WorldWideScience

Sample records for atom vapor cells

  1. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude. PMID:17902946

  2. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude

  3. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    McCarron, Daniel J; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  4. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  5. High resolution field imaging with atomic vapor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I report on the development of imaging techniques in atomic vapor cells. This is a relatively unexplored area, despite the ubiquitous use of imaging in experiments with ultracold atoms. Our main focus is in high resolution imaging of microwave near fields, for which there is currently no satisfactory established technique. We detect microwave fields through Rabi oscillations driven by the microwave on atomic hyperfine transitions. The technique can be easily modified to also i...

  6. Diffusion of Rb atoms in paraffin - coated resonant vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Atutov, S N; Plekhanov, A I; Sorokin, V A; Yakovlev, A V

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the diffusion of Rb atoms in paraffin - coated resonant vapor cells. We have modeled the Rb diffusion both in the cell and in the coating, assuming that the main loss of Rb atoms is due to the physical absorption of the atoms by the glass substrate. It is demonstrated that the equilibrium atomic density in the cell is a monotonic function of the thickness of the paraffin coating: the density increases with an increase in the thickness of the coating. The diffusion coefficient for rubidium in paraffin thin films has been determined to be equal to 4,7*10^-7 cm^2/s. The results of the experiment might be useful for a better understanding of the details involved in the processes of the interaction of alkali atoms with a paraffin coating.

  7. Dispersive radio frequency electrometry using Rydberg atoms in a prism-shaped atomic vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. Q.; Kumar, S.; Kübler, H.; Shaffer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a method to measure radio frequency (RF) electric fields (E-fields) using atoms contained in a prism-shaped vapor cell. The method utilizes the concept of electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms. The RF E-field induces changes in the index of refraction of the vapor resulting in deflection of the probe laser beam as it passes through the prism-shaped vapor cell. We measured a minimum RF E-field of 8.25 μ {{Vcm}}-1 with a sensitivity of ∼ 46.5 μ {{Vcm}}-1 {{Hz}}-1/2. The experimental results agree with a numerical model that includes dephasing effects. We discuss possible improvements to obtain higher sensitivity for RF E-field measurements.

  8. Study of Rb - vapor coated cell; atomic diffusion and cell curing process

    CERN Document Server

    Atutov, S N; Plekhanov, A I; Sorokin, V A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the study of an optical resonant cell filled by a vapor of the Rb atoms and coated with a non-stick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. We show that it is possible to define correctly the diffusion coefficient of the atoms in the coating, using geometric parameters of the cell and the vapor density in the cell volume only. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the cell curing time is presented. It is shown that the mysterious cell curing process can be explained in terms of the polymerization of the polymer coating by alkali atoms. Anomalous long dwell time of the Rb atoms on the PDMS coating is discussed as well.

  9. GHz Rabi flopping to Rydberg states in hot atomic vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, B; Schlagmüller, M; Kölle, A; Kübler, H; Löw, R; Pfau, T

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a timescale below one nanosecond in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of ~ 4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room temperature quantum devices. Furthermore the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by three orders of magnitude.

  10. Radio-frequency Electrometry Using Rydberg Atoms in Vapor Cells: Towards the Shot Noise Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Jahangiri, Akbar; Kuebler, Harald; Shaffer, James P.; 5. Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Stuttgart, Germany Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are a promising candidate for radio frequency (RF) electric field sensing. Our method uses electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in vapor cells to read out the effect that the RF electric field has on the Rydberg atoms. The method has the potential for high sensitivity (pV cm-1 Hz- 1 / 2) and can be self-calibrated. Some of the main factors limiting the sensitivity of RF electric field sensing from reaching the shot noise limit are the residual Doppler effect and the sensitivity of the optical read-out using the probe laser. We present progress on overcoming the residual Doppler effect by using a new multi-photon scheme and reaching the shot noise detection limit using frequency modulated spectroscopy. Our experiments also show promise for studying quantum optical effects such as superradiance in vapor cells using Rydberg atoms. This work is supported by DARPA, ARO, and NRO.

  11. GHz Rabi Flopping to Rydberg States in Hot Atomic Vapor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a time scale below 1 ns in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of ∼4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor, thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room-temperature quantum devices. Furthermore, the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single-atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by 3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Experimental study of vapor-cell magneto-optical traps for efficient trapping of radioactive atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied magneto-optical traps (MOTs) for efficient on-line trapping of radioactive atoms. After discussing a model of the trapping process in a vapor cell and its efficiency, we present the results of detailed experimental studies on Rb MOTs. Three spherical cells of different sizes were used. These cells can be easily replaced, while keeping the rest of the apparatus unchanged: atomic sources, vacuum conditions, magnetic field gradients, sizes and power of the laser beams, detection system. By direct comparison, we find that the trapping efficiency only weakly depends on the MOT cell size. It is also found that the trapping efficiency of the MOT with the smallest cell, whose diameter is equal to the diameter of the trapping beams, is about 40% smaller than the efficiency of larger cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the importance of two factors: a long coated tube at the entrance of the MOT cell, used instead of a diaphragm; and the passivation with an alkali vapor of the coating on the cell walls, in order to minimize the losses of trappable atoms. These results guided us in the construction of an efficient large-diameter cell, which has been successfully employed for on-line trapping of Fr isotopes at INFN's national laboratories in Legnaro, Italy. (authors)

  13. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  14. Efficiency of photodesorption of Rb atoms collected on polymer organic film in vapor-cell

    CERN Document Server

    Atutov, Sergey N; Chubakov, Pavel A; Plekhanov, Alexander I

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of photodesorption of Rb atoms previously collected on polymer organic film has been studied in detail. This study was carried out in a glass cell of which the inner surface was covered with (poly)dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film and illuminated by a photographic flash lamp. The desorption dynamic of the Rb atoms density in the cell caused by the illumination was studied using an Rb resonance lamp as a source of probing light. It was determined that about 25 percent of the total Rb atoms embedded on the cell walls can be desorbed by single flash from the lamp and almost 50 percent are desorbed by a sequence of several light pulses. Our result might help to construct an efficient light-driven source of atoms for a new type magneto optical trap for atoms in extremely low vapor density or very weak atomic flux of such artificial alkaline atoms as Francium. We believe that the collection and photodesorption of particles could be used for the development of sensors for the trace detection of various ele...

  15. Optical measurements of strong microwave fields with Rydberg atoms in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David A; Gordon, Joshua A; Butler, Miranda L; Holloway, Christopher L; Raithel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of Rydberg atoms in strong microwave fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) as an all-optical readout. The measured spectroscopic response enables optical, atom-based electric field measurements of high-power microwaves. In our experiments, microwaves are irradiated into a room-temperature rubidium vapor cell. The microwaves are tuned near the two-photon 65D-66D Rydberg transition and reach an electric field strength of 230V/m, about 20% of the microwave ionization threshold of these atoms. A Floquet treatment is used to model the Rydberg level energies and their excitation rates. We arrive at an empirical model for the field-strength distribution inside the spectroscopic cell that yields excellent overall agreement between the measured and calculated Rydberg EIT-Floquet spectra. Using spectral features in the Floquet maps we achieve an absolute strong-field measurement precision of 6%.

  16. Optical Measurements of Strong Microwave Fields with Rydberg Atoms in a Vapor Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. A.; Miller, S. A.; Raithel, G.; Gordon, J. A.; Butler, M. L.; Holloway, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectral analysis of Rydberg atoms in strong microwave fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) as an all-optical readout. The measured spectroscopic response enables optical, atom-based electric-field measurements of high-power microwaves. In our experiments, microwaves are irradiated into a room-temperature rubidium vapor cell. The microwaves are tuned near the two-photon 65 D -66 D Rydberg transition and reach an electric-field strength of 230 V /m , about 20% of the microwave-ionization threshold of these atoms. A Floquet treatment is used to model the Rydberg-level energies and their excitation rates. We arrive at an empirical model for the field-strength distribution inside the spectroscopic cell that yields excellent overall agreement between the measured and calculated Rydberg EIT-Floquet spectra. Using spectral features in the Floquet maps, we achieve an absolute strong-field measurement precision of 6%.

  17. Sub-picotesla Scalar Atomic Magnetometer with a Microfabricated Vapor Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Mhaskar, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We explore the sensitivity limits of scalar atomic magnetometry with a micro-fabricated Cs vapor cell. The millimeter-scale cell is fabricated using silicon Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The atomic spin procession is driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly polarized pump laser resonant with the D1 transition in Cs atoms. The precession is detected by an off-resonant linearly polarized probe laser using a balanced polarimeter setup. The probe light is spatially split into two beams to perform a gradiometer measurement. In a magnetic field of magnitude within the range of the earth magnetic field, we measure a sensitivity of less than 150 fT/ √Hz in the gradiometer mode, which shows that the magnetometer by itself can achieve sub-100 fT/ √Hz sensitivitiy. In addition to its high sensitivity, the magnetometer has a bandwidth of nearly 1 kHz due to the broad magnetic resonance inside the small cell. Our experiment suggests the feasibility of a portable, low-power and high-performance magnetometer, which can be operated in the earth's magnetic field. Such a device will greatly expand the range of applications for atomic magnetometers, such as the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in an unshielded environment.

  18. Frequency-Tunable Microwave Field Detection in an Atomic Vapor Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the sigma+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high resolution microwave imaging system, this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  19. Effect of atomic noise on optical squeezing via polarization self-rotation in a thermal vapor cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, M.T.L.; Hetet, G.; Peng, A.; Harb, C.C.; Bachor, H.-A.; Johnsson, M.T.; Hope, J.J.; Lam, P.K.; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Cviklinski, J.; Bramati, A.; Pinard, M.

    2006-01-01

    show results of the characterization of PSR in isotopically enhanced rubidium-87 cells, performed in two independent laboratories. We observed that, contrary to earlier work, the presence of atomic noise in the thermal vapor overwhelms the observation of squeezing. We present a theory that contains...... atomic noise terms and show that a null result in squeezing is consistent with this theory....

