WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic beam source

  1. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Radio frequency atomic hydrogen beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, convenient rf discharge source for the production of an intense beam of hydrogen atoms is described. The design and operation is such that the discharge tube can be operated over a period of several thousand hours, producing an intense beam with dissociation approx.95%

  3. Atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    A device for production of low-energy (5-10 eV) neutral atomic beams for surface modification studies, which recreates the flux of atomic oxygen in LEO, is described. The beam is produced by acceleration of plasma ions onto a negatively biased plate of high-Z metal; the ions are neutralized and reflected by the surface, retaining a large fraction of their incident kinetic energy, forming a beam of atoms. The device is based on a magnetically confined (3-4 kG) coaxial plasma source and the atom energy can be varied by adjusting the bias voltage. The source provides a neutral flux of roughly 5 x 10 to the 16th/sq cm/s at a distance of 10 cm and a fluence of roughly 10 to the 21st/sq cm in five hours. The source has been characterized with plasma diagnostics and by measuring the energy of an atomic argon beam using a mass spectrometer. Samples of carbon film, carbon-based paint, Kapton, Mylar, and Teflon exposed to atomic O beams show erosion quite similar to those observed in orbit on the Space Shuttle.

  4. A new atomic beam source: The ''candlestick''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Lene Vestergaard; Golovchenko, J. A.; Burns, Michael M.

    1994-12-01

    The design of a novel-type of atomic beam source which provides for long term, stable operation at high emission rates is reported. The heart of the design is the ``candlestick'' where liquid source material is transported by capillary action to a localized hot emission region. A surrounding cavity kept at the melting point for the source material shields the vacuum chamber walls from this region. The atomic beam escaping from the source is collimated, and uncollimated atoms are transported back to the liquid reservoir at the bottom of the ``candlestick'' by capillary action. This design has advantages over traditional oven designs: localized heating provides for large emission rates under high vacuum conditions, collimation is combined with recycling and conservation of source material, and the use of capillarity allows any orientation of the beam source. The source has been tested with sodium, and we believe that the design is useful for a broad range of applications including thin-film evaporation, molecular beam epitaxy, and semiconductor surface doping. With the low thermal mass of the emission section, the source could be optimized for pulsed mode operation. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the design ideas presented here could form the basis for a supersonic source with very high Mach numbers.

  5. Development of the RIKEN atomic beam type polarized ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN atomic beam type polarized ion source has been assembled and is operational. The present level of performance is 140 μA with 50-60% polarization of the ideal value. Results from operation will be described. (author)

  6. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  7. A microwave discharge atom beam source of high intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.45 GHz microwave discharge atom beam source of compact design has been developed. A standard extended quarter wavelength cavity design has been used in conjunction with a simple discharge tube and cooling arrangement. The source, while primarily designed for the production of atomic hydrogen, has also been tested with oxygen and nitrogen. The characteristics of the microwave source are compared with those of a Slevin type radiofrequency RF source and the influence of different cleaning procedures on performance have been investigated. Unlike the Slevin source the performance of the microwave source is not critically dependent on the cleaning procedure or gas purity. For hydrogen, both sources could provide a dissociation fraction of about 90% but the beam intensity obtainable from the microwave source (>1014 atoms cm-3) at the exit of a 1 mm capillary tube was significantly greater than that from the Slevin source. For oxygen, where the performance of the Slevin source was poor, the microwave source provided a dissociation fraction of up to about 60% and a beam density of about 1013 atoms cm-3. (Author)

  8. A microwave discharge atom beam source of high intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, A.; Hughes, M.P.; Geddes, J.; Gilbody, H.B. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pure and Applied Physics)

    1992-05-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave discharge atom beam source of compact design has been developed. A standard extended quarter wavelength cavity design has been used in conjunction with a simple discharge tube and cooling arrangement. The source, while primarily designed for the production of atomic hydrogen, has also been tested with oxygen and nitrogen. The characteristics of the microwave source are compared with those of a Slevin type radiofrequency RF source and the influence of different cleaning procedures on performance have been investigated. Unlike the Slevin source the performance of the microwave source is not critically dependent on the cleaning procedure or gas purity. For hydrogen, both sources could provide a dissociation fraction of about 90% but the beam intensity obtainable from the microwave source (>10{sup 14} atoms cm{sup -3}) at the exit of a 1 mm capillary tube was significantly greater than that from the Slevin source. For oxygen, where the performance of the Slevin source was poor, the microwave source provided a dissociation fraction of up to about 60% and a beam density of about 10{sup 13} atoms cm{sup -3}. (Author).

  9. An atomic beam source for actinide elements: concept and realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For ultratrace analysis of actinide elements and studies of their atomic properties with resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS), efficient and stable sources of actinide atomic beams are required. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the evaporation of actinide elements and oxides from a variety of metals were considered, including diffusion, desorption, and associative desorption. On this basis various sandwich-type filaments were studied. The most promising system was found to consist of tantalum as the backing material, an electrolytically deposited actinide hydroxide as the source of the element, and a titanium covering layer for its reduction to the metal. Such sandwich sources were experimentally proven to be well suited for the production of atomic beams of plutonium, curium, berkelium and californium at relatively low operating temperatures and with high and reproducible yields. (orig.)

  10. Optimization of atomic beam sources for polarization experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisser, Martin; Nass, Alexander; Stroeher, Hans [IKP, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    For experiments with spin-polarized protons and neutrons a dense target is required. In current atomic beam sources an atomic hydrogen or deuterium beam is expanded through a cold nozzle and a system of sextupole magnets and RF-transition units selects a certain hyperfine state. The achievable flux seems to be limited to about 10{sup 17} particles per second with a high nuclear polarization. A lot of experimental and theoretical effort has been undertaken to understand all effects and to increase the flux. However, improvements have remained marginal. Now, a Monte Carlo simulation based on the DSMC part of the open source C++ library OpenFOAM is set up in order to get a better understanding of the flow and to optimize the various elements. It is intended to include important effects like deflection from magnetic fields, recombination on the walls and spin exchange collisions in the simulation and make quantitative predictions of changes in the experimental setup. The goal is to get a tool that helps to further increase the output of an atomic beam source. So far, a new binary collision model, magnetic fields, RF-transition units and a tool to measure the collision age are included. The next step will be to couple the whole simulation with an optimization algorithm implementing Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) in order to automatically optimize the atomic beam source.

  11. The FILTEX/HERMES polarized hydrogen atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FILTEX/HERMES atomic beam source (ABS) for polarized hydrogen is described. Recent improvements concern mainly the optimization of the beam forming system and a new design of the sextupole magnet system. For a precise measurement (error 5%) of the output flow a calibrated compression tube was installed. The output flow of 0.81x1017 H atoms per second in two hyperfine substates was constant within 2% in a long-term measurement over 16 h. At the FILTEX test experiment, the target density in the storage cell fed by the ABS was constant within the experimental error of 4% over a period of four months. (orig.)

  12. Optimization of atomic beam sources for polarization experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisser, Martin; Nass, Alexander; Stroeher, Hans [IKP, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    For experiments with spinpolarized protons and neutrons a dense target is required. In current atomic beam sources an atomic hydrogen or deuterium beam is expanded through a cold nozzle and a system of sextupole magnets and RF-transition units selects a certain hyperfine state. The achievable flux seems to be limited to about 10{sup 17} particles per second with a high nuclear polarization. A lot of experimental and theoretical effort has been undertaken to understand all effects and to increase the flux. However, improvements have remained marginal. Now, a Monte Carlo simulation based on the DSMC part of the open source C++ library OpenFOAM is set up in order to get a better understanding of the flow and to optimize the various elements. The goal is to include important effects like deflection from a magnetic field, recombination on the walls and spin exchange collisions in the simulation and make quantitative predictions of changes in the experimental setup. The goal is to get a tool that helps to further increase the output of an atomic beam source.

  13. Optimization of atomic beam sources for polarization experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For experiments with spinpolarized protons and neutrons a dense target is required. In current atomic beam sources an atomic hydrogen or deuterium beam is expanded through a cold nozzle and a system of sextupole magnets and RF-transition units selects a certain hyperfine state. The achievable flux seems to be limited to about 1017 particles per second with a high nuclear polarization. A lot of experimental and theoretical effort has been undertaken to understand all effects and to increase the flux. However, improvements have remained marginal. Now, a Monte Carlo simulation based on the DSMC part of the open source C++ library OpenFOAM is set up in order to get a better understanding of the flow and to optimize the various elements. The goal is to include important effects like deflection from a magnetic field, recombination on the walls and spin exchange collisions in the simulation and make quantitative predictions of changes in the experimental setup. The goal is to get a tool that helps to further increase the output of an atomic beam source.

  14. Development of a Supersonic Atomic Oxygen Nozzle Beam Source for Crossed Beam Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Buss, R. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    A high pressure, supersonic, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of intense beams of ground state oxygen atoms. An efficient impedance matching scheme was devised for coupling the radio frequency power to the plasma as a function of both gas pressure and composition. Techniques for localizing the discharge directly behind the orifice of a water-cooled quartz nozzle were also developed. The above combine to yield an atomic oxygen beam source which produces high molecular dissociation in oxygen seeded rare gas mixtures at total pressures up to 200 torr: 80 to 90% dissociation for oxygen/argon mixtures and 60 to 70% for oxygen/helium mixtures. Atomic oxygen intensities are found to be greater than 10{sup 17} atom sr{sup -1} sec{sup -1}. A brief discussion of the reaction dynamics of 0 + IC1 ..-->.. I0 + C1 is also presented.

  15. Hypervelocity supersonic nozzle beam source of atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, A.; Unkel, W.; Silver, J.; Kolb, C.

    1984-01-01

    A hypervelocity source of atomic oxygen was developed. Dissociation of molecular oxygen is accomplished by injection into a flow of helium and/or argon which has been heated in a commercial plasma torch. Atomic velocities of up to 4 kms(-1) were produced; recent improvements offer the possibility of even higher velocities. This source was utilized in studies of translational-to-vibrational energy transfer in carbon dioxide and in an investigation of the shuttle glow effect.

  16. Characterization of a cryogenic beam source for atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bulleid, N E; Hendricks, R J; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of beam formation from a cryogenic buffer gas cell. Atoms and molecules are loaded into the cell by laser ablation of a target, and are cooled and swept out of the cell by a flow of cold helium. We study the thermalization and flow dynamics inside the cell and measure how the speed, temperature, divergence and extraction efficiency of the beam are influenced by the helium flow. We use a finite element model to simulate the flow dynamics and use the predictions of this model to interpret our experimental results.

  17. High-flux beam source for cold, slow atoms or molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, S. E.; Brahms, N.; deCarvalho, R.; Helton, J.; Nguyen, S V; Patterson, D; Doyle, J. M.; Glenn, D. R.; Petricka, J.; DeMille, D.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate and characterize a high-flux beam source for cold, slow atoms or molecules. The desired species is vaporized using laser ablation, then cooled by thermalization in a cryogenic cell of buffer gas. The beam is formed by particles exiting a hole in the buffer gas cell. We characterize the properties of the beam (flux, forward velocity, temperature) for both an atom (Na) and a molecule (PbO) under varying buffer gas density, and discuss conditions for optimizing these beam paramete...

  18. CO/sub 2/ laser sustained CW discharge atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high pressure, supersonic, laser sustained plasma nozzle beam source has been developed for the production of intense (>1019 particles s1-sr-1) beams of atomic and/or radical species having kinetic energies in the range of 1 to 10 eV. A high plasma temperature (10 to 30,000 K) is produced in the throat of a hydrodynamic expansion nozzle by sustaining a cw optical discharge in a gas using a high power cw CO2 laser. Gas mixtures are expanded through the nozzle/discharge region creating energetic atoms and molecules. An oxygen atom beam has been produced with a kinetic energy of 2 to 3 eV and an intensity of approx. 1018 O-atoms s-1sr-1. O-atom collisions (1 eV) from an uncharacterized nickel surface shows strong specular scattering with approximately 50% energy loss to the surface. Argon beams having kinetic energies between 5 to 10 eV with intensities of >1019 atoms s-1sr-1 have also been produced. 13 refs., 8 figs

  19. The polarized H and D atomic beam source for ANKE at COSY-Jülich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polarized atomic beam source was developed for the polarized internal storage-cell gas target at the magnet spectrometer ANKE of COSY-Jülich. The intensities of the beams injected into the storage cell, measured with a compression tube, are 7.5×1016 hydrogen atoms/s (two hyperfine states) and 3.9×1016 deuterium atoms/s (three hyperfine states). For the hydrogen beam the achieved vector polarizations are pz≈±0.92. For the deuterium beam, the obtained combinations of vector and tensor (pzz) polarizations are pz≈±0.90 (with a constant pzz≈+0.86), and pzz=+0.90 or pzz=−1.71 (both with vanishing pz). The paper includes a detailed technical description of the apparatus and of the investigations performed during the development. This source has been very successfully used for single and double polarization measurements at ANKE as well as for studies of the polarization of recombining hydrogen molecules

  20. High energy-intensity atomic oxygen beam source for low earth orbit materials degradation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high intensity (1019O-atoms/s-sr) high energy (5 eV) source of oxygen atoms has been developed that produces a total fluence of 1022 O-atoms/cm2 in less than 100 hours of continuous operation at a distance of 15 cm from the source. The source employs a CW CO2 laser sustained discharge to form a high temperature (15,000 K) plasma in the throat of a 0.3-mm diameter nozzle using 3--8 atmospheres of rare gas/O2 mixtures. Visible and infrared photon flux levels of 1 watt/cm2 have been measured 15 cm downstream of the source while vacuum UV (VUV) fluxes are comparable to that measured in low earth orbit. The reactions of atomic oxygen with kapton, Teflon, silver, and various coatings have been studied. The oxidation of kapton (reaction efficiency = 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/24/ cm /+-/ 50%) has an activation energy of 0.8 Kcal/mole over the temperature range of 25/degree/C to 100/degree/C at a beam energy of 1.5 eV and produces low molecular weight gas phase reaction products (H2O, NO, CO2). Teflon reacts with ∼0.1--0.2 efficiency to that of kapton at 25/degree/C and both surfaces show a rug-like texture after exposure to the O-atom beam. Angular scattering distribution measurements of O-atoms show a near cosine distribution from reactive surfaces indicating complete accommodation of the translational energy with the surface while a nonreactive surface (nickel oxide) shows specular-like scattering with 50% accommodation of the translational energy with the surface. A technique for simple on orbit chemical experiments using resistance measurements of coated silver strips is described. 9 figs

  1. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  2. The Polarized H and D Atomic Beam Source for ANKE at COSY-J\\"ulich

    CERN Document Server

    Mikirtychyants, M; Grigoryev, K; Kleines, H; Kravtsov, P; Lorenz, S; Nekipelov, M; Nelyubin, V; Rathmann, F; Sarkadi, J; Schieck, H Paetz gen; Seyfarth, H; Steffens, E; Ströher, H; Vasilyev, A

    2013-01-01

    A polarized atomic beam source was developed for the polarized internal storage-cell gas target at the magnet spectrometer ANKE of COSY-J\\"ulich. The intensities of the beams injected into the storage cell, measured with a compression tube, are $7.5\\cdot 10^{16}$ hydrogen atoms/s (two hyperfine states) and $3.9\\cdot 10^{16}$ deuterium atoms/s (three hyperfine states). For the hydrogen beam the achieved vector polarizations are $p_{\\rm z}\\approx\\pm0.92$. For the deuterium beam, the obtained combinations of vector and tensor ($p_{\\rm zz}$) polarizations are $p_{\\rm z}\\approx\\pm 0.90$ (with a constant $p_{\\rm zz}\\approx +0.86$), and $p_{\\rm zz}=+0.90$ or $p_{\\rm zz}=-1.71$ (both with vanishing $p_{\\rm z}$). The paper includes a detailed technical description of the apparatus and of the investigations performed during the development.

  3. Radiative lifetimes in MoI using a novel atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative lifetimes of the 4d5(a6S)5pz7P0 levels and the 4d5(a6S)5pz5P0 levels in MoI are reported as follows: tau(z7P04) = 15.9 ns, tau(z7P03) = 17.0 ns, tau(z7P02) = 17.1 ns, tau(z5P03) = 22.3 ns, tau(z5P02) = 22.1 ns, and tau(z5P01) = 21.7 ns (+-5%). The lifetimes are measured using time resolved laser induced fluorescence and a novel atomic beam source. This novel hollow cathode effusive beam source produces an intense beam of ground state Mo atoms and metastable Mo atoms. Our measurements on the z7P0 levels are in agreement with earlier lifetime measurements. Our measurements on the z5P0 levels are the first direct radiative lifetime measurements of these levels; the z5P0 measurements are of particular interest because the a5S → z5P0 multiplet is used to determine the solar abundance of Mo. (orig.)

  4. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    CERN Document Server

    McClelland, J J; Knuffman, B; Twedt, K A; Schwarzkopf, A; Wilson, T M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 uK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Never...

  5. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.;

    2012-01-01

    We report on a directional atomic beam created using an alkali metal dispenser and a nozzle. By applying a high current (15 A) pulse to the dispenser at room temperature we can rapidly heat it to a temperature at which it starts dispensing, avoiding the need for preheating. The atomic beam produced...

  6. An ultra-low energy (30-200 eV) ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition in ultrahigh vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Jindrich; Samoril, Tomás; Voborný, Stanislav; Kolíbal, Miroslav; Zlámal, Jakub; Spousta, Jirí; Dittrichová, Libuse; Sikola, Tomás

    2011-08-01

    The paper describes the design and construction of an ion-atomic beam source with an optimized generation of ions for ion-beam-assisted deposition under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The source combines an effusion cell and an electron impact ion source and produces ion beams with ultra-low energies in the range from 30 eV to 200 eV. Decreasing ion beam energy to hyperthermal values (≈10(1) eV) without loosing optimum ionization conditions has been mainly achieved by the incorporation of an ionization chamber with a grid transparent enough for electron and ion beams. In this way the energy and current density of nitrogen ion beams in the order of 10(1) eV and 10(1) nA/cm(2), respectively, have been achieved. The source is capable of growing ultrathin layers or nanostructures at ultra-low energies with a growth rate of several MLs/h. The ion-atomic beam source will be preferentially applied for the synthesis of GaN under UHV conditions. PMID:21895238

  7. New source of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S., E-mail: sargis@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Prasad, R. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany); Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7-1NN (United Kingdom); Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, CEA, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, 33405 Talence (France)

    2016-02-15

    The scenario of “electron-capture and -loss” was recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with MeV kinetic energies. However, it does not explain why the formation of negative ions in a liquid spray is much more efficient than with an isolated atom. The role of atomic excited states in the charge-exchange processes is considered, and it is shown that it cannot account for the observed phenomena. The processes are more complex than the single electron-capture and -loss approach. It is suggested that the shell effects in the electronic structure of the projectile ion and/or target atoms may influence the capture/loss probabilities.

  8. Polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, N.; Crowe, D.M.; Lubell, M.S.; Tang, F.C.; Vasilakis, A.; Mulligan, F.J.; Slevin, J.

    1988-12-01

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the beam at all points along its path. As a subsidiary result, we also present measurements of the relative and absolute efficiencies of the V/G Supavac mass analyzer for masses 1 and 2.

  9. Candlestick rubidium beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, M. R.; Fox, P. J.; Scholten, R. E.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a long-lived, bright and intense rubidium atomic beam source based on a previously published recirculating candlestick design for sodium, with several modifications and enhancements. The device operates for thousands of hours without maintenance, with brightness of 1.9×1022 m-2 s-1 sr-1.

  10. Production of rare-earth atomic negative ion beams in a cesium-sputter-type negative ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desire to study negative ion structure and negative ion-photon interactions has spurred the development of ion sources for use in research and industry. The many different types of negative ion sources available today differ in their characteristics and abilities to produce anions of various species. Thus the importance of choosing the correct type of negative ion source for a particular research or industrial application is clear. In this study, the results of an investigation on the production of beams composed of negatively-charged rare-earth ions from a cylindrical-cathode-geometry, cesium-sputter-type negative ion source are presented. Beams of atomic anions have been observed for most of the first-row rare-earth elements, with typical currents ranging from hundreds of picoamps to several nanoamps

  11. Imaging an atomic beam using fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming He(何明); Jin Wang(王谨); Mingsheng Zhan(詹明生)

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence detection scheme is applied to image an atomic beam. Using two laser diodes as the sources of detection light and pumping light respectively, the fluorescence image of the atomic beam is then observed by a commercial CCD-camera, which is corresponding to the atomic state and velocity distribution. The detection scheme has a great utilization in the experiments of cold atoms and atomic optics.

  12. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  13. High flux source of cold rubidium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the production of a continuous, slow, and cold beam of 87Rb atoms with an extremely high flux of 3.2x1012 atoms/s, a transverse temperature of 3 mK, and a longitudinal temperature of 90 mK. We describe the apparatus created to generate the atom beam. Hot atoms are emitted from a rubidium candlestick atomic beam source and transversely cooled and collimated by a 20 cm long atomic collimator section, boosting overall beam flux by a factor of 50. The Rb atomic beam is then decelerated and longitudinally cooled by a 1 m long Zeeman slower

  14. High flux source of cold rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowe, Christopher; Vernac, Laurent; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2005-10-01

    We report on the production of a continuous, slow, and cold beam of Rb87 atoms with an extremely high flux of 3.2×1012atoms/s, a transverse temperature of 3mK, and a longitudinal temperature of 90mK. We describe the apparatus created to generate the atom beam. Hot atoms are emitted from a rubidium candlestick atomic beam source and transversely cooled and collimated by a 20cm long atomic collimator section, boosting overall beam flux by a factor of 50. The Rb atomic beam is then decelerated and longitudinally cooled by a 1m long Zeeman slower.

  15. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmogorov, A.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ritter, J.; Stupishin, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H- ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ˜0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  16. A cold 87Rb atomic beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Jia; Feng Yan-Ying; Xue Hong-Bo; Zhou Zhao-Ying; Zhang Wen-Dong

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimental setup for the production of a beam source of cold 87Rb atoms.The atoms are extracted from a trapped cold atomic cloud in an unbalanced three-dimensional magneto-optical trap.Via a radiation pressure difference generated by a specially designed leak tunnel along one trapping laser beam,the atoms are pushed out continuously with low velocities and a high flux.The most-probable velocity in the beam is varied from 9 m/s to 19 m/s by varying the detuning of the trapping laser beams in the magneto-optical trap and the flux can be tuned up to 4× 109 s-1 by increasing the intensity of the trapping beams.We also present a simple model for describing the dependence of the beam performance on the magneto-optical trap trapping laser intensity and the detuning.

  17. Dielectric barrier discharge source for supersonic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luria, K.; Lavie, N.; Even, U. [Sackler School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-10-15

    We present a new excitation source for pulsed supersonic beams. The excitation is based on dielectric barrier discharge in the beam. It produces cold beams of metastable atoms, dissociated neutral atoms from molecular precursors, and both positive and negative ions with high efficiency and reliability.

  18. Single beam atom sorting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We create two overlapping one-dimensional optical lattices using a single laser beam, a spatial light modulator and a high numerical aperture lens. These lattices have the potential to trap single atoms, and using the dynamic capabilities of the spatial light modulator may shift and sort atoms to a minimum atom-atom separation of 1.52 μm. We show how a simple feedback circuit can compensate for the spatial light modulator's intensity modulation

  19. A polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, N; Crowe, D.M.; Lubell, M. S.; Tang, F.C.; Vasilakis, A.; Mulligan, F. J.; Slevin, J.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the b...

  20. A polarized atomic hydrogen beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design and operating characteristics of a simple polarized atomic hydrogen beam particularly suitable for applications to crossed beams experiments. In addition to experimental measurements, we present the results of detailed computer models, using Monte-Carlo ray tracing techniques, optical analogs, and phase-space methods, that not only provide us with a confirmation of our measurement, but also allow us to characterize the density, polarization, and atomic fraction of the beam at all points along its path. As a subsidiary result, we also present measurements of the relative and absolute efficiencies of the V/G Supavac mass analyzer for masses 1 and 2. (orig.)

  1. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of 87Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm2 at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10−5 rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments

  2. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G; Thorn, A

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  3. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C(4+) beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C(4+) was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C(4+) beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10(-7) mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C(4+) beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed. PMID:24593482

  4. Atom diffraction with a 'natural' metastable atom nozzle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, J.-C.; Wipf, N.; Grucker, J.; Perales, F.; Boustimi, M.; Vassilev, G.; Bocvarski, V.; Mainos, C.; Baudon, J.; Robert, J.

    2005-08-01

    The resonant metastability-exchange process is used to obtain a metastable atom beam with intrinsic properties close to those of a ground-state atom nozzle beam (small angular aperture, narrow velocity distribution). The estimated effective source diameter (15 µm) is small enough to provide at a distance of 597 mm a transverse coherence radius of about 873 nm for argon, 1236 nm for neon and 1660 nm for helium. It is demonstrated both by experiment and numerical calculations with He*, Ne* and Ar* metastable atoms, that this beam gives rise to diffraction effects on the transmitted angular pattern of a silicon-nitride nano-slit grating (period 100 nm). Observed patterns are in good agreement with previous measurements with He* and Ne* metastable atoms. For argon, a calculation taking into account the angular aperture of the beam (0.35 mrad) and the effect of the van der Waals interaction—the van der Waals constant C3 = 1.83+0.1-0.15 au being derived from spectroscopic data—leads to a good agreement with experiment.

  5. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  6. Electron-Beam Ion Source MIS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INP develops and produces electron-beam ion sources of multicharged ions. These ion sources provide a high density of the electron beam in the ionization area at the ion trap ≥ 103 A/cm2. They produce multicharge ions of various elements, both gaseous and solid ones. These ion sources successfully employ the technique of the dozed inlet of solid elements atoms into the ion trap

  7. Atomic and molecular beams production and collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Cyril Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular beams are employed in physics and chemistry experiments and, to a lesser extent, in the biological sciences. These beams enable atoms to be studied under collision-free conditions and allow the study of their interaction with other atoms, charged particles, radiation, and surfaces. Atomic and Molecular Beams: Production and Collimation explores the latest techniques for producing a beam from any substance as well as from the dissociation of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and the halogens.The book not only provides the basic expressions essential to beam design but also offers

  8. The atomic physics facility at the LBL ECR source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-energy beam line facility for atomic and surface physics research has been added to the injection line of the ECR source at the LBL 88 in. cyclotron. Beams throughout the periodic table can be delivered to three beam line stations at energies up to 15Q keV. Experiments using this facility inlcude forbidden line emission from the ion beam, ion-atom collisions, merged electron-ion beams and sputtering by highly charged ions. (orig.)

  9. The atomic physics facility at the LBL ECR Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy beam line facility for atomic and surface physics research has been added to the injection line of the ECR source at the LBL 88-Inch Cyclotron. Beams throughout the periodic table can be delivered to 3 beam line stations at energies up to 15 Q keV. Experiments using this facility include forbidden line emission from the ion beam, ion-atom collisions, merged electron-ion beams and sputtering by highly charged ions. 9 refs., 4 figs

  10. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  11. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  12. Theoretical tools for atom laser beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, J. -F.; Coq, Y. Le; Impens, F; Guerin, W.; Bordé, C. J.; Aspect, A; Bouyer, P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the propagation of non self-interacting atom laser beams. We start from a general propagation integral equation, and we use the same approximations as in photon optics to derive tools to calculate the atom laser beam propagation. We discuss the approximations that allow to reduce the general equation whether to a Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral calculated by using the stationary phase method, or to the eikonal. Within the paraxial approximation, we also introduce...

  13. The intra-atomic motion of bound electrons as a possible source of a systematic error in electron beam polarization measurements by means of a Moller polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the motion of electrons bound in target atoms in electron beam polarization measurements by means of a Moeller polarimeter is discussed. It is shown that this effect can result in an essential overestimate of the value being measured, which exceeds considerably the error of the target polarization determination, and therefore, it should be taken into account in the development of polarimeters. Some recommendations are given to eliminate this systematic error. 8 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tables. (author)

  14. An MCNPX accelerator beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkee, Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Elson, Jay S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Waters, Laurie S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-06-04

    MCNPX is a powerful Monte Carlo code that can be used to conduct sophisticated radiation-transport simulations involving complex physics and geometry. Although MCNPX possesses a wide assortment of standardized modeling tools, there are instances in which a user's needs can eclipse existing code capabilities. Fortunately, although it may not be widely known, MCNPX can accommodate many customization needs. In this article, we demonstrate source-customization capability for a new SOURCE subroutine as part of our development to enable simulations involving accelerator beams for active-interrogation studies. Simulation results for a muon beam are presented to illustrate the new accelerator-source capability.

  15. Doppler-free spectroscopy on tantalum atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the usefulness of an atomic beam source for refractory metals in Doppler-free spectroscopy. The splittings between seven hyperfine components of the weak 578.01 nm transition in TaI are measured to +- 1 MHz. The hyperfine A and B coefficients for the upper and lower level are determined from the observed splittings. (orig.)

  16. The Stockholm Electron Beam Ion Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, E.; Liljeby, L.; Engstroem, A.; Bjoerkhage, M. (Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1993-03-01

    The electron beam ion source, CRYSIS, produces highly charged ions for injection into the heavy ion storage ring - CRYRING at the Manne Siegbahn Institute, and for low energy atomic physics experiments. It will also provide highly charged ions for the Stockholm-Mainz Penning trap scheduled for installation at MSI in early 1993. CRYSIS has produced ions up to Ar[sup 18+] and [sup 136]Xe[sup 49+] using electron beam currents of typically I[sub e] = 200-300 mA and current density j[sub e] = 100-200 A/cm[sup 2]. Continuous electron beams of energy E = 19 keV and current I[sub e] = 600 mA have been propagated through the source with transmission greater than 99.9%. Test beams of He[sup 2+] and N[sup 7+] extracted from the source in 50-100 [mu]s pulses have been injected into CRYRING with the entire CRYSIS platform raised to 20 kV. Ions of charge up to [sup 136]Xe[sup 44+] extracted in extended 50-100 ms pulses have been used in coincidence-type atomic physics experiments. The status of CRYSIS as of March 15, 1992 is reported. Improvements, modes of operation, and results are discussed. (orig.).

  17. Enabling Nanotechnology with Focused Ion Beams from Laser Cooled Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Orloff, J.; Maazouz, M.; McClelland, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Magneto-Optical Trap Ion Source (MOTIS) being developed at NIST has the potential to enable numerous advances in nanoscale science. In a MOTIS, atoms are captured into a MOT, photoionized, and accelerated to an energy of a few hundred eV to a few tens of kV. A beam formed in this way can be brought to a tight focus, competitive with the commercial focused ion beam machines deployed widely today. Additionally, the unique characteristics of this source, coupled with the user's choice of ion from the long and growing list of laser-coolable atomic species suggest that the MOTIS has the potential to advance the state of the art in applications such as imaging, nanofabrication, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and others. I will present high-resolution images from our lithium and chromium MOTIS-based focused ion beams and discuss applications which we will pursue with these new tools.

  18. Light forces on an indium atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis it was studied, whether indium is a possible candidate for the nanostructuration respectively atomic lithography. For this known method for the generation and stabilization of the light necessary for the laser cooling had to be fitted to the special properties of indium. The spectroscopy of indium with the 451 nm and the 410 nm light yielded first hints that the formulae for the atom-light interaction for a two-level atom cannot be directly transferred to the indium atom. By means of the obtained parameters of the present experiment predictions for a possible Doppler cooling of the indium atomic beam were calculated. Furthermore the possibility for the direct deposition of indium on a substrate was studied

  19. Atomic physics at the advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne's 7-GeV synchrotron light source (APS) is expected to commence operations for research early in FY 1996. The Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Research Center (BESSRC) is likewise expected to start its research programs at that time. As members of the BESSRC CAT (Collaborative Access Team), we are preparing, together with atomic physicists from the University of Western Michigan, the University of Tennessee, and University of Notre Dame, to initiate a series of atomic physics experiments that exploit the unique capabilities of the APS, especially its high brilliance for photon energies extending from about 3 keV to more than 50 keV. Most of our early work will be conducted on an undulator beam line and we are thus concentrating on various aspects of that beam line and its associated experimental areas. Our group has undertaken responsibilities in such areas as hutch design, evaluation of undulator performance, user policy, interfacing and instrumentation, etc. Initial experiments will probably utilize existing apparatus. We are, however, planning to move rapidly to more sophisticated measurements involving, for example, ion-beam targets, simultaneous laser excitation, and the spectroscopy of emitted photons

  20. A high-intensity beam of metastable helium atoms with good velocity resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation of a low-energy ground state helium beam to its metastable states by electron impact is analysed. It is shown that the narrowest velocity distribution for the resulting metastable helium beam is obtained by directing the helium and electron beams parallel or antiparallel. A source of metastable helium atoms was constructed according to this analysis which produced a beam of 3 x 1014 metastable atoms/s sr with a velocity resolution of 3% FWHM for a room-temperature beam (E = 66 MeV). A possible source of errors in time-of-flight experiments with metastable atoms is pointed out. (author)

  1. Nanoscale focused ion beam from laser-cooled lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a new type of nanoscale focused ion beam (FIB) based on photoionizing laser-cooled atoms held at millikelvin temperatures in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). This new source expands the range of available ionic species and accessible ion beam energies for FIBs, enhancing their role as one of the most important tools for nanoscale characterization and fabrication. We show examples of microscopy with lithium ions obtained by scanning the FIB and collecting the resulting secondary electrons, and characterize the beam focus by a 25-75% rise distance measurement of (26.7 ± 1.0) nm at a beam energy of 2 keV. We also examine the dependence of the focal size on MOT temperature and beam energy. (paper)

  2. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x109 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x107 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  3. Versatile compact atomic source for high resolution dual atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T; Gilowski, M; Jentsch, C; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2007-01-01

    We present a compact $^{87}$Rb atomic source for high precision dual atom interferometers. The source is based on a double-stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) design, consisting of a 2-dimensional (2D)-MOT for efficient loading of a 3D-MOT. The accumulated atoms are precisely launched in a horizontal moving molasses. Our setup generates a high atomic flux ($>10^{10}$ atoms/s) with precise and flexibly tunable atomic trajectories as required for high resolution Sagnac atom interferometry. We characterize the performance of the source with respect to the relevant parameters of the launched atoms, i.e. temperature, absolute velocity and pointing, by utilizing time-of-flight techniques and velocity selective Raman transitions.

