru during the period October 17- November 4, 1988. One hundred and eighty-five A-bomb survivors were comfirmed to reside in the five countries. One hundred and eighteen A-bomb survivors (64%) participated in the examination, consisting of 50 men and 68 women. Seventy seven (35 men and 42 women) and 41 (15 men and 26 women) A-bomb survivors came from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. An average age of participants was 56.1{plus minus}9.7 years for men and 58.4{plus minus}9.6 years for women. The acquisition rate of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook was 28.8%. A questionnaire survey for subjective symptoms revealed a high frequency of fatigue, decreased physical fitness, numbness, and dizziness. Fifty-four A-bomb survivors (47%) were needed to receive detailed examinations. Predominant diseases were hypertension, obesity, and urinary tract disease. (N.K.).

  13. A comparison of clinicopathological features and prognosis in prostate cancer between atomic bomb survivors and control patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Koichi; Teishima, Jun; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Shinmei, Shunsuke; Akita, Tomoyuki; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Takeshima, Yukio; Arihiro, Koji; Tanaka, Junko; Yasui, Wataru; Matsubara, Akio

    2017-07-01

    An atomic bomb (A-bomb) was dropped on Hiroshima on 6th August 1945. Although numerous studies have investigated cancer incidence and mortality among A-bomb survivors, only a small number have addressed urological cancer in these survivors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinicopathological features of prostate cancer (PCa) in A-bomb survivors. The clinicopathological features and prognosis of PCa were retrospectively reviewed in 212 survivors and 595 control patients between November 1996 and December 2010. The histopathological and clinical outcomes of surgical treatment of PCa were also evaluated in 69 survivors and 162 control patients. Despite the higher age at diagnosis compared with the control group (P=0.0031), survivors were more likely to have been diagnosed with PCa from a health check compared with the control group (Pbomb exposure was not found to be an independent predictor for prognosis by multivariate analysis (OS, P=0.7800; CS, P=0.8688). The clinicopathological features of patients who underwent a prostatectomy were similar except for the diagnosis opportunity between the two groups. Progression-free survival rates were similar between the two groups (P=0.5630). A-bomb exposure was not a significant and independent predictor for worsening of progression-free prognosis by multivariate analysis (P=0.3763). A-bomb exposure does not appear to exert deleterious effects on the biological aggressiveness of PCa and the prognosis of patients with PCa.

  14. Outline of developing projects of atomic bomb in Japan and USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Shuji

    2007-01-01

    The content of the title connecting with the World War II is described hoping that younger researchers of nuclear physics could know some of the facts that scientists and the military of Japan and USA, respectively, had have developing projects of atomic bomb by fission reaction, although there are no official documents of those in Japan, even if there are some unofficial documents that are uncertain partly in Japan. Described are a chronological table, the content of research and development of atomic bombs, Japan's experiments by Kikuchi Laboratory of Osaka Imperial University and Nishina Laboratory of RIKEN, as well as the USA's action such as production of fissile nuclide, Pu-239 and U-235, selection of the site to fabricate atomic bomb, investigation the state of research and development of atomic bombs in Germany, Italy and Japan. (S.Y.)

  15. Incidence of skin cancer among Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors; Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1990-09-01

    Among a total of 65,268 Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors recorded in the Scientific Data Center of Atomic Bomb Disaster, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 140 cases with skin cancer were collected from 31 hospitals in Nagasaki City from 1961 through 1987. Subsequently, these cases of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors were statistically analyzed in relation to the estimated distance from the hypocenter by age, sex, histology and latent period. The results were as follows: (1) A high correlation was observed between the incidence of skin cancer and the distance from the hypocenter. (2) The incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors now appears to be increasing in relation to exposure distance. (3) Among 140 cases, basal cell epithelioma was observed in 67 cases (47.9%) and squamous cell carcinoma in 43 cases (30.7%). (author).

  16. Mortality among atomic-bomb survivors, 1950-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Pierce, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of cancer mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from 1950 through 1990 was recently published in Radiation Research. Work is also nearing completion on an updated analysis of data on noncancer mortality in the LSS. The new LSS mortality reports, collectively called Report 12, differ from earlier LSS reports in several general aspects. The Report includes some simple tabular, and graphical summaries of the excess risks which were developed to make it easier to comprehend the magnitude and nature of the excess risks in this cohort while highlighting uncertainties in the current LSS data. In order to overcome problems inherent in the use of summary risk estimates averaged over the current follow-up, sex- and age-at-exposure-specific lifetime risks computed for the LSS cohort are used as primary summaries of the excess risks. Throughout the new report, risk estimates were derived from models that make explicit allowance for important risk-modifying factors, such as age-at-exposure, sex, or attained age. This chapter contains a brief summary of some of the findings of the cancer mortality report and provides a preview of the latest non-cancer results

  17. Genetic effects of the atomic bombs: a reappraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, M.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on four indicators of genetic effects from studies of children born to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The indicators are frequency of untoward pregnancy outcomes (stillbirth, major congenital defect, death during the first postnatal weak); occurrence of death in live-born children, through an average of life expectancy of 17 years; frequency of children with sex chromosome aneuploidy; and frequency of children with mutation resulting in an eletrophoretic variant. In no instance is there a statistically significant effect of parental exposure; but for all indicators the observed effect is in the direction suggested by the hypothesis that genetic damage resulted from the exposure. On the basis of assumptions concerning the contribution that spontaneous mutation in the preceding generation makes to the indicators in question, it is possible to estimate the genetic doubling dose for radiation for the first three indicators (the data base is still too small for the fourth). The average of these estimates is 156 rems. This is some four times higher than the results from experimental studies on the mouse with comparable radiation sources, which have been the principal guide to the presumed human sensitivities. The relevance of these data in setting permissible limits for human exposures is discussed briefly

  18. Increased somatic cell mutant frequency in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, Masayuki; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Awa, A.A.; Yamakido, Michio; Otake, Masanori.

    1988-05-01

    Frequencies of mutant T-cells in peripheral blood, which are deficient in the activity of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were determined for atomic bomb survivors by direct clonal assay using a previously reported method. Results from 30 exposed survivors (exposed to more than 1 rad) and 17 age- and sex-matched controls (exposed to less than 1 rad) were analyzed. The mean mutant frequency (Mf) in the exposed (5.2 x 10 -6 ; range 0.8 - 14.4 x 10 -6 ) was significantly higher than in controls (3.4 x 10 -6 ; range 1.3 - 9.3 x 10 -6 ), a fact not attributable to lower nonmutant cell cloning efficiencies in the exposed group since cell cloning efficiencies were virtually identical in both groups. An initial analysis of the data did not reveal a significant correlation between individual Mfs and individual radiation dose estimates when the latter were defined by the original, tentative estimates (T65D), even though there was a significant positive correlation of Mfs with individual frequency of lymphocytes bearing chromosome aberration. However, reanalysis using the newer revised individual dose estimates (DS86) for 27 exposed survivors and 17 controls did reveal a significant but shallow positive correlation between T-cell Mf values and individual exposure doses. These results indicate that HPRT mutation in vivo in human T-cells could be detected in these survivors 40 years after the presumed mutational event. (author)

  19. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Chikako; Naitoh, Yasuo; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1976-01-01

    Fluororoentogenography of stomach was carried out on the cases of which stool-test was positive at the time of general physical examinations from October, 1971 to September, 1975. Necessity rate of detailed examination was high in male, but there was no difference by exposure condition between female and male. Rate of detailed examination carried out tended to be high in female, but there was no difference by exposure condition. Rate showing abnormal findings was high in male, and was high in the aged of both female and male. Rate showing abnormal findings according to exposure condition was higher in the group exposed directly to atomic bomb over 2.1 km from the hypocenter, in the group who entered city after explosion, and in other groups than in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. In findings of the detailed examinations, incidence of gastric ulcer was high in young fellows and male, and incidence of gastric polyp was high in the aged of female. Incidence rate of stomach cancer was high in male, and it increased with increase of age in both female and male. Estimated incidence rate of stomach cancer by exposure condition seemed to be high in the group exposed directly within 1 km from the hypocenter. However, a statistically significant difference was not recognized because of small samples. Incidence rate of stomach cancer by sex was higher in females exposed proximally. (Kanao, N.)

  20. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, C; Naitoh, Y; Kumasawa, T [Hiroshima A-Bomb Survivors Health Control Clinic (Japan)

    1976-09-01

    Fluororoentogenography of stomach was carried out on the cases of which stool-test was positive at the time of general physical examinations from October, 1971 to September, 1975. Necessity rate of detailed examination was high in male, but there was no difference by exposure condition between female and male. Rate of detailed examination carried out tended to be high in female, but there was no difference by exposure condition. Rate showing abnormal findings was high in male, and was high in the aged of both female and male. Rate showing abnormal findings according to exposure condition was higher in the group exposed directly to atomic bomb over 2.1 km from the hypocenter, in the group who entered city after explosion, and in other groups than in the group exposed within 2 km from the hypocenter. In findings of the detailed examinations, incidence of gastric ulcer was high in young fellows and male, and incidence of gastric polyp was high in the aged of female. Incidence rate of stomach cancer was high in male, and it increased with increase of age in both female and male. Estimated incidence rate of stomach cancer by exposure condition seemed to be high in the group exposed directly within 1 km from the hypocenter. However, a statistically significant difference was not recognized because of small samples. Incidence rate of stomach cancer by sex was higher in females exposed proximally.

  1. Serum autoantibodies in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Yamakido, Michio; Hamilton, H.B.; Kobuke, Kyoko; Fujiwara, Saeko; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Yoshimoto, Keiko; Fujikura, Toshio.

    1983-12-01

    In order to evaluate delayed effects of radiation on humoral immunity, an attempt was made to detect antibodies in the serum of atomic bomb survivors against kidney, liver, and parietal cells from rats. The following results were observed. Comparing by sex and age, the detection frequency of antibodies increased significantly for all three organs in the male group only. Analysis of changes in antibody detection frequencies by age and exposure dose without considering sex showed that the rates for those exposed to 100 + rad showed a trend to increase with age for all three organs (P < 0.01). However, in the 0 rad group, a significant trend to increase with age was noted for antikidney and antiliver antibodies only (P < 0.01 for both). Analysis of changes in antibody detection frequencies by sex, age, and exposure dose showed that the detection frequencies increased significantly with age for all three organs in males exposed to 100 + rad (P < 0.05), but only the antiliver antibody frequency increased significantly with age in males in the 0 rad exposure group. Females failed to show any statistical changes in any exposure group. (author)

  2. Genetic effects of the atomic bombs: a reappraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, M.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on four indicators of genetic effects from studies of children born to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Negasaki. The indicators are frequency of un toward pregnancy outcomes (stillbirth, major congenital defect, death during first postnatal week); occurrence of death in live-born children, through an average life expectancy of 17 years; frequency of children with sex chromosome aneuploidy; and frequency of children with mutation resulting in an electrophoretic variant. In no instance is there a statistically significant effect of parental exposure; but for all indicators the observed effect is in the direction suggested by the hypothesis that genetic damage resulted from the exposure. On the basis of assumptions concerning the contribution that spontaneous mutation in the preceding generation makes to the indicators in question, it is possible to estimate the genetic doubling dose for radiation for the first three indicators (the data base is still too small for the fourth). The average of these estimates is 156 rems. This is some four times higher than the results from experimental studies on the mouse with comparable radiation sources, which have been the principal guide to the presumed human sensitivities. The relevance of these data in setting permissible limits for human exposures is discussed briefly

  3. Medical Database for the Atomic-Bomb Survivors at Nagasaki University

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    The Scientific Data Center for Atomic-Bomb Disasters at Nagasaki University was established in 1974. The database of atomicbomb survivors has been in operation since 1977. The database is composed of following 6 physical database : (1) Fundamental information database. (2) Atomic-Bomb Hospital database, (3) Pathological database, (4) Household reconstruction database, (5) Second generation database, and (6) Address database. We review the current contents of the database for its further appli...

  4. Health examination for A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako

    1996-01-01

    The health examination for A-bomb survivors by national, prefectural and city administrations was described and discussed on its general concept, history, time change of examinee number, improvement of examination, prevalence of individual diseases, significance of cancer examinations, examinees' point of view and future problems. Subjects were the survivors living in Hiroshima city: in 1994, their number was 100,188, whose ages were 63 y in average for males consisting of 39.5% and 67 y for females of 60.5%. The examination was begun in 1957 on the law for medical care for the survivors firstly and then systematically in 1961. From 1965, it was performed 4 times a year, and in 1988, one examination in the four was made for cancer. Authors' Center examined previously 90% but recently 70% of the examinees. The remainder underwent the examination in other medical facilities. Tests are blood analysis, electrocardiography and computed radiography of chest with imaging plate, of which data have been accumulated either in photodisc or in host computer. From 1973 to 1993, the cardiovascular diseases increased from 6.1% to 26.9%, metabolic and endocrinic ones like diabetes, 3.6% to 19.7%, and bowel ones, 0.9% to 12.3%. Correlations of these diseases with A-bomb irradiation are not elucidated and possibly poor. Five classes of cancer examinations are performed but the examinee rate in the survivors is as low as 7.6-21.8% (1993). The cancer of the large intestine is increasing. The overall examinee rates in the survivors were 70.6% in 1965-1967, 69.5% in 1976-1977 and 58.2% in 1990. In conclusion, how to examine the survivors, who are getting older, as many as possible is the future problem. (H.O.)

  5. Ophthalmologic survey of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, 1949. Atomic bomb radiation cataract case report with histopathologic study. Medical examination of Hiroshima patients with radiation cataracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, D.G.; Martin, S.F.; Kimura, S.J.; Ikui, Hiroshi; Fillmore, P.G.

    1959-01-01

    This document contains 3 reports dealing with the delayed effects of radiation on the eyes of survivors of the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the first study, 1000 persons who were listed as having been in the open and within two kilometers of the hypocenter at the time of the explosion were selected at random from the census files of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission for study. In addition, 231 others, comprising the total available number of surviving persons listed at present in the census files as having been within one kilometer of the hypocenter, were examined, as were several hundred others who were contacted through newspaper publicity, referrals from local ophthalmologists, or through hearsay. The survey resulted in bringing in persons having, or having had, a variety of ocular conditions. Those connected with the atomic bomb included the following diagnoses; multiple injuries of eyes and eyelids; keratoconjunctivitis from ultraviolet and ionizing radiations; thermal burn of the cornea and of the retina; retinitis proliferans; and radiation cataracts. The cataracts were the only delayed manifestations of ocular injury from the atomic bomb. The second paper is a case report of a histopathologic study of atomic bomb radiation cataract. The third paper presents the results of medical examinations of survivors having radiation induced cataracts. 32 references, 8 figures. (DMC)

  6. Some hematological disorders among atomic bomb survivors. Presidential Address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Susumu

    1977-01-01

    Focusing on their hematological disorders, the late radiation effects among Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, including cytogenetic and cytological studies, are summarized and discussed. Because of personal research experience, the data were concentrated on the Hiroshima survivors

  7. Progress in reassessment of atomic bomb radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Studies for reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are underway in both Japan and the US. The progress made in various reassessment studies has been reported at several US-Japan joint workshops. The medical follow-up studies by the RERF provide data on dose-related parameters such as the location of the survivors and their shielding by surrounding structures at the times of the bombings. To make accurate estimates of the radiation dose for individual survivors in the two cities, they need reliable information concerning (a) the hypocenters and burst heights of the bombs, (b) the energy yields of the bombs and the source terms for the initial radiations from the bombs, (c) the atmospheric radiation transport to determine the initial radiation fields at the location of the survivors, (d) the attenuation factors for shielding afforded by structures and terrain, and (e) the shielding of specific organs by overlying tissues of the body. A computer code combining the above elements has been installed at the RERF and used in a preliminary reassessment of radiation doses to survivors who were indoors, shielded by houses at the times of the bombings. These results will be presented and discussed. The discussions will be focused, however, on specific areas where binational agreement has been reached and on specific areas where additional work is needed before the reassessment can be considered final

  8. Dietary factors and cancer mortality among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvaget, Catherine; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Waldren, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    Dietary factors such as fruit and vegetables are thought to reduce the risk of cancer incidence and mortality. We investigated the effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables against the long-term effects of radiation exposure on the risk of cancer. A cohort of 36,228 atomic-bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, for whom radiation dose estimates were currently available, had their diet assessed in 1980. They were followed for a period of 20 years for cancer mortality. The joint-effect of fruit and vegetables intake and radiation exposure on risk of cancer death was examined, in additive (sum of effects of diet alone and radiation alone) and multiplicative (product of effects of diet alone and radiation alone) models. In the additive model, a daily intake of fruit and vegetables significantly reduced the risk of cancer deaths by 13%, compared to an intake of once or less per week. Radiation exposure of 1 Sievert (Sv) increased significantly the risk of cancer death by 48-49%. The additive joint-effects showed a lower risk of cancer among those exposed to 1 Sv who had a diet rich in vegetables (49%-13%=36%) or fruit (48%-13%=35%). The multiplicative model gave similar results. The cancer risk reduction by vegetables in exposed persons went from 52% (effect of radiation alone) to 32% (product of effect of vegetables and radiation), and cancer risk reduction by fruit was 52% (radiation alone) to 34% (product of effect of fruit and radiation). There was no significant evidence to reject either the additive or the multiplicative model. A daily intake of fruit and vegetables was beneficial to the persons exposed to radiation in reducing their risks of cancer death

  9. Biochemical mutations in the children of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Neel, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic effects of atomic bombs in children of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were studied using two biochemical indicators. Eligible children were classified as those born to parents exposed at up to 2,000 m from the hypocenter (Group I, n=13,052); and those born to either parents exposed at a distance of over 2,500 m or parents who were not in the cities (Group II, n=10,609). Thirty blood proteins were examined by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In Group I, 3 mutations altering electrophoretic mobility of proteins were identified among 667,404 locus tests. This corresponded to a mutation rate of 0.45 x 10 -5 per locus per generation. In Group II, 3 mutations among 466,881 locus tests were seen, yielding a mutation rate for electromorphs of 0.64 x 10 -5 per locus per generation. According to the dose schedule developed in 1965 (T65 DR), average gonal doses of gamma and neutrons were 16.9 and 3.4, respectively, for Hiroshima's fathers; 14.0 and 1.3 for Hiroshima's mothers; 26.2 and 0.3 for Nagasaki's fathers; and 19.7 and 0.1 for Nagasaki's mothers. A screening for variants in 9 erythrocyte enzymes with activity ≤66% of normal value revealed one mutation resulting in the loss of enzyme activity in 60,529 tests for Group I, but none of the mutations in 61,741 tests for Group II. The mutation rates in both groups are thus considered to be 0.60 and 0.64 x 10 -5 , respectively, per locus per generation. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Result of medical survey in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Tsubota, Motoki; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1980-01-01

    General health examinations were performed on 242,296 a-bomb survivors during 5 years between 1972 and 1977. They were grouped according to exposure conditions, sex, and ages, and the results of examinations were compared. The rate of an erythrocyte count under 3,490,000 or the rate of a hemoglobin under 11.0 g/dl was higher in men of the group exposed within 1.9 km from the hypocenter than those in other exposed groups. The rate of an erythrocyte count under 3,490,000 and the incidence of hypertension were higher in women of the group exposed within 1.9 km than those of other exposed groups. There was a difference in an erythrocyte count, a hemoglobin, a white blood cell count, the rate of positive test for protein and glucose in urine, and blood pressure between men and women. The incidences of mild anemia and hypertension and the rate of positive test for glucose in urine increased with time. An erythrocyte count and a hemoglobin in women aged over 60 and men decreased linearly with their aging, but there was not a difference in them caused by exposure conditions. The maximum blood pressure in men and women increased with their aging, but there was not a difference in them caused by exposure conditions. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. Anti-human T-lymphotropic virus type-I antibodies in atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Nakashima, Eiji; Carter, R.L. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan). Nagasaki Branch] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), induced by human T-lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I), is endemic in Nagasaki, Japan. To investigate the effects of atomic-bomb radiation on development of this specific type of leukemia, 6182 individuals in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Adult Health Study sample in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were examined for positive rate of HTLV-I antibody. Several lymphocyte parameters were also studied for 70 antibody-positive subjects in Nagasaki. The HTLV-I antibody-positive rate was higher in Nagasaki (6.36%) than in Hiroshima (0.79%) and significantly increased with increasing age, but no association was observed with radiation dose. Whether relationship existed between antibody titer levels and radiation dose among antibody-positive subjects was not clear. The frequency of abnormal lymphocytes tended to be higher in antibody-positive subjects than in antibody-negative subjects, and higher in females than in males regardless of radiation dose. The lymphocyte count was lower in antibody-positive subjects than in antibody-negative subjects and lower in female than in male subjects. No evidence was found to suggest that atomic-bomb radiation plays an important role in HTLV-I infection. (author).

  12. Genetic effects of radiation in atomic-bomb survivors and their children. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori

    2006-01-01

    Genetic studies in the offspring of atomic bomb survivors have been conducted since 1948 at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Past studies include analysis of birth defects (untoward pregnancy outcome; namely, malformation, stillbirth, and perinatal death), chromosome aberrations, alterations of plasma and erythrocyte proteins as well as epidemiologic study on mortality (any cause) and cancer incidence (the latter study is still ongoing). There is, thus far, no indication of genetic effects in the offspring of survivors. Recently, the development of molecular biological techniques and human genome sequence databases made it possible to analyze DNA from parents and their offspring (trio-analysis). In addition, a clinical program is underway to establish the frequency of adult-onset multi-factorial diseases (diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease etc) in the offspring. The complementary kinds of data that will emerge from this three-pronged approach (clinical, epidemiologic, and molecular aspects) promise to shed light on health effects in the offspring of radiation-exposed people. (author)

  13. Epidemiological research on radiation-induced cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozasa, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    The late effects of exposure to atomic bomb radiation on cancer occurrence have been evaluated by epidemiological studies on three cohorts: a cohort of atomic bomb survivors (Life Span Study; LSS), survivors exposed in utero, and children of atomic bomb survivors (F 1 ). The risk of leukemia among the survivors increased remarkably in the early period after the bombings, especially among children. Increased risks of solid cancers have been evident since around 10 years after the bombings and are still present today. The LSS has clarified the dose–response relationships of radiation exposure and risk of various cancers, taking into account important risk modifiers such as sex, age at exposure, and attained age. Confounding by conventional risk factors including lifestyle differences is not considered substantial because people were non-selectively exposed to the atomic bomb radiation. Uncertainty in risk estimates at low-dose levels is thought to be derived from various sources, including different estimates of risk at background levels, uncertainty in dose estimates, residual confounding and interaction, strong risk factors, and exposure to residual radiation and/or medical radiation. The risk of cancer in subjects exposed in utero is similar to that in LSS subjects who were exposed in childhood. Regarding hereditary effects of radiation exposure, no increased risk of cancers associated with parental exposure to radiation have been observed in the F 1 cohort to date. In addition to biological and pathogenetic interpretations of the present results, epidemiological investigations using advanced technology should be used to further analyze these cohorts

  14. Effect Analysis on the Radiation Dose Rate of Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors by Atmospheric Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Sun; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chang Ho [Innovative Technology Center for Radiation Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) had been established to evaluate the radiation doses for the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The radiation effects of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the atomic bombs detonated at both cities were analyzed, and two types of radiation transport codes (i.e., MCNP4C and DORT) were employed in their studies. It was specifically investigated for contribution of each type of radiations to total dose. However, it is insufficient to examine the effects by various environmental factors such as weather conditions, because their calculations were only performed under certain condition at the times of the bombings. In addition, the scope of them does not include acute radiation injury of the atomic bomb survivors in spite of important information for investigating hazard of unexpected radiation accident. Therefore, this study analyzed the contribution of primary and secondary effects (i.e., skyshine and groundshine) of neutrons emitted from the Nagasaki atomic bomb. These analyses were performed through a series of radiation transport calculations by using MCNPX 2.6.0 code with variations of atmospheric density. The acute radiation injury by prompt neutrons was also evaluated as a function of distance from the hypocenter, where hypocenter is the point on the ground directly beneath the epicenter which is the burst point of the bomb in air

  15. Atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    Better atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation dose estimates with a higher accuracy are required for the epidemiological studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Several scientists have tried to evaluate the free-in-air gamma ray and neutron dose and some weighting factors such as house shielding and body shielding. Since 1965, the tentative 1965 dose (T65D) has been widely used as the basic data for the dose determination of A-bomb survivors in epidemiological studies. In 1976, however, the reevaluation of the T65D dose was proposed by an American scientist who calculated the A-bomb doses on the basis of declassified data on the radiation spectra of the A-bomb. The development of computer technology made it possible to perform complicated dosecalculations for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. This paper describes the history of A-bomb dosimetry, reviews some issues in the determination of T65D, and discusses the necessity of reassessment of A-bomb dose and the expected values for survivors. (author)

  16. The association between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Nobuko; Hida, Ayumi; Imaizumi, Misa; Nakashima, Eiji; Akahoshi, Masazumi

    2013-01-01

    Atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic CVD risk factors. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also known to be a risk factor for CVD and little is known whether CKD is associated with A-bomb radiation. To examine whether CKD is associated with CVD risk factors or with A-bomb radiation in A-bomb survivors, we classified renal dysfunction in 1,040 A-bomb survivors who were examined in 2004-2007 as normal [n = 121; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)]; mild (n = 686; eGFR 60-89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); moderate (n = 217; eGFR 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); or severe (n = 16; eGFR bomb radiation. Hypertension [odds ratio (OR), 1.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-2.20, P = 0.009]; DM (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.23-2.61, P = 0.002); hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.12-2.14, P = 0.008); and MetS (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.32-2.63, P bomb survivors.

  17. Atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.

    1986-01-01

    Better atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation dose estimates with a higher accuracy are required for the epidemiological studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Several scientists have tried to evaluate the free-in-air gamma ray and neutron dose and some weighting factors such as house shielding and body shielding. Since 1965, the tentative 1965 dose (T65D) had been widely used as the basic data for the dose determination of A-bomb survivors in epidemiological studies. In 1976, however, the reevaluation of the T65D dose was proposed by an American scientist who calculated the A-bomb doses on the basis of declassified data on the radiation spectra of the A-bomb. The development of computer technology made it possible to perform complicated dosecalculations for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. This paper describes the history of A-bomb dosimetry, reviews some issues in the determination of T65D, and discusses the necessity of reassessment of A-bomb dose and the expected values for survivors

  18. Whole-blood phagocytic and bactericidal activities of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Sumiko; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Toyota, Emiko; Neriishi, Shotaro; Yamakido, Michio; Matsuo, Miyo; Hosoda, Yutaka; Finch, S.C.

    1989-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of leukocytes in aliquots of whole blood from Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors for Staphylococcus aureus. The data were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Any significant effects of exposure to A-bomb radiation could not be detected for both phagocytic and bactericidal activities of whole blood from A-bomb survivors. In addition, there were no significant effects of age categories, sex or city, except in neutrophil counts. (J.P.N.)

  19. Study of gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Sadamatsu; Tadehara, Futoshi; Okusaki, Ken; Ito, Yoshiko; Ogawa, Junichiro; Kato, Masafumi; Ito, Chikako; Oyama, Hiroko; Mito, Kazuyo.

    1990-01-01

    Ten gastric cancer A-bomb survivors who had been false negative in mass screening for gastric cancer one year before the diagnosis were entered in a study determining an adequate interval of gastric mass screening for A-bomb survivors. Doubling time of cancer was determined on X-ray films. Of the 10 A-bomb survivors, 8 had entered the city after the bombing and the other two had been exposed at 1,700 m and 2,500 m, respectively, from the hypocenter. Six had early gastric cancer and the other 4 had advanced cancer. Doubling time averaged 19.1 months for early cancer and 7.6 months for advanced cancer. Three measurements of tumor diameter available for 4 A-bomb survivors revealed a very rapid increase in doubling time during the progression period from early to advanced cancer. An interval of one year seems to be adequate in mass screening to detect early cancer. (N.K.)

  20. Seeing the Light: Visibility of the July '45 Trinity Atomic Bomb Test from the Inner Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2006-01-01

    In his "The Making of the Atomic Bomb," Richard Rhodes remarks of the July 16, 1945, Trinity atomic bomb test in New Mexico that "had astronomers been watching they could have seen it reflected from the moon, literal moonshine," an allusion to Ernest Rutherford's famous dismissal of the prospect of atomic energy. Investigating…

  1. Impact of Nagasaki atomic bomb exposure on myelodysplastic syndrome patients who are treated with azacitidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Tatsuro; Horio, Kensuke; Shigematsu, Kazuto

    2015-05-01

    High-dose radiation exposure greatly increases the risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), however the clinical characteristics of MDS among atomic bomb survivors have not been thoroughly investigated to date. We designed this study to identify these characteristics. We retrospectively evaluated data from 13 atomic bomb survivors with MDS and 15 elderly patients with de novo MDS who were diagnosed between April 2011 and April 2013 at the Nagasaki Genbaku Hospital. All patients were treated with azacitidine (AZA; a hypomethylating agent) and overall survival rates were estimated. No clear difference was observed in the clinical response to AZA between the two groups. However, atomic bomb survivors had a survival disadvantage, independent of their karyotype. Minute genetic alterations caused by exposure to atomic radiation can adversely affect the response to AZA, even 66 years after the exposure. Further studies are required to clarify the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Extension lectures: the effects of radiation from atomic bombing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yutaka; Mine, Mariko

    1999-01-01

    About 56,000 A-bomb survivors are living in Nagasaki city even today. Nagasaki citizens, whether they are A-bomb survivors or not, can not live without concerns on the existence of radiation effects. They have fears of any amount of radiation and are afraid that it may harm their life. As results of studies in the university on radiation effects are not familiar to the citizens, we have started extension lectures on 'the effects of radiation from A-bombing' to them since 1990. We discuss the problems as well as significance of the extension lectures by reporting the details of the extension lectures which we have managed in the past. (author)

  3. Study of thyroid tumors in atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ichiro; Shichijo, Kazuko; Ito, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Masao; Mine, Mariko; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Ooya, Seiichi.

    1992-01-01

    Thyroid tumors, which were registered during 16 years from 1973 through 1988 in the Nagasaki tumor tissue registration committee, were examined with the purpose of searching for the relationship between thyroid tumors and A-bombing. One hundred and three A-bomb survivors having an A-bomb survivors 'handbook and 89 non-exposed persons born before August 9, 1945 in Nagasaki City were enrolled in the present study. The A-bomb survivors were divided into three groups: people exposed at >2,000 m from the hypocenter (n=20), those exposed at ≤2,000 m (n=68), and those entered the city early after A-bombing (n=15). Thyroid tumors examined were: thyroid carcinoma, nodular goiter, thyroid adenoma and malignant lymphoma. Crude incidence rate and relative risk of thyroid cancer were higher in all exposed groups, except for the ≤2,000 m group of males, than the non-exposed group. In particular, the >2,000 m group had significantly higher incidence of thyroid cancer, irrespective of sex. These findings confirmed the previous data for the higher incidence of thyroid cancer in A-bomb survivors exposed to higher doses of radiation. According to age, thyroid cancer was the most common in their sixth decade of life in the exposed group and in their fifth decade of life in the non-exposed group. Histologically, follicular carcinoma occupied higher incidence in the exposed group (19.2%) than the non-exposed group (8.7%). (N.K.)

  4. Report on results of fourth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Tetsuo; Ito, Chikako; Tanaka, Yoshikiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Inamizu, Tsutomu.

    1984-01-01

    Review was made of the fourth medical examination and the actual state of health of the U.S. atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors. The number of survivors registered with the Committee of A-bomb Survivors residing in the U.S. as of the end of June 1983 in 592 (males 154, females 438), of whom 58.8% possess U.S. citizenship. Survivor's health handbooks issued to survivors under the Japanese A-bomb Survivors Medical Treatment Law are possessed by 29.2%, with female holders being about twice as numerous as males. Responses to the health survey questionnaire were received from 306. Complaints of subjective symptoms tended to be higher in the early entrants, and by place of examination, those of Honolulu had the higher rate. Those who underwent health examination numbered 305 (73 males and 232 females). RBC and hemoglobin value were higher in the U.S. survivors than in Hiroshima survivors. No abnormality was observed in 47.5%. The main abnormalities noted were obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and liver disease. Comparison of those who had received examination on two consecutive occasions in 1981 and 1983 and those who were examined for the first time in 1983 showed a decrease in the frequency of obesity and hypertension. (J.P.N.)

  5. Radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, E T

    1959-01-01

    This report summarizes the present state of knowledge in dosimetry of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. Data have been presented on the physical factors involved in the two cities and on attenuation of radiation by various shielding situations. This information is being used to estimate a tentative radiation dose to individual A-bomb survivors. It should be emphasized that many important problems remain to be solved before accurate doses can be assigned to individual survivors. Such information will greatly strengthen investigation of biological consequences of instantaneous doses of gamma and neutron irradiation in men. 18 references, 9 figures.

  6. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  7. Why didn't Hitler get the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevassus-au-Louis, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    This bibliographical note presents a book in which the author reports his historical studies on the Nazi's nuclear activities as, by the end of the 1930's, Germany was probably the leader in this domain. He mentions and describes the various programs that were launched between 1939 and 1945, discusses some evidences related to the fact that the Germans probably tried to master nuclear energy production, and that they might have tested a weapon containing fissile materials (probably a dirty bomb). The author analyses the reasons of the failure of this nuclear sector: a lack of organization, war and bombings, and a relative lack of interest of political authorities

  8. Studies on population change of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima prefecture 1965-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueoka, Hiroshi; Munaka, Masaki; Kurihara, Minoru

    1984-01-01

    Studies of population change of Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors from 1965 to 1979 in Hiroshima prefecture of which registered in Data Base of Atomic Bomb Survivors of RINMB were conducted, and following were obtained: 1. Population change of Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors showed increasing trend until 1976 and diminishing trend from 1977. It would be estimated that reason of increasing trend of Atomic Bomb Survivors was correlated the same trend to get register card of ''Atomic Bomb Treatment Law'', and decreasing trend of them was related so much death of the elderly generations. 2. Analysing by residential place the survivors who make a living in Hiroshima city was almost 110,000, and those who make a living in Hiroshima prefecture (except Hiroshima city) was 65,000. Considering exposed distance of the survivors in Hiroshima city, those survivors exposed within 2 km showed diminishing trend; and those who make a living in Hiroshima prefecture (except Hiroshima city), exposed within 2 km showed increasing trend. 3. In 1979, the ratio of male and female survivors by age level showed difference. Those male survivors over 50 years old in Hiroshima city showed much lower percentage than female. 4. In 1979, the population trends of survivors who get the ''card'' before 1964 showed rapid decrease, and those who get the ''card'' after 1965 showed mild decrease. (author)

  9. Mortality statistics among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima Prefecture. 1968-1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, M; Munaka, M; Hayakawa, N; Yamamoto, H; Ueoka, H; Ohtaki, M [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1981-12-01

    In a comparative analysis of mortality among atomic bomb survivors versus the non-exposed, both resident in Hiroshima Prefecture, it was found that in addition to leukaemia, malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and cancers of the thyroid gland, breast, lung, esophagus, stomach, urinary organs and salivary gland which have been reported from the past to be elevated in risk among atomic bomb survivors, cancers of the colon, larynx, accessory sinuses, uterus, ovary and testis, diseases of the blood, cirrhosis of liver, hypertensive disease and diabetes mellitus were elevated in risk, but the risk of cerebrovascular disease, heart disease, peptic ulcer, gastroenteritis, senility, and accidents was lower than the non-exposed. The relationship of atomic bomb exposure to the relative risk of cancers of the lung, breast, uterus, and testis could be readily explained, but the relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the relative risk of cancers of many other sites, diseases of the blood, and other causes of death was inconsistent. One of the reasons why the risk of senility was low and the risk of diseases of the blood, malignant neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, and hypertensive disease was high is considered to be the higher diagnostic accuracy in atomic bomb survivors.

  10. Surgical techniques for the atomic bomb survivors of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Nobuo; Dohi, Kiyohiko; Noso, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    As for proper surgical techniques for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, this paper explains with a focus on the Hiroshima University cases, with an addition of the cases of Radiation Effects Research Foundation and Takeichi Clinic. The definitive diagnosis of thyroid cancer is usually carried out by echo-guided aspiration biopsy cytology, but Takeichi Clinic faces the surgery by preparing 'thyroid - cervical lymph node map' by combining this technique with CT and MRI. As the surgery examples at Hiroshima University, 259 cases during 1955-1972 and 363 cases during 1965-1982 were taken up, and the survival rate and cancer death rate classified by tissue types for 10 years after the initial operations were shown in a table. Dead patients were mostly the surgery cases of senior persons of 60 years in age or older, and the death rate for surgery cases of the persons of 19 years old or younger was only 1.9% at 6 cases. Higher cancer death rate was seen in the cases of papillary cancer of more than 5 cm in size, where extra glandular infiltration could not be curated or cut out, and 64/318 cases of patients had a recurrence of cancer at thyroid gland. The mortality rate up to 20 years after the surgery of atomic bomb survivors was not significantly different from that of non-victims. Information on the multicentric cancerous focuses and microscopic cancer in the thyroid gland, as well as the tissue types and high risk of cancer death were described from the cases of Hiroshima University and Takeichi Clinic. The thyroid cancer of radiation exposure victims often results in papillary cancer, and the following are described related with this: (1) selection of ablation method, (2) method to protect the parathyroid tissue, and (3) method to prevent damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve and superior laryngeal nerve. The surgical procedure to perform the neck outside area lymph node dissection due to the quasi-subtotal or quasi-complete removal of the thyroid gland is

  11. Pathological review of lung cancer among A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima Atomic-bomb Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Shigeru; Akamizu, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Hamada, Tadao.

    1989-01-01

    Autopsy findings were reviewed in 161 A-bomb survivors with lung cancer during the period 1956-1987. The overall ratio of male to female was 2.1. In the group of A-bomb survivors exposed at ≤2,000 m from the hypocenter, the ratio of male to female in the incidence of lung cancer was 1.3. According to age groups, it was the highest in people in their seventies. Histology revealed that the incidence was 41.6% for adenocarcinoma, 29.2% for squamous cell carcinoma, 19.9% for small cell carcinoma, 6.8% for large cell carcinoma, and 2.5% for adenosquamous cell carcinoma. The incidence of small cell carcinoma was relatively high in the ≤2,000 m group. For females in the ≤2,000 m group, the incidence of adenocarcinoma was relatively low, and the incidences of squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma tended to be high. The incidence of histologic type of lung cancer varied with time: squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma were the most predominant during the period 1957-1967; since 1968, it has been gradually replacing by adenocarcinoma. In the ≤2,000 m group, however, small cell carcinoma has still been more predominant even since 1984. For 8 A-bomb survivors exposed at the age of 20 years or less, 7 had adenocarcinoma, showing a significantly higher incidence than those exposed at older ages. (Namekawa, K)

  12. Accurate dating with radiocarbon from the atom bomb tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogel

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The artificial radiocarbon produced by the thermonuclear bomb tests in the 1950s and 1960s significantly increased the level of C-14 in the environment. A detailed record of the subsequent changes in the C-14 concentration of the atmosphere can...

  13. Leukemia among atomic bomb survivors during the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumi, Shizuyo; Matsuo, Tatsuki

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of the dosimetry system 1986, exposure doses were determined in a cohort of 86,502 subjects for the Life Span Study during the period 1950-1985. A total of 248 people were found to develop leukemia in Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities. This is an analysis of the 248 patients with leukemia in connection with exposure doses, years after A-bombing, age at the time of A-bombing, relative risk, and background. An average exposure dose was 0.20 Gy for Hiroshima and 0.22 Gy for Nagasaki. Relative risk for leukemia tended to show a linear increase in proportion to exposure doses. This was significant for acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), regardless of whether A-bomb survivors came from Hiroshima or Nagasaki. The younger the age at the time of A-bombing was, the higher excess relative risk for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) was. For AML, however, it was independent of the age at that time. These findings were similar in Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, irrespective of age. As for non-exposed group, the incidence of CML was three times higher in Hiroshima citizen than Nagasaki citizen. Similarly, Hiroshima citizen had a 1.6 fold incidence of AML. There was no significant difference in the incidence of ALL between the cities. The incidences of both AML and ALL tended to increase more and more with aging, but the prevalences tended to increase in younger generation. An increased incidence of CML was associated with aging alone. (N.K.)

  14. Study of skin cancer incidence in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 1958-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Otake, Masanori; Honda, Takeo.

    1993-03-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on skin cancer incidence in a cohort of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in the Nagasaki Extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) sample have been investigated. Among 25,942 exposed survivors at risk whose DS86 dose estimates were available, 47 cases of skin cancer including malignant melanoma were confirmed in the Nagasaki Tumor Registry during the period from 1 April 1958 to 31 December 1985. The dose-response relationship of skin cancer based on an additive relative risk model showed linearity without threshold, not a linear-quadratic curve. The excess relative risk (ERR) of 2.2 per gray in the LSS-E85 sample was highly significant (95% confidence limits: 0.5 to 5.0). In addition, the ERR of 3.1 per gray in the Adult Health Study (AHS) sample was also significant (95% confidence limits: 0.6 to 20.3). When dose equivalents based on a relative biological effectiveness of neutrons of 10 were used, the ERR in the former sample decreased to 2.0 per sievert (95% confidence limits: 0.7-4.5), and the risk in the latter group also declined, to 2.7 per sievert (95% confidence limits: 0.6-17.8). The ERRs did not differ significantly between males and females in the LSS-E85 and AHS samples, but a highly significant increase was observed for the ERR of age at exposure and time trend since exposure. The ERR of skin cancer cases including and excluding 4 malignant melanoma cases for the LSS-E85 sample (there were no malignant melanoma cases in the AHS sample) showed almost the same linear dose response. This is the first report to demonstrate a highly significant dose-response relationship between A-bomb exposure and skin cancer incidence. (author)

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masami; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Hata, Jotaro; Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Nakatsuka, Hirofumi; Tahara, Eiichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to elucidate the biological characteristics of colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, a total of 159 cases of colorectal cancers comprising 73 cases in exposed atomic bomb survivors and 86 cases in non-exposed individuals were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for various functioning proteins. No statistical differences could be demonstrated in the incidence of various marker expressions of colorectal cancers between the exposed group and control group. However, comparison by the site of colorectal cancer showed that sigmoid colon cancers in the exposed group or high dose group showed a significantly higher frequency of glycoproteins such as α 1 -antichymotrypsin (ACT), secretory component (SC), α 1 -antitrypsin (AAT), and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) when compared with the control group. These results correlated well with the epidemiological data that the radiation effect on the incidence of colorectal cancer in atomic bomb survivors was most remarkable in the sigmoid colon. (author)

  16. Natural history of disease in atomic bomb exposed twins in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, Yukio; Ohmae, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Naomasa; Abe, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Shoji

    1982-01-01

    The subjects of this study are mainly pairs of monozygotic twins, one of whom was exposed to the atomic bomb and the other not exposed, and the natural history of the diseases of these twins was analyzed to find out genetic and environmental factors of the diseases and some biological effect of the atomic bomb exposure or other. In this study, 13 pairs of monozygotic and 5 pairs of dizygotic twins and other 34 cases of non-twins were examined by means of heart and lung X-ray films and electrocardiograms. The results suggest that most of the monozygotic twins show the similar findings of chest X-ray films, though their electrocardiograms have a tendency to deviate to the left in the QRS axis. These findings will not be enough to clear up the relation between the atomic bomb exposed and the abnormal electrocardiograms. (author)

  17. Mental health for elder A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Hata, Tomoko [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1994-12-01

    A pilot study was made, based on an interview survey, to improve mental hygiene in A-bomb survivors. The study consisted of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 12 items, Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), Social Disabilities Schedule (SDS), and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 30 items. A majority of the subjects were those aged in their fifties, sixties, and seventies. Eighty A-bomb survivors answered GHQ 12 items, consisting of 7, 17, and 41 who were exposed at <2.0 km, 2.0-2.9 km, and {>=}3.0 km from the hypocenter, respectively, and 15 who entered the city early after A-bombing. Thirty-three A-bomb survivors answered CIDI. According to the distance from the hypocenter, the corresponding figures were 2, 10, 15, and 6 A-bomb survivors. The survey for GHQ 12 items revealed that more A-bomb survivors exposed nearer the hypocenter suffered from mental problems. In the survey for CIDI, the most common complaints were found to be physical expression disorder (n=9) and chronic pain (n=8), followed by hypochondria (n=4), panic disorder (n=2), and anxiery (n=one). According to the SDS survey, 85% were judged as having no mental disorder, and the remaining 15% as having merely mild or moderate disorder. (N.K.).