  20. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad2/Hz and −129 dB rad2/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10−14 at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out

  1. Detection of slow atoms confined in a Cesium vapor cell by spatially separated pump and probe laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Petko; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The velocity distribution of atoms in a thermal gas is usually described through a Maxwell-Boltzman distribution of energy, and assumes isotropy. As a consequence, the probability for an atom to leave the surface under an azimuth angle {\\theta} should evolve as cos {\\theta}, in spite of the fact that there is no microscopic basis to justify such a law. The contribution of atoms moving at a grazing incidence towards or from the surface, i.e. atoms with a small normal velocity, here called "slow" atoms, reveals essential in the development of spectroscopic methods probing a dilute atomic vapor in the vicinity of a surface, enabling a sub-Doppler resolution under a normal incidence irradiation. The probability for such "slow" atoms may be reduced by surface roughness and atom-surface interaction. Here, we describe a method to observe and to count these slow atoms relying on a mechanical discrimination, through spatially separated pump and probe beams. We also report on our experimental progresses toward such a g...

  2. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere. PMID:27483916

  3. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  4. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert, E-mail: r.loew@physik.uni-stuttgart.de [5. Physikalisches Institut and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  5. Focusing Light Beams To Improve Atomic-Vapor Optical Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2010-01-01

    Specially designed focusing of light beams has been proposed as a means of improving the performances of optical buffers based on cells containing hot atomic vapors (e.g., rubidium vapor). There is also a companion proposal to improve performance by use of incoherent optical pumping under suitable conditions. Regarding the proposal to use focusing: The utility of atomic-vapor optical buffers as optical storage and processing devices has been severely limited by nonuniform spatial distributions of intensity in optical beams, arising from absorption of the beams as they propagate in atomic-vapor cells. Such nonuniformity makes it impossible to optimize the physical conditions throughout a cell, thereby making it impossible to optimize the performance of the cell as an optical buffer. In practical terms simplified for the sake of brevity, "to optimize" as used here means to design the cell so as to maximize the group delay of an optical pulse while keeping the absorption and distortion of the pulse reasonably small. Regarding the proposal to use incoherent optical pumping: For reasons too complex to describe here, residual absorption of light is one of the main impediments to achievement of desirably long group delays in hot atomic vapors. The present proposal is directed toward suppressing residual absorption of light. The idea of improving the performance of slow-light optical buffers by use of incoherent pumping overlaps somewhat with the basic idea of Raman-based slow-light systems. However, prior studies of those systems did not quantitatively answer the question of whether the performance of an atomic vapor or other medium that exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Raman gain is superior to that of a medium that exhibits EIT without Raman gain.

  6. Optical Multidimensional Spectroscopy of Atomic Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemens Mark E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical single- and double-quantum three-dimensional Fourier-transform spectra are obtained for atomic vapors. We show that three-dimensional spectra can be used to identify the Hamiltonian of complex systems and to reveal the nature of many-body interactions.

  7. A CPT-based Cs vapor cell atomic clock with a short-term fractional frequency stability of 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Liu, Xiaochi; Guérandel, Stéphane; De Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on the development and short-term fractional frequency stability of a continuous-regime (CW) Cs vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The push-pull optical pumping technique is used to increase the number of atoms that participate to the clock transition, yielding a typical CPT resonance contrast of 25% for a CPT linewidth of about 450 Hz. The clock short-term fractional frequency stability is measured to be 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2 up to 100 seconds averaging time, in correct agreement with the signal-to-noise ratio limit. The mid-term frequency stability results are currently mainly limited by laser power effects. The detection of high-contrast narrow Raman-Ramsey fringes is demonstrated with this setup by making the atoms interact with a light pulse sequence.

  8. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  9. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  10. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  11. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10−14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10−14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10−15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards

  12. Coupling a thermal atomic vapor to an integrated ring resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Strongly interacting atom-cavity systems within a network with many nodes constitute a possible realization for a quantum internet which allows for quantum communication and computation on the same platform. To implement such large-scale quantum networks, nanophotonic resonators are promising candidates because they can be scalably fabricated and interconnected with waveguides and optical fibers. By integrating arrays of ring resonators into a vapor cell we show that thermal rubidium atoms above room temperature can be coupled to photonic cavities as building blocks for chip-scale hybrid circuits. Although strong coupling is not yet achieved in this first realization, our approach provides a key step towards miniaturization and scalability of atom-cavity systems.

  13. [Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program from January through July, 1992. Each of the tasks assigned during this period is described, and results are presented. Section I details work on sensitivity matrices for the UDS relay telescope. These matrices show which combination of mirror motions may be performed in order to effect certain changes in beam parameters. In Section II, an analysis is given of transmission through a clipping aperture on the launch telescope deformable mirror. Observed large transmission losses could not be simulated in the analysis. An EXCEL spreadsheet program designed for in situ analysis of UDS optical systems is described in Section III. This spreadsheet permits analysis of changes in beam first-order characteristics due to changes in any optical system parameter, simple optimization to predict mirror motions needed to effect a combination of changes in beam parameters, and plotting of a variety of first-order data. Optical systems may be assembled directly from OSSD data. A CODE V nonsequential model of the UDS optical system is described in Section IV. This uses OSSD data to build the UDS model; mirror coordinates may thus be verified. Section V summarizes observations of relay telescope performance. Possible procedures which allow more accurate assessment of relay telescope performance are given

  14. Investigation of odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yaqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Teaching and Research Section of Maths and Physics, Guangzhou Commanding Academy of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Guangzhou, 510440 (China); Wu, Zhenkun; Si, Jinhai; Yan, Lihe; Zhang, Yiqi; Yuan, Chenzhi; Sun, Jia [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Yanpeng, E-mail: ypzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-06-15

    We theoretically deduce the macroscopic symmetry constraints for arbitrary odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in homogeneous media including atomic vapors for the first time. After theoretically calculating the expressions using a semiclassical method, we demonstrate that the expressions for third- and fifth-order nonlinear susceptibilities for undressed and dressed four- and six-wave mixing (FWM and SWM) in atomic vapors satisfy the macroscopic symmetry constraints. We experimentally demonstrate consistence between the macroscopic symmetry constraints and the semiclassical expressions for atomic vapors by observing polarization control of FWM and SWM processes. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations. -- Highlights: •The macroscopic symmetry constraints are deduced for homogeneous media including atomic vapors. •We demonstrate that odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities satisfy the constraints. •We experimentally demonstrate the deduction in part.

  15. High-resolution Resonance Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition from a population difference grating in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Wang*, Hai; Li, Shujing; Zhang, Chunhong; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2009-01-01

    The laser spectroscopy with a narrow linewidth and high signal to noise ratio (S/N) is very important in the precise measurement of optical frequencies. Here, we present a novel high-resolution backward resonance Bragg-scattering (RBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG). The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field in thermal 87Rb vapor, which periodically modulates the space population distribution of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. A probe beam, having the identical frequency and the orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. Such Bragg-scattered light becomes stronger at an atomic resonance transition, which forms the RBS spectrum with a high S/N and sub-natural linewidth. Using the scheme of the coherent superposition of the individual Rayleigh-scattered light emitted from the atomic dipole oscillators on the PDG, the experimentally observed RBS spectroscopy is theoretically explained.

  16. Investigations on atomic-vapor-filter high-spectral-resolution lidar for temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, E.; Weitkamp, C.

    1992-01-01

    The temperature measurement by the analysis of Rayleigh scattered laser radiation with atomic vapor filters is investigated in both theory and laboratory experiments. Synthetic air is irradiated with a cw dye laser at 283 nano-meters, and the backscattered spectrum is analyzed with two lead vapor cells in one oven. Temperature measurements are carried out, and the effect of different parameters on the accuracy is investigated. Important aspects for the realization of a lidar are given.

  17. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of atomic vapor laser isotope separation [AVLIS] as the technology to meet the United States' future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. The authors discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques employed. The methodology adopted is illustrated with examples of other elements that are under study in the program. (author)

  18. Dichroic atomic vapor laser lock with multi-gigahertz stabilization range

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S; Sholtes, T; Budker, D

    2015-01-01

    A dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) system exploiting buffer-gas-filled millimeter-scale vapor cells is presented. This system offers similar stability as achievable with bulk vapor cells, but has several important advantages. In addition to its compactness, it may provide continuous stabilization in a multi-gigahertz range around the optical transition. This range may be controlled either by changing the temperature of the vapor or by application of a buffer gas under an appropriate pressure. In particular, we show that the DAVLL system with a buffer-gas cell enables locking the laser frequency between two hyperfine components of the $^{85}$Rb ground state or as far as 16 GHz away from the closest optical transition.

  19. Method And Apparatus For Atomizing And Vaporizing Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Lal, Amit

    2014-09-18

    A method and apparatus for atomizing and vaporizing liquid is described. An apparatus having an ejector configured to eject one or more droplets of liquid may be inserted into a reservoir containing liquid. The ejector may have a vibrating device that vibrates the ejector and causes liquid to move from the reservoir up through the ejector and out through an orifice located on the top of the ejector. The one or more droplets of liquid ejected from the ejector may be heated and vaporized into the air.

  20. Dichroic atomic vapor laser lock with multi-gigahertz stabilization range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustelny, S.; Schultze, V.; Scholtes, T.; Budker, D.

    2016-06-01

    A dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) system exploiting buffer-gas-filled millimeter-scale vapor cells is presented. This system offers similar stability as achievable with conventional DAVLL system using bulk vapor cells, but has several important advantages. In addition to its compactness, it may provide continuous stabilization in a multi-gigahertz range around the optical transition. This range may be controlled either by changing the temperature of the vapor or by application of a buffer gas under an appropriate pressure. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate the ability of the system to lock the laser frequency between two hyperfine components of the 85Rb ground state or as far as 16 GHz away from the closest optical transition.