  4. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  5. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  6. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300ºC and 1100ºC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  7. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x1019 atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  8. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgeland, H; Kole, P R; Allison, W; Ellis, J; Jardine, A P

    2009-07-01

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5 x 10(19) atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed. PMID:19655995

  9. Production of heavy ion beams for atomic physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory for research in atomic physics of ions has been set up around a 2 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator designed and built indegenously. Mass analysed negatively charged heavy ion beams from a directly extracted duoplasmatron ion source are injected through various ion-optical elements into the accelerating tube. A gas stripper at the high voltage dome changes the negative ions into positive ions which are subsequently accelerated. The high energy end of the accelerator consists of quadrupole focussing magnets and an analysing magnet. A pair of insulated tantalum slits provide corona feedback and stabilize the energy of the accelerator. A beam resolution of 5 keV at 1 MeV proton energy has been measured. A number of experiments are presently being planned to utilize the accelerator in the field of basic research in atomic physics. These include beam-foil spectroscopic measurements involving detection of decay photon/electrons, ion-induced X-ray emission, analytical applications and radiation damage studies. Electron spectrometers which are in the stage of testing include cylindrical mirror analyser and parallel plate analyser. On the accelerator front, efforts are underway to develop a new sputter ion source and computer automation for improving stability and reliability. The salient features of the accelerator and the instrumentation developed for carrying out experiments in atomic physics are reported. (author). 14 refs., 17 figs

  10. Single structured light beam as an atomic cloud splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a scheme to split a cloud of cold noninteracting neutral atoms based on their dipole interaction with a single structured light beam which exhibits parabolic cylindrical symmetry. Using semiclassical numerical simulations, we establish a direct relationship between the general properties of the light beam and the relevant geometric and kinematic properties acquired by the atomic cloud as it passes through the beam.

  11. Large area ion and plasma beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past a number of ion beam sources utilizing different methods for plasma excitation have been developed. Nevertheless, a widespread use in industrial applications has not happened, since the sources were often not able to fulfill specific demands like: broad homogeneous ion beams, compatibility with reactive gases, low ion energies at high ion current densities or electrical neutrality of the beam. Our contribution wants to demonstrate technical capabilities of rf ion and plasma beam sources, which can overcome the above mentioned disadvantages. The physical principles and features of respective sources are presented. We report on effective low pressure plasma excitation by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) for the generation of dense homogeneous plasmas and the rf plasma beam extraction method for the generation of broad low energy plasma beams. Some applications like direct plasma beam deposition of a-C:H and ion beam assisted deposition of Al and Cu with tailored thin film properties are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Cluster beam sources. Part 1. Methods of cluster beams generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ju. Karpenko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The short review on cluster beams generation is proposed. The basic types of cluster sources are considered and the processes leading to cluster formation are analyzed. The parameters, that affects the work of cluster sources are presented.

  13. Cluster beam sources. Part 1. Methods of cluster beams generation

    OpenAIRE

    A.Ju. Karpenko; V.A. Baturin

    2012-01-01

    The short review on cluster beams generation is proposed. The basic types of cluster sources are considered and the processes leading to cluster formation are analyzed. The parameters, that affects the work of cluster sources are presented.

  14. High yields from the Stockholm electron beam ion source CRYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, R.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Carle, P.; Engstroem, Aa.; Liljeby, L.; Rouleau, G.; Wenander, F. [Manne Siegbahn Lab., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    CRYSIS is an electron beam ion source (EBIS) with a superconducting solenoid. Highly charged ions are delivered to the acceleration and storage ring CRYRING, SMILETRAP and to low energy atomic and surface physics experiments. Stable electron beam currents up to 700 mA are obtained, in order to enhance the ion yield out of the EBIS. Measurements of the total charge per pulse at different working conditions and electron beam current density measurements were done. At electron beam currents of 600 mA yields up to 2.5 x 10{sup 10} charges per pulse could be measured. (orig.). 8 refs.

  15. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  16. Wave mechanics of a two-wire atomic beam splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the problem of an atomic beam propagating quantum mechanically through an atom beam splitter. Casting the problem in an adiabatic representation (in the spirit of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in molecular physics) sheds light on explicit effects due to nonadiabatic passage of the atoms through the splitter region. We are thus able to probe the fully three-dimensional structure of the beam splitter, gathering quantitative information about mode mixing, splitting ratios, and reflection and transmission probabilities

  17. Measuring the quantum statistics of an atom laser beam

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, A. S.; Olsen, M. K.; Haine, S. A.; Hope, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We propose and analyse a scheme for measuring the quadrature statistics of an atom laser beam using extant optical homodyning and Raman atom laser techniques. Reversal of the normal Raman atom laser outcoupling scheme is used to map the quantum statistics of an incoupled beam to an optical probe beam. A multimode model of the spatial propagation dynamics shows that the Raman incoupler gives a clear signal of de Broglie wave quadrature squeezing for both pulsed and continuous inputs. Finally, ...

  18. Important atomic physics issues for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper suggests several current atomic physics questions important to ion beam fusion. Among the topics discussed are beam transport, beam-target interaction, and reactor design. The major part of the report is discussion concerning areas of research necessary to better understand beam-target interactions

  19. A beam source model for scanned proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion

  20. Emittance Measurements for Beams Extracted from LECR3 Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoYun; ZhaoHongwei; MaLei; ZhangZimin

    2003-01-01

    High quality ion beams are required by IMP cyclotron and atomic physics research, so it is important to research and measure beam emitt ance of ECR ion source. Intense beams extracted from ECR ion source usually have low energy, so it is suitable to use Electric-Sweep Scanner to measure the emittance. This kind of measurement is popularly used at ECR ion source, and it has some prominent merits such as high accuracy, very short time of data processing and easy expressing of the emittance pattern. So we designed and built this emittance scanner to measure emittance of the ion beams produced by LECR3 ion source. The structure of the ESS is shown in Fig.l, and the photo of the ESS is shown in Fig.2.

  1. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments.

  2. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up - a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture - in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam. PMID:26922370

  3. A directly heated electron beam line source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 140-mm cathode length, Electron Beam Line Source with a high degree of focusing of the beam is constructed. The design principles and basic characteristic considerations for electron beam line source consists of parallel plate electrode geometric array as well as a beam power of 35kW are worked out. The dimensions of the beam at the work site are 1.25xl00mm. The gun is designed basically for the study of evaporation and deposition characteristic of refractory metals for laboratory use. However, it may be equally used for melting and casting of these metals. (author)

  4. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  5. Caborane beam from ITEP Bernas ion source for semiconductor implanters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seleznev, D.; Hershcovitch, A.; Kropachev, G.; Kozlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Koshelev, V.; Kulevoy, T.; Jonson, B.; Poole, J.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Oks, E.; Gushenets, V.; Polozov, S.; Masunov, E.

    2010-02-01

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for hundreds of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past 5 years. The difficulties of extraction and transportation of low energy boron beams can be solved by implanting clusters of boron atoms. In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the Bernas ion source successfully generated the beam of decaborane ions. The carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beam is more attractive material due to its better thermal stability. The results of carborane ion beam generation are presented. The result of the beam implantation into the silicon wafer is presented as well.

  6. Primary beams of an electron beam ion source (EBIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron guns for the ion sources of the SATURN II facility were tested and compared with models. The guns tested were a gun with 36 mm diameter cathode, 7 mm, 4 mm, 4 mm with insulated Whenelt, and 8 mm. A lanthanium hexaboride cathode is presented. For the primary ion beams, zeolite and plasma sources were realized. In DIONE, which will replace CRYEBIS as ion source in SATURNE, the density of the electron beam compressed within the maximum magnetic field can be evaluated. Results indicate a factor of 3 improvement compared with CRYEBIS. Lithium sources can be used, but gas sources do not produce significant improvements

  7. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  8. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  9. Focussing a helium atom beam by reflection from a concave surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of 1-dimensional focussing of a Helium-atom beam reflected from a concave, cylindrical surface are presented. The atomic beam is created by a supersonic expansion and collimated by a skimmer and two slits, variable in size (5-20 μm). For grazing incident angles of a few milliradian the beam is coherently reflected by quantum reflection. Beam profiles at the focus are measured by cutting off the intensity by scanning a knife edge with a piezo (analogy to waist measurement by a razor blade in laser optics). The width of the focus is limited by the source size, by spherical aberration and by diffraction effects. We tune the deBroglie-wavelength by changing the temperature of the atom beam source to see how diffraction influences the focus' width and shape. The smallest focus achieved so far is 1.0±0.1 μm

  10. Feshbach-resonance-induced atomic filamentation and quantum pair correlation in atom-laser-beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Weiping; Search, Chris P.; Pu, Han; Meystre, Pierre; Wright, Ewan M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of an atom laser beam through a spatial region with a magnetic field tuned to a Feshbach resonance. Tuning the magnetic field below the resonance produces an effective focusing Kerr medium that causes a modulational instability of the atomic beam. Under appropriate circumstances, this results in beam breakup and filamentation seeded by quasi-particle fluctuations, and in the generation of correlated atomic pairs.

  11. Electron temperature effects for an ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogen high temperature plasma up to 200 eV is produced by acceleration of electrons in a hot hollow cathode discharge and is used as an ion beam source. Then, two characteristics are observed: A rate of the atomic ion (H+) number increases above 70%. A perveance of the ion beam increases above 30 times compared with that of a cold plasma, while a floating potential of an ion acceleration electrode approaches an ion acceleration potential (- 500 V) according as an increment of the electron temperature. Moreover, a neutralized ion beam can be produced by only the negative floating electrode without an external power supply. (author)

  12. Development of francium atomic beam for the search of the electron electric dipole moment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Tomoya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For the measurement of the electron electric dipole moment using Fr atoms, a Fr ion-atom conversion is one of the most critical process. An ion-atom converter based on the “orthotropic” type of Fr source has been developed. This converter is able to convert a few keV Fr ion beam to a thermal atomic beam using a cycle of the surface ionization and neutralization. In this article, the development of the converter is reported.

  13. Beams made of twisted atoms: A theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed Bessel beams of two-level atoms that are driven by a linearly polarized laser light. Based on the Schroedinger equation for two-level systems, we first determine the states of two-level atoms in a plane-wave field by taking into account propagation directions both of the atom and the field. For such laser-driven two-level atoms, we construct Bessel beams by going beyond the typical paraxial approximation. In particular, we show that the probability density of these atomic beams exhibits a non-trivial, Bessel-squared-type behavior. The profile of such twisted atoms is affected by atom and laser parameters, such as the nuclear charge, atom velocity, laser frequency, and propagation geometry of the atom and laser beams. Moreover, we spatially and temporally characterize the beam of hydrogen and selected (neutral) alkali-metal atoms that carry non-zero orbital angular momentum (OAM). The proposed spatiotemporal Bessel states (i) are able to describe twisted states of any two-level system which is driven by the radiation field and (ii) have potential applications in atomic and nuclear processes as well as in quantum communication.

  14. An atomic beam fluorescence locked magneto-optical trap for krypton atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here an atomic beam loaded magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable krypton atoms in which the fluorescence signal from the atomic beam is used to lock the cooling laser frequency. The fluorescence signal is generated by exciting the metastable krypton atomic beam using a probe laser beam (i.e. part of the cooling laser beam) intersecting the atomic beam at an angle. A spectral shift in the fluorescence signal can be achieved by varying the angle between the probe laser beam and the atomic beam to obtain the desired frequency detuning to lock the cooling laser frequency. This has been used to optimize the number of cold atoms in the MOT. The dependence of the peak height and slope of the atomic beam fluorescence (ABF) locking signal on the RF power in the discharge tube and pressure in the observation chamber of the setup has been studied to correlate its effect on the number of atoms in the MOT. (paper)

  15. Multicharged and intense heavy ion beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cyclotron plasma-are source (PIG), duoplasmatron (DP), laser source (LS), electron beam ion source (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance source (ECRS) from the viewpoint of generating intense and high charge state beams are considered. It is pointed out that for the last years three types of multicharged ion sources-EBIS, ECR and LS have been essentially developed. In the EBIS source the Xe48+ ions are produced. The present day level of the development of the electron-beam ionization technique shows that by means of this technique intensive uranium nuclei beams production becomes a reality. On the ECR source Xe26+ approximately 4x1010 h/s, Asub(r)sup(12+) approximately 1012 h/s intensive ion beams are produced. In the laser source a full number of C6+ ions during one laser pulse constitutes not less than 1010 from the 5x10mm2 emission slit. At the present time important results are obtained pointing to the possibility to separate the ion component of laser plasma in the cyclotron central region. On the PIG source the Xe15+ ion current up to 10μA per pulse is produced. In the duoplasmatron the 11-charge state of xenon ion beams is reached

  16. Relative-velocity distributions for two effusive atomic beams in counterpropagating and crossed-beam geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2012-01-01

    Formulas are presented for calculating the relative velocity distributions in effusive, orthogonal crossed beams and in effusive, counterpropagating beams experiments, which are two important geometries for the study of collision processes between atoms. In addition formulas for the distributions...

  17. PYRAMIDAL-HOLLOW-BEAM DIPOLE TRAP FOR ALKALI ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN JIAN-PING; GAO WEI-JIAN; WANG YU-ZHU; ZHU YI-FU; WANG YI-QIU

    2000-01-01

    We propose a dark gravito-optical dipole trap, for alkali atoms, consisting of a blue-detuned, pyramidal-hollow laser beam propagating upward and the gravity field. When cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap are loaded into the pyramidal-hollow beam and bounce inside the pyramidal-hollow beam, they experience efficient Sisyphus cooling and geometric cooling induced by the pyramidal-hollow beam and the weak repumping beam propagating downward. Our study shows that an ultracold and dense atomic sample with an equilibrium 3D momentum of ~ 3hk and an atomic density above the point of Bose-Einstein condensation may be obtained in this pure optical trap.

  18. Discrimination of ionic species from broad-beam ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a broad-beam, three-grid, ion extraction system incorporating radio frequency (RF) mass discrimination was investigated experimentally. This testing demonstrated that the system, based on a modified single-stage Bennett mass spectrometer, can discriminate between ionic species having about a 2-to-1 mass ratio while producing a broad-beam of ions with low kinetic energy (less than 15 eV). Testing was conducted using either argon and krypton ions or atomic and diatomic oxygen ions. A simple one-dimensional model, which ignores magnetic field and space-charge effects, was developed to predict the species separation capabilities as well as the kinetic energies of the extracted ions. The experimental results correlated well with the model predictions. This RF mass discrimination system can be used in applications where both atomic and diatomic ions are produced, but a beam of only one of the species is desired. An example of such an application is a 5 eV atomic oxygen source. This source would produce a beam of atomic oxygen with 5 eV kinetic energy, which would be directed onto a material specimen, to simulate the interaction between the surface of a satellite and the rarefied atmosphere encountered in low-Earth orbit

  19. Coherent and non coherent atom optics experiment with an ultra-narrow beam of metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, we present a new type of atomic source: an ultra-narrow beam of metastable atoms produced by resonant metastability exchange inside a supersonic beam of rare gas atoms. We used the coherence properties of this beam to observe the diffraction of metastable helium, argon and neon atoms by a nano-transmission grating and by micro-reflection-gratings. Then, we evidenced transitions between Zeeman sublevels of neon metastable 3P2 state due to the quadrupolar part of Van der Waals potential. After we showed experimental proofs of the observation of this phenomenon, we calculated the transition probabilities in the Landau - Zener model. We discussed the interest of Van der Waals - Zeeman transitions for atom interferometry. Last, we described the Zeeman cooling of the supersonic metastable argon beam (3P2). We have succeeded in slowing down atoms to speeds below 100 m/s. We gave experimental details and showed the first time-of-flight measurements of slowed atoms

  20. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-07-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  1. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  2. A 400 MHz Atomic Hydrogen Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hydrogen maser is a frequency standard with the highest frequency stability. The atomic Hydrogen beam for the maser is realized with a RF discharge (400 MHz) produced between the plates of the condenser of a capacitively loaded coaxial cavity. The molecular Hydrogen is stored in a FeTi hydrure bottle at a pressure of 0.2 MPa. After the passage of a Palladium leak the pressure is reduced in the range of 0.1 Torr, ie the pressure in the discharge tube, where the molecular Hydrogen is dissociated, resulting the atomic Hydrogen beam. The electronic part controls the pressure in the discharge in order to control the atomic beam intensity.We studied the dependence of the maser level and the discharge luminosity against the power in the discharge. We found that for a given pressure, the maser oscillation level is constant after a certain power level is exceeded. We concluded that a RF discharge is very convenient to use because: -The cavity ensures a good shielding which limit the parasitic field in the maser room at a very low value. -The cavity allows us to know the discharge parameters -The cavity ensure a good cooling of the discharge tube -The dissociation rate increases with frequency and the breakdown is very easy to obtain

  3. Several atomic-physics issues connected with the use of neutral beams in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energetic neutral beams are used for heating and diagnostics in present magnetic fusion experiments. They are also being considered for use in future large experiments. Atomic physics issues are important for both the production of the neutral beams and the interaction of the beams and the plasma. Interest in neutral beams based on negative hydrogen ions is growing, largely based on advances in producing high current ion sources. An extension of the negative ion approach has been the suggestion to use negative ions of Z > 1 elements, such as carbon and oxygen, to form high power neutral beams for plasma heating

  4. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future. PMID:20192368

  5. Particle beam technology for control of atomic-bonding state in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Junzo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The atomic-bonding state in materials can be controlled through `kinetic bonding` process by energetic particle beams which have a sufficient atomic kinetic energy. In order to clarify the `kinetic bonding` process the negative-ion beam deposition is considered as an ideal method because the negative ion has no additional active energies. Sputter type heavy negative-ion sources can be used for this purpose. Carbon films prepared by carbon negative-ion beam deposition have a strong dependency of the film properties on ion beam kinetic energy and have a quite high thermal conductivity which is comparable to that of the IIb diamond at a kinetic energy of 50-100 eV/atom. It suggests that new or metastable materials could be formed through the `kinetic bonding` process. Negative-ion beams can also be used for ion implantation, in which charging problems are perfectly reduced. (author)

  6. An Atomic Lens Using a Focusing Hollow Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏勇; 印建平; 王育竹

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to generate a focused hollow laser beam by using an azimuthally distributed 2π-phase plate and a convergent thin lens, and calculate the intensity distribution of the focused hollow beam in free propagation space. The relationship between the waist w0 of the incident collimated Gaussian beam and the dark spot size of the focused hollow beam at the focal point, and the relationship between the focal length f of the thin lens and the dark spot size are studied respectively. The optical potential of the blue-detuned focused hollow beam for 85Rb atoms is calculated. Our study shows that when the larger waist w of the incident Gaussian beam and the shorter focal length f of the lens are chosen, we can obtain an extremely small dark spot size of the focused hollow beam, which can be used to form an atomic lens with a resolution of several angstroms.

  7. Demonstration of a cold atom beam splitter on atom chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a new scheme to split cold atoms on an atom chip. The atom chip consists of a U-wire and a Z-wire. The cold atom cloud is initially loaded and prepared in the Z-trap, which is split into two separate parts by switching on the current of the U-wire. The two separate atom clouds have a distance more than one millimeter apart from each other and show almost symmetrical profiles, corresponding to about a 50/50 splitting ratio. Project supported by the State Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921504) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91536107).

  8. Advanced Light Source beam diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, has been recently commissioned. Beam diagnostics were very important to the success of the operation. Each diagnostic system is described in this paper along with detailed discussion of its performance. Some of the systems have been in operation for two years. Others, in the storage ring, have not yet been fully commissioned. These systems were, however, working well enough to provide the essential information needed to store beam. The devices described in this paper include wall current monitors, a beam charge monitor, a 50 ohm Faraday cup, DC current transformers, broad-hand striplines, fluorescence screens, beam collimators and scrapers, and beam position monitors. Also, the means by which waveforms are digitized and displayed in the control room is discussed

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  10. Atomic modeling of the plasma EUV sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Koike, Fumihiro; Tanuma, Hajime

    2009-09-01

    We present the development of population kinetics models for tin plasmas that can be employed to design an EUV source for microlithography. The atomic kinetic code is constrained for the requirement that the model must be able to calculate spectral emissivity and opacity that can be used in radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Methods to develop compact and reliable atomic model with an appropriate set of atomic states are discussed. Specifically, after investigation of model dependencies and comparison experiment, we improve the effect of configuration interaction and the treatment of satellite lines. Using the present atomic model we discuss the temperature and density dependencies of the emissivity, as well as conditions necessary to obtain high efficiency EUV power at λ = 13.5 nm.

  11. Theoretical tools for atom-laser-beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Jean-Félix; Le Coq, Yann; Impens, François; Guerin, William; Bordé, Christian,; Aspect, Alain; Bouyer, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the propagation of non self-interacting atom laser beams. We start from a general propagation integral equation, and we use the same approximations as in photon optics to derive tools to calculate the atom laser beam propagation. We discuss the approximations that allow to reduce the general equation whether to a Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral calculated by using the stationary phase method, or to the eikonal. Within the paraxial approximation, we also introduce...

  12. Atom gratings produced by large angle atom beam splitters

    OpenAIRE

    Dubetsky, B.; Berman, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of atom scattering by large amplitude periodic potentials is developed in the Raman-Nath approximation. The atom grating profile arising after scattering is evaluated in the Fresnel zone for triangular, sinusoidal, magneto-optical, and bichromatic field potentials. It is shown that, owing to the scattering in these potentials, two \\QTR{em}{groups} of momentum states are produced rather than two distinct momentum components. The corresponding spatial density profile is cal...

  13. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2002-01-01

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  14. Manufacture of high-speed neutral atomic and molecular beam apparatus and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our research group has been studying chemical reactivity at solid surfaces. For example, the study of O2/Si (001) reaction dynamics has been demonstrated with a hyperthermal molecular beam technique and synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. By using more reactive atomic and molecular beams with higher kinetic energy than supersonic molecular beams, it is expected that researches on surface chemical reactivity can be progressed. For this reason, we are developing a high-speed neutral atomic and molecular beam generator. This apparatus generates ion beams with a plasma ion source. The control of kinetic energy of neutral beams is performed by accelerating and decelerating the positive ion beams. Desirable ions are selected with a Wien filter: Passing through a gas cell they are neutralized by charge transfer reactions. In this report we describe characteristics of ion beams, which are generated by using oxygen as a sample gas, as well as neutral beams. When acceleration energy was 8 keV and 20 eV, total ion beam current was 52 μA, and 17 μA respectively. Characteristics of the mass separator were good, even when ion beam energy was 20 eV. Ion beam current was 5.5 μA for O+ and 11 μA for O2+, respectively (author)

  15. Cold atom dynamics in crossed laser beam waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Torrontegui, E; Ruschhaupt, A; Guéry-Odelin, D; Muga, J G

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics of neutral cold atoms in an $L$-shaped crossed-beam optical waveguide formed by two perpendicular red-detuned lasers of different intensities and a blue-detuned laser at the corner. Complemented with a vibrational cooling process this setting works as a one-way device or "atom diode".

  16. Metastable argon beam source using a surface wave sustained plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new source of metastable argon atoms in the thermal energy range is reported. The source is based on expanding a plasma sustained by electromagnetic surface waves in a quartz tube through a converging nozzle and extracting a beam from the supersonic free-expansion jet. The beam was characterized by time-of-flight measurements which yielded the absolute intensity and velocity distribution of the argon metastables. The source produced a maximum intensity of 6.2x1014 metastables per second per steradian, the highest time-averaged intensity of thermal argon metastables of any source reported to date. A simple picture of an expanding plasma in a recombination regime is used to explain the dependence of the metastable intensity on absorbed power

  17. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} 6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm{sup 3} and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state via the intercombination 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 1} state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 Degree-Sign C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  18. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  19. Development of ion source for neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a few methods for further raising (secondary heating) toroidal plasma temperature above the limit of Joule heating of 1 to 2 keV. In this paper, the ion source used for neutral beam injection heating is described, which is now considered to be the most effective means as the secondary heating. It was reported that in Oak Ridge National Laboratory, neutral particle beam was injected into the torus and the plasma temperature increased as expected. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) planned the plasma heating by neutral beam injection in JFT-2 torus from the summer of 1976 and it was decided that the heating by neutral beam injection is also employed in the critical plasma test facility (JT-60) which is scheduled to start operation in 1980. For this purpose, JAERI decided to build some test stand for ion source development including ITS-1 already prepared. At present, the test stand ITS-2 for the development of two stage acceleration ion source is ordered as a part of the development program of neutral beam injection heating for JT-60. This stand will be available for the test of ion sources of up to 100 kV, 20 A, and pulse width 1 sec. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Isotopically selective optical deflection of a krypton atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We deflected a well-collimated beam of krypton atoms in the metastable 1s5 state by radiation pressure from a single-frequency dye laser. To produce the radiation pressure, we resonantly excited the krypton atoms, using the 1s5--2p9 transition. The natural width of this transition is much smaller than its isotope shift, which allowed us to deflect one isotope at a time. This created a new isotopically enriched atomic beam of Kr(1s5). We achieved a maximum enrichment factor of 1.2 x 104 at a deflection angle of 19 mrad. This enrichment is limited mainly by scattering of the parent atomic beam by residual gas. This degree of enrichment may make it possible to perform sensitive measurements of the concentrations of rare krypton isotopes in environmental samples

  1. Plasma-Based Ion Beam Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam sources cover a broad spectrum of scientific and technical applications delivering ion currents between less than 1 mA and about 100 A at acceleration voltages between 100 V and 100 kV. The ions are mostly generated by electron collisions in a gas discharge and then extracted from the discharge plasma, focused and post-accelerated by single- or multi-aperture electrode systems. Some important applications require the neutralization of the exhausted beam either by charge exchange or by admixture of electrons. In the first part of the paper, the theory of ionization by electron impact, the energy and carrier balances in the plasma, and the extraction and focusing mechanisms will be outlined. The principles of the preferred gas discharges and of the ion beam sources based on them are discussed; i.e. of the Penning, bombardment, arc, duoplasmatron, radio frequency, and microwave types. In the second part of the paper, the special requirements of the different applications are described together with the related source hardware. One distinguishes: 1. Single-aperture ion sources producing protons, heavy ions, isotope ions, etc. for particle accelerators, ion microprobes, mass spectrometers, isotope separators, etc.; quality determinative quantities are brightness, emittance, energy width, etc. 2. Broad-beam multi-aperture injector sources for fusion machines with positive or negative deuterium ions; very high beam densities, small portions of molecular ions, flat beam profiles with small divergence angles, etc. are required. 3. Broad-beam multi-aperture ion thrusters for space propulsion operated with singly charged xenon ions; high efficiencies, reliable operation, and long lifetimes are most important. Spin-offs are applied in industry for material processing. Referring to these applications, the following sources will be described in some detail: 1. Cold cathode and filament driven sources, capillary arc and plasmatron types, microwave and ECR-sources. 2

  2. A New ECR Ion Source for Atomic Physics Research at IMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source (LECR3-Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No.3) was constructed this year. The main purpose of this source is to provide highly charged ion beams for atomic physics and surface physics research. The design of this ion source is based on the IMP 14.5 GHz ECR ion source (LECR2-Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No.2) with double RF heating

  3. A compact design for a magnetic synchrotron to store beams of hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    van der Poel, Aernout P P; Softley, Timothy P; Bethlem, Hendrick L

    2015-01-01

    We present a design for an atomic synchrotron consisting of 40 hybrid magnetic hexapole lenses arranged in a circle. We show that for realistic parameters, hydrogen atoms with a velocity up to 600 m/s can be stored in a 1-meter diameter ring, which implies that the atoms can be injected in the ring directly from a pulsed supersonic beam source. This ring can be used to study collisions between stored hydrogen atoms and molecular beams of many different atoms and molecules. The advantage of using a synchrotron is two-fold: (i) the collision partners move in the same direction as the stored atoms, resulting in a small relative velocity and thus a low collision energy, and (ii) by storing atoms for many round-trips, the sensitivity to collisions is enhanced by a factor of 100-1000. In the proposed ring, the cross-sections for collisions between hydrogen, the most abundant atom in the universe, with any atom or molecule that can be put in a beam, including He, H$_2$, CO, ammonia and OH can be measured at energies...

  4. Intense Electron Beams from GaAs Photocathodes as a Tool for Molecular and Atomic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Krantz, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at stable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. ...

  5. Intense proton beam source for ITER neutral-beam spectroscopy diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense proton beam has been developed to evaluate a gas-cell neutralizer for use in an intense-neutral beam source for Tokomak Spectroscopy diagnostics. The allowed energy range of the proton stream is determined to be 50 to 70 keV from neutralization and reionization cross-sections and from the alpha particle charge exchange recombination intensity as a function of energy (baseline diagnostic). The neutralization evaluation source uses a flashover anode, magnetized, ion-diode. Neutral probes sensitive to energetic atomic and molecular hydrogen, developed to evaluate neutralizer performance, show neutral fluence from the ion-diode during the beam pulse. An array of Rogowski current probes, used to study the evolution of the current path, suggests that expansion of the anode plasma along the radial insulating magnetic field leads to impedance collapse

  6. Ions beams and ferroelectric plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton

    Near-perfect space-charge neutralization is required for the transverse compression of high perveance ion beams for ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments, such as the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX). Neutralization can be accomplished by introducing a plasma in the beam path, which provides free electrons that compensate the positive space charge of the ion beam. In this thesis, charge neutralization of a 40 keV, perveance-dominated Ar+ beam by a Ferroelectric Plasma Source (FEPS) is investigated. First, the parameters of the ion beam, such as divergence due to the extraction optics, charge neutralization fraction, and emittance were measured. The ion beam was propagated through the FEPS plasma, and the effects of charge neutralization were inferred from time-resolved measurements of the transverse beam profile. In addition, the dependence of FEPS plasma parameters on the configuration of the driving pulser circuit was studied to optimize pulser design. An ion accelerator was constructed that produced a 30-50 keV Ar + beam with pulse duration ion source showed that the dependence of beam radius on Q was consistent with space charge expansion. It was concluded that the beam was perveance-dominated with a charge neutralization fraction of approximately zero in the absence of neutralizing plasma. Since beam expansion occurred primarily due to space charge, the decrease in effective perveance due to neutralization by FEPS plasma can be inferred from the reduction in beam radius. Results on propagation of the ion beam through FEPS plasma demonstrate that after the FEPS is triggered, the beam radius decreases to its neutralized value in about 5 mus. The duration of neutralization was about 10 mus at a charging voltage VFEPS = 5.5 kV and 35 mus at VFEPS = 6.5 kV. With VFEPS = 6.5 kV, the transverse current density profile 33 cm downstream of the source had a Gaussian shape with xrms =5 mm, which corresponds to a half-angle divergence of 0.87°. The

  7. Numerical Simulation Multicomponent Ion Beam Transport form ECR Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaLei; SongMingtao; ZhangZimin; CaoYun

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate the transport of multi-components ion beam extracted from an ECR ion source, we have developed a multi-charged ion beam transport program named MCIBS 1.0. The program is dedicated to numerical simulation of the behavior of highly-charged ion beam and optimization of beam optics in transport lines and is realized on a PC with Windows user interface of Microsoft Visual Basic. Among all the ions with different charge states in the beam, the exchanges of electrons between highly charged ions and low charged ions or neutral,atoms of residual gas are taken into account by using classical Molecular Over-barrier Model and Monte Carlo method. An advanced Windows graphical interface makes it; comfortable and friendly for the user to operate in an interactive mode. The present program is used for the numerical calculation and optimization of beam optics in a transport line consisting of various magnetic elements, such as dipole magnet, quadrupole and so on. It is possible to simultaneously simulate 200,000 particles, in a transport line of 340 m at most, and show every particle orbit. Beam cross section graphics and emittance phase pictures can be also shown at any position in the transport line.

  8. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented

  9. Characterization of a metastable neon beam extracted from a commercial RF ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used a commercial RF ion-source to extract a beam of metastable neon atoms. The source was easily incorporated into our existing system and was operative within a day of installation. The metastable velocity distribution, flux, flow, and efficiency were investigated for different RF powers and pressures, and an optimum was found at a flux density of 2 × 1012 atoms/s/sr. To obtain an accurate measurement of the amount of metastable atoms leaving the source, we insert a Faraday cup in the beam line and quench some of them using a weak 633 nm laser beam. In order to determine how much of the beam was quenched before reaching our detector, we devised a simple model for the quenching transition and investigated it for different laser powers. This detection method can be easily adapted to other noble gas atoms

  10. Characterization of a metastable neon beam extracted from a commercial RF ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Ohayon, B; Ron, G

    2015-01-01

    We have used a commercial RF ion-source to extract a beam of metastable neon atoms. The source was easily incorporated into our existing system and was operative within a day of installation. The metastable velocity distribution, flux, flow, and efficiency were investigated for different RF powers and pressures, and an optimum was found at a flux density of $2\\times10^{12}\\,$atoms/s/sr. To obtain an accurate measurement of the amount of metastable atoms leaving the source, we insert a Faraday cup in the beam line and quench some of them using a weak $633\\,$nm laser beam. In order to determine how much of the beam was quenched before reaching our detector, we devised a simple model for the quenching transition and investigated it for different laser powers. This detection method can be easily adapted to other noble gas atoms.