  18. Mental health for elder A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Hata, Tomoko

    1994-01-01

    A pilot study was made, based on an interview survey, to improve mental hygiene in A-bomb survivors. The study consisted of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 12 items, Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), Social Disabilities Schedule (SDS), and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 30 items. A majority of the subjects were those aged in their fifties, sixties, and seventies. Eighty A-bomb survivors answered GHQ 12 items, consisting of 7, 17, and 41 who were exposed at <2.0 km, 2.0-2.9 km, and ≥3.0 km from the hypocenter, respectively, and 15 who entered the city early after A-bombing. Thirty-three A-bomb survivors answered CIDI. According to the distance from the hypocenter, the corresponding figures were 2, 10, 15, and 6 A-bomb survivors. The survey for GHQ 12 items revealed that more A-bomb survivors exposed nearer the hypocenter suffered from mental problems. In the survey for CIDI, the most common complaints were found to be physical expression disorder (n=9) and chronic pain (n=8), followed by hypochondria (n=4), panic disorder (n=2), and anxiery (n=one). According to the SDS survey, 85% were judged as having no mental disorder, and the remaining 15% as having merely mild or moderate disorder. (N.K.)

  19. Statistical study of autopsy cases in Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital 1956-1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, T; Ishida, S [H.ma Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Matsushita, Hiroshi

    1976-03-01

    In order to study the differences in the incidence of a variety of disease (excluding tumors), between the cases exposed to the atomic bomb and those who were unexposed, main lesions were studied statistically by autopsy. The subjects were 1230 cases autopsied at the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital or the Hiroshima Red-Cross Hospital. They were divided into 318 cases exposed at a short distance from the bombed area (within 2 km), and 420 cases exposed at a long distance from that area (more than 2 km), including those who had come to Hiroshima later. Four hundred twenty nine unexposed cases were selected as controls. The incidence of tumor, disturbance of circulation, disturbance of the blood vessels in the brain, blood disease, and respiratory disease was higher in the exposed cases than in the unexposed cases. The incidence of cirrhosis of the liver was higher in females than in males, and was lower in cases farther from the bombed area. Cardiac infarction, valvular disease, and endocarditis were more often seen in the cases exposed near the bombed area. The incidence of the blood vessels in the brain was highest in the exposed cases near the bombed area. The incidence of disturbance of circulation, and disturbance of the blood vessels in the brain had a tendency to be higher in the exposed cases than in the unexposed cases. This is considered to be due to the advanced age in the exposed cases.

  20. A statistical study of autopsy cases in Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital 1956-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Ishida, Sadamu; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    In order to study the differences in the incidence of a variety of disease (excluding tumors), between the cases exposed to the atomic bomb and those who were unexposed, main lesions were studied statistically by autopsy. The subjects were 1230 cases autopsied at the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital or the Hiroshima Red-Cross Hospital. They were divided into 318 cases exposed at a short distance from the bombed area (within 2 km), and 420 cases exposed at a long distance from that area (more than 2 km), including those who had come to Hiroshima later. Four hundred twenty nine unexposed cases were selected as controls. The incidence of tumor, disturbance of circulation, disturbance of the blood vessels in the brain, blood disease, and respiratory disease was higher in the exposed cases than in the unexposed cases. The incidence of cirrhosis of the liver was higher in females than in males, and was lower in cases farther from the bombed area. Cardiac infarction, valvular disease, and endocarditis were more often seen in the cases exposed near the bombed area. The incidence of the blood vessels in the brain was highest in the exposed cases near the bombed area. The incidence of disturbance of circulation, and disturbance of the blood vessels in the brain had a tendency to be higher in the exposed cases than in the unexposed cases. This is considered to be due to the advanced age in the exposed cases. (Serizawa, K.)

  1. Accident in science history. Hitler's atomic bomb; Stoerfall der Wissenschaftsgeschichte. Hitlers Atombombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    Up to now the historical explanation for the fact that NS Germany did not develop an atomic bomb was that there was enough scientific and technical knowledge but not enough resources. Recent historical research showed that the German scientists in the ''Uranverein'' did not know the cross section of U-235 and had no possibility to measure these cross sections. There exist only very few documents dealing with the bomb. The bomb was treated as a special case of a reactor. Obviously the German scientists did not know he bomb technology. It seems that the project was not success-oriented because the scientists expected to be sent to the front in case of a project stop.

  2. The relationship between the life environment of the atomic bomb survivors (Hibakusha) and their cardiovascular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Masatoshi; Saito, Osamu; Miyaki, Sumiyo; Watabu, Akiko

    1978-01-01

    In order to observe clinically the effects of the atomic bomb on the human body (and on the environment), subjects were divided into group A (persons living in Hiroshima city more than 10 years after dropping of the atomic bomb) and group B (persons who changed their residence within 1 month). Group A was divided into two separate groups: group A 1 (persons living in segregated areas), and group A 2 (persons living in other areas). General examinations showed no abnormal findings. Incidence of abnormal ECG findings was higher in subjects living in segregated areas and was also higher in women than in men. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. A study on thyroid disorder of Sjoegren's disease in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji; Sasaki, Hideo; Ito, Chikako; Hasegawa, Kazuyo.

    1984-01-01

    Thyroid disorders were seen in eight of 25 atomic bomb survivors with Sjoegren's disease -- simple goiter in 2, chronic thyroiditis in 4, and primary hypothyroidism probably arising from chronic thyroiditis in 2. Thyroid disorders associated with Sjoegren's disease seemed to occur frequently in survivors exposed near the explosion. One of the two survivors with primary hypothyroidism had been exposed to atomic bomb 1.7 km from the explosion. As for the other clinical laboratory findings, there was no significant difference between the group with thyroid disorders and the group without them. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Frequency of marriage and live birth among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blot, W.J.; Shimizu, Y.; Kato, H.; Miller, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Frequency of marriage and birth as of January 1973 was determined for persons exposed in utero to the atomic bombs in 1945 and for controls. The marriage rate was lower in persons heavily exposed in utero than in the non-exposed or lightly exposed. This difference is attributed partly to the lesser marriageability of persons with mental retardation who are significantly more numerous among the heavily exposed, and partly to unmeasured variables, possibly including social discrimination against survivors of the atomic bomb. No consistent relation was observed between radiation exposure and three reproductive indices: childless marriages, number of births, and interval between marriage and first birth

  5. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, Motoki; Ito, Chikako

    1980-01-01

    Mass examinations of the stomach were performed on 13,412 a-bomb survivors from Oct. 1975 to Mar. 1979. The necessity rate for detailed examinations was 13.6% on the average, and it was a little lower than the average in Japan. That in women was higher than that in men. The performance rate of detailed examinations was very high (91.8%), which might be influenced by active appeals to have detailed examinations. The estimated discovery rate of stomach cancer was 0.27% on the average, and it was higher than that in mass examinations of Chugoku and Shikoku districts. A relationship between the estimated discovery rate of stomach cancer and exposure conditions was not clarified. The discovery rate of stomach cancer was supposed to be influenced strongly by aging of a-bomb survivors. (Tsunoda, M.)

  6. Investigation of lung cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Itoh, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1976-01-01

    Fourty two cases of lung cancer in A-bomb survivors experienced between 1971 and 1975 were compared to non-exposure cases with lung cancer, and discussed. The mean age of A-bomb survivors with lung cancer was 68.7 year old, and that of control cases was 60 year old. The incidence ratio of male to female in the group was 4 : 1, and that of control group was 5 : 1. Occupation was one of the predisposing causes, but patients who had engaged in the occupation which was considered to predispose lung cancer were three. Among 39 patients with lung cancer whose smoking histories were clarified, 20.5 per cent was nonsmoker, and 69.3 per cent was heavy smoker. Among 39 patients whose cancer histories were clarified, 28.2 per cent of the patients had family history of cancer. Subjective symptoms of this disease were cough, sputum, bloody sputum and chest pain, and some had no symptoms. Seventeen cases (40.5 per cent) were detected in the physical examination for the A-bomb survivors. For the early detection of lung cancer in A-bomb survivors, patients with high risk should be selected to have received clearly established diagnosis. Histologically, squamous cell carcinoma was seen in many cases, following adenoma, and undifferenciated large cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. Disturbances in pulmonary functions were obstructive ventilation, high rate of residual air, lowered diffusions ability. Therapy was operation in stage I, chemotherapy and radiation therapy in stage II and stage III. (Kanao, N.)

  7. Pathological study of multiple myeloma in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaki, Y.; Kishikawa, M.; Bundo, K. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1980-11-01

    Pathological records of autopsies carried out in Nagasaki from '46 to '77 were reviewed. Of 9331 autopsies, 5787 were unexposed cases and were used as a control. 9.2% of the deaths were due to hematologic disorders. There was no evidence that the incidence of multiple myeloma among a-bomb survivors increased compared with the control. The incidences of leukemia, lymphoma and aplastic anemia were also listed.

  8. Effects of radiation on aging in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo; Miyajima, Junko; Ichimaru, Michito

    1980-01-01

    Effect of radiation on aging was studied for 122 female a-bomb survivors exposed to more than 100 rad. Correlations of grades of external appearances, Physiological functions, and hematological features with age and radiation were investigated. Several parameters were used for multiple regression analysis, including hair loss, skin elasticity, grip strength, blood pressure, potassium content etc. The comparison of the estimated age of the exposed group and unexposed one showed no statistically significant difference. (Nakanishi, T.)

  9. Autopsy cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihara, Megumu; Kurihara, Kanji; Aimitsu, Shiomi; Yukaya, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tadao.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1956, 388 autopsy cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been obtained at the Hiroshima Red Cross and A-Bomb Survivors Hospital, which consisted of those of proximately exposed 52 A-bomb survivors (mean age, 63.8 years), 105 distally exposed A-bomb survivors (mean age, 64.2 years), and the other 231 non-exposed patients (mean age, 60.6 years). Since 1985, the incidence of HCC tended to be higher in both proximately and distally exposed groups than the non-exposed group. There was no consistent tendency for the incidence of HCC by ages at autopsy and A-bombing. The incidence of liver cirrhosis was approximately 2 times higher in males than females in the non-exposed group, although no gender difference existed after 1981. In the exposed group, the incidence was similar in male and female groups. Approximately 90% of HCC patients had coexistent liver cirrhosis. Liver cirrhosis was associated with HCC in 50-60%. No significant differences in these incidences were observed between the exposed and non-exposed groups. The proportion of liver cirrhosis associated with HCC became constant in patients over the age of 40 in the non-exposed group. In the exposed group, on the other hand, the proportion reached the peak in those in their fifties and sixties. Survival time tended to be longer in the exposed group than the non-exposed group. The patients in the non-exposed group tended to have histologically atypical type and metastases, as compared with those in the exposed group. (N.K.)

  10. Autopsy cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujihara, Megumu; Kurihara, Kanji; Aimitsu, Shiomi; Yukaya, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Red Cross Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Hamada, Tadao

    1994-12-01

    Since 1956, 388 autopsy cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have been obtained at the Hiroshima Red Cross and A-Bomb Survivors Hospital, which consisted of those of proximately exposed 52 A-bomb survivors (mean age, 63.8 years), 105 distally exposed A-bomb survivors (mean age, 64.2 years), and the other 231 non-exposed patients (mean age, 60.6 years). Since 1985, the incidence of HCC tended to be higher in both proximately and distally exposed groups than the non-exposed group. There was no consistent tendency for the incidence of HCC by ages at autopsy and A-bombing. The incidence of liver cirrhosis was approximately 2 times higher in males than females in the non-exposed group, although no gender difference existed after 1981. In the exposed group, the incidence was similar in male and female groups. Approximately 90% of HCC patients had coexistent liver cirrhosis. Liver cirrhosis was associated with HCC in 50-60%. No significant differences in these incidences were observed between the exposed and non-exposed groups. The proportion of liver cirrhosis associated with HCC became constant in patients over the age of 40 in the non-exposed group. In the exposed group, on the other hand, the proportion reached the peak in those in their fifties and sixties. Survival time tended to be longer in the exposed group than the non-exposed group. The patients in the non-exposed group tended to have histologically atypical type and metastases, as compared with those in the exposed group. (N.K.).

  11. Hyperparathyroidism among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1986-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Ezaki, Haruo; Sposto, R.; Akiba, Suminori; Neriishi, Kazuo; Kodama, Kazunori; Hosoda, Yutaka; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Yoshimitsu, Kengo.

    1990-10-01

    During the two-year period from August 1986 to July 1988, the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) was determined among A-bomb survivors and unexposed control subjects in Hiroshima. The diagnosis of HPT was determined biochemically, based upon the presence of consistent hypercalcemia and elevated serum parathyroid hormone levels. Among a population of 4,675 individuals (1,527 males, 3,148 females), primary HPT was diagnosed in 22 (3 males, 19 females). Of these, 8 underwent surgery, of whom 6 had a single parathyroid adenoma and 2 had parathyroid hyperplasia. HPT was more prevalent among the A-bomb survivors who received higher radiation doses (p <.001 for linear trend). The prevalence rates predicted from the model were 0.204% (±0.094%) at 0 Gy and 0.893% (±0.237%) at 1 Gy. The background rate of HPT did not differ significantly by sex or by age at the time of the bombing, although the effect of radiation exposure was greater for individuals exposed at a younger age (p <.01). (author)

  12. Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases Among Atomic Bomb Survivors Exposed in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Misa; Ohishi, Waka; Nakashima, Eiji; Sera, Nobuko; Neriishi, Kazuo; Yamada, Michiko; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Fujiwara, Saeko; Sugino, Keizo; Ando, Takao; Usa, Toshiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Hida, Ayumi

    2017-07-01

    The risk of thyroid cancer increases and persists for decades among individuals exposed to ionizing radiation in childhood, although the long-term effects of childhood exposure to medium to low doses of radiation on thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid diseases have remained unclear. To evaluate radiation dose responses for the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease among atomic bomb survivors exposed in childhood. Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors who were younger than 10 years old at exposure underwent thyroid examinations at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation between 2007 and 2011, which was 62 to 66 years after the bombing. Data from 2668 participants (mean age, 68.2 years; 1455 women) with known atomic bomb thyroid radiation doses (mean dose, 0.182 Gy; dose range, 0 to 4.040 Gy) were analyzed. Dose-response relationships between atomic bomb radiation dose and the prevalence of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease), and positive for antithyroid antibodies. Prevalences were determined for hypothyroidism (129 cases, 7.8%), hyperthyroidism (32 cases of Graves' disease, 1.2%), and positive for antithyroid antibodies (573 cases, 21.5%). None of these was associated with thyroid radiation dose. Neither thyroid antibody-positive nor -negative hypothyroidism was associated with thyroid radiation dose. Additional analyses using alternative definitions of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism found that radiation dose responses were not significant. Radiation effects on thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid diseases were not observed among atomic bomb survivors exposed in childhood, at 62 to 66 years earlier. The cross-sectional design and survival bias were limitations of this study. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  13. Fallout: Hedley Marston and atomic bomb tests in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.T.

    2001-01-01

    This book tells the story of Australian scientists involved in the 1956 British atomic tests at Maralinga. The story involves several of the country's most respected and trusted scientists of the 1950s and spills over to the scientific organisations that mattered. As the drama unfolds we see how the controversy touched the lives of many senior Australian scientists, and in a few cases those of British scientists, too. What is described in this book, however, is more than an esoteric scientific dispute kept within laboratory walls; it is a story about the nature of science in relation to society that continues into the present day. This controversy was, and is, about the health effects of low-level ionising radiation. There is still, after all these years, intense debate about the health effects of low-level ionising radiation to which from time to time most Australians are exposed through the dental and medical industry

  14. Mental retardation occurring in embryo exposed in utero to the atomic bomb (Hiroshima). After 30 years follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, H; Shimasaki, A; Fujiwara, K [Saijo Mental Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Harada, M; Minami, R

    1978-11-01

    This paper deals with a long term follow-up study on psychological symptoms in four patients with microscopically microcephaly induced by prenatal exposed to atomic bomb. They were exposed to atomic bomb at 8- and 12-week-embryos. The distance from the center of the explosion was 780 - 1180 m. All their mothers had acute radiation hazards. Their growths in the uterus were markedly damaged. Postnatal body weight ranged between 1,300 and 2,000 g. They were commonly characterized by microcephaly, physiological and mental retardation, stigmata of degeneracy, and skin symptoms, who were diagnosed as ''microcephaly induced by early prenatal exposure to atomic bomb'' by the research group for microcephaly in the Ministry of Health and Welfare. These common symptoms such as microcephaly, stigmata of degeneracy, and disturbed growth, but neurological symptoms such as motor aphasia were slighter in these patients than in those having congenital Minamata disease prenatal. These results suggested that the prognosis of these patients in whom 30 years have passed is unexpectedly serious.

  15. Reassessment of the atomic bomb radiation dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dosimetry system 2002. DS02. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert W.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The extensive efforts to review the dosimetry of the atomic-bomb survivors and formulate the new dosimetry system DS02 have been greatly welcomed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). This accomplishment is a fine tribute to the importance of the epidemiological studies being conducted at RERF. No other study is so informative of the effects of radiation on human health. The gracious participation in the RERF program by the atomic-bomb survivors allows us to contribute to the well being of these individuals, and the high quality of the data obtained allows the RERF results to feature so prominently in the formulation of international guidelines for radiation protection. Such a great effort to improve and substantiate the dosimetry would not otherwise have been justified. RERF greatly appreciates the independent work of the U.S. and Japanese Working Groups on the atomic-bomb dosimetry and the review by the Joint Senior Review Group of this overall effort. We are assured that unbiased development of the new dosimetry system will reflect well in its application in the RERF epidemiology study. The documentation included in this report will serve as reference for the many deliberations concluded. The title publications are divided into 2 volumes. This is the first volume. The 8 of the reports in each chapter are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Reassessment of the atomic bomb radiation dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dosimetry system 2002. DS02. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert W.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The extensive efforts to review the dosimetry of the atomic-bomb survivors and formulate the new dosimetry system DS02 have been greatly welcomed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). This accomplishment is a fine tribute to the importance of the epidemiological studies being conducted at RERF. No other study is so informative of the effects of radiation on human health. The gracious participation in the RERF program by the atomic-bomb survivors allows us to contribute to the well being of these individuals, and the high quality of the data obtained allows the RERF results to feature so prominently in the formulation of international guidelines for radiation protection. Such a great effort to improve and substantiate the dosimetry would not otherwise have been justified. RERF greatly appreciates the independent work of the U.S. and Japanese Working Groups on the atomic-bomb dosimetry and the review by the Joint Senior Review Group of this overall effort. We are assured that unbiased development of the new dosimetry system will reflect well in its application in the RERF epidemiology study. The documentation included in this report will serve as reference for the many deliberations concluded. The title publications are divided into 2 volumes. This is the second volume. The 29 of the reports in each chapter are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. Statistical aspects of the program of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, G W

    1961-02-24

    The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) is a medical research institute in Hiroshima and Nagasaki devoted to long term study of the late effects of nuclear radiation upon man. The work draws its great interest from the paucity of existing information on the effect of radiation on man; from the unique radiation experience of the atomic bomb survivors; from the increasing utilization of nuclear energy in modern technology; and from humanitarian concern for the survivors of the bombs. The ABCC program provides the statistician with an important opportunity to apply the tools and concepts of statistics, for the inferences to be drawn are largely statistical inferences growing out of the comparison of samples defined as to radiation exposure. The work is of international as well as statistical interest by virtue of its subject matter and as a meeting-ground for statisticians trained in different countries.

  18. Noncancer mortality based on the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb survivors registry over 30 years, 1968-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, Keiko

    2002-01-01

    The relation of radiation exposure with noncancer mortality was examined on 44,514 atomic bomb survivors (17,935 males, 26,579 females, and mean age 22.8±15.7 yrs at the time of bombing) registered at Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, based on mortality follow-up over 30 years, 1968-1997. Noncancer mortality was significantly related to radiation dose with relative risk of 1.06 at 1 Sv radiation dose, although weaker than the dose response in solid cancer mortality. The significant dose responses were observed especially in circulatory disease, stroke and urinary organ disease, and suggestive dose response in pneumonia. The temporal pattern in dose response by age at the time of bombing indicated that the relative risk of noncancer mortality was higher with follow-up period, which is contrary to a decreasing dose response in solid cancer mortality with follow-up period. The tendency was remarkable in those survivors younger at the time of bombing. These findings suggest that the significant radiation risk observed in noncancer mortality might increase as the proportion of younger survivors among atomic bomb survivors increases. (author)

  19. Harry Truman and the Atomic Bomb: An Excursion into Character Education through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Tony R.

    2006-01-01

    This article asserts the importance of character education through the utilization of historical storytelling in the social studies classroom. After briefly noting the value of the historical story in this regard, a specific, ready-made example is provided concerning Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb and includes a crucial set of follow-up…

  20. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: The development of the first Soviet atomic bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, German A.; Ryabev, Lev D.

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1930s and early 1940s, two remarkable physical phenomena — the fission of heavy nuclei and the chain fission reaction — were discovered, implying that a new powerful source of energy (nuclear fission energy) might become a practical possibility for mankind. At that time, however, the political situation in the world made the development of the atomic bomb the main objective of nuclear energy research in the countries involved. The first atomic bombs, notoriously used in the war against Japan, were produced by the United States of America only six and a half years after the discovery of fission. Four years later, the first Soviet atomic bomb was tested. This was a major step toward the establishment of nuclear parity which led to stability and global peace and thus greatly influenced the destiny of human kind. Based on documentary materials covering the period from 1939 to 1949, this paper traces the origin and evolution of the physical ideas behind the first Soviet atomic bomb and discusses the most important events associated with the project.

  1. The significance of chromosome deletions in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Shigeta, Chiharu; Oguma, Nobuo; Kamada, Nanao; Deng, Z.; Niimi, Masanobu; Aisaka, Tadaichi.

    1986-01-01

    In 39 A-bomb survivors 40 years after exposure at ≤ 1,000 m from ground zero, the frequency and features of chromosome deletions in peripheral lymphocytes were examined using a differential staining technique. Simultaneously, in vitro irradiation experiment with Cf-252 was made to infer chromosome aberrations occuring immediately after exposure. Californium-252 with 100 rad induced dicentric and ring chromosomes in 40 % of the cells and acentric fragments in 44 %. Among the A-bomb survivors, chromosome aberrations were observed in 651 (21 %) of the total 3,136 cells. There were 146 cells with deletions (22 % of abnormal cells; 5 % of the total cells), and 10 cells with acentric fragment (0.3 % of the total cells). The figure for deletions was far higher than that reported in the literature. A large number of deletions were seen in chromosomes no.4, no.21, and no.22, and a few deletions in chromosomes no.7 and no.20. Significance of chromosome deletions is discussed. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Adult health study report 7. noncancer disease incidence in the atomic-bomb survivors, 1958-86 (examination cycles 1-14)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong F, Lennie; Yamada, Michiko; Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Akiba, Suminori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Hosoda, Yutaka.

    1993-08-01

    Using the longitudinal data of the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort collected during 1958-86, we examined for the first time the relationship between exposure to ionizing radiation and the incidence of 19 selected nonmalignant disorders. Diagnoses of the diseases were based on general laboratory tests, physical examinations, and histories taken during the biennial AHS examinations. The outcomes were encoded as three-digit International Classification of Diseases codes in the AHS data base, which served as the basis for case ascertainment. Statistically significant excess risk was detected for myoma uteri, chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, and thyroid disease, defined broadly as the presence of one or more of certain noncancerous thyroid conditions. The finding for myoma uteri might be additional evidence indicating that benign tumor growths are possible effects of radiation exposure. An age-at-exposure effect was detected in nonmalignant thyroid disease, with increased risk for those exposed at ages ≤ 20 yr, but not for older persons. Thus, the AHS data also suggest that the thyroid gland in young persons is more radiosensitive not only to the development of thyroid malignancies, as shown in the most recent LSS report on cancer incidence, but also possibly to the development of nonmalignant disorders. Our findings hold independent of the dose effects observed for thyroid malignancies. No significant dose-response relationships were detected in any of our cardiovascular disease endpoints. Our analysis also suggests that new occurrences of lens opacity during 1958-86 are not increased with radiation dose among the AHS participants. Our results emphasize the utility and importance of the AHS in searching for the effects of acute exposure to ionizing radiation in noncancer diseases. (J.P.N.)

  3. Statistical observation on autopsy cases of malignancy at the Japanese Red Cross, Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, O; Toyoda, S; Tsuno, S; Mukai, H; Uemura, S [Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan)

    1976-09-01

    Statistical observation was made as to autopsy cases of atomic-bomb survivors in Nagasaki. The total of autopsy cases at the Japanese Red Cross, Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital from the opening of the hospital, 1968, to December in 1975 was 1,486 cases (autopsy rate, 65.1%) in which 880 cases of atomic bomb survivors (autopsy rate, 68.0%) were contained. Cases of malignancy totaled 829 and 528 cases of those were atomic bomb survivors. Cases of malignancy were divided into three groups, that is, group exposured to atomic bomb at place within 2 km from the explosion place, group exposured at place from more than 2 km or entering after explosion into the city, and not-exposured group. Relationship between main malignancies and exposure was discussed, and the following results were obtained. 1) Obvious relationship was found to exist between exposure and acute and chronic medullary leukemia. 2) Malignant lymphoma was scarcely correlated with exposure, but its occurrence rate was higher than the mean rate in Japan in reflection the region where this disease occurs much geographically. 3) Relationship between exposure and stomach cancer, lung cancer, cancer of the large intestine, and double cancer was not found obviously, but occurrence rate of hepatic cancer was higher than the mean rate in Japan in three groups. The reason was supposed to be geographical factor. 4) Cases of thyroid gland cancer were a small number in female of the group exposured within 2 km, and cases of prostate cancer were a small number in the group within 2 km, but their occurrence rate was high specifically.

  4. Statistical observation on autopsy cases of malignancy at the Japanese Red Cross, Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Osamu; Toyoda, Shigeki; Tsuno, Sumio; Mukai, Hideaki; Uemura, Seiji

    1976-01-01

    Statistical observation was made as to autopsy cases of atomic-bomb survivors in Nagasaki. The total of autopsy cases at the Japanese Red Cross, Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital from the opening of the hospital, 1968, to December in 1975 was 1,486 cases (autopsy rate, 65.1%) in which 880 cases of atomic bomb survivors (autopsy rate, 68.0%) were contained. Cases of malignancy totaled 829 and 528 cases of those were atomic bomb survivors. Cases of malignancy were divided into three groups, that is, group exposured to atomic bomb at place within 2 km from the explosion place, group exposured at place from more than 2 km or entering after explosion into the city, and not-exposured group. Relationship between main malignancies and exposure was discussed, and the following results were obtained. 1) Obvious relationship was found to exist between exposure and acute and chronic medullary leukemia. 2) Malignant lymphoma was scarecely correlated with exposure, but its occurrence rate was higher than the mean rate in Japan in reflection the region where this disease occurs much geographically. 3) Relationship between exposure and stomach cancer, lung cancer, cancer of the large intestine, and double cancer was not found obviously, but occurrence rate of hepatic cancer was higher than the mean rate in Japan in three groups. The reason was supposed to be geographical factor. 4) Cases of thyroid gland cancer were a small number in female of the group exposured within 2 km, and cases of prostate cancer were a small number in the group within 2 km, but their occurrence rate was high specifically. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Relationship of stature to gamma and neutron exposure among atomic bomb survivors aged less than 10 at the time of the bomb, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Amano, Takako; Kawamoto, Sadahisa.

    1982-10-01

    A reanalysis has been undertaken of the relationship of attained adult height of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors aged less than 10 at the time of the bomb (ATB) to radiation dose based upon new dosimetry data. The present analysis aims to examine the relationship of stature to radiation dose in terms of gamma rays and neutrons, separately. The 628 individuals were selected from Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors, aged less than 10 ATB, whose doses were available, and whose statures were recorded at the Adult Health Study (AHS) biennial health examination during 1970-72. To ascertain the relationship of attained adult stature to gamma and neutron doses three doseresponse models were applied to the data. The analysis revealed that the attained height is a separate function of exposure to gamma rays and neutrons. The model assuming a squared term dependence on gamma rays and a linear dependence on neutrons provides a better explanation of the data. The regression coefficient associated with the squared gamma dose is -0.00000927 and the coefficient associated with neutron dose is -0.0172. The relative biological effectiveness of neutrons in relation to gamma radiation with respect to the effect for diminished development of stature is estimated as 43.1 / √Dn in kerma (Dn=neutron dose). The 95% confidence limits are 19.3 / √Dn--96.5 / √Dn. (author)

  6. Survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Yamada, H.; Marks, S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the United States. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutron-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter

  7. Lessons from the atomic bomb about secondary MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Tomoko; Imanishi, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) is a hematological neoplasm defined by ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplasia of hematopoietic cells, and risk of progression to acute leukemia. MDS occurs as de novo or secondary, and chemoradiotherapy for cancers is thought to increase the risk of MDS among patients. Recently, an epidemiological study for MDS among A-bomb survivors was performed, and it clearly demonstrated that the exposure to external radiation significantly increased the risk of MDS. Precise epidemiological data among survivors have revealed important clinical factors related to the risk of leukemias. In this review, by comparing data for secondary MDS and leukemia/MDS among survivors, several factors which would affect the risk of MDS, especially secondary MDS, are discussed.

  8. Neoplasms among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima City. First report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Tomin; Ishida, Morihiro

    1960-04-01

    The 1957-1958 incidence of neoplasms among the survivors of the Hiroshima A-bomb, varies directly with radiation dose insofar as it may be inferred from distance from the hypocenter at exposure. The incidence of all malignant neoplasms among the survivors who were within 1000 meters is more than 4 times that of the non-exposed population. The incidence of benign neoplasms among the survivors exposed within 1500 meters is also significantly higher than that among the non-exposed. For survivors under 1500 meters significant differences are seen between the numbers of observed cancers of the lung, stomach, uterus and ovary and the expected cases calculated from the age-specific rates of the non-exposed portion of the Hiroshima population. The increased incidence among survivors within 1500 meters is not related to sex or age. 18 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

  9. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors, 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masafumi; Matsumoto, Yasuko; Mito, Kazuyo; Kumazawa, Toshihiko; Ito, Chikako.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of the results of gastric mass survey performed during a 3-year period from 1982 through 1984. Included in this survey were 16,781 A-bomb survivors. The subjects were divided into three groups: a group exposed at ≤ 2,000 m from ground zero (Group 1), a group exposed at > 2,000 m from ground zero (Group 2), and a group consisting of those who entered the city after the bombing or others (Group 3). Regarding the rate for necessity of detailed examinations, there was no difference among the groups. The incidence of abnormal findings was 6.1 % in Group 1, 5.4 % in Group 2, and 4.9 % in Group 3, showing significant difference between Groups 1 and 3. Similarly, the incidence of respective disease was significantly higher in Group 1 than Group 3: gastritis was the most common (2.7 % vs 2.0 %), followed by gastric polyp (0.9 % vs 0.5 %) and gastric cancer (0.6 % vs 0.2 %). The age-adjusted incidence of gastric cancer and polyp was high, irrespective of sex, in Group 1. This was significant for gastric cancer in women and for gastric polyp in men. The incidence of gastric cancer in any age class was higher in Group 1 than Group 3. The incidence of gastric polyp tended to increase with aging in Group 1, being higher particularly for survivors over the age of 50 than those in Groups 2 and 3. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Capillary microscopic observation on the superficial minute vessels of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima, 1972--1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuya, A.; Wakano, Y.; Otake, M.; Dock, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic and photographic studies were conducted in 1972 to 1973 at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in Hiroshima on the morphology of superficial blood vessels of A-bomb survivors to determine whether the somatic effects of radiation still existed 30 yr after the A-bomb. Control curves representing the relationship between age and score values assigned to morphological changes of the minute blood vessels of the fingernail fold, labial mucosa, and lingual mucosa, which could be regarded as an index of aging, were obtained. These were compared with similar curves obtained from A-bomb survivors with the aim of evaluating the effect of radiation on the aging process of these vessels. The late somatic effects of irradiation which were demonstrated 10 yr after the A-bomb in a previous study (1956 to 1957) were found to persist in the current study (1972 to 1973) conducted 30 yr after the A-bomb, though not as pronounced as in the earlier study. A significant effect was observed only in the nail fold of those exposed to 100 rad or more under the age of 10 at the time of bomb (ATB). A statistically significant difference was not observed with labial and lingual mucosae because the number of cases available for score evaluation was small, but a trend was observed for abnormalities of these two sites to be higher in frequency in the group exposed to 100 rad or more under the age of 10 ATB than that of the control group. No significant difference was observed between the control and exposed with regard to radiation effect on the aging process using the relationship of score values to age as an index of aging

  11. The incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 1955 - 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Mine, Mariko; Hori, Makoto; Yoshida, Hikotaro; Ichimaru, Michito; Honda, Takeo; Yoshida, Katsuro; Fujiwara, Naoko; Sadamori, Michiko.

    1988-01-01

    Of 20,348 persons included in the extended Life Span Study in Nagasaki, 59 persons were registered as having skin tumors during the years 1955 - 1984. Included in this study were 40 patients with histologically proven skin cancer. Thirty five patients were considered to be exposed to ≥ one cGy. There was statistically significant correlation between the incidence of skin cancer and exposure doses in both men and women (p < 0.01). Overall, the incidence of skin cancer was significantly correlated as well with the distance from the hypocenter; however, this was not significant when restricted to either men or women. Because the incidence of skin cancer has definitively increased since 1955 among A-bomb survivors, follow-up of A-bomb survivors is warranted with respect to atomic bomb-related skin cancer. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Leukaemia following childhood radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in medically exposed groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Incidence and mortality risks of radiation-associated leukaemia are surveyed in the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors exposed in early childhood and in utero. Leukaemia incidence and mortality risks are also surveyed in 16 other studies of persons who received appreciable doses of ionizing radiation in the course of treatment in childhood and for whom there is adequate dosimetry and cancer incidence or mortality follow-up. Relative risks tend to be lower in the medical series than in the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The relative risks in the medical studies tend to diminish with increasing average therapy dose. After taking account of cell sterilisation and dose fractionation, the apparent differences between the relative risks for leukaemia in the Japanese A-bomb survivors and in the medical series largely disappear. This suggests that cell sterilisation largely accounts for the discrepancy between the relative risks in the Japanese data and the medical studies. Excess absolute risk has also been assessed in four studies, and there is found to be more variability in this measure than in excess relative risk. In particular, there is a substantial difference between the absolute risk in the Japanese atomic bomb survivor data and those in three other (European) populations. In summary, the relative risks of leukaemia in studies of persons exposed to appreciable doses of ionizing radiation in the course of treatment for a variety of malignant and non-malignant conditions in childhood are generally less than those in the Japanese A-bomb survivor data. The effects of cell sterilisation can largely explain the discrepancy between the Japanese and the medical series. (authors)

  13. Incidence of leukemia in survivors of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folley, J H; Borges, W; Yamawaki, Takuso

    1959-01-01

    This document contains two reports. The aim of the first investigation was to obtain information concerning all individuals in Hiroshima and Nagasaki having onset of symptoms of leukemia or dying of the disease since the atomic explosion in 1945. Results show that: (1) There is a significant increase in the incidence of leukemia in the exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as compared with the non-exposed populations of the two cities; (2) there is a significant increase in the incidence of leukemia within the exposed population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in subjects exposed at distances less than 2000 meters from the hypocenter; and (3) The concept that radiation from the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is a leukemogenic agent in man is supported. In the second report, 10 patients were used to study the early hematologic and preclinical phases of leukemia in atomic bomb survivors. Findings are presented. 23 references, 13 figures, 15 tables.

  14. Hepatocellular carcinoma risk in relation to atomic-bomb radiation and hepatitis virus infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, S.; Cologne, J.B.; Hattori, N.; Suzuki, G.

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, most cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are related to chronic hepatitis C (HCV) or B (HBV) virus infections. Increased liver cancer risk among atomic-bomb survivors has been reported based on mortality studies or tumor registries, but virus infection status-particularly B, which is associated with radiation dose-was not taken account. The objectives of this study were to determine HCC risk in relation to radiation exposure, after adjusting for virus infection in a cohort follow-up study. The study subjects were 6,121 Adult Health Study participants who received tests for hepatitis C and B virus antigen or antibody in 1993-5. A total of 58 HCC cases were newly diagnosed during 1993-2002. As of August 2002, 8% of individuals positive for HCV antibody subsequently developed HCC, compared with less than 1% of individuals who were negative for HCV antibody. Cox regression analysis revealed that the incidence of HCC was 27 times higher among HCV antibody positive individuals and 7 times higher among HBV surface antigen positive individuals. Men had 1.6 times higher risk than women. The risk of HCC increased with age at exam overall but declined with age at exam among the HCV-infected persons. Risk of HCC was 1.3 times higher on average among individuals exposed to radiation, but persons who were younger at the time of bombing had a higher risk of HCC for radiation. There was no evidence of interaction between HCV and radiation exposure. In conclusion, hepatocellular carcinoma risk increased with radiation exposure among persons exposed at young ages, even after adjusting for hepatitis virus infection. There was no evidence of synergy between radiation and HCV infection in this late follow-up. Further study including earlier diagnosed cases is needed to clarify this issue

  15. Subclinical hyperthyroidism (Sh) in atomic-bomb survivors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizawa, K.; Imaizumi, M.; Usa, T.; Tominaga, T.; Hida, A.; Ejima, E.; Neriishi, K.; Soda, M.; Fujiwara, S.; Maeda, R.; Akahoshi, M.; Nagataki, S.; Eguchi, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Purpose/Background Subclinical hyperthyroidism (Sh) is defined as a biochemical abnormality characterized by a subnormal level of TSH with otherwise normal thyroid tests (F T 3 , F T 4 ) and no clinical symptoms. There are only a small number of cross-sectional studies on the prevalence of Sh. With the improvement of the sensitivity of TSH assay, it has become possible to survey the clinical significance of Sh. With regard to both Sh and subclinical hypothyroidism, discussions are being focused on such as the necessity of treatment. In order to elucidate the clinical significance of Sh, examination data of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were analyzed. Subjects and Method Between 2000 and 2003, of 4,090 A-bomb survivors (1,352 males and 2,738 females with average age of 70.7), 75 individuals (1.83%) with Sh were found who had normal Free T 4 (0.71∼1.51 ng/dL) and TSH<0.45 m U/L. Analysis was limited to those who had not taken antithyroid drugs or thyroxin, and the Sh group (n=35; 9 males and 26 females) was compared with a control group with TSH:0.45∼4.5 m U/L (Group C; N=3,243; 1,109 males and 2,134 females). Result: Nine individuals had TSH<0.1 m U/L. In the Sh group, six individuals were TPO antibody-positive (17%) and 14 were TG antibody-positive (40%); hence, TG antibody-positive was significantly greater in number (p=0.0096). Hematological biochemical tests showed no significant difference between the two groups. Electrocardiograms indicated that more individuals had atrial fibrillation [p=0.028; Odds ratio (OR)=3.98; 95% Confidential interval (CI)=1.2-13.7] or ventricular premature contraction [p=0.016; OR=3.29; 95% CI=1.3-8.6] in the Sh group. In terms of the presence or absence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperuricemia, there was no difference between the two groups. One individual from the Sh group was confirmed to have Graves' disease two years later. Conclusion: Since more individuals in the Sh group were

  16. Subclinical hyperthyroidism (Sh) in atomic-bomb survivors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashizawa, K; Imaizumi, M; Usa, T; Tominaga, T; Hida, A; Ejima, E; Neriishi, K; Soda, M; Fujiwara, S; Maeda, R; Akahoshi, M; Nagataki, S; Eguchi, K [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan). Nagasaki Branch

    2005-07-01

    Full text: Purpose/Background Subclinical hyperthyroidism (Sh) is defined as a biochemical abnormality characterized by a subnormal level of TSH with otherwise normal thyroid tests (F T{sub 3}, F T{sub 4}) and no clinical symptoms. There are only a small number of cross-sectional studies on the prevalence of Sh. With the improvement of the sensitivity of TSH assay, it has become possible to survey the clinical significance of Sh. With regard to both Sh and subclinical hypothyroidism, discussions are being focused on such as the necessity of treatment. In order to elucidate the clinical significance of Sh, examination data of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were analyzed. Subjects and Method Between 2000 and 2003, of 4,090 A-bomb survivors (1,352 males and 2,738 females with average age of 70.7), 75 individuals (1.83%) with Sh were found who had normal Free T{sub 4} (0.71{approx}1.51 ng/dL) and TSH<0.45 m U/L. Analysis was limited to those who had not taken antithyroid drugs or thyroxin, and the Sh group (n=35; 9 males and 26 females) was compared with a control group with TSH:0.45{approx}4.5 m U/L (Group C; N=3,243; 1,109 males and 2,134 females). Result: Nine individuals had TSH<0.1 m U/L. In the Sh group, six individuals were TPO antibody-positive (17%) and 14 were TG antibody-positive (40%); hence, TG antibody-positive was significantly greater in number (p=0.0096). Hematological biochemical tests showed no significant difference between the two groups. Electrocardiograms indicated that more individuals had atrial fibrillation [p=0.028; Odds ratio (OR)=3.98; 95% Confidential interval (CI)=1.2-13.7] or ventricular premature contraction [p=0.016; OR=3.29; 95% CI=1.3-8.6] in the Sh group. In terms of the presence or absence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperuricemia, there was no difference between the two groups. One individual from the Sh group was confirmed to have Graves' disease two years later. Conclusion: Since more individuals in

  17. Association of radiation dose with prevalence of thyroid nodules among atomic bomb survivors exposed in childhood (2007-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Misa; Ohishi, Waka; Nakashima, Eiji; Sera, Nobuko; Neriishi, Kazuo; Yamada, Michiko; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Fujiwara, Saeko; Sugino, Keizo; Ando, Takao; Usa, Toshiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Hida, Ayumi

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have evaluated the association of radiation dose with thyroid nodules among adults exposed to radiation in childhood. To evaluate radiation dose responses on the prevalence of thyroid nodules in atomic bomb survivors exposed in childhood. This survey study investigated 3087 Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors who were younger than 10 years at exposure and participated in the thyroid study of the Adult Health Study at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Thyroid examinations including thyroid ultrasonography were conducted between October 2007 and October 2011, and solid nodules underwent fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Data from 2668 participants (86.4% of the total participants; mean age, 68.2 years; 1213 men; and 1455 women) with known atomic bomb thyroid radiation doses (mean dose, 0.182 Gy; median dose, 0.018 Gy; dose range, 0-4.040 Gy) were analyzed. The prevalence of all thyroid nodules having a diameter of 10 mm or more (consisting of solid nodules [malignant and benign] and cysts), prevalence of small thyroid nodules that were less than 10 mm in diameter detected by ultrasonography, and atomic bomb radiation dose-responses. Thyroid nodules with a diameter of 10 mm or more were identified in 470 participants (17.6%): solid nodules (427 cases [16.0%]), malignant tumors (47 cases [1.8%]), benign nodules (186 cases [7.0%]), and cysts (49 cases [1.8%]), and all were significantly associated with thyroid radiation dose. Excess odds ratios per gray unit were 1.65 (95% CI, 0.89-2.64) for all nodules, 1.72 (95% CI, 0.93-2.75) for solid nodules, 4.40 (95% CI, 1.75-9.97) for malignant tumors, 2.07 (95% CI, 1.16-3.39) for benign nodules, and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.15-3.12) for cysts. The interaction between age at exposure and the dose was significant for the prevalence of all nodules (P = .003) and solid nodules (P bomb survivors 62 to 66 years after their exposure in childhood. However, radiation exposure is not associated with small thyroid

  18. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors, 6. Gastric mass survey in atomic bomb survivors (1982 - 1984)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masafumi; Matsumoto, Yasuko; Mito, Kazuyo; Kumazawa, Toshihiko; Ito, Chikako

    1986-11-01

    This is a report of the results of gastric mass survey performed during a 3-year period from 1982 through 1984. Included in this survey were 16,781 A-bomb survivors. The subjects were divided into three groups: a group exposed at less than or equal to 2,000 m from ground zero (Group 1), a group exposed at > 2,000 m from ground zero (Group 2), and a group consisting of those who entered the city after the bombing or others (Group 3). Regarding the rate for necessity of detailed examinations, there was no difference among the groups. The incidence of abnormal findings was 6.1% in Group 1, 5.4% in Group 2, and 4.9% in Group 3, showing significant difference between Groups 1 and 3. Similarly, the incidence of respective disease was significantly higher in Group 1 than Group 3: gastritis was the most common (2.7% vs 2.0%), followed by gastric polyp (0.9% vs 0.5%) and gastric cancer (0.6% vs 0.2%). The age-adjusted incidence of gastric cancer and polyp was high, irrespective of sex, in Group 1. This was significant for gastric cancer in women and for gastric polyp in men. The incidence of gastric cancer in any age class was higher in Group 1 than Group 3. The incidence of gastric polyp tended to increase with aging in Group 1, being higher particularly for survivors over the age of 50 than those in Groups 2 and 3. (Namekawa, K.).