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies of metal vapor atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing electron spectrometry in conjunction with tuneable synchrotron radiation, we will present a detailed examination of the photoionization dynamics of selected metal vapor atoms. In particular, this paper will focus on the relative partial cross sections of the atomic Li K-shell main and satellite (ionization with excitation) photoelectron lines in the region of the strong 1snln'l' autoionizing transitions, the atomic Sc 3d, 4s main and satellite photoelectron lines in the region of the 3p→3d giant resonance, and also the atomic Fe 3d, 4s main and satellite photoelectron lines in the same resonance region. Our experimental data for Sc and Fe will be compared to our state-of-the-art calculations based on the superposition of configuration method developed by Cowan (The Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectra. University of California Berkeley Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1981). Our partial cross section measurements for Li and Sc will be complemented with measurements of the angular distribution parameter, β. In addition, our Li data will also be compared with recent R-matrix calculations (Phys. Rev. 57 (1998) 1045). In the case of Fe, we will also address the term dependent behavior of the partial cross sections on resonance. These results will highlight what can be achieved with today's technology and point the way towards future endeavors in the study of the photoionization dynamics of open-shell metal vapor atoms

  2. Observation of prolonged coherence time of the collective spin wave of an atomic ensemble in a paraffin-coated 87Rb vapor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a prolonged coherence time of the collective spin wave of a thermal 87Rb atomic ensemble in a paraffin-coated cell. The spin wave is prepared through a stimulated Raman process. The long coherence time is achieved by prolonging the lifetime of the spins with paraffin coating and minimize dephasing with optimal experimental configuration. The observation of the long-time-delayed-stimulated Stokes signal in the writing process suggests the prolonged lifetime of the prepared spins; a direct measurement of the decay of anti-Stokes signal in the reading process shows the coherence time is up to 300 μs after minimizing dephasing. This is 100 times longer than the reported coherence time in the similar experiments in thermal atomic ensembles based on the Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller and its improved protocols. This prolonged coherence time sets the upper limit of the memory time in quantum repeaters based on such protocols, which is crucial for the realization of long-distance quantum communication. The previous reported fluorescence background in the writing process due to collision in a sample cell with buffer gas is also reduced in a cell without buffer gas.

  3. Laser-induced transport effect and laser induced-line narrowing mechanism for laser excitation in 87Rb atomic vapors in a finite-size buffer-less cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Coherent population trapping (CPT) and double radio-optical resonance (DROR) are quantum nonlinear effects. Both these effects are the base for the creation of high precision magnetometers and atomic frequency standards. We study the influence of the laser induced transport (LIT) and the laser induced line narrowing (LILN) effects on the DROR and CPT resonance line shape for excitation in 87Rb atomic vapors in wall-coated and uncoated cell. We take into account both hyperfine and Zeeman structures of the ground and the excited states of 87Rb atoms as well as the probabilities of spontaneous transitions. We investigate the dependence of the resonance shape on the length of the cell, on the type of boundary conditions, on the polarization and intensity of laser and microwave fields, and on the laser line width ('narrow-band' and 'broad-band'). Laser induced transport in DROR: the first the LIT was predicted for three-level model. We show that the LIT takes place in buffer-less cell with real 87Rb atoms. The physical essence of the LIT effect is the caused by the Doppler effect velocity-selectivity of the interaction of 'narrow-band' laser field with atoms, resulting in Bennett dips and peaks in the velocity distribution of atoms in the ground state sublevels. Asymmetry of the two velocity distributions gives rise to the opposite-directed (along the laser propagation direction) fluxes of the atoms in the ground state sublevels. Therefore, a flux of the population inversion (or, equivalently, of the longitudinal magnetization) arises. This behavior one experimentally can obverse as the transmission peak in the centre of the DROR signal. LIT effect is most pronounced for 'narrow-band' laser pumping. Laser induced line narrowing in CPT resonance: the LILN of the CPT resonance realizes only in the case of excitation by 'narrow-band' laser. We established that for the LILN mechanism the parameters (the amplitude and width) of the CPT resonance excited on

  4. Isotropic Negatively-Refracting Atomic-Vapor Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    A new scenario to realize negative refraction with a photonic-resonant vapor material that can exhibit both electric and magnetic responses via multilevel quantum coherence is suggested. Compared with the previous method of artificial composite metamaterial, where the mechanism was considered by means of classical electromagnetic theory and the materials produced have anisotropic millimetre-scale composite structures, the present scheme suggested within the framework of quantum optics can be used to design and fabricate isotropic negatively-refracting materials with atomic-scale microscopic structure units. Such an advantage may lead to a potentially important application in the techniques of superlens and perfect imaging.

  5. Modeling atomization processes in high-pressure vaporizing sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf D.

    The theoretical basis and numerical implementation of KIVA, a multidimensional computer code for the simulation of atomization and vaporization processes in the injection of a liquid through a round hole into a compressed gas, are described. KIVA is based on the blob-injection model of Reitz and Diwakar (1987), taking into account the effects of liquid inertia, surface tension, and the aerodynamic forces on the jet, as well as drop collision and coalescence and the effect of drops on turbulence in the gas. The predictions of KIVA for different injection regimes are compared with published experimental data in extensive graphs, and good agreement is demonstrated.

  6. Single Molecule DNA Detection with an Atomic Vapor Notch Filter

    CERN Document Server

    Uhland, Denis; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2015-01-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-sciences. Commonly, it founds on the fluorescence detection of single molecules, which are for example attached to the structures under study. For fluorescence microscopy and sensing the crucial parameters are the collection and detection efficiency, such that photons can be discriminated with low background from a labeled sample. Here we show a scheme for filtering the excitation light in the optical detection of single stranded labeled DNA molecules. We use the narrow-band filtering properties of a hot atomic vapor to filter the excitation light from the emitted fluorescence of a single emitter. The choice of atomic sodium allows for the use of fluorescent dyes, which are common in life-science. This scheme enables efficient photon detection, and a statistical analysis proves an enhancement of the optical signal of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration.

  7. Spin-polarized lithium diffusion in a glass hot-vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    We report diffusion coefficients of optically pumped lithium atoms in helium buffer gas. The free-induction decay and the spin-echo signals of ground-state atoms were optically detected in an external magnetic field with the addition of field gradient. Lithium hot vapor was produced in a borosilicate-glass cell at a temperature between 290 and 360°C. The simple setup using the glass cells enabled lithium atomic spectroscopy in a similar way to other alkali-metal atoms and study of the collisional properties of lithium atoms in a hot-vapor phase.

  8. Single molecule DNA detection with an atomic vapor notch filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhland, Denis; Rendler, Torsten; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg; Gerhardt, Ilja [University of Stuttgart and Stuttgart Research Center of Photonic Engineering (SCoPE) and IQST, 3rd Physics Institute, Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    The detection of single molecules has facilitated many advances in life- and material-science. Commonly the fluorescence of dye molecules is detected, which are attached to a non-fluorescent structure under study. For fluorescence microscopy one desires to maximize the detection efficiency together with an efficient suppression of undesired laser leakage. Here we present the use of the narrow-band filtering properties of hot atomic sodium vapor to selectively filter the excitation light from the red-shifted fluorescence of dye labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. A statistical analysis proves an enhancement in detection efficiency of more than 15% in a confocal and in a wide-field configuration. (orig.)

  9. A HBAR-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Daugey, Thomas; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source. A 2.298~GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally-controlled two-port AlN-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24000 at 68$^{\\circ}$C, is frequency multiplied by 2 to 4.596~GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the HBAR is measured to be $-23$~ppm/$^{\\circ}$C at 2.298~GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596~GHz source is $-105$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 1~kHz offset and $-150$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 100~kHz offset. The 4.596~GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator (LO) in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter (VCPS) implemented in the 2.298~GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming...

  10. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10−9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10−11 τ−1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance

  11. Radio-frequency-modulated Rydberg states in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Stephanie A; Raithel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We measure strong radio-frequency (RF) electric fields using rubidium Rydberg atoms prepared in a room-temperature vapor cell as field sensors. Electromagnetically induced transparency is employed as an optical readout. We RF-modulate the 60$S_{1/2}$ and 58$D_{5/2}$ Rydberg states with 50~MHz and 100~MHz fields, respectively. For weak to moderate RF fields, the Rydberg levels become Stark-shifted, and sidebands appear at even multiples of the driving frequency. In high fields, the adjacent hydrogenic manifold begins to intersect the shifted levels, providing rich spectroscopic structure suitable for precision field measurements. A quantitative description of strong-field level modulation and mixing of $S$ and $D$ states with hydrogenic states is provided by Floquet theory. Additionally, we estimate the shielding of DC electric fields in the interior of the glass vapor cell.

  12. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  13. Determination of mercury by intermittent flow electrochemical cold vapor generation coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for determination of mercury was developed using an intermittent flow electrochemical cold vapor generation coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry (IF-ECVG-AFS). The mercury vapor was generated on the surface of glassy carbon cathode in the flow cell. The operating conditions for the electrochemical generation of mercury vapor were investigated in detail, and the interferences from various ions were evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, no evident memory effects of mercury were observed. The calibration curve was linear up to 5 μg L-1 Hg at 0.54 A cm-2. A detection limit of 1.2 ng L-1 Hg and a relative standard deviation of 1.8% for 1 μg L-1 Hg were obtained. The accuracy of method was verified by the determination of mercury in the certified reference human hair. The ECVG avoided the use of reductants, thereby greatly reducing the contamination sources. In addition, the manifold of IF-ECVG-AFS was simple and amenable to automation

  14. Electric and magnetic dipole allowed transitions of atoms for three-dimensionally isotropic left handedness in a mixed atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2014-03-01

    Since previous negative-index atomic media based on quantum optical approaches are highly lossy, a proposal for realizing a three-dimensionally isotropic left-handed atomic vapor medium is suggested based on a mechanism of incoherent gain assisted atomic transitions. Two three-level atomic systems are utilized for producing simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability, respectively, in the same frequency band. We suggest that fine and hyperfine level transitions of atoms (e.g., a hyperfine level transition in a hydrogen atomic system and a fine level transition in an alkali-metal atomic system) would be applicable to realization of such a negatively refracting atomic vapor. The attractive features of the present scenario include: i) three-dimensionally isotropic negative indices; ii) incoherent gain wave amplification in the negative-index atomic vapor; iii) tunable negative indices depending upon external fields. Such a left-handed quantum optical medium can serve as a supporting substrate for lossy negative-index materials for loss compensation. It can also be used in designing new quantum optical and photonic devices (e.g., a subwavelength focusing system and a negative-index superlens for perfect imaging) because of its attractive properties of three-dimensional isotropy and high-gain wave amplification.