  11. Targets for neutron beam spallation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting on Targets for Neutron Beam Spallation Sources held at the Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung at KFA Juelich on June 11 and 12, 1979 was planned as an informal get-together for scientists involved in the planning, design and future use of spallation neutron sources in Europe. These proceedings contain the papers contributed to this meeting. For further information see hints under relevant topics. (orig./FKS)

  12. Ion beam source construction and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to improve the performance of a new shape cold cathode Penning ion source to be suitable for some applications. In this work, many trials have been made to reach the optimum dimensions of the new shape of cold Molybdenum cathode Penning ion source with radial extraction. The high output ion beam can be extracted in a direction transverse to the discharge region. The new shape cold cathode Penning ion source consists of Copper cylindrical hollow anode of 40 mm length, 12 mm diameter and has two similar cone ends of 15 mm length, 22 mm upper cone diameter and 12 mm bottom cone diameter. The two movable Molybdenum cathodes are fixed in Perspex insulator and placed symmetrically at two ends of the anode. The Copper emission disc of 2 mm thickness and has central aperture of different diameters is placed at the middle of the anode for ion beam exit. The inner surface of the emission disc is isolated from the anode by Perspex insulator except an area of diameter 5 mm to confine the electrical discharge in this area. A movable Faraday cup is placed at different distances from the emission electrode aperture and used to collect the output ion beam from the ion source. The working gases are admitted to the ion source through a hole in the anode via a needle valve which placed between the gas cylinder and the ion source. The optimum anode- cathode distance, the uncovered area diameter of the emission disc, the central aperture diameter of the emission electrode, the distance between emission electrode and Faraday cup have been determined using Argon gas. The optimum distances of the ion source were found to be equal to 6 mm, 5 mm, 2.5 mm, and 3 cm respectively where stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current at low discharge current can be obtained. The discharge characteristics, ion beam characteristics, and the efficiency of the ion source have been measured at different operating conditions and different gas pressures using

  13. Biprism electron interferometry with a single atom tip source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, G.; Rembold, A.; Pooch, A.; Meier, S. [Institute of Physics and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISA" +, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 15, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, TU Wien - Atominstitut, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Günther, A. [Institute of Physics and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISA" +, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Chang, W.T.; Hwang, I.S. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Stibor, A., E-mail: alexander.stibor@uni-tuebingen.de [Institute of Physics and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISA" +, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 15, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Experiments with electron or ion matter waves require a coherent, monochromatic and long-term stable source with high brightness. These requirements are best fulfilled by single atom tip (SAT) field emitters. The performance of an iridium covered W(111) SAT is demonstrated and analyzed for electrons in a biprism interferometer. Furthermore we characterize the emission of the SAT in a separate field electron and field ion microscope and compare it with other emitter types. A new method is presented to fabricate the electrostatic charged biprism wire that separates and combines the matter wave. In contrast to other biprism interferometers the source and the biprism size are well defined within a few nanometers. The setup has direct applications in ion interferometry and Aharonov–Bohm physics. - Highlights: • The performance of a single atom tip is demonstrated in an electron interferometer. • The single atom tip emission is characterized in a field ion microscope. • A new method for the preparation of a biprism beam splitter is presented. • The electron emission of a single atom tip is studied in the time domain.

  14. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

    2015-01-01

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

  15. Atomic-Beam Magnetic Resonance Experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the atomic-beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) experiments at ISOLDE is to map the nuclear behaviour in wide regions of the nuclear chart by measuring nuclear spins and moments of ground and isomeric states. This is made through an investigation of the atomic hyperfine structure of free, neutral atoms in a thermal atomic-beam using radio-frequency techniques. On-line operation allows the study of short-lived nuclei far from the region of beta-stability.\\\\ \\\\ The ABMR experiments on the |2S^1 ^2 elements Rb, Cs, Au and Fr have been completed, and present efforts are directed towards the elements with an open p-shell and on the rare-earth elements.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental data obtained are compared with results from model calculations, giving information on the single-particle structure and on the nuclear shape parameters.

  16. Atomic Beam Probe Diagnostic for COMPASS Tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Háček, Pavel; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Stöckel, Jan; Anda, G.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Berta, M.

    Vol. 2. Prague: MATFYZPRESS, 2010 - (Šafránková, J.; Pavlů, J.), s. 7-11. (WDS'10). ISBN 978-80-7378-140-8. [Annual Conference of Doctoral Students - WDS 2010 /19th./. Prague (CZ), 01.06.2010-04.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma diagnostics * tokamak * COMPASS * beam diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://server.ipp.cas.cz/~vwei/work/wds2010_201_f2.pdf

  17. Ultra thin coherent atom beam by Stern-Gerlach interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, F.; Robert, J.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.

    2007-06-01

    It is demonstrated that a Stern-Gerlach interferometer including a special transverse phase shifter can generate an atomic beam of a small diameter (few tens of nm). Calculations carried out in a coherent regime confirm this point. They also show that the device is almost insensitive to velocity dispersion and that the required mechanical accuracy is quite accessible. Due to the peculiar transverse amplitude distribution (of the Lorentz type), the spreading of the generated beam profile is very small compared to that given by a circular diaphragm or a Gaussian profile of comparable initial diameter. This is a key property as regards applications, e.g. in atom lithography and surface probing.

  18. A compact source for bunches of singly charged atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murböck, T.; Schmidt, S.; Andelkovic, Z.; Birkl, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Vogel, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have built, operated, and characterized a compact ion source for low-energy bunches of singly charged atomic ions in a vacuum beam line. It is based on atomic evaporation from an electrically heated oven and ionization by electron impact from a heated filament inside a grid-based ionization volume. An adjacent electrode arrangement is used for ion extraction and focusing by applying positive high-voltage pulses to the grid. The method is particularly suited for experimental environments which require low electromagnetic noise. It has proven simple yet reliable and has been used to produce μs-bunches of up to 106 Mg+ ions at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. We present the concept, setup and characterizing measurements. The instrument has been operated in the framework of the SpecTrap experiment at the HITRAP facility at GSI/FAIR to provide Mg+ ions for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions by laser-cooled 24Mg+.

  19. Sensitive spectroscopy of an ytterbium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Guttridge, A; Kemp, S L; Boddy, D; Freytag, R; Tarbutt, M R; Hinds, E A; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of ultracold ytterbium atoms generally involve the frequency stabilisation (locking) of lasers to two transitions at 399 and 556 nm in order to implement laser cooling. Here we present a simple and robust apparatus for generation of suitable, narrow fluorescence signals with a high signal to noise ratio at both wavelengths. The design utilises easily acquired vacuum parts, optics and electronics and requires very little laser power. We demonstrate the stability and precision of the frequency stabilisation at 556 nm by presenting sensitive measurements of the gravitational sag of an ytterbium MOT as a function of laser power.

  20. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  1. Cleaning techniques for intense ion beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of high power lithium ion beams on the SABRE (1TW) and PBFA-X (20 TW) accelerators have been limited by the parallel acceleration of contaminant ions. during the beam pulse lithium is replaced by protons and carbon ions. This replacement is accompanied by rapid impedance decay of the diode. The contaminant hydrogen and carbon is believed to originate from impurity molecules on the surface and in the bulk of the lithium ion source and its substrate material. Cleaning techniques designed to remove hydrocarbons from the ion source have been employed with some success in test stand experiments and on SABRE. The test stand experiments have shown that a lithium fluoride (LiF) ion source film can accrue dozens of hydrocarbon monolayers on its surface while sitting in vacuum. Application of 13.5 MHz RF discharge cleaning with 90% Ar/10% O2 can significantly reduce the surface hydrocarbon layers on the LiF film. On SABRE, combinations of RF discharge cleaning, anode heating, layering gold between the source film (LiF) and its substrate, and cryogenic cathode cooling produced an increase by a factor of 1.5--2 in the quantity of high energy lithium in the ion beam. A corresponding decrease in protons and carbon ions was also observed. Cleaning experiments on PBFA-X are underway. New designs of contamination resistant films and Li ion sources are currently being investigated

  2. Beam Stability at the Advanced Photon Source

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source has been in operation since 1996. Since that time, extensive incremental improvements to orbit stabilization systems have been made. This includes the addition of 80 channels of narrowband rf beam position monitors (bpm's), 40 channels of bending magnet photon bpm's, and most recently the inclusion of 36 insertion device photon bpm's into the orbit correction response matrix. In addition, considerable improvements have been made in the area of power supply regulation, both for the main multipole magnets and the steering corrector magnets. The present status of overall performance will be discussed, including long term pointing stability, reproducibility, and AC beam motion.

  3. Cluster Beams Sources. Part 2. The Formation of Cluster Beams in Nozzle Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ju. Karpenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly examines the processes occurring during the formation of cluster beams in sources of clusters, using the expansion of the gas mixture through a nozzle. The basic parameters of the gas cluster flow at the outlet nozzle, leading to the formation of clusters are analyzed. Some aspects of the formation of cluster beams from aerodynamic flows are discussed.

  4. Efficient sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an indium atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Ihn

    2009-07-23

    Laser cooled atomic gases and atomic beams are widely studied samples in experimental research in atomic and optical physics. For the application of ultra cold gases as model systems for e.g. quantum many particle systems, the atomic species is not very important. Thus this field is dominated by alkaline, earthalkaline elements which are easily accessible with conventional laser sources and have convenient closed cooling transition. On the other hand, laser cooled atoms may also be interesting for technological applications, for instance for the creation of novel materials by atomic nanofabrication (ANF). There it will be important to use technologically relevant materials. As an example, using group III atoms of the periodical table in ANF may open a route to generate fully 3D structured composite materials. The minimal requirement in such an ANF experiment is the collimation of an atomic beam which is accessible by one dimensional laser cooling. In this dissertation, I describe transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam. For efficient laser cooling on a cycling transition, I have built a tunable, continuous-wave coherent ultraviolet source at 326 nm based on frequency tripling. For this purpose, two independent high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for the generation of the fundamental radiation at {lambda}{sub {omega}} = 977 nm have been constructed. I have observed sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam on a cycling transition of In by introducing a polarization gradient in the linear-perpendicular-linear configuration. The transverse velocity spread of a laser-cooled In atomic beam at full width at half maximum was achieved to be 13.5{+-}3.8 cm/s yielding a full divergence of only 0.48 {+-} 0.13 mrad. In addition, nonlinear spectroscopy of a 3-level, {lambda}-type level system driven by a pump and a probe beam has been investigated in order to understand the absorption line shapes used as a frequency reference in a previous two

  5. Efficient sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an indium atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser cooled atomic gases and atomic beams are widely studied samples in experimental research in atomic and optical physics. For the application of ultra cold gases as model systems for e.g. quantum many particle systems, the atomic species is not very important. Thus this field is dominated by alkaline, earthalkaline elements which are easily accessible with conventional laser sources and have convenient closed cooling transition. On the other hand, laser cooled atoms may also be interesting for technological applications, for instance for the creation of novel materials by atomic nanofabrication (ANF). There it will be important to use technologically relevant materials. As an example, using group III atoms of the periodical table in ANF may open a route to generate fully 3D structured composite materials. The minimal requirement in such an ANF experiment is the collimation of an atomic beam which is accessible by one dimensional laser cooling. In this dissertation, I describe transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam. For efficient laser cooling on a cycling transition, I have built a tunable, continuous-wave coherent ultraviolet source at 326 nm based on frequency tripling. For this purpose, two independent high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for the generation of the fundamental radiation at λω = 977 nm have been constructed. I have observed sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam on a cycling transition of In by introducing a polarization gradient in the linear-perpendicular-linear configuration. The transverse velocity spread of a laser-cooled In atomic beam at full width at half maximum was achieved to be 13.5±3.8 cm/s yielding a full divergence of only 0.48 ± 0.13 mrad. In addition, nonlinear spectroscopy of a 3-level, Λ-type level system driven by a pump and a probe beam has been investigated in order to understand the absorption line shapes used as a frequency reference in a previous two-color spectroscopy experiment

  6. Design of a laser neutral atom source for a collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible schemes are considered for storing and accelerating ions in electron rings using the collective heavy-ion accelerator (CHIA) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Studies at Dubna. It is shown that the system can be supplied with ions by injecting a pulsed beam of atoms from a laser source into the electron ring. Tests of the laser source reveal that atomic beams of various elements can be produced which are well suited for use with the accelerator. The design and operation of some laser sources are discussed

  7. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Atomic beam study of a superconductor's magnetic vortex lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an atomic beam technique for studying magnetic vortices and vortex lattices of superconductors. Atoms moving near a superconductor's surface see a fluctuating magnetic field as they pass vortices. This field may drive magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine states. Measuring the magnetic resonance transition probability as a function of atom velocity probes the vortex lattice autocorrelation function. We demonstrate this technique by studying the vortex lattice of a niobium film sample and measuring the sample's penetration depth. We also identify a systematic problem that we think thwarted an earlier attempt to experimentally realize this technique. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Guiding cold atoms in a hollow laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinye; Minogin, V. G.; Lee, Kwanil; Wang, Yuzhu; Jhe, Wonho

    1999-12-01

    The theory of atom guiding in a far blue-detuned hollow laser beam (HLB) is developed for the dipole interaction scheme described by a three-level Λ model. The complete kinetic description of atomic motion based on the Fokker-Planck equation for the atomic distribution function is presented. The dipole gradient force, radiation pressure force, and momentum diffusion tensor are then derived. It is found that even for a far-detuned laser beam, the optical potential for a three-level Λ atom is not generally reduced to a sum of two independent potentials associated with the two two-level interactions in the Λ scheme. The theory developed here is also compared with the experimental guiding of cold 85Rb atoms in the HLB. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations based on the three-level Λ model. We observe that the guiding efficiency depends strongly on the intensity and the detuning of the HLB and the initial temperature of atoms. In particular, the experimental results show that, at small detunings, the guiding efficiency is deteriorated strongly by the radiation pressure force. The Monte Carlo simulations also indicate that the efficiency of guiding versus detuning depends strongly on the direction of the HLB propagation with respect to that of atomic motion. Under optimal conditions, the guiding efficiency was found to be about 20%.

  10. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  11. Ramsey fringes in a thermal beam of Yb atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rathod, K D

    2014-01-01

    We use the Ramsey separated oscillatory fields (SOF) technique in a $400^\\circ$C thermal beam of Yb atoms to measure the Larmor precession frequency with high precision. For the experiment, we use the strongly-allowed ${^1S_0} \\rightarrow {^1P_1}$ transition at $399$ nm, and choose the odd isotope $^{171}$Yb with nuclear spin $I=1/2$, so that the ground state has only two magnetic sublevels $m_F = \\pm 1/2$. With a magnetic field of $22.2$ G and a separation of about $400$ mm between the oscillatory fields, the central Ramsey fringe is at $16.64$ kHz and has a width of $350$ Hz. The technique can be readily adapted to a cold atomic beam, and should be useful in experiments searching for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms.

  12. Decaborane beam from ITEP Bernas ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint research and development program is under way to develop steady-state intense ion sources for the two energy extremes of MeV and hundreds of eV. The difficulties of extraction and transportation of low-energy boron beams are investigated using a decaborane compound [I. Yamada, W. L. Brown, J. A. Northby, and M. Sosnowski, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 79, 223 (1993)]. Presented here are the results from ITEP experiments using the Bernas ion source with an indirectly heated LaB6 cathode

  13. Theory of longitudinal atomic beam spin echo and parity violating Berry-phases in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a nonrelativistic theory for the quantum mechanical description of longitudinal atomic beam spin echo experiments, where a beam of neutral atoms is subjected to static electric and magnetic fields. The atomic wave function is the solution of a matrix-valued Schroedinger equation and can be written as superposition of local (atomic) eigenstates of the potential matrix. The position- and time-dependent amplitude function of each eigenstate represents an atomic wave packet and can be calculated in a series expansion with a master formula that we derive. The zeroth order of this series expansion describes the adiabatic limit, whereas the higher order contributions contain the mixing of the eigenstates and the corresponding amplitude functions. We give a tutorial for the theoretical description of longitudinal atomic beam spin echo experiments and for the so-called Fahrplan model, which is a visualisation tool for the propagation of wave packets of different atomic eigenstates. As an example for the application of our theory, we study parity violating geometric (Berry-)phases. In this context, we define geometric flux densities, which for certain field configurations can be used to illustrate geometric phases in a vector diagram. Considering an example with a specific field configuration, we prove the existence of a parity violating geometric phase. (orig.)

  14. Electron beam ion sources for student education at universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Erik [DREEBIT GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Zschornack, Guenter [TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Ion beams have become essential tools used in many fields of fundamental research as well as industrial applications. Thus, it is important for todays physics students to understand the basics of ion beam creation, transportation as well as ion-surface interactions. We present results from laboratory training courses using table-top sized electron beam ion sources of the Dresden EBIT type which is able to produce a large spectrum of ions with low or high charge states. The initial ion beam is guided through several ion optical elements like Einzel lenses and deflectors, is separated by the charge-to-mass ratio of its components with a Wien-Filter or dipole analyzing magnet and is detected in a Faraday Cup. A specific assembly for laboratory training as used at the Technische Universitaet Dresden and the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, is introduced. In typical experiments, students analyze the charge-to-mass ratio spectrum from a Dresden EBIT measured using a Wien Filter. The composition of the extracted ion beam can be manipulated by the gas pressure or the ionisation time. In a wider context, the atomic physics processes occurring especially during the production of highly charged ions also appear in nuclear fusion facilities as well as in many astrophysical phenomena, for example supernovas. Such aspects can be discussed in order to help students connect to modern research carried out at large international facilities.

  15. Electron beam ion sources for student education at universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beams have become essential tools used in many fields of fundamental research as well as industrial applications. Thus, it is important for todays physics students to understand the basics of ion beam creation, transportation as well as ion-surface interactions. We present results from laboratory training courses using table-top sized electron beam ion sources of the Dresden EBIT type which is able to produce a large spectrum of ions with low or high charge states. The initial ion beam is guided through several ion optical elements like Einzel lenses and deflectors, is separated by the charge-to-mass ratio of its components with a Wien-Filter or dipole analyzing magnet and is detected in a Faraday Cup. A specific assembly for laboratory training as used at the Technische Universitaet Dresden and the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, is introduced. In typical experiments, students analyze the charge-to-mass ratio spectrum from a Dresden EBIT measured using a Wien Filter. The composition of the extracted ion beam can be manipulated by the gas pressure or the ionisation time. In a wider context, the atomic physics processes occurring especially during the production of highly charged ions also appear in nuclear fusion facilities as well as in many astrophysical phenomena, for example supernovas. Such aspects can be discussed in order to help students connect to modern research carried out at large international facilities.

  16. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; Denis, A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  17. High resolution electron imaging system for sub-micron sized metastable atom beams produced by Stern Gerlach interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Bocvarski, V.; Jureta, J.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Karam, J.-C.; Grucker, J.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Robert, J.; Baudon, J.

    2005-10-01

    The method of modulating an atom beam profile by an immaterial magnetic mask generated in a Stern-Gerlach interferometer is recalled. A special magnetic configuration aimed at producing a single central bright interference fringe (atomic spot) was used. The effects of velocity spread, source coherence and source size on the limiting spot size at large values of the magnetic gradient are discussed. The observation of such small sizes requires a high spatial resolution of the position-sensitive detector. A new electron optical device is described, which images the secondary electron source generated by the impact of the atomic beam on a metallic electrode (detection in real time). Magnifications as high as 65 are accessible, leading to a better than 100 nm resolution of the atomic beam profile when a position-sensitive detector of a few µm resolution is used. Geometric and chromatic aberrations are discussed and, according to simulations, they do not significantly deteriorate the resolution.

  18. High-resolution spectral analysis of light from neutral beams and ion source plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral distributions of Balmer alpha emission from 7- and 22-cm-diam neutral hydrogen beams have been measured with a Fabry-Perot interferometer to obtain information on the beam energy, divergence, and species composition. Results of these measurements are compared with other data on the beam properties to evaluate high-resolution spectroscopy as a beam diagnostic technique. Measurements on ion source plasmas and on beam-produced background plasmas yield average neutral atom energies of approximately 0.3 and 2.5 eV, respectively

  19. Entanglement of atomic beams: Tests of complementarity and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that distinct atomic beams can be entangled when they interact with quantum superpositions of macroscopically separated micromaser fields. Experimentally feasible tests of complementarity are proposed, detecting Ramsey interference (or not) in one and open-quote open-quote Welcher Weg close-quote close-quote information (or not) in the other entangled beam. Available information and fringe contrast can be manipulated using classical and quantum fields. The open-quote open-quote quantum eraser close-quote close-quote is realized in the former case, while it is only a special feature in the latter one. Other applications of entangled atoms are also suggested. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek Singh; V B Tiwari; S Singh; S R Mishra; H S Rawat

    2014-07-01

    The effect of size of a cooling laser beam in a zig-zag atomic beam collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam is investigated. The simulation results show that discreteness in the interaction between the cooling laser beam and atomic beam, arising due to finite size and incidence angle of the cooling laser beam, significantly reduces the value of transverse velocity capture range of the collimator. The experimental observations show the trend similar to that obtained from simulations. Our study can be particularly useful where a small zig-zag collimator is required.

  1. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  2. Workshop on the use of atomic beams in plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material of the workshop entitled 'Use of Atomic Beams in Plasma Experiments', which was organized to summarize the results of the joint research and to give an outlook to the future trends of development in the field is presented. Different topics on plasma diagnostics, plasma impurities, impurity injection, transport theory in plasma and their use in tokamak devices are covered. 18 items are separately indexed for INIS database. (K.A.)

  3. Proposal for a magneto-optical beam splitter for atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Pfau, Tilman; Adams, Charles S.; Mlynek, Jürgen

    1993-01-01

    In this letter we present a theoretical study of the coherent diffraction of three-level atoms from a light field with a polarization gradient (counterpropagating crossed linearly polarized beams) and a static magnetic field applied parallel to the laser propagation direction. We show that for a particular ratio of the laser field intensity and the magnetic-field strength, there occurs a resonance between the Larmor precession of the magnetic alignment and the Rabi oscillations. On resonance ...

  4. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Joseph, E-mail: jkhoury@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C. [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  5. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants

  6. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C.

    2013-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  7. Measurements of atomic transition probabilities in highly ionized atoms by fast ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of the beam-foil method by which level lifetimes and transition probabilities can be determined in atoms and ions. Results are presented for systems of particular interest for fusion research, such as the Li, Be, Na, Mg, Cu and Zn isoelectronic sequences. The available experimental material is compared to theoretical transition probabilities. (author)

  8. Focusing Light Beams To Improve Atomic-Vapor Optical Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2010-01-01

    Specially designed focusing of light beams has been proposed as a means of improving the performances of optical buffers based on cells containing hot atomic vapors (e.g., rubidium vapor). There is also a companion proposal to improve performance by use of incoherent optical pumping under suitable conditions. Regarding the proposal to use focusing: The utility of atomic-vapor optical buffers as optical storage and processing devices has been severely limited by nonuniform spatial distributions of intensity in optical beams, arising from absorption of the beams as they propagate in atomic-vapor cells. Such nonuniformity makes it impossible to optimize the physical conditions throughout a cell, thereby making it impossible to optimize the performance of the cell as an optical buffer. In practical terms simplified for the sake of brevity, "to optimize" as used here means to design the cell so as to maximize the group delay of an optical pulse while keeping the absorption and distortion of the pulse reasonably small. Regarding the proposal to use incoherent optical pumping: For reasons too complex to describe here, residual absorption of light is one of the main impediments to achievement of desirably long group delays in hot atomic vapors. The present proposal is directed toward suppressing residual absorption of light. The idea of improving the performance of slow-light optical buffers by use of incoherent pumping overlaps somewhat with the basic idea of Raman-based slow-light systems. However, prior studies of those systems did not quantitatively answer the question of whether the performance of an atomic vapor or other medium that exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Raman gain is superior to that of a medium that exhibits EIT without Raman gain.

  9. Sources of polarized ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation we discuss methods of producing large quantities of polarized atoms and ions (Stern-Gerlach separation, optical pumping, and spin-exchange) as well as experimental methods of measuring the degree of polarization of atomic systems. The usefulness of polarized atoms in probing the microscopic magnetic surface properties of materials will also be discussed. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  10. On-line laser spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Guimbal, P; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Serre, J M; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a CW tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. /sup 76-98/Rb, /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 208-213/Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while /sup 30-31/Na and /sup 38-47/K have been studied by setting the apparatus directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. The hyperfine structure, spins and isotope shifts of the alkali isotopes and isomers are measured. (8 refs).

  11. A source of translationally cold molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Laszlo C.

    Currently the fields studying or using molecules with low kinetic energies are experiencing an unprecedented growth. Astronomers and chemists are interested in chemical reactions taking place at temperatures below or around 20 K, spectroscopists could make very precise measurements on slow molecules and molecular physicists could chart the potential energy surfaces more accurately. And the list continues. All of these experiments need slow molecules, with kinetic energies from around 10 cm-1 down to 0. Several designs of cold sources have already been made. The most interesting ones are presented. This work describes the design and the testing of a cold source based on the collisional cooling technique: the molecules of interest are cooled well below their freezing point by a precooled buffer gas. This way condensation is avoided. The source is a copper cell cooled to 4.2 K by an external liquid helium bath. The cell is filled with cold buffer gas (helium). The molecules of choice (ammonia) are injected through a narrow tube in the middle of the cell. The cold molecules leave the cell through a 1 millimeter hole. Two versions of pulsing techniques have been employed: a shutter blade which covers the source hole and opens it only for short moments, and a chopper that modulates the beam further downstream. Both produced pulse lengths around 1 millisecond. The source is tested in an experiment in which the emerging molecules are focused and detected. Time of flight technique is used to measure the kinetic energies. Two detectors have been employed: a microwave cavity to analyze the state of the molecules in the beam, and a mass spectrometer to measure the number density of the particles. The molecules coming out of the source hole are formed into a beam by an electrostatic quadrupole state selector. The quantum mechanical aspects and the elements of electrodynamics involved in the focusing are described. A computer simulation program is presented, which helped

  12. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kumar; G Rodrigues; U K Rao; C P Safvan; D Kanjilal; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply charged ion beams ranging from a few keV to a few MeV for research in materials sciences, atomic and molecular physics is described. One of the important features of this facility is the availability of relatively large currents of multiply charged positive ions from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source placed entirely on a high voltage platform. All the electronic and vacuum systems related to the ECR source including 10 GHz ultra high frequency (UHF) transmitter, high voltage power supplies for extractor and Einzel lens are placed on a high voltage platform. All the equipments are controlled using a personal computer at ground potential through optical fibers for high voltage isolation. Some of the experimental facilities available are also described.

  13. BEAM TRANSFER LINES FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAPARIA,D.; LEE,Y.Y.; WENG,W.T.; WEI,J.

    2002-04-08

    Beam transfer lines for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are designed to have low beam losses for hand on maintenance while satisfying the facility footprint requirements. There are two main beam transfer lines, High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) line which connect super conducting linac to the accumulator ring and Ring to Target Beam transport (RTBT) which transfers beam from accumulator ring to the target. HEBT line not only transfer the beam from linac to ring but also prepare beam for ring injection, correct the energy jitter from the linac, provide required energy spread for the ring injection, clean the transverse and longitudinal halo particles from the beam, determine the linac beam quality, and provide the protection to the accumulator ring. RTBT line transport the beam from ring to target while fulfilling the target requirements of beam size, maximum current density, beam moment on the target in case of ring extraction kicker failure. and protect the target from the ring fault conditions.

  14. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  15. Interaction of a deuterium atomic beam with a palladium membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livshits, A.I.; Metter, I.M.; Samartsev, A.A.

    1976-07-01

    It is suggested that under certain conditions the permeability of a solid membrane of the usual thickness for gases can be comparable to the permeability of an aperture in a thin wall. Experiments are carried out to test this suggestion. A study is made of the penetration of deuterium from a thermal atomic beam with a flux density of 10/sup 11/--10/sup 12/ atoms/cm/sup 2/xsec) through an ''inactive'' palladium membrane (i.e., which is comparatively impenetrable for molecular hydrogen). The probability for the penetration of deuterium atoms in a single collision with the membrane over the temperature range 20--520degreeC is independent of the temperature and is equal to 0.1 (i.e., a value of the same order of magnitude as the sticking probability for hydrogen atoms on metals). It is shown experimentally that the desorption is of second order in the concentration of the desolved gas. It is suggested that each atom which recombines at the membrane is first absorbed and then reaches the opposite boundary.

  16. An ion source with bunched beam release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a continuation of a preceding study, the possibility of bunched beam release from a FEBIAD-B2 ion source was investigated for the alkali metals, the alkaline-earths, aluminum, the transition elements scandium to nickel and for ytterbium. With an appropriate choice of the cooling/heating system and of the trap material, efficient bunching is reached for the alkalies, calcium, manganese and ytterbium, which have enthalpies of adsorption within the range 2.6 ≤ΔH, < 5 eV, the window useful for bunching. Utilizing deduced values of the mean sticking time at a surface of defined temperature, ΔH/sub a/-values up to approximately 6 eV can be determined. Thus the conditions can be specified which should allow bunching and chemical separation for various other elements that are too refractory for the present device. Experimental and semi-empirical ΔH/sub a/-values are in good agreement for the transition elements and aluminium but exhibit strong deviations for the alkali metals, the alkaline-earths, ytterbium and probably some other lanthanides. On-line mass separation of neutron-deficient isotopes of cadmium, indium and tin with a high degree of selectivity demonstrates the chemical separation power of bunched beam release

  17. Matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip for a portable atom-interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S J; Gang, S T; Kim, J B

    2016-01-01

    We construct a matter-wave beam splitter using 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip. Through the use of radio-frequency-induced double-well potentials, we were able to split a BEC into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 2.8 {\\mu}m to 57 {\\mu}m. Interference between these two freely expanding BECs has been observed. By varying the rf-field amplitude, frequency, or polarization, we investigate behaviors of the beam-splitter. From the perspective of practical use, our BEC manipulation system is suitable for application to interferometry since it is compact and the repetition rate is high due to the anodic bonded atom chip on the vacuum cell. The portable system occupies a volume of 0.5 m3 and operates at a repetition rate as high as ~0.2 Hz.

  18. The development of the high intensity electron cyclotron resonance ion source at China Institute of Atomic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, B; Ma, R; Ma, Y; Chen, L; Huang, Q; Liang, H; Cui, B; Jiang, W

    2014-02-01

    High-current microwave ion source has been under development over 15 years for accelerator driven sub-critical system research at China Institute of Atomic Energy, and the beam intensity higher than 140 mA proton beam is produced by this ion source with long lifetime and high reliability. The emittance of high intensity continue-wave and pulse beam is measured on a test-bench in the laboratory. Based on the good performance of this proton ion source, a new 120 mA deuterium ion source is proposed for a high intensity neutron generator. The ion source details and status will be presented. PMID:24593490

  19. Ramsey fringes in a thermal beam of Yb atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Rathod, K. D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2014-01-01

    We use the Ramsey separated oscillatory fields (SOF) technique in a $400^\\circ$C thermal beam of Yb atoms to measure the Larmor precession frequency with high precision. For the experiment, we use the strongly-allowed ${^1S_0} \\rightarrow {^1P_1}$ transition at $399$ nm, and choose the odd isotope $^{171}$Yb with nuclear spin $I=1/2$, so that the ground state has only two magnetic sublevels $m_F = \\pm 1/2$. With a magnetic field of $22.2$ G and a separation of about $400$ mm between the oscil...

  20. Atomic lifetime measurements by beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, H.; Volz, U.

    1993-01-01

    Beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy as a precise, cascade-free and collision-free method for measuring atomic lifetimes and individual oscillator strengths is described. Its recent application to fine-structure levels of the KrI 5p configuration is reported. The experimental uncertainty is reduced by one order of magnitude, with respect to previous work, down to 0.3% (1σ). The discussion of these results in comparison with experimental and theoretical ones from the literature underlines the precision of the method and its potential to guide future theoretical developments.

  1. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron-beam heater and associated power supply have been developed for use in formation of metal vapors for neutral beam studies. The device is small with relatively low power (250 W). It is easily constructed and designed such that the target surface is normal to the direction of propagation of the neutral beam. Beams of tantalum atoms and carbon particles have been formed using the device

  2. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, J.A.; Vroom, D.A.

    1978-07-01

    An electron-beam heater and associated power supply have been developed for use in formation of metal vapors for neutral beam studies. The device is small with relatively low power (250 W). It is easily constructed and designed such that the target surface is normal to the direction of propagation of the neutral beam. Beams of tantalum atoms and carbon particles have been formed using the device.

  3. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-12-31

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes` efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs.

  4. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes' efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs.

  5. The status of the Electron Beam Ion Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than twenty years after its invention, 13 examples of the Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) are in operation worldwide. The substantial progress in operation and insight, achieved over the last few years, made the EBISes become reliable tools for the production of beams of very highly charged, low-energy ions. For example, 8 EBISes produce bare argon on a standard basis. The successful production of hydrogen-like xenon presents the ions with the highest ionization energy, whereas the production of Th80+ presents the highest achieved charge state. Several synchrotrons are fed by EBIS injectors, taking advantage of the EBIS batch mode production, which yields the highest charge states. A few EBISes are used for ion source development. However, most of the EBISes' efforts are directed to research the physics of highly charged ions. Some of those are used to study the electron--ion interaction inside the source. But normally, most EBISes deliver the ions for external experiments, which so far concentrate on the recombination of the highly charged ions with atoms, molecules and surfaces. The ions are typically produced at a potential of 1 to a few kilovolts per charge; but in most cases, the EBIS is mounted on a high voltage platform or is followed by an RFQ, and therefore can generate ion energies from a few hundred volts up to a few hundred kilovolts per charge. The delivered beams have a low emittance and a low energy spread, which is an advantage for high-resolution experiments. This paper presents briefly all operational EBISes, their capabilities, their achievements, and their contribution to physics research. 5 figs., 1 tab., 59 refs

  6. New results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source is the world's first low-energy third-generation synchrotron radiation source. It has been running reliably and exceeding design specifications since it began operation in October 1993. It is available to a wide community of researchers in many scientific fields, including atomic and molecular science and chemistry. Here, new results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source demonstrate the opportunities available in atomic and molecular physics at this synchrotron light source. The unprecedented brightness allows experiments with high flux, high spectral resolution, and nearly 100% linear polarization

  7. Quantification of a radical beam source for methyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radical beam source for methyl radicals (CH3) was characterized applying ionization-threshold mass spectrometry. The beam source is based on thermal dissociation of methane (CH4) or azomethane (N2(CH3)2) in a heated tungsten capillary. A flux of (3±1)x1013 cm-2 s-1 CH3 radicals is produced using methane as precursor gas and a capillary temperature of 1650 K. Alternatively, a flux of (3±1)x1014 cm-2 s-1 CH3 is produced using azomethane as precursor gas and a capillary temperature of 1150 K. The dominant production of methyl from the precursor methane occurs due to reaction 2 CH4+M→2 CH3+H2+M at the hot tungsten surface. The dominant production of methyl from azomethane occurs due to the reaction N2(CH3)2→2 CH3+N2. Besides methyl radicals, only stable molecules contribute to the emitted flux; within the detection limit, no atomic hydrogen is observed. From the comparison of ionization-threshold mass spectrometry and standard mass spectrometry, it is concluded that the cracking pattern of methane varies with the methane gas temperature. This is explained by the vibrational assisted dissociation of methane

  8. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for HIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high current low emittance high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver HIF (heavy ion fusion) driver accelerator scale beam. Using high-charge-state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system which consists of the gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 2D beam envelope simulations and experimental feasibility studies' results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector

  9. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Rathod; P K Singh; Vasant Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the generation of an isotopically pure beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first slowed using a Zeeman slower. They are then subjected to a pair of molasses beams inclined at 45° with respect to the slowed atomic beam. The slowed atoms are deflected and probed at a distance of 160 mm. We demonstrate the selective deflection of the bosonic isotope 174Yb and the fermionic isotope 171Yb. Using a transient measurement after the molasses beams are turned on, we find a longitudinal temperature of 41 mK.