  19. Cancer and non-cancer effects in Japanese atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M P

    2009-01-01

    The survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are a general population of all ages and sexes and, because of the wide and well characterised range of doses received, have been used by many scientific committees (International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR)) as the basis of population cancer risk estimates following radiation exposure. Leukaemia was the first cancer to be associated with atomic bomb radiation exposure, with preliminary indications of an excess among the survivors within the first five years after the bombings. An excess of solid cancers became apparent approximately ten years after radiation exposure. With increasing follow-up, excess risks of most cancer types have been observed, the major exceptions being chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and pancreatic, prostate and uterine cancer. For most solid cancer sites a linear dose response is observed, although in the latest follow-up of the mortality data there is evidence (p = 0.10) for an upward curvature in the dose response for all solid cancers. The only cancer sites which exhibit (upward) curvature in the dose response are leukaemia, and non-melanoma skin and bone cancer. For leukaemia the dose response is very markedly upward curving, indeed largely describable as a pure quadratic dose response, particularly in the low dose (0-2 Sv) range. Even 55 years after the bombings over 40% of the Life Span Study cohort remain alive, so continued follow-up of this group is vital for completing our understanding of long-term radiation effects in people. In general, the relative risks per unit dose among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors are greater than those among comparable subsets in studies of medically exposed individuals. Cell sterilisation largely accounts for the discrepancy in relative risks between these two populations, although other

  20. Colorectal cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Tsutomu

    1992-01-01

    Colorectal cancer incidence in the Life Span Study (LSS) sample during 1950-80 was investigated. A total of 730 incidence cases of colorectal cancer were confirmed from a variety of sources. Sixty-two percent of the cancers were microscopically verified and 12% were ascertained through death certificate only. The risk of colon cancer increased significantly with intestinal dose, but no definite increase of risk was observed for rectal cancer. Relative risk at 1 Sv and excess risk per 10 4 PY-Sv for colon cancer are 1.80 (90% confidence interval 1.37-2.36) and 0.36 (90% confidence interval 0.06-0.77) respectively. City and sex did not significantly modify the dose-response of colon cancer, but the risk decreased with age at the time of bombings (ATB). The relative risk of colon cancer does not vary substantially over time following exposure. A non-linear dose response did not significantly improve the fit. Further, the anatomic location of the tumors indicate that the cecum and ascending, transverse and descending, and sigmoid colon seem equally sensitive to radiation. No difference in the distribution of tumor histological types could be observed by radiation dose. (author)

  1. Colorectal cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirofumi Nakatsuka; Yukiko Shimizu; Tsutomu Yamamoto; Ichiro Sekine; Haruo Ezaki; Eiichi Tahara; Makoto Takahashi; Takatoshi Shimoyama; Nobuo Mochinaga; Masao Tomita; Ryoichi Tsuchiya; Land, Charles E.

    1992-10-01

    Colerectal cancer incidence in the LSS sample during 1950-80 was investigated. A total of 730 incidence cases of colorectal cancer were confirmed from a variety of sources. Sixty-two percent of the cancers were microscopically verified and 12% were ascertained through death certificate only. The risk of colon cancer increased significantly with intestinal dose, but no definite increase of risk was observed for rectal cancer. Relative risk at 1 Sv and excess risk per 10 4 PY-Sv for colon cancer are 1.80 (90% confidence internal 1.37-2.36) and 0.36 (90% confidence interval 0.06-0.77) respectively. City and sex did not significantly modify the dos-response of colon cancer, but the risk decreased with age at the time of bombings (ATB). The relative risk of colon cancer does not vary substantially over time following exposure. A non-linear dose response did not significantly improve the fit. Further, the anatomic location of the tumors indicate that the cecum and ascending, transverse and descending, and sigmoid colon seem equally sensitive to radiation. No difference in the distribution of tumor histological types could be observed by radiation dose. (author)

  2. Evaluation of gynecological tumors in the atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Hisao

    1960-07-15

    During a series of routine examinations at ABCC, 1785 exposed women (under 2000 meters from the bomb hypocenter and with major acute radiation symptoms) and 1802 control subjects received physical examinations. Of this group, less than 50% of the married patients accepted pelvic examination as part of the routine physical examination, so that 838 exposed women and 603 controls were examined. Carcinoma of the cervix was the most common neoplasm encountered. Biopsy or autopsy tissue confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained in 9 exposed and in 2 control subjects. When cases, clinically evident but unconfirmed by tissue were added, the total was increased to 11 cases in the exposed and 7 cases in the control. Since fewer control cases accepted pelvic examination, the incidence does not appear increased in the exposed group. (The age of onset of cervical carcinoma was not significantly different between control and radiation-exposed patients.) Only scattered pelvic neoplasms of other types were encountered, but one patient with ovarian thecoma, a tumor reported to be radiation-induced in animals, was seen in the exposed group. These findings from a survey examination emphasize the importance of routine pelvic examination in the detection of major disease, particularly carcinoma of the cervix. Cytologic studies and frequent use of biopsy would be of further value in the detection of this important disease. 8 references, 10 table.

  3. Results of lung cancer screening in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masayo; Kato, Hironari; Inoue, Noriko; Naito, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Kira, Sakurako; Sasaki, Hideo; Ishida, Hajime; Maeda, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    Risk of lung cancer in A-bomb survivors is reportedly increased. The screening in the title has been conducted since 1988 and this report summarizes its results of the latest 6-year term (2004-2009). The total number of subjects who visited authors' facility for the screening in the period was 39,147 men (average age 70.6 y) and 45,351 women (71.8 y), of the age range of 60-89 y. The screening results of the cancer were examined concerning with sex, age and exposure situation. As well, the relationship between the found cancer incidence and exposure in never, formerly and currently smoking subjects were also examined. Exposure situation was divided in 3 groups of the exposure by entrance in the city/by other reasons, within 2 km close (Close, C) to, and out of 2.1 km afar (Distant, D) from, the city. Statistic analysis was performed by Chi-squire and/or Fisher's exact test. The index of positive finding in the screening of the lung cancer per 1,000 subjects was the highest in C men of ages 70s, 2.88 subjects, which was statistically significant from 0.85 in D men of the same generation. In current smokers, the index 5.40 in C men of ages 70s was significantly higher than 0.90 in D men of the same generation. Overall, positive results tended to be high in survivors of C regardless to sex and smoking, and was significantly high in current smokers of C as above, both implying the particular necessity of promotion to stop smoking in survivors. (T.T.)

  4. Investigation of stomach diseases in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Naito, Yasuo; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1977-01-01

    Indirect gastroroentgenegraphy was performed in 14890 of the survivors, in whom stool examination was positive for occult blood at time of general examinations during 3 years and 11 months from November 1971 to September 1975. The results were as follows. The rate of the survivors to whom precise examination was required was 20.8% in male, 14.0% in female and 16.7% in total at all ages. The rate was higher in male than in female. Precise examination was carried out in 80.1% in male and 83.1% in female, showing higher percentage in female. The rate of the survivors with abnormal findings was higher in male and aged people in both sexes. The rate was also higher in the direct exposed group at more than 2.1 km from hypocenter, settlers into the city after A-bomb explosion and other groups than in the direct exposed group within 2.0 km. The findings of 2024 precise examinations revealed that gastric ulcer was more frequently found in male than in female and in the younger people than in the aged people. Gastric polyp was more frequently seen in female than in male, and in the aged people than in the younger people. The rate of estimated gastric carcinoma was 1.02% in male and 1.19% in female in the direct exposed group within 1.0 km, showing higher percentage than that in the direct exposed group more than 2.1 km, settlers group and other groups. The ratio of male-to-female reached almost 1 in proximally exposed survivors. (Kumagaya, S.)

  5. Smoking and serum proteins in atomic-bomb survivors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stram, D.O.; Akiba, S.; Neriishi, K.; Stevens, R.G.; Hosoda, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Associations of smoking habit with serum levels of total protein as well as protein fractions were studied in a population consisting of 4,739 atomic-bomb survivors and unexposed control subjects in Hiroshima, Japan who participated in the 1979-1981 period of the Adult Health Study, an ongoing health follow-up program of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Smoking was strongly related to serum protein concentration after correction for age, sex, and body mass index. Among current smokers, levels of total protein, beta globulin, and gamma globulin were significantly lower and levels of alpha-1 and alpha-2 globulin were significantly higher, when compared with nonsmokers. For serum albumin levels a decrease was also noted, but it failed to attain statistical significance. Ex-smokers were indistinguishable from nonsmokers in terms of the serum protein levels analyzed. With an increase of the amount of daily cigarette consumption, monotonic increases of serum levels were observed only in alpha-1 globulin. Duration of smoking was related to increased alpha-1 and alpha-2 globulin. Smoking duration was also associated with albumin level, but the trend was not monotonic. The radiation exposure effect on serum protein level was significant in several instances but was in general much smaller than the smoking effect, and its inclusion in the regression models did not noticeably affect the association between smoking and serum proteins

  6. Pathological study on autopsy cases at Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital, September 1956 - March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Shigeru; Fujihara, Megumu; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi; Hamada, Tadao.

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective review was made of 2,659 autopsy patients obtained during the past 31 years and a half in Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital. Of the patients, 1,328 (49.9%) were A-bomb survivors. Five hundred and six A-bomb survivors (38.1%) had been exposed at up to 2,000 m from the hypocenter. There was no correlation between the incidence of malignancy and the presence of exposure to A-bombing. The incidence of multiple malignancy was slightly higher in A-bomb survivors exposed at the place nearer the hypocenter. In the group of A-bomb survivors, cancer of the lung was the most common for men; and cancer of the stomach was the most common for women. The incidence of malignancy has been high in the exposed group during the early eras of examination; however, this figure has recently become high in the non-exposed group. Regarding the kinds of malignancy, there was no significant difference between the exposed and non-exposed groups. The incidence of leukemia was high during the early eras, and tentatively decreased in both the exposed and non-exposed groups. It has recently increased again. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma rapidly increased during the recent eras, regardless of sex, in both groups; this was marked in women in the exposed group. Thyroid and breast cancers tentatively increased in women in the exposed group. Benign diseases were seen in 35% for the exposed group and 33% for the non-exposed group; liver diseases were most frequent in both groups. In the exposed group, the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and central nervous diseases has recently increased. (N.K.)

  7. Effects of atomic bomb radiations on human food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, F C

    1956-01-01

    The increase in energy release of atomic weapons has increased the hazard of atomic radiation to food. Products of atomic explosions are probably similar regardless of size. Of the energy released, blast energy accounts for one-half, heat flash for one-third, initial nuclear radiation for one-twentieth, and residual radiation (potential fallout) about one-tenth. Radioactive elements may enter man by inhalation, by open wounds, or by ingestion of contaminated food. Food can become contaminated by direct fallout on unprotected food or through metabolic assimilation by plants or animals. Dust-proof containers and undamaged cans provide protection from the first hazard. Cans, etc. should be washed before opening. Other food could be cleaned and used if subsequent monitoring indicated that the fallout material had been removed.

  8. Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma in the Retroperitoneum in an Atomic Bomb Survivor: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Nakamura

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old Japanese man was admitted to Kosei-Nenkin Hospital (Osaka, Japan in November 2006; his chief complaint was a 10-kg loss in body weight over 3 months prior to admission. Abdominal computed tomography (CT and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed three masses in the retroperitoneum. The patient subsequently underwent surgery. The final histopathological diagnosis of tumors 1 and 2 was malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the retroperitoneum, and tumor 3 was a well-differentiated liposarcoma. By the presence of the liposarcoma, tumor 1 and 2 were thought to be the dedifferentiated areas of liposarcomas. At the age of 16, the patient had been exposed to radiation from the atomic bomb at Hiroshima towards the end of the Second World War. We postulate that in this case, radiation from the atomic bomb may have played an important role in the development of the sarcomas.

  9. The age of the bomb: History of the atomic threat from Hiroshima through today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salewski, M.

    1995-01-01

    The booklet describes the history of the ''bomb'' from the ''Manhattan project'' to the present, tracing the drastic changes provoked by the nuclear weapons for world politics, but also for ethical thought and cultural conception of ourselves. Both the crises at the brink of nuclear war - Suez crisis, Berlin crisis, Cuba crisis - and the development of strategic doctrines, the arms race, the history of arms control, and the anti-atomic movement are dealt with in the contributions written by renowned authorities. The concluding paper on the role of nuclear weapons in a world politics that has become more intricate shows insistently that the age of the bomb is anything but over since the end of the East-West conflict. The example of North Korea or of the ''plutonium transfer deals'' from nuclear installations of the Soviet Union has recently shown that also the future will remain ''atomic''. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Study of mortality and cancer incidence among the offspring of atomic bomb survivors. 1946-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Soda, Midori.

    1996-01-01

    The mortality and cancer incidence among offspring of atomic bomb survivors whose exposure dose was estimated in DS86 (Dose System 1986) were studied as one of means to evaluate the genetic influence of atomic bomb radiation. Big malformation incidence and mortality of subjects with the malformation were also studied. Death and its cause were traced from the city register and certificate of death of 67,586 offspring born in 1946-1984. Cancer was confirmed by certificate of death until 1957 and by cancer registration after 1958. Big malformation and the mortality were traced from clinical diagnostic records at birth or at necropsy, of 9-month examination after birth and of certificate of death. Comparisons were made in general and the offspring's age-related mortalities and in mortality or cancer incidence in relation to the radiation doses the parents had been exposed to. The comparisons showed no statistically significant relationships in those examined parameters. (K.H.)

  11. A simple reductionist model for cancer risk in atom bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    1) In data from the atom bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the roughly linear-quadratic radiation dose responses for chromosome aberration and leukemia correspond closely to each other, as do the linear dose responses for gene mutation and solid cancer incidence. 2) In view of the increasing evidence for multiple oncogene and suppressor gene changes in human cancer, as well as the evidence that human cancer rate is often proportional to age to the power of 6 or so, it is postulated that the radiation has contributed one and only one oncogenic mutational event to the radiation induced cancers. 3) The radiation induced cancers should therefore display a cancer rate versus age relationship that has a power of n-1, where n is the power for the corresponding background cancers. 4) It is shown that this is precisely what is happening in the collective solid cancer incidence of the atom bomb survivors. (author)

  12. Studies on preparation of the database system for clinical records of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsuyoshi

    1981-01-01

    Construction of the database system aimed at multipurpose application of data on clinical medicine was studied through the preparation of database system for clinical records of atomic bomb survivors. The present database includes the data about 110,000 atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki City. This study detailed: (1) Analysis of errors occurring in a period from generation of data in the clinical field to input into the database, and discovery of a highly precise, effective method of input. (2) Development of a multipurpose program for uniform processing of data on physical examinations from many organizations. (3) Development of a record linkage method for voluminous files which are essential in the construction of a large-scale medical information system. (4) A database model suitable for clinical research and a method for designing a segment suitable for physical examination data. (Chiba, N.)

  13. Tentative estimations of genetic hazards for the atomic bomb radiations, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Isao; Ayaki, Toshikazu

    1978-01-01

    The degree of genetic hazards which could appear in the offspring of A-bomb survivors (after F1) was estimated on the basis of a report by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 1977. The genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on humans (insufficient data) were investigated on the basis of data obtained from animal experiments (especially mice). The incidence of chromosome aberration and gene mutation induced by radiation was estimated based on data obtained from experiments with marmosets and mice, respectively. The appearance time and frequency of chromosome aberration and dominant mutation were estimated based on the incidence of mutation induced by radiation. The effects of recessive mutation were determined by estimating the probability of such mutation in a presumed human group by means of a simulation method in which a computer was used. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Neutron and gamma ray calculation for Hiroshima-type atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Endo, Satoru; Takada, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Shoichiro; Hasai, Hiromi

    1998-03-01

    We looked at the radiation dose of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb again in 1986. We gave it the name of ``Dosimetry System 1986`` (DS86). We and other groups have measured the expose dose since 1986. Now, the difference between data of {sup 152}Eu and the calculation result on the basis of DS86 was found. To investigate the reason, we carried out the calculations of neutron transport and neutron absorption gamma ray for Hiroshima atomic bomb by MCNP3A and MCNP4A code. The problems caused by fast neutron {sup 32}P from sulfur in insulator of pole. To correct the difference, we investigated many models and found agreement of all data within 1 km. (S.Y.)

  15. Mathematical phantoms for use in reassessment of radiation doses to Japanese atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1985-07-01

    In 1972 committees of the United Nations and the US National Academy of Sciencs emphasized the need for organ dose estimates on the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. These estimates were then supplied by workers in Japan and the US, and they were used with the so-called T65D estimates of a survivor's radiation exposure to assess risk from radiation. Recently the T65D estimates have been questioned, and programs for reassessment of atomic-bomb radiation dosimetry have been started in Japan and the US. As a part of this new effort a mathematical analogue of the human body (or ''mathematical phantom''), to be used in estimating organ doses in adult survivors, is presented here. Recommendations on organ dosimetry for juvenile survivors are also presented and discussed. 57 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Original signs and symptoms in patients surviving five years after atomic bomb exposure under 1000 meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J J; Patterson, H A

    1959-01-01

    Atomic bomb victims in Hiroshima who were exposed under 1000 meters and survived over five years were reinvestigated. There were 619 patients who comprised a total sample. Mechanical, blast, burn and radiation injuries were evaluated as to onset, duration, severity, body area affected and type of healing. The modal patient experienced severe radiation and mild trauma. Results were compared with similar earlier studies. The question emerges as to the possibility that patients exposed within 1000 meters with radiation and/or thermal injuries have been dying at a faster rate than those with mechanical or no injuries. A short history of the development of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission is included. 17 references, 11 tables.

  17. Month of estimated onset of leukemia in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefzger, M D; Hoshino, Takashi; Itoga, Takashi; Yamada, Atsushi; Toyoda, Shigeki

    1963-10-03

    The monthly distribution of onset of leukemia during 1946-61 has been examined in 638 known cases among Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. Comparisons were made of sex, city, chronicity, and distance from the hypocenter. A summer excess was most prominent in the group 0-1999 m from the hypocenter, and an autumn deficiency was most consistently seen in the various subgroups. No explanation of these differences can be offered. 1 reference, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Molecular analyses of in vivo hprt mutant T cells from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, M.; Hirai, Y.; Kyoizumi, S.; Akiyama, M.

    1989-01-01

    In vivo-derived hprt-deficient mutant T cells isolated from three nonirradiated controls and two atomic bomb survivors were studied by Southern blot analysis to investigate the molecular spectra of the mutations. Mutant frequencies for the three controls were 1.8, 2.3, and 7.3 x 10(-6), and those for the two survivors (who had received radiation doses of 2.46 and 2.15 Gy, based upon the revised atomic bomb shielded kerma estimates) were 9.3 and 14.4 x 10(-6), respectively. Fourteen (13%) of 105 mutant T-cell colonies from the controls showed various structural changes in the hprt gene. The frequency of mutants with hprt gene structural changes in one atomic bomb survivor, who exhibited a mutant frequency of 9.3 x 10(-6), was 26% (16/61), which was significantly higher than that of the controls. However, the frequency of structural changes in the other survivor (14%, 8/59) was not higher than that of the controls. Two sets of mutants (in total, eight mutants) from the survivor, who showed a significantly higher frequency of mutants with hprt gross alterations than did the controls, had the same hprt changes and the same rearrangements of T-cell receptor (TcR) beta- and gamma-chain genes, indicating a clonal expansion from one progenitor mutant. This phenomenon may reflect an in vivo recovery process of T cells in the periphery after exposure to atomic bomb radiation. However, when comparing the frequency of mutations, these two sets of mutants should be reduced. After reducing the total number of mutants from the number of gross hprt changes, the frequency was not significantly higher than that of the controls

  19. Phagocytic and bactericidal activities of leukocytes in whole blood from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, S.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Toyota, E.; Neriishi, S.; Yamakido, M.; Matsuo, M.; Hosoda, Y.; Finch, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of peripheral blood leukocytes from Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors for Staphylococcus aureus. The data were analyzed by multiple linear regression for age, sex, radiation exposure, city of exposure, and neutrophil counts. No significant radiation effect was observed for either blood phagocytic or bactericidal activities. The only significant variable for these functions was the neutrophil count

  20. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, Shizuyo [Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, Tokyo (Japan); Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi [Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  1. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  2. From the Dawn of Nuclear Physics to the First Atomic Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolbright, Stephen; Schumacher, Jacob; Michonova-Alexova, Ekaterina

    2014-03-01

    This work gives a fresh look at the major discoveries leading to nuclear fission within the historical perspective. The focus is on the main contributors to the discoveries in nuclear physics, leading to the idea of fission and its application to the creation of the atomic bombs used at the end of the World War II. The present work is a more complete review on the history of the nuclear physics discoveries and their application to the atomic bomb. In addition to the traditional approach to the topic, focusing mainly on the fundamental physics discoveries in Europe and on the Manhattan Project in the United States, the nuclear research in Japan is also emphasized. Along with that, a review of the existing credible scholar publications, providing evidence for possible atomic bomb research in Japan, is provided. Proper credit is given to the women physicists, whose contributions had not always been recognized. Considering the historical and political situation at the time of the scientific discoveries, thought-provoking questions about decision-making, morality, and responsibility are also addressed. The work refers to the contributions of over 20 Nobel Prize winners. EM-A is grateful to Prof. Walter Grunden and to Prof. Emeritus Shadahiko Kano, Prof. Emeritus Monitori Hoshi for sharing their own notes, documents, and references, and to CCCU for sponsoring her participation in the 2013 Nuclear Weapons Seminar in Japan.

  3. Clinical study of mass survey for lung cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Ito, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Kamitsuna, Akimitsu; Nishimoto, Yukio; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1988-01-01

    In mass screening for lung cancer, chest roentgenography was performed in A-bomb survivors over the age of 50 years. Out of 47,960 A-bomb survivors examined during seven years from 1979 through 1986, 58 were found to have lung cancer. The prevalence of lung cancer was 120.9/100,000, which was extremely higher than previously reported. A-bomb survivors, as well as persons exposed to environmental pollution and occupational hazards, are considered to belong to the high risk group for lung cancer. Asymptomatic lung cancer was of earlier stage than symptomatic lung cancer. It was also associated with higher surgical rate and faborable prognosis. Primary screening failed to detect lung cancer in 20 %, requiring double checking by pulmonary disease specialists. The role of health care workers is stressed in view of the necessity of detailed examination and surgery for lung cancer. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of atomic bomb survivors using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kobuke, Kyoko; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Ochi, Yoshimichi; Jones, S.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the effects of exposure to atomic bomb radiation on the immune competence of man, the proportions of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (subpopulations) were determined by an indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescence microscopy. The study was based on a total of 104 Adult Health Study participants in Hiroshima, including 29 individuals exposed to 100 + rad, 46 exposed to 1 - 99 rad, and 29 0 rad controls. No change in the proportion of Leu-1 positive cells (total T cells) and Leu-2a positive cells (cytotoxic/suppressor T cells) and the ratio of Leu-3a/Leu-2a was observed with age, while Leu-3a positive cells (helper/inducer T cells) decreased with age and HLA-DR positive cells (B cells and monocytes) increased with age, with the differences occurring predominantly in the oldest age group (age > 75). The proportion of HLA-DR positive cells was higher in males, but there was no significant sex difference in the proportions of other cell types and the ratio of Leu-3a/Leu-2a. Radiation exposure did not significantly affect the proportions of Leu-1, Leu-2a, Leu-3a, and HLA-DR positive cells and the ratio of Leu-3a/Leu-2a. No interaction between the effects of age and radiation exposure was demonstrated. (author)

  5. Celluloid mushroom clouds: Hollywood and the atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans-Karastamatis, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the development of the imagery associated with atomic technology found in Hollywood film produced and distributed between 1948 and 1964. Based upon a content and thematic analysis of a sample of 90 Hollywood produced films, the research examines the construction of nuclear images, their transformation throughout the fifteen year period, and the specific socio-political context and conditions of production which helped determine their selection. From the early experimentation with the issue, in searching for a profitable way to present atomic subjects, to the development of a science fiction genre which capitalized upon the public's anxiety over uncontrollable transmutational properties of nuclear energy, Hollywood filmmakers chose to perpetuate certain images and ignore others. These films provided the audience with a specific set of representations for constructing a view of atomic technology and all that it entailed. The industry's production practices and economic structure, prevailing ideologies, political pressure, and the social and cultural context helped determine what representations reached the screen. The findings illustrate how texts of popular culture are constructed, as a result of often contradictory determinants which include economic practices, signifying practices, and more general social conflict. Film content consists of texts composed on the basis of stylized conventions and codes, drawing on familiar or latent cultural myths and images. Film content can capitalize upon popular anxieties through use of metaphor and selection of genres. Hollywood selectively incorporated residual themes within the culture to exploit the fears and anxieties of audiences, and to allow a venue for questioning the wisdom of official government agenda. These potentially oppositional sentiments were defused, and governmental criticism and pressure avoided by holding the images within the margins of cold war ideology.

  6. The quantum exodus jewish fugitives, the atomic bomb, and the holocaust

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Gordon Murray

    2012-01-01

    It was no accident that the Holocaust and the Atomic Bomb happened at the same time. When the Nazis came into power in 1933, their initial objective was not to get rid of Jews. Rather, their aim was to refine German culture: Jewish professors and teachers at fine universities were sacked. Atomic science had attracted a lot of Jewish talent, and as Albert Einstein and other quantum exiles scattered, they realized that they held the key to a weapon of unimaginable power. Convincedthat their gentile counterparts in Germany had come to the same conclusion, and having witnessed what the Nazis were

  7. Remembering the Atomic Bomb in its Birthplace, New Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Genay, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    On July 16, 1945 the « Land of Enchantment » acquired a new identity as the cradle of the nuclear age when the world’s first atomic bomb exploded in the Jornada del Muerto desert. New Mexico underwent a phenomenal transformation as a result of the arrival of atomic science in its remotest lands. The Trinity date does not hold the same place in collective memory as Hiroshima and Nagasaki but its historical significance takes various shapes on different memory scales. Therefore, this article ad...

  8. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-06

    There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

  9. Risk of death among children of atomic bomb survivors after 62 years of follow-up: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eric J; Furukawa, Kyoji; Sakata, Ritsu; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Sadakane, Atsuko; Takahashi, Ikuno; Utada, Mai; Shimizu, Yukiko; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2015-10-01

    No clear epidemiological hereditary effects of radiation exposure in human beings have been reported. However, no previous studies have investigated mortality into middle age in a population whose parents were exposed to substantial amounts of radiation before conception. We assessed mortality in children of the atomic bomb survivors after 62 years of follow-up. In this prospective cohort study, we assessed 75 327 singleton children of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and unexposed controls, born between 1946 and 1984, and followed up to Dec 31, 2009. Parental gonadal doses of radiation from the atomic bombings were the primary exposures. The primary endpoint was death due to cancer or non-cancer disease, based on death certificates. Median follow-up was 54·3 years (IQR 45·4-59·3). 5183 participants died from disease. The mean age of the 68 689 surviving children at the end of follow-up was 53·1 years (SD 7·9) with 15 623 (23%) older than age 60 years. For parents who were exposed to a non-zero gonadal dose of radiation, the mean dose was 264 mGy (SD 463). We detected no association between maternal gonadal radiation exposure and risk of death caused by cancer (hazard ratio [HR] for 1 Gy change in exposure 0·891 [95% CI 0·693-1·145]; p=0·36) or risk of death caused by non-cancer diseases (0·973 [0·849-1·115]; p=0·69). Likewise, paternal exposure had no effect on deaths caused by cancer (0·815 [0·614-1·083]; p=0·14) or deaths caused by non-cancer disease (1·103 [0·979-1·241]; p=0·12). Age or time between parental exposure and delivery had no effect on risk of death. Late effects of ionising radiation exposure include increased mortality risks, and models of the transgenerational effects of radiation exposure predict more genetic disease in the children of people exposed to radiation. However, children of people exposed to the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki had no indications of deleterious health effects after 62

  10. Statistical studies on heart disease of the pathological autopsy cases in the Atomic Bomb Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matushita, H [Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital (Japan); Hamada, T; Ishida, S

    1976-03-01

    Of 1230 autopsied cases in the Atomic Bomb Hospital and in the Red-Cross Hospital from 1956 to March, 1975, a statistical study was made on 118 cases in which primary or secondary heart disease had been found. The results are as follows. The incidence of myocardial infarction was 2.4 times higher in the group exposed to the atomic bomb within 2 km distance from the bombed area than that it was in the unexposed group. The incidence of acquired valvular disease was 4.1 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. From the standpoint of the incidence of myocardiosis, there was no difference between the groups. The incidence of pericarditis was 1.5 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. The incidence of cor pulmonale was 1.8 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. The incidence of other heart disease including congenital disease was, however, 1.6 times higher in the unexposed group than in the exposed group. The incidence of general heart disease was 1.7 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. The incidence of hypertrophy of the heart (more than 400 g) was 1.2 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group.

  11. Statistical studies on heart disease of the pathological autopsy cases in the Atomic Bomb Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, Hiroshi; Hamada, Tadao; Ishida, Sadamu.

    1976-01-01

    Of 1230 autopsied cases in the Atomic Bomb Hospital and in the Red-Cross Hospital from 1956 to March, 1975, a statistical study was made on 118 cases in which primary or secondary heart disease had been found. The results are as follows. The incidence of myocardial infarction was 2.4 times higher in the group exposed to the atomic bomb within 2 km distance from the bombed area than that it was in the unexposed group. The incidence of acquired valvular disease was 4.1 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. From the standpoint of the incidence of myocardiosis, there was no difference between the groups. The incidence of pericarditis was 1.5 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. The incidence of cor pulmonale was 1.8 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. The incidence of other heart disease including congenital disease was, however, 1.6 times higher in the unexposed group than in the exposed group. The incidence of general heart disease was 1.7 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. The incidence of hypertrophy of the heart (more than 400 g) was 1.2 times higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Urinary findings of children exposed in utero to the atomic bombs, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, L R; Keehn, R J

    1966-06-09

    Data from urinalyses at ages 9 to 16 were tabulated for children exposed to ionizing radiation in utero at the time of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and for comparable control groups. Proteinuria was detected more often at various ages in boys in Hiroshima and girls in both cities whose mothers were within 1500 m of the bomb hypocenters. However, the differences were statistically significant only in girls ages 13 or 14. Casts were also seen more commonly in Hiroshima girls located at the same distance. Red and white blood cell excretion in the urine and glycosuria did not appear to be related to radiation exposure. Future investigations will be necessary to define the biological significance of these findings. 11 references, 8 tables.

  13. Liver cirrhosis and primary carcinoma of the liver among atomic bomb survivors. Study of autopsy cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, T [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan)

    1980-11-01

    Liver cirrhosis and primary carcinoma of the liver were investigated in 1699 autopsies of atomic bomb survivors carried out in Hiroshima from 1956 to 1980. Liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic biliary carcinoma were observed in 116, 111, and 17 cases respectively, the ratios of man to woman and were 2.3, 3.9, and 1.8 with a mean age of 56, 60, and 67 years respectively. There was no evidence that exposure to a-bomb increased the risk of these diseases significantly. About 90% of the hepatocellular carcinomas was combined with liver cirrhosis. Weight of liver and spleen, amount of ascites, hemorrhage from the digestive canals, esophageal varix, combination with other diseases, and histologic correlation with the activities of HBs antigen and ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein were discussed with the relation to the exposure.

  14. Recent results concerning radiation-induced cancer in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The most recent data of the prospective study among Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors support the following conclusions: (a) the dose-response relationship is consistent with a straight line through the origin, including the lowest dose group (approx. 3 rad); (b) sensitivity to cancer induction varies considerably by irradiated tissues. (c) most cancers show a radiation effect still increasing 40 years after exposure; (d) a small leukemia excess among those irradiated is still present in Hiroshima; (e) the thyroid cancer excess is declining at present; (g) smoking adds to lung cancer incidence; (g) certain benign tumors show a radiation-related effect; (h) children under 10 years old at time of bombing are presently showing the highest relative cancer risk compared to other survivors at equal attained age. If this effect persists, age-specific cancer risk coefficients are necessary [fr

  15. Late effects of atomic bomb radiation on human immune responses, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Zhou, Ou-Liang; Akiba, Suminori

    1988-01-01

    In an effort to examine whether or not natural killer (NK) cell activation with IL-2 was influenced by atomic bombing, NK cell activity, the ratio of lymphocytes seropositive for NK cell-related antigens, and NK cell activation with IL-2 were examined in 328 A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima. NK activity and the ratio of lymphocytes seropositive for Leu 7, Leu 11 and OKM 1 antigens were higher in men than women. These findings became more marked with advancing age in both men and women. An activation of NK cells was significantly stimulated with IL-2. This was significantly correlated with an increase in the seropositive rate for Leu 11 antigen. NK cell activation, as expressed as stimulation index, was significantly higher in women than men. In neither men nor women was there correlation between stimulation index and both aging and exposure doses. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells in heavily exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Ohkita, Takeshi

    1986-01-01

    Seven hundred and ten bone marrow cells from 13 A-bomb survivors, who were heavily exposed to atomic radiation, were examined using chromosome banding method. An average frequency of chromosome aberrations was 17 %. The most common structural abnormality was translocation (47 %), followed by complex aberrations involving three or more chromosomes (32 %). These abnormalities were frequently seen in A-bomb survivors exposed to estimated doses of 3.5 - 4.0 Gy. Eighty two percent of the structural aberrations were stable. Diploid cells were seen in 0.4 % and tetraploid cells were seen in 0.7 %. The frequency of breakpoint sites was high in chromosomes 1 and 17; while it was low in chromosomes 3, 6, 9, and 11. Abnormal clones were seen in one of the 13 survivors. Chromosome aberrations common to the bone marrow cells and peripheral lymphocytes were not seen in the same individual. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Lymphocyte subsets and response to PHA among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Susumu; Noguchi, Kyouichi; Eida, Kazuyuki; Tashiro, Kazunori; Hayashida, Ken

    1986-01-01

    In an effort to elucidate the effect of radiation exposure on immune competence in man, the number of lymphocytes, lymphocyte subsets, and the percentage of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced transformation of lymphocytes were determined in 66 cancer patients, 25 of whom were exposed to atomic radiation at ≤ 2,000 m from ground zero and 41 others were not exposed. The number of lymphocytes was decreased with increasing age at exposure. The percentage of OKT3-positive cells tended to be lower in exposed patients who were in their twenties at the time of exposure than the non-exposed patients. Among patients in their teens and twenties at the time of exposure, there was a tendency toward decreased percentage of OKT4-positive cells (T4) and increased percentage of OKT8-positive cells (T8). The T4/T8 ratio was reduced. Patients who were in their first decade of life at the time of exposure tended to have decreased OKIa 1-positive cells, and increased Leulla-positive cells. Patients exposed in their twenties and thirties had slightly decreased percentage of PHA-induced transformation of lymphocytes. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis of leukemias found in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Nanao; Tanaka, Kimio; Eguchi, Mariko

    1994-01-01

    Seventy five radiation-related leukemia patients in Hiroshima including 16 patients exposed to more than one Gray were cytogenetically examined. Statistical analysis of data on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in the survivor groups according to bone marrow doses by DS86 estimation revealed that the heavily exposed group tended to have significantly higher aberration rates compared to the non-exposed group. Furthermore, the chromosomal aberrations in the survivors were observed to be of a more complex nature and had the characteristic findings of secondary leukemia. These observations therefore suggest that patients with a history of heavy exposure to atomic bomb radiation had leukemic cells originating from a stem cell which had been damaged by irradiation at the time of the bombing as well as cells involved in complex chromosome abnormalities. A higher incidence(p=0.06) of 11q23 abnormality was found in acute leukemia patients who had a history of exposure to A-bomb and developed from 1986 to 1993. However, we could not detect rearrangement of MLL gene in these patients. Break point region on 11q23 of radiation induced leukemias may be different from the common 8.5 kb region. Molecular biologic studies on RAS genes in acute and chronic leukemias and the BCR gene in chronic myelocytic leukemia were performed in exposed and non-exposed groups. So far, no distinctive differences have been observed in the frequency and sites of point mutations in N and K-RAS genes or in the rearrangement of the BCR gene. Further, retrospective analysis using DNA from leukemia patients who developed the disease in the early period from atomic bomb radiation exposure would be useful for elucidation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia. (author)

  19. History of radiation research. On radiation, radioactivity and radiation protection. Pt. 2. The sword of Damocles. Decade of the atomic bomb 1940-1950

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    2006-01-01

    The book includes contributions with the following titles: Szilards bomb; the excess neutrons; Napoleon's successor; Einstein's letter; the interim year 1940; administration and research; the sailor from India; the production facilities; ''I am the death, destroyer of the world''; Heisenberg's bomb; from other horizons; Potsdam and the atomic bomb decision; Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the beginning of nuclear power; renewed contacts; epilogue.

  20. Serum immunoglobulin levels in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, C B; Hall, W J; Ashley, F W; Hamilton, H B

    1972-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins (SI) were determined in 803 survivors and matched controls. Each subject's age, sex, health, exposure, and medical record were evaluated with respect to serum IgG, IgA, IgM levels. The IgG and IgA levels tended to be higher for this Hiroshima population than for Americans. Past exposure to ionizing radiation showed no significant correlation to SI levels. However, age and sex did influence the SI. IgM was significantly higher in females. With advancing age IgG and IgA increased in males, and IgM decreased in females. Elevated sedimentation rate and increased lymphocytes were accompanied by increased SI levels. Radiographic TB was detected in 45% of the population; IgG and IgA levels were somewhat elevated in these individuals. (DLC)

  1. The delayed effects of radiation exposure among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1945-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.C.; Moriyama, I.M.

    1980-07-01

    The most important radiation-induced late medical effect in the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been the increased occurrence of certain neoplasms, specifically, leukemia and cancers of the thyroid, lung, and breast. Other definite radiation-related effects include an increase in posterior lenticular opacities, chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and some abnormalities of growth and development following irradiation while in utero or during childhood. Moderate to fairly strong associations between A-bomb exposure and the increased occurrence of stomach cancer, multiple myeloma, and several other types of cancer have been observed. Radiation relationships also are suggestive for alterations of certain aspects of immune mechanisms and the increased occurrence of myelofibrosis. No increase in genetic effects has been demonstrated in the children born of exposed parents, and studies to data have been negative for evidence of increased infertility, accelerated aging, or increased mortality from diseases other than cancer. In general, the radiation dose-response relationships for most positive effects have been higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki, and the shape of the dose-response curves for certain effects is different in the two cities. These differences may be related to differences in the quality of the radiation from the two A-bombs. For several radiation-related effects the latent period following exposure is shorter and the incidence rate is higher in personse exposed when young as compared to exposure later in life. (author)

  2. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950 - 76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Mikami, Motoko; Matsunaga, Masako.

    1979-10-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the occurrence of multiple myeloma has been evaluated in a fixed cohort of approximately 100,000 A-bomb survivors and nonexposed controls during the period from October 1950 to December 1976. Analysis of these data revealed the standardized relative risk adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of the bombs (ATB) to be significantly greater in the group of individuals who received 100 rad or more of radiation than in their controls. An excess risk became apparent in the high dose group about 20 years after exposure. The excess risk of multiple myeloma in those persons aged 20 - 59 ATB is estimated to be approximately 0.24 per million person-years per rad (PYR) in kerma dose and approximately 0.48 per million PYR in bone marrow dose. The interval between radiation exposure and the occurrence of an excess risk for multiple myeloma in the high dose population is considerably longer than that for leukemia. The cases of multiple myeloma observed in the high dose group showed no unusual clinical features. (author)

  3. Notes of problems in estimating mortality rate among atomic-bomb survivors, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Ohtaki, Megu; Matsuura, Masaaki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Munaka, Masaki

    1990-01-01

    Annual changes in death hazard were compared in the group in which persons entered the city after the A-bomb explosion and acquired a health handbook during the period 1968-1976 (the case group) and the group in which A-bomb survivors had already acquired it as of 1960 (the control group). Mortality was analyzed by malignant diseases, cardiovascular diseases, digestive system diseases, and respiratory system diseases. Death hazard from malignant tumors was markedly high 3 to 4 years after the acquisition of the health handbook, irrespective of sex, in the case group. For cardiovascular diseases, it was high up to 8 years after the acquisition in males of the case group; however, it tended to be slightly higher in women immediately after the acquisition, and thereafter, it was not different from that in the control group. For both digestive system diseases and respiratory system diseases, death hazard tended to be higher in the case group than the control group during 8 years after the acquisition. The fact that death hazard was higher in the case group than the control group several years after the acquisition means that the acquisition of health handbook may be triggered by worse health conditions in A-bomb survivors in the case group. (N.K.)