  15. Selenium determination in biological material by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in graphite furnace and using vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry to the determination of selenium in biological material using vapor generation and electrothermal atomization in the graphite furnace was investigated. Instrumental parameters and the analytical conditions of the methods were studied. Decomposition methods for the samples were tested, and the combustion in the Wickbold apparatus was chosen. (author)

  16. Measurement of background gas in paraffin-coated alkali vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiguchi, Naota

    2015-01-01

    We measured the rate of velocity-changing collisions (VCCs) between alkali atoms and background gas in buffer-gas-free anti-spin-relaxation-coated cells. The average VCC rate in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells prepared in this work was $1 \\times 10^{6}$ s$^{-1}$, which corresponds to $\\sim$1 mm in the mean free path of rubidium atoms. This short mean free path indicates that alkali atoms do not travel freely between the cell walls. In addition, we found that a heating process known as "ripening" increases the VCC rate, and also confirmed that ripening improves the anti-relaxation performance of the coatings.

  17. Storage and Retrieval of Thermal Light in Warm Atomic Vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young-Wook; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2009-01-01

    We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed-propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light...

  18. Atomic mercury vapor inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vogl, Ulrich; Joly, Nicolas Y; Russell, Philip St J; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate high atomic mercury vapor pressure in a kagom\\'e-style hollow-core photonic crystal fiber at room temperature. After a few days of exposure to mercury vapor the fiber is homogeneously filled and the optical depth achieved remains constant. With incoherent optical pumping from the ground state we achieve an optical depth of 114 at the $6^3P_2 - 6^3D_3$ transition, corresponding to an atomic mercury number density of $6 \\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$. The use of mercury vapor in quasi one-dimensional confinement may be advantageous compared to chemically more active alkali vapor, while offering strong optical nonlinearities in the ultraviolet region of the optical spectrum.

  19. Biological atomism and cell theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Daniel J

    2010-09-01

    Biological atomism postulates that all life is composed of elementary and indivisible vital units. The activity of a living organism is thus conceived as the result of the activities and interactions of its elementary constituents, each of which individually already exhibits all the attributes proper to life. This paper surveys some of the key episodes in the history of biological atomism, and situates cell theory within this tradition. The atomistic foundations of cell theory are subsequently dissected and discussed, together with the theory's conceptual development and eventual consolidation. This paper then examines the major criticisms that have been waged against cell theory, and argues that these too can be interpreted through the prism of biological atomism as attempts to relocate the true biological atom away from the cell to a level of organization above or below it. Overall, biological atomism provides a useful perspective through which to examine the history and philosophy of cell theory, and it also opens up a new way of thinking about the epistemic decomposition of living organisms that significantly departs from the physicochemical reductionism of mechanistic biology. PMID:20934641

  20. Low helium permeation cells for atomic microsystems technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellis, Argyrios T; Shah, Vishal; Donley, Elizabeth A; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2016-06-15

    Laser spectroscopy of atoms confined in vapor cells can be strongly affected by the presence of background gases. A significant source of vacuum contamination is the permeation of gases such as helium (He) through the walls of the cell. Aluminosilicate glass (ASG) is a material with a helium permeation rate that is many orders of magnitude lower than borosilicate glass, which is commonly used for cell fabrication. We have identified a suitable source of ASG that is fabricated in wafer form and can be anodically bonded to silicon. We have fabricated chip-scale alkali vapor cells using this glass for the windows and we have measured the helium permeation rate using the pressure shift of the hyperfine clock transition. We demonstrate micro fabricated cells with He permeation rates at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of cells made with borosilicate glass at room temperature. Such cells may be useful in compact vapor-cell atomic clocks and as a micro fabricated platform suitable for the generation of cold atom samples. PMID:27304286

  1. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Gan, Chenli

    2005-11-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atom-field interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L < ?/4) in experiments.

  2. Heterodyne phase shift diagnostic for measuring atomic vapor density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a technique for atomic density measurements. We generate and recombine frequency shifted laser beams producing beat signals on reference and signal detectors. Opacity in the signal detector leg is proportional to the phase difference between detector signals. 4 refs., 2 figs

  3. Study of elimination of vapor atom deposition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this study was to define and evaluate methods by which an optical system could be protected from performance degradation arising from exposure to a beam of heavy metal atoms. The optical system is coupled to a chamber in which the metal atoms are being produced and processed. The coupling aperture is the source of the contaminating metal atom beam, which, if un-attenuated, would degrade the system performance in an unacceptably short period of time. It was agreed early in the program to concentrate on a gaseous scattering technique, with a stated objective of metal beam flux reduction of about 106. Additional constraints require that the scattering gas must not effuse back into the main process chamber at such a rate that it has significant effect on the vacuum level in the chamber, which is of the order of 10-6 torr; finally, the path length between the main chamber and the optical system must not be increased unduly. This report summarizes the analyses that were performed under the program. Section 2 presents a summary review, while the details of the analyses are described in Section 3. Recommendations leading toward final system design are given in Section 4. Finally, an appendix contains a description and printout of a program that was developed and used to facilitate the evaluation of system performance parametrically. 6 refs., 9 figs

  4. Photo- and chemo ionization processes in the saturated rubidium vapors at resonant-excited atomic transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutual competition of the two-photon, associative, and penning ionization of the resonant-excited rubidium atoms in a dye-laser field has been investigated. For each ionization channel the ranges of laser intensities and rubidium vapor pressure are determined within the limits of that its contribution is predominant. On the basis of the data obtained the cross section of photo- and collision ionization processes of excited atoms are determined. (author)

  5. Influence of Size Effects on Uptake of Impurity Atoms by Aerosol Nanoparticles Growing in Vapor Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Levdansky, V.V.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that impurity atoms (molecules) in the main substance can affect its physicochemical properties. Semiconductor doping is paramount in micro- and nanoelectronics. In some cases nanoparticle doping is needed. Nanoparticle doping in the general case depends on the size of nanoparticles. Below we consider theoretically size effects in the uptake of impurity (dopant) atoms by the aerosol nanoparticle that grows in the supersaturated vapor.

  6. Vapor generation – atomic spectrometric techniques. Expanding frontiers through specific-species preconcentration. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Raúl A.; Pacheco, Pablo H.; Cerutti, Soledad [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Martinez, Luis D., E-mail: ldm@unsl.edu.ar [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina)

    2015-05-22

    This article reviews 120 articles found in SCOPUS and specific Journal cites corresponding to the terms ‘preconcentration’; ‘speciation’; ‘vapor generation techniques’ and ‘atomic spectrometry techniques’ in the last 5 years. - Highlights: • Recent advances in vapor generation and atomic spectrometry were reviewed. • Species-specific preconcentration strategies after and before VG were discussed. • New preconcentration and speciation analysis were evaluated within this framework. - Abstract: We review recent progress in preconcentration strategies associated to vapor generation techniques coupled to atomic spectrometric (VGT-AS) for specific chemical species detection. This discussion focuses on the central role of different preconcentration approaches, both before and after VG process. The former was based on the classical solid phase and liquid–liquid extraction procedures which, aided by automation and miniaturization strategies, have strengthened the role of VGT-AS in several research fields including environmental, clinical, and others. We then examine some of the new vapor trapping strategies (atom-trapping, hydride trapping, cryotrapping) that entail improvements in selectivity through interference elimination, but also they allow reaching ultra-low detection limits for a large number of chemical species generated in conventional VG systems, including complete separation of several species of the same element. This review covers more than 100 bibliographic references from 2009 up to date, found in SCOPUS database and in individual searches in specific journals. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this field.

  7. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  8. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm

  9. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  10. Light scattering studies of solids and atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, T.C.

    1978-09-01

    The general technique of light scattering and luminescence was used to study the properties of a number of material systems. First, multi-phonon resonant Raman scattering up to four phonons in GaSe and one- and two-phonon resonant Raman scattering in the mixed GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ crystals with x < or = 0.23 were investigated. Second, the observation of one-phonon resonant Raman scattering in HfS/sub 2/ is reported. The result is used to determine the position of the direct gap of HfS/sub 2/. Third, the first observation of the ..pi..-polarized one-magnon luminescence sideband of the /sup 4/T/sub lg/ (/sup 4/G) ..-->.. /sup 6/A/sub lg/(/sup 6/S) excitonic transition in antiferromagnetic MnF/sub 2/ is presented. An effective temperature of the crystal is deduced from the simultaneously observed anti-Stokes sideband emission. Multi-magnon (< or = 7) excitonic luminescence sidebands were also observed in MnF/sub 2/, KMnF/sub 2/, and RbMnF/sub 3/ using pulsed excitation and detection. A simple model based on two-ion local exchange is proposed to explain the results qualitatively. Fourth, the first observation of two-magnon resonant Raman scattering in MnF/sub 2/ around the magnon sidebands is reported. A simple theoretical description explains the experimental observations. Fifth, a detailed theory of exciton-exciton interaction in MnF/sub 2/ is developed to explain and to predict the experimental results on two-exciton absorption, high level excitation, and exciton--exciton scattering. Sixth, Brillouin scattering was used to obtain the five independent elastic constants of the layered compound GaSe. The results show clear elastic anisotropy of the crystal. Resonant Brillouin scattering near the absorption edge was also studied, but no resonant enhancement was found. Seventh, two-photon parametric scattering in sodium vapor was studied. Phase matching angles and scattering cross sections are calculated for a given set of experimental conditions.