  10. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, K. D.; Singh, P. K.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate generation of an isotopically pure beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first slowed using a Zeeman Slower. They are then subjected to a pair of molasses beams inclined at $45^\\circ$ with respect to the slowed atomic beam. The slowed atoms are deflected and probed at a distance of 160 mm. We demonstrate selective deflection of the bosonic isotope $^{174}$Yb, and the fermionic isotope $^{171}$Yb. Using a transient measurement after the molasses beams are turned on, we find a longitudinal temperature of 41 mK.

  11. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses

    CERN Document Server

    Rathod, K D; Natarajan, Vasant

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate generation of an isotopically pure beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first slowed using a Zeeman Slower. They are then subjected to a pair of molasses beams inclined at $45^\\circ$ with respect to the slowed atomic beam. The slowed atoms are deflected and probed at a distance of 160 mm. We demonstrate selective deflection of the bosonic isotope $^{174}$Yb, and the fermionic isotope $^{171}$Yb. Using a transient measurement after the molasses beams are turned on, we find a longitudinal temperature of 41 mK.

  12. One Atomic Beam as a Detector of Classical Harmonic Vibrations with Micro Amplitudes and Low Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simplest detector of harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies, i.e. the detector consisting of one atomic beam. Here the atomic beam is induced by a plane harmonic wave and has a classical collective harmonic vibrations, which vibrant directions are perpendicular to the wave vectors of atomic beam. Compared with the detector consisting of atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the new detector has two advantages: (1) it is suitable for the detection of the harmonic vibrations induced either by a longitudinal plane harmonic wave or by a transverse plane harmonic wave; (2) the quantum noise fluctuation of the atomic beam is exactly zero.

  13. Atom trapping in a bottle beam created by a diffractive optical element

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, V V; Saffman, M; Kemme, S A; Ellis, A R; Brady, G R; Wendt, J R; Biedermann, G W; Samora, S

    2013-01-01

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) has been fabricated for creating blue detuned atomic bottle beam traps. The DOE integrates several diffractive lenses for trap creation and imaging of atomic fluorescence. We characterize the performance of the DOE and demonstrate trapping of cold Cesium atoms inside a bottle beam.

  14. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, A. N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Li, M. S. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Ave. Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, 13565-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  15. Crossed beam reactive scattering of oxygen atoms and surface scattering studies of gaseous condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibener, S.J.

    1979-09-01

    A high pressure, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of very intense (greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ atoms sr/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/) supersonic beams of oxygen atoms. This source is capable of producing seeded beams of ground state O(/sup 3/P/sub J/) atoms when dilute oxygen-argon mixtures are used, with molecular dissociation levels exceeding 80% being realized for operation at pressures up to 350 torr. When dilute oxygen-helium mixtures are employed both ground state O(/sup 3/P/sub J/) and excited state O(/sup 1/D/sub 2/) atoms are present in the terminal beam, with molecular dissociation levels typically exceeding 60% being achieved for operation at pressures up to 200 torr. Atomic oxygen mean translational energies from 0.14 to 0.50 eV were obtained using the seeded beams technique, with Mach numbers as high as 10 (FWHM ..delta.. v/v approx. = 20%) being realized. The IC1, CF/sub 3/I, C/sub 6/H/sub 6/, and C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ reactions are discussed in detail. The IC1 and CF/sub 3/I studies have enabled us to determine an improved value for the bond energy of the IO radical: D/sub o/(IO) = 55 +- 2 kcal/mole. The IO product angular and velocity distributions have been used to generate center-of-mass flux contour maps, which indicate that these two reactions proceed via relatively long-lived collision complexes whose mean lifetimes are slightly shorter than their respective rotational periods. The O(/sup 3/P/sub J/) + C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ and C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ reactions were studied in order to elucidate the reaction mechanism, and, in particular, to identify the primary reaction products produced in these reactions. Finally, a series of beam-surface scattering experiments are described which examined the internal and translational energy dependence of molecular condensation probabilities for collisions involving either CC1/sub 4/ or SF/sub 6/ and their respective condensed phases. 117 references. (JFP)

  16. Crossed beam reactive scattering of oxygen atoms and surface scattering studies of gaseous condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high pressure, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of very intense (greater than or equal to 1018 atoms sr-1 sec-1) supersonic beams of oxygen atoms. This source is capable of producing seeded beams of ground state O(3P/sub J/) atoms when dilute oxygen-argon mixtures are used, with molecular dissociation levels exceeding 80% being realized for operation at pressures up to 350 torr. When dilute oxygen-helium mixtures are employed both ground state O(3P/sub J/) and excited state O(1D2) atoms are present in the terminal beam, with molecular dissociation levels typically exceeding 60% being achieved for operation at pressures up to 200 torr. Atomic oxygen mean translational energies from 0.14 to 0.50 eV were obtained using the seeded beams technique, with Mach numbers as high as 10 (FWHM Δ v/v approx. = 20%) being realized. The IC1, CF3I, C6H6, and C6D6 reactions are discussed in detail. The IC1 and CF3I studies have enabled us to determine an improved value for the bond energy of the IO radical: D/sub o/(IO) = 55 +- 2 kcal/mole. The IO product angular and velocity distributions have been used to generate center-of-mass flux contour maps, which indicate that these two reactions proceed via relatively long-lived collision complexes whose mean lifetimes are slightly shorter than their respective rotational periods. The O(3P/sub J/) + C6H6 and C6D6 reactions were studied in order to elucidate the reaction mechanism, and, in particular, to identify the primary reaction products produced in these reactions. Finally, a series of beam-surface scattering experiments are described which examined the internal and translational energy dependence of molecular condensation probabilities for collisions involving either CC14 or SF6 and their respective condensed phases. 117 references

  17. Time dependence of desorbed ground-state lithium atoms following pulsed-electron-beam irradiation of lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments have shown that during the irradiation of lithium fluoride crystals by a chopped electron beam the signal of desorbed ground-state lithium atoms continues for times up to seconds in the beam-off period. A quantitative model is presented which connects the desorption of lithium atoms with the diffusion of lithium fluoride F centers to the surface. The model thus introduces a new source of time delay (F-center diffusion) in the desorption of ground-state metal atoms from alkali halides. Formerly it has been supposed that the delay occurred entirely during the surface desorption step. The model fits the experimental data very well, and should be applicable to other similar systems. For the cases considered here, F-center diffusion turns out to be the primary source of delay in the Li-atom signal. The model suggests some new directions for investigation

  18. Molecular beam studies of oxide reduction by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graphite and oxide internals of a CTR are susceptible to chemical corrosion as well as to physical degradation by high-energy particles. Reactions of thermal atomic hydrogen with oxides are being studied. The hydrogen used is at thermal energy (0.22 eV). Typical data are reported for the H/UO2 system. The reaction probability is plotted as a function of solid temperature at fixed beam intensity and moculation frequency. The reaction probability increases from low temperature to a high-temperature plateau at about 13000C. Here the reaction rate is limited solely by the sticking probability of H on the surface; about one in seven of the incident atoms is chemisorbed by the surface and ultimately returns to the gas phase as water vapor. A reaction model comprising sticking, recombination to H2, solution and diffusion of H in the bulk of the UO2, surface reaction of adsorbed H with lattice oxygen atoms to produce the hydroxyl radical, and production of water is constructed. The rate constants for the elementary steps in the mechanism are tabulated. 2 figures, 2 tables

  19. Advancing atomic nanolithography: cold atomic Cs beam exposure of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of a study into the quality of functionalized surfaces for nanolithographic imaging. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coverage, subsequent post-etch pattern definition and minimum feature size all depend on the quality of the Au substrate used in atomic nanolithographic experiments. We find sputtered Au substrates yield much smoother surfaces and a higher density of {111} oriented grains than evaporated Au surfaces. A detailed study of the self-assembly mechanism using molecular resolution AFM and STM has shown that the monolayer is composed of domains with sizes typically of 5-25 nm, and multiple molecular domains can exist within one Au grain. Exposure of the SAM to an optically-cooled atomic Cs beam traversing a two-dimensional array of submicron material masks and also standing wave optical masks allowed determination of the minimum average Cs dose (2 Cs atoms per SAM molecule) and the realization of < 50 nm structures. The SAM monolayer contains many non-uniformities such as pin-holes, domain boundaries and monoatomic depressions which are present in the Au surface prior to SAM adsorption. These imperfections limit the use of alkanethiols as a resist in atomic nanolithography experiments. These studies have allowed us to realize an Atom Pencil suitable for deposition of precision quantities of material at the microand nanoscale to an active surface

  20. Novel Atomic Mirror with a Blue-Detuned Semi-Gaussian Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑萍; 高伟建; 印建平

    2003-01-01

    A novel and simple atomic mirror composed of a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam is proposed. From the Fresnel diffraction theory, the intensity distributions of a collimated GaUssian laser beam diffracted by the straight edge of a semi-infinite opaque plate are studied. The optical potential of the semi-Gaussian beam for 85 Rb atoms and its spontaneous emission probability are calculated and compared with the performance of the evanescent-wave mirror. Our study shows that the blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam, as a novel atomic mirror, can be used to reflect atomic beam efliciently, and under the same beam parameters and lower normal atomic velocity, the performance of the semi-Gaussian-beam mirror is better than that of the evanescent-wave mirror.

  1. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 103 cm-3 at the ionization area. (author)

  2. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-10-28

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  3. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  4. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses

    OpenAIRE

    Rathod, KD; Singh, PK; Natarajan, Vasant

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of an isotopically pure beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first slowed using a Zeeman slower. They are then subjected to a pair of molasses beams inclined at 45(a similar to) with respect to the slowed atomic beam. The slowed atoms are deflected and probed at a distance of 160 mm. We demonstrate the selective deflection of the bosonic isotope Yb-174 and the fermionic isotope Yb-171. Using...

  5. Preparation of a single-state atomic beam by optical pumping and radiative deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple technique for producing a single-state sodium atomic beam is described. A single laser both optically pumps the F = 2 ground-state atoms into m/sub F/ = +2 and deflects the pumped atoms away from residual F = 1 atoms. Data demonstrating the technique are presented, and a practical design for an apparatus based on these principles is described

  6. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanada, M., E-mail: hanada.masaya@jaea.go.jp; Kojima, A.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-0913 (Japan); Yamano, Y. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama-ken 338-8570 (Japan); Grisham, L. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  7. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications. PMID:26932050

  8. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  9. Coherent and non coherent atom optics experiment with an ultra-narrow beam of metastable rare gas atoms; Experiences d'optique atomique coherente ou non avec un jet superfin d'atomes metastables de gaz rares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grucker, J

    2007-12-15

    In this thesis, we present a new type of atomic source: an ultra-narrow beam of metastable atoms produced by resonant metastability exchange inside a supersonic beam of rare gas atoms. We used the coherence properties of this beam to observe the diffraction of metastable helium, argon and neon atoms by a nano-transmission grating and by micro-reflection-gratings. Then, we evidenced transitions between Zeeman sublevels of neon metastable {sup 3}P{sub 2} state due to the quadrupolar part of Van der Waals potential. After we showed experimental proofs of the observation of this phenomenon, we calculated the transition probabilities in the Landau - Zener model. We discussed the interest of Van der Waals - Zeeman transitions for atom interferometry. Last, we described the Zeeman cooling of the supersonic metastable argon beam ({sup 3}P{sub 2}). We have succeeded in slowing down atoms to speeds below 100 m/s. We gave experimental details and showed the first time-of-flight measurements of slowed atoms.

  10. Transverse coherence of a natural metastable-atom nozzle beam : Scattering and van der Waals-Zeeman transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Boustimi, M.; Perales, F.; Bocvarski, V.; Vassilev, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Mainos, C.; Grucker, J.; Wipf, N.; Robert, J.

    2004-12-01

    By use of the resonant metastability-exchange process, a metastable-atom beam possessing all genuine qualities of a " natural " ground-state atom nozzle beam is prepared. Owing to the angular narrowness (0.35 mrad) and smallness of the effective source diameter (15 μm) of this beam, the scattering of metastable atoms by a silicon-nitride nano-slit grating is investigated in detail, in a partially coherent regime. The elastic scattering exhibits high-order diffraction peaks combined with a standard van der Waals deflection effect. When a static magnetic field is present, surface-induced exo-energetic transitions among Zeeman sub-levels are observed.

  11. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 Ω Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed

  12. Beam Instrumentation for the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10-4. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring

  13. Atomic physics at high brilliance synchrotron sources: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the following topics: present status of SPring-8 and the atomic physics undulator beamline; recent photoabsorption measurements in the rare gases and alkalis in the 3 to 15 keV proton energy region; atomic and molecular physics at LURE; experiments on atoms, ions and small molecules using the new generation of synchrotron radiation sources; soft x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using tunable synchrotron radiation; soft x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy excited by synchrotron radiation: Inelastic and resonant scattering near threshold; outer-shell photoionization of ions; overview of the APS BESSRC beamline development; the advanced light source: Research opportunities in atomic and molecular physics; Photoionization of the Ba+ ion by 4d shell excitation; decay dynamics of inner-shell excited atoms and molecules; absorption of atomic Ca, Cr, Mn and Cu; High-resolution photoelectron studies of resonant molecular photoionization; radiative and radiationless resonant raman scattering by synchrotron radiation; auger spectrometry of atoms and molecules; some thoughts of future experiments with the new generation of storage rings; Electron spectroscopy studies of argon K-shell excitation and vacancy cascades; ionization of atoms by high energy photons; ion coincidence spectroscopy on rare gas atoms and small molecules after photoexcitation at energies of several keV; an EBIS for use with synchrotron radiation photoionization of multiply charged ions and PHOBIS; gamma-2e coincidence measurements the wave of the future in inner-shell electron spectroscopy; recoil momentum spectroscopy in ion-atom and photon-atom collisions; a study of compton ionization of helium; future perspectives of photoionization studies at high photon energies; and status report on the advanced photon source. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  14. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-01

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable. PMID:24593588

  15. Manipulation and analysis of atomic and molecular beams using transmission gratings and Fresnel zone plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisenti, R.E.

    2000-06-01

    In this thesis experimental results on the diffraction of rare gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) and molecular (D{sub 2}) beams by a 100 nm period transmission grating and on the focusing of a helium atom beam through a Fresnel zone plate have been reported. (orig.)

  16. SOME PROPERTIES OF ATOMIC BEAM PRODUCED BY LASER INDUCED ABLATION OF Li TARGET

    OpenAIRE

    Harnafi, M.; Dubreuil, B.

    1987-01-01

    In this experiment, pulsed atomic beams produced in vacuum by laser induced ablation from lithium target are analyzed by laser-induced fluorescsence (LIF). As an application of this atomic beam production technique, the l-mixing processes induced in the n = 9, 10 Li Rydberg states by collisions with CO2 molecules have been investigated.

  17. Atomic scattering from an adsorbed monolayer solid with a helium beam that penetrates to the substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, L.W.; Dammann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction and one-phonon inelastic scattering of a thermal energy helium atomic beam are evaluated in the situation that the target monolayer lattice is so dilated that the atomic beam penetrates to the interlayer region between the monolayer and the substrate. The scattering is simulated by...

  18. Atomic physics research with second and third generation synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution to these proceedings is intended to provide an introduction and overview for other contributions on atomic (and related) physics research at existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The emphasis will be on research accomplishments and future opportunities, but a comparison will be given of operating characteristics for first, second, and third generation machines. First generation light sources were built to do research with the primary electron and positron beams, rather than with the synchrotron radiation itself. Second generation machines were specifically designed to be dedicated synchrotron-radiation facilities, with an emphasis on the use of bending-magnet radiation. The new third generation light sources are being designed to optimize radiation from insertion devices, such as undulators and wigglers. Each generation of synchrotron light source offers useful capabilities for forefront research in atomic physics and many other disciplines. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  19. Preparation of state purified beams of He, Ne, C, N, and O atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankunas, Justin; Reisyan, Kevin S.; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    The production and guiding of ground state and metastable C, N, and O atoms in a two-meter-long, bent magnetic guide are described. Pure beams of metastable He(3S1) and Ne(3P2), and of ground state N(4S3/2) and O(3P2) are obtained using an Even-Lavie valve paired with a dielectric barrier discharge or electron bombardment source. Under these conditions no electronically excited C, N, or O atoms are observed at the exit of the guide. A general valve with electron impact excitation creates, in addition to ground state atoms, electronically excited C(3P2; 1D2) and N(2D5/2; 2P3/2) species. The two experimental conditions are complimentary, demonstrating the usefulness of a magnetic guide in crossed or merged beam experiments such as those described in Henson et al. [Science 338, 234 (2012)] and Jankunas et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244302 (2014)].

  20. Preparation of state purified beams of He, Ne, C, N, and O atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankunas, Justin; Reisyan, Kevin S.; Osterwalder, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.osterwalder@epfl.ch [Institute for Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-03-14

    The production and guiding of ground state and metastable C, N, and O atoms in a two-meter-long, bent magnetic guide are described. Pure beams of metastable He({sup 3}S{sub 1}) and Ne({sup 3}P{sub 2}), and of ground state N({sup 4}S{sub 3/2}) and O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) are obtained using an Even-Lavie valve paired with a dielectric barrier discharge or electron bombardment source. Under these conditions no electronically excited C, N, or O atoms are observed at the exit of the guide. A general valve with electron impact excitation creates, in addition to ground state atoms, electronically excited C({sup 3}P{sub 2}; {sup 1}D{sub 2}) and N({sup 2}D{sub 5/2}; {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) species. The two experimental conditions are complimentary, demonstrating the usefulness of a magnetic guide in crossed or merged beam experiments such as those described in Henson et al. [Science 338, 234 (2012)] and Jankunas et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244302 (2014)].

  1. Injection line of 1+ ion beam for electron beam ion-charge breeding source and related beam elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main purpose of the electron beam ion-charge breeding source (EBIBS) is to produce highly pure and highly charged ion beam from single charge ion of stable or radioactive species. It can accept low emittance ion beam from either online or offline ECR ion sources (ECRIS). The emittance of the extracted beam is low at lower RF frequencies and magnetic field of the ECRIS. The beam at the position of extraction is approximately reproduced at the entrance of the electron collector of the EBIBS. The beam moves forward under the influence of the negative potential deep of the electron beam and enters the ionization region in solenoid field of the EBIBS. The injection line starts at the extraction region of the ECRIS. The assumed parameters of the extracted beam of 20 keV energy and 0.0732 GeV/c momentum for injection are 10 mm diameter and 30 mrad beam divergence cone. As mass number of the ions decreases the energy decreases for constant momentum of the ion beam. The value of the momentum or the beam rigidity is judiciously chosen to encompass the most of the isotopes of various elements. The beam is focused by a quadrupole doublet and passes the beam through a 90° bending magnet. The beam is analyzed also by the dipole magnet to remove the contaminants and the selected ion beam is focused by a quadrupole doublet magnet to pass through an electrostatic 90° bending elements. The beam approaches the opening of 16 mm diameter of the electron collector. A round beam of 12 mm diameter is achieved here with the help of a quadrupole triplet through point-to-point imaging from start to the end. The transport matrices for the electrostatic bending elements were calculated and incorporated into the TRANSPORT code. (author)

  2. Intense metal ion beam source for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an ion source which can produce high current beams of metal ions. The source uses a metal vapor vacuum arc discharge as the plasma medium from which the ions are extracted, so we have called this source the MEVVA ion source. The metal plasma is created simply and efficiently and no carrier gas is required. Beams have been produced from metallic elements spanning the periodic table from lithium through uranium, at extraction voltages from 10 to 60 kV and with beam currents as high as 1.1 Amperes (electrical current in all charge states). A brief description of the source is given and its possible application as an ion source for heavy ion fusion is considered. Beams such as C+ (greater than or equal to99% of the beam in this species and charge state), Cr2+ (80%), and Ta/sup 3+,4+,5+/ (mixed charge states) have been produced. Beam emittance measurements and ways of increasing the source brightness are discussed

  3. Narrow linewidth single laser source system for onboard atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Theron, Fabien; Renon, Geoffrey; Bidel, Yannick; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We present an original compact and robust laser system for atom interferometry based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser. Thanks to an original stabilization architecture on a saturated absorption, we obtain a frequency agile laser system allowing fast tuning of the laser frequency over 1 GHz in few ms using only a single laser source. The different laser frequencies used for atom interferometry are created by changing dynamically the frequency of the laser and by creating sidebands using a phase modulator. We take advantage of the maturity of fiber telecom technology to reduce the number of free-space optical components, which are intrinsically less stable, and to make the setup compact, much less sensitive to vibrations and thermal fluctuations. This source provides spectral linewidth below 2.5 kHz required for precision atom interferometry, and particularly for an high performance atomic inertial sensor.

  4. Twin-atom beam generation in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    dynamics of the stimulated twin-beam emission is analyzed quantitatively, and good agreement with a newly developed theoretical model is found. In analogy to a pumped gain medium in optics, the starting point of the twin-beam emission process is a population-inverted state in the transverse vibrational degree of freedom of the elongated confinement. The preparation and characterization of this source state, which resembles a Fock state of a single-particle system, is the second main result of this thesis. To reach the pumped state, we apply a purely mechanical technique, where the transverse wave function of the condensate is controlled by displacement of the anharmonic trapping potential. The precise trajectory of the trap motion is obtained from quantum optimal control theory, which has been applied to the excitation of a condensate for the first time. By time-resolved observation of the system response, excellent agreement between experiment and theory, and a near-unit efficiency of the excitation process is obtained. Also, an effective two-level description is developed, that allows to capture the dynamics in an intuitive way. The availability of quantum-correlated twin-atom beams opens up a plethora of research opportunities towards strongly entangled many-body states, enabling both fundamental experiments, and quantum-enhanced metrology techniques. (author)

  5. Narrow linewidth single laser source system for onboard atom interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Theron, Fabien; Carraz, Olivier; Renon, Geoffrey; Bidel, Yannick; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust laser system for atom interferometry based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser is presented. Thanks to an original stabilization architecture on a saturated absorption setup, we obtain a frequency-agile laser system allowing fast tuning of the laser frequency over 1 GHz in few ms using a single laser source. The different laser frequencies used for atom interferometry are generated by changing dynamically the frequency of the laser and by creating sidebands using a phase...

  6. Ion source developments for stable and radioactive ion beams at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, R; Lecesne, N; Jardin, P; Gaubert, G; Huguet, Y; Pacquet, J Y; Villari, A C C; Lecler, D; Been, T

    1999-01-01

    Since now many years, the Ganil ion source team has in charge to develop ion sources with three main purposes. The first one concerns the radioactive ion production that implies high efficiency ion sources as the amount of created exotic atoms is very low (between 10 to 108 particle per second). The second one deals with high intensities of stable metallic ion beams for the injectors of the accelerator while the last one tries to increase the intensities of very high charge state ion beams for atomic physic. Concerning radioactive ion production, the recent results obtained, in collaboration with the ISN Grenoble group, with the 1+/n+ method drove us to develop a new concept of ecr ion source for monocharged ion production. The results of the first tests of this source will be given. This new idea for the construction of ecr ion source can be applied to multicharged ion production. Concerning the high charge state ion beam production, a new source called SUPERSHYPIE has been built that allow to increase by a ...

  7. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactions of O(3P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(1D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(3P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively

  8. Transport line for beam generated by ITEP Bernas ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint research and development program is underway to investigate beam transport systems for intense steady-state ion sources for ion implanters. Two energy extremes of MeV and hundreds of eV are investigated using a modified Bernas ion source with an indirectly heated cathode. Results are presented for simulations of electrostatic systems performed to investigate the transportation of ion beams over a wide mass range: boron to decaborane

  9. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  10. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  11. Power system for the text diagnostic neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam source (DNB) has been built and installed on the Texas Experimental Tokamek (TEXT). The power supplies necessary for the 100 millisecond pulsed source operation have been built and are described in this paper. The high voltage power supply utilizing capacitor banks for energy storage is described. The suppressor, arc, filament, snubber bias, and deflection magnet supplies are described. A description of the arc notcher used to modulate the beam is given

  12. Detailed atomic modeling of Sn plasmas for the EUV source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic model of Sn plasmas is developed to calculate coefficients of radiative transfer, based on the calculated atomic data using the Hullac code. We find that the emission spectrum and conversion efficiency depend critically on the wavelength and spectral structure of the 4d-4f transition arrays. Satellite lines, which have a significant contribution to the emission, are determined after iterative calculations by changing the number of levels in the atomic model. We also correct transition wavelengths through comparison with experiments. Using the present emissivity and opacity, the radiation hydrodynamics simulation will be carried out toward the optimization of the EUV source

  13. Detailed atomic modeling of Sn plasmas for the EUV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, A.; Sunahara, A.; Nishihawra, K.; Nishikawa, T.; Koike, F.; Tanuma, H.

    2008-05-01

    An atomic model of Sn plasmas is developed to calculate coefficients of radiative transfer, based on the calculated atomic data using the Hullac code. We find that the emission spectrum and conversion efficiency depend critically on the wavelength and spectral structure of the 4d-4f transition arrays. Satellite lines, which have a significant contribution to the emission, are determined after iterative calculations by changing the number of levels in the atomic model. We also correct transition wavelengths through comparison with experiments. Using the present emissivity and opacity, the radiation hydrodynamics simulation will be carried out toward the optimization of the EUV source.

  14. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  15. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Drullinger, R. E.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable View the MathML source state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trap...

  16. Velocity Distribution of Effective Atoms in a Small Optically Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the velocity distribution of effective atoms in a small optically pumped cesium beam frequency standard has been achieved from the Fourier transforms of the experimentally recorded Ramsey patterns. The result fits well with the theoretical calculation. The second order Doppler shift correction of the small cesium atomic clock is obtained from the velocity distribution of effective atoms.

  17. Ion beams in SEM: An experiment towards a high brightness low energy spread electron impact gas ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jun, D.S.; Kutchoukov, V.G.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    A next generation ion source suitable for both high resolution focused ion beam milling and imaging applications is currently being developed. The new ion source relies on a method of which positively charged ions are extracted from a miniaturized gas chamber where neutral gas atoms become ionized b

  18. Fundamental limits on beam stability at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbit correction is now routinely performed at the few-micron level in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Three diagnostics are presently in use to measure and control both AC and DC orbit motions: broad-band turn-by-turn rf beam position monitors (BPMs), narrow-band switched heterodyne receivers, and photoemission-style x-ray beam position monitors. Each type of diagnostic has its own set of systematic error effects that place limits on the ultimate pointing stability of x-ray beams supplied to users at the APS. Limiting sources of beam motion at present are magnet power supply noise, girder vibration, and thermal timescale vacuum chamber and girder motion. This paper will investigate the present limitations on orbit correction, and will delve into the upgrades necessary to achieve true sub-micron beam stability

  19. Production of transversely cooled, spin-polarized pulse beam from a low-velocity intense source of rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experiment we studied the possibility of producing a pulsed beam for greater instantaneous beam flux, cooling the beam transversely to increase the effective beam flux and finally optical pumping to produce spin polarized atomic beam. We successfully and reliably produced a pulsed beam, and observed definite transverse cooling of the beam. We developed rather elaborate control program and interface hardware to produce the pulsed beam, and transversely cool, optically pump, and detect the atoms. We have produced the low-velocity intense source(LVIS) beam and operated it in a pulsed mode. Using an electronically controlled shutter we could load a Magneto Optical Trap(MOT) for 1 sec and launched a pulse of rubidium atoms. We performed the transverse cooling experiment using the pulses. In order to detect how the cooling is working, we used a slit to narrow down the probe beam. The probe beam had a width of 1 mm and we scanned it using a micrometer-controlled translational stage. (Cho, G.S.). 7 refs., 2 figs

  20. High voltage beam power source for high frequency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the importance of the plasma heating by high frequency electric power has increased in the research and development of nuclear fusion. There are three methods in the plasma heating by high frequency electric power, that is, electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid resonance frequency heating and ion cyclotron range of frequency heating. In all cases, the vacuum tubes requiring high voltage beam power sources are used as the high frequency electric power generator, and the typical vacuum tubes are a gyrotron in ECH, a Klystron in LHRF and a quadrupole tube in ICRF. The gyrotron is a special millimeter wave vibrating tube, while the other two are amplifying tubes, accordingly, severe specification is imposed on the stability of beam voltage and the protection function against load short circuit of the gyrotron. The typical specifications of beam power sources are shown. The vibrating characteristics of a gyrotron are dependent largely on beam voltage and anode voltage. The beam power source for a gyrotron is the type using commercial power or the output of a flywheel generator on-line, or the type making the constant voltage control of the energy accumulated in a condenser bank and supplying it to a gyrotron. The control of beam voltage and anode voltage in the beam power source for a gyrotron and the protection of a gyrotron are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  1. ITEP Bernas ion source with additional electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint research and development program is underway to develop steady-state intense ion sources for the two energy extremes of MeV and hundreds of eV. For the MeV range the investigations were focused on charge-state enhancement for ions generated by the modified Bernas ion sources. Based on the previously successful ITEP experience with the e-metal vapor vacuum arc ion source [e.g., Batalin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 1900 (2004)], the injection of a high-energy electron beam into the Bernas ion source discharge region is expected to enhance the production of high charge states. Presented here are construction details and studies of electron-beam influence on the enhancement of ion-beam charge states generated by the modified Bernas ion source

  2. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  3. Intense source of cold Rb atoms from a pure two-dimensional magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) setup for the production of a continuous collimated beam of cold 87Rb atoms out of a vapor cell. The underlying physics is purely two-dimensional cooling and trapping, which allows for a high flux of up to 6x1010 atoms/s and a small divergence of the resulting beam. We analyze the velocity distribution of the 2D MOT. The longitudinal velocity distribution of the atomic beam shows a broad feature (full width at half maximum ≅75 m/s), centered around 50 m/s. The dependence of the flux on laser intensity, on geometry of the trapping volume, and on pressure in the vapor cell was investigated in detail. The influence of the geometry of the 2D MOT on the mean velocity of the cold beam has been studied. We present a simple model for the velocity distribution of the flux based on rate equations describing the general features of our source

  4. Generation of energetic He atom beams by a pulsed positive corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-of-flight measurements were made of neutral helium atom beams extracted from a repetitive, pulsed, positive-point corona discharge. Two strong neutral peaks, one fast and one slow, were observed, accompanied by a prompt photon peak and a fast ion peak. All peaks were correlated with the pulsing of the discharge. The two types of atoms appear to be formed by different mechanisms at different stages of the corona discharge. The fast atoms had energies of 190 eV and were formed at the onset of the pulsing, approximately 0.7 μs before the maximum of the photon peak. The slow peak, composed of electronically metastable He atoms, originated 30 50 μs after the photon pulse, and possessed a nearly thermal velocity distribution. The velocity distribution was typical of an undisturbed supersonic expansion with a stagnation temperature of 131 K and a speed ratio of 3.6. Peak intensities and velocities were measured as a function of source voltage, stagnation pressure, and skimmer voltage. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. A reflex electron beam discharge as a plasma source for electron beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reflex electron beam glow discharge has been used as a plasma source for the generation of broad-area electron beams. An electron current of 120 A (12 A/cm/sup 2/) was extracted from the plasma in 10 μs pulses and accelerated to energies greater than 1 keV in the gap between two grids. The scaling of the scheme for the generation of multikiloamp high-energy beams is discussed

  6. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  7. Scattering of low-energy electrons by excited sodium atoms using a photon and electron atomic beam recoil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for measuring cross sections for the scattering of electrons by laser-excited atoms is described. It is a generalization of the atomic-beam recoil technique, taking advantage of the recoil of atoms during resonant photon interactions to spatially separate excited from nonexcited atoms. A preliminary value for the total cross section for the scattering of electrons by the 32P3/2(m/sub F/=3) state of sodium at 4.4 eV is presented

  8. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  9. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO2+ with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH+, CH2+, and CH4+ have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  10. Generation of tubular beams of negative hydrogen ions by a surface plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experiments on obtaining a tubular beam of hydrogen negative ions from a surface plasma source with emission ring slit of 100 mm diameter are described in the study. Conditions of burning of a high current ring discharge generating effectively hydrogen negative ions with current density up to 2.1 A/cm2 are investigated. The possibility of generation of intensive tubular beams of hydrogen negative ions by surface plasma sources is shown, the 2.4 A ion beam is obtained. The results of preliminary experiments on accelerating tubular beam up to 135 keV are described. Azymuthally uniform current density distribution of intensive tubular beams generated by discharges with a close electron drift in a surface plasma source with emission ring slit, absence of high-frequency oscillations in optimal conditions of sources operation as well as the possibility of the most complete use of generated by the discharge negative ions flow show the prospects of development of these sources for fast atom injectors

  11. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  12. A compact 3.5-dB squeezed light source with atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Guzhi; Chen, Bing; Guo, Jinxian; Shen, Heng; Chen, Liqing; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    We reported a compact squeezed light source consisting of an diode laser near resonant on 87Rb optical D1 transition and an warm Rubidium vapor cell. The -4dB vacuum squeezing at 795 nm via nonlinear magneto-optical rotation was observed when applying the magnetic field orthogonal to the propagation direction of the light beam. This compact squeezed light source can be potentially utilized in the quantum information protocols such as quantum repeater and memory, and quantum metrology such as atomic magnetometer.