  4. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb; Kettenreaktion. Die Geschichte der Atombombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-07-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  5. A case of anemia with left atrial myxoma suspected as late effect of an atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Hiroko; Aosaki, Noboru; Kurita, Akira

    1980-01-01

    A 43 years old housewife with a history of exposure to an atomic bomb at 8 years old, recently developed anemia and palpitation. The laboratory data showed accelerated ESR, anemia (Hb 10.0 g/dl), and hyper γ-globulinemia. Despite the suspicion of late effect of atomic radiation, further examinations confirmed the diagnosis of left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic studies revealed the decrease of diastolic descent rate, and multiple echos reflected from the tumor within the mitral orifice during diastole. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated remarkably high value of PCWP (V-wave 38 mmHg) and space filling defect moving from left atrium to left ventricle by cineangiography. Phonecardiographic studies were similar to mitral stenosis. After left atrial myxoma was removed, her symptoms and laboratory data including all noninvasive findings were improved. Therefore we suspected that her symptoms was related with left atrial myxoma rather than the late effect of atomic bomb exposure. We have discussed its significance and usefulness of noninvasive diagnostic approaches as well as whole body computed tomography in heart tumor. (author)

  6. Studies of colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1950-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Hirofumi

    1985-01-01

    Among the 82,064 subjects, 595 cases of colorectal cancer were confirmed, 395 cases (66.4%) by microscopic examinations of histological specimens and 69 cases (11.6%) by death certificate only. Subjects with unknown exposure dose or who were not in Hiroshima city at the time of the bombing were excluded, and the analysis was based on 60,470 persons with estimated exposure dose. In this population, there were 450 colorectal cancer cases: 239 cases of colon cancer, 203 cases of rectal cancer and eight cases with unknown site. Concerning the relationship between incidence of colorectal cancer and radiation exposure, the following conclusions were obtained: 1. The incidence of colorectal cancer increased with radiation dose, and this tendency was observed in both sexes. 2. The risk of colon cancer increased with dose, and linear trend tests showed that the increase was significant both in males (p<0.05) and females (p<0.01). The effects of radiation on the incidence of colon cancer differed by age at the time of the bombing. Among survivors exposed at young ages (less than 20) the effects were especially remarkable, the relative risk of the 100+ rad group versus the 0 rad group being 6.2, which was significantly greater than unity (p<0.01). Further, by site of colon cancer, radiation dose effects on the incidence of cancer of the right side colon (cecum and ascending colon), and sigmoid colon were observed, while dose effects on the incidence of the transverse colon or descending colon were not. 3. No effects atomic bomb radiation on the incidence of rectal cancer could be demonstrated, even when examined by sex and age at the time of the bombing. 4. For both colon cancer and rectal cancer, no difference in the distribution of tumor histological types could be observed by radiation dose. (J.P.N.)

  7. Malignant tumors in people exposed as children to atomic bomb in Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takayoshi; Matsuo, Takeshi; Mori, Yo; Nonaka, Masaru; Oribe, Takashi

    1976-01-01

    In order to determine both the conditions under which malignant tumors occurred and the pathological specificity of those tumors in people exposed as children (at the age of 0-9) to the atomic bomb in Nagasaki, a comparative study was made of malignant tumors (including brain tumor but excluding leukemia) in 88 exposed cases taken from the data of the committee for the statistical analysis of tumors in Nagasaki and from other literature, and in unexposed cases of malignancy. The following items were analyzed; the distance from the bombed area (doses), the age at the time that the disease occurred, the latent period, the annual incidence of disease, the site of tumor, and the type of tissue. The results are summarized as follows, although they are inconclusive because of the small number of cases. The incidence of malignant lymphoma, cancer of the tyroid gland, brain tumor, sarcoma, and cancer of the ovary had a tendency to be higher in the exposed cases than in the unexposed cases. From the standpoint of sex, there was a tendency that cancer of the stomach and malignant lymphoma occurred more often in females than in males. On the other hand, sarcoma and brain tumor were seen more often in males. From the standpoint of the relationships among these factors: the distance from the bombed area, the latent period, and the type of tumor, it was suggested that cancer of the thyroid gland, brain tumor and cancer of the stomach were observed especially in cases which had been exposed as children. In addition, it was considered that the influence of not only a short distance from the bombed area but also a middle distance from that area can not be neglected. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Occurrence of breast cancer, renal cancer and multiple myeloma in a Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Tsutomu; Kubota, Kazuo; Tamura, Jun'ichi; Kurabayashi, Hitoshi; Shirakura, Takuo; Hayashida, Masayoshi; Nagayama, Tadao.

    1990-01-01

    A 60-year-old female, who was exposed to the Nagasaki atomic bomb at 18 years old, had renal cancer and subsequently was found to have multiple myeloma (IgGk). She underwent the left mastectomy for breast cancer at 43 years old but was not given chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The karyotype of bone marrow cells was 46, XX. The estimated radiation dose was under 10 rads. While the effect of such a low-dose of radiation is considered to be almost negligible, there would be a possibility that in this case the risk of carcinogenesis was enhanced as her age advanced. (author)

  9. A synthetic medical and sociological study on twins exposed by atomic bomb, 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, Yukio; Watanabe, Shoji; Kyo, Taiichi

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, IgM) levels and the exposure status was examined in 13 enzygotic twin pairs who had been exposed to atomic bomb under the same or different conditions and who had no disease showing changes in immunoglobulin levels. The difference in immunoglobulin levels tended to be smaller between the twins exposed under the same conditions and to be larger between the twins exposed under the different conditions. This should be further studied because there were some exceptions in this study. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Deep underground measurements of 60Co in steel exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Mikael; Gasparro, Joël; Vasselli, Roberto; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Arnold, Dirk; Neumaier, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    When using gamma-ray spectrometry performed deep underground, it is possible to measure 60Co activities down to 0.1 mBq in steel samples of some 100 g without any pre-concentration. It is thus still possible to measure 60Co induced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in pieces of steel collected at distances up to about 1200 m slant range. The results of non-destructive measurements of eight steel samples are compared with the 1986 Dose Re-Evaluation (DS86) model calculations.

  11. Deep underground measurements of 60Co in steel exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, Mikael; Gasparro, J.Joeel; Vasselli, Roberto; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Arnold, Dirk; Neumaier, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    When using gamma-ray spectrometry performed deep underground, it is possible to measure 60 Co activities down to 0.1 mBq in steel samples of some 100 g without any pre-concentration. It is thus still possible to measure 60 Co induced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in pieces of steel collected at distances up to about 1200 m slant range. The results of non-destructive measurements of eight steel samples are compared with the 1986 Dose Re-Evaluation (DS86) model calculations

  12. Deep underground measurements of {sup 60}Co in steel exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hult, Mikael E-mail: mikael.hult@cec.eu.int; Gasparro, J.Joeel; Vasselli, Roberto; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Arnold, Dirk; Neumaier, Stefan

    2004-09-01

    When using gamma-ray spectrometry performed deep underground, it is possible to measure {sup 60}Co activities down to 0.1 mBq in steel samples of some 100 g without any pre-concentration. It is thus still possible to measure {sup 60}Co induced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in pieces of steel collected at distances up to about 1200 m slant range. The results of non-destructive measurements of eight steel samples are compared with the 1986 Dose Re-Evaluation (DS86) model calculations.

  13. Agreement between death-certificate and autopsy diagnoses among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, E.; Carter, R.L.; Jablon, S.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko.

    1993-11-01

    Using the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission/Radiation Effects Research Foundation series of over 5000 autopsies, we examined death-certificate accuracy for several disease categories and assessed the effect of potential modifying factors on this accuracy. For 12 cause-of-death categories, the overall percent agreement between death-certificate and autopsy diagnoses was only 52.5%. Although neoplasms had the highest detection rate (on the death certificate) in the study, still almost 25% of cancers diagnosed at autopsy were missed on the death certificate. Only for neoplasms and external causes of death were confirmation and detection rates above 70%. Confirmation rates were between 50% and 70% for infectious and parasitic diseases and heart and other vascular diseases. Detection rates reached a similar level for infectious and parasitic, cerebrovascular, and digestive diseases. Specificity rates were above 90% for all but the cerebrovascular disease category. Overall agreement decreased with increasing age of the decedents and was lower for deaths occurring outside of hospital vs those occurring in a hospital. There was some suggestion that agreement rates were higher for more-recent deaths but no indication that radiation dose, sex, city of residence, or inclusion in a biennial clinical-examination program influenced agreement. Because the inaccuracy of death-certificate diagnoses can have major implications for many aspects of health research and planning, it is important to be aware that death-certificate accuracy is low and can vary widely depending on the patient's age at death and the place of death. (J.P.N.)

  14. Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Y.

    1990-01-01

    This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered

  15. Report on the results of eighth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Sasaki, Hideo; Neriishi, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    This is a report of the 7th survey of A-bomb survivor residents in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Wailuku, and Honolulu conducted from June 11 through July 11, 1991. As of the end of July 1991, the number of A-bomb survivors registered in North America was 1,012, including 23 in Canada, which was increased by 94 compared with the end of July 1989. Of these A-bomb survivors, 963 (255 males and 708 females), excluding 49 deaths, were eligible for the present analysis. A-bomb survivors who had been exposed in Hiroshima accounted for 89.5%. The US nationality and the Japanese nationality with permanent US residency rights were seen in 61.5% and in 30.8%, respectively. They ranged in age from 45 to over 80 years of age, with a mean age of 61.2 years: those aged 55 to 64 years accounted for 52.5%. Those eligible for the Medicare program occupied one fourth of the total. Their residence was comprised of 28 states in the US and 3 provinces in Canada, with 60.7% living in the state of California, 19.4% in the state of Hawaii, and 5.8% in the state of Washington: overall, 67.8% were living on the west coast of the US. The number of A-bomb survivor's health handbook holders showed a 3.2-fold increase during the previous 8 years, with the acquisition rate being 55.5%. During the same period, the number of handbook holders among those with the US nationality showed a 3.4-fold increase, with the acquisition rate being 51.5%. Of a total of 963 eligible A-bomb survivors, 482 (50.1%) participated in the present examination, including 50 offspring (F 1 ). The most common disease requiring treatment and follow-up was hypertension (27.6%) followed by hyperlipidemia, liver disease, thyroid disease, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus in that order. The incidence of liver disease and thyroid disease was increased. (N.K.)

  16. Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H.

    1990-01-01

    This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual

  17. Autopsy case of acute myelocytic leukemia preceded by hemopoietic dysplasia found in an atomic bomb survivor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Y; Edagawa, J; Taniwaki, M; Ide, T; Misawa, S [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1981-03-01

    An autopsy case of acute myelocytic leukemia preceded by hemopoietic dysplasia, presumably on a sequela to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima is reported. On admission, severe anemia and thrombocytosis were found and the bone marrow aspiration showed myeloid hyperplasia without definite maturation arrest. Mild to moderate eosinophilia and basophilia continued during the course of the disease, accompaning mild monocytosis 2 years later. Furthermore, he had the radical operation for the early gastric cancer in this preleukemic stage. After the administration of methenolone acetate (25 mg/day), severe anemia has dramatically improved, but leukocytosis with profound monocytosis persisted, and subsequently acute myelocytic leukemia developed. He died from an intracerebral bleeding due to an accidental trauma on the head. Autopsy findings disclosed the systemic leukemic infiltration. Repeated chromosome analyses revealed the mosaic karyotype of 46, XY/45, XY, -16 on admission, but it was 46, XY/46, XY, del (8) (p 12) in the overt leukemic phase. The granulopoietic colony forming capacity of bone marrow cells was already low one year before the onset of overt leukemia. This finding suggested that the existence of an abnormal clone could be predictable. In addition, the possible causative effect of the exposure to the atomic bomb in leukemogenesis in this case is discussed.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an atomic bomb survivor receiving corticosteroid therapy for aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujihara, Kazuo; Shida, Norihiko; Ohta, Michiya [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan)

    1995-12-01

    We report a case of successfully treated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) meningitis in a atomic bomb survivor receiving steroid therapy for aplastic anemia. The patient was a 62-year-old woman and the past medical history included hypothyroidism due to radioiodide therapy for Basedow disease, breast cancer, aplastic anemia, steroid-induced diabetes mellitus, and pulmonary tuberculosis. At the time of onset, she was receiving corticosteroid, anabolic steroid, an H{sub 2}-blocker (famotidine), and other medication. Since she developed symptoms of meningitis when she visited our hospital for regular medical check-up for aplastic anemia, she was hospitalized and given antibiotic therapy, including ABPC, without delay. With this effective antibiotic therapy and successful management of the co-existing medical conditions, she was cured except for being a little euphoric. Lm meningitis is known to occur in aged and immunocompromised patients. Since most of the atomic bomb survivors are now aged and the prevalence of malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and other diseases which cause immunodeficiency have been rising year by year, Lm meningitis is one of the emergency neurologic conditions whose diagnosis should not be delayed in this population. (author).

  19. New approaches to evaluating the genetic effects of the atomic bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki fifty years ago, one of the compelling biomedical questions that arose concerned the genetic effects of this exposure. More recently, revelations of the extent of industrial or accidental exposures in the former Soviet Union and charges that employment in the Sellafield Nuclear Reprocessing Plant in West Cumbria, England has resulted in a gene-mediated increase in children of plant employees have served to keep in the public mind the issue of the genetic risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. The study of the genetic effects of the atomic bombs has moved from the gross morphological level of congenital malformations to the examination of DNA. However, were the need for such genetic studies to arise in the foreseeable future, despite this impressive progress in DNA-oriented systems, the documentation of congenital defect, genetic disease and child survival would still be an essential component of any future study. Whatever the geneticists may think, the phenotypic well-being and survival of children are still the primary indicators on which the public, who ultimately supports these studies, will base its judgement of risk. 28 refs

  20. Cancer incidence in the population of Nagasaki city 30 years after atomic bombing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Shinichi; Mishina, Hitoshi

    1988-01-01

    In order to attest the evolutionary hypothesis of non-epithelial-epithelial tumor shift (Okuyama and Mishina 1986), the published cancer incidence data for the population of Nagasaki City during the period of 1973-1977 was studied along with appropriate control populations of Fukuoka City, and Miyagi and Osaka prefectures. Significant increments of non-epithelial tumors including leukemias, and epithelial tumors such as cervical cancers and choriocarcinomas were observed. An inference was made to the post-atomic bomb radiation carcinogenesis that different organ systems responded to that irradiation with different oncogenic patterns: Neoplasms of the pre-vertebral organs (non-epithelial organ systems) were the first to react and tapered long (curve type I); Tumors of the vertebral but pre-mammalian (those of the digestive tract, respiratory and thyroid) could have formed two separate peaks, one for the early and high dosage and the other for the late and low dosage (II); With breast cancer or the mammalian symbol tumor, there was a single peak reflecting the cohort of reproductives (III). The evolutionary and phylogenetic progression could have taken place from I through III. Thus, cancer incidence analysis may be helpful in deciphering the atomic bomb radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  1. Hot spring therapy of the patients exposed to atomic bomb radiation, 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Tamon [Genbaku Hibakusha Beppu Onsen Ryoyo Kenkyusho, Oita (Japan); Tsuji, Hideo

    1983-03-01

    The patients exposed to the atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima area came to Beppu Spa to have hot spring therapy. During the fiscal year of 1982 (April, 1982, to March, 1983), 3972 persons came to the hot spring sanatorium, and 586 patients (14.8 %) received physical examination. Among them, 473 patients (80.7 %) were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation on August 6, 1945, or entered in the city of Hiroshima by August 20, 1945, according to the official notebook issued by the government. Physical examination was performed twice a week during their stay, and more than 53.5 % of the patients were older than 70, and the oldest was 93 years old. Blood pressure was measured when the patients came in and went out, and hypertensive patients were asked to observe the rule of treatment strictly. The complaints of the patients which brought them to the hot spring were mostly pain in bodies and lower extremities, and hypertension, common cold syndrome, diabetes and constipation. Patients took hot spring bath 2

  2. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an atomic bomb survivor receiving corticosteroid therapy for aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihara, Kazuo; Shida, Norihiko; Ohta, Michiya

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of successfully treated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) meningitis in a atomic bomb survivor receiving steroid therapy for aplastic anemia. The patient was a 62-year-old woman and the past medical history included hypothyroidism due to radioiodide therapy for Basedow disease, breast cancer, aplastic anemia, steroid-induced diabetes mellitus, and pulmonary tuberculosis. At the time of onset, she was receiving corticosteroid, anabolic steroid, an H 2 -blocker (famotidine), and other medication. Since she developed symptoms of meningitis when she visited our hospital for regular medical check-up for aplastic anemia, she was hospitalized and given antibiotic therapy, including ABPC, without delay. With this effective antibiotic therapy and successful management of the co-existing medical conditions, she was cured except for being a little euphoric. Lm meningitis is known to occur in aged and immunocompromised patients. Since most of the atomic bomb survivors are now aged and the prevalence of malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and other diseases which cause immunodeficiency have been rising year by year, Lm meningitis is one of the emergency neurologic conditions whose diagnosis should not be delayed in this population. (author)

  3. Levels of parathyroid hormone and calcitonin in serum among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Yokoyama, Naokata; Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Sposto, R.; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Shiraki, Mastaka

    1994-01-01

    To examines the potential causes of increased levels of calcium in serum with increasing dose of atomic bomb radiation, which was obtained from the previous preliminary analysis, levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitonin in serum were examined among 1459 subjects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. A significant effect of radiation on levels of calcium, PTH and calcitonin in serum was found, even after patients with hyperparathyroidism were excluded. The level of calcium in serum increased with radiation dose; this can be explained partly by the increase in the level of PTH with radiation dose. However, the dose effect on calcium remained even after adjustment for PTH, calcitonin and confounding factors such as renal function, serum albumin level and medication. Parathyroid hormone increased initially by 6.8% per gray, but the dose response leveled off after about 1 Gy. The level of calcitonin increased with radiation dose, probably in part due to feedback mechanisms stimulated by the increase in calcium. However, after adjustment for the level of calcium, the increase in the level of calcitonin with dose was still found. Although the etiological mechanisms of the effect of radiation on serum levels of calcium, PTH and calcitonin are unclear, radiation exposure may affect secretion of PTH and calcitonin and regulation of calcium a long time after atomic bomb exposure. 21 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Hot spring therapy of the patients exposed to atomic bomb radiation, 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Tamon; Tsuji, Hideo.

    1983-01-01

    The patients exposed to the atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima area came to Beppu Spa to have hot spring therapy. During the fiscal year of 1982 (April, 1982, to March, 1983), 3972 persons came to the hot spring sanatorium, and 586 patients (14.8 %) received physical examination. Among them, 473 patients (80.7 %) were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation on August 6, 1945, or entered in the city of Hiroshima by August 20, 1945, according to the official notebook issued by the government. Physical examination was performed twice a week during their stay, and more than 53.5 % of the patients were older than 70, and the oldest was 93 years old. Blood pressure was measured when the patients came in and went out, and hypertensive patients were asked to observe the rule of treatment strictly. The complaints of the patients which brought them to the hot spring were mostly pain in bodies and lower extremities, and hypertension, common cold syndrome, diabetes and constipation. Patients took hot spring bath 2 - 3 times daily, and many patients had microwave and low frequency wave treatment. Soaking in a bath (containing 1.4 mg of cupric sulfate and 11.4 mg of zinc sulfate per liter) was practiced by diabetic patients. The therapeutic effects were difficult to judge because the period of stay of the most patients was about 10 days, but in most of them, subjective symptoms were relieved when they left the sanatorium. (Yamashita, S.)

  5. Selection, follow-up, and analysis in the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablon, S.

    1985-01-01

    More is known about ionizing radiation as a cause of human cancer than about any other carcinogen. Most of this knowledge is derived from the studies conducted by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Radiation Effects Research Foundation on about 100,000 Japanese survivors of the atomic bombing in 1945. The importance of these studies is based on the large size of the exposed population and the fact that individual estimates of radiation dose were possible. These factors and the combined excellence of the centralized vital statistics reporting and population registration systems in Japan have made feasible the continuing longitudinal studies of cancer mortality by site in relation to radiation dose over a span of more than 30 years. Excellent voluntary cooperation by the survivors has enabled the continuation of a biennial physical examination program which has made possible the acquisition of blood for studies of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and mutations at the level of specific genes. Similarly, with the cooperation of local universities, hospitals, and physicians, tumor and tissue registries necessary for the study of cancer incidence have been developed. An autopsy pathology program has enabled study of the accuracy of cause of death certification

  6. Relationship between the life environment of the atomic bomb survivors (Hibakusha) and their cardiovascular disorders. Chiefly regard to ECG findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, M; Saito, O; Miyaki, S; Watabu, A [Fukushima Medical Co-Operative Hospital (Japan)

    1978-04-01

    In order to observe clinically the effects of the atomic bomb on the human body (and on the environment), subjects were divided into group A (persons living in Hiroshima city more than 10 years after dropping of the atomic bomb) and group B (persons who changed their residence within 1 month). Group A was divided into two separate groups: group A/sub 1/ (persons living in segregated areas), and group A/sub 2/ (persons living in other areas). General examinations showed no abnormal findings. Incidence of abnormal ECG findings was higher in subjects living in segregated areas and was also higher in women than in men.

  7. Experimental patients of drug treatment for cataracta in the persons exposed to an atomic bomb near the explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Shigenori

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical process of 4 persons exposed to an atomic bomb near the explosion in Nagasaki who have received chemotherapy because of incipient senile cataracta associated by cataracta due to an atomic bomb. The dropping of Catalin and Tathion in the eyes, oral administration of Thiola, and injection of Glutathione were done. Dramatic results were not obtained. However, when the administration was done at the time of slight corneal opacity, it did not developed. Therefore, it can't be denied now that the chemotherapy is effective. (Kanao, N.)

  8. Experimental patients of drug treatment for cataracta in the persons exposed to an atomic bomb near the explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Shigenori [Hiroshima City (Japan)

    1976-03-01

    This paper describes the clinical process of 4 persons exposed to an atomic bomb near the explosion in Nagasaki who have received chemotherapy because of incipient senile cataracta associated by cataracta due to an atomic bomb. The dropping of Catalin and Tathion in the eyes, oral administration of Thiola, and injection of Glutathione were done. Dramatic results were not obtained. However, when the administration was done at the time of slight corneal opacity, it did not developed. Therefore, it can't be denied now that the chemotherapy is effective.

  9. Exposure to an atomic bomb explosion is a risk factor for in-hospital death after esophagectomy to treat esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Y; Takeishi, K; Guntani, A; Tsujita, E; Yoshinaga, K; Matsuyama, A; Hamatake, M; Maeda, T; Tsutsui, S; Matsuda, H; Ishida, T

    2015-01-01

    Esophagectomy, one of the most invasive of all gastrointestinal operations, is associated with a high frequency of postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure to the atomic bomb explosion at Hiroshima in 1945 might be a preoperative risk factor for in-hospital mortality after esophagectomy in esophageal cancer patients. We thus reviewed the outcomes of esophagectomy in 31 atomic bomb survivors with esophageal cancer and 96 controls (also with cancer but without atomic bomb exposure). We compared the incidences of postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. Of the clinicopathological features studied, mean patient age was significantly higher in atomic bomb survivors than in controls. Of the postoperative complications noted, atomic bomb survivors experienced a longer mean period of endotracheal intubation and higher incidences of severe pulmonary complications, severe anastomotic leakage, and surgical site infection. The factors associated with in-hospital mortality were exposure to the atomic bomb explosion, pulmonary comorbidities, and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Multivariate analysis revealed that exposure to the atomic bomb explosion was an independent significant preoperative risk factor for in-hospital mortality. Exposure to the atomic bomb explosion is thus a preoperative risk factor for in-hospital death after esophagectomy to treat esophageal cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. Primary intracranial tumors among atomic bomb survivors and controls, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyama, Shinichi; Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Iijima, Soichi; Mori, Kazuo.

    1980-02-01

    An analysis was made of the relationship of radiation dose to the occurrence of primary intracranial tumors among atomic bomb survivors and nonexposed controls, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the fixed cohort of the Life Span Study (LSS) extended sample during the period 1961-75, or 16 to 30 years after the A-bombs. Based on various medical sources, 104 cases of primary intracranial tumors were identified among approximately 99,000 LSS extended sample members who were alive as of 1 January 1961. Of these 104 cases, 45 had manifested clinical signs of brain tumors, but, 59 cases were identified incidentally at postmortem examination. The distributions of morphologic type, age, and size of tumor were quite different for those primary intracranial tumors with and without a clinical sign of brain tumor. Glioma was the most frequent type of tumor with a clinical sign and meningioma was the most frequent type without. In relation to radiation dose the incidence rate of primary intracranial tumors with a clinical sign showed a significant excess risk for males in the high dose group who received 100 rad or more after adjustment for age at the time of the bomb (ATB). The standardized relative risk is around 5 in this group. The data also suggest that the crude relative risk of glioma is greater in the high dose group for younger ages ATB. However, there is no increased risk in females. Among the 5,012 autopsy subjects in the LSS extended sample during 1961-75, there is no relationship between radiation dose and the prevalence rate of primary intracranial tumors in those identified incidentally by autopsy. The relative risk of subclinical adenoma of the pituitary gland between high dose subjects and controls was also examined for a sample of 95 sex- and age-matched pairs using Hiroshima autopsy materials for 1961-74, but no relationship to dose was observed. (author)

  11. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Mikami, M.; Matsunaga, M.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimated risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure

  12. Nine cases of multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Masanobu; Matsueda, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Kazurou; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kou, Hassei; Mikami, Motoko; Nakamura, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Yoshikiyo; Aisaka, Tadakazu

    1986-03-01

    Nine A-bomb survivors (2 men and 7 women) were diagnosed as having multiple myeloma (MM) 24 years to 38 years after exposure. According to exposure doses, three survivors were exposed at less than or equal to 1,800 m from the hypocenter, three between 2,200 m and 2,500 m, and three between 3,100 m and 4,100 m. Acute atomic radiation injuries, such as epilation and disturbance in bone marrow function, were observed in survivors exposed at less than or equal to 2,400 m. Complications included hypertension in two, diabetes mellitus in one, and cancer of the pharynx in one. Three of the patients are still alive with follow-up periods of 3 years and 6 months to 7 years and 11 months. Two survivors, who showed no evidence of abnormal physical findings, did not meet typical MM criteria according to Abe et al. There has been a continuing discussion regarding the association between A-bomb radiation and intermediate type MM seen in the two survivors. (Namekawa, K.).

  13. Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Land, C.E.; Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori; Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori

    1994-01-01

    An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Radiosensitivity of skin fibroblasts from atomic bomb survivors with and without breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadayuki; Setlow, R.B.; Bender, M.A.

    1990-11-01

    Fibroblasts were established in vitro from skin biopsies obtained from 55 women and one man with or without breast cancer and with or without exposure to radiation from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. The radiosensitivity of these cells was evaluated by clonogenic assays after exposure to X rays or to fission neutrons from a 252 Cf source. Data were fitted to a multitarget model, S/S 0 = A[1-(1-e kD ) N ], for both X-ray and neutron dose-survival curves. A single-hit model, S/S 0 = Ae kD , fits the neutron dose-survival responses as well. These was no difference in the means or variances of radiosensitivity between exposed and nonexposed groups, or between patients with or without breast cancer. Hence, although the sample is not large, it provides no support for the hypothesis that A-bomb radiation preferentially induces breast cancer in women whose cells in vitro are sensitive to cell killing by radiation. (author)

  15. Urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanefuji, Hayato; Ishimaru, Toranosuke.

    1980-03-01

    A study was made of the relationship of radiation dose to the incidence of urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors and controls in the RERF Life Span Study extended sample. A total of 112 cases of urinary bladder tumors was identified among approximately 99,000 subjects in this fixed cohort during 1961-72. Morphologic diagnoses were available for 86 cases (76.8%), cystoscopy alone for 21 cases (18.7%), and only the cause of death recorded on death certificates for 5 cases (4.5%). Urothelial carcinoma (transitional cell carcinoma) is the most common type of urinary bladder tumor for which morphologic diagnoses are available. The 1961-72 incidence rate was calculated using 106 cases identified as urinary bladder tumors. Although the crude annual incidence rate in the high dose group (100 rad or more) is elevated in both cities and both sexes, all nine cases with this dose were aged 40 years or more at the time of the bomb (ATB). The standardized relative risk adjusted for city and sex for those of age 40 or more ATB in the high dose group is 1.8 in comparison with the control group and this is a suggestive statistical difference. A statistically significant elevation of risk occurs in the high dose group for urothelial carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder among those aged 40 or more ATB. (author)

  16. Ending the War against Japan: Science, Morality, and the Atomic Bomb. Choices for the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Don

    This unit presents students with dilemmas faced by U.S. policymakers with three distinct options for U.S. policy toward Japan. Background readings provide students with information on the U.S. decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan in 1945. By exploring a spectrum of alternatives, students gain a deeper understanding of the values underlying…

  17. Some effects of random dose measurement errors on analysis of atomic bomb survivor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of random dose measurement errors on analyses of atomic bomb survivor data are described and quantified for several procedures. It is found that the ways in which measurement error is most likely to mislead are through downward bias in the estimated regression coefficients and through distortion of the shape of the dose-response curve. The magnitude of the bias with simple linear regression is evaluated for several dose treatments including the use of grouped and ungrouped data, analyses with and without truncation at 600 rad, and analyses which exclude doses exceeding 200 rad. Limited calculations have also been made for maximum likelihood estimation based on Poisson regression. 16 refs., 6 tabs

  18. Bone marrow cytology in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors 5 years following exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterle, S.N.; Finch, S.C.

    1978-11-01

    Bone marrow aspiration smears obtained from 35 individuals, 5 years following exposure to the Hiroshima atomic bomb, were intensively evaluated for radiation related cytologic abnormalities. No definite radiation related changes were observed, but some findings were very suggestive. The most interesting of these was the occurrence of internuclear bridges joining erythroid precursors in the marrow smears of seven (20%) of the heavily exposed survivors. Although not specific it is likely that this lesion is indicative of residual stem cell damage and some degree of ineffectual erythropoiesis. The bone marrow morphologic lesions may be good markers of residual radiation damage but they are too infrequent in their occurrence to be of value as a biologic dosimeter. The findings in this study also suggest that a gradual disappearance of radiation induced late bone marrow changes continues for periods of 3 to 5 years or more following high dose acute radiation exposure. (author)

  19. Analysis of atomic-bomb survivor data: ongoing research and opportunities for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Study of the atomic bomb survivors has provided uniquely valuable information about the types of effects that are produced by ionizing radiation and their relation to dose, age at exposure, time after irradiation, and other variables. There are still, however, many unresolved questions requiring further investigation. These include reassessment of the dosimetry in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki; continued follow-up of survivors for cancer and other late effects, especially those who were exposed early in life and are just now reaching the age when the common cancers of adult life make their appearance; further evaluation of the possibility of measuring genetic effects in the children of survivors; and continued longitudinal investigation of risk factors predisposing to cancer, preneoplastic lesions, and other diseases. To the extent that a strong statistical foundation is essential to such investigations, the high calibre and sophistication of ongoing statistical research at RERF augers well for the future. 30 references, 4 figures

  20. A model-free description of the experience of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaider, M.; Brenner, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of low doses of radiation on human populations are primarily evaluated from the experience of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Most evaluations performed to date have in common: a) the use of a parametric model for estimating risks, and b) factorizing, in the model, the time post-exposure and dose dependencies. Since there is very little theoretical understanding of carcinogenesis the choice of any one model is arbitrary. Furthermore different models make risk predictions which might differ by factors as large as 100. The Japanese data base is analyzed here using non-parametric monotonic regression methods. These methods make use of only one assumption, namely that the effect is monotonically changing with its covariates (neutron and gamma dose, and time). With these mild restrictions, model-free risk predictions are made of the risks of being irradiated with indirectly ionizing radiation, whether singly or in combination

  1. Histological review of breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuoka, Shoji; Asano, Masahide; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Sakamoto, Goi; Hartmann, W.H.; Hutter, R.V.P.; Henson, D.E.

    1983-09-01

    A group of pathologists from the United States and Japan reviewed breast cancer material of women exposed to the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and controls. The purpose of the review was to verify the diagnoses, establish a base of confirmed cases for epidemiologic study, and provide a reference for other pathology review. Compared to the control group, matched through the Life Span Study extended sample, there were no differences in distribution of tumor type and tumor size. There were also no differences in histological type by age or radiation dose. The peak age for cancer to develop was the same in the exposed and control groups. The type of radiation had no effect on histological type. Atypical changes or residual proliferative lesions were not found in women exposed to radiation but free from cancer. On the basis of this study, it was concluded that radiogenic breast cancer does not differ histologically from spontaneously occurring cancer in Japanese women. (author)

  2. Mental retardation in children exposed in utero to the atomic bomb - Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, J W; Johnson, K G; Omori, Yoshiaki; Kawamoto, Sadahisa; Keehn, R J

    1966-05-19

    Subjects who were exposed in utero to the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, along with suitable controls, are examined annually at ABCC. Of the 1613 subjects in the study sample, 30 have gross mental retardation. Within 1500 m from the hypocenter the prevalence of mental retardation is 5 times as high as for the more distal subjects, and 6 to 15 weeks gestation was the most sensitive period. Even when subjects with possible explanations for their retardation are excluded the pattern of differences remains the same. All but two of the retarded subjects had a smaller than average head and for those who were within 1500 m this effect is accentuated. 17 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  3. T and B cells and PHA response of peripheral lymphocytes among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakido, Michio; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Dock, D.S.; Hamilton, H.B.; Awa, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    Little is known about immune compretence in atomic bomb survivors. The following results were observed from this study. T and B cells showed no change in proportion by age or exposure dose. The percentage of T cells was slightly lower in malignant tumor patients than in the control group. However, it was significantly higher in the group with chromosomal aberrations than in the control group. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) response of peripheral lymphocytes decreased significantly with age in the 0 rad control group and the 200+ rad exposure group, particularly so in the latter. The malignant tumor group also showed lower PHA response than the control group. The PHA response of the chromosomal aberration group was significantly depressed compared with that of the control group. (author)

  4. Differential effects of atomic bomb irradiation in inducing major leukemia types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomonaga, Masao; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Carter, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    In this report we utilize data from the additional 517 cases from the leukemia registry together with the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort data to study the effects of atomic bomb irradiation on major leukemia types. The French-American-British classification and other improved diagnostic methods were used to reclassify cases into 21 categories, including new disease entities such as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). These categories were then grouped into four major types for analysis: (1) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), (2) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), (3) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and (4) OTHER types including ATL. Analyses of radiation effects were based on the updated Dosimetry System 1986(DS86). Incidence rates of all four leukemia types increased with increasing exposure level. The effects of radiation were significantly greater on the incidence of ALL and CML than on that of AML and OTHER. In the two lowest dose categories (1-49 and 50-499 mGy), estimated incidence either remained constant or increased slightly as the population of survivors aged. In the two highest dose categories (500-1,499 and ≥ 1,500 mGy). Among unexposed persons, the estimated risk of CML in Nagasaki relative to Hiroshima was significantly less than that of AML, whereas that of OTHER types was significantly greater. The time to onset of ALL, AML, and CML declined with increasing dose. The rate of decline, however, was greater for ALL and CML than for AML. The resulting differences at high doses reflect shorter incubation times for atomic-bomb-induced ALL and CML than for AML. (J.P.N.)

  5. Malignant tumors during the first 2 decades of life in the offspring of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Y.; Neel, J.V.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H.; Soda, M.; Eto, R.; Mabuchi, K.

    1990-01-01

    The risk of cancer (incidence) prior to age 20 years has been determined for children born to atomic bomb survivors and to a suitable comparison group. Tumor ascertainment was through death certificates and the tumor registries maintained in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The rationale for the study stemmed from the evidence that a significant proportion of such childhood tumors as retinoblastoma and Wilms tumor arise on the basis of a mutant gene inherited from one parent plus a second somatic cell mutation involving the allele of this gene. Gonadal radiation doses were calculated by the recently established DS86 system, supplemented by an ad hoc system for those children for one or both of whose parents a DS86 dose could not be computed but for whom an ad hoc dose could be developed on the basis of the available information. The total data set consisted of (1) a cohort of 31,150 live-born children one or both of whose parents received greater than 0.01 Sv of radiation at the time of the atomic bombings (average conjoint gonad exposure 0.43 Sv) and (2) two suitable comparison groups totaling 41,066 children. Altogether, 43 malignant tumors were ascertained in the children of exposed parents, and 49 malignant tumors were ascertained in the two control groups. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed no increase in malignancy in the children of exposed parents. However, examination of the data suggested that only 3.0-5.0% of the tumors of childhood that were observed in the comparison groups are associated with an inherited genetic predisposition that would be expected to exhibit an altered frequency if the parental mutation rate were increased. There is thus far no confirmation of the positive findings that Nomura found in a mouse system

  6. The incidence of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors: 1950 – 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Preston, Dale L.; Soda, Midori; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kimura, Akiro; Kamada, Nanao; Dohy, Hiroo; Tomonaga, Masao; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Cullings, Harry M.; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-01-01

    A marked increase in leukemia risks was the first and most striking late effect of radiation exposure seen among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. This paper presents analyses of radiation effects on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma incidence in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors updated 14 years since the last comprehensive report on these malignancies. These analyses make use of tumor- and leukemia-registry-based incidence data on 113,011 cohort members with 3.6 million person-years of follow-up from late 1950 through the end of 2001. In addition to a detailed analysis of the excess risk for all leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia (neither of which appear to be radiation-related), we present results for the major hematopoietic malignancy types: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, adult T-cell leukemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Poisson regression methods were used to characterize the shape of the radiation dose response relationship and, to the extent the data allowed, to investigate variation in the excess risks with sex, attained age, exposure age, and time since exposure. In contrast to the previous report that focused on describing excess absolute rates, we considered both excess absolute rate (EAR) and excess relative risk (ERR) models and found that ERR models can often provide equivalent and sometimes more parsimonious descriptions of the excess risk than EAR models. The leukemia results indicated that there was a non-linear dose response for leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia, which varied markedly with time and age at exposure, with much of the evidence for this non-linearity arising from the acute myeloid leukemia risks. Although the leukemia excess risks generally declined with attained age or time since exposure, there was evidence

  7. A survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Yamada, H.; Marks, S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the U.S. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutral-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter. (author)

  8. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oikawa Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN, which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Methods Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. Results The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread, which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05. The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively. The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15. Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40. Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005 independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Conclusions Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for

  9. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide aCGH analysis. Our results suggested that A-bomb

  10. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-12-07

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide aCGH analysis. Our results suggested that A-bomb

  11. Socio-psycho-historical observation on the twin. Sampling methods and case study of the atomic bomb exposed twins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S; Satow, Y; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Munaka, M; Kurihara, M [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1980-07-01

    The so-called ''twin control study'', mainly on the monozygotic twins one of which was A-bomb exposed and the other was non-exposed were carried out. Sampling was conducted utilizing the materials as follows: 1) The survey on casualities of A-bomb exposed families in Hiroshima which was undertaken in 1946. 2) The survey of A-bomb survivors in 1965. 3) A-bomb exposed family survey conducted between 1973 to 1975. 4) Investigations of A-bomb victims exposed in the proximal areas from the hypocenter. From the above mentioned materials 470 pairs were selected, of which 220 were exposed. Among them 172 pairs were twins of the same sex. Female and male pair were also employed. In one case they were exposed, while the others were nonexposed. Two pairs were examined under the following methods: 1) Depth interview to ascertain familial casualities with reference to the family life cycle. 2) Socio-historical research. 3) Motoaki's Jinkaku Shindan Kensa (Modified Rorschach test by H. Motoaki), and T.A.T. test. Results obtained were summarized as follows: 1) Both pairs of twins were of similar appearance and personality traits, and had a strong feeling of companionship for each other. 2) In family relationships, the persons studied were very conscious of the role expectations of elder and younger siblings in the twin pairs. 3) Through depth interviews and projective tests, A-bomb exposed pairs still showed deep psychological stresses, resulting from the A-bomb disaster. 4) Both among the exposed twins and within the nonexposed control group twin siblings had a close feeling of companionship for each other. However, nonexposed twins could not understand the psychological experience of twins who had been subjected to the atomic disaster.

  12. Report on the results of medical examination for atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yutaka; Takayama, Sadamatsu; Ishibashi, Sinzo; Kato, Masashi; Mito, Kazuyo; Nakasaki, Minako; Ito, Chikako

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of results of health screening for A-bomb survivors, performed from 1972 through 1985, yielded the following findings. The subjects were divided into three groups: a group exposed at ≤1,900 m from the hypocenter, a group exposed at ≥2,000 m, and a group of persons who entered the city after the bombing. An average age was higher, irrespective of sex, in the ≤1,900 m group than the ≥ 2,000 m group. The incidence of anemia and leukopenia was higher in women than men, while the incidence of hypertension and positive rates for urinary glucose and protein were higher in men than women. In the ≤1,900 m group, 11 g/dl or less of Hb and 349 x 10 4 of erythrocytes tended to be frequent in men and women, respectively. The incidence of mild anemia and positive rate of urinary glucose have gradually increased since 1972 and become flat since 1977. The positive rate of urinary glucose was increased in both men and women. The incidence of hypertension tended to decrease in both men and women. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, S.; Cologne, J.; Akahoshi, M. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, S.; Kodama, K.; Yoshizawa, H.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze various laboratory indicators of inflammation measured in atomic bomb survivors. Subjects are 6304 survivors who underwent inflammatory tests at RERF between 1998 and 1992 and whose radiation doses (DS86) are available. Inflammatory tests include leukocyte counts, neutrophil counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, corrected erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alpha 1 globulin, alpha 2 globulin, and sialic acid. Adjusting for age, sex, smoking, and city of residence, regression analysis was conducted. Regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and city of residence showed statistically significant associations with radiation dose for leukocyte counts (71.0 /mm{sup 3}/Gy, p=0.00151), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (1.58 mm/hour/Gy, p=0.0001), corrected erythrocyte sedimentation rate (1.14 mm/hour/Gy, p=0.0001), alpha 1 globulin (0.0057 g/dl/Gy, p=0.0001), alpha 2 globulin (0.0128 g/dl/Gy, p=0.0001), and sialic acid (1.2711 mg/dl/Gy, p=0.0001), but not for neutrophil counts (29.9 /mm{sup 3}/Gy, p=0.1729). Standardized scores combining results from these seven inflammatory tests showed significant associations with radiation dose both for persons with and without inflammatory disease, and for two inflammatory conditions in particular, chronic thyroiditis and chronic liver disease. In analyses of data from 403 AHS patients, in whom both inflammation indicators and T-cell ratios were measured, increased inflammation correlates with decreases in CD4 T-cells. Since the laboratory indicators of inflammation that we studied are not specific for particular clinical diseases, the implication of their dose-response-pattern is hard to interpret. The general occurrence of infectious diseases in survivors is not related to radiation dose. Such a relationship does exist, however, for other diseases in which infection may play an etiologic role. Virologic studies in A-bomb survivors have suggested dose-response alterations in immune

  14. Radiation-related ophthalmologic changes and aging among the atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Masanori; Finch, S.C.; Choshi, Kanji; Takaku, Isao; Mishima, Hiromu; Takase, Tomoko.