  11. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, J C de A; Oriá, M; Chevrollier, M; de Silans, T Passerat

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can \\textit{a priori} be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in L\\'evy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdifusion process. Here, we report on a Monte-Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of Complete Frequency Redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyse the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regime in the light transport: superdiffusive when the vapor is excited n...

  12. Temporal intensity correlation of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Dussaux, A; Guerin, W; Alibart, O; Tanzilli, S; Vakili, F; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We present temporal intensity correlation measurements of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor. Clear evidence of photon bunching is shown at very short time-scales (ns) imposed by the Doppler broadening of the hot vapor. Moreover, we demonstrate that some relevant information about the scattering process, such as the ratio of single to multiple scattering, can be deduced from the measured intensity correlation function. These measurements confirm the interest of temporal intensity correlation measurements to access non-trivial spectral features, with potential applications in astrophysics.

  13. Some energy levels, which can be used in atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the bibliographical data concerning energy levels, isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting constants of the following elements were collected: Fe, Ca, Nd, Eu, Dy, La, Pb, Sm, Ba, Ti, Ta, Mg, V, Zr, Pu, Na, K, Li, Tc, Ni, Ag, Sn, Bk, Am, Np, Th. This Database is very useful for AVLIS and can help by choosing the equipment for atomic vapor laser isotope separation. Wavelength, waveform and bandwidth of the used laser are determined by this data. The properties of the vaporizer, separation chamber, and collection system are influenced by this data. This database is also necessary for calculations of the excitation selectivity. (author)

  14. Determination of mercury by multisyringe flow injection system with cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new software-controlled time-based multisyringe flow injection system for mercury determination by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. Precise known volumes of sample, reducing agent (1.1% SnCl2 in 3% HCl) and carrier (3% HCl) are dispensed into a gas-liquid separation cell with a multisyringe burette coupled with one three-way solenoid valve. An argon flow delivers the reduced mercury to the spectrometer. The optimization of the system was carried out testing reaction coils and gas-liquid separators of different design as well as changing parameters, such as sample and reagents volumes, reagent concentrations and carrier gas flow rate, among others. The analytical curves were obtained within the range 50-5000 ng L-1. The detection limit (3σ b/S) achieved is 5 ng L-1. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.4%, evaluated from 16 successive injections of 250 ng L-1 Hg standard solution. The injection and sample throughput per hour were 44 and 11, respectively. This technique was validated by means of solid and water reference materials with good agreement with the certified values and was successfully applied to fish samples

  15. New niobium and rhenium halides synthesis routes by atomic vaporization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New synthetic route as the so called 'chimie douce' or MVS (Metal Vapor Synthesis) has been an increasing field lately to synthesize new kind of solid state structures. Our interest is the assembly of small molecular building blocks of early transition metal halides. We illustrate the use of vaporized rare earth metals to condense NbCls units. We probed the local order around the Nb atom with X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, far Infra-Red and XPS in order to better understand the mechanisms involved. A first EXAFS, IR and XPS study on solid state products has shown the evolution of the NbCl5 dimer towards a chain like structure. However, the condensation patterns depends on the rare earth atoms vaporized. These results have been confirmed by X-ray Absorption ab initio calculations. Because our compounds are extremely air sensitive we have developed in situ MVS reactor to take 'snapshots' of the structural intermediates by EXAFS. This study showed the condensation of the initial NbCl5 building blocks by reduction of the Nb oxidation state by rare earth vaporization. This method is a new way of looking at condensation mechanisms via structural evolution observed by EXAFS. (author)

  16. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Iracema Takase; Hugo Borges Pereira; Aderval S. Luna; Patrícia Grinberg; Reinaldo Calixto de Campos

    2002-01-01

    The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES) are considered. Hydride generation...

  17. Early Stages of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Pyrolytic Carbon Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pfrang, Andreas; WAN Yong-Zhong; Schimmel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The early stages of chemical vapor deposition of pyrolytic carbon on planar silicon substrates were studied by the atomic force microscopy-based technique of chemical contrast imaging. Short deposition times were chosen to focus on the early stages of the deposition process, and three different types of nucleation were found: random nucleation of single islands, nucleation of carbon islands along lines and secondary nucleation which corresponds to the nucleation of carbon islands at the edges...

  18. Atomic characterization of Au clusters in vapor-liquid-solid grown silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanghua; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (LPICM), UMR 7647, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pareige, Philippe; Castro, Celia [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux (GPM), Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6634, CNRS, Av. de l' Université, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Xu, Tao; Grandidier, Bruno; Stiévenard, Didier [Institut d' Electronique et de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies (IEMN), UMR 8520, CNRS, Département ISEN, 41 bd Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France)

    2015-09-14

    By correlating atom probe tomography with other conventional microscope techniques (scanning electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, and scanning tunneling microscopy), the distribution and composition of Au clusters in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Si nanowires is investigated. Taking advantage of the characteristics of atom probe tomography, we have developed a sample preparation method by inclining the sample at certain angle to characterize the nanowire sidewall without using focused ion beam. With three-dimensional atomic scale reconstruction, we provide direct evidence of Au clusters tending to remain on the nanowire sidewall rather than being incorporated into the Si nanowires. Based on the composition measurement of Au clusters (28% ± 1%), we have demonstrated the supersaturation of Si atoms in Au clusters, which supports the hypothesis that Au clusters are formed simultaneously during nanowire growth rather than during the cooling process.

  19. Atomic characterization of Au clusters in vapor-liquid-solid grown silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By correlating atom probe tomography with other conventional microscope techniques (scanning electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, and scanning tunneling microscopy), the distribution and composition of Au clusters in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Si nanowires is investigated. Taking advantage of the characteristics of atom probe tomography, we have developed a sample preparation method by inclining the sample at certain angle to characterize the nanowire sidewall without using focused ion beam. With three-dimensional atomic scale reconstruction, we provide direct evidence of Au clusters tending to remain on the nanowire sidewall rather than being incorporated into the Si nanowires. Based on the composition measurement of Au clusters (28% ± 1%), we have demonstrated the supersaturation of Si atoms in Au clusters, which supports the hypothesis that Au clusters are formed simultaneously during nanowire growth rather than during the cooling process

  20. Enhanced synthesis of Sn nanowires with aid of Se atom via physical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huacheng; Wang, Wendong; Liu, Peiwen; Wang, Guangming; Liu, Ankang; He, Zhe; Cheng, Zhaofang; Zhang, Shengli; Xia, Minggang

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate tin (Sn) nanowires growth enhanced by Selenium (Se) atoms via physical vapor transport (PVT) method. The Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that Sn nanowires are synthesized with a large quantity, good quality and high purity of Sn. The growth of Sn nanowires is attributed to Solid-Vapor-Liquid mechanism. The effects of gold nanoparticles catalyst, Si substrate, and Se atoms on Sn nanowires growth are discussed in detail. We find that Se atom plays a key role in the growth of Sn nanowires. The gaseous Sn atoms are absorbed by the eutectic alloy droplets of Se-Au at first. Then Sn atoms precipitate at the liquid-solid phase interface due to a supersaturated solution and form a one-dimensional nanostructure. In all, this PVT method could provide a simple and quick way to synthesize monocrystalline Sn nanowires with an advantage in both quality and quantity. The optical transmittance of Sn nanowires thin film with 2 μm2 density approaches 85-90% in visible wavelength. Therefore, the Sn nanowires thin film can be applied to transparent electrode along with their metallic property.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program: laser technology and demonstration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a large-scale process for photophysically enriching isotopes of several elements. The program now deploys plant prototypical hardware to demonstrate this enrichment process at full scale. The Laser Demonstration Facility, a fully integrated laser system has been constructed and when complete will produce more than 5000 W of tunable average power at a pulse repetition frequency >10 kHz. In AVLIS, an atomic vapor of mixed isotopes is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to photoionize only desired isotopes. The resulting electrically charged photoions are deflected in an electric field to collector (or extractor) plates where they condense as enriched products. The AVLIS laser system consists of a series of high-average-power dye lasers optically pumped by an array of copper lasers. The dye lasers are used to do the three-step photoionization process. These lasers are well suited for the AVLIS process for both technical and economic reasons. They provide the precise narrowband (<100-MHz), short-pulse (<100-nsec), high-average-power, high-repetition-frequency laser light required by the atomic spectroscopy and vapor flow properties. Equally important, the capital and operating costs of this laser system in its present state of development are consistent with a commercially viable process deployment

  2. Enhanced light-vapor interactions and all optical switching in a chip scale micro-ring resonator coupled with atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of atomic and photonic resonances serves as an important tool for enhancing light-matter interactions and enables the observation of multitude of fascinating and fundamental phenomena. Here, by exploiting the platform of atomic-cladding wave guides, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of rubidium vapor and an atomic cladding micro ring resonator. Specifically, we observed cavity-atom coupling in the form of Fano resonances having a distinct dependency on the relative frequency detuning between the photonic and the atomic resonances. Moreover, we were able to significantly enhance the efficiency of all optical switching in the V-type pump-probe scheme. The coupled system of micro-ring resonator and atomic vapor is a promising building block for a variety of light vapor experiments, as it offers a very small footprint, high degree of integration and extremely strong confinement of light and vapor. As such it may be used for important applications, such as all optical switching, disp...