  13. Atomic physics with high-brightness synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of atomic physics experiments that we intend to carry out at the National Synchrotron Light Source is given. Emphasis is given to work that investigates the properties of multiply charged ions. The use of a synchrotron storage ring for highly charged heavy ions is proposed as a way to produce high current beams which will make possible experiments to study the photoexcitation and ionization of multiply charged ions for the first time. Experiments along the same lines which are feasible at the proposed Advanced Light Source are considered briefly. 7 refs., 2 figs

  14. Sources of Helicity-correlated Electron Beam Asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of high current, high polarization electron beams from laser-driven GaAs photocathodes has enabled a broad program studying parity violation in electron scattering. Precision measurements of the tiny (<1 part per million) parity-violating beam-helicity asymmetry are used to study the structure of nuclei or to test the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. As these experiments grow ever more precise, asymmetric beam properties between the two beam helicity states threaten to become the leading source of experimental uncertainty.These helicity-correlated beam asymmetries are predominantly created in the conversion of circularly polarized laser light to a polarized electron beam. In recent experiments at Jefferson Lab, improved techniques for configuring the laser optics of the polarized source have been used to control beam asymmetries to such a level as to be a negligible source of systematic uncertainty. This successful result serves as a promising start for the next generation of parity-violating electron-nuclear scattering measurements, which strive to improve precision by a factor of twenty.

  15. Potential Sources of Gravitational Wave Emission and Laser Beam Interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, J. A. de Freitas

    2000-01-01

    The properties of potential gravitational wave sources like neutron stars, black holes and binary systems are reviewed, as well as the different contributions (stochastic and continuous) to the gravitational wave background. The detectability of these sources by the present generation of laser beam interferometers, which will be fully operational around 2002, is also considered.

  16. Beam tests of a 10 GHz compact ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion source for medical facilities should have characteristics of easy maintenance, low electric power, good stability and long operation time without maintenance (one year or more). The 10 GHz compact Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source with all permanent magnets has been developed 2003. The maximum mirror magnetic field on the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas injection side. The minimum B strength is 0.25 T. The size of the source is 300 mm in diameter and 290 mm in length. Details of the design and the results of preliminary beam test are reported. (author)

  17. At the Cutting Edge of Bright Beams: The NSLS Source Development Lab (432nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspired by the discoveries with synchrotron light at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and similar facilities around the world, researchers are looking for more brilliant beams of light. To develop this next-generation of light sources, accelerator physicists at the NSLS Source Development Laboratory (SDL) make use of a magnesium photocathode irradiated by ultraviolet laser light to produce electron beams of unprecedented brightness. As Murphy will describe in his talk, he and fellow researchers have developed various techniques to catch molecules and atoms in action. In one recent study, the researchers used a laser to control the pulse duration of light from a free-electron laser (FEL), a type of light source with a potential peak brightness up to one billion times higher than that of ordinary synchrotron light. In another technique, Murphy and his colleagues generated extremely short pulses of terahertz radiation that are the highest intensity of their type ever produced.

  18. Calculation of electron beam source with a variable intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation on an electron beam source with a variable intensity of the current on the output is presented. Such beams are planned to be used at surface metal treatment (casehardening). The problem of analysis and synthesis of source electromagnetic system is computerized with the use of display. When analysis is performed in calculated electromagnetic fields due to electrodes and solenoid, equation of motion for electron emission was solved. The synthesis (the choice of source optimal parameters) was realized by numerical experiment. The form of electrodes, their potentials, which produce electron beams with a cross section of 3 mm2 on output at 5A current have been found. It is shown that the variation of position of emitting electrode or of deflecting electrode potential could change twice the current on the source output

  19. Theoretical study on isotope separation of an ytterbium atomic beam by laser deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope separation by laser deflecting an atomic beam is analyzed theoretically. Interacting with a tilted one-dimensional optical molasses, an ytterbium atomic beam is split into multi-beams with different isotopes like 172Yb,173Yb, and 174Yb. By using the numerical calculation, the dependences of the splitting angle on the molasses laser intensity and detuning are studied, and the optimal parameters for the isotope separation are also investigated. Furthermore, the isotope separation efficiency and purity are estimated. Finally a new scheme for the efficient isotope separation is proposed. These findings will give a guideline for simply obtaining pure isotopes of various elements. (atomic and molecular physics)

  20. Ion source development for JT-60 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design work of the JT-60 neutral beam injection system requires two ion sources in each beam line. A low divergent ion beam of 35 A at 75 keV shall be extracted for several to ten seconds through 12 cm x 27 cm extraction grids. The corresponding ion current density is about 0.27 A/cm2 with 40% transparency. To develop ion sources of these specifications, we investigate the beam optics of the two-stage acceleration system using the 100 kV test stand. The extraction grids are made of copper disk with 83 apertures over 5 cm diam. area. The total acceleration energy ranges from 50 keV to 70 keV, and the extraction and the acceleration gap distances are changed in the range of 4.5 to 8 mm. The beam divergence is plotted as a function of perveance for a set of these parameters. We find the tendency that the minimum beam divergence is improved with the decrease of field intensity ratio f, while one must allow the decrease of optimum perveance, the perveance at which the beam divergence is minimum. When f is smaller than 0.25, where the strong lens effect is expected, we obtain the smallest beam divergence (1.0 degree), but the heat loading of the plasma and the gradient grid increases significantly above a certain perveance value. Chamfering of the aperture edge in the plasma and the gradient grid improves beam optics appreciably. The heat loading of each grid is discussed in relation to the beam optics. The maximum perveance per hole obtained is 1.3 nanopervs., where the beam energy is 70 keV and the divergence is 1.4 degree

  1. Application of cold beam of atoms and molecules for studying luminescence of oxygen atoms stimulated by metastable helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a method for creating a high flux beam of cold atoms and molecules. By using this beam method, spectroscopic studies of the afterglow of oxygen-helium gas mixtures at cryogenic temperatures were performed. The cooling by helium vapor of a helium jet containing trace amounts of oxygen after passing through a radiofrequency discharge zone led to the observation of strong emissions from atomic oxygen. The effect results from the increased efficiency of energy transfer from metastable helium atoms and molecules to the atomic oxygen in the cold dense helium vapor. The effect might find application for the detection of small quantities of impurities in helium gas as well as possible laser action

  2. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  3. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuzzi, D., E-mail: diego.marcuzzi@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Muri, M.; Chitarin, G.; Gambetta, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Pilan, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Trevisan, L.; Visentin, M.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaupa, M. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Hemsworth, R. S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2016-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design.

  4. Quasi-Bessel beams from asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Angelina; Wapler, Matthias C; Schwarz, Ulrich T; Reisacher, Markus; Holc, Katarzyna; Ambacher, Oliver; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2016-07-25

    We study the spatial intensity distribution and the self-reconstruction of quasi-Bessel beams produced from refractive axicon lenses with edge emitting laser diodes as asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources. Comparing these to a symmetric mono-mode fiber source, we find that the asymmetry results in a transition of a quasi-Bessel beam into a bow-tie shaped pattern and eventually to a line shaped profile at a larger distance along the optical axis. Furthermore, we analytically estimate and discuss the effects of astigmatism, substrate modes and non-perfect axicons. We find a good agreement between experiment, simulation and analytic considerations. Results include the derivation of a maximal axicon angle related to astigmatism of the illuminating beam, impact of laser diode beam profile imperfections like substrate modes and a longitudinal oscillation of the core intensity and radius caused by a rounded axicon tip. PMID:27464190

  5. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  6. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  7. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems

  8. Measuring the proton beam polarization from the source to RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makdisi,Y.

    2007-09-10

    Polarimeters are necessary tools for measuring the beam polarization during the acceleration process as well as a yardstick for performing spin physics experiments. In what follows, I will describe the principles of measuring the proton beam polarization and the techniques that are employed at various energies. I will present a tour of the polarimetry employed at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion collider (RHIC) polarized proton complex as it spans the full spectrum from the source to collider energies.

  9. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  10. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  11. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance

  12. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 (micro)m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance

  13. ATOMIC BEAM POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT OF THE RHIC POLARIZED H-JET TARGET.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKDISI,Y.; NASS,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; RITTER,J.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The RHIC polarized H-Jet measures the polarization of the RHIC proton beam via elastic scattering off a nuclear polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The atomic beam is produced by a dissociator, a beam forming system and sextupole magnets. Nuclear polarization is achieved by exchanging occupation numbers of hyperfine states using high frequency transitions. The polarization was measured using a modified form of a Breit-Rabi polarimeter including focusing magnets and another set of high frequency transitions. The sampling of a large part of the beam and low noise electronics made it possible to measure the polarization to a high degree of accuracy in a very short time period (1 min). Using this system, we measured no depolarization of the atomic beam due to the RF fields of the bunched proton beam. Time-of-Flight measurements were done using a fast chopper and a QMA at the position of the RHIC interaction point to determine the areal density of the atomic beam seen by the RHIC beam.

  14. Chaotic dynamics of dilute thermal atom clouds on stationary optical Bessel beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We characterize the semiclassical dynamics of dilute thermal atom clouds located in three-dimensional optical lattices generated by stationary optical Bessel beams. The dynamics of the cold atoms is explored in the quasi-Hamiltonian regime that arises using laser beams with far-off resonance detuning. Although the transverse structure of Bessel beams exhibits a complex topological structure, it is found that the longitudinal motion along the main propagation axis of the beam is the detonator of a high sensitivity of the atoms' motion to the initial conditions. This effect would not be properly described by bidimensional models. We show that an experimental implementation can be highly simplified by an analysis of the behaviour of the dynamical system under scale transformations. Experimentally feasible signatures of the chaotic dynamics of the atom clouds are also identified. (paper)

  15. Status of the hydrogen and deuterium atomic beam polarized target for NEPTUN experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandikov, N. I.; Ershov, V. P.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Kulikov, M. V.; Pilipenko, Yu. K.; Shutov, V. B.

    1995-09-01

    NEPTUN-NEPTUN-A is a polarized experiment at Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK, IHEP) with two internal targets. Status of the atomic beam polarized target that is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna is presented.

  16. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low Te plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas

  17. Simulation code for beam trajectories in an ion source 'IONORB'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer simulation code developed is for studying optimum configuration of the ion beam extraction electrodes in an ion source. It simulates ion extraction from a source plasma and acceleration through the extraction electrodes. The shape and position of the emitter are self-consistently computed so that the plasma temperature saturation current is equal to the space-charge-limitted current at the emitter. Finite ion and electron temperatures and wall sheath length between the source plasma and the electrode are considered at the emitter. The extracted ions which pass through the zero equipotential surface under the grounded electrode suffer from no space-charge-expansion because of the electron cloud. The beam divergence is thus computed on the surface. The computation is possible for both the beams from an aperture and a slot. (auth.)

  18. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Les; Hickey, Mark; Krasovitskiy, Vitaliy; Rathnayaka, Daya; Lyuksyutov, Igor; Herschbach, Dudley

    2012-10-01

    We continue the characterization of a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source. The original device was described by M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001). The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, and a shutter gate eliminate the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1--0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  19. Detail design of the beam source for the SPIDER experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuzzi, D. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Agostinetti, P., E-mail: piero.agostinetti@igi.cnr.i [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; Trevisan, L. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (PRIMA-Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated) is planned to be built at Consorzio RFX (Padova, Italy). PRIMA includes two experimental devices: a full size plasma source with low voltage extraction called SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) and a full size neutral beam injector at full beam power called MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement). SPIDER is the first experimental device to be built and operated, aiming at testing the extraction of a negative ion beam (made of H{sup -} and in a later stage D{sup -} ions) from an ITER size ion source. The main requirements of this experiment are a H{sup -}/D{sup -} current of approximately 70 A/50 A and an energy of 100 keV. This paper presents an overview of the SPIDER beam source design, with a particular focus on the main design choices, aiming at reaching the best compromise between physics, optics, thermo-mechanical, cooling, assembly and electrical requirements.

  20. Beam test of compact ECR ion source for carbon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion source for medical facilities should have characteristics of easy maintenance, low electric power, good stability and long operation time without maintenance (one year or more). Based on the proto type compact source, a 10 GHz compact ECR ion source with all permanent magnets has been developed. Peaks of the mirror magnetic field along the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas injection side, respectively, while the minimum B strength is 0.25 T. The source has a diameter of 320 mm and a length of 295 mm. The result of beam tests shows that a C4+ intensity of 530 μA was obtained under an extraction voltage of 45 kV. This paper describes the design detail and the experimental results for the new source. (author)

  1. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2008-06-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally-applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage ({approx} 8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO{sub 3} source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios {approx} 120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high energy density physics applications.

  2. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ∼ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage (∼ 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K+ ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments

  3. Magnetic focusing of cold atomic beam with a 2D array of current-carrying wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liu; Min Yun; Jianping Yin

    2006-01-01

    @@ A new scheme to realize a two-dimensional (2D) array of magnetic micro-lenses for a cold atomic beam,formed by an array of square current-carrying wires,is proposed.We calculate the spatial distributions of the magnetic fields from the array of current-carrying wires and the magnetic focusing potential for cold rubidium atoms,and study the dynamic focusing processes of cold atoms passing through the magnetic micro-lens array and its focusing properties by using Monte-Carlo simulations and trajectory tracing method.The result shows that the proposed micro-lens array can be used to focus effectively a cold atomic beam,even to load ultracold atoms or a BEC sample into a 2D optical lattice formed by blue detuned hollow beams.

  4. The beam delivery modeling and error sources analysis of beam stabilization system for lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Lihua; Hou, Liying; He, Guojun; Ren, Bingqiang; Zeng, Aijun; Huang, Huijie

    2013-12-01

    Beam stabilization system is one of the most important units for lithography, which can accomplish displacement and pointing detection and control and includes beam measurement unit(BMU) and beam steering unit(BSU). Our group has set up a beam stabilization system and verified preliminarily beam stabilization algorithm of precise control beam position and angle. In the article, we establish beam delivery mathematic model and analyze the system inherent error. This shows that the reason why image rotation effect arises at the output plane of beam stabilization is the fast steering mirror (FSM) rotation of BSU in the process of beam stabilization. Two FSMs rotation around 45o axis of FSM make the most contribution to image rotation which rotates 1.414 mrad as two FSMs rotation angle difference changes 1 mrad. It is found that error sources include three key points: FSM accuracy; measurement noise and beam translation by passing through of beam splitters changing as the ambient temperature changing. FSM accuracy leads to the maximum 13.2μm displacement error and 24.49μrad angle error. Measurement inaccuracy as a result of 5μm measurement noise results in the maximum 0.126mm displacement error and 57.2μrad angle error. Beam translation errors can be negligible if temperature is unchanged. We have achieved beam stability of about 15.5μrad for angle and 28μm for displacement (both 1σ) after correcting 2mm initial displacement deviation and 5mrad initial angle deviation with regard to the system rebuilt due to practical requirements.

  5. Beam optics optimization of a negative-ion sputter source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Osswald; R Rebmeister

    2002-11-01

    A negative-ion sputter source has been studied in order to increase the beam intensity delivered by the Vivitron tandem injector. The aim was to characterize the influence on the beam intensity of some factors related to the configuration of the source such as the shape of the target holder, the target surface topography and the anode/cathode voltage. The paper reports the results carried out by experimentation on a test facility and on the injector itself as well as the investigations performed with computer simulations.

  6. An all-solid-state laser source at 671 nm for cold atom experiments with lithium

    CERN Document Server

    Eismann, Ulrich; Canalias, Carlota; Zukauskas, Andrius; Trénec, Gérard; Vigué, Jacques; Chevy, Frédéric; Salomon, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    We present an all solid-state narrow line-width laser source emitting $670\\,\\mathrm{mW}$ output power at $671\\,\\mathrm{nm}$ delivered in a diffraction-limited beam. The source is based on a frequency-doubled diode-end-pumped ring laser operating on the ${^4F}_{3/2} \\rightarrow {^4I}_{13/2}$ transition in Nd:YVO$_4$. By using periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (ppKTP) in an external build-up cavity, doubling efficiencies of up to 86% are obtained. Tunability of the source over $100\\,\\rm GHz$ is accomplished. We demonstrate the suitability of this robust frequency-stabilized light source for laser cooling of lithium atoms. Finally a simplified design based on intra-cavity doubling is described and first results are presented.

  7. Collisions of metastable Ne*, He* atoms with ground-state He, Ne atoms studied by atomic beam and laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A crossed nozzle-beam experiment is used to investigate thermal energy collisions: Ne* (2p53s, 3P0,2) + He(1s2, 1S0), almost purely elastic, and He*(1s2s, 1,3S + Ne(2p6, 1S0), in which inelastic excitation transfers occur. State and velocity selection of the scattered Ne* atoms is performed using a tunable cw dye laser frequency locked on a definite Zeeman component of the transition 1s5 → 2p6 (λ = 614.3 nm) of 20Ne or 22Ne. In the purely elastic case, this technique allows the selection of one of the two final velocities, and then an unambiguous transformation of the differential cross section at 62 meV tallies on accords with a calculation using a single effective potential. In He* on Ne collisions, the main inelastic processes are endothermic excitation transfers from He*(21S). Experimental results obtained at different energies (62, 95, 109, 124 meV) show that the transfers essentially result in levels 3s and 4d of Ne. (orig.)

  8. RFI hydrogen beam source system for materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Radio Frequency Induction (RFI) ion source system has been designed, constructed and tested for integration as a fast rise time (≅100μsec), long pulse to CW heat source for the Sandia National Laboratories Plasma and Materials Test Facility (PMTF). The ion source system to be described is capable of producing a 40kV, 20A hydrogen beam and providing a uniform heat flux of up to 2.0 kWatt/cm/sup 2/ at targets, with areas in excess of 100cm/sup 2/, located ≅4. meters from the accelerator. An intense plasma is produced in the RFI ion source by inductive coupling of RF energy at a frequency of 1.5MHz to plasma electrons which are collisionally heated and maintain the discharge. Since no hot cathode structures are required with this plasma production techniques, source impurities are reduced and system control and reliability is enhanced. Source current density and extracted beam current is determined for a given source geometry, solely by the quantity of RF power coupled to the source. The beam current is thus controlled by the amplitude to the low level oscillator feeding the PA. Previous RFI sources we have built have been operated to extractable hydrogen or deuterium current densities of up to 500mA/cm/sup 2/ and have provided measured beam species fractions of 72/17/11% for H/sup +//H/sub 2//sup +//H/sub 3//sup +/, respectively, during 80k Volt extraction tests at LBL

  9. A miniaturized, high flux BEC source for precision atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Waldemar; Rudolph, Jan; Popp, Manuel; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Atom chips have proven to be excellent sources for the fast production of ultra-cold gases due to their outstanding performance in evaporative cooling. However, the total number of atoms has previously been limited by the small volume of their magnetic traps. To overcome this restriction, we have developed a novel loading scheme that allows us to produce Bose-Einstein condensates of a few 105 87Rb atoms every two seconds. The apparatus is designed to be operated in microgravity at the drop tower in Bremen, where even higher numbers of atoms can be achieved in the absence of any gravitational sag. Using the drop tower's catapult mode, our setup will perform atom interferometry during nine seconds in free fall. Thus, the fast loading scheme allows for interferometer sequences of up to seven seconds - interrogation times which are inaccessible for ground based devices. The QUANTUS project is supported by the German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant number DLR 50WM1131. Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Universitaet Bremen, HU Berlin, Universitaet Hamburg, Universitaet Ulm, TU Darmstadt, MPQ-Garching.

  10. Mo/Si multilayer-coated amplitude-division beam splitters for XUV radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-wavelength XUV beam splitters consisting of multilayer reflective and transmissive coatings on 3 × 3 mm and 10 × 10 mm SiN membranes have been developed and fully characterized. Amplitude-division beam splitters for XUV radiation sources have been developed and extensively characterized. Mo/Si multilayer coatings were deposited on 50 nm-thick SiN membranes. By changing the multilayer structure (periodicity, number of bilayers, etc.) the intensity of the reflected and transmitted beams were optimized for selected incident radiation parameters (wavelength, incident angle). The developed optical elements were characterized by means of XUV reflectometry and transmission measurements, atomic force microscopy and optical interferometry. Special attention was paid to the spatial homogeneity of the optical response and reflected beam wavefront distortions. Here the results of the characterization are presented and improvements required for advanced applications at XUV free-electron lasers are identified. A flatness as low as 4 nm r.m.s. on 3 × 3 mm beam splitters and 22 nm r.m.s. on 10 × 10 mm beam splitters has been obtained. The high-spatial-frequency surface roughness was about 0.7–1 nm r.m.s. The middle-spatial-frequency roughness was in the range 0.2–0.8 nm r.m.s. The reflection and transmission of the beam splitters were found to be very homogeneous, with a deviation of less than 2% across the full optical element

  11. MEMS-Based Optical Beam Steering System for Quantum Information Processing in 2D Atomic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Kim, Changsoon; Liu, Bin; Lu, Felix P.; Kim, Jungsang

    2007-01-01

    In order to provide scalability to quantum information processors utilizing trapped atoms or ions as quantum bits (qubits), the capability to address multiple individual qubits in a large array is needed. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology can be used to create a flexible and scalable optical system to direct the necessary laser beams to multiple qubit locations. We developed beam steering optics using controllable MEMS mirrors that enable one laser beam to address multiple qub...

  12. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to form metal vapors for neutral beam studies, an electron-beam heater and a power supply have been designed. The source, which measures about 30 x 50 x 70 mm, consists of a filament, accelerating plate (defined by pole pieces), and a supported target. The electrons from the filament are focused by the field penetration through a 2 mm slit in the high-voltage cage. They are then accelerated to about 5 kV to a ground plate. The electrons then follow a path in the magnetic field and strike the sample to be heated on its front surface. The assembly is attached to a water-cooled base plate. The electron beam source has produced beams of Ta and C particles with densities of about 10 to the 8th power/cu cm.

  13. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio

  14. Engineering of hydrophilic and plasmonic properties of Ag thin film by atom beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box - 10502, New Delhi, 110 067 (India); Agarwal, D.C.; Khan, S.A.; Kumar, Manish; Tripathi, A.; Singhal, R. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box - 10502, New Delhi, 110 067 (India); Panigrahi, B.K. [Material Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box - 10502, New Delhi, 110 067 (India)

    2011-12-01

    Hydrophilic Ag nanostructures were synthesized by physical vapour deposition of 5 nm Ag thin films followed by irradiation with 1.5 keV Ar atoms. Optical absorbance measurements show a characteristic surface plasmon resonance absorption band in visible region. A blue-shift in absorbance from 532 to 450 nm is observed with increasing fluence from 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 2}. Atomic force microscopy was performed for the pristine and irradiated samples to study the surface morphology. The atom beam irradiation induced sputtering and surface diffusion lead to the formation of plasmonic surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of the pristine and irradiated film indicates that metal content in the film decreases with ion fluence, which is attributed to the sputtering of Ag by Ar atoms. The contact angle measurement demonstrates the possibility of engineering the hydrophilicity by atom beam irradiation.

  15. High intensity negative proton beams from a SNICS ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past year we have been involved in a project to develop an intense (> 100μA) negative proton beam from a SNICS (Source of Negative Ions by Cesium Sputtering) ion source. This report will cover how we accomplished and exceeded this goal by more than 40%. Included in these observations will be the following: A description of an effective method for making titanium hydride cathodes. How to overcome the limitations of the titanium hydride cathode. The modification of the SNICS source to improve output; including the installation of the conical ionizer and the gas cathode. A discussion of problems including: poisoning the proton beam with oxygen, alternative gas cathode materials, the clogging of the gas inlet, long burn-in times, and limited cathode life times. Finally, how to optimize source performance when using a gas cathode, and what is the mechanism by which a gas cathode operates; facts, fantasies, or myth

  16. Localisation of beam offset jitter sources at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, J; Patecki, M; Schulte, D; Tomás, R

    2014-01-01

    For the commissioning and operation of modern particle accelerators, automated error detection and diagnostics methods are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we present two such methods, which are capable of localising sources of beam offset jitter with a combination of correlation studies and so called degree of freedom plots. The methods were applied to the ATF2 beam line at KEK, where one of the major goals is the reduction of the beam offset jitter. Results of this localisation are shown in this paper. A big advantage of the presented method is its high robustness especially to varying optics parameters. Therefore, we believe that the developed beam offset jitter localisation methods can be easily applied to other accelerators.

  17. Preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh; Yoo, Jae Gwon; Park, Seong Hee

    2000-07-01

    The preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source based on a superconducting electron accelerator is presented. The advanced quantum beams include: high power free electron lasers, monochromatic X-rays and {gamma}-rays, high-power medium-energy electrons, high-flux pulsed neutrons, and high-flux monochromatic slow positron beam. The AQBS system is being re-designed, assuming that the SPS superconducting RF cavities used for LEP at CERN will revived as a main accelerator of the AQBS system at KAERI, after the decommissioning of LEP at the end of 2000. Technical issues of using the SPS superconducting RF cavities for the AQBS project are discussed in this report. The advanced quantum beams will be used for advanced researches in science and industries.

  18. Preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source based on a superconducting electron accelerator is presented. The advanced quantum beams include: high power free electron lasers, monochromatic X-rays and γ-rays, high-power medium-energy electrons, high-flux pulsed neutrons, and high-flux monochromatic slow positron beam. The AQBS system is being re-designed, assuming that the SPS superconducting RF cavities used for LEP at CERN will revived as a main accelerator of the AQBS system at KAERI, after the decommissioning of LEP at the end of 2000. Technical issues of using the SPS superconducting RF cavities for the AQBS project are discussed in this report. The advanced quantum beams will be used for advanced researches in science and industries

  19. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roychowdhury, P., E-mail: pradipr@barc.gov.in; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  20. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10−3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source

  1. Independent individual addressing of multiple neutral atom qubits with a MEMS beam steering system

    OpenAIRE

    Knoernschild, Caleb; Zhang, Xianli L.; Isenhower, Larry; Gill, Alex T.; Lu, Felix P.; Saffman, Mark; Kim, Jungsang

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a scalable approach to addressing multiple atomic qubits for use in quantum information processing. Individually trapped 87Rb atoms in a linear array are selectively manipulated with a single laser guided by a MEMS beam steering system. Single qubit oscillations are shown on multiple sites at frequencies of ~3.5 MHz with negligible crosstalk to neighboring sites. Switching times between the central atom and its closest neighbor were measured to be 6-7 us while moving between th...

  2. Measurement of Pionic 121Sn atoms at the RI beam factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the energy spectrum of pionic 121Sn atoms by missing-mass spectroscopy of the 122Sn(d, 3He) reaction near the π − emission threshold. The measurement serves as a pilot experiment for high precision systematic spectroscopy of deeply bound pionic atoms in a new pionic Atom Factory project (piAF) at the RI beam factory (RIBF) of RIKEN. The status of the analysis is reported.

  3. Numerical Investigation Of The Bombardment Of A Graphene Sheet By A Beam Of Carbon Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Khomenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical molecular dynamics simulations of the bombardment of a graphene sheet by a beam of carbon atoms are carried out. Covalent bonds in the irradiated sample are described by the Brenner potential. The approximation of elastic balls interacting with graphene via the Lennard-Jones potential is used for particles in a beam. The influence of the energy and density of irradiating carbon atoms and of the presence of a thermostat on physical processes occurring during the collisions with the sample is investigated. Energy values of the particles in a beam, which are enough for the sample destruction, are defined.

  4. Generation of cold low divergent atomic beam of indium by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of low-energy (below 100 m/s), low divergence (without any collimation optics) pulsed indium atomic beam via ablation of thin film by direct illumination (unfocused) from the rear side with second harmonic of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser under high vacuum (∼10-5 Torr) is reported. Angular divergence of an ablated indium beam was measured for the different laser powers. Axial atomic and ionic velocities were studied as a function of laser energy per pulse using a beam deflection setup

  5. Thermionic sources for HI-brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper surveys the capabilities and limitations of modern thermionic electron sources for producing high emission density (>10 A/cm2)-high brightness beams. The emphasis is on dispenser cathodes. The capabilities of existing commercial cathodes as well as the potential for future cathode improvements as demonstrated in various prototype structures are described

  6. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  7. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  8. A two-dimensional lattice of blue detuned atom traps using a projected Gaussian beam array

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowicz, M J; Maller, K; Li, G; Zhang, S; Isenhower, L; Saffman, M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new type of blue detuned optical lattice for atom trapping which is intrinsically two dimensional, while providing three-dimensional atom localization. The lattice is insensitive to optical phase fluctuations since it does not depend on field interference between distinct optical beams. The array is created using a novel arrangement of weakly overlapping Gaussian beams that creates a two-dimensional array of dark traps which are suitable for magic trapping of ground and Rydberg states. We analyze the spatial localization that can be achieved and demonstrate trapping and detection of single Cs atoms in 6 and 49 site two-dimensional arrays.

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on atomic physics with fast heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Workshop on Atomic Physics with Fast Heavy-Ion Beams was held in the Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory on January 20 and 21, 1983. The meeting brought together approx. 50 practitioners in the field of accelerator-based atomic physics. The workshop was held to focus attention on possible areas of atomic physics research which would benefit from use of the newest generation of accelerators designed to produce intense high-quality beams of fast heavy ions. Abstracts of individual paper were prepared separately for the data base

  10. Beam quality of a non-ideal atom laser

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Jean-Félix; Guerin, William; Le Coq, Yann; Fauquembergue, Marie; Bouyer, Philippe; Josse, Vincent; Aspect, Alain

    2006-01-01

    International audience We study the propagation of a non-interacting atom laser distorted by the strong lensing effect of the Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) from which it is outcoupled. We observe a transverse structure containing caustics that vary with the density within the residing BEC. Using WKB approximation, Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral formalism and ABCD matrices, we are able to describe analytically the atom laser propagation. This allows us to characterize the quality of the non-id...

  11. Nonclassically paired photons from sources based on cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głódź, Małgorzata; Janowicz, Maciej; Kowalski, Krzysztof; Szonert, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    In this short review some essentials concerning creation and testing of nonclassically correlated photons (biphotons) are given. In the introduction we remind the role which the experimentally produced entangled states have been playing for the foundations of the quantum physics, by witnessing against the model of local hidden variables. The well established sources of biphotons are based on spontaneous parametric down conversion in nonlinear crystals. A popular source with two BBO crystals is described, which generates pairs of photons nearly maximally entangled in polarization. Crystalbased sources rely on intrinsically broadband transitions, therefore thus produced biphotons are also broadband. Additional efforts (like applying optical cavities) are needed to reach narrowband biphotons which would comply with the requirements of some implementations in the quantum communication science. The topical issue of our article is a review of another, more recent approaches based on narrowband transitions between levels in cold atoms. Such method provides naturally narrowband biphotons. First, the principles are given of an atomic source of nonclassically paired photons, which is operated in a pulsed write-read mode. Such source is based on two separated in time Raman transitions triggered successively in two Λ-schemes. Next, cw-mode sources based (mainly) on spontaneous four wave mixing process (SFWM) are presented in a generic four-level scheme. Some underlying physics is sketched and profiles of biphoton correlation functions in the time domain are explained. Among other presented SFWM sources, one proves in testing high degree entanglement of generated biphotons, both in time-frequency and polarization (hyperentanglement).

  12. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lychagin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections from methane; also the source size could be significantly larger than the incident beam diameter. We provide preliminary calculations of cooling of neutrons. These calculations show that such a source being installed at an intense source of thermal or cold neutrons like the ILL or PIK reactor or the ESS spallation source could provide the UCN density 105 cm−3, the production rate 107 UCN/s−1. Main advantages of such an UCN source include its low radiative and thermal load, relatively low cost, and convenient accessibility for any maintenance. We have carried out an experiment on cooling of thermal neutrons in a methane cavity. The data confirm the results of our calculations of the spectrum and flux of neutrons in the methane cavity.

  13. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections from methane; also the source size could be significantly larger than the incident beam diameter. We provide preliminary calculations of cooling of neutrons. These calculations show that such a source being installed at an intense source of thermal or cold neutrons like the ILL or PIK reactor or the ESS spallation source could provide the UCN density 105 cm−3, the production rate 107 UCN/s−1. Main advantages of such an UCN source include its low radiative and thermal load, relatively low cost, and convenient accessibility for any maintenance. We have carried out an experiment on cooling of thermal neutrons in a methane cavity. The data confirm the results of our calculations of the spectrum and flux of neutrons in the methane cavity

  14. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  15. Design and operation of a stable intense high-temperature arc-discharge source of hydrogen atoms and metastable trihydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a design for a stable intense beam source of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms. The basis for the design is an arc heater used first by Knuth for the generation of high-translational energy He--Ar beams. In the case of hydrogen atom generation this source is very unstable due to the corresponding higher temperatures which are generated by the plasma discharge. We have substantially eliminated these difficulties by the insertion of discharge-localizing insulators and the use of a tungsten nozzle mounted in the center of a 1-kG electromagnet. This source generates exceptionally high hydrogen atom beam intensities of approx.1022 atoms s-1 sr-1 with translational energy distribution functions which extend to 18 eV and whose peak occurs at energies as high as 13 eV. In addition metastable H3 molecules having an intensity between 1020 and 1021 molecules s-1 sr-1 are formed

  16. Setup and proof of principle of SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), a novel source of polarized H-/D- ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was the setup and the proof-of-principle of a new type of negative polarized hydrogen or deuterium ion source, which is based on the charge-exchange reaction vectorH0+Cs0→vectorH-+Cs+, as for instance the Colliding-Beams-Source (CBS) at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Juelich. In contrast to the CBS, the use of a storage cell for the charge-exchange region promises an increase in H- current by at least an order of magnitude without considerable polarization losses. For these purposes, a new laboratory was equipped and both a polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source and an intense neutral cesium-beam source have been build-on. A Lambshift polarimeter, which allows the measurement of the nuclear polarization of the atomic as well as ionic beams, was completed with the construction of a new spin-filter. After commissioning and optimizing each of these sources, a storage cell was developed and installed in the charge-exchange region with a magnetic field. Additionally, components for the extraction, detection and analysis of the negative ion beam were installed. Following the decisive proof of principle, investigation of the properties of the storage cell, especially as to H recombination and depolarisation, was begun. Furthermore, a number of software programs was developed for the control and monitoring of different components of the sources as well as a universal measuring software for the complete installation, including the measurement and calculation of the beam polarization. At the same time, the remote control system of the Cologne source of polarized ions LASCO at the FN tandem accelerator was completely modernized. (orig.)