    1993-05-01

    The relationship of ionizing radiation to the age-related ophthalmologic findings of the 1978-80 ophthalmologic examination of the atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been reanalyzed using Dosimetry System 1986 eye organ dose estimates. The main purpose of this re-evaluation was to determine whether age and radiation exposure have an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect on ophthalmologic changes. The best model fitting axial opacities gives a significant positive effect for both linear dose-response and linear age-related regression coefficients and a significant negative effect for an interaction between radiation dose and age. Such a negative interaction implies an antagonistic effect in that the relative risks with relation to radiation doses decrease with increasing age. This phenomenon suggests that the lenses of younger persons are more sensitive to radiation than are those of older persons. However, the best-fitting relationship for posterior subcapsular changes suggested a linear-quadratic dose response and linear age-related effects. The quadratic estimate of radiation dose squared showed a highly significant effect with a negative trend, but the negative quadratic estimate was so extremely small it had almost no contributive value within an appropriative dose area. These data suggest an additive relationship between aging and radiation for the induction of posterior subcapsular changes, and they also indicate that there is no distinct evidence of a radiation-induced aging effect. The radiation-related relative risks increase with a log linearity. The decrease of visual acuity and accommodation with increasing age were comparable in both exposed and control subjects, with age-related visual acuity decreasing more than accommodation. (J.P.N.)

  15. Malignant breast tumors among Atomic Bomb Survivors, Hirsoshima and Nagasaki, 1950 to 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, M.; Norman, J.E. Jr.; Asano, M.; Tokuoka, S.; Ezaki, H.; Nishimori, I.; Tsuji, Y.

    1979-01-01

    From 1950 to 1974, 360 cases of malignant breast tumors were identified among the 63,000 females of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) Extended Life-Span Study sample of survivors of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; 288 of these females were residing in one of these two cities at the time of bombing (ATB). Two-thirds of all cases were classified as breast cancers on the basis of microscopic review of slides, and 108 cases received an estimated breast tissue dose of at least 10 rads. The number of cases of radiogenic breast cancer could be well estimated by a linear function of radiation dose for tissue doses below 200 rads. Excess risk estimates, based on this function, for women 10 to 19, 20 to 29, 30 to 39, and 50 years old or older ATB were 7.3, 4.2, 2.6, and 4.7 cases per million women per year per rad, respectively. Women irradiated in their forties showed no dose effect. Among all women who received at least 10 rads, those irradiated before age 20 years will have experienced the highest rates of breast cancer throughout their lifetimes. Separate excess risk estimates for Hiroshima and Nagasaki did not differ significantly, which indicates that for radiogenic breast cancer the effects of neutrons (emitted only in the Hiroshima explosion) and gamma radiation were about equal. Radiation did not reduce the latency period for the development of breast cancer, which was at least 10 years. The distribution of histologic types of cancers did not vary significantly with radiation dose. The data suggested that irradiation prior to menarche conferred a greater risk than irradiation after menarche

  16. Hematologic studies of irradiated survivors in Hiroshima, Japan. Refractory anemia occurring in survivors of the atomic bombing in Nagasaki, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasowa, Yoshimichi; Lange, R D; Wright, S W; Tomonaga, Masanobu; Kurasaki, Hirotami; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Matsunaga, Haruji

    1959-01-01

    This document contains 2 reports on the effects of radiation on the survivors of the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first report is a hematologic survey conducted 33 to 44 months after the detonation of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, Japan. The hematologic findings on a total of 824 survivors are compared with those on a control group of 1145 residents of Kure. Although statistical differences are apparent in the two groups, when one takes into account errors inherent in the hematologic methods themselves and differences in the possible incidence of parasitism and nutrition it would be unwarranted to attribute the slight changes found to radiation effect. The data presented here seem to indicate that radiation resulting from the explosion of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, on August 6, 1945, has not significantly varied the hematologic values as analyzed in this report over a three-to four-year period. In the second report, the case histories of six Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors who developed refractory anemia are presented. Four of these individuals received undoubted radiation injury. The fact that refractory anemia may occur as a late manifestation of exposure to atomic radiation is pointed out. 15 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Report on the results of the twelfth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuji; Ohama, Koso; Fujiwara, Saeko

    2000-01-01

    The twelfth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in North America, was conducted in San Francisco and Seattle from May 20 through June 2 1999, and in Los Angeles and Hawaii from June 9 through 23 1999, The examination included an interview, measurement of height, weight, and blood pressure, an ECG, urine and stool tests, blood tests, a physical examination, examination of the breast, thyroid, and rectum by a surgeon, and screening for uterine cancer and a gynecological interview and examination by an obstetrician and gynecologist. The total confirmed number of A-bomb survivors residing in North America as of the end of June 1999 was 1076. Of the 1062 survivors that remained after excluding the 14 subjects whose survey was incomplete, 279 males and 654 females had been exposed in Hiroshima, and 10 males and 119 females in Nagasaki. The peak age at the time of exposure in both sexes was 15-19 years, followed by 10-14 years. The number of survivors exposed <2000 m from the hypocenter was 236, accounting for 21.9% of the total. The confirmed number of survivors exposed in utero was 26. The survivors' age (mean ±S.D.) was: 69.0±8.69 years; males, 68.4±80.5 years; females, 69.2±8.91 years. A total of 414 survivors were examined (male 129; female 285; mean age 68.0 years). Approximately 80% of the examinees had experienced at least one general symptom. Many still complain of symptoms that suggest possible posttraumatic stress disorder as a result of exposure to the A-bomb. It will be necessary to consider providing mental health care by psychiatrists beginning with the next examination. The prevalence of life-style diseases has been gradually increased with age. A previous history of cancer was found in 9.2% of the examinees. The most prevalent was of breast cancer, followed by malignant tumors of the colon, rectum, uterus, brain, stomach, and thyroid. The need for cancer screening and promotion of life-style education was keenly felt. (K.H.)

  18. Report on the results of the twelfth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasuji [Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan); Ohama, Koso; Fujiwara, Saeko (and others)

    2000-06-01

    The twelfth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors residing in North America, was conducted in San Francisco and Seattle from May 20 through June 2 1999, and in Los Angeles and Hawaii from June 9 through 23 1999, The examination included an interview, measurement of height, weight, and blood pressure, an ECG, urine and stool tests, blood tests, a physical examination, examination of the breast, thyroid, and rectum by a surgeon, and screening for uterine cancer and a gynecological interview and examination by an obstetrician and gynecologist. The total confirmed number of A-bomb survivors residing in North America as of the end of June 1999 was 1076. Of the 1062 survivors that remained after excluding the 14 subjects whose survey was incomplete, 279 males and 654 females had been exposed in Hiroshima, and 10 males and 119 females in Nagasaki. The peak age at the time of exposure in both sexes was 15-19 years, followed by 10-14 years. The number of survivors exposed <2000 m from the hypocenter was 236, accounting for 21.9% of the total. The confirmed number of survivors exposed in utero was 26. The survivors' age (mean {+-}S.D.) was: 69.0{+-}8.69 years; males, 68.4{+-}80.5 years; females, 69.2{+-}8.91 years. A total of 414 survivors were examined (male 129; female 285; mean age 68.0 years). Approximately 80% of the examinees had experienced at least one general symptom. Many still complain of symptoms that suggest possible posttraumatic stress disorder as a result of exposure to the A-bomb. It will be necessary to consider providing mental health care by psychiatrists beginning with the next examination. The prevalence of life-style diseases has been gradually increased with age. A previous history of cancer was found in 9.2% of the examinees. The most prevalent was of breast cancer, followed by malignant tumors of the colon, rectum, uterus, brain, stomach, and thyroid. The need for cancer screening and promotion of life-style education was keenly felt. (K.H.)

  19. Report on the results of the seventh medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Kodama, Kazunori; Sasaki, Hideo; Ishibashi, Shinzo; Dote, Keigo; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Hirata, Katsumi; Sugimoto, Sumio.

    1990-01-01

    During a one-month period from June 13 through July 13, 1989, the seventh medical examination was conducted at five cities, including San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, Wailuku and Honolulu, for A-bomb survivors residents in North America. Nine hundred and eighteen A-bomb survivors, including 21 living in Canada, were confirmed, consisting of 234 men and 684 women as of the end of July 1989. The number was increased by 167, compared with that as of the end of July 1987. During the past three years, there were 40 deaths; and 878 A-bomb survivors (223 men and 655 women) are still alive. Ninety percent of the survivors came from Hiroshima. U.S. nationality was seen in 61% and Japanese nationality with permanent U.S. residency rights was seen in 32%. The majority (39%) of the A-bomb survivors were in their fifties, with an average age of 59.4 years. The survivors were residing in 26 states in the USA and in 3 provinces in Canada. The acquisition rate of the A-bomb survivors' health handbook was 52%. Four hundred and six A-bomb survivors participated in the medical examination, including one male and 8 female children born to A-bomb survivors. Questionnaire survey revealed a history of surgical resection for cancer in 21 survivors. Subjective symptoms included complete exhaustion or fatigue, heat intolerance, loss of vigor, and numbness of the body. Overall evaluation revealed the necessity of medical treatment or observation in 71%. This was independent of exposure status. Hypertension was the most common (27%), followed by obesity, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus. Malignant tumors were seen in 9 survivors, consisting of 3 with breast cancer, 2 with colorectal cancer, and single survivors with lung cancer, Hodgkin's disease, cervical cancer, or hepatoma. Only 29% of them have had finantial guarantee for their health management according to the Japanese law. (N.K.)

  20. Chromosome aberrations and oncogene alterations in atomic bomb related leukemias - different mechanisms from de novo leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, H.; Kamada, N.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that leukemia occurred more frequently among atomic bomb survivors. In 132 atomic bomb related ( AB- related) leukemia patients during 1978-1999, 33 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients had their exposure doses of more than 1Gy (DS86). Chromosome aberrations of the 33 patients were compared with those from 588 de novo AML/MDS patients who had been bone before August 1945 as control. No FAB M3 patient was observed in the exposed group. Most AB-related AML preceded a long term of MDS stage. Twenty seven of the 33 patients showed complex types of chromosome aberrations with more than three chromosomes involving chromosomes 5,7 and 11. The number of chromosomes abnormality per cell in the AB-related leukemia was 3.78 while 0.92 in de novo leukemia. Only one of the 33 patients had normal karyotype, while 44.1% in de novo leukemia patients. Translocations of chromosome 11 at 11q13 to 11q23 and deletion/ loss of chromosome 20 were frequently observed in AB-related leukemia. No leukemia-type specific translocations such as t(8;21),t(15;17) and 11q23 were found in the 33 AB-related leukemia patients. Furthermore, molecular analyses using FISH and PCR-SSCP revealed the presence of breakpoint located outside of MLL gene in the patients with translocations at 11q22-23 and DNA base derangements of RUNT domain of AML1(CBF β 2)gene with AML/MDS patients without t(8;21) and with a high dose of exposure. These results suggest that AB-related leukemia derives from an exposed pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell which has been preserved for a long time in the bone marrow, expressing high genetic instability such as microsatellite instability. On the other hand, de novo leukemia develops from a committed hematopoietic stem cell and shows simple and leukemia-type specific chromosome aberrations. These findings are important for understanding mechanisms for radiation-induced leukemia

  1. A search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of proximally and distally exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, Chiyoko; Hamilton, H.B.; Otake, Masanori; Goriki, Kazuaki; Kageoka, Takeshi; Fujita, Mikio; Neriishi, Shotaro; Asakawa, Jun-ichi.

    1981-07-01

    A total of 289,868 locus tests based on 28 different protein phenotypes, employing one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of 'proximally exposed' parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure dose of between 31 and 39 rem from the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of 'distally exposed' parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure. (author)

  2. The articles on atomic bomb of the newspaper in the past 15 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubuki, Satoru; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Hatano, Hiroko

    1990-01-01

    A-bomb hazards are given publicity by journalism every year from the end of the 1960s, especially in July and August, in Japan. This is generally termed 'the publication of A-bomb articles'. This paper outlines 'the publication of A-bomb articles' and introduces the actual conditions of A-bomb hazard problems. Articles were selected from three major national newspapers and two domestic newspapers (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) during the past 15 years from 1975 through 1989. Contents of the articles were divided into 20 categories and subdivided into 92 categories. According to newspaper, the Hiroshima domestic newspaper published the articles in the largest number (approximately 30% of all the articles). Overall, approximately 21% of the articles were published in August. The most common article content was A-bomb survivors' experiences, accounting for 47% before 1981 and 60% since 1982. (N.K.)

  3. Twelve cases of multiple myeloma in Nagasaki (especially seven atomic bombing casualty cases). [In Japanese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M; Yasuhi, S; Ouchuru, S

    1963-12-01

    Since 1958, there have been 12 cases of multiple myeloma in Nagasaki, and among them were 7 cases representing atomic bombing casualties, with 3 cases being with 2 km distance from the hypocenter. The age of onset was between 51 and 69 years, and the sex ratio was 8:4, it occurring mostly in males. Symptoms were predominantly low back pain and chest pain caused by the bone changes in 8 cases. Two cases complained of general malaise and palpitation which resulted from anemia. One developed persistent epistaris, and another complained of diplopia caused by the paralysis of the oculomotor nerve. Peripheral blood in all cases showed anemia, 9 with hyperchromic and 3 with normochromic or hypochromic anemia. Low platelet counts were seen in 3 cases. All showed leukopenia. All cases showed typical ..gamma..-globulin change with a myeloma peak, and in 4 cases showed an increase of ..beta..-globulin. Bence-Jones proteinuria was present in 5 cases. Average course was 1 year 4 months. Among complications, myeloma nephrosis, aplastic anemia, and pneumonia were the most important ones.

  4. Leukemia incidence in the atomic bomb survivor Life Span Study, 1950 - 87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, K.; Kusumi, S.; Izumi, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) is currently preparing a series of reports on cancer incidence in the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of atomic bomb survivors for the period from 1950 to 1987. One of these reports will present analyses of the data on the risk of hematopoietic cancers including leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. These analyses add an additional 11 years of follow-up to the previous comprehensive analysis of the LSS leukemia data. In this presentation, these data are presented and the methods being used modeling the leukemia risks are outlined. An analysis of the leukemia data pooled over subtypes will be used to illustrate these methods. It is shown that the data suggest a non-linear, concave upward dose response and that the temporal pattern of the radiation-induced excess absolute risks (EARs) depends on age-at-exposure and sex. There is no evidence of city differences in the EAR in this pooled analysis. The results suggest that the EARs for the youngest survivors were initially much higher and have declined more rapidly than those for older survivors. The same general pattern is seen both sexes, but the initial peak incidence is somewhat lower and the rate of decline less rapid for women than for men. (author)

  5. Flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte subset in patients with neutropenia among atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Nobutaka; Kimura, Akiro [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1998-12-01

    In 51 patients (atomic bomb survivors 50, unexposed persons 1) who have had neutropenia for two years or more under indistinct cause, cell surface antigen was analyzed by flow cytometry. Twenty-nine cases of survivors were diagnosed as NK cell leukemia or NK cell cytosis because analysis data showed CD3(-), CD56(+) and CD57(+/-). Six cases were diagnosed as NK like T cell hypercytosis because analysis data showed CD3(+), CD56(+/-) and CD57(+). As for 15 cases, CD56(+) cell number was in range of 15.96{+-}5.35 of a normal person, and no relation with NK cell was recognized. But, CD4/CD8 ratio was higher than 2.1, and gain of T helper cell was recognized. One unexposed persons was diagnosed as chronic NK cell leukemia because analysis data showed CD3(-), CD56(+) and CD57(+). Anti-neutrophil antibody wasn't recognized. Cytotoxic activity for K562 and Raji cell line showed high value compared with that of a normal person. Epstein Barr virus wasn't detected. (K.H.)

  6. Report on the results of the ninth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors in South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Michiya; Hiyama, Keiko; Matsuo, Kakaru; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Nishida, Masashi; Sasaki, Yoshinobu

    2001-01-01

    The results of the ninth medical examination are reported. Atomic bomb survivors who had emigrated to South America as of November 2000 totaled 180 (153 to Brazil, 4 to Paraguay, 7 to Bolivia, 13 to Argentina, and 3 to Peru). Eighty persons (44.4%) were examined (62 in Brazil, 2 in Paraguay, 6 in Bolivia, 7 in Argentina, and 3 in Peru). The mean age of the males was 71.3 years, and the mean age of the females was 69.7 years. They had hypertension (24.1%), diabetes (10.1%), cancer (8.9%), heart disease (7.6%), and thyroid disease (2.5%). The most common manifestations of illness were fatigue (69.6%), loss of vigor (65.8%), taking medicine (55.7%), and heat intolerance (53.2%). The incident rates of electrocardiographic abnormalities and urine, blood, and biochemical tests abnormalities were almost the same as at the previous examination, and there was no change in the percentage of those who required detailed tests and treatment. When independence in daily life was judged by the criteria of the nursing care insurance system, 68 persons were judged ''independent'', and 7 persons ''handicapped.'' (K.H.)

  7. Report on the results of the ninth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors in South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Michiya [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Hiyama, Keiko; Matsuo, Kakaru; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Nishida, Masashi; Sasaki, Yoshinobu

    2001-06-01

    The results of the ninth medical examination are reported. Atomic bomb survivors who had emigrated to South America as of November 2000 totaled 180 (153 to Brazil, 4 to Paraguay, 7 to Bolivia, 13 to Argentina, and 3 to Peru). Eighty persons (44.4%) were examined (62 in Brazil, 2 in Paraguay, 6 in Bolivia, 7 in Argentina, and 3 in Peru). The mean age of the males was 71.3 years, and the mean age of the females was 69.7 years. They had hypertension (24.1%), diabetes (10.1%), cancer (8.9%), heart disease (7.6%), and thyroid disease (2.5%). The most common manifestations of illness were fatigue (69.6%), loss of vigor (65.8%), taking medicine (55.7%), and heat intolerance (53.2%). The incident rates of electrocardiographic abnormalities and urine, blood, and biochemical tests abnormalities were almost the same as at the previous examination, and there was no change in the percentage of those who required detailed tests and treatment. When independence in daily life was judged by the criteria of the nursing care insurance system, 68 persons were judged ''independent'', and 7 persons ''handicapped.'' (K.H.)

  8. Chromosomal instability in acute myelocytic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Mitsue; Tanaka, Kimio; Shintani, Takahiro; Takahashi, Tomoko; Kamada, Nanao

    1999-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of leukemogenesis in atomic bomb survivors, leukemic cells were investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis on the basis of conventional G-banding in patients with a history of radiation exposure and also in de novo patients. Conventional G-banding showed higher incidences (p<0.005) of structural and numerical abnormalities without any specific types of chromosome aberrations in the group exposed to a dose of more than one Gy, compared to the non-exposed group. FISH analysis revealed significantly higher incidences (P<0.05) of subclones with monosomy 7 and deletion of the 20q13.2 region, which were not found in conventional cytogenetic analysis in the exposed group (more than one Gy) compared to the non-exposed controls. Furthermore, segmental jumping translocation (SJT) of the c-MYC gene region was observed only in the exposed group. These chromosomal instability suggested that the leukemic cells from the heavily exposed patients contained persistent cellular genetic instability which may strongly influence the development of leukemia in people exposed to radiation. (author)

  9. The shape of the cancer mortality dose-response curve for atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, D.A.; Vaeth, M.

    1989-10-01

    The shape of the cancer mortality dose-response in the atomic bomb survivor data is analyzed in the context of linear-quadratic (LQ) models. Results are given for all cancers except leukemia as a group, for leukemia, and for combined inferences assuming common curvature. Since there is substantial information aside from these data suggesting a dose-response concave from above, the emphasis here is not on estimating the best-fitting dose-response curve, but rather on assessing the maximal extent of curvature under LQ models which is consistent with the data. Such inferences are substantially affected by imprecision in the dose estimates, and methods are applied which make explicit allowances for biases due to this. The primary means used here to express the extent of curvature is the factor by which linear risk estimates should be divided to arrive at appropriate low-dose risk estimates. In the past, influential committees have recommended ranges of 2-10 and of 1.5-3 for such a factor. Results here suggest that values greater than about 2 are at least moderately inconsistent with these data, within the context of LQ models. It is emphasized, however, that there is little direct information in these data regarding low-dose risks; the inferences here depend strongly on the link between low-dose and high-dose risks provided by the assumption of an LQ model. (author)

  10. Available data for house shielding estimates of Japanese atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolson, William A.

    1987-01-01

    To make intelligent decisions concerning the methods to update the dosimetry assignments for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, it is necessary to know the available shielding information that exists in uncoded form on paper and in coded form that can be directly accessed by the computer. The objective of this report is to provide a summary of the available shielding data, both in uncoded and coded form. This report is the result of visits to RERF in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in February and November 1983. The special assistance provided by Mr. Hiroaki Yamada at Hiroshima and Mr. Yoshio Okamoto at Nagasaki is acknowledged. They were in charge of the ABCC shielding sections at their respective locations and have been long involved in the RERF shielding program. Their familiarity with the methods, procedures, and data was of invaluable assistance in this work. The following sections of this report will provide a description of the information that is available in the shielding history files in uncoded form; a brief description of the various shielding methods that were used over the course of time from the T57D system to the present day T65D; and a description of the current coded data bases that can be accessed by computer

  11. Mortality among the offspring (F1) of atomic bomb survivors, 1946-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Schull, W.J.; Kato, Hiroo; Neel, J.V.

    1991-01-01

    We compare the mortality in the years of 1946-85 in a cohort of 31,159 children born to parents one or both of whom were exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (a parental gonadal dose ≥0.01 Sv) with that in a control group of 41,069 children. The average gonadal dose for the exposed parents was 0.435 Sv. The mean age of the cohorts was 28.8 years. In the ≥0.01 Sv dose group 1,253 deaths were observed in the subset of children both of whose parents have been assigned DS86 doses. 3.2% were attributed to cancers, 72.9% to all diseases except neoplasms. These proportions in the 0 Sv dose group were about the same. Based on a linear relative risk model, no statistically significant increase in the mortality attributable to diseases other than neoplasms is noted following parental exposure, the excess relative risk being 0.030 (±0.046) per sievert based on the DS86 doses (RBE of neutrons=20). For fatal cancer, no statistically significant effect of parental radiation dose was also observed. An analysis based on the full sample, using not only the DS86 dose group but also ad hoc dose group, yields essentially the same results as the analysis restricted to the DS86 dose group. (author)

  12. Autopsy findings of the first and second filial generations of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, Yukio

    1992-01-01

    Autopsy findings of 652 fetuses whose parents or one parent were exposed to the Atomic Bomb (F 1 ) and 115 fetuses which had one or two grandparents exposed (F 2 ) were compared with that of 8570 fetuses whose parents were not exposed (control). The F 1 fetuses have been collected since 1963 and F 2 fetuses since 1971 voluntarily in Hiroshima. The findings were classified according to the types of delivery and to the distances away from the hypocenter where the parents and grandparents were exposed. Many normal cases in the group of artificial abortions and many malformations and pathological findings in the group of spontaneous abortions were found in both groups of F 1 and F 2 . The malformations were cardiovascular, central nervous and urogenital system, quantitatively in that order, in both groups of F 1 and F 2 . Although there were a few cases of cystic kidney and chondrodystrophy which belong to autosomal dominant and osteogenesis imperfecta which belong to autosomal recessive, these cases were not correlated with the distance. Most cases of malformation which belong to the multifactorial inheritance were found in each organ. No peculiar malformation was found in the groups of F 1 and F 2 . (author)

  13. Autopsy findings of the first and second filial generations of atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satow, Yukio (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology)

    1992-01-01

    Autopsy findings of 652 fetuses whose parents or one parent were exposed to the Atomic Bomb (F[sub 1]) and 115 fetuses which had one or two grandparents exposed (F[sub 2]) were compared with that of 8570 fetuses whose parents were not exposed (control). The F[sub 1] fetuses have been collected since 1963 and F[sub 2] fetuses since 1971 voluntarily in Hiroshima. The findings were classified according to the types of delivery and to the distances away from the hypocenter where the parents and grandparents were exposed. Many normal cases in the group of artificial abortions and many malformations and pathological findings in the group of spontaneous abortions were found in both groups of F[sub 1] and F[sub 2]. The malformations were cardiovascular, central nervous and urogenital system, quantitatively in that order, in both groups of F[sub 1] and F[sub 2]. Although there were a few cases of cystic kidney and chondrodystrophy which belong to autosomal dominant and osteogenesis imperfecta which belong to autosomal recessive, these cases were not correlated with the distance. Most cases of malformation which belong to the multifactorial inheritance were found in each organ. No peculiar malformation was found in the groups of F[sub 1] and F[sub 2]. (author).

  14. Chromosome break points of T-lymphocytes from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Ohkita, Takeshi

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome break points of T-lymphocytes were investigated for 9 atomic bomb survivors estimated to be irradiated with 100 - 630 red. Chromosome aberration was found in 199 cells out of 678 cells investigated, with non-random distribution. The types of the chromosome aberration were, transfer: 56%, deficit: 38%, additional abnormality 3%, and reverse: 2%. High and low incidence of chromosome aberrations were observed at the chromosome numbers of 22, 21, and 13, and 11, 12, and 4, respectively. The aberration numbers per arm were high in 22q, 21q, and 18p and low in 11q, 5p, and 12q. For the distribution of aberration number within a chromosome, 50.7% was observed at the terminal portion and 73% was at the pale band appeared by Q-partial-stain method, suggesting the non-random distribution. The incidence of aberration number in 22q was statistically significant (P 1 chromosome in chronic myelocytic leukemia. The non-random distribution of chromosome break points seemed to reflect the selection effect since irradiation. (Nakanishi, T.)

  15. Changes of disease incidence among atomic-bomb survivors 1956-78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao; Matsushita, Hiroshi.

    1978-01-01

    Statistical observation was made concerning changes with time of incidences of various diseases in autopsy cases since 1956 when Atomic Bomb Hospital was established, and the following results were obtained. The incidence of lung cancer tended to increase in men and women of both groups (an exposed group and a non-exposed group). A marked decrease of the incidence of leukemia was recognized in men and women of both groups, and a decrease of that of malignant lymphoma was recognized in men. The incidence of liver cirrhosis and hepatic cancer tended to decrease in men and women of both groups. The incidence of colon cancer tended to increase in both groups, but that of stomach cancer decreased recently in men and women of both groups. Incidences of digestive organ diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular disorder, and respiratory organ diseases tended to increase in both groups, but urinary tract diseases, infectious diseases, and blood diseases tended to decrease in both groups, which suggested an increase of older persons' diseases due to aging of the exposed. Incidences of various diseases in the exposed changed almost in parallel with those in the non-exposed, and a difference in incidences of various diseases tended to be shortened. (Tsunoda, M.)

  16. Infectious diseases in atomic bomb survivors. Statistical study on autopsy cases, 1965--1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, T; Ishida, S [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Matsushita, H

    1976-09-01

    Incidences of various infectious diseases in 986 autopsy cases at Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital and Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital from 1965 to 1975 were compared according to the distance from the explosion place, and the following results were obtained. There was not a significant difference at incidences of most infectious diseases between each exposured group and not-exposured group. Incidence of old tuberculosis focus was a little higher in exposured groups, but incidences of main lesions such as tuberculosis, active tuberculosis, and miliary tuberculosis were lower in exposured groups and effect of exposure was negative. Out of urinary tract infections, the nearer the distance to the explosion place was, the higher incidence of cistitis in female was. Incidence of cystitis of female was higher than that of male in the group exposured near to the explosion place. With respect to stomach cancer, leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and cerebrovascular disorder, the nearer the distance to the explosion place was, the higher incidences of various infectious diseases were.

  17. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation. Artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the ‘integrate-and-fire’ algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (1) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (2) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to 239 Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation–environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking. (author)

  18. A time series analysis on an individual data of atomic-bomb survivors and reduction to a medical treatment of atomic-bomb survivors using the results, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Hiroshi; Hamada, Tadao; Kawagoe, Kazuko; Shigenobu, Takuzo; Matsuura, Chifumi.

    1980-01-01

    To prevent death of a-bomb survivors with myocardial infarction, a time series analysis of conditions of death caused by myocardial infarction was performed. Six a-bomb survivors who died of myocardial infarction were selected as subjects because their time series data could be obtained. Growth-equilibrium curves and polynomial trend line obtained from time series analysis were analysed by using a computer. Changes in a white blood cell count, a erythrocyte count, and Hb showed patterns of hemorrhagic shock at a terminal stage. Essential condition necessary for preservation of damaged heart was to keep up an erythrocyte count of 3,060,000 and Hb of 64.7%. The borderline between life and death was systolic pressure of 54 mmHg. It was demonstrated that prof. Abe's theory that the condition necessary for controlling diabetis is to keep up fasting glucose in blood of 140 mg/dl was correct. (Tsunoda, M.)

  19. Neutron-induced {sup 63}Ni activity and microscopic observation of copper samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: shizuma@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Quantum Energy Applications, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Endo, Satoru [Quantum Energy Applications, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Shinozaki, Kenji [Materials Joining Science and Engineering, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Fukushima, Hiroshi [Materials Physics, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2013-05-01

    Fast neutron activation data for {sup 63}Ni in copper samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb are important in evaluating neutron doses to the survivors. Up to until now, accelerator mass spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting methods have been applied in {sup 63}Ni measurements and data were accumulated within 1500 m from the hypocenter. The slope of the activation curve versus distance shows reasonable agreement with the calculation result, however, data near the hypocenter are scarce. In the present work, two copper samples obtained from the Atomic bomb dome (155 m from the hypocenter) and the Bank of Japan building (392 m) were utilized in {sup 63}Ni beta-ray measurement with a Si surface barrier detector. Additionally, microscopic observation of the metal surfaces was performed for the first time. Only upper limit of {sup 63}Ni production was obtained for copper sample of the Atomic bomb dome. The result of the {sup 63}Ni measurement for Bank of Japan building show reasonable agreement with the AMS measurement and to fast neutron activation calculations based on the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) neutrons.

  20. The grave is wide: the Hibakusha of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the legacy of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and the Radiation Effects Research Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Gerald F

    2016-07-01

    Following the atomic bomb attacks on Japan in 1945, scientists from the United States and Japan joined together to study the Hibakusha - the bomb affected people in what was advertised as a bipartisan and cooperative effort. In reality, despite the best efforts of some very dedicated and earnest scientists, the early years of the collaboration were characterized by political friction, censorship, controversy, tension, hostility, and racism. The 70-year history, scientific output and cultural impact of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and the Radiation Effects Research Foundation are described in the context of the development of Occupied Japan.

  1. Report on the results of the second medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitsuna, Akimitsu; Monzen, Tetsuo; Oguma, Nobuo; Sakuma, Saburo; Takata, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Yoshiaki; Sakata, Morimitsu.

    1987-01-01

    In October 9 - 31, 1986, the second medical examination for A-bomb survivors was undertaken in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru. Among 173 recognized A-bomb survivors in the five countries, 126 (73 %) participated in the examination, consisting of 61 men and 65 women. Seventy-eight A-bomb survivors came from Hiroshima and 48 from Nagasaki. The average age was 55.6 +- 9.7 years for men and 56.5 +- 9.8 years for women. The acquisition rate of ''Survivor's Health Handbook'' was 34 %. Gastric cancer was observed in two survivors and cervical cancer in one survivor. Major subjective symptoms were: fatigue, sensation of paralysis, heat intolerance, decreased physical strength, and itching. None of the abnormal findings were observed in 33 %. The incidence of hypertension, obesity, cardiac disease, and liver disease was high. The incidence of hypercholesteremia and diabetes mellitus was lower than that in the USA. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Mutations detected in the repetitive sequences in the children of the atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Kodaira, Mieko

    1994-01-01

    We have been examining genetic effects of radiation in the children of the atomic bomb survivors. In a pilot study, 50 exposed families with 64 children and 50 control families with 60 children were examined for trinucleotide repeat expansion mutations at 3 loci and mutations at 6 minisatellite loci. Average dose of the 51 exposed parents was 1.8 Sv. By examining 124 children of 100 families, 65 germ cells derived from exposed parents and 183 germ cells of non-exposed parents were examined. The trinucleotide repeat expansions in genes of certain human genetic diseases show remarkable variation both within the cells of a single individual and among affected members of a single family which have been interpreted as mitotic and meiotic instability. We examined the regions with triplet repeats in the FMR-1, AR and DM genes causative for fragile X syndrome, spinobulbar muscular atrophy and myotonic dystrophy. No mutations were detected in 177 regions derived from 65 germ cells of exposed parents and 443 regions from 183 germ cells of non-exposed parents. No effects on the instability of the triplet repeats in the germ cells derived from exposed or unexposed individuals were observed. In the examinations of the 6 minisatellite loci of Pc-1, λTM-18, ChdTC-15, pλg3, λMS-1, and CEB-1, we detected single mutations at each of the pλg3 and λMS-1, and 4 mutations at the CEB-1 locus which had occurred in the 65 gametes in the exposed parents. Thus, mutation rates per gamete at the pλg3, λMS-1 and CEB-1 were 1.5%, 1.5% and 6.2%. On the other hand, mutations in these 3 loci in the 183 gametes of non-exposed parents were 0, 11 and 11, that is, the mutation rates per gamete were 0%, 6.0% and 6.0%. No significant difference was observed in the mutation rate at each of the 3 loci between 2 groups of parents. These preliminary results suggest that A-bomb exposure seems not to affect the germline instability at these 3 loci. (J.P.N)

  3. Detection of de novo single nucleotide variants in offspring of atomic-bomb survivors close to the hypocenter by whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Makiko; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Chisa; Kinoshita, Akira; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tsuruda, Kazuto; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Sato, Shinya; Imanishi, Daisuke; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Hata, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro

    2018-03-01

    Ionizing radiation released by the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 caused many long-term illnesses, including increased risks of malignancies such as leukemia and solid tumours. Radiation has demonstrated genetic effects in animal models, leading to concerns over the potential hereditary effects of atomic bomb-related radiation. However, no direct analyses of whole DNA have yet been reported. We therefore investigated de novo variants in offspring of atomic-bomb survivors by whole-genome sequencing (WGS). We collected peripheral blood from three trios, each comprising a father (atomic-bomb survivor with acute radiation symptoms), a non-exposed mother, and their child, none of whom had any past history of haematological disorders. One trio of non-exposed individuals was included as a control. DNA was extracted and the numbers of de novo single nucleotide variants in the children were counted by WGS with sequencing confirmation. Gross structural variants were also analysed. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants prior to the study. There were 62, 81, and 42 de novo single nucleotide variants in the children of atomic-bomb survivors, compared with 48 in the control trio. There were no gross structural variants in any trio. These findings are in accord with previously published results that also showed no significant genetic effects of atomic-bomb radiation on second-generation survivors.

  4. Psychological problems of atomic bomb survivors from the medical social worker's standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoike, Toshio

    1994-01-01

    Mental data from 80 A-bomb survivors were available during a 20-year period 1973-1992. Types of A-bomb survivors were classified into (1) directly exposed A-bomb survivors, (2) A-bomb survivors living in the United States, (3) those living in prefectures other than Nagasaki, (4) ex-soldiers, (5) A-bomb survivors having family problems and others, (6) the demented elderly, (7) the alcoholic, and (8) others. Mental problems were judged as psychogenic, endogenous, and exogenous. Mental problems were most frequently associated with Type 1 (34.9%), followed by Type 8 (21.0%), Type 2 (18.6%), and Type 3 (7.0%). Noticeable finding was that Type 1 A-bomb survivors suffered from psychogenic and exogenous mental problems in an extremely high incidence, as compared with the non-exposed group (66.3% vs 24%). The incidence of both exogenous and endogenous problems was higher in the non-exposed group (32.6% and 24.5%) than the exposed group (23.2% and 10.5%). There was no significant gender difference in the development of mental problems. According to types of A-bomb survivors, both psychogenic and exogenous mental problems were most common for Type 1. The incidence of psychogenic problems was 2.85 times higher than that of exogenous problems. (N.K.)

  5. Psychological problems of atomic bomb survivors from the medical social worker`s standpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomoike, Toshio [Japanese Red Cross Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Mental data from 80 A-bomb survivors were available during a 20-year period 1973-1992. Types of A-bomb survivors were classified into (1) directly exposed A-bomb survivors, (2) A-bomb survivors living in the United States, (3) those living in prefectures other than Nagasaki, (4) ex-soldiers, (5) A-bomb survivors having family problems and others, (6) the demented elderly, (7) the alcoholic, and (8) others. Mental problems were judged as psychogenic, endogenous, and exogenous. Mental problems were most frequently associated with Type 1 (34.9%), followed by Type 8 (21.0%), Type 2 (18.6%), and Type 3 (7.0%). Noticeable finding was that Type 1 A-bomb survivors suffered from psychogenic and exogenous mental problems in an extremely high incidence, as compared with the non-exposed group (66.3% vs 24%). The incidence of both exogenous and endogenous problems was higher in the non-exposed group (32.6% and 24.5%) than the exposed group (23.2% and 10.5%). There was no significant gender difference in the development of mental problems. According to types of A-bomb survivors, both psychogenic and exogenous mental problems were most common for Type 1. The incidence of psychogenic problems was 2.85 times higher than that of exogenous problems. (N.K.).

  6. Report on results of medical survey of atomic bomb survivors residing in South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Akio; Monzen, Tetsuo; Inamizu, Tsutomu; Oguma, Nobuo; Yotsuya, Koichi; Ozaki, Shinpei; Takamatsu, Katsuro; Kawaguchi, Kiyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Medical survey of A-bomb survivors was made from October 21 through November 7, 1985 in Brazil, Argentine, and Paraguay. One hundred fifty four A-bomb survivors were identified in these three countries. Of these A-bomb survivors, 133 (86 %) participated in this survey. Eighy six survivors came from Hiroshima and the other 47 from Nagasaki. The average age of them was 55.8 +- 11.1 yr for men and 56.3 +- 9.9 yr for women. Abnormal findings requiring detailed examinations and life instruction were seen in 56 % of the participants. Common findings were hypertension, heart disease, and obesity. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Report on the results of the tenth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Jun; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The 10th medical examination of A-bomb survivors resident in North America was conducted from 6 June to 6 July 1995 in L.A., S.F., Seattle, Wailuku, and Honolulu. Since this is the 10th medical examination, results of the previous examination are summarized. With the exclusion of 55 whose death has been confirmed, the total registered number of A-bomb survivors resident in North America is 1,043. The examinees in the present examination amounted to 463 (48 of them are the children of A-bomb survivors), 26 of whom are newly registered survivors. The mean age of the examinees in 64 years. The proportion of those having US nationality gradually increased and reached 62% at the time of the 10th examination, while that of those who have Japanese nationality and permanent US residency rights decreased to 30%. When the examination program was initiated, A-bomb survivors resident in 15 states of the US, but now, in Canada and 31 states of the US. About 90% of these survivors reside along the west coast of the US including Hawaii. The number of holders of A-bomb survivor's health handbook has increased year after year, reaching 612. When the holders in North-America visit Japan for medical treatment, they are treated similarly with their counterparts in Japan. The major subjective symptoms are complete exhaustion or fatigue, heat intolerance, loss of vigor, and numbness or tingling. The prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus and the proportion of abnormal ECG findings has been increasing with the age. The prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was high and that of low HDL cholesterolemia was low. A significant difference was observed between the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and North America. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes mellitus were observed mainly. Diseased of specific places were not observed. (H.O.)

  8. Report on the results of the tenth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Jun [Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan); Ohta, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Hideo [and others

    1996-01-01

    The 10th medical examination of A-bomb survivors resident in North America was conducted from 6 June to 6 July 1995 in L.A., S.F., Seattle, Wailuku, and Honolulu. Since this is the 10th medical examination, results of the previous examination are summarized. With the exclusion of 55 whose death has been confirmed, the total registered number of A-bomb survivors resident in North America is 1,043. The examinees in the present examination amounted to 463 (48 of them are the children of A-bomb survivors), 26 of whom are newly registered survivors. The mean age of the examinees in 64 years. The proportion of those having US nationality gradually increased and reached 62% at the time of the 10th examination, while that of those who have Japanese nationality and permanent US residency rights decreased to 30%. When the examination program was initiated, A-bomb survivors resident in 15 states of the US, but now, in Canada and 31 states of the US. About 90% of these survivors reside along the west coast of the US including Hawaii. The number of holders of A-bomb survivor`s health handbook has increased year after year, reaching 612. When the holders in North-America visit Japan for medical treatment, they are treated similarly with their counterparts in Japan. The major subjective symptoms are complete exhaustion or fatigue, heat intolerance, loss of vigor, and numbness or tingling. The prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus and the proportion of abnormal ECG findings has been increasing with the age. The prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was high and that of low HDL cholesterolemia was low. A significant difference was observed between the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and North America. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes mellitus were observed mainly. Diseased of specific places were not observed. (H.O.).

  9. Measurements of europium-152 depth profile of stone embankments exposed the Nagasaki atomic bomb for neutron spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi-Miyajima, Junko; Shimasaki, Tatsuya; Okajima, Shunzo; Takada, Jitsuya; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki; Okumura, Yutaka; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of neutron-induced radionuclide of 152 Eu in rocks near the hypocenter (ground center of the atomic bomb explosion) in Nagasaki was performed to obtain the depth profiles and calculate the neutron energy spectrum. Core samples were drilled and taken from the stone embankments on both sides of river within a radius of 500 m from the hypocenter. After cutting each core into about 27 mm-thick sections, each section was measured its gamma-ray spectrum with a pure germanium semiconductor detector and analyzed a content of natural europium by the activation method. The highest value 8.0 x 10 -2 Bq/μg of 152 Eu at the time of the blast was obtained from the surface plates of rock cores collected near the hypocenter. The surface activity of cores was reduced with increasing the slant distances from the hypocenter. The slopes of the depth profiles were similar among samples taken from the same location. In order to analyze the depth profile of 152 Eu activity in rock andesite, experiments using a fast neutron reactor and thermal neutron reactor were carried out. Comparing the measurements on the A-bomb exposure rock with the simulated results at the reactors, among the experiments, the depth profile using the neutron moderator of 10 mm polyethylene was closed to that obtained from the A-bomb exposed samples. The experiment of thermal neutron incidence only could not reproduce the profiles from the A-bomb exposed samples. This fact indicates that the depth profiles of 152 Eu in rock exposed to the A-bomb include valuable information concerning the neutron spectrum and intensity. (author)

  10. Patient with pure red cell aplasia who was exposed to the atomic bomb near the site of blast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, N; Matsukuma, G; Uchiyama, E; Tsunoo, S; Anpi, S [Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan)

    1976-03-01

    This paper describes a female patient who had been exposed at the age of 26 to the atomic bomb at a distance of 1.3 km from the bombed area. She was pointed out to have anemia and the disturbance of the liver in 1961. In 1963, she had iron deficiency, hypoleucocytosis, and hyper-..gamma.. globulinemia, and showed a high value of serum colloids. In 1969, she had more frequently anemia together with hyper ..gamma..-globulinemia. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum colloids were still high. The positive reaction to the LE cells began to appear. The liver biopsy findings showed proliferation of Kupper cells in the lobule, decidual degeneration of some liver cells, infiltration of many round cells in the Glisson's sheath. Therefore, she was diagnosed as having pure red cell aplasia and lupoid hepatitis. However, in 1970 she was suspected of having pulmonary valvular insufficiency caused by pulmonary hypertension in spite of the continuous steroid therapy. In 1974, she died of jundice, hyper-..gamma..-globulinemia which accompanied urea in the blood and the increased values of nitrogen and NH/sub 3/. This patient was considered to be interested on the assumption of the relationships between exposure to the atomic bomb and disturbance of immunity.