  3. Fabrication and characterization of an electrically contacted vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschner, R; Ritter, R; Kübler, H; Frühauf, N; Kurz, E; Löw, R; Pfau, T

    2012-06-15

    We demonstrate the use of electrically contacted vapor cells to switch the transmission of a probe laser. The excitation scheme makes use of electromagnetically induced transparency involving a Rydberg state. The cell fabrication technique involves thin-film-based electric feedthroughs, which are well suited for scaling this concept to many addressable pixels like in flat panel displays. PMID:22739878

  4. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C0, where the change in characteristic mass, m0, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as Emax, maximum enhancement factor; Et, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and Ev, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps

  5. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C{sub 0}, where the change in characteristic mass, m{sub 0}, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as E{sub max}, maximum enhancement factor; E{sub t}, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and E{sub v}, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps.

  6. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2008-08-01

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C0, where the change in characteristic mass, m0, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as Emax, maximum enhancement factor; Et, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and Ev, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation in a vapor of sodium atoms in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Pei-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at normal temperature (T=343K) has been observed because an electric field was first applied. There are two ways to achieve phase transition: lower the temperature of Bose gas or increase its density. This article provides more appropriate method: increase the voltage. In theory, 3s and 3p states of sodium are not degenerate, but Na may be polar atom doesnot conflict with quantum mechanics because it is hydrogen-like atom. Our innovation lies in we applied an electric field used for the orientation polarization. Na vapor was filled in a cylindrical capacitor. In order to determine the polarity of sodium, we measured the capacitance at different temperatures. If Na is non-polar atom, its capacitance should be independent of temperature because the nucleus of atom is located at the center of the electron cloud. But our experiment shows that its capacitance is related to temperature, so Na is polar atom. In order to achieve Na vapor phase transition, we measured the capacitance at different voltages. From the entropy of Na vapor S=0, the critical voltage Vc=68volts. When V0; when V>Vc, the atoms become aligned with the field Svapor entered quasi-vacuum state. We create a BEC with 2.506×1017 atoms, condensate fraction reached 98.9%. This is BEC in momentum space. Our experiment shows that if a Bose gas enters quasi-vacuum state, this also means that it underwent phase transition and generates BEC. Therefore, quasi-vacuum state of alkali gas is essentially large-scale BEC. This is an unexpected discovery. BEC and vacuum theory are two unrelated research areas, but now they are closely linked together. The maximum induced dipole moment dind≤7.8×10-15 e cm can be neglected. Ultra-low temperature is in order to make Bose gas phase transition, we achieve the phase transition by the critical voltage, so the ultra-low temperature is not necessary. According to the standard proposed by Ketterle, although we didn't use laser cooling atoms

  8. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  9. The Synthesized of Carbon Nano tubes from Palm Oil by Topas Atomizer Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on preparation of Carbon Nano tubes (CNTs) based on palm oil as a natural resource precursor. The Topas Atomizer was utilized to vapor up the carbon gas into the reaction chamber of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) to yield the CNTs in powder form at the inner wall of the Quartz tube. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of deposition temperature from 650 - 850 degree Celsius. The samples characteristics were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The results revealed that the increasing of the deposition temperature, the ID/IG ratio decreased from 650 - 850 degree Celsius. The results of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) are also presented. (author)

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  11. Modulation of the photonic band structure topology of a honeycomb lattice in an atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-01-01

    In an atomic vapor, a honeycomb lattice can be constructed by utilizing the three-beam interference method. In the method, the interference of the three beams splits the dressed energy level periodically, forming a periodic refractive index modulation with the honeycomb profile. The energy band topology of the honeycomb lattice can be modulated by frequency detunings, thereby affecting the appearance (and disappearance) of Dirac points and cones in the momentum space. This effect can be usefully exploited for the generation and manipulation of topological insulators.

  12. Observation of picosecond superfluorescent pulses in rubidium atomic vapor pumped by 100-fs laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the superfluorescence (SF) from a gas of rubidium atoms. The atoms of a dense vapor are excited to the 5D state from the 5S state by a two-photon process driven by 100-fs laser pulses. The atoms decay to the 6P state and then to the 5S state. The SF emission at 420 nm on the 6P-5S transition is recorded by a streak camera with picosecond time resolution. The time duration of the generated SF is tens of picoseconds, which is much shorter than the time scale of the usual relaxation processes, including spontaneous emission and atomic coherence dephasing. The dependence of the time delay between the reference input pulse and SF is measured as a function of laser power. The experimental data are described quantitatively by a simulation based on the semiclassical atom-field interaction theory. The observed change in scaling laws for the peak intensity and delay time can be elucidated by an SF theory in which the sample length is larger than the cooperation length.

  13. Atomic force microscopy in cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhexue; ZHANG Zhiling; PANG Daiwen

    2005-01-01

    The history, characteristic, operation modes and coupling techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) are introduced. Then the application in cell biology is reviewed in four aspects: cell immobilization methods, cell imaging, force spectrum study and cell manipulation. And the prospect of AFM application in cell biology is discussed.

  14. Suppressing decoherence of spin waves in a warm atomic vapor by applying a guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation to extend lifetimes of light storages by applying guiding magnetic fields in a room-temperature atomic vapor. The storages are based on dynamic electromagnetically induced transparency. Retrieval efficiencies versus storage time are experimentally measured for different strengths of the guiding magnetic fields. The measured results show that the 1/e storage times are ∼6 μs and ∼59 μs for the guiding field B0z = 0 and B0z = 93 mG, respectively. Physical processes causing decoherence in an atomic ensemble have been discussed and analyzed. A theory model which is used to evaluate the decoherence caused by fluctuations of transverse magnetic fields is developed. Based on this evaluation, the fact that storage lifetimes can be increased by applying guiding magnetic fields is well explained. (paper)

  15. Two-photon dichroic atomic vapor laser lock using electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a technique to lock the frequency of a laser to a transition between two excited states in Rb vapor using a two-photon process in the presence of a weak magnetic field. We use a ladder configuration from specific hyperfine sublevels of the 5S1/2, 5P3/2, and 5D5/2 levels. This atomic configuration can show electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption processes. The error signal comes from the difference in the transparency or absorption felt by the two orthogonal polarizations of the probe beam. A simplified model is in good quantitative agreement with the observed signals for the experimental parameters. We have used this technique to lock the frequency of the laser up to 1.5 GHz off atomic resonance.

  16. Dual-axis vapor cell for simultaneous laser frequency stabilization on disparate optical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a dual-axis ytterbium (Yb) vapor cell and used it to simultaneously address the two laser cooling transitions in Yb at wavelengths 399 nm and 556 nm, featuring the disparate linewidths of 2π × 29 MHz and 2π × 182 KHz, respectively. By utilizing different optical paths for the two wavelengths, we simultaneously obtain comparable optical densities suitable for saturated absorption spectroscopy for both the transitions and keep both the lasers frequency stabilized over several hours. We demonstrate that by appropriate control of the cell temperature profile, two atomic transitions differing in relative strength across a large range of over three orders of magnitude can be simultaneously addressed, making the device adaptable to a variety of spectroscopic needs. We also show that our observations can be understood with a simple theoretical model of the Yb vapor

  17. Dual-axis vapor cell for simultaneous laser frequency stabilization on disparate optical transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Anupriya; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a dual-axis ytterbium (Yb) vapor cell and used it to simultaneously address the two laser cooling transitions in Yb at wavelengths 399 nm and 556 nm, featuring the disparate linewidths of 2π × 29 MHz and 2π × 182 KHz, respectively. By utilizing different optical paths for the two wavelengths, we simultaneously obtain comparable optical densities suitable for saturated absorption spectroscopy for both the transitions and keep both the lasers frequency stabilized over several hours. We demonstrate that by appropriate control of the cell temperature profile, two atomic transitions differing in relative strength across a large range of over three orders of magnitude can be simultaneously addressed, making the device adaptable to a variety of spectroscopic needs. We also show that our observations can be understood with a simple theoretical model of the Yb vapor.

  18. Characterization of Cs vapor cell coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane using coherent population trapping spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; Maurice, Vincent; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, UFC, 26 Chemin de l' Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Guérandel, Stéphane; Clercq, Emeric de [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2015-05-14

    We report the realization and characterization using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated centimeter-scale Cs vapor cell. The dual-structure of the resonance lineshape, with presence of a narrow structure line at the top of a Doppler-broadened structure, is clearly observed. The linewidth of the narrow resonance is compared to the linewidth of an evacuated Cs cell and of a buffer gas Cs cell of similar size. The Cs-OTS adsorption energy is measured to be (0.42 ± 0.03) eV, leading to a clock frequency shift rate of 2.7 × 10{sup −9}/K in fractional unit. A hyperfine population lifetime, T{sub 1}, and a microwave coherence lifetime, T{sub 2}, of 1.6 and 0.5 ms are reported, corresponding to about 37 and 12 useful bounces, respectively. Atomic-motion induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances is observed in Cs-OTS cells by reducing the optical beam diameter. Ramsey CPT fringes are detected using a pulsed CPT interrogation scheme. Potential applications of the Cs-OTS cell to the development of a vapor cell atomic clock are discussed.

  19. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  20. Coherent Population Trapping Resonances in Cs Atomic Vapor Layers of Micrometric Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krasteva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel behavior of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA resonance observed on the D2 line of Cs for atoms confined in cells with micrometric thickness. With the enhancement of light intensity, the EIA resonance amplitude suffers from fast reduction, and even at very low intensity (W < 1 mW/cm2, resonance sign reversal takes place and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT resonance is observed. Similar EIA resonance transformation to EIT one is not observed in conventional cm-size cells. A theoretical model is proposed to analyze the physical processes behind the EIA resonance sign reversal with light intensity. The model involves elastic interactions between Cs atoms as well as elastic interaction of atom micrometric-cell windows, both resulting in depolarization of excited state which can lead to the new observations. The effect of excited state depolarization is confirmed also by the fluorescence (absorption spectra measurement in micrometric cells with different thicknesses.