  17. Atomic physics at the Advanced Photon Source: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Workshop on Atomic Physics at the Advanced Photon Source was held at Argonne National Laboratory on March 29--30, 1990. The unprecedented brightness of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the hard X-ray region is expected to make possible a vast array of new research opportunities for the atomic-physics community. Starting with discussions of the history and current status of the field, presentations were made on various future directions for research with hard X-rays interacting with atoms, ions, clusters, and solids. Also important were the discussions on the design and status of the four next-generation rings coming on line during the 1990's: the ALS 1.6 GeV ring at Berkeley; the ESRF 6.0-GeV ring at Grenoble (1993); the APS 7.0-GeV ring at Argonne (1995); and the SPring-8 8.0-GeV ring in Japan (1998). The participation of more than one hundred scientists from domestic as well as foreign institutions demonstrated a strong interest in this field. We plan to organize follow-up workshops in the future emphasizing specific research topics

  18. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, J Q; Wu, C F; Zhang, J W; Feng, Y Y; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam for cold atomic beam extraction. Regulated independently by the pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is $4.02\\times 10^{10}$ atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D$^+$ MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 $\\mu$W and detuning $0\\Gamma$, the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense cold cesium atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by 20 times in magnitude. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with a FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoreti...

  19. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections ...

  20. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H- ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H- beam with a peak current of 35 mA at a 6.2% duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H- beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H- beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson's equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail

  1. Energy spread of ion beams generated in multicusp ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the production of future microelectronics devices, various alternate methods are currently being considered to replace the presently used method of lithography with ion beam lithography. One of these methods is the Ion Projection Lithography (IPL), which aims at the possibility of projecting sub-0.25 μm patterns of a stencil mask onto a wafer substrate. In order to keep the chromatic aberrations below 25 nm, an ion source which delivers a beam with energy spread of less than 3 eV is desired. For this application, multicusp ion sources are being considered. We measure the longitudinal energy spread of the plasma ions by using a two-grid electrostatic energy analyzer. The energy spread of the extracted beam is measured by a high-voltage retarding-field energy analyzer. In order to obtain the transverse ion temperature, a parallel-plate scanner is being set up to study the beam emittance. In this paper, comparisons are made for different ion source configurations

  2. Characterization of the proton ion source beam for the high intensity neutrino source at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Wai-Ming

    Fermilab is considering an 8 GeV superconducting H-- linac with the primary mission of enabling 2MW beam power from the 120 GeV Fermilab Main Injector for a neutrino program. The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D program is underway to demonstrate the technical feasibility in a 30MeV prototype linac. The HINS Linac Front-end is composed of an ion source, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), a medium energy beam transport and 16 room temperature Crossbar H-type cavities that accelerate the beam to 10 MeV. The cavities are separated by superconducting solenoids enclosed in individual cryostats. Beyond 10 MeV, the design uses superconducting spoke resonators. Recently, the HINS proton ion source has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec pulsed beam with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5 Hz. The beam is transported to the RFQ by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. All beam studies are based on data taken using the wire scanner. We start with interpreting the signal measured by the wire scanner. Then, we performed a beam-calibration to the steering dipole magnets. We then study transverse motion coupling due to solenoidal field by measuring beam rotation through solenoid. Analysis to these measurements is accompanied with beam physics modeling and particle tracking simulation. Also, transverse emittance was measured using two different methods and results are compared. Finally, a bunch shape monitor will be introduced. It is a high bandwidth instrumentation device that measures the longitudinal profile of a bunched proton/H- beam. HINS will use it for its 2.5MeV beam. Operational principle

  3. Pulsed rotating supersonic source used with merged molecular beams

    OpenAIRE

    Sheffield, L.; Hickey, M.; Krasovitskiy, V.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Herschbach, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device, in...

  4. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  5. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  6. Control system for the text diagnostic neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic neutral beam source (DNB) has been designed, built, and installed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The control system, presented in this paper, coordinates the functioning of all associated subsystems necessary for neutral beam operation. These include the modulator/regulator, the capacitor bank charging system, the arc and filament supplies, the biased snubber supply, the deflection magnet supply, the suppressor switch, and the Culham vacuum system. The control system architecture is a hierarchical, decentralized, hardwired logic system designed to meet criteria of reliability, modularity, and flexibility

  7. Multiple-composition hyperthermal atomic beams formed by a laser-induced plasma for planetary environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple-composition beam with a velocity of 8 km s−1 was formed using a laser detonation source in order to simulate the physical and chemical effects of neutral gas collisions on a material in the sub-low earth orbit (LEO). A premixed target gas was applied in the laser detonation beam technique. It was found that atoms of different masses, O and Ar for Ar + O2 target gas, are accelerated to similar velocities, i.e. different translational energies. Promotion of O2 decomposition is confirmed by using a mixed gas target. It is concluded that the multiple-composition beam obtained using a mixed target gas is suitable for simulating a neutral gas environment in the sub-LEO region. (paper)

  8. High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using electron beam ion traps and advanced light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bernitt, Sven; Eberle, Sita; Hell, Natalie; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kelley, Rich; Leutenegger, Maurice; Porter, F. Scott; Rudolph, Jan; Steinbrugge, Rene; Traebert, Elmar; Crespo-Lopez-Urritia, Jose R.

    2015-08-01

    We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap coupled with a NASA/GSFC microcalorimeter spectrometer instrument to systematically address problems found in the analysis of high resolution X-ray spectra from celestial sources, and to benchmark atomic physics codes employed by high resolution spectral modeling packages. Our results include laboratory measurements of transition energies, absolute and relative electron impact excitation cross sections, charge exchange cross sections, and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths. More recently, we have coupled to the Max-Plank Institute for Nuclear Physics-Heidelberg's FLASH-EBIT electron beam ion trap to third and fourth generation advanced light sources to measure photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections, as well as, natural line widths of X-ray transitions in highly charged iron ions. Selected results will be presented.

  9. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  10. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2012-04-01

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm2 have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ~1275 °C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ≥ 1.5 mA/cm2, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, ≤0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~40 h at ~1275 °C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Finally, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  11. Generation of slow muon beam by laser resonant ionization of muonium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report first results of re-acceleration of thermal muons, which were generated by laser resonant ionization of muonium atoms. The re-accelerated beam (slow muon beam) has better energy resolution and space distribution compared to initial surface muon beam, and its use will extend the scope of muon spin relaxation technique from bulk material to thin film, multi-layers, surfaces and extremely small samples. The yield of slow muons obtained during the first beam time was 0.03 muons/s

  12. Development and Testing of Atomic Beam-Based Plasma Edge Diagnostics in the CIEMAT Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the development of plasma edge diagnostic based on atomic beam techniques fir their application in the CIEMAT fusion devices is described. The characterisation of the beams in laboratory experiments at the CSIC, together with first results in the Torsatron TJ-II are reported. Two types of beam diagnostics have been developed: a thermal (effusive) Li and a supersonic, pulsed He beams. This work has been carried out in collaboration between the institutions mentioned above under partial financial support by EURATOM. (Author) 17 refs

  13. Prospects for radiation-beam treatment of materials for atomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consideration is given to various types of radiation-beam technology (ion, plasma, ion-plasma treatments, irradiation with concentrated fluxes of energy) as well as to prospects of their use for optimization of structural and phase states of reactor materials and for surface finishing. The results of corrosion tests and structural studies are presented for fuel tubes of Eh110 and Eh635 zirconium alloys and steels ChS-68, EhJ847, EhP172, EhP450, EhP753 before and after radiation-beam treatments. It is revealed that corrosion resistance and wear resistance are enhanced due to structural changes in a subsurface layer. The advantages of radiation-beam technology are noted to be ecological safety, low power consumption, high controllability and predictability of the results of action, a possibility to vary essentially the element composition and the phase state of a surface layer, as well as to form a specified surface relief. The radiation-beam technology is shown to be promising for treatment of nuclear reactor core components operating under severe conditions

  14. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  15. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-11-15

    plasma physics group of the Technische Universitat Darmstadt initiated the development of a test stand to transport, focus and bunch rotate these beams by conventional ion optics and RF technology. The field strength of 7.5 T enabled collimation of protons with an energy of >10 MeV for the first time. In addition, the focusing capability of the solenoid provided a flux increase in the focal spot of about a factor of 174 at a distance of 40 cm from the source, compared to a beam without using the magnetic field. For a quantitative analysis of the experiment numerical simulations with the WarpRZ code were performed. The code, which was originally developed to study high current ion beams and aid in the pursuit of heavy-ion driven inertial confinement fusion, was modified to enable the use of laser-accelerated proton beams as particle source. The calculated energy-resolved beam parameters of RIS could be included, and the plasma simulation criteria were studied in detail. The geometrical boundaries of the experimental setup were used in the simulations. 2.99 x 10{sup 9} collimated protons in the energy range of 13.5{+-}1 MeV could be transported over a distance of 40 cm. In addition, 8.42 x 10{sup 9} protons in the energy range of 6.7{+-}0.2 MeV were focused into a spot of <2 mm in diameter. The transmission through the solenoid for both cases was about 18%. (orig.)

  16. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    initiated the development of a test stand to transport, focus and bunch rotate these beams by conventional ion optics and RF technology. The field strength of 7.5 T enabled collimation of protons with an energy of >10 MeV for the first time. In addition, the focusing capability of the solenoid provided a flux increase in the focal spot of about a factor of 174 at a distance of 40 cm from the source, compared to a beam without using the magnetic field. For a quantitative analysis of the experiment numerical simulations with the WarpRZ code were performed. The code, which was originally developed to study high current ion beams and aid in the pursuit of heavy-ion driven inertial confinement fusion, was modified to enable the use of laser-accelerated proton beams as particle source. The calculated energy-resolved beam parameters of RIS could be included, and the plasma simulation criteria were studied in detail. The geometrical boundaries of the experimental setup were used in the simulations. 2.99 x 109 collimated protons in the energy range of 13.5±1 MeV could be transported over a distance of 40 cm. In addition, 8.42 x 109 protons in the energy range of 6.7±0.2 MeV were focused into a spot of <2 mm in diameter. The transmission through the solenoid for both cases was about 18%. (orig.)

  17. Development of 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for Muti-charged Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion sources to make multi-charged ion beam based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) principle have played major role in the advancement of the knowledge of atomic and nuclear physics and in many areas of applied science and technology. Since the final energy of an ion beam is directly proportional to the charge of the ion during acceleration, a premium is placed on ion sources which are capable of generating very high charge state ion beams for use at accelerator-based research facilities. Recently in KAERI a 14.5 GHz ECRIS (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source) has been designed and is being fabricated to produce multi-charged ion beams for medical applications in a cyclotron. The design results, fabrication status, and future plan will be presented in this topic

  18. Analysis of laser beam propagation effects in atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the atomic laser isotope separation process, the laser beams propagate through the atomic vapor over a long distance. It has been shown that the laser-atom interactions significantly modify the laser pulse shape and propagation velocity, resulting in degradation of the isotope separation efficiency. These propagation effects have been analyzed quantitatively, and a simple scaling formula has been derived to estimate the necessary laser energy for such optically thick atomic vapor. The optimum conditions of incident laser pulse have also been discussed. (author)

  19. Compact, high power electron beam based terahertz sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedron, S. G.; Lewellen, J. W.; Milton, S. V.; Gopalsami, N.; Schneider, J. F.; Skubal, L.; Li, Y. L.; Virgo, M.; Gallerano, G. P.; Doria, A.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Spasovsky, I. P.; Office of The Director-Applied Science and Technology; Univ. of Maryland; ENEA

    2007-08-01

    Although terahertz (THz) radiation was first observed about 100 years ago, this portion of the electromagnetic spectrum at the boundary between the microwaves and the infrared has been, for a long time, rather poorly explored. This situation changed with the rapid development of coherent THz sources such as solid-state oscillators, quantum cascade lasers, optically pumped solid-state devices, and novel coherent radiator devices. These in turn have stimulated a wide variety of applications from material science to telecommunications, from biology to biomedicine. Recently, there have been two related compact coherent radiation devices invented able to produce up to megawatts of peak THz power by inducing a ballistic bunching effect on the electron beam, forcing the beam to radiate coherently. An introduction to the two systems and the corresponding output photon beam characteristics will be provided.

  20. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Stuart [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Aleksandrov, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Christopher K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Assadi, Saeed [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bartoski, Dirk [University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). Anderson Cancer Center; Blokland, Willem [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Casagrande, F. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Campisi, I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chu, C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Cousineau, Sarah M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crofford, Mark T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Danilov, Viatcheslav [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deibele, Craig E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dodson, George W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feshenko, A. [Inst. for Nuclear Research (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Galambos, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Han, Baoxi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hardek, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holmes, Jeffrey A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holtkamp, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Howell, Matthew P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jeon, D. [Inst. for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea); Kang, Yoon W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kasemir, Kay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Sang-Ho [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kravchuk, L. [Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Long, Cary D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McManamy, T. [McManamy Consulting, Inc., Middlesex, MA (United States); Pelaia, II, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Piller, Chip [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Plum, Michael A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pogge, James R. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Purcell, John David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shea, T. [European Spallation Source, Lund (Sweden); Shishlo, Andrei P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sibley, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stockli, Martin P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stout, D. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Tanke, E. [European Spallation Source, Lund (Sweden); Welton, Robert F [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Y. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Zhukov, Alexander P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  1. Cold atoms gyroscope: limits on the stability and the accuracy due to the atomic beam splitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis present the study of a cold atoms gyroscope based on atom interferometry. The interferometer used cold cesium atoms which are manipulated with stimulated Raman transitions. The improvement of the experimental setup have allowed to reach a sensitivity similar to the best optical fiber gyroscope. Especially, we characterized the performances bring about a new Raman laser design and the atom detection system. In addition, we have studied spurious phase shifts induced by the Raman interactions and have shown they are the main limitation for the long term stability and the accuracy. (author)

  2. Electron beam dynamics and design of electron beam ion-charge breeding source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a requirement to develop an electron beam ion-charge breeding source (EBIBS) to produce a highly charged and highly pure ion beam of common elements as well as rare isotopes. The EBIBS consists of an electron gun chamber, the main solenoid and ionization chamber and an electron collector chamber for attaining highly charged and pure ion beam of species. Some studies have been performed to reach appropriate design of the proposed source, The report explains certain design choices and constraints involved in developing the EBIBS. Trajectory simulation of electron beams in >5A range current has been done to determine the configuration of electrodes and magnet coils appropriate to obtain high current density electron pencil beam at the ionization region in high magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. The electron beam starts from the high pervious electron gun and dumped on the water cooled electron collector. The background pressure in the trap region should be low enough that one does not produce a significant number of ions from the background gas. An impurity value of the order of ∼5% can be tolerated, so an acceptable range of vacuum in EBIBS, 10-10 - 10-12 mbar, is assumed. Physics design of high perveance electron gun, superconducting solenoid ionization region and the electron collector has been done and is under further study to achieve superior design of the source, The mechanical design of various components and the source bench has been started also. All these developments will be presented in the conference. (author)

  3. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Prasad, R. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany); Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); ELI–Beamlines, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Science, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Andreev, A. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Vavilov State Optical Institute, 119034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Nickles, P. V. [WCU Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, University of Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS, 33405 Talence (France); Ter-Avetisyan, S. [ELI–Beamlines, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Science, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source.

  4. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source

  5. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, G; T.M. Brzozowski; R. DRULLINGER; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Toninelli, C.; Tino, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser Optics 2003: Solid State Lasers and Nonlinear Frequency Conversion, edited by Vladimir I. Ustugov abstract: We present a new laser setup suited for high precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium. The source is used for an absolute frequency measurement of the visible 5s21S0-5s5p3P1 intercombination line of strontium which is considered a possible candidate for a future optical frequency standard. The optical frequency is measured with an optical comb generator referenced to the SI t...

  6. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized 3He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem

  7. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  8. Advances with tungsten coil atomizers: Continuum source atomic absorption and emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new tungsten coil spectrometers are described: a continuum source tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer and a tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometer. Both devices use a 150 W tungsten coil extracted from a slide projector bulb. The power is provided by a computer-controlled, solid state, constant current 0-10 A supply. The heart of the optical system is a high-resolution spectrometer with a multi-channel detector. The continuum source system employs xenon or deuterium lamps, and is capable of multi-element analyses of complex samples like engine oil, urine, and polluted water. Spiked engine oil samples give mean percent recoveries of 98 ± 9, 104 ± 9, and 93 ± 0.8 for Al, V, and Ni, respectively. Copper, Zn, and Cd are determined in urine samples; while Cd, Co, Yb, and Sr are determined in water samples. Detection limits for Cd, Zn, Cu, Yb, Sr, and Co are: 8, 40, 1, 4, 1, and 4 μg l-1. The technique of tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry using a 150 W commercial projector bulb is reported for the first time. Calcium, Ba, and Sr are determined with detection limits of 0.01, 0.5, and 0.1 μg l-1. Relative standard deviations are lower than 10% in each case, and Sr is determined in two water standard reference materials

  9. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  10. Pulsed rotating supersonic source used with merged molecular beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, L; Krasovitskiy, V; Rathnayaka, K D D; Lyuksyutov, I F; Herschbach, D R

    2012-01-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device, in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1-0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ~10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ~ 10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, Cl2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when...

  11. Hybrid silicon free-space source with integrated beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doylend, J. K.; Heck, M. J. R.; Bovington, J. T.; Peters, J. D.; Davenport, M. L.; Coldren, L. A.; Bowers, J. E.

    2013-02-01

    Free-space beam steering using optical phase arrays are desirable as a means of implementing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and free-space communication links without the need for moving parts, thus alleviating vulnerabilities due to vibrations and inertial forces. Implementing such an approach in silicon photonic integrated circuits is particularly desirable in order to take advantage of established CMOS processing techniques while reducing both device size and packaging complexity. In this work we demonstrate a free-space diode laser together with beam steering implemented on-chip in a silicon photonic circuit. A waveguide phased array, surface gratings, a hybrid III-V/silicon laser and an array of hybrid III/V silicon amplifiers were fabricated on-chip in order to achieve a fully integrated steerable free-space optical source with no external optical inputs, thus eliminating the need for fiber coupling altogether. The chip was fabricated using a modified version of the hybrid silicon process developed at UCSB, with modifications in order to incorporate diodes within the waveguide layer as well as within the III-V gain layer. Beam steering across a 12° field of view with +/-0.3° accuracy and 1.8°x0.6° beam width was achieved, with background peaks suppressed 7 dB relative to the main lobe within the field of view for arbitrarily chosen beam directions.

  12. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Reheem, A M; Ahmed, M M; Abdelhamid, M M; Ashour, A H

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition. PMID:27587108

  13. Biprism electron interferometry with a single atom tip source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, G; Rembold, A; Pooch, A; Meier, S; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A; Günther, A; Chang, W T; Hwang, I S; Stibor, A

    2014-06-01

    Experiments with electron or ion matter waves require a coherent, monochromatic and long-term stable source with high brightness. These requirements are best fulfilled by single atom tip (SAT) field emitters. The performance of an iridium covered W(111) SAT is demonstrated and analyzed for electrons in a biprism interferometer. Furthermore we characterize the emission of the SAT in a separate field electron and field ion microscope and compare it with other emitter types. A new method is presented to fabricate the electrostatic charged biprism wire that separates and combines the matter wave. In contrast to other biprism interferometers the source and the biprism size are well defined within a few nanometers. The setup has direct applications in ion interferometry and Aharonov-Bohm physics. PMID:24704604

  14. Biprism Electron Interferometry with a Single Atom Tip Source

    CERN Document Server

    Schütz, Georg; Pooch, Andreas; Meier, Simon; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno; Günther, Andreas; Chang, Wei-Tse; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Stibor, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with electron or ion matter waves require a coherent, monochromatic and long-term stable source with high brightness. These requirements are best fulfilled by single atom tip (SAT) field emitters. The performance of an iridium covered W(111) SAT is demonstrated and analyzed for electrons in a biprism interferometer. Furthermore we characterize the emission of the SAT in a separate field electron and field ion microscope and compare it with other emitter types. A new method is presented to fabricate the electrostatic charged biprism wire that separates and combines the matter wave. In contrast to other biprism interferometers the source and the biprism size are well defined within a few nanometers. The setup has direct applications in ion interferometry and Aharonov-Bohm physics.

  15. Precision atomic physics techniques for nuclear physics with radioactive beams

    OpenAIRE

    Blaum, Klaus; Dilling, Jens; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics techniques for the determination of ground-state properties of radioactive isotopes are very sensitive and provide accurate masses, binding energies, Q-values, charge radii, spins, and electromagnetic moments. Many fields in nuclear physics benefit from these highly accurate numbers. They give insight into details of the nuclear structure for a better understanding of the underlying effective interactions, provide important input for studies of fundamental symmetries in physics...

  16. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  17. High flux cold Rubidium atomic beam for strongly coupled Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity QED experiments in the regime of strong coupling. A 2 $D^+$ MOT, loaded by rubidium getters in a dry film coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate of 1.5 x $10^{10}$ atoms/sec. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a 280 $\\mu$m cavity resulting in a Rabi splitting of more than +/- 10 MHz. The presence of sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling regime, with parameters (g, $\\kappa$, $\\gamma$)/2$\\pi$ equal to (7, 3, 6)/ 2$\\pi$ MHz.

  18. Production of a 'natural' metastable nozzle beam: Van der Waals Zeeman atomic levels near a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, J.-C.; Grucker, J.; Boustimi, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Vassilev, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Mainos, C.; Perales, F.; Baudon, J.; Robert, J.; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-01-01

    A method for obtaining a metastable atom beam with properties near to those of a ground state supersonic beam is demonstrated. Calculations on m sublevels of metastable argon near a metal surface are then presented.

  19. On plasma ion beam formation in the Advanced Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Plasma Source (APS) is employed for plasma ion-assisted deposition (PIAD) of optical coatings. The APS is a hot cathode dc glow discharge which emits a plasma ion beam to the deposition chamber at high vacuum (p ≲ 2 × 10−4 mbar). It is established as an industrial tool but to date no detailed information is available on plasma parameters in the process chamber. As a consequence, the details of the generation of the plasma ion beam and the reasons for variations of the properties of the deposited films are barely understood. In this paper the results obtained from Langmuir probe and retarding field energy analyzer diagnostics operated in the plasma plume of the APS are presented, where the source was operated with argon. With increasing distance to the source exit the electron density (ne) is found to drop by two orders of magnitude and the effective electron temperature (Te,eff) drops by a factor of five. The parameters close to the source region read ne ≳ 1011 cm−3 and Te,eff ≳ 10 eV. The electron distribution function exhibits a concave shape and can be described in the framework of the non-local approximation. It is revealed that an energetic ion population leaves the source region and a cold ion population in the plume is build up by charge exchange collisions with the background neutral gas. Based on the experimental data a scaling law for ion beam power is deduced, which links the control parameters of the source to the plasma parameters in the process chamber. (paper)

  20. GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitors for spallation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, G., E-mail: Gabriele.Croci@cern.ch [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”—CNR, Milan (Italy); Sez. INFN Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Claps, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati—INFN, Frascati (Italy); Caniello, R. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”—CNR, Milan (Italy); Cazzaniga, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”—CNR, Milan (Italy); Murtas, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati—INFN, Frascati (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Vassallo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”—CNR, Milan (Italy); Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Sez. INFN Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Nowak, G.; Stoermer, M. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    The development of new large area and high flux thermal neutron detectors for future neutron spallation sources, like the European Spallation Source (ESS) is motivated by the problem of {sup 3}He shortage. In the framework of the development of ESS, GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) is one of the detector technologies that are being explored as thermal neutron sensors. A first prototype of GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitor (bGEM) has been built during 2012. The bGEM is a triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with an aluminum cathode coated by 1μm thick B{sub 4}C layer used to convert thermal neutrons to charged particles through the {sup 10}B(n,{sup 7}Li)α nuclear reaction. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a bGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beamline. Beam profiles (FWHM{sub x}=31 mm and FWHM{sub y}=36 mm), bGEM thermal neutron counting efficiency (≈1%), detector stability (3.45%) and the time-of-flight spectrum of the beam were successfully measured. This prototype represents the first step towards the development of thermal neutrons detectors with efficiency larger than 50% as alternatives to {sup 3}He-based gaseous detectors.

  1. A D- surface-conversion source for neutral beam applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a surface-conversion source, using a 10 cm diameter solid barium converter, to produce D- ion beams suitable for acceleration by the ESQ accelerator. The ion temperature was found to be ∼3% of the converter bias potential. The efficiency of converting D+ to D- is as high as 4.8% but only 25% of the D- ions survived to leave the source without being stripped by the plasma or the gas molecules. Some early results from the RF discharges are promising because of their higher power efficiency and gas efficiency

  2. A computer gas cluster ion beam source at QSEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description is given for a compact ion source developed in our laboratory which can serve not only as an accelerator in a range of a few tens of kV but also as a Wiley-McLaren Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Using this new type ion source we can select a variety of desired cluster size and obtain a well collimated beam with the aide of Grid Lenses. We describe two technical details that play a key role in cluster size measurements; electrostatic lenses in a TOF system and the use of a mesh in an electrostatic optical system. (author)

  3. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  4. Confinement of ultracold atoms in a Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam created with diffractive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Sharon A; Farrar, J Tom; Akin, T G; Krzyzewski, S; Abraham, E R I

    2013-01-01

    We report 2D confinement of Rb 87 atoms in a Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam. Changing of the sign of the detuning from the atomic resonance dramatically alters the geometry of the confinement. With the laser detuned to the blue, the atoms are confined to the dark, central node of the Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. This trapping method leads to low ac Stark shifts to the atomic levels. Alternatively, by detuning the laser to the red of the resonance, we confine atoms to the high intensity outer ring in a multiply-connected, toroidal configuration. We model the confined atoms to determine azimuthal intensity variations of the trapping laser, caused by slight misalignments of the Laguerre-Gaussian mode generating optics.

  5. 12th International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion Sources and Traps and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Stefan; Baumann, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The EBIST symposia date back to 1977 and have taken place every 3 to 4 years to specifically discuss progress and exchange ideas in the design, development, applications of electron beam ion sources and traps, and the physics with highly charged ions. The topics to be covered in 2014 are: - Progress and status of EBIS/T facilities, - Atomic spectroscopy of highly charged ions, - Charge-exchange and surface interaction with highly charged ions, - Charge breeding of stable and radioactive isotopes, - Nuclear physics with highly charged ions.

  6. A=225 implantation for $^{221}$Fr source for TRIUMF atom trap

    CERN Multimedia

    The FrPNC Collaboration is mounting an atom trap for parity violation experiments and precision spectroscopy on francium atoms at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We would like to use ISOLDE's capability of simultaneously implanting A=225 (while another experiment runs online) to make a long-lived source feeding $^{221}$Fr for tests of the trap. $^{225}$Ra $\\beta$-decays to $^{225}$Ac, which then $\\alpha$-decays, producing 100 keV $^{221}$Fr t$_{1/2}$= 4.8 minute recoils. The implanted A=225 source would be shipped to TRIUMF, where it would be held for several minutes at a time a few mm from the same yttrium foil that normally receives the ISAC beam. SRIM calculations imply that 20% of the $^{221}$Fr will be implanted in a 1 cm diameter spot on the yttrium. Then the yttrium foil is moved to the trap and heated to release the Fr atoms, just as in normal ISAC online operation. A test implantation will be done at 10$^{7}$/sec production for 1 day, testing whether carbon cracking on the implantation foil in the mass separ...

  7. Laser beam propagation effects in atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of two different-color laser pulses in the resonant three-level medium is studied. The three-level Bloch-Maxwell equations are solved numerically to analyze the change of the pulse shapes and the time-varying atomic populations. The pulse delay and the pulse shape break-up are observed especially for the first excitation laser pulse. Complete separation of the two laser pulses occur from a certain critical distance. It is shown that the rapid decrease of the ionization efficiency is caused by the separation of the two laser pulses. (author)

  8. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    OpenAIRE

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-01-01

    In dieser Dissertation werden zwei komplementäre Methoden für die Laserkühlung eines magnetisch geführten, ultrakalten Atomstrahls untersucht. Kombiniert könnten diese Methoden den Ausgangspunkt für eine, möglicherweise sogar kontinuierliche, Hochdurchsatzproduktion von Bose-Einstein-Kondensaten darstellen. Als erstes wird ein Mechanismus vorgestellt, mit dem sich ultrakalte Atome aus einem magnetisch geführten Atomstrahl in eine optische Dipolfalle umladen lassen. Es wird ein kontinuierli...

  9. Plasma heating simulation in the T-11 device on the neutral atom beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the energy balance in the tokamak with injection of hot atom beams are carried out. Considered are atom ionization and capture of the produced ones as well as the transmission of energy to plasma. Energy losses on recharging are taken into account. Given are temperature dependencies on injection power, plasma density and other parameters. A possibility to obtain collisionless regime by ions is described

  10. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gao; Liu, H.; P. Xu; Tian, X.; Y Wang; Ren, J; Haibin Wu; Hong Chang

    2014-01-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques use...

  11. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  12. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, L., E-mail: neri@lns.infn.it; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund (Sweden); Galatà, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Patti, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Gozzo, A.; Lega, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Università degli Studi di Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  13. Status report on the Stockholm cryogenic electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liljeby, L.; Engstroem, A. (Manne Siegbahn Institute, S-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden (SE))

    1989-06-01

    The EBIS project in stockholm started as a collaboration between MSI and IPN in Orsay, France. Two almost identical cryogenic EBIS sources were constructed at IPN: CRYEBIS II for IPN and CRYSIS for MSI. The main difference between the two sources was that CRYEBIS II was equipped with a 50 keV electron gun as compared to 10 keV for CRYSIS. Both sources were planned to be dedicated to atomic physics experiments but during the construction plans to use CRYSIS as an injector for a storage ring evolved. Both source were completed in the beginning of 1984 and after initial tests, CRYSIS was moved to MSI in December 1984 and installed in a temporary laboratory.

  14. Numerical simulation program of multicomponent ion beam transport from ECR ion source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lei; SONG Ming-Tao; CAO Yun; ZHAO Hong-Wei; ZHANG Zi-Min; LI Xue-Qian; LI Jia-Cai

    2004-01-01

    In order to research multi-component ion beam transport process and improve transport efficiency, a special simulating program for ECR beam is becoming more and more necessary. We have developed a program written by Visual Basic to be dedicated to numerical simulation of the highly charged ion beam and to optimization of beam dynamics in transport line. In the program the exchange of electrons between highly charged ions and low chargedions or neutral atoms (residual gas in transport line) is taken into account, adopting classical molecular over-barrier model and Monte Carlo method, so the code can easily give the change of charge state distribution along the transmission line. The main advantage of the code is the ability to simultaneously simulate a large quantity of ions with different masses and charge states, and particularly, to simulate the loss of highly charged ions and the increase of low charged ions due to electron exchange in the whole transport process. Some simulations have been done to study the transmission line of LECR3[1] which is an ECR ion source for highly charged ion beam at IMP. Compared with experimental results, the simulations are considered to be successful.

  15. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  16. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  17. Low-Velocity Intense Source of Atoms from a Magneto-optical Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have produced and characterized an intense, slow, and highly collimated atomic beam extracted from a standard vapor cell magneto-optical trap (MOT).The technique used is dramatically simpler than previous methods for producing very cold atomic beams. We have created a 0.6mm diameter rubidium atomic beam with a continuous flux of 5x109/s and a pulsed flux 10times greater. Its longitudinal velocity distribution is centered at 14 m/s with a FWHM of 2.7 m/s. Through an efficient recycling process, 70% of the atoms trapped in the MOT are loaded into the atomic beam. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  19. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  20. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  1. Time-of-flight measurements in atomic beam devices using adiabatic high frequency transitions and sextupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic beam devices are frequently equipped with sextupole magnets to focus the beam or to act as spin filters in combination with RF-transitions for manipulating the hyperfine population within the atomic beam. A useful tool for the analysis of sextupole systems, the application of time-of-flight (TOF) measurements is presented. TOF measurements are enabled without mechanical beam chopper by utilizing adiabatic radio frequency transitions to select atoms within a certain time interval. This method is especially interesting for the use in atomic beam devices that are already equipped with RF-transitions and sextupole magnets and where space limitations or the required quality of the vacuum do not allow the installation of a mechanical chopper. The measurements presented here were performed with the atomic beam polarimeter of the HERMES polarized deuterium target and the results have been used to optimize the sextupole system of the polarimeter

  2. A high-performance electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi,J.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McCafferty, D.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Syndstrup, L.

    2009-06-08

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high current Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has been developed as part of a new preinjector that is under construction to replace the Tandem Van de Graaffs as the heavy ion preinjector for the RHIC and NASA experimental programs. This preinjector will produce milliampere-level currents of essentially any ion species, with q/A {ge} 1/6, in short pulses, for injection into the Booster synchrotron. In order to produce the required intensities, this EBIS uses a 10A electron gun, and an electron collector designed to handle 300 kW of pulsed electron beam power. The EBIS trap region is 1.5 m long, inside a 5T, 2m long, 8-inch bore superconducting solenoid. The source is designed to switch ion species on a pulse-to-pulse basis, at a 5 Hz repetition rate. Singly-charged ions of the appropriate species, produced external to the EBIS, are injected into the trap and confined until the desired charge state is reached via stepwise ionization by the electron beam. Ions are then extracted and matched into an RFQ, followed by a short IH Linac, for acceleration to 2 MeV/A, prior to injection into the Booster synchrotron. An overview of the preinjector is presented, along with experimental results from the prototype EBIS, where all essential requirements have already been demonstrated. Design features and status of construction of the final high intensity EBIS is also be presented.

  3. New atomic beam studies at low energies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neynaber, R.H.; Rutherford, J.A.; Vroom, D.A.