  11. Prevalence rate of thyroid diseases among autopsy cases of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1951-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Ezaki, Haruo; Etoh, Ryozo; Hiraoka, Toshio; Akiba, Suminori

    1995-01-01

    To examine the radiogenic risk of latent thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma, colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis, the date for 3821 subjects collected in the course of autopsies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima from 1951 to 1985 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) were analyzed using a logistic model. About 80% of the autopsies were performed at RERF and the remainder at local hospitals. The frequencies of the above diseases were not associated with whether the underlying cause of death was cancer. However, note that our results may be influenced by potentially biasing factors associated with autopsy selection. The relative frequency of latent thyroid cancer (greatest dimension ≤1.5 cm but detectable on a routine microscopic slide of the thyroid gland) increased as the radiation dose increased and was about 1.4-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. The relative occurrence of thyroid adenoma also increased as radiation dose increased, and was about 1.5-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. Sex, age at the time of the bombing or period of observation did not significantly modify the radiogenic risks for thyroid adenoma or latent thyroid cancer. No statistically significant association was found between radiation exposure and the rates of colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis. The possible late effect of atomic bomb radiation on the frequency of benign thyroid diseases is discussed on the basis of these data. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Report on the results of the fifth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the United States and Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Inamizu, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Hideo; Niimi, Masanobu; Yamada, Hiroaki; Doko, Fumio; Sugimoto, Sumio.

    1986-01-01

    The 5th medical examination of A-bomb survivors resident in North America was conducted from 11 June to 18 July 1985 in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, Maui, and Honolulu in the US and in Vancouver in Canada. A total of 682 A-bomb survivors (177 men and 505 women) were confirmed as of the end of July 1985, including 23 who died. Among them, 90.7 % were exposed to A-bombing in Hiroshima. By nationality, 60.8 % and 35.3 % of the survivors possessed US nationality and Japanese nationality with permanent US residency right, respectively. The mean age of the survivors was 56.4 years. By residence, 445 of 659 A-bomb survivors (67.5 %) were residing in California. The rate of health handbook acquisition was 33.2 %. Questionnaires performed in 350 survivors revealed a history of cancer in 16 survivors, and subjective symptoms, such as fatigue, heat intolerance, itching, loss of vigor, and chest pain, in high frequencies. The medical examination performed in 339 survivors, including 115 participating in it for the first time, revealed no abnormality in 12.3 %, and higher incidence of hypertension and heart diseases than those in the previous examinations. According to the Japanese law, health management allowance would be payable in 30.3 % of the survivors with a certain disease. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Reanalysis of atomic bomb survivors' leukemia based on the recent classification for leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao.

    1990-01-01

    Four hundred and ninety-three A-bomb survivors developing leukemia, who had been exposed within 9,000 m from the hypocenter, were entered on the study for reanalysis of their disease based on the new classification. Chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) showed the highest concordance rate (95%) between the previous and new classifications. For 10 survivors previously diagnosed as having chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a new classification diagnosed CLL as well in 3 and adult T-cell leukemia in the other 7. None of the A-bomb survivors exposed to one Gy or more had subtype M3 of acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), although the exposed group had almost the same distribution pattern of AML subtypes as the naturally induced leukemic group. The incidence of CML was significantly lower than that of AML in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. As A-bomb survivors were older at the time of A-bombing, the relative risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was decreased; that of CML and other types of leukemia was increased. An increased relative risk of ALL and CML tended to be associated with larger doses. A significantly shortened interval between A-bomb exposure and the development of leukemia was also associated with larger doses. (N.K.)

  14. Joint analysis of site-specific cancer risks for the atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, D.A.; Preston, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Statistical methods are presented for joint analysis of site-specific cancer risks for the atomic-bomb survivors. Previous analyses of these data, aside from those on leukemia, have been made either without regard to cancer type, or separately for types or classes of cancers. Clearly, analyses without regard to cancer type are less than satisfactory. The primary advantages of joint, rather than separate, analyses are that (1) models can be fitted with parameters common to cancer types, which can allow more-precise estimation of effects of interest, (2) significance tests can be used to compare type-specific risks, and (3) a clearer understanding may be obtained of risk-modification factors such as sex, age at exposure, and time since exposure. Joint analysis is straightforward, entailing primarily the incorporation of another factor for cancer type in the usual cross-tabulation of the data for analysis. The use of these methods is illustrated in an analysis of the three categories of cancer studied by the fifth Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR V): digestive, respiratory, and other solid tumors. Based on this analysis, some criticism is made of the BEIR V-preferred models. Since the proposed methods are applicable to models for either relative or absolute risks, some comments on the use of explicit models for the absolute excess risk are also given. Although some of the gains from joint analysis are apparent from the results here, it will be important to use these methods with a more suitable choice of cancer classes and for cancer incidence data in which the diagnoses are more accurate. (author)

  15. Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, E.; Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Thompson, D.E.; Soda, Midori

    1994-01-01

    This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Congenital malformations, stillbirths, and early mortality among the children of atomic bomb survivors: A reanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, M.; Schull, W.J.; Neel, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Of all the data sets pertinent to the estimation of the genetic risks to humans following exposure to ionizing radiation, potentially the most informative is that composed of the cohort of children born to atomic bomb survivors. We present here an analysis of the relationship between parental exposure history and untoward pregnancy outcomes within this cohort, using to the fullest extent possible the recently revised estimates of the doses received by their parents, the so-called DS86 doses. Available for study are 70,073 terminations, but DS86 doses have not been or presently cannot be computed on the parents of 14,770. The frequency of untoward pregnancy outcomes, defined as a pregnancy terminating in a child with a major congenital malformation, and/or stillborn, and/or dying in the first 14 days of life, increases with combined (summed) parental dose, albeit not significantly so. Under a standard linear model, when the sample of observations is restricted to those children whose parents have been assigned the newly established DS86 doses (n = 55,303), ignoring concomitant sources of variation and assuming a neutron RBE of 20, the estimated increase per sievert in the predicted frequency of untoward outcomes is 0.00354 (+/- 0.00343). After adjustment for concomitant sources of variation, the estimated increase per sievert in the proportion of such births is 0.00422 (+/- 0.00342) if the neutron RBE is assumed to be 20. A one-hit model with appropriate adjustments for extraneous sources of variation results in an almost identical value, namely, 0.00412 (+/- 0.00364)

  17. Cytogenetic study of the offspring of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awa, A.A.; Honda, Takeo; Neriishi, Shotaro

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a cytogenetic study on 8,322 children born to atomic bomb survivors (4,716 in Hiroshima and 3,606 in Nagasaki) and 7,976 controls (5,112 in Hiroshima and 2,864 in Nagasaki). Because no child was examined before age 12, the data may not be considered valid for the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities that impose a high risk of early death. Thus, we will restrict our comparison to the sex-chromosome aneuploids and autosomal structural rearrangements of the balanced type, although other abnormalities encountered in this survey will be enumerated. Among the children born to exposed parents, 19 individuals (0.23 %) exhibited sex chromosome abnormalities and 23 (0.28 %) exhibited autosomal structural rearrangements, whereas among children born to unexposed parents, 24 (0.30 %) and 27 (0.34 %), respectively, were observed to exhibit these abnormalities. Only one child with a karyotype of 47,XY,+21 was found in the Hiroshima exposed group. Thus, there was no statistically significant difference in the overall frequencies of cytogenetically abnormal cases between the exposed (0.52 %) and control (0.64 %) populations. In Hiroshima, frequencies of chromosome abnormalities were similar between exposed and control groups (0.64 % vs 0.65 %). However, the value observed in the exposed group in Nagasaki was slightly lower (0.36 %) - though not statistically significant - than the value observed in the control group (0.63 %). This value of the Nagasaki control group was similar to that in Hiroshima. Family studies on probands with chromosome abnormalities revealed that the majority of cases (about 90 %) with autosomal structural rearrangements of the balanced type were inherited from one or the other parent. The mutation rates for these reaarangements were similar between the exposed and control groups, being 0.98 x 10 -4 per gamete per generation. (author)

  18. Breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-69. Pathologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D H [Veterans Administration Hospital, Kansas (USA); Land, C E; Choi, K; Tokuoka, S; Liu, P I

    1981-01-01

    The pathological features of 161 cases of breast cancer --7% noninfiltrating carcinoma, 47% nonspecific infiltrating duct carcinoma, 21% nonfiltrating papillary duct carcinoma, 7% comedo carcinoma, 6% medullary carcinoma, 6% colloid carcinoma, 4% lobular carcinoma, and 2% sarcoma-- were investigated and their relation to irradiation dosage due to the atomic bomb was studied. Irradiation dosage was estimated from T65 dosage, the total dosage of ..gamma..-rays and neutrons in unshielded tissue. However, there was no relation between the dosage and any specific tissue type. Breast cancers were classified as either type I, type II, or type III according to the histological grade, and each grade was divided according to the degree of differentiation, multiplicity, and mitiotic activity. The pathological characteristics, lymphatic infiltration, fibrosis, necrosis, localization, calcification, and vascular, perineurial, muscular, and dermal invasion were investigated in each case. The histological grade and the incidence of localized invasion, necrosis, localization, and calcification were lower in the patients who were irradiated with more than 50 rad than in those who were not irradiated. The absolute risk rate for breast cancer was estimated to increase by 1.9 cases/100,000 rad from 1950 to 1969. This increase was much smaller than that estimated from x-ray irradiation during medical treatment in North America. The dose response curves at Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar and fitted well with a linear model, suggesting that the effect of ..gamma..-rays was analogous to that of neutrons in inducing cancer. The problems involved in the histological classification of breast cancer and the histological differences between cancer patients in Japan and in the U.S.A. were discussed.

  19. Capillary microscopic observations on the superficial minute vessels of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima 1972-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuya, Akira; Wakano, Yoichi; Otake, Masanori; Dock, D.S.

    1978-04-01

    Microscopic and photographic studies were conducted in 1972-73 at ABCC in Hiroshima on the morphology of superficial blood vessels of A-bomb survivors to determine whether the somatic effects of radiation still existed 30 years after the A-bomb. Control curves representing the relationship between age and score values assigned to morphological changes of the minute blood vessels of the fingernail fold, labial mucosa, and lingual mucosa, which could be regarded as an index of aging, were obtained. These were compared with similar curves obtained from A-bomb survivors with the aim of evaluating the effect of radiation on the aging process of these vessels. The late somatic effects of irradiation which were demonstrated 10 years after the A-bomb in a previous study (1956-57) were found to persist in the current study (1972-73) conducted 30 years after the A-bomb though not as pronounced as in the earlier study. A significant effect was observed only in the fingernail fold of those exposed to 100 rad or more under the age of 10 at the time of the bomb. A statistically significant difference was not observed for labial mucosa and lingual mucosa because the number of cases available for scoring was small, but a trend was observed for abnormalities of these two sites to be higher in frequency in the 100+ rad group under the age of 10 ATB than that of the control group. No significant difference was observed between the control and exposed with regard to radiation effect on the aging process using the relationship of score values to age as an index of aging. This is in accord with results of studies of A-bomb survivors which suggested that radiation induces life shortening attributable primarily to cancers, but not a general acceleration of the aging phenomenon. (author)

  20. Incidence of skin cancer in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors based on DS86 dosimetry system, 1958-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadamori, Naoki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Otake, Masanori; Honda, Takeo

    1992-03-01

    The incidence of skin cancer during the period 1958-1985 was examined in the population registered in the life span study extension (LSSE) and the adult health study (AHS). Among 25,942 A-bomb survivors in whom DS86 was available, skin cancer was confirmed in 47 A-bomb survivors. These A-bomb survivors consisted of 24 males and 23 females. According to DS86 dosimetry system, ten A-bomb survivors had been exposed to 0.50 Gy or more. The most common histology was basal cell epithelioma (n=25), followed by malignant melanoma (n=4) and basosquamous cell carcinoma and sweat gland carcinoma (one each). In the group of 0.50 Gy or more, the incidence of occurrence of skin cancer was 20.8/100,000 population per year (PY) for the LSSE population and 22.8/100,000 PY for the AHS population. In the group of 0.01-0.49 Gy, it was 6.8/100,000 PY for the LSSE population and 12.8/100,000 PY for the AHS population. It was significantly associated with higher exposure doses. The dose-response relationship was linear. (N.K.).

  1. Study on cardiac function in atomic bomb survivors, using pulsed doppler method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Shinzo; Takayama, Sadamatsu; Nakano, Kikuo; Mito, Kazuyo; Kato, Masafumi; Ito, Chikako

    1989-01-01

    Influences of A-bombing on the cardiovascular system are of great interest in the graying society. Therefore, diastolic blood circulation was examined by pulsed doppler echocardiography in 44 A-bomb survivors (25 men and 19 women), with an average age of 59 years, who had been exposed at ≤ 2000 m from the hypocenter. Age- and sex-matched A-bomb survivors, who had been exposed at ≥ 3000 m or entered the city 4 days after the bombing, served as the control. Regarding both the peak velocity of atrial contraction (PVAC) and peak velocity of rapid filling (PVRF), there was no significant difference between the exposed and control groups. In the control group, PVAC was significantly associated with aging (p<0.05). A decreased PVRF was significantly observed with aging in both the exposed group (p<0.01) and the control group (p<0.001). There was no marked difference in the ratio of PVAC to PVRF among all of the age groups in both groups; it was significantly increased with aging. Deceleration half time of rapid filling was significantly prolonged in older age group in the exposed group, although there was no difference in the acceleration half time between the exposed and control groups. These findings indicated none of the influences of A-bombing on diastolic function of the heart. (N.K.)

  2. Report on the results of the fourteenth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Jitsuro; Kambe, Masayuki; Hakoda, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    The fourteenth medical examination of atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors resident in North America was carried out from June 18th through July 2nd and from July 24th through August 6th, 2003, in the cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and Honolulu. The total number of those who underwent the fourteenth medical examination was 453, 65 of whom were second-generation A-bomb survivors. As the survivors in North America are advancing in age, the average age of the examinee was 71.6 years. The examination items included an interview, clinical and physical examinations, electrocardiography (E.C.G.), and blood, urine, and stool tests. The review of the medical history showed that hypertension was the most frequent in the survivors examined, with the prevalence of 45.4%. Previous history of malignant tumors was observed in 15.7% of the survivors examined, with major sites being the mammary gland, uterine, colon, and prostate. As a result of the blood test, 14.9% of the survivors examined were diagnosed as diabetic, and hypercholesterolemia was found in 28.4% of the survivors examined. Latent hypothyroidism was found in 21.2% of the survivors examined. No disease or examination finding showed a clear relation with exposure status. A report providing the results of the medical examination and necessity of undergoing closer examination and receiving medical treatment, if any, was mailed to each examinee. (author)

  3. A search for effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of the F1 generation, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusho, Toshiyuki; Otake, Masanori.

    1980-08-01

    A comparative study to detect possible genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of offspring of A-bomb survivors was made on a group of junior high school students 12 to 14 years of age born to exposed and to nonexposed parents in Hiroshima using as variables weight, sitting height, and chest circumference. With data from offspring born to nonexposed parents, a regression analysis was made for the effect of parental age on the weight, sitting height, and chest circumference of the offspring, but no statistically significant relation was observed. The mean values of weight, sitting height, and chest circumference of offspring of nonexposed parents were compared with those of offspring born to exposed fathers and nonexposed mothers, of exposed mothers and nonexposed fathers, and with those of offspring of parents both exposed. The differences showed no specific tendency and very few of them were statistically significant. Next, the variance values were compared, and some of the differences between the two groups of offspring were statistically significant; in every case the variance of offspring of exposed parents was larger, suggesting a genetic effect due to exposure to A-bomb radiation. However, the sample of offspring born to exposed parents is small and the parent-offspring correlation is unknown for want of comparable measurements on the parents. (author)

  4. A search for genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of the F1 generation, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusho, Toshiyuki; Otake, Masanori.

    1980-02-01

    In a search for possible genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the stature of the offspring of A-bomb survivors a comparative study has been made of junior high school students 12 to 14 years of age born in Hiroshima to exposed and nonexposed parents. The mean stature and variance of the offspring and the covariance and correlation between one parent or the sum for both parents and their children were compared. The observed differences were both positive and negative in sign, and only a few were statistically significant. No clear tendency was demonstrated. When one parent was exposed, seven variance values of the offspring were statistically significant and six were positive in sign. Regression analyses of the mean stature and variance of the offspring, or the covariance, and correlation between one parent or the sum for both parents and their offspring by parental radiation dose revealed no clear effects of exposure. Only a very few of the regression coefficients were significantly different from zero. While genetic effects of A-bomb radiation on the stature of the children of exposed parents cannot be ruled out by this study, neither can such effects be unequivocally demonstrated. (author)

  5. A chromosome study of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in T lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Yoshiaki; Hakoda, Masayuki; Shimba, Hachiro; Awa, A.A.; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1989-07-01

    Cytogenetic characterizations were made of lymphocyte colonies established from somatic mutation assays for 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. G-banded chromosomes were analyzed in both TG-resistant (TG r ) and wild-type (not TG-selected) colonies. Included were 45 TG r and 19 wild-type colonies derived from proximally exposed A-bomb survivors, as well as colonies from distally exposed control individuals who were not exposed to a significant level of A-bomb radiation (18 TG r and 9 wild-type colonies). Various structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes were observed in both TG r and wild-type colonies. Aberrations of the X chromosome, on which the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus is present, were found in six colonies: two resistant colonies from controls [45,X/46,XX; 46,X,ins(X)], three resistant colonies [45,X/46,XX/46,X,+mar; 46,X,t(Xq+;14q-); 46,Y,t(Xq-;5q+)], and one wild-type colony [45,X/47,XXX] from proximally exposed persons. In cases with exchange aberrations, each of the break points on the X chromosome was situated proximally to band q26 where the HPRT locus is known to be assigned. DNA replicating patterns were also studied, and it was found that abnormal X chromosomes showed early replicating patterns, while normal X chromosomes showed late replicating patterns. (author)

  6. Age-at-exposure effects on risk estimates for non-cancer mortality in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Muirhead, Colin R; Hunter, Nezahat

    2005-01-01

    Statistically significant increases in non-cancer disease mortality with radiation dose have been observed among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The increasing trends arise particularly for diseases of the circulatory, digestive, and respiratory systems. Rates for survivors exposed to a dose of 1 Sv are elevated by about 10%, a smaller relative increase than that for cancer. The aetiology of this increased risk is not yet understood. Neither animal nor human studies have found clear evidence for excess non-cancer mortality at the lower range of doses received by A-bomb survivors. In this paper, we examine the age and time patterns of excess risks in the A-bomb survivors. The results suggest that the excess relative risk of non-cancer disease mortality might be highest for exposure at ages 30-49 years, and that those exposed at ages 0-29 years might have a very low excess relative risk compared with those exposed at older ages. The differences in excess relative risk for different age-at-exposure groups imply that the dose response relationships for non-cancer disease mortality need to be modelled with adjustment for age-at-exposure

  7. Report on the results of the ninth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Neriishi, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Naoki; Sato, Reiko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Nishihara, Yoji; Yamane, Kiyoaki; Fukuhara, Teruaki.

    1994-01-01

    The 9th medical examination of A-bomb survivors resident in the North America was conducted from June 16 to July 15, 1993 at Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Wailuku and Honolulu. As of the end of July 1993, the number of A-bomb survivors registered in the North America was 1073, including 23 in Canada. Of these survivors, 53 deaths were confirmed. Thus, the total number of living survivors was 1020, being composed of 268 men and 752 women, with an average age of 62.8 years. Those exposed in Hiroshima accounted for 88.5%. U.S. nationality was seen in 62.1%; Japanese nationality with permanent U.S. residency rights in 30.6%. The most common residential state was California (61.6%), followed by Hawaii (18.8%) and Washington (5.6%). The rate of A-bomb survivors' health handbook possession was 58.5%, which was 3.9 times higher than that 10 years ago. Four hundreds and seventy-one A-bomb survivors (46.2%) participated in the present examination. In addition, 78 offsprings (F 1 ) of A-bomb survivors also participated in it, consisting of 35 men and 43 women. The most common disease requiring treatment and follow-up was hyperlipidemia (33.7%), followed by hypertension, liver disease, heart disease, thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus in that order. Cancer was seen in 4 survivors, consisting of colon cancer (2), leukemia (one) and Hodgkin's disease (one). (N.K.)

  8. Cytogenetic studies on leukemia and preleukemic state in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamori, Naoki; Tomonaga, Yu; Tagawa, Masuko; Kusano, Miyuki; Nishino, Kenji

    1980-01-01

    Chromosomal abberation of bone marrow cells in healthy persons and patients with various hematologic diseases both of the exposed and the non-exposed were discussed. One healthy a-bomb survivor exposed near the hypocenter and structural abnormality of chromosomes closely similar to that found out in a small number of patients with hematologic diseases, but clone formation was not recognized. Though it was clarified that there was chromosomal abberation peculiar to each hematologic disease, specific chromosomal abberation peculiar to a-bomb survivors with hematologic diseases was not recognized. There were many a-bomb survivors with hemopoietic dysplasia who had structural abnormality of chromosomes, and their frequency was significantly higher than that of the non-exposed. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Mass survey of gastric diseases in over 60 years of atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, C; Kawase, T; Sato, K; Kumasawa, T [Hiroshima A-Bomb Survivors Health Control Clinic

    1980-11-01

    Gastric diseases screening examination was received by 2165 of A-bomb survivors over 60 years for one year. The close investigation was required in 11.5% of them, and 96% of them received the close examination. The detection rate of gastric cancer was estimated to be 1.00% in males and 0.51% in females. This investigation disclosed 14 gastric cancers. The rate of early cancer was 64.2%, which was significantly higher than 24.2% in the investigation on A-bomb survivors who had anemia and occult blood positive test results. It is considered that 66.7% of the early cancer which was found this time could not have been detected unless the present general screening examination was used. Qualitative reevaluation of general screening examination is necessary for aged A-bomb survivors.

  10. A search for genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of the F1 generation, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusho, Toshiyuki; Otake, Masanori.

    1978-10-01

    In a search for possible genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of offspring of A-bomb survivors a survey was made in 1965 on approximately 200,000 children of all primary schools, junior high schools, and senior high schools in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Of the collected data, those pertaining to senior high school students 15 to 17 years of age of Hiroshima City were analyzed to determine if there was any genetic effect of A-bomb radiation on stature. Comparisons were made with regard to the mean stature and variance of the offspring and the covariance and correlation between one parent or the sum for both parents and offspring for the exposed group and the nonexposed group. The observed differences included those with both positive and negative signs, but none were statistically significant nor did they demonstrate any specific tendency. A comparison was made with a similar study reported by Neel and Schull. Furthermore, estimation of the regression coefficients of the mean stature, variance, covariance, and correlation between one parent or the sum for both parents and offspring by parental radiation dose also did not show any specific tendency. Though the genetic effects of A-bomb radiation on stature could not be accurately estimated in the current series of analyses, the stature data of 6- to 14-year-old children in Hiroshima and those of 6- to 17-year-old children in Nagasaki Will soon be studied, which should permit a more comprehensive and extensive analysis and evaluation of the possible genetic effects of radiation on stature. (author)

  11. Delayed effects occurring within the first decade after exposure of young individuals to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R W

    1956-01-01

    The review of the literature and the data presented in this report describe the late effects of exposure of young subjects to ionizing radiation or to nuclear weapons as known in the early part of 1955. The new information may be useful in the further definition of the tolerance of humans to ionizing radiation. In 6 years ending in December 1954, 19 persons who were within 2100 meters of the hypocenter have developed leukemia before attaining the age of 19 years. The annual incidence of this disease among those who were within 1500 meters and who were younger than 19 years of age at the time of exposure is 1:1000. There are no cataracts that impair vision among the present pediatic group. An increased incidence of a mild visual disability, the cause of which is thus far indefinite, has been found among those now 16 through 19 years of age who were within 1800 meters of the bomb center. The incidence of chronic otitis media is the same for the 2 exposure groups, as are the means of the hematologic values for the patients with this ailment. There is no increase in the tumor incidence of the exposed children as compared with the nonexposed. There are no data to prove it, but the impression is that among the survivors the fear of late effects may be common and potentially disabling. Of those 19 years of age and younger, there were 2771 within 3000 meters of the hypocenter at the time of detonation of the bomb who were examined in 1954. Twenty-four of these had sequelae of the blast or thermal effects of the bomb other than well-heated scars. No other abnormalities related to atomic bomb exposure have been identified.

  12. A survey on respiratory diseases of atomic bomb survivors using chest X-ray examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Noma, Koji; Ito, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Kamitsuna, Akimitsu; Nishimoto, Yukio; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1986-01-01

    From April 1981 through March 1986, 39,363 A-bomb survivors older than 50 years of age underwent chest X-ray examination. The incidence of abnormal findings was higher in men (28 %) than in women (13 %). The most common disease was old pulmonary tuberculosis in both men and women. The incidence of pulmonary fibrosis was remarkably high in survivors exposed directly to A-bomb radiation, when compared with controls. There was no data suggesting the relationship between the incidence of respiratory disease and exposure status such as the distance from ground zero. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Further observations on sex ratio among infants born to survivors of the atomic bombs, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schull, W J; Neel, J V; Hashizume, Asaji

    1965-11-18

    Data are presented on the sex ratio of 47,624 children born in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during 1956 to 1962. The total number of births in these two cities for which information is available is now 140,542, and of this number in 73,994 instances one or both parents were exposed to the atomic bombs. The suggestion of an effect of exposure on sex ratio in the earlier data is not borne out by the present findings. One can argue either that a small early effect has disappeared or that the original observation had no biological significance. 27 references, 4 tables.

  14. Carcinoma of the stomach in atomic bomb survivors. A comparison of clinicopathologic features to the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, S.; Nagasue, N.; Abe, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Sasaki, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of gastric cancer were reviewed retrospectively for 135 atomic bomb survivors and 377 control patients. The mean age was significantly higher in the survivors than in the controls. Otherwise, both groups were quite comparative especially in terms of the stage of the disease. Histopathologically, the rates of poorly differentiated or undifferentiated types of carcinoma and secondary lymph node involvements were significantly lower in the survivors than in the controls. There were no significant difference between the two groups in postoperative morbidity and mortality rates and long-term survival rate. The incidence of second primary malignancies, however, was apparently higher in the survivors than in the controls

  15. Mortality among the offspring (F1) of atomic bomb survivors, 1946-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Schull, W.J.; Kato, Hiroo; Neel, J.V.

    1991-03-01

    We compare deaths occurring in the years 1946-85 in a cohort of 31,159 children born to parents one or both of whom were exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima or Nagasaki, and received a combined (i.e., joint) gonadal dose of 0.01 Sv or more, with deaths in a comparable control group, totaling 41,069 children. The average combined gonadal dose equivalent for the exposed parents was 0.435 Sv. Gonadal doses were calculated using the recently established DS86 system, supplemented by an ad hoc system for those children for whom a DS86 dose could not be computed for one or both parents. The mean age of living members of the cohorts was 28.8 years. When a linear relative risk model is fitted to the data, no statistically significant increase in the risk of mortality attributable to diseases other than neoplasms is noted following parental exposure, the excess relative risk being 0.030 (±0.046) per sievert based on the subset of individuals with DS86 doses, assuming the RBE of neutrons to be 20. For fatal cancer, in confirmation of an earlier report on cancer incidence below the age of 20 in this same group, again no statistically significant effect was observed as parental radiation dose increased. This model was also fitted to the data used in the relative risk estimate to provide some continuity with the past. The results give an intercept of 0.0420(±0.0015) and a linear regression coefficient of 0.00169 (±0.00157) per sievert. This leads to the calculation of a (statistically nonsignificant) excess relative risk of 0.040, in good agreement with the excess obtained by fitting the relative risk model. An analysis based on the full sample, using not only the DS86 dose group but also the ad hoc dose group, yields essentially the same result as the analysis restricted to the DS86 dose group. (J.P.N.)

  16. Dose-responses for mortality from cerebrovascular and heart diseases in atomic bomb survivors: 1950-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoellnberger, Helmut [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and the Environment, Neuherberg (Germany); Eidemueller, Markus; Simonetto, Cristoforo; Kaiser, Jan Christian [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Cullings, Harry M. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Department of Statistics, Hiroshima (Japan); Neff, Frauke [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen and Technical University of Munich, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    The scientific community faces important discussions on the validity of the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for radiation-associated cardiovascular diseases at low and moderate doses. In the present study, mortalities from cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) and heart diseases from the latest data on atomic bomb survivors were analyzed. The analysis was performed with several radio-biologically motivated linear and nonlinear dose-response models. For each detrimental health outcome one set of models was identified that all fitted the data about equally well. This set was used for multi-model inference (MMI), a statistical method of superposing different models to allow risk estimates to be based on several plausible dose-response models rather than just relying on a single model of choice. MMI provides a more accurate determination of the dose response and a more comprehensive characterization of uncertainties. It was found that for CeVD, the dose-response curve from MMI is located below the linear no-threshold model at low and medium doses (0-1.4 Gy). At higher doses MMI predicts a higher risk compared to the LNT model. A sublinear dose-response was also found for heart diseases (0-3 Gy). The analyses provide no conclusive answer to the question whether there is a radiation risk below 0.75 Gy for CeVD and 2.6 Gy for heart diseases. MMI suggests that the dose-response curves for CeVD and heart diseases in the Lifespan Study are sublinear at low and moderate doses. This has relevance for radiotherapy treatment planning and for international radiation protection practices in general. (orig.)

  17. The human sex odds at birth after the atmospheric atomic bomb tests, after Chernobyl, and in the vicinity of nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherb, Hagen; Voigt, Kristina

    2011-06-01

    Ever since the discovery of the mutagenic properties of ionizing radiation, the possibility of birth sex odds shifts in exposed human populations was considered in the scientific community. Positive evidence, however weak, was obtained after the atomic bombing of Japan. We previously investigated trends in the sex odds before and after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In a pilot study, combined data from the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Norway, Poland, and Sweden between 1982 and 1992 showed a downward trend in the sex odds and a significant jump in 1987, the year immediately after Chernobyl. Moreover, a significant positive association of the sex odds between 1986 and 1991 with Chernobyl fallout at the district level in Germany was observed. Both of these findings, temporality (effect after exposure) and dose response association, yield evidence of causality. The primary aim of this study was to investigate longer time periods (1950-2007) in all of Europe and in the USA with emphasis on the global atmospheric atomic bomb test fallout and on the Chernobyl accident. To obtain further evidence, we also analyze sex odds data near nuclear facilities in Germany and Switzerland. DATA AND STATISTICAL METHODS: National gender-specific annual live births data for 39 European countries from 1975 to 2007 were compiled using the pertinent internet data bases provided by the World Health Organization, United Nations, Council of Europe, and EUROSTAT. For a synoptic re-analysis of the period 1950 to 1990, published data from the USA and from a predominantly western and less Chernobyl-exposed part of Europe were studied additionally. To assess spatial, temporal, as well as spatial-temporal trends in the sex odds and to investigate possible changes in those trends after the atomic bomb tests, after Chernobyl, and in the vicinity of nuclear facilities, we applied ordinary linear logistic regression. Region-specific and eventually changing spatial

  18. JNIH-ABCC life span study of children born to atomic bomb survivors. Report II. Mortality in children of atomic bomb survivors and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J V; Kato, H; Schull, W J; Jablon, S

    1972-01-01

    The study was updated so that the average interval between birth and verification of death or survival is now 17 years. The mortality experience is based on 18,946 children liveborn to parents proximally exposed (dose 117 rem); 16,516 children born to distally exposed parents (essentially no dose); and 17,263 children born to parents not in Hiroshima or Nagasaki at the time of the bombs. No clearly significant effect of parental exposure on child's survival can be demonstrated by contingency chi/sup 2/ or regression analysis. Based on regression, the minimal gametic doubling dose for mutations resulting in death during the first 17 years for liveborn infants conceived 0--13 years after parental exposure is 46 rem for fathers and 125 rem for mothers. Since the regression coefficients do not differ significantly from zero, it is preferable, in a situation where men and women are irradiated in equal numbers, to employ the average of the two estimates, namely 85 rem. The gametic doubling dose for chronic, low-level radiation is expected to be 3 to 4 times this value. (DLC)

  19. Mental disorders in 37 cases of 'Hibakusya' 40 years after exposure to the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takeshi; Tohyama, Teruhiko; Nakazawa, Masao; Ando, Ichiro; Hayashi, Hideki; Miura, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    In 1985, 40 years after the bombing, 37 (8 %) of a total of 814 A-bomb survivors living in Tokyo visited the Department of Neuro-Psychiatry. This is an analysis of these A-bomb survivors suffering from mental disorders. There were 11 men and 26 women. They ranged in age from 45 to 87 years with a median of 61. Eighteen survivors (55 %) were exposed within 2,000 m from ground zero, and 21 (66 %) presented with acute radiation symptoms. According to the classification of DSM-III, features of mental disorders fell into five types: (1) organic psychotic conditions (n = 7), (2) endogenous psychotic conditions (n = 14), (3) delution (n = 3), (4) anxiety somatization (n = 11), and (5) personality disorder (n = 2). Psychotic conditions characterized by mixed atypical symptoms, variable clinical features during the process, and undefined somatic symptoms were noticeable in this series. This is in contrast to the previous reports dealing with neurasthenic A-bomb survivors. The etiology of psychotic conditions must await further study. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Relationship between epidemiological factors and mortality among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Masanori

    1980-01-01

    In 1965, mail survey on environmental and individual factors was performed for 11,724 male a-bomb survivors, with the age of 40 to 69, selected from the group subjected to joint JNIH-ABCC investigation of life span in a-bomb survivors. During 10 years after the mail survey, 2,834 died. The aim of this mail survey was to clarify the relationship between the mortality and specific environmental, social, and economic factors. There was a relationship between high mortality and low social and economical condition for all causes of death combined, cerebral vascular diseases, all malignant neoplasms, and gastric cancer. Smoking was a significant risk factor to all causes of death combined, ischemic heart diseases, all malignant neoplasms, gastric, tracheal, bronchial, and lung cancers. The mortality due to cardiovascular diseases was significantly higher in a-bomb survivors with heavy weight. The mortality due to all causes of death combined, all malignant neoplasms, lung, and gastric cancer tended to become higher in a-bomb survivors who got married early. (Tsunoda, M.)

  1. Chromosome aberrations in cultured skin cells obtained from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takeo; Sadamori, Naoki.

    1989-01-01

    Skin specimens were obtained from 11 A-bomb survivors, 10 of whom had been exposed at ≤2300 m from the hypocenter, and 7 non-exposed controls. There was a higher frequency (12%, 147/1222 cells) of chromosome aberrations in the exposed group compared with 1.2% (4/341 cells) in the control group. This suggests that aberrant cells are still present in the skin tissue 40 years or more after the bombing. Of 147 cells, 136 cells (91.3%) showed translocation of chromosome. Other aberrations, such as inversion, deletion, dicentric chromosome and acentric fragment, were observed in only 3.8%. These aberrant cells tended to be observed in A-bomb survivors exposed to high doses and with a history of severe acute symptoms. One hundred and twenty two (83%) of 136 aberrant cells were obtained from 3 A-bomb survivors, which has important implications for marked proliferation of specific clone cells. In an analysis by B-band staining technique for the 122 cells, band sites of break point were found to correspond to loci of protooncogenes, suggesting the involvement in aggressive proliferation of clone cells. (Namekawa, K)

  2. Relationship between epidemiological factors and mortality among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, M [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1980-11-01

    In 1965, mail survey on environmental and individual factors was performed for 11,724 male a-bomb survivors, with the age of 40 to 69, selected from the group subjected to joint JNIH-ABCC investigation of life span in a-bomb survivors. During 10 years after the mail survey, 2,834 died. The aim of this mail survey was to clarify the relationship between the mortality and specific environmental, social, and economic factors. There was a relationship between high mortality and low social and economical condition for all causes of death combined, cerebral vascular diseases, all malignant neoplasms, and gastric cancer. Smoking was a significant risk factor to all causes of death combined, ischemic heart diseases, all malignant neoplasms, gastric, tracheal, bronchial, and lung cancers. The mortality due to cardiovascular diseases was significantly higher in a-bomb survivors with heavy weight. The mortality due to all causes of death combined, all malignant neoplasms, lung, and gastric cancer tended to become higher in a-bomb survivors who got married early.

  3. Late effects of atomic bomb radiation on human immune responses, (10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Saito, Mayumi; Cologne, J.B.; Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Anti-Epstein-Barr (EV) virus antibody titers were measured in age- and sex-matched three groups of each 124 A-bomb survivors who had exposed to 1 Gy. These serum samples showed positive antibodies against viral capsid antigens (VCA). Antibody titers to anti-VCA-IgM or anti-EA-IgG were significantly higher in the groups of 0.01-1 Gy and >1 Gy than in the group of <0.01 Gy, reflecting decreased immune response ability for EV virus. When precursor frequency of cytotoxic cells against autologous EB virus LCL was determined in 68 other A-bomb survivors, no definitive influence of A-bombing was observed. However, serological study revealed that there was inverse correlation between precursor frequency and anti-EA-IgG antibody titer. These findings suggest that the immune response ability for EB virus may have been damaged and that biological reactivity of EB virus may occur frequently in A-bomb survivors. (N.K.)

  4. Clinical survey of blood dyscrasias among Hiroshima A-bomb survivors by the periodical health examination, (3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taketomi, Y; Abe, T; Kamada, N; Kuramoto, A; Takahashi, H [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1978-04-01

    The actual condition of polycythemia in atomic bomb survivors was evaluated laying stress on the results of general clinical examinations in Hiroshima A-bomb Survivors Health Control Clinic in 1973. Of 40,410 subjects examined in 1973 (male 15,390; female 25,020), 218 males and 220 females, 438 in total, excluding the patients with cardiopulmonary diseases, satisfied the criteria for polycythemia that males show higher values over 17.1 g/dl of Hb and 51.5% of Ht and females over 15.2 g/dl of Hb and 46.0% of Ht. The incidence of this disease was higher in younger males but it increased with age in females. However, there was no correlationship between the incidence of this disease and the distance from the epicenter. Further, 10 males and 8 females, 18 in total, of these patients satisfied the Komiya's criteria for polycythemia (RBC 6,000,000, Ht 50% in males, and RBC 5,500,000, Ht>50% in females) in 1973 or before, and one of them was diagnosed as polycythemia vera by the present examination (1977). This survey was made on 40,410 subjects, one of which was diagnosed as polycythemia vera. Because of a lower incidence of polycythemia than that of leukemia, it was difficult to give an accurate diagnosis and it was also hard to evaluate the incidence of this disease in atomic bomb survivors comparing with that in healthy people. It is therefore required to pile up the data year after year. In various blood diseases such as chronic myelogenic leukemia and acute leukemia, the foregoing state of myeloid proliferation was sometimes observed preceding the onset of these blood diseases. Therefore, the 18 cases at least which satisfied the Komiya's criteria should be followed up carefully.

  5. Clinical survey of blood dyscrasias among Hiroshima A-bomb survivors by the periodical health examination, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketomi, Yoshinori; Abe, Tsutomu; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    The actual condition of polycythemia in atomic bomb survivors was evaluated laying stress on the results of general clinical examinations in Hiroshima A-bomb Survivors Health Control Clinic in 1973. Of 40,410 subjects examined in 1973 (male 15,390; female 25,020), 218 males and 220 females, 438 in total, excluding the patients with cardiopulmonary diseases, satisfied the criteria for polycythemia that males show higher values over 17.1 g/dl of Hb and 51.5% of Ht and females over 15.2 g/dl of Hb and 46.0% of Ht. The incidence of this disease was higher in younger males but it increased with age in females. However, there was no correlationship between the incidence of this disease and the distance from the epicenter. Further, 10 males and 8 females, 18 in total, of these patients satisfied the Komiya's criteria for polycythemia (RBC 6,000,000, Ht 50% in males, and RBC 5,500,000, Ht>50% in females) in 1973 or before, and one of them was diagnosed as polycythemia vera by the present examination (1977). This survey was made on 40,410 subjects, one of which was diagnosed as polycythemia vera. Because of a lower incidence of polycythemia than that of leukemia, it was difficult to give an accurate diagnosis and it was also hard to evaluate the incidence of this disease in atomic bomb survivors comparing with that in healthy people. It is therefore required to pile up the data year after year. In various blood diseases such as chronic myelogenic leukemia and acute leukemia, the foregoing state of myeloid proliferation was sometimes observed preceding the onset of these blood diseases. Therefore, the 18 cases at least which satisfied the Komiya's criteria should be followed up carefully. (Ueda, J.)

  6. Report on the results of the sixth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Hiroaki; Hirata, Katsumi; Taguchi, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumio; Nawachi, Sadahiro; Terada, Kensaku.

    1995-01-01

    The medical examination of A-bomb survivors was carried out in Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Republic of Peru, and Paraguay from October 25th to November 11th 1994. The survivors were 191 persons, and 98 (51.3%) of them received health consultation. Sixty-two persons were exposured in Hiroshima and 36 in Nagasaki. Average age of the medical examinee was 65.0±8.5-year-old. The holding rate of A-bomb survivor's handbook was 55.1%. The lowered physical vitality and the involution of the mental vitality with increased age were observed from interview sheets. This first orthopedic examination revealed abnormal findings in 12 persons. Sixty-five persons required further examinations. Cardiovascular risk factors of such as hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus were observed. (H.O.)

  7. Report on the results of the sixth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Hiroaki [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Hirata, Katsumi; Taguchi, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumio; Nawachi, Sadahiro; Terada, Kensaku

    1995-11-01

    The medical examination of A-bomb survivors was carried out in Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Republic of Peru, and Paraguay from October 25th to November 11th 1994. The survivors were 191 persons, and 98 (51.3%) of them received health consultation. Sixty-two persons were exposured in Hiroshima and 36 in Nagasaki. Average age of the medical examinee was 65.0{+-}8.5-year-old. The holding rate of A-bomb survivor`s handbook was 55.1%. The lowered physical vitality and the involution of the mental vitality with increased age were observed from interview sheets. This first orthopedic examination revealed abnormal findings in 12 persons. Sixty-five persons required further examinations. Cardiovascular risk factors of such as hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus were observed. (H.O.).