  1. Characterizing passive coherent population trapping resonance in a cesium vapor cell filled with neon buffer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a pair of phase-locked lasers with a 9.2-GHz frequency difference through the injection locking of a master laser to the RF-modulation sideband of a slave diode laser. Using this laser system, a coherent population trapping (CPT) signal with a typical linewidth of ∼ 182 Hz is obtained in a cesium vapor cell filled with 30 Torr (4 kPa) of neon as the buffer gas. We investigate the influence of the partial pressure of the neon buffer gas on the CPT linewidth, amplitude, and frequency shift. The results may offer some references for CPT atomic clocks and CPT atomic magnetometers. (atomic and molecular physics)

  2. Theory of optical near-resonant cone emission in atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-dependent theory for conical emission during near-resonant propagation of laser light in an atomic vapor, which includes full propagation for the laser and frequency sidebands in a nonlinear two-level medium is presented. The density-matrix equations for the dipole moment and population are solved in the dressed atomic frame. The polarization source terms are accurate to order γ/R, where γ is a damping constant and R is the generalized Rabi frequency. Analytical plane-wave solutions and numerical, cylindrically symmetric propagation simulations including diffraction are presented. It is shown that the calculations with cylindrically symmetric fields and atomic excitation profiles are incapable of accounting for the high levels of optical gain that are responsible for the intense conical emission observed in experiments. This result is at first surprising, since the model accounts rigorously for all of the physical phenomena that have been previously proposed as being responsible for generating large gains, and the calculation matches the symmetry of the observations. The lack of large calculated gain seems to imply the existence of higher-order (m>0) radial modes in the field for the experimental conditions that give rise to cone emission. In the simulations, however, the cylindrically symmetric fields do produce weak red-detuned cones with angular-frequency distributions similar to those seen in experiments

  3. Magnetically tuned, robust and efficient filtering system for spatially multimode quantum memory in warm atomic vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Dąbrowski, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Warm atomic vapor quantum memories are simple and robust, yet suffer from a number of parasitic processes which produce excess noise. For operating in a single-photon regime precise filtering of the output light is essential. Here we report a combination of magnetically tuned absorption and Faraday filters, both light-direction-insensitive, which stop the driving lasers and attenuate spurious fluorescence and four-wave mixing while transmitting narrowband Stokes and anti-Stokes photons generated in write-in and readout processes. We characterize both filters with respect to adjustable working parameters. We demonstrate a significant increase in the signal to noise ratio upon applying the filters seen qualitatively in measurements of correlation between the Raman-scattered photons.

  4. Electromagnetically-induced transparency in Cs and Rb in the same vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Matt; Gordon, Joshua; Holloway, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) in both cesium and rubidium in the same vapor cell with coincident optical fields. Each atomic system can detect radio frequency (RF) field strengths through modification of the EIT signal. We show that these two systems can detect the same RF field strength simultaneously. This allows us to perform the same measurement in two effective ``laboratories,'' providing an immediate independent reference, which will lead to an SI-traceable RF E-field measurement. We examine the impact of coincident, simultaneous EIT on RF field metrology and the EIT signal.

  5. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Wenchuan; Wang, Zhenghao

    2016-03-01

    A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL(-1) methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH3(+) solutions were in the range of 0.2-5 ng mL(-1)(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88×10(-3)ng mL(-1) and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL(-1) standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7-45.8 ng g(-1). The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6-103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n=6) were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis. PMID:26615576

  6. Mesoscale imperfections in MoS2 atomic layers grown by a vapor transport technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingnan; Ghosh, Rudresh; Wu, Di; Ismach, Ariel; Ruoff, Rodney; Lai, Keji

    2014-08-13

    The success of isolating small flakes of atomically thin layers through mechanical exfoliation has triggered enormous research interest in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. For device applications, however, controlled large-area synthesis of highly crystalline monolayers with a low density of electronically active defects is imperative. Here, we demonstrate the electrical imaging of dendritic ad-layers and grain boundaries in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by a vapor transport technique using microwave impedance microscopy. The micrometer-sized precipitates in our films, which appear as a second layer of MoS2 in conventional height and optical measurements, show ∼ 2 orders of magnitude higher conductivity than that of the single layer. The zigzag grain boundaries, on the other hand, are shown to be more resistive than the crystalline grains, consistent with previous studies. Our ability to map the local electrical properties in a rapid and nondestructive manner is highly desirable for optimizing the growth process of large-scale MoS2 atomic layers. PMID:25019334

  7. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  8. Dressed Gain from the Parametrically Amplified Four-Wave Mixing Process in an Atomic Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wen, Feng; Che, Junling; Zhang, Dan; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-10-01

    With a forward cone emitting from the strong pump laser in a thermal rubidium atomic vapor, we investigate the non-degenerate parametrically amplified four-wave mixing (PA-FWM) process with dressing effects in a three-level “double-Λ” configuration both theoretically and experimentally. By seeding a weak probe field into the Stokes or anti-Stokes channel of the FWM, the gain processes are generated in the bright twin beams which are called conjugate and probe beams, respectively. However, the strong dressing effect of the pump beam will dramatically affect the gain factors both in the probe and conjugate channels, and can inevitably impose an influence on the quantum effects such as entangled degree and the quantum noise reduction between the two channels. We systematically investigate the intensity evolution of the dressed gain processes by manipulating the atomic density, the Rabi frequency and the frequency detuning. Such dressing effects are also visually evidenced by the observation of Autler-Townes splitting of the gain peaks. The investigation can contribute to the development of quantum information processing and quantum communications.

  9. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  10. Enhancement reagents for simultaneous vapor generation of zinc and cadmium with intermittent flow system coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous vapor generation of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) was evaluated by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with an intermittent flow vapor generation system. Some complexing reagents, surfactant and transition metal ions were respectively tested as enhancement reagents. Experiments showed that an appropriate amount of 8-hydroxyquinoline or phenanthroline and nickel ion simultaneously, effectively improved the vapor generation efficiency of Zn and Cd. The volatile species generation was presumed to be a hydrogenation process interpreting how the enhancement reagents played an important role in vapor generation. Additionally, due to the instability of volatile species, reaction temperature, rapid and sufficient mixing of reagents and rapid separation of the volatile species from liquid phase were also crucial. The method of simultaneous determination of Zn and Cd by intermittent flow vapor generation led to the development of atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The detection limits (3σb) were 1.6 μg l-1 for Zn and 0.01 μg l-1 for Cd and the relative standard deviations were 3.6% for Zn (50 μg l-1, n=11) and 1.7% for Cd (2 μg l-1, n=11) respectively. Results for the determination of Zn and Cd have been confirmed by the analysis of CRMs with good agreement between the certified and found values

  11. A double cell for X-ray absorption spectrometry of atomic Zn

    CERN Document Server

    Mihelic, A; Arcon, I; Padeznik-Gomilsek, J; Borowski, M

    2002-01-01

    A high-temperature cell with a double wall design has been constructed for X-ray absorption spectrometry of metal vapors. The inner cell, assembled from a corundum tube and thin plates without welding or reshaping, serves as a container of the vapor sample. It is not vacuum tight: instead, the outer tube provides inert atmosphere. Several spectra of K-edge atomic absorption of Zn were obtained in the stationary working regime below the Zn boiling point. The K-edge profile shows an extremely strong resonance and, above the continuum threshold, coexcitations of the outer electrons.

  12. Delta-doping of boron atoms by photoexcited chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron delta-doped structures in Si crystals were fabricated by means of photoexcited chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Core electronic excitation with high-energy photons ranging from vacuum ultraviolet to soft x rays decomposes B2H6 molecules into fragments. Combined with in situ monitoring by spectroscopic ellipsometry, limited number of boron hydrides can be delivered onto a Si(100) surface by using the incubation period before the formation of a solid boron film. The boron-covered surface is subsequently embedded in a Si cap layer by Si2H6 photo-excited CVD. The crystallinity of the Si cap layer depended on its thickness and the substrate temperature. The evaluation of the boron depth profile by secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that boron atoms were confined within the delta-doped layer at a concentration of 2.5 x 1020 cm-3 with a full width at half maximum of less than 9 nm, while the epitaxial growth of a 130-nm-thick Si cap layer was sustained at 420 deg. C.

  13. Cell mechanics measured with Atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this contribution, I would like to present recent results about cell mechanics obtained with atomic force microscopy and its relation with basic soft matter science. We will present a novel way to obtain viscoelastic properties (Young modulus, relaxation time and viscosity) of breast cancer cells based on stress relaxation and creep measurements. Additionally we will show the influence of applied stress on red blood cell shape. The importance of such type of measurements on soft matter physics, cell biology, and biomedical science. (author)

  14. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO2, H2 and H2O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L-1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L-1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  15. Determination of mercury by electrochemical cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using polyaniline modified graphite electrode as cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Xianjuan [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Gan Wuer, E-mail: wgan@ustc.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wan Lingzhong; Zhang Hanchang; He Youzhao [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-02-15

    An electrochemical cold vapor generation system with polyaniline modified graphite electrode as cathode material was developed for Hg (II) determination by coupling with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. This electrochemical cold vapor generation system with polyaniline/graphite electrode exhibited higher sensitivity; excellent stability and lower memory effect compared with graphite electrode electrochemical cold vapor generation system. The relative standard deviation was 2.7% for eleven consecutive measurements of 2 ng mL{sup -1} Hg (II) standard solution and the mercury limit of detection for the sample blank solution was 1.3 rg mL{sup -1} (3sigma). The accuracy of the method was evaluated through analysis of the reference materials (GBW09101) (Human hair) and GBW (08517) (Laminaria Japonica Aresch) and the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of human hairs.