    1975-10-08

    Final cross sections have been obtained for charge transfer between the ions O/sup +/ and N/sup +/ and the neutral atoms uranium and thorium. In the course of these measurements, cross sections were also obtained for some of the other charge transfer reactions. A second task completed was the measurement of cross sections for the reaction of Al/sup +/ with molecular nitrogen and oxygen. Attempts were made to measure cross sections for other processes involving these reactants, but no measurable signals could be detected. A final set of experiments involved a search for a route for formation of H/sub 3/O/sup +/ using NO/sup +/ as a precursor. No conclusive evidence for such a process could be found in the energy range covered by the experiments. (GRA)

  4. Nonlinear dynamic response of cantilever beam tip during atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanolithography of copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the nonlinear dynamic response of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beam tip during the nanolithography of a copper (Cu) surface using a high-depth feed. The dynamic motion of the tip is modeled using a combined approach based on Newton's law and empirical observations. The cutting force is determined from experimental observations of the piling height on the Cu surface and the rotation angle of the cantilever beam tip. It is found that the piling height increases linearly with the cantilever beam carrier velocity. Furthermore, the cantilever beam tip is found to execute a saw tooth motion. Both this motion and the shear cutting force are nonlinear. The elastic modulus in the y direction is variable. Finally, the velocity of the cantilever beam tip as it traverses the specimen surface has a discrete characteristic rather than a smooth, continuous profile

  5. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  6. Generation of energetic He atom beams by a pulsed positive corona discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Shui-Yin; Lobo, Julio D.; Blumberg, Seth; Dibble, Theodore S.; Zhang, Xu; Tsao, Chun-Cheng; Okumura, Mitchio

    1997-01-01

    Time-of-flight measurements were made of neutral helium atom beams extracted from a repetitive, pulsed, positive-point corona discharge. Two strong neutral peaks, one fast and one slow, were observed, accompanied by a prompt photon peak and a fast ion peak. All peaks were correlated with the pulsing of the discharge. The two types of atoms appear to be formed by different mechanisms at different stages of the corona discharge. The fast atoms had energies of 190 eV and were formed at the onset...

  7. New diagnostic technique for Zeeman-compensated atomic beam slowing: technique and results

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, P.A.; Van Der Straten, P.; Heideman, H.G.M.; Metcalf, H.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the study of Zeeman-compensated slowing of an alkali atomic beam. Our time-of-flight technique measures the longitudinal veloc- ity distribution of the slowed atoms with a resolution below the Doppler limit of 30 cm/s. Furthermore, it can map the position and velocity distribution of atoms in either ground hyperfine level inside the solenoid without any devices inside the solenoid. The technique reveals the optical pumping ef- fects, and shows in de...

  8. An intense plane-beam ion source (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are described carried out on the cross-section of a Penning type ion source which is a prototype of the annular ion source intended for the M.M.I.I. device at the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre. It is shown that the existence or absence of a very strong concentration depends in particular on the magnetic geometry. With a suitable magnetic and electrical geometry it is possible to concentrate the discharge towards the slit and thus to increase considerably the electrical yield and the gas yield. In pulsed conditions, the current derived from this source can exceed 100 mA with a slit 20 cm long and 0.2 mm wide. The gas yield can attain 20 per cent. The main characteristics of the discharge and of the beam are examined. (authors)

  9. Optical Beam Timing Monitor Experiments at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the initial results of an experimental study of a beam timing monitor based on an optoelectronic technique. This technique uses the electrical signal from a beam position monitor to modulate the amplitude of a train of laser pulses, converting timing jitter into an amplitude jitter. This modulation is then measured with a photodetector and sampled by a fast ADC. This approach has already demonstrated sub-100fs resolution and promises even better results. Additionally, we are planning to use the technique as a way to extract the maximum possible bandwidth from a BPM, avoiding the dispersion typical of long RF cables. We show our initial results using signals from the Advanced Light Source storage ring

  10. Some results of the advanced photon source beam lifetime studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total beam lifetime consists of two components: the residual-gas-scattering lifetime and Touschek lifetime. The residual-gas lifetime is comprised of the elastic and inelastic scattering on electrons and elastic and inelastic scattering on nuclei. Touschek scattering involves scattering of particles within the bunch. One usually calculates only the elastic scattering on nuclei (single Coulomb scattering) and inelastic scattering on nuclei (bremsstrahlung) of the residual-gas-scattering lifetime component. Experience gained from computing the beam lifetime in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring shows that the electron scattering should not be neglected, particularly the inelastic contribution. Given the measured quantities from the APS storage ring, one can compare theoretical predictions with experimental results. Uncertainties in calculating the various contributions to lifetime will be discussed

  11. Application of droplet evaporation model to the expansion cooling of an atomic uranium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the technique of laser induced fluorescence to measure the velocity distribution function of an atomic uranium beam produced by evaporation from a spherical surface by electron bombardment, we have observed the phenomenon of vapour expansion cooling. Agreement between the theoretical analysis and experimental results is satisfactory. (author)

  12. Crossed molecular beam study of H and D atom reactions with NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental details and results of molecular beam studies of the reactions of H and D atoms with NO2 (with an observed isotope effect of the differential cross section) with much improved sensitivity and resolution, in good agreement with earlier results of the authors, are briefly summerized. (HK)

  13. Plasma diagnosis as a tool for the determination of the parameters of electron beam evaporation and sources of ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jaya; Dileep Kumar, V.; Yadav, S. P.; Barnwal, Tripti A.; Dikshit, Biswaranjan

    2016-07-01

    The atomic vapor generated by electron beam heating is partially ionized due to atom–atom collisions (Saha ionization) and electron impact ionization, which depend upon the source temperature and area of evaporation as compared to the area of electron beam bombardment on the target. When electron beam evaporation is carried out by inserting the target inside an insulating liner to reduce conductive heat loss, it is expected that the area of evaporation becomes significantly more than the area of electron beam bombardment on the target, resulting in reduced electron impact ionization. To assess this effect and to quantify the parameters of evaporation, such as temperature and area of evaporation, we have carried out experiments using zirconium, tin and aluminum as a target. By measuring the ion content using a Langmuir probe, in addition to measuring the atomic vapor flux at a specific height, and by combining the experimental data with theoretical expressions, we have established a method for simultaneously inferring the source temperature, evaporation area and ion fraction. This assumes significance because the temperature cannot be reliably measured by an optical pyrometer due to the wavelength dependent source emissivity and reflectivity of thin film mirrors. In addition, it also cannot be inferred from only the atomic flux data at a certain height as the area of evaporation is unknown (it can be much more than the area of electron bombardment, especially when the target is placed in a liner). Finally, the reason for the lower observed electron temperatures of the plasma for all the three cases is found to be the energy loss due to electron impact excitation of the atomic vapor during its expansion from the source.

  14. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Mark-II Ultra-Cold Jet Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Murray, J. R.; Neumann, J. J.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Kleppner, D.; Davidenko, A. M.; Grishin, V. N.

    2000-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Mark-II). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. Recently, the Jet produced a measured electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam of about 10^15 H s-1 into a 0.3 cm^2 area at the detector. This intensity corresponds to the free jet density of about 10^11 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. So far, the intensity is limited by the high insulation vacuum pressure due to the evaporation of the separation cell's helium film. The beam's angular and radial distributions were measured. A test of a new superfluid-^4He-coated parabolic mirror, attached to the separation cell, appeared to increase the beam intensity by a factor of about 3, as expected.

  15. ECR [electron cyclotron resonance] ion source beams for accelerator applications: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable, easily operated ion sources are always in demand for accelerator applications. This paper reports on a systematic study of ion-beam characterisrtics and optimization of beam quality for production of light ion beams in an ECR ion source. Of particular interest is the optimization of beam brightness (defined as ion current divided by the square of the emittance), which is typically used as a figure-of-merit for accelerator-quality beams. Other areas to be discussed include the measurement of beam emittance values, the effects of various source parameters on emittances, and scaling effects from operating the same ECR source at different frequencies. 4 refs., 4 figs

  16. Radiation forces on a three-level atom in the high-order Bessel beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zheng-Ling; Yin Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces acting on a A-configuration three-level atom in an arbitrary light field are derived by means of the optical Bloch equations based on the atomic density matrix elements, and the general properties of the average dissipative and dipole forces on a three-level atom in the linearly-polarized high-order Bessel beams (HBBs) are analysed. We find a resonant property (with two resonant peaks) of the dissipative force and a non-resonant property (with two pairs of non-resonant peaks) of the dipole force on the three-level atom, which are completely different from those on the two-level atom. Meanwhile we find a saturation effect of the average dissipative force in the HBB, which comes from the saturation of the upper-level population. Our study shows that the general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces on the three-level atom will be simplified to those of the two-level atom under the approximation of large detuning. Finally, we study the axial and azimuthal Doppler cooling of atoms in 1D optical molasses composed of two counter-propagating HBBs and discuss the azimuthal influence of the HBB on the Doppler cooling limit. We also find that the Doppler limit of atoms in the molasses HBB is slightly below the conventional Doppler limit of hг/(2кB) due to the orbital angular momentum lh of the HBB.

  17. Design and operation of a stable intense high-temperature arc-discharge source of hydrogen atoms and metastable trihydrogen molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, James F.; Kuppermann, Aron

    1986-01-01

    We report a design for a stable intense beam source of hyperthermal hydrogen atoms. The basis for the design is an arc heater used first by Knuth for the generation of high‐translational energy He–Ar beams. In the case of hydrogen atom generation this source is very unstable due to the corresponding higher temperatures which are generated by the plasma discharge. We have substantially eliminated these difficulties by the insertion of discharge‐localizing insulators and the use of a tungsten n...

  18. Atomic beam magnetic resonance apparatus for systematic measurement of hyperfine structure anomalies (Bohr-Weisskopf effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) apparatus has been constructed at Orsay, and has been installed at the CERN PS Booster ISOLDE mass separator facility for 'on-line' work with radioactive isotopes in a program to measure hyperfine structure anomalies (the Bohr-Weisskopf effect) over long isotopic chains. The hfs anomalies result from the effect of the spatial distribution of the nuclear magnetization on the atomic hfs interaction. Constructional details of the system are described: Emphasis is placed on the measurement of nuclear g-factors by a triple resonance, laser state selected, ABMR method. A precision better than 10-4 for gI values has been obtained in stable atomic beam tests, leading to hfs anomaly measurements better than 10%. Two types of detection systems are described: Laser fluorescence and surface ionization coupled with mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear effects in optical pumping of a cold and slow atomic beam

    KAUST Repository

    Porfido, N.

    2015-10-12

    By photoionizing hyperfine (HF) levels of the Cs state 62P3/2 in a slow and cold atom beam, we find how their population depends on the excitation laser power. The long time (around 180μs) spent by the slow atoms inside the resonant laser beam is large enough to enable exploration of a unique atom-light interaction regime heavily affected by time-dependent optical pumping. We demonstrate that, under such conditions, the onset of nonlinear effects in the population dynamics and optical pumping occurs at excitation laser intensities much smaller than the conventional respective saturation values. The evolution of population within the HF structure is calculated by numerical integration of the multilevel optical Bloch equations. The agreement between numerical results and experiment outcomes is excellent. All main features in the experimental findings are explained by the occurrence of “dark” and “bright” resonances leading to power-dependent branching coefficients.

  20. Beam dynamics of a liquid metal ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RMS emittance growth of liquid metal ion sources is studied. Processes included are nonlinear expansion through extractor and accelerator fringe fields, nonlinear beam space charge, plasma effects near needle, and waves (either ion-acoustic or space charge limited as considered by V.I. Dudnikov). This investigation consists of 2-D analysis of appropriate Vlasov-Poisson equations in both steady-state and time-dependent formulations. Various geometries will be considered such as some used by G. Alton of ORNL. 2 refs., 7 figs

  1. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong, E-mail: xieyh@ipp.ac.cn; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-02-15

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST.

  2. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O7+ and 1.15 emA of O6+, more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar13+, Ca13+, Fe13+, Co14+ and Kr18+, and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr26+, Xe28+, Au35+, Bi34+ and U34+ have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe36+, Au46+, Bi47+ and U48+. An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I ≥ 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams

  3. Angular correlation measurements in a thermal beam of H^* (2s) atoms using a Stern-Gerlach atomic axicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, J.; Miniatura, Ch.; Chormaic, S. Nic; Lawson-Daku, J.; Gorceix, O.; Perales, F.; Baudon, J.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of transverse magnetic gradients in Stern-Gerlach atom interferometry is to make interfere plane waves the momenta of which differ in their directions. As a result the contrast of the interference pattern produced by the longitudinal gradient is attenuated by an angular auto-correlation function in the momentum space. This effect is studied experimentally on a thermal beam of metastable H^* (2s) atoms, with a radial transverse gradient (atomic “axicon”). L'effet de gradients magnétiques transverses en interférométrie atomique de type Stern-Gerlach est de faire interférer des ondes planes ayant initialement des vecteurs d'onde différant par leurs directions. Il en résulte que, dans le signal d'interférences induit par le gradient longitudinal, le contraste est atténué par une fonction d'autocorrélation angulaire. Cet effet est étudié expérimentalement sur un jet thermique d'atomes métastables H^* (2s), dans le cas d'un gradient transverse radial (“axicon” atomique).

  4. Trapping atoms in a bottle beam generated by a diffractive optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V.; Isaacs, J.; Saffman, M.; Kemme, S. A.; Brady, G. R.; Ellis, A. R.; Wendt, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Highly excited Rydberg states have been used to demonstrate a neutral atom quantum gate, two-atom entanglement and hold promise for studies of surface potentials, such as the Casimir-Polder potential. Blue detuned Optical Bottle Beam (BoB) traps where atoms are confined in intensity minima trap both ground and Rydberg state atoms. This minimizes qubit decoherence and allows accurate measurements of the frequencies of the Rydberg transitions. We have generated optical bottle beam traps using a segmented diffractive optical element with π phase shift between the inner and outer regions. The idea for this trap follows the approach used by Ozeri, et al. Phys. Rev. A 59, R1750 (1999) but integrates the phase shift and focusing lens into a single diffractive element fabricated at Sandia National Lab. Measured profiles of the trap light intensity are compared with numerical predictions using a Fresnel diffraction code. Progress towards atom trapping in the bottle for studies of atom-surface interactions will be presented.

  5. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  6. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  7. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline. PMID:22380298

  8. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  9. Guiding ultraslow weak-light bullets with Airy beams in a coherent atomic system

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of guiding stable ultraslow weak-light bullets by using Airy beams in a cold, lifetime-broadened four-level atomic system via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We show that under EIT condition the light bullet with ultraslow propagating velocity and extremely low generation power formed by the balance between diffraction and nonlinearity in the probe field can be not only stabilized but also steered by the assisted field. In particular, when the assisted field is taken to be an Airy beam, the light bullet can be trapped into the main lobe of the Airy beam, propagate ultraslowly in longitudinal direction, accelerate in transverse directions, and move along a parabolic trajectory. We further show that the light bullet can bypass an obstacle when guided by two sequential Airy beams. A technique for generating ultraslow helical weak-light bullets is also proposed.

  10. Repetitive electron beam source for high power microwave experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact pulse transformer has been developed to operate at ∼1 Hz, producing a 100 kV, 250 ns pulse. The output pulse has a ±1% flat top for 120 ns. This pulse is coupled to an electron beam diode which uses a ferroelectric ceramic disk as the source of a high current density electron beam. A portion of the pulse (∼ 2 kV) is applied across the ferroelectric causing a rapid change in the polarization state. This change results in the emission of a high density electron cloud into an accelerating diode gap. The accelerating pulse is applied across the diode gap and the electron beam is extracted into a cylindrical drift tube. A magnetic guide field is supplied by a 5 cm diameter pulsed coil system. They have reported results from the ferroelectric ceramic as an electron source. The diode gap is adjusted between 110 mm and the anode potential is varied from 0--500 V. The emitted current is measured as a function these parameters. Current densities of 70 A/cm2 have, been measured. The Child-Langmuir current density, for 500 V applied across a 4 mm gap, is 0.2 A/cm2. These results will be summarized and compared to predictions from an analytical model that has been developed. They are planning to increase the repetition rate pulser output to 500 kV, 800 A in the near future. In addition they are attempting to modulate the emitted electron cloud by applying an RF voltage at 2.45 GHz to the diode gap. Initial results from this experiment will also be presented

  11. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/a, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  12. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D+ magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 1010 atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  13. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  14. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 °C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukachev, D. D.; Kalganova, E. S.; Sokolov, A. V.; Savchenkov, A. V.; Vishnyakova, G. A.; Golovizin, A. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N.; Sorokin, Vadim N.

    2013-04-01

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 °C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz.

  16. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Savchenkov, A V; Vishnyakova, G A; Golovizin, A A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2013-04-30

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 Degree-Sign C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  17. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a Strontium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, F; Xu, P; Tian, X; Wang, Y; Ren, J; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We measure precisely the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam with a velocity selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. By using the ultrastable laser system and narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms, the resolution of the velocity measured can be reached 0.13m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy unit. The experimental results are agreement very well with a theoretical calculation. With the spectroscopic techniques, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of $^{88}$Sr is measured by an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, which is given by 434 829 121 318(10)kHz.

  18. Monte Carlo source model for photon beam radiotherapy: photon source characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major barrier to widespread clinical implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation is the difficulty in characterizing the radiation source within a generalized source model. This work aims to develop a generalized three-component source model (target, primary collimator, flattening filter) for 6- and 18-MV photon beams that match full phase-space data (PSD). Subsource by subsource comparison of dose distributions, using either source PSD or the source model as input, allows accurate source characterization and has the potential to ease the commissioning procedure, since it is possible to obtain information about which subsource needs to be tuned. This source model is unique in that, compared to previous source models, it retains additional correlations among PS variables, which improves accuracy at nonstandard source-to-surface distances (SSDs). In our study, three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations were performed for SSDs ranging from 50 to 200 cm and for field sizes from 1x1 to 30x30 cm2 as well as a 10x10 cm2 field 5 cm off axis in each direction. The 3D dose distributions, using either full PSD or the source model as input, were compared in terms of dose-difference and distance-to-agreement. With this model, over 99% of the voxels agreed within ±1% or 1 mm for the target, within 2% or 2 mm for the primary collimator, and within ±2.5% or 2 mm for the flattening filter in all cases studied. For the dose distributions, 99% of the dose voxels agreed within 1% or 1 mm when the combined source model--including a charged particle source and the full PSD as input--was used. The accurate and general characterization of each photon source and knowledge of the subsource dose distributions should facilitate source model commissioning procedures by allowing scaling the histogram distributions representing the subsources to be tuned

  19. Some properties of atomic beam produced by laser induced ablation of Li target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed atomic beams produced in vacuum by laser induced ablation from a lithium target are analyzed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The 1-mixing processes induced in the n = 9, 10 Li Rydberg states by collisions with CO2 molecules illustrate the application of the method. Resolution is limited by the 1 mm diameter of the probe laser beam. Combining LIF and absorption measurements gives nLi as a function of time at various distances from the target surface. The investigation of the Li-C02 1-mixing process in a heat pipe oven proved impossible due to the high reactivity of Li with C02. This problem was solved by renewing the Li atoms at each laser shot. Values obtained for n = 9, n = 10 are k = 17 x 10-8 and 15 x 10-8 cc/sec, respectively

  20. Brightness limitations in multi-kiloampere electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuristic relationships such as the Lawson-Penner criterion, used to scale Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier gain and efficiency over orders of magnitude in beam current and brightness, have no fundamental basis. The brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. The design of low emittance, high current electron guns has received considerable attention at Livermore over the past few years. The measured brightnesses of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) guns are less than predicted with the EBQ gun design code; this discrepancy is due to plasma effects from the present cold, plasma cathode in the code. The EBQ code is well suited to exploring the current limits of gridless relativistic Pierce columns with moderate current density (2) at the cathode. As EBQ uses a steady-state calculation it is not amenable for study of transient phenomena at the beam head. For this purpose, a Darwin approximation code, DPC, has been written. The main component in our experimental cathode development effort is a readily modified electron gun that will allow us to test many candidate cathode materials, types and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MV/cm. 6 references, 6 figures

  1. Industrialization and production of neutral beam ion sources for MFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing LLNL designs of the 20 and 80kV deuterium fueled Neutral Beam Ion Source Modules (NBSM) have been industrialized and are being produced successfully for the MFTF. Industrialization includes value engineering, production engineering, cost reduction, fixturing, facilitation and procurement of components. Production assembly, inspection and testing is being performed in a large electronics manufacturing plant. Decades of experience in high voltage, high vacuum power tubes is being applied to the procedures and processes. Independent quality and reliability assurance criteria are being utilized. Scheduling of the various engineering, procurement and manufacturing task is performed by the use of a Critical Path Method (CPM) computer code, Innovative, computerized grid alignment methods were also designed and installed specifically for this project. New jointing and cleaning techniques were devised for the NBSMs. Traceability and cost control are also utilized

  2. Characterization of the Plasma Edge for Technique of Atomic Helium Beam in the CIEMAT Fusion Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the measurement of Electron Temperature and Density in the Boundary Plasma of TJ-II with a Supersonic Helium Beam Diagnostic and work devoted to the upgrading of this technique are described. Also, simulations of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies of level populations of electronically excited He atoms are shown. This last technique is now being installed in the CIEMAT fusion device. (Author )

  3. Beam models for radio sources. III. Offset sources and single jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early stages of radio source evolution are studied using a modified version of our previously developed approach to the twin beam model. A continuous source of energy and relativistic plasma lies within a cloud of confining gas in an active galactic nucleus. The nature of ''engine'' is not specified, but we assume an initially symmetric ejection of plasma. The boundary between the relativistic plasma and the confining medium is calculated using several approximations, and we treat the source's nondimensional reduced luminosity, its offset from the confining cloud's center, and the cloud's eccentricity as the key parameters, as the other properties of the cloud can be coupled with the engine's power to give the reduced luminosity. We conclude: sources with low energy tend to form bubbles while those with higher luminosities form jets; larger offsets increase the probability of direct jet formation; higher eccentricities provide better collimation, as do smaller offsets; even low offsets produce single jets or plasmoid streams in one direction

  4. Two experiments with cold atoms: I. Application of Bessel beams for atom optics, and II. Spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg blockade effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Ilya

    In this dissertation we report the results of two experimental projects with laser-cooled rubidium atoms: I. Application of Bessel beams for atom optics, and II. Spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg blockade effect. The first part of the thesis is devoted to the development of new elements of atom optics based on blue-detuned high-order Bessel beams. Properties of a 4thorder Bessel beam as an atomic guide were investigated for various parameters of the hollow beam, such as the detuning from an atomic resonance, size and the order of the Bessel beam. We extended its application to create more complicated interferometer-type structures by demonstrating a tunnel lock, a novel device that can split an atomic cloud, transport it, delay, and switch its propagation direction between two guides. We reported a first-time demonstration of an atomic beam switch based on the combination of two crossed Bessel beams. We achieved the 30% efficiency of the switch limited by the geometrical overlap between the cloud and the intersection volume of the two tunnels, and investigate the heating processes induced by the switch. We also showed other applications of crossed Bessel beams, such as a 3-D optical trap for atoms confined in the intersection volume of two hollow beams and a splitter of the atomic density. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to the spectroscopic measurements of the Rydberg blockade effect, a conditional suppression of Rydberg excitations depending on the state of a control atom. We assembled a narrow-linewidth, tunable, frequency stabilized laser system at 480 nm to excite laser-cooled rubidium atoms to Rydberg states with a high principal quantum number n ˜ 50 through a two-photon transition. We applied the laser system to observe the Autler-Townes splitting of the intermediate 5p3/2 state and used the broadening of the resonance features to investigate the enhancement of Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in the presence of an external electric field.

  5. A New Technique for Diagnosing Multi-charged Ion Beams Produced by ECR Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangZimin; ZhaoHongwei; CaoYun; MaLei; MaBaohua; LiJinyu; WangHui; FengYucheng; DuJunfeng

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the transmission properties of multi-charged ion beams between the ECR ion source and the analyzing magnet, a new diagnostic system composed of three Wien-filters with three single-wires has been built and installed on the IMP ECR source test bcnch. The single-wire is used to measure the beam profile and the beam density distribution, and the Wien-filter is used to measure the charge state distribution of ion beam.

  6. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Michigan Ultra-Cold Jet Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageya, T.; Blinov, B. B.; Denbow, J. M.; Kandes, M. C.; Krisch, A. D.; Kulkarni, D. A.; Lehman, M. A.; Luppov, V. G.; Morozov, V. S.; Murray, J. R.; Peters, C. C.; Raymond, R. S.; Ross, M. R.; Yonehara, K.; Borisov, N. S.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Kleppner, D.; Grishin, V. N.; Mysnik, A. L.

    2001-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Michigan Jet Target). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. The Jet produced, at the detector, a spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam with a measured intensity of about 1.7 10^15 H s-1 and a FWHM area of less than 0.13 cm^2. This intensity corresponds to a free jet density of about 1.3 10^12 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. When the transition RF unit is installed, we expect a proton polarization higher than 90%.

  7. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon. PMID:26932004

  8. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H− ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H− beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 1021 m−3, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon

  9. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  10. Study of Effect of Ion Source Energy Spread on RFQ Beam Dynamics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A

    2013-01-01

    With an upgrade to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at REX under consideration a study was launched in order to understand the effect of an increased energy spread from the ion source on the beam dynamics of the RFQ. Due to the increased electron beam potential needed to achieve the upgrade’s charge breeding specification it is expected that the energy spread of the beam will increase from today’s estimated value of approximately +-0.1%. It is shown through beam dynamics simulations that the energy spread can be increased to +-1% without significant degradation of the beam quality output by the RFQ.

  11. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; de Ruette, N; Stützel, J; Savin, D W; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of $\\sim$7.4\\% for H$^-$ at a beam energy of 10\\,keV and $\\sim$3.7\\% for C$^-$ at 28\\,keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975\\,nm and 808\\,nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2\\,kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  12. Atomic Funnel Composed of an HE11-Mode Output Hollow Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪赟; 刘南春; 印建平

    2003-01-01

    Using exact solutions of Maxwell equations based on the vector model, we calculate the diffracted near- and far-field distributions of the HEi1-mode output beam from a micron-sized hollow optical fibre under the Fresnel approximation, and compare the differences between the HE11- and LP01-mode output beams. Our study shows that it is unsuitable to calculate the diffracted near-field distribution of the hollow fibre by using weakly waveguiding approximation, and the near- and far-field intensity distributions of the HE11-mode output beam are doughnut-like, which can be used to form a simple atomic funnel as it is blue-detuned.

  13. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Bruhns, H; de Ruette, N; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; Savin, D W; Stützel, J; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ∼7.4% for H(-) at a beam energy of 10 keV and ∼3.7% for C(-) at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table. PMID:26628128

  14. OPTIMIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRON BEAM RESIST USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Sutikno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Resis negatif ma-N 2403 dan 495 K PMMA memiliki resolusi yang baik untuk aplikasi litografi berkas elektron (EBL. Ketebalanresist optimal memainkan peran penting dalam paparan berkas elektron. Oleh karena itu, dalam penelitian ini, ketebalan darikedua resist yang dioptimalkan menggunakan spincoater dalam jangkauan laju spin 1000-6000 rpm. Semakin laju spin meningkat,ketebalan resist menurun juga. Morfologi permukaan resist dikarakterisasi dengan mikroskop gaya atom. Butir butir resist nampakpanjang. Dalam analisis AFM, permukaan profil resist negatif ma-N 2403 dan 495 K PMMA nampak seperti kerucut. Negative resist ma-N 2403 and 495 K PMMA have good resolution for electron beam lithography (EBL application. The optimumresist thickness plays significant role in e-beam exposure. Therefore, in this research, thicknesses of both resists were optimizedusing spincoater within spin speeds of 1000-6000 rpm. As spin speed increased, resist thickness decreased as well. Morphology ofresist surfaces were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Grains of resist show long grains. In AFM analyses,surface profiles of negative resist ma-N 2403 and 495 K PMMA show cone peaks.Keywords: e-beam resist; spincoater; e-beam lithography

  15. Study of the properties of Ga beam from the nozzle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nozzle source, similar in principle to those used for ionized cluster beam deposition has been built and studied. The apparatus has been designed for both thin film deposition and the measurements of ion beam energy by the retarding potential method. Its unique features include a two filament electron emitter for heating a graphite crucible, which enables the control of the temperature gradient along the crucible axis. Good thermal and electrical shielding of both the crucible and the ionizer sections has been provided. The crucible is held at ground potential and its temperature is measured by a thermocouple. Multiple grid electrodes positioned in front of an ion collector help to discriminate against ion and electron background. Results obtained with Ga show the presence of energetic ions only when the crucible temperature is 1700 degree C or higher. The measured ion energies are consistent with the presence of clusters of hundreds of atoms ejected from the nozzle with thermal velocities. The current of the high energy component of the beam is only 0.1% of the total ion current and the measurement accuracy is limited by the background of charged particles present in the vacuum chamber and the accuracy of its determination limited by the background inherent in retarding potential measurements

  16. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  17. Experimental optimization of beam quality extracted from a duoplasmatron proton ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batygin, Y. K.; Draganic, I. N.; Fortgang, C. M. [LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The LANSCE accelerator facility operates with two independent ion injectors for H⁺ and H⁻ particle beams. The H⁺ ion beam is formed using a duoplasmatron source followed by a 750 keV Cockroft-Walton accelerating column. Formation of an optimal plasma meniscus is an important feature for minimizing beam emittance, and maximizing beam brightness. A series of experiments were performed to find the optimal combination of extraction voltage and extracted current for the H⁺ beam. Measurements yielded the best ratio of beam perveance to Child–Langmuir perveance of 0.52 for maximizing beam brightness.

  18. High temperature electron beam ion source for the production of single charge ions of most elements of the Periodic Table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of a high temperature electron beam ion source (HTEBIS) with a working temperature up to 2500 deg. C was developed for production of single charge ions of practically all elements. Off-line tests and on-line experiments making use of the developed ion source coupled with uranium carbide targets of different density, have been carried out. The ionization efficiency measured for stable atoms of many elements varied in the interval of 1-6%. Using the HTEBIS, the yields and on-line production efficiency of neutron rich isotopes of Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn and isotopes of heavy elements Pb, Bi, Po and some others have been determined. The revealed confinement effect of the ions produced in the narrow electron beam inside a hot ion source cavity has been discussed

  19. High temperature electron beam ion source for the production of single charge ions of most elements of the Periodic Table

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V N; Barzakh, A E; Fedorov, D V; Ivanov, V S; Moroz, F V; Orlov, S Y; Seliverstov, D M; Stroe, L; Tecchio, L B; Volkov, Y M

    2003-01-01

    A new type of a high temperature electron beam ion source (HTEBIS) with a working temperature up to 2500 deg. C was developed for production of single charge ions of practically all elements. Off-line tests and on-line experiments making use of the developed ion source coupled with uranium carbide targets of different density, have been carried out. The ionization efficiency measured for stable atoms of many elements varied in the interval of 1-6%. Using the HTEBIS, the yields and on-line production efficiency of neutron rich isotopes of Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn and isotopes of heavy elements Pb, Bi, Po and some others have been determined. The revealed confinement effect of the ions produced in the narrow electron beam inside a hot ion source cavity has been discussed.

  20. Studies of atomic processes for x-ray lasers and x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer tool for displaying Grotrian diagram of atomic energy level structure is developed, which uses computed atomic data from the HULLAC code. This tool is intended for providing atomic data of complex multiply charged ions for modeling x-ray lasers and x-ray sources. Visualization of the atomic structure using the Grotrian tool appears to be useful for identifying dominant ionization/excitation processes and emission channels in the plasma. (author)

  1. Production of fully-stripped neon beam with the ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory celebrated the 20th anniversary of the project starting-up in 1992. Ion beams themselves are being delivered since 1996. The facility is used for low energy atomic physics research, plasma investigations and for applications. There is continuous necessity to increase the quality of the produced ion beams and plasmas in order to satisfy the diversified requirements. For example high intensity, highly charged neon ion beams with very low kinetic energy (several hundred eV/nucleon) are necessary to measure some aspect of the nowadays very intensively studied physics of nano-capillaries (guiding of highly charged ions through nanocapillaries). We were motivated to measure the intensity of a fully-stripped neon ion beam (at first time in Hungary) which is impossible with natural neon due to the (always) present molecular hydrogen ions (same charge - to- mass ratio). In order to overcome this difficulty it was decided to use isotopically enriched (99.95 %) 22Ne gas. The ECR ion source operated in standard mode. The plasma was tuned for the required charge state by changing parameters like the microwave power (klystron amplified), the biased electrode (voltage and position) and the neon-gas flow. The extraction voltage was 10 kV and the analysed beam was measured by a Faraday cup. The size of the beam was defined by (10 mm x 30 mm) slits. At first the charge state distribution (CSD) of the extracted ion beam was recorded using natural neon gas when the source was tuned for 20Ne8+ in order to get a benchmark for comparison. The natural neon gas abundances of 20Ne and 22Ne are 90.48 % and 9.25 %, respectively. By measuring the CSD of both isotopes in one setting we were able to observe (likely for the first time) the so-called isotopic anomaly, well known for nitrogen and oxygen, see figure 1. The CSD for the heavier isotope is shifted to higher charges at the cost of higher losses (output) for low charge

  2. Electron-beam-ignited, high-frequency-driven vacuum ultraviolet excimer light source

    CERN Document Server

    Dandl, T; Heindl, T; Krücken, R; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    Transformation of a table-top electron beam sustained 2.45 GHz RF discharge in rare gases into a self burning discharge has been observed for increasing RF-amplitude. Thereby, the emission spectrum undergoes significant changes in a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared. A strong increase of VUV excimer emission is observed for the self burning discharge. The so called first excimer continuum, in particular, shows a drastic increase in intensity. For argon this effect results in a brilliant light source emitting near the 105 nm short wavelength cutoff of LiF windows. The appearance of a broad-band continuum in the UV and visible range as well as effects of RF excitation on the atomic line radiation and the so called third excimer continuum are briefly described.

  3. Multi-channel tunable source for atomic sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR will establish the feasibility of developing compact, robust, integrated components suitable for atomic interferometry. AdvR's design is enabled...