  8. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Review of Dose Related Factors for the Evaluation of Exposures to Residual Radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, George D; Egbert, Stephen D; Al-Nabulsi, Isaf; Bailiff, Ian K; Beck, Harold L; Belukha, Irina G; Cockayne, John E; Cullings, Harry M; Eckerman, Keith F; Granovskaya, Evgeniya; Grant, Eric J; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kaul, Dean C; Kryuchkov, Victor; Mannis, Daniel; Ohtaki, Megu; Otani, Keiko; Shinkarev, Sergey; Simon, Steven L; Spriggs, Gregory D; Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Stricklin, Daniela; Weiss, Joseph F; Weitz, Ronald L; Woda, Clemens; Worthington, Patricia R; Yamamoto, Keiko; Young, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Groups of Japanese and American scientists, supported by international collaborators, have worked for many years to ensure the accuracy of the radiation dosimetry used in studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Reliable dosimetric models and systems are especially critical to epidemiologic studies of this population because of their importance in the development of worldwide radiation protection standards. While dosimetry systems, such as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) and Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), have improved, the research groups that developed them were unable to propose or confirm an additional contribution by residual radiation to the survivor's total body dose. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of residual radiation exposures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a half-day technical session was held for reports on newer studies at the 59 th Annual HPS Meeting in 2014 in Baltimore, MD. A day-and-a-half workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of the newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposure to atomic bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The process also involved a re-examination of very early surveys of radioisotope emissions from ground surfaces at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and early reports of health effects. New insights were reported on the potential contribution to residual radiation from neutron-activated radionuclides in the airburst's dust stem and pedestal and in unlofted soil, as well as from fission products and weapon debris from the nuclear cloud. However, disparate views remain concerning the actual residual radiation doses received by the atomic bomb survivors at different distances from the hypocenter. The workshop discussion indicated that measurements made using thermal luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence, like earlier measurements, especially in very thin layers of the samples, could be expanded to detect possible

  9. An autopsy case of acute myelocytic leukemia preceded by hemopoietic dysplasia found in an atomic bomb survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yoshiaki; Edagawa, Junichi; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Ide, Tohru; Misawa, Shinichi

    1981-01-01

    An autopsy case of acute myelocytic leukemia preceded by hemopoietic dysplasia, presumably on a sequela to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima is reported. On admission, severe anemia and thrombocytosis were found and the bone marrow aspiration showed myeloid hyperplasia without definite maturation arrest. Mild to moderate eosinophilia and basophilia continued during the course of the disease, accompaning mild monocytosis 2 years later. Furthermore, he had the radical operation for the early gastric cancer in this preleukemic stage. After the administration of methenolone acetate (25 mg/day), severe anemia has dramatically improved, but leukocytosis with profound monocytosis persisted, and subsequently acute myelocytic leukemia developed. He died from an intracerebral bleeding due to an accidental trauma on the head. Autopsy findings disclosed the systemic leukemic infiltration. Repeated chromosome analyses revealed the mosaic karyotype of 46, XY/45, XY, -16 on admission, but it was 46, XY/46, XY, del (8) (p 12) in the overt leukemic phase. The granulopoietic colony forming capacity of bone marrow cells was already low one year before the onset of overt leukemia. This finding suggested that the existence of an abnormal clone could be predictable. In addition, the possible causative effect of the exposure to the atomic bomb in leukemogenesis in this case is discussed. (author)

  10. Epidemiology of large intestinal cancer in Nagasaki city with reference to atomic bomb exposure, 1973∼1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shingo; Shimokawa, Isao; Iwasaki, Keisuke; Sakai, Hidetaka; Matsuo, Takeshi; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko

    1988-01-01

    Epidemiological studies were conducted on 1098 cases of large intestinal cancer (615 cases of colon cancer and 483 cases of rectum cancer) registered at the Nagasaki Tumor Registry from 1973 to 1982, with emphasis on the relation to radiation exposure. The incidence in atomic bomb survivors was not significantly different from that in non-exposed persons, but the incidence in persons exposed at a young age tends to be higher, particularly the incidence of colon cancer in females. By site, about 56% of all colorectal cases investigated were shown to originate in the colon. In the colon, sigmoid cancer was the most frequent in both males and females, but there was no difference with regard to exposure status. In a comparison of the incidence during the first and second halves of the period examined, colorectal cancer revealed a general increasing trend, particularly for colon cancer in males and rectum cancer in females. Histologically, over 90% was differentiated adenocarcinoma and showed no difference by age, sex or exposure status. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that musinous carcinoma was more frequent in atomic bomb survivors than in non-exposed people. Further analysis of the incidence, site and histologic type of colorectal cancer, especially in the group exposed at a young age, is necessary. (author)

  11. Evidence of radiation-induced reduction of height and body weight from repeated measurements of adults exposed in childhood to the atomic bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Masanori; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Fujikoshi, Yasunori; Schull, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    Reduction of growth from exposure to atomic bomb radiation has been examined using individuals under 10 years old at the time of the bombing (ATB) and a growth curve analysis based on measurements of height and weight made in the course of the 4th-7th cycles of the Adult Health Study examinations (1964-1972). As expected, the largest difference in growth to emerge is between males and females. However, a highly significant reduction of growth associated with dose (DS86) was observed among those survivors for whom four repeated measurements of height and weight were available. Longitudinal analysis of a more extended data set (n = 821), using expected values based on simple linear regression models fitted to the three available sets of measurements of height and weight on the 254 individuals with a missing measurement, also indicates a significant radiation-related growth reduction. The possible contribution of such factors as poor nutrition and disruption of normal family life in the years immediately after the war is difficult to evaluate, but the effects of socioeconomic factors on the analysis of these data are discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Report on the results of the second medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in the South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitsuna, Akimitsu; Monzen, Tetsuo; Oguma, Nobuo; Sakuma, Saburo; Takata, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Yoshiaki; Sakata, Morimitsu.

    1987-06-01

    In October 9 - 31, 1986, the second medical examination for A-bomb survivors was undertaken in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru. Among 173 recognized A-bomb survivors in the five countries, 126 (73 %) participated in the examination, consisting of 61 men and 65 women. Seventy-eight A-bomb survivors came from Hiroshima and 48 from Nagasaki. The average age was 55.6 +- 9.7 years for men and 56.5 +- 9.8 years for women. The acquisition rate of ''Survivor's Health Handbook'' was 34 %. Gastric cancer was observed in two survivors and cervical cancer in one survivor. Major subjective symptoms were: fatigue, sensation of paralysis, heat intolerance, decreased physical strength, and itching. None of the abnormal findings were observed in 33 %. The incidence of hypertension, obesity, cardiac disease, and liver disease was high. The incidence of hypercholesteremia and diabetes mellitus was lower than that in the USA. (Namekawa, K.).

  13. The cohort of the atomic bomb survivors major basis of radiation safety regulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rühm, W; Nekolla, E A

    2006-01-01

    Since 1950 about 87 000 A-bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been monitored within the framework of the Life Span Study, to quantify radiation-induced late effects. In terms of incidence and mortality, a statistically significant excess was found for leukemia and solid tumors. In another major international effort, neutron and gamma radiation doses were estimated, for those survivors (Dosimetry System DS02). Both studies combined allow the deduction of risk coefficients that serve as a basis for international safety regulations. As an example, current results on all solid tumors combined suggest an excess relative risk of 0.47 per Sievert for an attained age of 70 years, for those who were exposed at an age of 30 years. After exposure to an effective dose of one Sievert the solid tumor mortality would thus be about 50% larger than that expected for a similar cohort not exposed to any ionizing radiation from the bombs.

  14. Late effects of atomic bomb radiation on human immune responses, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Fujita, Shoichiro; Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1989-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activities were determined in peripheral lymphocytes from 62 A-bomb survivors, with the purpose of evaluating their relation to age, sex, and estimated exposure doses (DS86). NK activity in fresh lymphocytes was significantly higher in men than women; a significantly increased activity was associated with aging. However, LAK activity, obtained on the culture medium in the presence of IL-2, was independent of sex and aging. These findings suggest that the cell group involved in LAK activity may be different from that involved in NK activity. The present series failed to reveal the influences of A-bombing on both NK and LAK activities. (N.K.)

  15. Mutation and cancer in relation to the atomic-bomb radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Sohei

    1988-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided many clues useful for elucidating mechanisms of induction of cancer and mutation in man after exposure to radiation. In the present paper, these clues are considered together with recent developments in the knowledge of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis in Drosophila, mice, rats and cultured human cells. A working hypothesis is presented for radiation carcinogenesis in man. The descriptions are given under two sections: I) Genetic and oncogenic effects of the A-bomb radiations, and II) Experimental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis relevant to the A-bomb radiation effects. Using data on somatic deletion and recombination in hemopoietic stem cells of A-bomb survivors, the two-mutation model is converted into a numerical equation for the frequency of the production of a preleukemic cell as a function of radiation dose. The slope of the theoretical dose-response curve obtained from this equation agrees faily well with those of the actual dose-response of leukemia in A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki except at a low dose. Experimental evidence supports the model that radiation acts, at high doses above a threshold value, as a promotor to produce cancer. Obviously, the promotor model predicts a sigmoidal dose-response. In fact, 4 out of 5 types of cancer in Nagasaki show seemingly sigmoidal curves; the mortality rate is lower among the group exposed in a limited low dose range than among the unexposed group. Whether such a low-level radiation really exerts beneficial effects is open for future study. (N.K.) 68 refs

  16. Radiation-related small head sizes among prenatally exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaki, Masanori; Schull, William J.

    2004-01-01

    The population prenatally exposed to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, referred to as the In Utero Clinical Sample, on whom Dosimetry System 1986 doses are available consists of 1566 individuals (1242 in Hiroshima and 324 in Nagasaki). Of these study subjects, 1473 had the circumference of their heads measured at least once between ages 9 to 19. Among these 1473 individuals, 62 had small heads - the circumference of the head was two standard deviations or more below the observed specific age-at-measurement mean. Twenty-six of the 30 cases with severe mental retardation described elsewhere are included among these subjects. Of these 26 severely mentally retarded cases, 15 (58%) had small heads. Most (86%) of the individuals with small heads were exposed in the first or second trimester of pregnancy - 55% in the former period and 31% in the latter. Various dose-response relationships, with and without a threshold, have been fitted to the data grouped by the trimester or postovulatory age (weeks after ovulation) at which exposure occurred. A significant effect of radiation on the frequency of individuals with atypically small heads is observed only in the first and second trimesters and for the intervals postovulation of 0-7 weeks and 8-15 weeks. Although the risk of a small head at 0-7 weeks postovulation increases significantly with increasing dose, no increase in risk for severe mental retardation is noted in this period. No excess risk of a small head was seen in the third trimester or among individuals exposed at ≥ 16 weeks postovulation. The estimated threshold, based either on a linear or a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship, is zero or thereabouts. This apparent absence of a threshold and the somewhat different periods of vulnerability suggest an embryological difference in the development of both a small head and mental retardation. Mean IQ (using the Koga test) and its standard deviation are 63.8 and 8.5, respectively, for the

  17. Why 159°?: a story about the dropping of the Hiroshima atom bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunty, Sean L.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the evasive manoeuvre undertaken by the pilot of the Enola Gay aircraft following the dropping of the first uranium bomb. The pilot was instructed to make a 159° turn following the bomb’s release in order to acquire the greatest distance from the point at which the bomb explodes. Accordingly, the objective here is to investigate why the angle should be exactly 159°. The optimum flight-path to maximize the distance from the detonation point is analysed by considering the escape or exit angle taken by the aircraft following a turning-manoeuvre that points it directly away from the detonation site. A range of escape angles are predicted based on the requirement to exit the turning radius prior to detonation. By using information that appeared in a historical account of the event regarding the manoeuvre undertaken by the pilot following the release of the bomb, an estimate is made of the escape angle. Despite the fact that the result shows reasonable agreement with the value of 159°, some uncertainty is expressed as to the close coincidence obtained. In addition, the location of the aircraft and the time of arrival of the shock wave following detonation are also briefly discussed.

  18. Epidemiological studies among the offspring (F1) of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of results of surveys for the frequency of malignant tumors during the period 1946-1982 and mortality during the period 1946-1985 among the offspring of A-bomb survivors, genetic effects of A-bombing were retrospectively investigated. Among 67,574 children born to parents whose gonad doses could be estimated, 83 in the age group of 20 years or younger were found to develop cancer. Of these, only 18 were considered to have genetic cancers, such as retinoblastoma, Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, and embryonal carcinoma. The other 31 and 34 patients had leukemia and other cancers, respectively. No significantly increased incidence of cancer was associated with radiation doses received in their parents. Genetic effects of A-bombing were considered responsible for 3% to 5% of spontaneously induced malignant tumors. Among 67,586 children born to parents whose gonad doses could be estimated, 3852 (5.7%) were dead during the period 1946-1985. Of these, 76% had died before the age of 4. Survey for mortality has also showed that there is no significant correlation between gonad doses in parents and cancer risk for their offspring. (N.K.)

  19. Chromosome break points in T-lymphocytes from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Ohkita, Takeshi; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    In 22 healthy A-bomb survivors who passed more than 30 years since receiving radiation, distribution of 592 chromosome break points found in T-lymphocytes of the peripheral blood was not proportional to the length, the arm length of chromosomes, nor the length of regions, but it was non-random on the chromosomes. High distribution of chromosome break points occurred in 11 regions: 22q1, 14q3, 5q3, 21q2, 6q2, 18p1, 13q3. The regions, 22q1, 14q3, 21q2, and 6q2, contained the chromosome break points which were frequently found in leukemic chromosomes. Some of the changes in nuclear-type observed in leukemic cells of A-bomb survivors were similar to those found in leukemic cells of non-exposed leukemic patients. In abnormal chromosomes of T-lymphocytes of healthy A-bomb survivors, no cells with abnormal nuclear types such as t(4;11), t(8;21), t(9;22), and t(15;17) which are seen in various types of leukemia were not found. However, cells with chromosome aberrations, 22q-, 14q+, and 6q-, were found to be 0.99%, 0.55%, and 0.25% respectively. On the basis of these results, implication of chromosome aberrations in developing cancer was discussed. (Ueda, J.)

  20. Effect of exposure on health of atomic bomb servivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitomi, Yutaka; Ueno, Yasushi; Nozaki, Tomoko; Kawaguchi, Fujino; Ishida, Setsuyo

    1976-01-01

    The effects of exposure on vital functions of survivors 30 years after exposure were analyzed, including somatic, psychic, and social factors. Of the survivors living in Nagasaki City, a short-distance exposure group (within 1 km, above 925 rad) and a long-distance exposure group (30 km, 0.6 rad) were selected. The questionnaire included acute symptoms at the time of exposure and present subjective symptoms as indicating vital functions, and psychic factors and medical treatment of exposure as social factors. More of the short-distance exposure group complained of decreased vital functions than did those of the long-distance exposure group. Anxiety was mentioned as one of the causes of the present subjective symptoms. It was not thought that there was relationship between the acute symptoms and the present symptoms. A tendency toward decreased hemoglobin was observed in some of the subjects. (Serizawa, K.)

  1. A search for genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of the F1 generation, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusho, Toshiyuki; Otake, Masanori.

    1978-08-01

    A comparative study to detect possible genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of offspring of A-bomb survivors was made on a group of senior high school students 15 to 17 years of age born to survivors and to nonexposed parents in Hiroshima using as variables weight, sitting height, and chest circumference. Using data from students born to nonexposed parents, regression analysis was made to determine the effect of parental age on the weight, sitting height, and chest circumference of the offspring, but no statistically significant relation was observed. The mean and variance values of weight, sitting height, and chest circumference of offspring of nonexposed parents were compared to those of offspring born to exposed father and nonexposed mother, and of offspring born to exposed mother and nonexposed father, but very few statistically significant differences were found. The mean and variance values of weight, sitting height, and chest circumference of offspring born to nonexposed parents were compared to those of offspring born to parents both exposed, and again there were very few statistically significant differences. No specific tendency was observed in relation to the combined radiation dose of both parents. (author)

  2. A search for genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the growth and development of the F1 generation, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusho, Toshiyuki; Otake, Masanori.

    1985-09-01

    In a search for possible genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on the stature of the offspring of A-bomb survivors, a comparative study was made on elementary school pupils 6 to 11 years of age born to exposed and nonexposed parents in Hiroshima. The mean stature and variance for the offspring were determined, and the covariance and correlation were calculated in a comparison between either the values for one parent or the sum for both parents, and those for the offspring. Only a few of the differences in mean stature between exposed and nonexposed groups were statistically significant, but in all instances the difference tends to be larger in the exposed group than in the nonexposed group. Also, only a few of the differences in variance between the two groups were statistically significant, but the variance value of the exposed group was higher. Concerning the difference in correlation (Z transformation) between the two groups, only a very few were statistically significant, but the values of the exposed group were higher. A few of the regression coefficient of variance values were statistically significant and the signs of these regression coefficients were not always in agreement. (author)

  3. Evaluation of adverse events in atomic bomb survivors receiving curative-intent radiation therapy from 2005 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yoshiko; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Imano, Nobuki; Kimura, Tomoki; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of radiation therapy (RT) in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors (ABS), we evaluated the frequency of RT-associated adverse events (AEs) in ABS. We selected patients who underwent curative external-beam RT (EBRT) at Hiroshima University Hospital between January 2005 and December 2010 and were born before August 1946; the patients were divided into ABS and non-ABS groups, which groups received identical treatments without stratification. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 220 ABS and 753 non-ABS patients. The median age was 72 years. The median observation durations were 41 and 37 months for the ABS and non-ABS groups, respectively. The ABS group had higher frequencies of women, breast cancer patients, and concurrent chemotherapy and had a lower incidence of only acute hematological AEs. However this tendency disappeared when breast cancer patients were excluded, and no significant differences were observed between the ABS and non-ABS groups regarding Grade ⩾ 3 other acute and late AEs. The overall cumulative incidence of Grade ⩾ 3 late AEs did not significantly differ between the ABS and non-ABS groups. Notable increases in AEs were not observed during or after RT among ABS. This study clarified that stratification is not required when treating ABS with RT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thyroid carcinoma in the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 1958 - 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Yoshitaka; Toyota, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    Relation between radiation dose and incidence rate of thyroid carcinoma in A-bomb survivors exposed with large doses was studied by analyzing 82 cases in total consisting of those reported by Parker et al. from 1956 to 1971 and additional 19 cases lately occurred until 1976. Among them, 40 cases were clinically evident cancer confirmed histologically from clinical findings, and 42 cases were silent cancer confirmed by autopsy findings. The incidence rate of thyroid carcinoma during these 18 years rose along with the increase of radiation dose, and especially, this trend is marked in women. More noticeable dose-response was observed in clinically evident cancer. In a dose-response curve, it was observed that the incidence rate tends to rise higher with an increase of doses. However, in terms of statistics, a significantly higher incidence rate than that of a control group of 0 rad was first observed in the group of 50 - 100 rad. As far as the annual changes of radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma are concerned, the group of over 100 rad still showed an increase of the incidence rate of thyroid carcinoma. By ages when patients were exposed to A-bomb, a group of those exposed under 30 years old showed an increase of the incidence rate since 1968 or 1969, while the group of those exposed at relatively higher ages recorded the high incidence rate already in 1958 and showed no remarkable increase afterwards. Also it was indicated that a noticeable influence given by A-bomb radiation appears after cancer age. By histological types, papillary type and papillary sclerosing type were often observed in clonically evident cancer and silent cancer, respectively. Papillary type was rather often seen in the group of over 100 rad. (Iwagami, H.)

  5. Cytogenetic study of the offspring of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awa, A.A.; Honda, T.; Neriishi, S.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to evaluate the radiation sensitivity of human germ-cell chromosomes by measuring the frequency of children with chromosome changes in structure or number induced by radiation in the germ cells of exposed parents. It is expected that stable chromosome aberrations, if induced in the germ cells, would be mot likely transmitted to the offspring. Although there is no evidence of chromosome aneuploidy being induced by radiation exposure in humans, it is difficult to exclude the possibility that abnormalities, such as XYY and XXX, would be induced in the offspring. The present chapter describes the results of somatic chromosome analysis of 8,322 children born to A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Hagasaki and 7,976 children born to parents who had received less than 1 rad (distally exposed) or were not in the cities (NIC) at the time of the bomb (ATB). Chromosome analyses were based mostly on nonbanded preparations throughout the study. Because of the recent, extensive reassessment of A-bomb dosimetry by a US-Japan team of experts, the present study samples have been divided into exposed and control groups based on the T65DR system that has been routinely used until recently at RERF. The data base for the new DS86 dose system has been entered into the RERF computer; however, calculations of the individual dose estimates for each survivor are now in progress, but are not available at this time. For this reason, no attempt has been made to analyze the present data in terms of parental radiation doses

  6. 15 years epidemiological studies of diabetes mellitus in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Tsubota, Motoki; Kawate, Ryoso.

    1978-01-01

    Diabetes millitus was studied in 49,176 to 113,853 a-bomb survivors per year from 1963 to 1977. Three to 4 times as many men as women had an abnormal amount of sugar in their urine. In 15 years this abnormal amount increased 2.2 times in men and 2.5 times in women. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on 19,990 survivors. The incidence of diabetes mellitus in women was 2 to 4 times as high as that in men. In 1977 it increased five times in men and 2.7 times in women, compared to that in 1964. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. A survey on respiratory diseases of atomic bomb survivors using chest X-ray examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsubara, Naoka; Isobe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    Chest X-ray films, taken from 48,160 A-bomb survivors aged 40 years or more during a 5-year period 1988-1992, were reviewed. Abnormal X-ray findings were obtained in 26.7% for men and 18.2% for women. The incidence of necessary detailed examination was 2.6%. Of these A-bomb survivors, 93.7% participated in it. Pulmonary fibrosis, chronic emphysema, and pulmonary cyst yielded higher prevalence per population of 100,000 in men, irrespective of exposure distance. In comparing with the results obtained during a 5-year period 1981-1985, the detection rate of primary lung cancer was not different from that in the present 5-year survey. For active pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and chronic emphysema, however, the prevalence tended to decrease. Primary lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis were more frequently detected with aging in both men and women. This was independent of exposure distance. (N.K.)

  8. Clinical survey of blood dyscrasias among Hiroshima a-bomb survivors by the periodical health examination, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketomi, Yoshinori; Abe, Tsutomu; Okita, Hajime; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1980-01-01

    Certain blood examinations were performed on a-bomb survivors having anemia more than moderate stage (the hemoglobin value under 9.0 g/dl), who were found out by the periodical health examination performed in Hiroshima-A-bomb Survivors Health Control Clinic during the latter period of the fiscal year 1975. The total number of a-bomb survivors who received the periodical health examination was 50,973, and the number of survivors whose hemoglobin value was under 9.0 g/dl was 201 (0.39%). The incidence of such anemia was high in women. There was not a relationship between this anemia and the exposure distance from the hypocenter. The incidence of this anemia was high in young a-bomb survivors, and more than 50% of a-bomb survivors having this anemia was under the age of 50. Iron-deficiency anemia was found in 88% of a-bomb survivors, and the course of their anemia ran in many years in many a-bomb survivors. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Liver cancer in atomic-bomb survivors. Histological characteristics and relationships to radiation and hepatitis B and C viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Sharp, G.B.; Mizuno, Terumi

    2001-01-01

    Histological features of primary liver cancer among atomic-bomb survivors and their relationship to hepatitis B (HBV) and C viral (HCV) infections are of special interest because of the increased risk of liver cancer in persons exposed to ionizing radiation and the high and increasing liver cancer rates in Japan and elsewhere. We conducted a pathology review of liver cancers occurring from 1958 to 1987 among subjects in the 120,321 member cohort of 1945 Hiroshima and Nagasaki residents. A panel of pathologists classified tumor histological types and defined accompanying cirrhotic changes of the liver. Archival tissue samples were assessed for HBV using pathology stains and PCR. Reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR was used to determine HCV status. We used unconditional logistic regression to compare 302 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases to 53 cholangiocarcinoma (CC) cases, adjusting for age, year of diagnosis, sex and viral status. Cirrhotic changes occurred significantly more often among HCC than CC cases (76% in HCC and 6% in CC). Compared to CC cases, HCC cases were 10.9 times more likely to be HBV-positive (95% confidence interval: 2.1-83.2) and 4.3 times more likely to be HCV-positive (95% confidence interval: 1.1-20.5) No significant differences were found between HCC and CC cases in radiation exposures. The predominance of HCC in the atomic-bomb survivors follows the background liver cancer pattern in Japan. Our findings suggest that HBV and HCV are involved in the pathogenesis of HCC with or without cirrhosis and are significantly less important in that of CC. (author)

  10. Aging in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors: soluble--insoluble collagen ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R E; Yamamoto, T; Thorslund, T W

    1973-01-01

    The soluble--insoluble collagen ratio was determined in aortas removed at autopsy during the period 1966--70 (21--25 years post-exposure); 261 specimens were examined from persons of both sexes, age 30--89 years at death. A portion of the test samples were from persons located less than 1500 m from the hypocenter at the time of the bomb. The ratio in this group was not significantly different from persons who were not in Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the time of the explosions. However, a possible discrepancy was noted between the two exposure groups involving both males and females who were less than 60 years of age at the time of death with lower average values among the exposed groups. This observation is interpreted and related to the pronounced life-shortening effect of radiation when animals are exposed at a young age. (DLC)

  11. Epidemiology of ovarian cancer in Nagasaki city with reference to atomic bomb exposure, 1973∼1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hidetaka; Shimokawa, Isao; Iwasaki, Keisuke; Matsuo, Takeshi; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Mine, Mariko; Mori, Hiroyuki

    1988-01-01

    Epidemiological study was conducted on 151 cases (67 exposed and 84 nonexposed) of ovarian cancer registered at the Nagasaki Tumor Registry from 1973 to 1982, with emphasis on the relation to radiation exposure. Although the crude incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the exposed group was higher than in the nonexposed group, the age-adjusted relative risk was not significantly different. The relative risk of ovarian cancer incidence by age at the time of the A-bomb was high in the 10-19 group (puberty), and was low in the 40-49 group. It suggested the possibility that radiation carcinogenesis in the ovary was closely related to the secondary excess of gonadotrophic hormones following radiation injury of the ovary. No significant different in histological type between the exposed and nonexposed groups could be found. (author)

  12. The radioecological consequences after explosion of the most powerful atomic bomb over Novaya Zemlya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugunov, V.V.; Ramzaev, P.V.

    1995-01-01

    On the 30 October 1961 an H-bomb of 50 MT TNT-equivalent was exploded at a height of 3.5 km over Novaya Zemlya. This explosion required the expert inspection of the most important regions of Russia Arctic to enforce the system of population radiation safety. It was necessary to inspect 10,000 km of coast and to assess the situation in towns and settlements of the main provinces, districts and autonomous republics. The scientific tasks included aerogamma survey and collection of air and snow samples, samples of local food, daily ration, soil, vegetables and autopsy material. The radioactivity of samples was measured and extensive contaminated material was obtained. Some of the data of importance regarding observed radioactivity in air, lichens, reindeer bones, permanent reindeer meat consumers and vegetables are presented in the present report. 1 fig

  13. A case of refractory anemia with chromosomal abnormality (5q-) in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Miyuki; Ikeda, Shuichi; Tomonaga, Yu; Sadamori, Naoki; Matsunaga, Masako

    1978-01-01

    Although assumed to be almost free from the effect of A-bomb radiation on the basis of the estimated dose, this case had progressive anemia with a specific manifestation and disclosed a clone with chromosomal abnormality (5q - ). In pure leukemia, a clone of abnormal chromosome is considered exactly that of leukemia. However, the presence of clones with chromosomal abnormality which are found in polycythemia vera or myelofibrosis do not always denote the leukemic changes. There is no established theory as to the significance of the clones with chromosomal abnormality in refractory anemia. Thus the interpretation of chromosomal abnormality in blood diseases is very difficult. Therefore analysis of chromosomes will be made actively in leukemia and related diseases as well as refractory anemia and preleukemia, and those will be compared in detail to search the relation between on occurrence of leukemia and chromosomal abnormality and also that between chromosomal abnormality and exposure to radiation. (Ueda, J.)

  14. Reassessment of diagnosis and subtyping of leukemias among atomic bomb survivors, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomonaga, Masao; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Ichimaru, Michito; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Finch, S.C.; Imanaka, Fumio; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao.

    1988-01-01

    In evaluable 456 (60 %) of 750 leukemic patients exposed at ≤9,000 m from the hypocenter, diagnosis and subtypes of leukemia were reevaluated in relation to radiation doses and age at the time of bombing using a new classification method of French-American-British (FAB). The FAB classification diagnosed 63 patients (13.5 %) as acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 181 (39.0 %) as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 26 (5.6 %) as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 106 (22.8 %) as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), 39 (7.5 %) as adult T-cell leukemia, and 5 (0.8 %) as chronic lymphocytic leukemia. According to radiation doses, the incidence of CML increased in the group exposed to one to 99 cGy; the incidences of ALL and MDS increased in the group exposed to ≥100 cGy. The incidence of CML was definitively higher in Hiroshima than Nagasaki in all groups; this was noted in the group exposed to 0 cGy (approximately 2.5 times higher). The incidences of ALL and MDS showed a tendency to increase in proportion to radiation doses. In the group exposed to ≥100 cGy, the incidences of ALL, CML, and MDS increased in patients younger than 15 years, those aged 16 - 35 years, and those older than 36 years, respectively, at the time of the bombing. In this group, there were also differences in latent period (10 yr in ALL and CML, 15 yr in AML, and 17 yr in MDS). None of the AML patients in the group exposed to ≥100 cGy had M3. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Two cases of primary acquired sideroblastic anemia and atypical leukemia with chromosomal abnormality in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Masuko; Sadamori, Naoki; Matsunaga, Masako; Tomonaga, Yu; Nonaka, Miki

    1976-01-01

    Case 1 was a 81 year old male who was exposed to A-bomb at the place 1.9 km far from the hypocenter (the estimated exposure dose of 13 rad) when he was 52 years old. He was pointed out Hb 5.0 g/dl in the health examination of 1975, and he was diagnosed as primary acquired sideroblastic anemia from a result of examination. In analysis of chromosomes, nucleus of abnormal type was recognized, but structural abnormality was not found out. Case 2 was a 80 year old male with symptoms of diarrhea, epilation, and blood-spot, who was exposed at the place 1.4 km far from the hypocenter when he was 51 years old. In January of 1976, fever, cough and sputum appeared, and neutropenia was pointed out as a result of routine examination. Furthermore, from a result of detailed examination, he was diagnosed as a typical leuekemia with neutropenia and monocytosis. Abnormal type 7sub(q)- was recognized in chromosome. Case 1 was leukemia induced by exposure within a range of low dose, so that it was impossible to estimate the effect of exposure to A-bomb. It seemed likely that case 2 was delayed disorder induced by exposure, because it showed acute symptoms by exposure. (Kanao, N.)

  16. Frequency of malignant tumors during the first two decades of life in the offspring (F1) of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Neel, J.V.; Kato, Hiroo; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Schull, W.J.; Soda, Midori; Eto, Ryozo.

    1990-05-01

    The incidence of cancer prior to age 20 has been determined in children born to atomic bomb survivors and to a suitable comparison group. Tumor ascertainment was through death certificates and the tumor registries maintained in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The rationale for the study stemmed from the evidence that a significant proportion of childhood tumors such as retinoblastoma and Wilms' tumor arise on the basis of a mutant gene inherited from one parent plus a second somatic cell mutation involving the allele of this gene. Gonadal radiation doses were calculated using the recently established DS86 system, supplemented by an ad hoc system for those children whose parents' (one or both) DS86 dose could not be computed but for whom a dose could be developed on the basis of the available information. The total data set consisted of: 1) a cohort of 31,150 liveborn children, one or both of whose parents received ≥ 0.01 Sv of radiation at the time of the A-bombings (an average conjoint gonad exposure of 0.435 Sv), and 2) two suitable comparison groups, totaling 41,066 children. A total of 92 cancer cases at age less than 20 years was confirmed; 49 and 43 cases, respectively, in the 0 Sv and ≥ 0.01 Sv groups. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed no increase in malignancy in the children of exposed parents. However, examination of the data suggested that only 3.0 % to 5.0 % of the tumors of childhood observed in the comparison groups are associated with an inherited genetic predisposition that would be expected to exhibit an altered frequency if the parental mutation rate were increased. These is thus far no confirmation of the positive findings of Nomura in a mouse system. (author)

  17. Incidence of ill-health among A-bomb victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, K.

    1988-01-01

    The author presents an outline criticism of the NRPB survey and the Imperial Cancer Research 1983/85 health survey of the British Nuclear Test Veterans, who are calling for a full Judicial Review, or public enquiry. (U.K.)

  18. Age-related alteration in the composition of immunocompetent blood cells in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Bloom, E.T.; Makinodan, Takashi; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1988-01-01

    1328 survivors of Hiroshima were studied for alterations in the number of blood lymphocytes belonging to T-cell subpopulations, CD19 antigen-positive B cells and Leu 7 and CD16 antigen-positive lymphocytes. With increasing age, significant decreasing trends in the numbers of some lymphocytes in T-cell subpopulations and of B-cells were seen. The number of blood lymphocytes positive for CD5 antigen was significantly lower in those exposed to radiation (> 1Gy) in the older age group (more than 30 years at the time of bombing) and a similar tendency for decreases in the numbers of CD4, CD8, and CD19 antigen-positive cells was observed, but differences were not significant. The results suggest aging of the T-cell related immune system is accelerated in the irradiated people of advanced age, explained by the age-related decrease in thymic function in those subjects. The number of Leu 7 or CD19 antigen-positive cells was found to be increased significantly in the older age group compared to the younger, although there was little dose dependence. (U.K.)

  19. From the atomic bomb to the Landau Institute autobiography top non-secret

    CERN Document Server

    Khalatnikov, Isaak M

    2012-01-01

    The book is an expanded autobiography of the famous theoretical physicist Isaak Khalatnikov. He worked together with L.D. Landau at the Institute for Physical Problems lead by P.L. Kapitza. He is the co-author of L.D. Landau in a number of important works. They worked together in the frame of the so-called Nuclear Bomb Project. After the death of L.D. Landau, I.M. Khalatnikov initiated the establishment of the Institute for Theoretical Physics, named in honour of L.D. Landau, within the USSR Academy of Sciences. He headed this institute from the beginning as its Director. The institute inherited almost all traditions of the Landau scientific school and played a prominent role in the development of theoretical physics. So, this is a story about how the institute was created, how it worked, and about the life of the physicists in the "golden age" of the Soviet science. A separate chapter is devoted to today´s life of the institute and the young generation of physicists working now in science. It is an historic...

  20. Immunogenetical study of the atomic-bombed patients of neoplastic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Masaki; Miyazaki, Takashige; Tomonaga, Akimitsu; Hara, Kohei; Hirose, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    The immunogenetical backgrounds of 30 patients with neoplastic diseases (group I) and 30 with non-neoplastic diseases (group II) who were exposed to the A-bomb within 30 km of the center of explosion were studied using human leucocyte antigen (HLA), whose gene combines with Ir-gene, as an index. Eighty-four healthy, non-exposed persons (group III) were selected as controls. Regarding phenotype and genotype frequency, type A9 showed Aw24 and type A10 showed A26 in all cases. Except for Bw40, there was no significant difference among the groups (frequency of A9, I>II; that of A10, II< III). Bw40 was frequently observed in group I although it had racial specificity. There were 16 cases of Bw40 in group I (53.3%), 10 cases in group II (33.3%), and 23 cases in group III (27.3%). Further analysis of Bw40 revealed that Bw40.1 and Bw40.2 were more frequent in group I than in the control group. Bw40.3 was not observed in any of the groups. (Tsunoda, M.)

  1. Brain abnormalities among the mentally retarded prenatally exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, Masanori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Kobayashi, Takuro; Goto, Ikuo.

    1992-07-01

    An increased occurrence of severe mental retardation, with or without accompanying small head size, at specific gestational ages has been the most conspicuous effect on brain development of prenatal exposure to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. A variety of biological mechanisms could be responsible for this finding, including cell killing and mismanaged neuronal migration. We describe here the findings on magnetic resonance imaging of the brains of five of these mentally retarded individuals, all of whom were exposed in the 8th through the 15th weeks following fertilization, the gestational period shown to be the most vulnerable to radiation-related damage. In the two cases exposed at the 8th or 9th week following fertilization, large areas of ectopic gray matter are seen, strong evidence of a failure of the neurons to migrate to their proper functional sites. The two individuals exposed in the 12th or 13th week show no readily recognized ectopic gray areas but do show mild macrogyria, which implies some impairment in the development of the cortical zone. Moreover, both have mega cisterna magna. Finally, the one individual seen who was exposed still later in development, in the 15th week, shows none of the changes seen in the other four individuals. This person's brain, though small, appears to have normal architecture. These findings are discussed in terms of the embryological events transpiring at the time of the prenatal exposure of these individuals to ionizing radiation. (author)

  2. The LD50 associated with exposure to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shoichiro; Kato, Hiroo; Schull, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Data on a total of 7,593 persons in Hiroshima who were in 2,518 wooden Japanese houses and exposed to A-bomb within 1.6 km from the hypocenter have been used to estimate the LD 50/60 . The effect of radiation shielding for these people in particularly well-characterized in the new dosimetry system DS86. A range of values emerge, varying slightly with the method of estimation used. This range, derived from DS86 marrow doses, and based on a linear fit to equally weighted estimates of the probabilities of death at various doses, is 2.3-2.6 Gy. A linear estimate in which the probabilities of death at the various doses are weighted by the inverse of their variances is somewhat lower, 2.2 Gy. These values may be underestimates of actual LD 50/60 because of inclusion of deaths in the first day, and the severely injured (burns, trauma) who survived the first day but succumbed later to their injuries. (author)

  3. Genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation on growth of stature of F1 generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusho, Toshiyuki

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the data on stature of high school students aged from 15 to 17 in Hiroshima Prefecture, exposed group was divided into two groups. One was both-parents exposed group and the other was one-parent only exposed group. Each group was subdivided into 1 rad > exposed group and 1 rad . However, the difference of fourth central moment and correlation showed no definite tendency. Difference of mean was minus in many children of the father exposed and mother non-exposed group, but was plus in the contrary group. In other groups, no definite tendency was found. Regression analysis of exposure dose of parents from mean value of children showed no particular results, including non-exposed group or not. However, minus regression coefficient was more frequently seen on statistically significant level. Estimated value of induced mutation rate of polygene by A-bomb radiation, which effected on stature per generation, site of polygene in co-ordinate and 1 rad, was very low. As it was, however, the estimated value per 1 rad, it seemed to be not necessarily low. Concerning on the induced mutation rate, similar results were obtained in both-parents exposed group and one-parent only exposed group. (Kanao, N.)

  4. M-proteinemia in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neriishi, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Mikami, Motoko

    1990-01-01

    A comparative analysis of monoclonal gammopathy (M proteinemia) in A-bomb survivors, detected during the period from October 1979 through September 1981 (the first survey) and the period from June 1985 through May 1987 (the second survey), was made by using the 1986 dosimetry system. M-proteinemia was detected in 33 (0.38%) of 8,796 participants in the first survey and in 69 (0.94%) of 7,350 participants in the second survey; the prevalence of M-proteinemia was 2.5 times higher in the second survey than the first survey. It occurred more frequently with aging, especially in the 70 years and older age group. In 9 (27%) of 33 patients detected at the first survey, death was confirmed at the second survey; it was attributable to malignant tumor in 4, multiple myeloma in 2, and colon cancer, lung cancer and prostatic cancer in one each. Follow-up, available in 8 patients diagnosed as benign monoclonal gammopathy at the first survey, revealed the occurrence of immunoglobulin suppression in 4 patients. The relative risk between the persons exposed to 0.01 Gy or more and non-exposed persons was 2.0 for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and 1.3 for benign monoclonal gammopathy; however, this was not statistically significant. (N.K.) 50 refs

  5. An operated case with post-traumatic epilepsy following atomic bombing injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Takato; Nishio Shunji; Muraishi; Mitsuteru; Hisada, Kei; Takase, Keiichirou; Matsukado, Koichiro; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Ohta, Michiya

    1999-12-01

    The case was 54-years-old man who was bombed at 4-years old 1.5 km apart from the center of explosion in Hiroshima, and had intractable epilepsy after 10 years or more. He suffered from systemic convulsion from 18 years old and took anti-convulsant drugs from 23 years old. The frequency of seizure increased from once a half year to thrice 2 months for these 3-4 years. The attack mainly occurred at night, and it was generalized tonicoclonic convulsion accompanied with unconsciousness and urinary incontience. Valproate (1,800 mg) and clonazepam (1 mg) failed to control the attack, and then he was referred to author's hospital. By CT scanning, MRI and HMPAO-SPECT, the area around the ossified lesion in the right frontal lobe was considered the focus of the epilepsy, and the focus was removed on June 4, 1998. No neurodegeneration and convulsive seizure occurred after surgery. The ossified lesion was confirmed to be bone tissue containing osteoblasts from histological findings and was accompanied by severe gliosis to the brain surface. A large number of active astrocytes were found around the nerve cells in the cortex showing spine-like wave focus, but there were no significant changes in blood vessels in the brain. (K.H.)

  6. Estimation of risk map for cohort study of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. 1970-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonda, Tetsuji; Satoh, Kenichi; Otani, Keiko; Sato, Yuya; Maruyama, Hirofomi; Kawakami, Hideshi; Tashiro, Satoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ohtaki, Megu

    2012-01-01

    A risk map (map I) involving the effects of direct A-bomb exposure and of other confounding factors was estimated to analyze the death risk in the geographic distribution, and another risk map (map II) was also made by subtracting the direct exposure effect to see the confounder effect. The cohort was 37,382/157,327 survivors at Jan. 1, 1970, whose positional coordinates at the exposure were known, and was followed up until Dec. 31, 2009. For survival analysis, the endpoint was defined to be death (total 19,119) by regarding other 18,263 as censoring. Confounding factors were sex, age at the exposure, exposed dose and shielded condition. Maps I and II were depicted using the hazard ratio at the exposed position relative to the hypocenter, which was estimated by previously reported hazard model functions. Map I was found to be rather similar to concentric circle of the hypocenter, but to be tended a bit distorted toward northwest area. The distortion was clearer in the map II, indicating that death causes other than direct exposure existed. The confounder was thought to be the indirect exposure through the black rain, residual radiation and/or internal exposure, which awaiting future investigation. (T.T.)

  7. A case of polycythemia with low neutrophilic alkaline phosphatase and chromosome abnormalities in atomic bomb survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiyoda, Shin; Toyoda, Shigeki; Shikaya, Takaaki; Tagawa, Masuko; Matsunaga, Masako.

    1978-01-01

    A case of mild polycythemia with low neutophilic alkaline phosphatase in a short-distance group was reported. The patient was exposed 1.4 km from the center of explosion (estimated exposure dose, 330 rad). He suffered from acute symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, increase in temperature, loss of hair, poor appetite, and hemorrhage. In an examination of a-bomb survivors in 1969, his erythrocyte count was 622 x 10 4 /mm 3 and his hemoglobin level was 18.3 gm/dl. Later his erythrocyte count was sometimes over 550 x 10 4 /mm 3 . Upon admission to a hospital for a detailed examination, a slight increase in erythrocyte count and hemoglobin level and low NAP values were observed. Bone marrow findings revealed a slight increase in erythroblasts. Chromosomal analysis of bone marrow cells and peripheral lymphocytes revealed various abnormalities, seemingly related to exposure to radiation. Low NAPS values continued for a long time, and the patient remained healthy. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. Histologic review of breast cancer cases in survivors of atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuoka, S.; Asano, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Tokunaga, M.; Sakamoto, G.; Hartmann, W.H.; Hutter, R.V.; Land, C.E.; Henson, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    A panel of Japanese and American pathologists reviewed existing histologic material used to study breast cancer risk among the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a population in which incidence studies have found a strong relationship between breast cancer risk and radiation dose. The primary charge to the panel was to define a body of confirmed cases in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation that would require little or no review for inclusion in future studies of breast cancer incidence. Broad agreement on histologic type was reached for 298 of 300 confirmed cases. The distribution of histologic types was, overall, similar to that seen in other studies of breast cancer in Japanese women, and did not appear to depend on dose; thus radiation-induced breast cancer appeared to be no different histologically from other breast cancer. Also, no evidence was found of variation in histologic type by city, age at exposure, age at diagnosis, or calendar time

  9. Comparison of medical data of atomic-bomb survivors resident in the U.S. and Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Matsubara, Hiroomi; Yamakido, Michio; Yamada, Hiroaki.

    1982-01-01

    The third medical examination of A-bomb survivors residing in the U.S. was performed in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle and Honolulu during the period 6 - 28 May 1981. The test results were studied and the actual state of the survivors in the U.S., was reviewed as explained hereunder. 1) The number of survivors actually registered with the Committee of A-bomb Survivors in the U.S. is 491 (133 males and 358 females) of whom 57.2% are U.S. citizens. Those exposed in Hiroshima accounted for 91.8%. The mean age was 53.3 +- 8.9, thus they were more than 3 years younger than their counterparts in Hiroshima. The present addresses of the survivors are distributed over 15 states, but those in California constitute 77.6% of the total, and when those residing in the states along the west coast and Hawaii are added the rate increases to 95.9%. 2) Those who underwent health examination numbered 166 (45 males and 121 females), and comparison of the U.S. survivors against the Hiroshima survivors showed there to be a difference in the following points. The prevalence of hypertension was lower among the U.S. survivors, but RBC counts and hemoglobin concentration were significantly higher. The same was observed for blood lipids with hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia being found at a significantly higher rate in the U.S. survivors. 3) Those free of clinical abnormalities in this survey were 37.3%, and the rest required dietary guidance, follow-up observation, detailed examination of treatment. Those with diseases which are considered would make them eligible for health management allowance if in Japan, accounted for 18.7%. (author)

  10. Severe mental retardation among the prenatally exposed survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Masanori; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi; Schull, W.J.

    1988-05-01

    In March 1986, as a result of a comprehensive reevaluatioin of the exposures of the survivors of the A-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a new method for the estimation of individual doses was introduced, termed the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). In the new system they are computed individually without the use generally of explicit, average correction factors and thus allow better for the scattering of radiant energy that occurs within tissues. The comparisons described here rest on the computed dose to the mother's uterus. The DS86 sample itself consists of 1,544 individuals (96.6 %) of the 1,598 belonging to the clinical sample on whom T65DR doses are available. A variety of models with and without a threshold have been fitted to the individual as well as grouped dose data to ascertain the most suitable dose-response relationship. Briefly the findings of this comparison are as follows: The risk of severe mental retardation due to radiation exposure changes little from one dosimetric system to the other. The highest risk of radiation damage to the embryonic and fetal brain occurs 8 - 15 weeks after fertilization under both the T65DR and DS86 systems. Somewhat more evidence exists under the DS86 system of a threshold to the dose-response relationship in the 8 - 15 week interval than existed with the T65DR doses. However, the location and reality of the threshold are difficult to assess. Damage to the fetus 16 - 25 weeks after fertilization seems linear-quadratically or quadratically related to dose, especially in the DS86 sample, and suggests a threshold in the neighborhood of 0.70 Gy (DS86 dose), under a linear model using the individual dose data, with a lower 95 % confidence bound of 0.21 Gy. Grouped dose data give the same lower bound, but an estimate of the threshold of 0.64 Gy. (author)

  11. Atomic bomb made in Germany. Geo-radar measurements provide new insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, Rolf-Guenter; Focken, Christel

    2017-01-01

    The authors describe new geo radar measurements In Jonastal and discuss the results in relation to rumors on German efforts to build an atomic bond during the Second World War. The book includes available documentation on German and American research and technological activities (Manhattan project).

  12. Reanalysis of interviewing study data in the health attitude survey of A-bomb survivors, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    The interviewing study data in the title were initially contained in the official request of Hiroshima City and Prefecture, which had been presented to MHLW (Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare) in 2010, concerning spread of previously defined A-bomb exposed regions and were statistically reanalyzed based on the requirement of the consequent MHLW council. The data were originally derived from the questionnaire in 2008 about the health attitude survey by Hiroshima authorities, from which 892 survivors had received the interview together with self-writing, and answers of 869 parsons (524 males) were finally subjected to the present reanalysis. Measures of the interview involved the SF-36 (Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36-item Health Survey) for QOL, GHQ28 (General Health Questionnaire 28-item) for screening of neurosis/depression, and CAPS (Clinician Administered PTSD Scale) for diagnosis of PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), etc. These measures were analyzed along with classes of A-bomb experience with adjustment factors of sex, age and income by multiple-/multivariate logistic-regression. It was found that measures were tended to be worse in groups experiencing the black rain without effects of adjustment factors, which was similar to groups experiencing the heavier rainfall; however, these results were statistically insignificant. (T.T.)

  13. Review of the blast pressure, heat, and radiation dose of an atomic bomb received by survivors with ophthalmological disturbances. [In Japanese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, S

    1962-12-01

    Radiation damage to the eyes of subjects exposed to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima is surveyed. Acute radiation sicknes was found even in those who were exposed to a dose of only 70 to 80 r. Severe burns were observed among those who had been outdoors as far as 2100 m from the hypocenter. Cataract was found in those who received large irradiation doses (2685 to 3040 r) and the cataracts progress very slowly.

  14. A longitudinal study of growth and development among prenatally exposed atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Masanori; Fujikoshi, Yasunori; Schull, W.J.; Izumi, Shizue.

    1994-05-01

    Growth retardation due to A-bomb exposure has been evaluated for 455 individuals with nine repeated measurements of stature at age 10-18 yr using growth curve analysis and either two covariates, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) uterine absorbed dose and postovulatory age (weeks), or three covariates, DS86 uterine dose, DS86 uterine dose squared, and postovulatory age. Of the several comparisons made by city, sex, DS86 dose, and postovulatory age, the largest significant difference was found. However, on the basis of a linear-quadratic (L-Q) dose response, no significant difference was found. A highly significant growth retardation due to DS86 uterine absorbed dose was observed for all trimesters combined and for the first and second trimesters. In the first trimester, all parameter estimates based on a linear (L) or L-Q dose-response relationship were negative in relation to DS86 uterine absorbed dose. The parameter estimates in the second trimester were negative for a constant term and positive for an L or L-Q term. Radiation-related growth retardation at age 10-18 yr is clearly evident. The dose effect in the third trimester was not significant with either the L or the L-Q model. A growth analysis, based on an L dose-response relationship, was made for 704 and 838 children with four repeated measurements of stature from ages 10-13 and 15-18 yr, respectively. The retardation effect is clearly evident at age 10-13 and continues at age 15-18. Growth retardation in age 10-13 was highly significant for all trimesters combined but suggestive only for the first trimester. The group age 15-18 revealed a highly significant growth retardation for both the first and second trimesters. The relationship between birth weights and repeated measurements of stature in adolescence was discussed on the basis of the results obtained by a growth curve analysis. (J.P.N.)

  15. An autopsy study of histopathological changes in the urinary bladder transitional epithelium of atomic bomb survivors, 1960 - 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Ryozo; Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Tokunaga, Masayoshi

    1988-01-01

    From the ABCC-RERF Life Span Study extended sample, there were 4,499 cases in the Pathology Study sample of atomic bomb survivors who had come to autopsy in the period 1960 - 83. Among 370 subjects who were heavily exposed with an estimated dose (T65D) of 100 rad or more, 72 (about 20 %) of them, whose urinary bladder epithelia had been preserved satisfactorily to suit the purpose of this study, were sampled as the index group. An equal number of control subjects were selected from the unexposed group individually, matched with the index cases by city, sex, age at death, and year of death. However, cases with marked epithelial autolysis and those pathologically diagnosed as urinary bladder cancer were previously excluded from both the index group and control subjects. These 72 pairs of autopsy cases were pathologically studied for the presence or absence of epithelial lesions of the urinary bladder, namely, hyperplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma-in-situ, and the frequencies of appearance of these lesions were compared statistically by χ 2 test based on a case-control study design. Carcinoma-in-situ and severe dysplasia were detected in neither the index cases nor the control cases. The risk was relatively higher in the index group than in the control subjects for both hyperplasia and dysplasia (mild and moderate), in particular the relative risk of papillary hyperplasia being about 4.0, but as the total number of cases were small, this was not statistically significant. (author)

  16. Effect of follow-up period on minimal-significant dose in the atomic-bomb survivor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cologne, John; Grant, Eric J.; Cullings, Harry M.; Ozasa, Kotaro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Preston, Dale L. [Hirosoft International, Eureka, CA (United States)

    2018-03-15

    It was recently suggested that earlier reports on solid-cancer mortality and incidence in the Life Span Study of atomic-bomb survivors contain still-useful information about low-dose risk that should not be ignored, because longer follow-up may lead to attenuated estimates of low-dose risk due to longer time since exposure. Here it is demonstrated, through the use of all follow-up data and risk models stratified on period of follow-up (as opposed to sub-setting the data by follow-up period), that the appearance of risk attenuation over time may be the result of less-precise risk estimation - in particular, imprecise estimation of effect-modification parameters - in the earlier periods. Longer follow-up, in addition to allowing more-precise estimation of risk due to larger numbers of radiation-related cases, provides more-precise adjustment for background mortality or incidence and more-accurate assessment of risk modification by age at exposure and attained age. It is concluded that the latest follow-up data are most appropriate for inferring low-dose risk. Furthermore, if researchers are interested in effects of time since exposure, the most-recent follow-up data should be considered rather than the results of earlier reports. (orig.)

  17. Report on the result of the eighth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors in the South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Michiya [Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital (Japan); Ishioka, Shinichi; Hayakawa, Tohru; Kawano, Michimura; Sasaki, Yoshioki; Hirakami, Kojiro

    1999-05-01

    The atomic bomb survivors emigrating in the South America were 189 in total (160 in Brazil, 4 in Paraguay, 8 in Bolivia, 14 in Argentina and 3 in Peru) in November, 1998. Ninety-three persons (49%) took a medical examination (72 in Brazil, 3 in Paraguay, 6 in Bolivia, 9 in Argentina and 3 in Peru). The mean age was 68.6 years in male, and 68.1 years in female. They had hypertension (21.5%), diabetes (8.6%), cancer (6.5%), heart disease (5.4%), and thyroid gland diseases (4.3%). The subjective symptoms with high frequency were complete exhaustion or fatigue (58.1%), loss of vigor (55.9%), heat intolerance (49.5%) and numbness or tingling (47.1%). Electrocardiogram abnormality, total protein decrement, hypercholesterolemia and corpulence were almost the same as the last time. There was no change of a ratio of persons who needed tests on treatments. (K.H.)

  18. Report on the result of the eighth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors in the South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Michiya; Ishioka, Shinichi; Hayakawa, Tohru; Kawano, Michimura; Sasaki, Yoshioki; Hirakami, Kojiro

    1999-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors emigrating in the South America were 189 in total (160 in Brazil, 4 in Paraguay, 8 in Bolivia, 14 in Argentina and 3 in Peru) in November, 1998. Ninety-three persons (49%) took a medical examination (72 in Brazil, 3 in Paraguay, 6 in Bolivia, 9 in Argentina and 3 in Peru). The mean age was 68.6 years in male, and 68.1 years in female. They had hypertension (21.5%), diabetes (8.6%), cancer (6.5%), heart disease (5.4%), and thyroid gland diseases (4.3%). The subjective symptoms with high frequency were complete exhaustion or fatigue (58.1%), loss of vigor (55.9%), heat intolerance (49.5%) and numbness or tingling (47.1%). Electrocardiogram abnormality, total protein decrement, hypercholesterolemia and corpulence were almost the same as the last time. There was no change of a ratio of persons who needed tests on treatments. (K.H.)

  19. Inverse associations between obesity indicators and thymic T-cell production levels in aging atomic-bomb survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Yoshida

    Full Text Available Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, i.e., T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC numbers in CD4 and CD8 T cells. The number of TRECs showed a strong positive correlation with naive T cell numbers, and lower TREC numbers were associated with higher age. We found that the TREC number was inversely associated with levels of obesity indicators (BMI, hemoglobin A1c and serum CRP levels. Development of type-2 diabetes and fatty liver was also associated with lower TREC numbers. This population study suggests that obesity with enhanced inflammation is involved in aging of the human T-cell immune system. Given the fact that obesity increases the risk of numerous age-related diseases, attenuated immune competence is a possible mechanistic link between obesity and disease development among the elderly.

  20. Incidence of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in relation to neutron and gamma dose, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Otake, Masanori; Ichimaru, Michito.

    1978-03-01

    The incidence of leukemia during 1950-71 in the fixed mortality sample of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been analyzed as a function of individual gamma and neutron kerma and marrow dose. Two dose response models were tested for each of acute leukemia, chronic granulocytic leukemia, and all types of leukemia, respectively. Each model postulates that leukemia incidence depends upon the sum of the separate risks imposed by the gamma ray and neutron doses; in Model I both are assumed to be directly proportional to the respective doses, while Model II assumes that while the risk from neutrons is directly proportional to the dose, the risk from gamma rays is proportional to dose-squared. Weighted regression analyses were performed for each model. When the two models were fitted to the data for all types of leukemia, the estimated regression coefficients corresponding to the neutron and gamma ray doses both differed significantly from zero, for each model. However, when analysis was restricted to acute leukemia, both the neutron and gamma ray coefficients were significant only for Model II, and with respect to chronic granulocytic leukemia, only the coefficient of the neutron dose was significant, using either Model I or Model II. It appeared that the responses of the two leukemia types differed by type of radiation. If the chronic granulocytic and acute leukemias are considered together, the Model II appears to fit the data slightly better than Model I, but neither models is rejected by the data. (author)

  1. Study of the titers of Anti-Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in the sera of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Mizuno, Shoichi; Cologne, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Antibody titers to Epstein-Barr virus antigens were determined in the sera of 372 atomic bomb survivors to evaluate the effect of the previous radiation exposure on immune competence against the latent infection of the virus. The proportion of persons with high titers (≥ 1:40) of IgG antibodies to the early antigen was significantly elevated in the exposed survivors. Furthermore, the distribution of IgM titers against the viral capsid antigen was significantly affected by radiation dose with an increased occurrence of titers of 1:5 and 1:10 in the exposed persons, although the dose effect was only marginally suggestive when persons with rheumatoid factor were eliminated from the analysis. These results suggest that reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus in the latent stage occurs more frequently in the survivors, even though this might not be affected by the radiation dose. Otherwise, there was neither an increased trend in the prevalence of high titers (≥ 1:640) of IgG antibodies to the viral capsid antigen among the exposed people nor a correlation between the radiation exposure and distributions of titers of IgA antibodies to the viral capsid antigen or antibodies to the anti-Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen. (author)

  2. External radiation in Dolon village due to local fallout from the first USSR atomic bomb test in 1949.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fukutani, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Sakaguchi, Aya; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-02-01

    Dolon village, located about 60 km from the border of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, is known to be heavily contaminated by local fallout from the first USSR atomic bomb test in 1949. External radiation in Dolon was evaluated based on recent 137Cs data in soil and calculation of temporal change in the fission product composition. After fitting a log-normal distribution to the soil data, a 137Cs deposition of 32 kBq m-2, which corresponds to the 90th-percentile of the distribution, was tentatively chosen as a value to evaluate the radiation situation in 1949. Our calculation indicated that more than 95% of the cumulative dose for 50 y had been delivered within 1 y after the deposition. The resulting cumulative dose for 1 y after the deposition, normalized to the initial contamination containing 1 kBq m-2 of 137Cs, was 15.6 mGy, assuming a fallout arrival time of 3 h and a medium level of fractionation. Finally, 0.50 Gy of absorbed dose in air was derived as our tentative estimate for 1-year cumulative external dose in Dolon due to local fallout from the first USSR test in 1949.

  3. Study of the titers of Anti-Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in the sera of atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Mizuno, Shoichi; Cologne, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Antibody titers to Epstein-Barr virus antigens were determined in the sera of 372 atomic bomb survivors to evaluate the effect of the previous radiation exposure on immune competence against the latent infection of the virus. The proportion of persons with high titers ({>=} 1:40) of IgG antibodies to the early antigen was significantly elevated in the exposed survivors. Furthermore, the distribution of IgM titers against the viral capsid antigen was significantly affected by radiation dose with an increased occurrence of titers of 1:5 and 1:10 in the exposed persons, although the dose effect was only marginally suggestive when persons with rheumatoid factor were eliminated from the analysis. These results suggest that reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus in the latent stage occurs more frequently in the survivors, even though this might not be affected by the radiation dose. Otherwise, there was neither an increased trend in the prevalence of high titers ({>=} 1:640) of IgG antibodies to the viral capsid antigen among the exposed people nor a correlation between the radiation exposure and distributions of titers of IgA antibodies to the viral capsid antigen or antibodies to the anti-Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen. (author).

  4. Perinatal loss and neurological abnormalities among children of the atomic bomb. Nagasaki and Hiroshima revisited, 1949 to 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, J.N.; Schull, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were exposed to ionizing radiation in utero have demonstrated a significant increase in perinatal loss and the vulnerability of the developing fetal brain to injury. These studies have also helped to define the stages in the development of the human brain that are particularly susceptible to radiation-related damage. Exposure at critical junctures in development increases the risk of mental retardation, small head size, subsequent seizures, and poor performance on conventional tests of intelligence and in school. The most critical period, 8 through 15 weeks after fertilization, corresponds to that time in development when neuronal production increases and migration of immature neurons to their cortical sites of function occurs. The epidemiologic data are, however, too sparse to settle unequivocally the nature of the dose-response function and, in particular, whether there is or is not a threshold to damage. If a threshold does exist, it appears to be in the 0.10- to 0.20-Gy fetal-dose range in this vulnerable gestational period

  5. Serum TSH, thyroglobulin, and thyroidal disorders in atomic bomb survivors exposed in youth: 30-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, I.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Sato, K.; Hamilton, H.B.; Kawamoto, S.; Izumi, M.; Nagataki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Follow-up examinations to determine the frequency of thyroidal disorders were conducted by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) on individuals in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were less than 20 yr of age at the time of exposure to the atomic bomb. Concentrations of serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), and anti-TG antibody 30 yr after exposure were also determined. Nontoxic uninodular goiter was found in 13 cases of the 100 + rad exposed group (n = 477) and in three cases of the nonexposed group (n = 501). The prevalence in the 100+ rad exposed group was significantly higher (chi-squared = 6.584, p less than 0.01). Thyroid cancer was found in eight exposed cases, all of whom were in the 100+ rad group, and the prevalence was significantly greater (chi-squared = 7.919, p less than 0.01). Regardless of the presence or absence of thyroid disorders, serum TSH and TG levels were not statistically different between the 100 rad + exposed and nonexposed groups. Although hypothyroidism was found in 23 of the total cases, there was no correlation between its development and exposure to ionizing irradiation

  6. Inverse associations between obesity indicators and thymic T-cell production levels in aging atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kubo, Yoshiko; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, i.e., T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) numbers in CD4 and CD8 T cells. The number of TRECs showed a strong positive correlation with naive T cell numbers, and lower TREC numbers were associated with higher age. We found that the TREC number was inversely associated with levels of obesity indicators (BMI, hemoglobin A1c) and serum CRP levels. Development of type-2 diabetes and fatty liver was also associated with lower TREC numbers. This population study suggests that obesity with enhanced inflammation is involved in aging of the human T-cell immune system. Given the fact that obesity increases the risk of numerous age-related diseases, attenuated immune competence is a possible mechanistic link between obesity and disease development among the elderly.

  7. Investigation on circular asymmetry of geographical distribution in cancer mortality of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors based on risk maps: analysis of spatial survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonda, Tetsuji; Satoh, Kenichi; Otani, Keiko; Ohtaki, Megu; Sato, Yuya; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi; Tashiro, Satoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    While there is a considerable number of studies on the relationship between the risk of disease or death and direct exposure from the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, the risk for indirect exposure caused by residual radioactivity has not yet been fully evaluated. One of the reasons is that risk assessments have utilized estimated radiation doses, but that it is difficult to estimate indirect exposure. To evaluate risks for other causes, including indirect radiation exposure, as well as direct exposure, a statistical method is described here that evaluates risk with respect to individual location at the time of atomic bomb exposure instead of radiation dose. In addition, it is also considered to split the risks into separate risks due to direct exposure and other causes using radiation dose. The proposed method is applied to a cohort study of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. The resultant contour map suggests that the region west to the hypocenter has a higher risk compared to other areas. This in turn suggests that there exists an impact on risk that cannot be explained by direct exposure. (orig.)

  8. Investigation on circular asymmetry of geographical distribution in cancer mortality of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors based on risk maps: analysis of spatial survival data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonda, Tetsuji; Satoh, Kenichi; Otani, Keiko; Ohtaki, Megu [Hiroshima University, Department of Environmetrics and Biometrics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (Japan); Sato, Yuya [Hiroshima University, Division of Radiation Information Registry, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (Japan); Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi [Hiroshima University, Department of Epidemiology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (Japan); Tashiro, Satoshi [Hiroshima University, Division of Radiation Information Registry, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (Japan); Hiroshima University, Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Department of Radiation Biophysics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    While there is a considerable number of studies on the relationship between the risk of disease or death and direct exposure from the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, the risk for indirect exposure caused by residual radioactivity has not yet been fully evaluated. One of the reasons is that risk assessments have utilized estimated radiation doses, but that it is difficult to estimate indirect exposure. To evaluate risks for other causes, including indirect radiation exposure, as well as direct exposure, a statistical method is described here that evaluates risk with respect to individual location at the time of atomic bomb exposure instead of radiation dose. In addition, it is also considered to split the risks into separate risks due to direct exposure and other causes using radiation dose. The proposed method is applied to a cohort study of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. The resultant contour map suggests that the region west to the hypocenter has a higher risk compared to other areas. This in turn suggests that there exists an impact on risk that cannot be explained by direct exposure. (orig.)

  9. Distribution of onset of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in the leukemia registry by dose, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1946-75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Ichimaru, Michito; Mikami, Motoko; Yamada, Yasuaki; Tomonaga, Yuu.

    1982-03-01

    The data from the RERF Leukemia Registry for the years 1946-75 were used to determine the distribution of onset of acute leukemia and chronic granulocytic leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in relation to city, dose, and age at the time of the bomb (ATB). A total of 509 confirmed leukemia cases (297 in Hiroshima and 212 in Nagasaki) have occurred among A-bomb survivors in the open populations of these cities in these years. Analysis revealed that the onset of both acute leukemia and chronic granulocytic leukemia tends to shift to earlier years with increasing dose in Hiroshima, but in Nagasaki, although the onset of both types of leukemia was earlier in the high dose group than in the low dose or control groups, the latter two groups did not differ. The distribution of onset of acute leukemia in the three dose groups also depended upon age ATB. While the distribution of onset of acute leukemia among those survivors whose age ATB was less than 30 differed significantly in the three dose classes, this tendency was not observed among those individuals whose age ATB was 30 years or more. For chronic granulocytic leukemia, the onset was shifted to earlier years in the high dose group than in the control group regardless of age ATB in Hiroshima. These findings support the pattern of leukemogenesis observed in A-bomb survivors in the Life Span Study sample, a fixed cohort, in relation to city, dose, age ATB, and years after exposure. (author)

  10. Effects of atomic bomb radiation on differentiation of B lymphocytes and on the function of concanavalin A-induced suppressor T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Neriishi, S.; Ishimaru, T.; Shimba, N.; Hamilton, H.B.; Ohgushi, Y.; Koyanagi, M.; Ichimaru, M.

    1985-01-01

    The differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into immunoglobulin-producing cells (Ig-PC) by pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and the function of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced suppressor T lymphocytes were examined to elucidate the late effects of atomic bomb radiation. A total of 140 individuals, 70 with an exposure dose of 100 rad or more and an equal number with an exposure dose of 0 rad matched by sex and age, were selected from the Nagasaki Adult Health Study (AHS) sample. Both the differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into Ig-PC by PWM and the function of Con A-induced suppressor T lymphocytes tended to be more depressed in the exposed group than in the control group, but a statistically significant difference could not be observed between the two groups. The function of Con A-induced suppressor T lymphocytes tended to decrease with age, but a statistical significance was detected only for percentage suppression against IgM-PC

  11. Dose survival of G0 lymphocytes irradiated in vitro: A test for a possible population bias in the cohort of atomic-bomb survivors exposed to high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori; Sposto, R.; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1993-04-01

    An in-vitro colony assay was employed for X-ray dose-survival studies of peripheral-blood lymphocytes from 117 Adult Health Study participants with Dosimetry System 1986 doses 10 values (the X-ray dose required to kill 90% of cells) for these two groups were 3.40 Gy (7.5%) and 3.34 Gy (7.8%), respectively. No statistically significant differences in their distributions were detected. In addition, neither sex nor age affected the in-vitro radiosensitivity of lymphocytes for either group or for all subjects combined. Therefore it was concluded that, as far as the G 0 -lymphocyte colony assay is concerned, there is no evidence for preferential loss of individuals with higher cellular radiosensitivity among the high-dose atomic bomb survivors. However, it should be noted that the interindividual variations in cellular radiosensitivity were not large compared with the experimental variations. Consequently, the above-mentioned results should be considered due to the small heterogeneity of lymphocyte radiosensitivity among the survivors. (J.P.N.)

  12. Ph1 chromosomes and bcr gene rearrangements in chronic myelocytic leukemia patients developed from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Takechi, Miho; Shigeta, Chiharu; Sakatani, Keiko; Oguma, Nobuo; Kamada, Nanao; Takimoto, Yasuo; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1989-01-01

    This study compared findings of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) in A-bomb survivors (n=8) developing CML within 10 years after the bombing and in non-exposed CML patients (n=14). Both Ph 1 chromosomes and bcr rearrangement were observed in all patients in both exposed and non-exposed groups. There was no significant difference in distribution sites of bcr rearrangement between the groups. These results suggest that bcr-abl chimera mRNA and chimera protein associated with Ph 1 chromosomes have an important role in the development of CML among A-bomb survivors, as well as among non-exposed patients. (N.K.)

  13. Bomb CAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, R.J.; Howard, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes BombCAD a computer-aided analysis technique for assessing the damage to diverse structures which results from specific high explosive detonations within or near the structure. BombCAD analyzes the vulnerability of specific facilities to bomb attach, and evaluates siting, screening and hardening/softening aspects of comprehensive bomb defense programs. The paper describes BombCAD's architectural models of specific structures, computations of blastwave effects and the paradigms which relate blast wave effects to both structural damage and human injury. The use of BombCAD in bomb attack vulnerability assessment, facility design, bomb threat response planning and post-incident analyses is described and field examples are presented

  14. Health effects on individuals and health services of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkita, T.

    1984-01-01

    Human injuries caused by the A-bomb can be categorized as the result of thermal rays, ionizing radiation, or blast. Many persons sustained injuries from more than one cause, any one of which could have been fatal. In addition to such direct injuries, indirect injuries were sustained, caused by fire or the fall of rubble from demolished buildings. The severity of early A-bomb injuries was directly proportional to distance from the hypocentre. Many hospitals and clinics throughout Hiroshima City and Nagasaki City were destroyed or damaged depending on their distance from the hypocentre and the extent to which they were shielded topographically

  15. (In)security factor atomic bomb. An analysis of the crisis with the Iranian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Iran is a rational actor in the international politics that decides on the basis of the perception of threat. Iran's security situation is comparable with that of Israel with the rational consequence to rely on the atomic program with respect to deterrence and self-defense. The solution of the Iran crisis is basically dependent on a change of the perception of threat. A military act against the Iranian nuclear facilities would be counterproductive, would only slowing down the program but not prevent further activities. In fact a military act would enhance the perception of threat. For the analysis of the Iran crises the author used the Cuba crisis as blueprint, were mislead perceptions were responsible for the escalation.

  16. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamatani, K.; Mukai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Nakachi, K.; Kusunoki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  17. Relationship between spontaneous γH2AX foci formation and progenitor functions in circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells among atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Weng, Nan-Ping; Young, Lauren F; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-05-01

    Accumulated DNA damage in hematopoietic stem cells is a primary mechanism of aging-associated dysfunction in human hematopoiesis. About 70 years ago, atomic-bomb (A-bomb) radiation induced DNA damage and functional decreases in the hematopoietic system of A-bomb survivors in a radiation dose-dependent manner. The peripheral blood cell populations then recovered to a normal range, but accompanying cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells still remain that bear molecular changes possibly caused by past radiation exposure and aging. In the present study, we evaluated radiation-related changes in the frequency of phosphorylated (Ser-139) H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation in circulating CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34+Lin-) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) among 226Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. An association between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation in HSPCs and the radiation dose was observed, but the γH2AX foci frequency was not significantly elevated by past radiation. We found a negative correlation between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation and the length of granulocyte telomeres. A negative interaction effect between the radiation dose and the frequency of γH2AX foci was suggested in a proportion of a subset of HSPCs as assessed by the cobblestone area-forming cell assay (CAFC), indicating that the self-renewability of HSPCs may decrease in survivors who were exposed to a higher radiation dose and who had more DNA damage in their HSPCs. Thus, although many years after radiation exposure and with advancing age, the effect of DNA damage on the self-renewability of HSPCs may be modified by A-bomb radiation exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Report of a workshop on the application of molecular genetics to the study of mutation in the children of atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    A workshop, entitled 'application of molecular genetics to the study of mutation in the children of atomic-bomb survivors,' was held on November 12-14, 1991, which was presided over by Mortimer Mendelsohn and Toshiyuki Kumatori, co-chairmen of the RERF Scientific Council. The purpose of this workshop was to evaluate the status of the emerging DNA-oriented techniques for the study of mutation and to discuss possible developments that would bear upon the program. Although specific genetic follow-up studies of children of A-bomb survivors were addressed, it was clear to the participants that their discussions had much-wider implications -- most notably, the Chernobyl accidents of 1986. This report summarizes the contents of the lively 2.5-day meeting. A complete list of the invited participants is shown in the Appendix. (N.K.) 79 refs

  19. Pathological study on breast lesions examined at Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic Bomb Survivors Hospital, April 1985-March 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Shigeru; Fujihara, Megumu; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of 312 breast biopsies of 303 patients, performed during a 5-year period from April 1985 through March 1990 in a survey of the effects of exposure to A-bomb radiation, yielded the following findings. Sixty four (20.5%) of the 312 biopsies were in patients who had been exposed to A-bomb radiation or who had entered the city after the A-bombing, 10 of which were in patients exposed at up to 2,000 m from the hypocenter. Of the 64 biopsies performed for breast lesions in the exposed group, 42 (65.6%) yielded breast cancer. This figure was higher when compared with 47.0% (64 biopsies) of 136 patients who had been born before the A-bombing in the non-exposed group. In the exposed group, age distribution at the time of A-bombing was 11.9% in the first decade, 35.7% in the second decade, 31.0% in the third decade, 16.7% in the fourth decade, and 4.8% in the fifth decade. There was no correlation between histology type and exposure history in breast cancer. Nor did correlation exist between the age at the time of A-bombing and histology type in the exposed group. (N.K.)

  20. The effects of the Omagh bomb on adolescent mental health: a school-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael; McDermott, Maura; Percy, Andrew; Ehlers, Anke; Clark, David M; Fitzgerald, Michael; Moriarty, John

    2015-02-06

    The main objective of this study was to assess psychiatric morbidity among adolescents following the Omagh car bombing in Northern Ireland in 1998. Data was collected within schools from adolescents aged between 14 and 18 years via a self-completion booklet comprised of established predictors of PTSD; type of exposure, initial emotional response, long-term adverse physical problems, predictors derived from Ehlers and Clark's (2000) cognitive model, a PTSD symptoms measure (PDS) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Those with more direct physical exposure were significantly more likely to meet caseness on the GHQ and the PDS. The combined pre and peri trauma risk factors highlighted in previous meta-analyses accounted for 20% of the variance in PDS scores but the amount of variance accounted for increased to 56% when the variables highlighted in Ehlers and Clark's cognitive model for PTSD were added. High rates of chronic PTSD were observed in adolescents exposed to the bombing. Whilst increased exposure was associated with increased psychiatric morbidity, the best predictors of PTSD were specific aspects of the trauma ('seeing someone you think is dying'), what you are thinking during the event ('think you are going to die') and the cognitive mechanisms employed after the trauma. As these variables are in principle amenable to treatment the results have implications for teams planning treatment interventions after future traumas.

  1. G-banding analysis of radiation-induced chromosome damage in lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Nakashima, Eiji.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the G-banding analysis of somatic chromosomes in lymphocytes from 63 atomic-bomb survivors in Hiroshima to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Summary findings are as follows: (1) The cells with stable-type chromosome aberrations (Cs cells) predominated among the aberrant cells and showed a dose-dependent increase. All stable chromosome aberrations were classified into 9 types: reciprocal translocations (t), translocations of complex type (t-cx), insertions (ins), complex exchanges (e-cx), peri- and paracentric inversions (inv-peri, inv-para), terminal and interstitial deletions (del-ter, del-int), and unidentified rearrangements. Aberration frequencies increased with increasing dose for all aberration categories. Among the chromosome aberrations classified, reciprocal translocations predominated in all dose ranges. The frequencies of complex aberrations were low at the low-dose level but increased sharply as dose increased. (2) The linear model was fitted to test the dose-response relationship for Cs-cell frequencies. With a constant neutron relative biological effectiveness of 10, an estimated linear slope of 15.2%/Sv was obtained for Dosimetry System 1986 bone-marrow dose with an intercept of 2.9% at dose 0. The present observation confirmed a wide variability of Cs-cell frequencies among individual survivors in every dose category.(3) Statistical analysis of data on 3370 break sites showed good correlations between relative DNA content and the distribution of chromosome breaks involved in translocations, although the involvement of chromosome 1 is significantly higher, for as-yet-unknown reasons. (J.P.N.)

  2. On the existence of a threshold in the dose-response relationship from the epidemiological data of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tatsuo; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    Whether or not there is a threshold dose in the dose-response relationship for cancer incidence due to radiation is one of the most important but controversial issues in radiation protection and nuclear policy making. The epidemiological studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) group of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, conducted by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) have been regarded to be most authentic, and they keep the view that there is no evidence to deny the linear non-threshold (LNT) hypotheses. The authors have claimed the necessity of reassessment of exposure doses of survivors, by considering the contribution of chronic dose, which comes from fall-out, induced radioactivity, and early entrance near the center of the city. The authors also have stressed the importance of the cases of if 'not-in-city' survivors, frequently reported to be fatal by the heavy chronic exposure. Recently we have noticed that the appearance of acute radiation symptoms is an important index for estimating total dose. In this paper, based on Obos statistical data (in 1957) for the acute symptoms observed for various category of survivors, we present an estimation of the average chronic dose of survivors, which should be added to the instantaneous dose for the directly exposed groups. By assuming the threshold for the appearance of the acute symptom such as epilation as 0.5 Sv, average chronic dose of 0.32 Sv was estimated for all survivors. Then the present dose-response relationship for cancer incidence should be shifted to the right hand side by this amount, and the value of about 0.32 Sv or more is suggested as the threshold for cancer incidence in low radiation level region

  3. Search for mutations altering protein charge and/or function in children of atomic bomb survivors: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, C.; Goriki, K.; Asakawa, J.; Fujita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kageoka, T.; Hazama, R.

    1988-01-01

    A sample of (1) children whose parents had been proximally exposed (i.e., less than 2000 m from the hypocenter) at the time of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and (2) a suitable comparison group have been examined for the occurrence of mutations altering the electrophoretic mobility or activity of a series of 30 proteins. The examination of the equivalent of 667,404 locus products in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded three mutations altering electrophoretic mobility; the corresponding figure for the comparison group was three mutations in 466,881 tests. The examination of a subset of 60,529 locus products for loss of enzyme activity in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded one mutation; no mutations were encountered in 61,741 determinations on the children of the comparison group. When these two series are compared, the mutation rate observed in the children of proximally exposed persons is thus 0.60 x 10(-5)/locus/generation, with 95% confidence intervals between 0.2 and 1.5 x 10(-5), and that in the comparison children is 0.64 x 10(-5)/locus/generation, with 95% intervals between 0.1 and 1.9 x 10(-5). The average conjoint gonad doses for the proximally exposed parents are estimated to be 0.437 Gy of gamma radiation and 0.002 Gy of neutron radiation. If a relative biological effectiveness of 20 is assigned to the neutron radiation, the combined total gonad dose for the parents becomes 0.477 Sv. (Organ absorbed doses are expressed in gray [1 Gy = 100 rad]; where dose is a mixture of gamma and neutron radiation, it is necessary because of the differing relative biological effectiveness of gamma and neutron radiation to express the combined gamma-neutron gonad exposures in sieverts [1 Sv = 100 rem])

  4. Search for mutations altering protein charge and/or function in children of atomic bomb survivors: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, Chiyoko; Goriki, Kazuaki; Asakawa, Jun-ichi; Fujita, Mikio; Takahashi, Norio; Kageoka, Takeshi; Hazama, Ryuji.

    1990-04-01

    A sample of children whose parents were proximally exposed at the time of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (i.e., within 2,000 m of the hypocenter) and a suitable comparison group have been examined for the occurrence of mutations altering the electrophoretic mobility or activity of a series of 30 proteins. The examination of the equivalent of 667,404 locus products in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded three mutations altering electrophoretic mobility; the corresponding figure for the comparison group was three mutations in 466,881 tests. The examination of a subset of 60,529 locus products for loss of enzyme activity in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded one mutation; no mutations were encountered in 61,741 determinations on the children of the comparison group. Combining these two series, the mutation rate observed in the children of proximally exposed is thus 0.60 x 10 -5 /locus/generation, with 95 % confidence intervals between 0.2 and 1.5 x 10 -5 , and in the comparison children, 0.64 x 10 -5 /locus/generation, with 95 % intervals between 0.1 and 1.9 x 10 -5 . The average conjoint gonad doses of the proximally exposed parents are estimated to be 0.437 Gy of gamma radiation and 0.002 Gy of neutron radiation. Assigning a relative biological effectiveness of 20 to the neutron radiation, the combined total gonad dose of the parents becomes 0.477 Sv. (author)

  5. Lack of effects of atomic bomb radiation on genetic instability of tandem-repetitive elements in human germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko; Hiyama, Keiko

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study to detect the potential effects of atomic bomb radiation on germ-line instability, we screened 64 children from 50 exposed families and 60 from 50 control families for mutations at six minisatellite loci by using Southern blot analysis with Pc-1, λTM-18, ChdTC-15, pλg3, λMS-1, and CEB-1 probes. In the exposed families, one or both parents received a radiation dose >0.01 Sv. Among the 64 children, only one child had parents who were both exposed. Thus, of a total of 128 gametes that produced the 64 children, 65 gametes were derived from exposed parents and 63 were from unexposed parents, the latter being included in a group of 183 unexposed gametes used for calculating mutation rates. The average parental gonadal dose for the 65 gametes was 1.9 Sv. We detected a total of 28 mutations at the pλg3, λMS-1, and CEB-1 loci, but no mutations at the Pc-1, λTM-18, and ChdTC-15 loci. We detected 6 mutations in 390 alleles of the 65 exposed gametes and 22 mutations in 1098 alleles of the 183 gametes from the unexposed parents. The mean mutation rate per locus per gamete in these six minisatellite loci was 1.5% in the exposed parents and 2.0% in the unexposed parents. We observed no significant difference in mutation rates in the children of the exposed and the unexposed parents (P = .37, Fisher's exact probability test). 38 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  6. Comparison of type and frequency of chromosome aberrations by conventional and G-staining methods in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Shimba, Hachiro; Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    Somatic chromosomes derived from cultured lymphocytes of 23 atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima were analyzed to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced structural aberrations, using in sequence the ordinary staining method (O-method) and the trypsin G-banding method (G-method). Of 896 cells examined, 342 were found to contain induced aberrations, including 31 cells in which the precise identification of the type of aberrations was not possible even by the G-method. The number of chromosome aberrations observed was 376 in the 311 cells where aberrant precise identification was possible. The majority (288 or 76.6%) were intra- or inter-chromosomal symmetric exchanges due to a two-break event, while only 24 were found to be asymmetric exchanges (dicentrics, rings, and interstitial deletions). Further, there were 28 aberrations showing acentric fragments and terminal deletions, and the remaining 36 were complex intra- and inter-chromosomal exchanges involving three or more breaks which result in insertions and double translocations. A comparative karyotype analysis of the same metaphases examined by the sequential 0- And G-methods was carried out independently on 361 aberrations, mostly of the symmetric type. It was found that 78 (21.6%) of the 361 were detected only by the G-method; among these were 14 paracentric inversions, 48 reciprocal interchanges of chromosome segments with either equal length (11) or unequal length (37), 14 minor deletions and 2 complex rearrangements, all of which were nevertheless judged to fall within the normal range of variation by theO-method. In contrast, 25 aberrations detected in O-method chromosomes which were overcontracted or twisted, were shown to have normal banding patterns by the G-method. (author)

  7. Report on results of third medical examination of Atomic Bomb Survivors residing in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Hiroomi; Yamakido, Michio; Ito, Chikako; Yamada, Hiroaki.

    1982-01-01

    The number of survivors actually registered with the Committee of A-bomb survivors in the U.S. in 491 (133 males and 358 females) of whom 57.3% are U.S. citizens. Those exposed in Hiroshima accounted for 91.8%. The mean age was 53.3 +- 8.9, thus they were more than 3 years younger than their counterparts in Hiroshima. Responses to the Health Survey Questionnaires numbered 255, and those with symptoms which appeared to be related to diseases were found at a high rate among the early entrants, but as the number of those receiving examination in this group was few, it is considered that many of those in poor health had come in for the examination. No association could be demonstrated between psychological complaints and exposure status. Those who underwent health examination numbered 166 (45 males and 121 females), and comparison of the U.S. survivors against the Hiroshima survivors showed there to be a difference in the following points. The prevalence of hypertension was lower among the U.S. survivors, but RBC counts and hemoglobin values were significantly higher. The same was observed for blood lipids with hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia being found at a significantly higher rate in the U.S. survivors, the cause being considered to be the larger intake of animal fat and sugar by those of Japanese ancestry than the indigenous Japanese. Those free of clinical abnormalities in this survey were 37.3%, and the rest required dietary guidance, follow-up observation, detailed examination or treatment. Those with diseases which are considered would make them eligible for health management allowance if in Japan, accounted for 18.7%. (J.P.N.)

  8. Report on the results of the eleventh medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakido, Michio; Dohy, Hiroo; Neriishi, Kazuo