  4. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  5. An all-solid-state laser source at 671 nm for cold-atom experiments with lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, U.; Gerbier, F.; Canalias, C.; Zukauskas, A.; Trénec, G.; Vigué, J.; Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an all-solid-state narrow-linewidth laser source emitting 670 mW output power at 671 nm delivered in a diffraction-limited beam. The source is based on a frequency-doubled diode-end-pumped ring laser operating on the 4 F 3/2→4 I 13/2 transition in Nd:YVO4. By using periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (ppKTP) in an external buildup cavity, doubling efficiencies of up to 86% are obtained. Tunability of the source over 100 GHz is accomplished. We demonstrate the suitability of this robust frequency-stabilized light source for laser cooling of lithium atoms. Finally, a simplified design based on intra-cavity doubling is described and first results are presented.

  6. Spectroscopy and Stark-effect of Rydberg states in Ca and Sr in an atomic beam experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg states of Calcium and Strontium were excited by laser radiation in an atomic beam experiment. Such spectroscopy of the Rydberg series could be done in both elements and also the Stark effect was examined in Strontium. (BEF)

  7. Nuclear structure of light thallium isotopes as deduced from laser spectroscopy on a fast atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After optimizing the system by experiments on /sup 201,203,205/Tl, the neutron-deficient isotopes 189-193Tl have been studied using the collinear fast atom beam laser spectroscopy system at UNISOR on-line to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. A sensitive system for the measurements was developed since the light isotopes were available in mass-separated beams of only 7 x 104 to 4 x 105 atoms per second. By laser excitation of the 535 nm atomic transitions of atoms in the beam, the 6s27s 2S/sub 1/2/ and 6s26s 2P/sub 3/2/ hyperfine structures were measured, as were the isotope shifts of the 535 nm transitions. From these, the magnetic dipole moments, spectroscopic quadrupole moments and isotopic changes in mean-square charge radius were deduced. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous data. The /sup 190,192/Tl isotopes show a considerable difference in quadrupole deformations as well as an anomalous isotope shift with respect to 194Tl. A large isomer shift in 193Tl is observed implying a larger deformation in the 9/2- isomer than in the 1/2+ ground state. The /sup 189,191,193/Tl isomers show increasing deformation away from stability. A deformed shell model calculation indicates that this increase in deformation can account for the dropping of the 9/2- band in these isotopes while an increase in neutron pairing correlations, having opposite and compensating effects on the rotational moment of inertia, maintains the 9/2- strong-coupled band structure. 105 refs., 27 figs

  8. Setup and proof of principle of SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), a novel source of polarized H{sup -}/D{sup -} ions; Aufbau und Funktionsnachweis von SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), einer neuartigen Quelle polarisierter H{sup -}/D{sup -}-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R.

    2007-02-14

    The objective of this work was the setup and the proof-of-principle of a new type of negative polarized hydrogen or deuterium ion source, which is based on the charge-exchange reaction (vector)H{sup 0}+Cs{sup 0}{yields}(vector)H{sup -}+Cs{sup +}, as for instance the Colliding-Beams-Source (CBS) at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Juelich. In contrast to the CBS, the use of a storage cell for the charge-exchange region promises an increase in H{sup -} current by at least an order of magnitude without considerable polarization losses. For these purposes, a new laboratory was equipped and both a polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source and an intense neutral cesium-beam source have been build-on. A Lambshift polarimeter, which allows the measurement of the nuclear polarization of the atomic as well as ionic beams, was completed with the construction of a new spin-filter. After commissioning and optimizing each of these sources, a storage cell was developed and installed in the charge-exchange region with a magnetic field. Additionally, components for the extraction, detection and analysis of the negative ion beam were installed. Following the decisive proof of principle, investigation of the properties of the storage cell, especially as to H recombination and depolarisation, was begun. Furthermore, a number of software programs was developed for the control and monitoring of different components of the sources as well as a universal measuring software for the complete installation, including the measurement and calculation of the beam polarization. At the same time, the remote control system of the Cologne source of polarized ions LASCO at the FN tandem accelerator was completely modernized. (orig.)

  9. Diffracted field distribution from a knife-edge truncated semi- Gaussian beam as an atomic (molecular) mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Ping; Gao Wei-Jian; Yin Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the diffraction characteristics of an incident Gaussian beam cut by a straight edge bounding a semi-infinite opaque plane using Kirchhoff scalar wave theory in the Fresnel limit, and propose a new and simple mirror scheme to reflect atoms by using the intensity gradient induced by a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian laser beam. The optical potential of the diffracted light of the knife-cut semi-Gaussian beam for 85Rb atom and its spontaneous emission probability are calculated and compared with the performance of the evanescent-wave mirror. Our study shows that the optical potential of the diffracted light of the semi-Gaussian beam is far higher than that of the evanescent light wave, and the maximum normal velocity of the incident atoms can be far greater than that of the evanescent light wave under the same parameters, so the blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam, as a novel atomic mirror, can be used to efficiently reflect cold atoms with a normal velocity of greater than 1 m/s. However, the intensity gradient (force) of the diffracted light of the semi-Gaussian-beam is much smaller than that of the evanescent light wave, so its spontaneous emission probability is greater than that from the evanescent-wave when the normal velocity of incident atoms is greater.

  10. Optimized coupling of cold atoms into a fiber using a blue-detuned hollow-beam funnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigate the process of coupling cold atoms into the core of a hollow-core photonic-crystal optical fiber using a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian beam. In contrast to the use of a red-detuned Gaussian beam to couple the atoms, the blue-detuned hollow beam can confine cold atoms to the darkest regions of the beam, thereby minimizing shifts in the internal states and making the guide highly robust to heating effects. This single optical beam is used as both a funnel and a guide to maximize the number of atoms into the fiber. In the proposed experiment, Rb atoms are loaded into a magneto-optical trap (MOT) above a vertically oriented optical fiber. We observe a gravito-optical trapping effect for atoms with high orbital momentum around the trap axis, which prevents atoms from coupling to the fiber: these atoms lack the kinetic energy to escape the potential and are thus trapped in the laser funnel indefinitely. We find that by reducing the dipolar force to the point at which the trapping effect just vanishes, it is possible to optimize the coupling of atoms into the fiber. Our simulations predict that by using a low-power (2.5 mW) and far-detuned (300 GHz) Laguerre-Gaussian beam with a 20-μm-radius core hollow fiber, it is possible to couple 11% of the atoms from a MOT 9 mm away from the fiber. When the MOT is positioned farther away, coupling efficiencies over 50% can be achieved with larger core fibers.

  11. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  12. Loading of a fountain clock with an enhanced Low-Velocity Intense Source of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrev, Georgi; Weyers, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a caesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms (LVIS) [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3331 (1996)], which we modified by adding a "dark" state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of $4 \\times 10^{8}$ atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of $8.6$ m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieved a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms $N_{\\mathrm{at}}=2.9 \\times 10^6$ in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability $\\sigma_y\\left(1\\text{s}\\right)=2.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ was demonstrated.

  13. Theory for beam-plasma millimeter-wave radiation source experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on theoretical studies for millimeter-wave plasma source experiments. In the device, millimeter-wave radiation is generated in a plasma-filled waveguide driven by counter-streaming electron beams. The beams excite electron plasma waves which couple to produce radiation at twice the plasma frequency. Physics topics relevant to the high electron beam current regime are discussed

  14. H- beam emittance measurements for the penning and the asymmetric, grooved magnetron surface-plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam-intensity and emittance measurements show that the H- beam from our Penning surface-plasma source (SPS) has twice the intensity and ten times the brightness of the H- beam from an asymmetric, grooved magnetron SPS. We deduce H- ion temperatures of 5 eV for the Penning SPS and 22 eV for the asymmetric, grooved magnetron

  15. Plasma studies and beam emittance measurements of 2.45 GHz microwave ion source at VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source operating at VECC is able to produce a total beam current of ∼ 12 mA at a beam energy of 75 KeV with a microwave power of 400 W as described in. In order to optimize the performance of the ion source, we have conducted systematic studies with the variation of ion source gas flow rate, magnetic field, extraction voltage, suppressor voltage, microwave power etc. The total extracted beam current was recorded as a function of each of the earlier mentioned parameters. Moreover, we have studied the effect on extracted beam current and its transmission in the beam transport line due to dielectric and water introduction into the plasma chamber. In the best setting, we have found a total extracted beam current of 12.5 mA with a beam transmission of 70 %. Furthermore, we have also studied the extracted beam current and its transmission in the beam transport line using aluminum plasma chamber of different diameters. Finally, we have estimated the beam emittance by solenoid scan technique of a neutralized 75 KeV, 5 mA proton beam by measuring beam profile using a non-interceptive residual gas fluorescence monitor. The measured normalized rms emittance of the neutralized beam is 0.05 mm-mrad, which seems to be quite reasonable. (author)

  16. Theory of longitudinal atomic beam spin echo and parity violating Berry-phases in atoms; Theorie des longitudinalen Atomstrahl-Spinechos und paritaetsverletzende Berry-Phasen in Atomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, T.F.

    2006-07-19

    We present a nonrelativistic theory for the quantum mechanical description of longitudinal atomic beam spin echo experiments, where a beam of neutral atoms is subjected to static electric and magnetic fields. The atomic wave function is the solution of a matrix-valued Schroedinger equation and can be written as superposition of local (atomic) eigenstates of the potential matrix. The position- and time-dependent amplitude function of each eigenstate represents an atomic wave packet and can be calculated in a series expansion with a master formula that we derive. The zeroth order of this series expansion describes the adiabatic limit, whereas the higher order contributions contain the mixing of the eigenstates and the corresponding amplitude functions. We give a tutorial for the theoretical description of longitudinal atomic beam spin echo experiments and for the so-called Fahrplan model, which is a visualisation tool for the propagation of wave packets of different atomic eigenstates. As an example for the application of our theory, we study parity violating geometric (Berry-)phases. In this context, we define geometric flux densities, which for certain field configurations can be used to illustrate geometric phases in a vector diagram. Considering an example with a specific field configuration, we prove the existence of a parity violating geometric phase. (orig.)

  17. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2008-12-01

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  18. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source

  19. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y., E-mail: yangyao@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Dou, W. P.; Sun, L. T.; Yao, Q. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, Y. J.; He, Y.; Zh, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-15

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source.

  20. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Dou, W. P.; Sun, L. T.; Yao, Q. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, Y. J.; He, Y.; Zh, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source.

  1. Spatial solitons in a three-level atomic medium supported by a Laguerre-Gaussian control beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the existence and stability of various types of spatial solitons in a three-level atomic medium with Laguerre-Gaussian control beam. Radial and azimuthal modulations of the medium properties, introduced by the control beam, provide possibilities for existence of diverse soliton patterns and dynamics. Beam diffraction provides additional soliton controllability. All types of solitons can be generated at very low input energy at a few-photon level.

  2. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  3. Atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on graphene through controlled ion beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Oh, Il-Kwon; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Hyungjun; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2016-05-01

    The polymer residue generated during the graphene transfer process to the substrate tends to cause problems (e.g., a decrease in electron mobility, unwanted doping, and non-uniform deposition of the dielectric material). In this study, by using a controllable low-energy Ar+ ion beam, we cleaned the polymer residue without damaging the graphene network. HfO2 grown by atomic layer deposition on graphene cleaned using an Ar+ ion beam showed a dense uniform structure, whereas that grown on the transferred graphene (before Ar+ ion cleaning) showed a non-uniform structure. A graphene-HfO2-metal capacitor fabricated by growing 20-nm thick HfO2 on graphene exhibited a very low leakage current (graphene, whereas a similar capacitor grown using the transferred graphene showed high leakage current.

  4. Beam simulation tools for GEANT4 (and neutrino source applications)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geant4 is a tool kit developed by a collaboration of physicists and computer professionals in the High Energy Physics field for simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The motivation for the development of the Beam Tools is to extend the Geant4 applications to accelerator physics. Although there are many computer programs for beam physics simulations, Geant4 is ideal to model a beam going through material or a system with a beam line integrated to a complex detector. There are many examples in the current international High Energy Physics programs, such as studies related to a future Neutrino Factory, a Linear Collider, and a very Large Hadron Collider

  5. Controllable Asymmetric Matter-wave Beam Splitter and Ring Potential on an Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S J; Gang, S T; Anderson, D; Kim, J B

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed an asymmetric matter-wave beam splitter and a ring potential on an atom chip with Bose-Einstein condensates using radio-frequency dressing. By applying rf-field parallel to the quantization axis in the vicinity of the static trap minima added to perpendicular rf-fields, versatile controllability on the potentials is realized. Asymmetry of the rf-induced double well is manipulated without discernible displacement of the each well along horizontal and vertical direction. Formation of an isotropic ring potential on an atom chip is achieved by compensating the gradient due to gravity and inhomogeneous coupling strength. In addition, position and rotation velocity of a BEC along the ring geometry are controlled by the relative phase and the frequency difference between the rf-fields, respectively.

  6. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size,fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm.The influence of laser power on deposition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW,the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW,but with laser power increase,equal to 50 mW,the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  7. A study of the spectrum of natural dysprosium with the laser-atomic-beam technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution study of 31 transitions in dysprosium in the wavelength regions 435-470 nm and 560-670 nm has been performed using CW dye lasers and a collimated atomic beam. Transitions from the 5I8 ground state as well as from the metastable states at 4134 cm-15I7 of the 4f106s25I multiplet were studied. In this paper the results of isotope shift measurements on transitions to the excited-state configurations 4f106s6p, 4f96s25d, 4f96s5d2 are presented and values for the specific mass shift and atomic factor of the field shift for the various configurations are evaluated. (author)

  8. High momentum splitting of matter-waves by an atom chip field gradient beam-splitter

    CERN Document Server

    Machluf, Shimon; Folman, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The splitting of matter-waves into superposition states is a fundamental tool for studying the basic tenets of quantum behavior, as well as a building block for numerous technological applications. We report on the first realization of a beam-splitter by a combination of magnetic field gradients and a radio-frequency technique. It may be used for freely propagating or trapped atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate or a thermal state. It has the advantageous feature of endowing its superposition state with a large differential momentum in the direction parallel or transverse to the atoms' motion, thereby, for example enabling to open large angles. As large space-time area of an interferometer increases its sensitivity, this may be used for new kinds of interferometry experiments (e.g. large angle Sagnac interferometry). Furthermore, it is also simple to use, fast, and does not require light.

  9. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10 kHz.

  10. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; Liu, H.; Tian, X. [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J. [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); Wu, Haibin, E-mail: hbwu@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Chang, Hong, E-mail: changhong@ntsc.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Xi' an 710600 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-02-15

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of {sup 88}Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10) kHz.

  11. Noise Effects on Entangled Coherent State Generated via Atom-Field Interaction and Beam Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarbashi, G.; Mirzaei, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a controllable method for producing two and three-mode entangled coherent states (ECS's) using atom-field interaction in cavity QED and beam splitter. The generated states play central roles in linear optics, quantum computation and teleportation. We especially focus on qubit, qutrit and qufit like ECS's and investigate their entanglement by concurrence measure. Moreover, we illustrate decoherence properties of ECS's due to noisy channels, using negativity measure. At the end the effect of noise on monogamy inequality is discussed.

  12. Use of an Atmospheric Atomic Oxygen Beam for Restoration of Defaced Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Karla, Margaret; Norris, Mary Jo; Real, William A.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    An atmospheric atomic oxygen beam has been found to be effective in removing organic materials through oxidation that are typical of graffiti or other contaminant defacements which may occur to the surfaces of paintings. The technique, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is portable and was successfully used at the Carnegie Museum of Art to remove a lipstick smudge from the surface of porous paint on the Andy Warhol painting "Bathtub." This process was also evaluated for suitability to remove felt tip and ball point ink graffiti from paper, gesso on canvas and cotton canvas.

  13. Laser Ion Source Operation at the TRIUMF Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The TRIUMF Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) for radioactive ion beam production is presented, with target ion source, laser beam transport, laser system and operation. In this context aspects of titanium sapphire (TiSa) laser based RILIS and facility requirements are discussed and results from the first years of TRILIS RIB delivery are given.

  14. A Study on the Ion Beam Extraction using Duo-PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC), we have started ion beam service in the new beam utilization building since March this year. For various ion beam irradiation services, we are developed implanters such as metal (150keV/1mA), gaseous (200keV/5mA) and high current ion beam facility (20keV/150mA). One of the new one is a vertical type ion beam facility without acceleration tube (60keV/20mA) which is easy to install the sample. After the installation is complete, it is where you are studying the optimal ion beam extraction process. Detailed experimental results will be presented. Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility without acceleration tube of 60keV 20mA class was installed. We successfully extracted 60keV 20mA using Duo- PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility. Use the BPM and Faraday-cup, is being studied the optimum conditions of ion beam extraction

  15. A Study on the Ion Beam Extraction using Duo-PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sok; Lee, Chan young; Lee, Jae Sang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC), we have started ion beam service in the new beam utilization building since March this year. For various ion beam irradiation services, we are developed implanters such as metal (150keV/1mA), gaseous (200keV/5mA) and high current ion beam facility (20keV/150mA). One of the new one is a vertical type ion beam facility without acceleration tube (60keV/20mA) which is easy to install the sample. After the installation is complete, it is where you are studying the optimal ion beam extraction process. Detailed experimental results will be presented. Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility without acceleration tube of 60keV 20mA class was installed. We successfully extracted 60keV 20mA using Duo- PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility. Use the BPM and Faraday-cup, is being studied the optimum conditions of ion beam extraction.

  16. Reconstruction of Sound Source Pressures in an Enclosure Using the Phased Beam Tracing Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2009-01-01

    Source identification in an enclosure is not an easy task due to complicated wave interference and wall reflections, in particular, at mid-high frequencies. In this study, a phased beam tracing method was applied to the reconstruction of source pressures inside an enclosure at medium frequencies...... all the pressure histories at the field points, source-observer relations can be constructed in a matrix-vector form for each frequency. By multiplying the measured field data with the pseudo-inverse of the calculated transfer function, one obtains the distribution of source pressure. An omni....... First, surfaces of an extended source are divided into reasonably small segments. From each source segment, one beam is projected into the field and all emitted beams are traced. Radiated beams from the source reach array sensors after traveling various paths including the wall reflections. Collecting...

  17. The examinations on purity of ion beams emitted by plasmatic and thermoemission ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of ion beam emitted by both Nielsen's type of plasmatic ion source and source with superficial ionization was examined. Investigations were connected with a design of simplified and chapper variant of implantator without ion beam analysis in magnetic field. The measurements were carried out using an isotope electromagnetic separator in the Institute of Physics at the Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin. A considerable differentation in ion beam in respect of both ion charge and kind was observed. The impurities were caused by gases absorbed in source elements as well as by residual gases filled the apparatus. An important reason of impurities seems to be also a source ''store'' due to previous separations. The methods which enable to obtain pure ion beams of argon, nitrogen, zinc and aluminium are presented. Besides the optimum conditions for source work the pure ion beams are determined. (author)

  18. Examinations on purity of ion beams emitted by plasmatic and thermoemission ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maczka, D.; Mazur, J.; Wasiak, A. (Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland). Inst. Fizyki)

    1981-01-01

    The composition of ion beam emitted by both Nielsen's type of plasmatic ion source and source with superficial ionization was examined. Investigations were connected with a design of simplified and chapper variant of implantator without ion beam analysis in magnetic field. The measurements were carried out using an isotope electromagnetic separator in the Institute of Physics at the Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin. A considerable differentation in ion beam in respect of both ion charge and kind was observed. The impurities were caused by gases absorbed in source elements as well as by residual gases filled the apparatus. An important reason of impurities seems to be also a source ''store'' due to previous separations. The methods which enable to obtain pure ion beams of argon, nitrogen, zinc and aluminium are presented. Besides the optimum conditions for source work the pure ion beams are determined.

  19. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A

    2012-02-01

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed. PMID:22380336

  20. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

  1. Influence of the Ion-to-Atom Ratio on the Structure of CeO2 Buffer Layer by Ion Beam Assisted E-Beam Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Su; Jo, Sung Jin; Kim, Woo Jin; Koo, Won Hoe; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Se Jong

    2005-09-01

    Using ion-beam assisted e-beam evaporation with the ion beam directed at 55° to the normal of the film plane, (200) oriented CeO2 films with biaxial texture were deposited on Hastelloy C276 substrates at room temperature. The crystalline quality and in-plane orientation of films was investigated by X-ray diffraction 2θ-scan and Φ-scan, atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was shown that the in-plane and out-of-plane textures of the CeO2 films were controlled by the deposition parameters. The orientation of the films was studied as a function of ion-to-atom ratio and film thickness. The ion-to-atom ratio was varied by independently adjusting the deposition rate and the ion current density. Under optimum condition, (200) textured CeO2 films have been successfully grown on Hastelloy C276.

  2. Multiply charged ion sources for photon-ion crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intense beams of synchrotron radiation which will be available from dedicated storage rings such as the x-ray and vuv rings at the National Synchrotron Light Source allow one to contemplate experimental arrangements which can be used to investigate photon-ion interactions in the x-ray and vuv ranges. Studies of multiple charged ions of charge greater than two and their interactions with photons are of great interest because of the general lack of experimental information about the properties of ground and highly excited states of such ions and the important role some multiply charged ions play in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. Experimental arrangements which would allow the use of photons as probes of such systems would be invaluable in these studies and would help stimulate research in a thus far untouched but increasingly important area of atomic physics. Specific experimental arrangements will depend on the aspects of the interaction being studied, but in general the experiments will be technically difficult and by necessity will involve crossed ion-photon beams with concomitant small interaction rates

  3. Beam splitting mirror for advanced photon source sector 34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The insertion device beamline at APS sector 34 is intended for tandem operation of two, high brilliance, experimental stations. Each station will require only a small fraction of the total cross-sectional area of the undulator beam, allowing both to operate simultaneously without compromise. A Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXD) station will be supplied with pink beam from a horizontally reflecting, beam splitting mirror, while a Micro-Focus Diffraction (MFD) station will operate with white beam that passes beside the mirror. Use of a mirror as a beam splitter requires good thermal and mechanical stability from the mirror and its associated positioning system. The mirror substrate is liquid nitrogen cooled to minimize the thermal bump and increase its thermal conductivity. The principal motions of the mirror (2 translations, 2 rotations) are handled outside the chamber and passed into vacuum via two sets of bellows

  4. Multiple-Beam Detection of Fast Transient Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been designed for using multiple independent stations to discriminate fast transient radio sources from local anomalies, such as antenna noise or radio frequency interference (RFI). This can improve the sensitivity of incoherent detection for geographically separated stations such as the very long baseline array (VLBA), the future square kilometer array (SKA), or any other coincident observations by multiple separated receivers. The transients are short, broadband pulses of radio energy, often just a few milliseconds long, emitted by a variety of exotic astronomical phenomena. They generally represent rare, high-energy events making them of great scientific value. For RFI-robust adaptive detection of transients, using multiple stations, a family of algorithms has been developed. The technique exploits the fact that the separated stations constitute statistically independent samples of the target. This can be used to adaptively ignore RFI events for superior sensitivity. If the antenna signals are independent and identically distributed (IID), then RFI events are simply outlier data points that can be removed through robust estimation such as a trimmed or Winsorized estimator. The alternative "trimmed" estimator is considered, which excises the strongest n signals from the list of short-beamed intensities. Because local RFI is independent at each antenna, this interference is unlikely to occur at many antennas on the same step. Trimming the strongest signals provides robustness to RFI that can theoretically outperform even the detection performance of the same number of antennas at a single site. This algorithm requires sorting the signals at each time step and dispersion measure, an operation that is computationally tractable for existing array sizes. An alternative uses the various stations to form an ensemble estimate of the conditional density function (CDF) evaluated at each time step. Both methods outperform standard detection strategies on a test

  5. Development of beam expander system using non-linear beam optics at J-PARC spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Japanese Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), proton beam with a high power such as 1 MW is induced to the target consisted of mercury. As increasing in the beam power, the damage of the target becomes serious. Especially for a target for high power short pulse spallation neutron source, the damage due to the proton beam on the target vessel for liquid metal target such as mercury is reported to be proportional of 4th power of the peak intensity of the proton beam. Reduction of the peak current density at the target is a key for a constant beam operation. For reduction of the peak current density, a non-linear beam optics using octupole magnets has been developed. In order to achieve completely flat distribution, higher order magnets than the octupole are required. It was found that a considerable flat distribution can be obtained by only using octupole magnets with reduction of the magnetic field. By using the present beam expander system, the peak current density can be reduced as much as 40%, which mitigates 90% of the pitting damage at the target. (author)

  6. Development of Multiple Beam Guns for High Power RF Sources for Accelerators and Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need for high power RF sources for the next generation of accelerators and colliders. Sources that operate at reduced beam voltage allow solid state power supplies with significant cost reduction over conventional pulse modulators. Multiple beam RF sources provide reduced beam voltage by using a multiplicity of beamlets that traverse the RF circuit through individual beam tunnels, reducing the space charge forces that drive the voltage requirement. The current generation of multiple beam devices typically use Brillouin focusing, which limits high power operation. The devices reported here utilize confined flow focusing which allows much tighter control of the electron beamlets and consequently, higher power operation. Progress in the development of a 100 MW multiple beam electron gun with confined flow focusing is reported

  7. Design of a neutrino source based on beta beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildner, E.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Stora, T.; Mendonca, T. Melo; Vlachoudis, V.; Bouquerel, E.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophime, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Chancé, A.; Payet, J.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Mezzetto, M.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Hass, M.; Berkovits, D.; Stahl, A.; Schaumann, M.; Wehner, J.

    2014-07-01

    "Beta beams" produce collimated pure electron (anti)neutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a racetrack shaped storage ring of 7 km circumference, the decay ring. EUROnu beta beams are based on CERN infrastructures and existing machines. Using existing machines may be an advantage for the cost evaluation, but will also constrain the physics performance. The isotope pair of choice for the beta beam is He6 and Ne18. However, before the EUROnu studies one of the required isotopes, Ne18, could not be produced in rates that satisfy the needs for physics of the beta beam. Therefore, studies of alternative beta emitters, Li8 and B8, with properties interesting for a beta beam have been proposed and have been studied within EUROnu. These alternative isotopes could be produced by using a small storage ring, in which the beam traverses a target, creating the Li8 and B8 isotopes. This production ring, the injection linac and the target system have been evaluated. Measurements of the cross section of the reactions to produce the beta beam isotopes show interesting results. A device to collect the produced isotopes from the target has been developed and tested. However, the yields of Li8 and B8, using the production ring for production of Li8 and B8, is not yet, according to simulations, giving the rates of isotopes that would be needed. Therefore, a new method of producing the Ne18 isotope has been developed and tested giving good production rates. A 60 GHz ECRIS prototype, the first in the world, was developed and tested for ion production with contributions from EUROnu. The decay ring lattices for the Li8 and B8 have been developed and the lattice for He6 and Ne18 has been optimized to ensure the high intensity ion beam stability.

  8. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H- beam formation and transport (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as dc discharge-driven and rf-driven multicusp sources, Penning-type, and electron cyclotron resonance-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber, and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed, ionization mechanism, beam formation, and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  9. An atomic force microscope tip as a light source

    OpenAIRE

    Lulevich, V.; Honig, Christopher D. F.; Ducker, William A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple method for causing the end of a silicon nitride atomic force microscope (AFM) tip to emit light, and we use this emitted light to perform scanning near-field optical microscopy. Illumination of a silicon nitride AFM tip by blue (488 nm) or green (532 nm) laser light causes the sharp part of the tip to emit orange light. Orange light is emitted when the tip is immersed in either air or water; and while under illumination, emission continues for a period of many hours withou...

  10. Average Dissipative and Dipole Forces on a Three-Level Atom in a Laguerre-Gaussian Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-Ling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ By means of the optical Bloch equations based on the atomic density matrix elements, the general expressions of the average dissipative force, dipole force and the mechanical torque acting on a A-configuration three-level atom in a linearly-polarized Laguerre-Gaussian beam (LGB) with an angular momentum of lh are derived, and the general properties of the average dissipative and dipole force on the three-level atom in the linearly-polarized LGB are analysed. We find a resonant property (with two resonant peaks) of the dissipative force and a non-resonant property (with two pairs of non-resonant peaks) of the dipole force on the three-level atom, which are completely different from those on the two-level atom. Our study also shows that all of general expressions on the three-level atom will be simplified to those on the two-level atom in the approximation of large detuning.

  11. Laser ion source: A direct plasma injection scheme for two-beam type interdigital-H radio frequency quadrupole linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a laser ion source using a direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) as an injection system for a two-beam type radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac with an interdigital-H (IH) type cavity. The laser ion source in the DPIS is directly connected to the RFQ cavity without the low energy beam transport system. We achieved a high current C2+ beam above 60 mA per beam channel from the ion source. The beam will be injected to the two-beam type IH-RFQ linac, and the linac will generate a beam current of approximately 44 mA per beam channel.

  12. Studies of atomic processes for x-ray lasers and x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated system of computational atomic database for spectroscopic investigation of x-ray lasers and x-ray sources is developed. The system consists of atomic data codes, database, a collisional radiative code, and programs for visualizing spectrum. Gain of Ni-like La laser is analyzed using the model. Furthermore, EUV spectrum from Xe is investigated, to identify measured transition arrays in 10 nm to 16 nm for the EUV light source. (author)

  13. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2–3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation

  14. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, L., E-mail: xialiansheng@caep.cn; Zhang, H.; Yang, A.; Shen, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J. [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2–3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation.

  15. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, H.; Yang, A.; Shen, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J.

    2014-06-01

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2-3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation.

  16. Characterization of volume type ion source for $p$, $H_2^+$ and $H_3^+$ beams

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there is an increasing need for $H_{2}^+$ and $H_{3}^+$ ion sources. One example are ion therapy facilities, where $C^{4+}$ and $H_{3}^+$ ion beams along the linac are of great interest. Another example is a $H_{2}^+$ test beam for linacs finally operated with intense deuteron beams. At Frankfurt, a simple proton ion source is needed to test a new kind of beam injection into a magnetic storage ring\\cite{EPAC08}\\cite{EPAC06}. This article describes a volume type ion source which can deliver upto $3.05~mA$ beam current at $10~keV$ in stable dc operation. It is a hot filament driven ion source which can provide high fractions of $p$, $H_{2}^+$ or $H_{3}^+$, depending on the operation settings.

  17. Research on multi-pulsed intensive electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is involved in multi-pulsed emission characteristics of some cathodes while generating intensive relativistic electron beams. Research results indicate that the velvet, the carbon fiber and the dispenser cathode all have the ability to generate a few kilo-ampere multi-pulsed beams with brightness better than 3 x 107 A/(m·rad)2. And some new cathodes such as carbon nano-tubes and nano-diamond film also can generate a few kilo-ampere multi-pulsed electron beams. Because of the cold field emission, the beams generated by the carbon nano-tubes and the nano-diamond film are expected to be higher brightness. Some experimental results of above cathodes are present and some suggestion for farther work is also proposed. (authors)

  18. A method for elemental analysis of bones by recoiling atoms in heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution is the first attempt to analyse the elemental composition of bones by the recoil atoms in heavy ion beams. The aim of this study was to observe differences in light elements depth gradients, concentrations and ratios (P/Ca, Mg/Ca, N/Ca, Li/Ca) of different human femoral bone compartment: cortical bone (C sample) and trabecular (T sample) bone. The differences could be linked to the function of these areas. An interesting feature concerning lithium has to be pointed out. Lithium continues to be a substance of interest as a potential therapeutic agent in a number of blood disorders as well as a very effective experimental agent to understand the basic biochemical and pharmacological properties that regulate cellular proliferation and differentiation. The first method of analysing and profiling of light elements by recoil atoms in heavy ion beams by using an ionization ΔE, E ionization chamber, was described in a previous paper. In this paper a 32 S beam accelerated at the Van de Graaff Tandem Accelerator was used. Further developing of this method has been presented. It was shown that the monitoring problem can be solved by using beams of ion substantially heavier than the sample to be analysed. For the analysis of bones an 127 I beam has been used. The ΔE,E ionization chamber has been built according to a recent patent. By introducing a getter in the compartment 7 of the chamber one could work in conditions of high purity of the gas inside the chamber. The entrance window of the chamber was made of mylar 2 μm thick. Very good stability of the chamber has been obtained over long runs, ∼ 5 hours, in conditions of closed circuit of the gas. Results are presented. In conclusion: 1) A large difference between the normal sample N and the osteoporotic samples T and C for the Mg/Ca ratio has been found; 2) A very high concentration of Li was observed in the T sample. (authors)

  19. Selective atomic layer deposition with electron-beam patterned self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors selectively deposited nanolines of titanium oxide (TiO2) through atomic layer deposition (ALD) using an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a nucleation inhibition layer. Electron-beam (e-beam) patterning is used to prepare nanoline patterns in the OTS SAM on SiO2/Si substrates suitable for selective ALD. The authors have investigated the effect of an e-beam dose on the pattern width of the selectively deposited TiO2 lines. A high dose (e.g., 20 nC/cm) causes broadening of the linewidth possibly due to scattering, while a low dose (e.g., 5 nC/cm) results in a low TiO2 deposition rate because of incomplete exposure of the OTS SAMs. The authors have confirmed that sub-30 nm isolated TiO2 lines can be achieved by selective ALD combined with OTS patterned by EBL at an accelerating voltage of 2 kV and line dose of 10 nC/cm. This research offers a new approach for patterned gate dielectric layer fabrication, as well as potential applications for nanosensors and solar cells.

  20. Optimization of negative ion sources for a heavy-ion-beam probe

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiura, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Kato, S.; Tsukada, K.; Nishizawa, A.; Hamada, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Mendenilla, A.; Wada, M.

    2006-01-01

    The development of plasma-sputter-type negative ion sources is underway for the heavy-ion-beam probe system as plasma diagnostic beams of the large helical device (LHD) for potential and fluctuation field measurements. Our purpose is to increase the doubly charged exchanged Au^+ beam intensity to enhance the detection signal after passing through the plasmas of the LHD. For this purpose, the characterization of the Au^– ion source and the beam optics has been carried out both experimentally a...