  16. In-situ vaporization and matrix removal for the determination of rare earth impurities in zirconium dioxide by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for the determination of trace rare earth impurities in ZrO2 powder has been developed based on electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. A polytetrafluoroethylene slurry was used as a fluorinating reagent to convert both the matrix (Zr) and the analytes (rare earth elements) into fluorides with different volatilities at a high temperature in a graphite furnace. The more volatile ZrF4 was removed in-situ by selective vaporization prior to the determination of the analytes, removing matrix spectral interferences. Under optimum operating conditions, the absolute detection limits of the analytes varied from 0.04 ng (Yb) to 0.50 ng (Pr) with relative standard deviations less than 5%. The recommended approach has been successfully applied to the determination of trace rare earth impurities (La, Pr, Eu, Gd, Ho and Yb) in ZrO2 powder and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by pneumatic nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after the separation of the matrix using a solvent extraction procedure

  17. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460–490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches. (paper)

  18. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  19. Vapor-air plum by explosion of nuclear power plant reactor at atomic submarine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scenario of hypothetic accident with nuclear submarine is given. Equations for calculating gas-dynamic, geometrical and concentrational characteristics of the formed short vapor-air plum are presented. Example for calculating vapor-air plum during hypothetic accident with nuclear submarine is given. 3 refs., 6 figs

  20. COMPARISON OF AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM VAPORIZING AND AIR ATOMIZING WASTE OIL HEATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions and vaporizing pot solid residues resulting from the combustion of waste crankcase oil in space heaters. Two types of waste oil burners were tested: a vaporizing oil burner rated at 35.2 kW, and an...

  1. All-atom force field for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria and interfacial properties of HFA134a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguin, Robson P S; Kamath, Ganesh; Potoff, Jeffrey J; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2009-01-01

    A new all-atom force field capable of accurately predicting the bulk and interfacial properties of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA134a) is reported. Parameterization of several force fields with different initial charge configurations from ab initio calculations was performed using the histogram reweighting method and Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. The 12-6 Lennard-Jones well depth and diameter for the different HFA134a models were determined by fitting the simulation results to pure-component vapor-equilibrium data. Initial screening of the force fields was achieved by comparing the calculated and experimental bulk properties. The surface tension of pure HFA134a served as an additional screening property to help discriminate an optimum model. The proposed model reproduces the experimental saturated liquid and vapor densities, and the vapor pressure for HFA134a within average errors of 0.7%, 4.4%, and 3.1%, respectively. Critical density, temperature, vapor pressure, normal boiling point, and heat of vaporization at 298 K are also in good agreement with experimental data with errors of 0.2%, 0.1%, 6.2%, 0%, 2.2%, respectively. The calculated surface tension is found to be within the experimental range of 7.7-8.1 mN.m(-1). The dipole moment of the different models was found to significantly affect the prediction of the vapor pressure and surface tension. The ability of the HFA134a models in predicting the interfacial tension against water is also discussed. The results presented here are relevant in the development of technologies where the more environmentally friendly HFA134a is utilized as a substitute to the ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbon propellants. PMID:19086791

  2. Role of fluorine atoms in the oxidation-hydrolysis process of plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition fluorinated silicon nitride film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, O.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Palacio, C. (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain))

    The oxidation and/or hydrolysis of a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition fluorinated silicon nitride film in a moisture atmosphere has been studied. The film presents fluorine atoms incorporated as -SiF, -SiF[sub 2], -SiF[sub 3], and [-SiF[sub 2]-][sub n] groups. The open structure of the film, due to the high fluorine content as [-SiF[sub 2]-][sub n], favors the penetration of oxygen and water molecules in the network. The evolution of the film has been explained by the different reactivity of the silicon atoms depending on their chemical environment. The role of fluorine atoms incorporated into the film has been established. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, Valeria [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici - ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Biagi, Simona [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici - IPCF-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ghimenti, Silvia [University of Pisa, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Onor, Massimo; D' Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici - ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici - ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg{sup 0}, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H{sub 2} microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L{sup -1} (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 {mu}mol L{sup -1} were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were

  4. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Luna, Aderval Severino

    2005-06-01

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH 4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO 3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K 2Cr 2O 7/H 2SO 4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg 0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N 2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L -1 of Hg 2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L -1 (0.14 μg kg -1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L -1.

  5. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K2Cr2O7/H2SO4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L-1 of Hg2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L-1 (0.14 μg kg-1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L-1

  6. Development of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a K-Rb hybrid cell and its application to magnetocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ito

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a hybrid cell of K and Rb. The hybrid optical pumping technique can apply dense alkali-metal vapor to the sensor head and leads to high signal intensity. We use dense Rb vapor as probed atoms, and achieve a sensitivity of approximately 100 fTrms/Hz1/2 around 10 Hz. In this case, the sensitivity is limited by the system noise, and the magnetic linewidth is narrower than that for direct Rb optical pumping. We demonstrated magnetocardiography using the magnetometer and obtained clear human magnetocardiograms.

  7. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    techniques. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), on the other hand, is a highly suitable and still relatively unexplored approach for the synthesis of noble metal catalysts. It is a vapor phase growth method, primarily used to deposit thin lms. ALD is based on self-limiting chemical reactions of alternately...

  8. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E

    2015-03-01

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells 'feel', we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved. PMID:25589563

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  10. Determination of Hg(II) as a pollutant in Karachi coastal waters by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Now a days, environmental monitoring has great importance and mercury is well known for its toxicity. Mercury (which is at trace level) is analyzed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy with amendments that are appropriate to the present laboratory need. The results are consistent with previous analysis, through other methods, two areas namely Ibrahim Hyderi and Fisheries were found to have mercury levels around 0.193 mu/L and 0.110 mu g/L, respectively. Whereas other areas have mercury levels similar to other places reported earlier. (author)

  11. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma is investigated. Feasibility of precursors of triethylsilane (TES) and bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) is discussed based on a calculation of bond energies by computer simulation. Refractive indices of 1.81 and 1.71 are obtained for deposited films with TES and BDMADMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the deposited film revealed that TES-based film coincides with the stoichiometric thermal silicon nitride

  12. Characterization of Cs vapor cell coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane using coherent population trapping spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Guérandel, Stéphane; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    We report the realization and characterization using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated centimeter-scale Cs vapor cell. The dual-structure of the resonance lineshape, with presence of a narrow structure line at the top of a Doppler-broadened structure, is clearly observed. The linewidth of the narrow resonance is compared to the linewidth of an evacuated Cs cell and of a buffer gas Cs cell of similar size. The Cs-OTS adsorption energy is measured to be (0.42 $\\pm$ 0.03) eV, leading to a clock frequency shift rate of $2.7\\times10^{-9}/$K in fractional unit. A hyperfine population lifetime, $T_1$, and a microwave coherence lifetime, $T_2$, of 1.6 and 0.5 ms are reported, corresponding to about 37 and 12 useful bounces, respectively. Atomic-motion induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances is observed in Cs-OTS cells by reducing the optical beam diameter. Ramsey CPT fringes are detected using a pulsed CPT interrogation scheme. Potential applications of th...

  13. Atomically resolved surface structures of vapor deposited amorphous silicon-carbon alloys: An atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide alloys are widely used in high-tech applications due to their interesting combination of chemical, mechanical and electronic properties. Growing thin films of this material in a simple and controlled way is a hot topic in modern material's science. In particular, the possibility to tailor the film properties just by tuning the deposition temperature would be an important progress. In the present work amorphous silicon-carbon alloys thin films have been deposited by electron beam sublimation of a poly-crystalline silicon carbide target in vacuum environment. The deposition temperature was varied from Room Temperature to about 1300 K. The resulting films were analyzed by means of Ultra High Vacuum-Atomic Force Microscopy (UHV-AFM) down to even atomic resolution. The observed features agree with literature data, e.g. interatomic bond lengths, as achieved by others methods, and the structural arrangements of silicon and carbon atoms as concluded from IR and Raman spectroscopy measurements carried out on the same samples. The results not only allow a correlation between film properties and deposition temperature but also support the notion of the UHV-AFM images of the amorphous surfaces being atomically resolved.

  14. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  15. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin||lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2009-01-01

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin||lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of rf modulation power, and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2*10^{-11} tau^{-1/2} for observation times 1s

  16. Chemical vapor generation of silver for atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer: Radiotracer efficiency study and characterization of silver species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatile Ag species were generated in flow injection arrangement from nitric acid environment in the presence of surfactants (Triton X-100 and Antifoam B) and permanent Pd deposits as the reaction modifiers. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer heated to 900 deg. C was used for atomization; evidence was found for thermal mechanism of atomization. Relative and absolute limits of detection (3σ, 250 μl sample loop) measured under optimized conditions were: 1.4 μg l-1 and 0.35 ng, respectively. The efficiency of chemical vapor generation (CVG) as well as spatial distribution of residual analyte in the apparatus was studied by 111Ag radioactive indicator (half-life 7.45 days) of high specific activity. It was found out that 23% of analyte was released into the gaseous phase. However, only 8% was found on filters placed at the entrance to the atomizer due to transport losses. About 40% of analyte remained in waste liquid, whereas the rest was found deposited over the CVG system. Presented study follows the hypothesis that the 'volatile' Ag species are actually metallic nanoparticles formed upon reduction in liquid phase and then released with good efficiency to the gaseous phase. Number/charge size distributions of dry aerosol were determined by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. Ag was detected in 40-45 nm particles holding 10 times more charge if compared to Boltzmann equilibrium. At the same time, Ag was also present on 150 nm particles, the main size mode of the CVG generator. The increase of Ag in standards was reflected by proportional increase in particle number/charge for 40-45 nm size particles only. Transmission electron microscopy revealed particles of 8 ± 2 nm sampled from the gaseous phase, which were associated in isolated clusters of few to few tens of nanometres. Ag presence in those particles was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  17. Role of atomic hydrogen density and energy in low power chemical vapor deposition synthesis of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates without diamond seeding by a very low power (∼40-80 W) microwave plasma continuous vapor deposition reaction of a mixture of helium-hydrogen-methane (48.2/48.2/3.6%) or argon-hydrogen-methane (17.5/80/2.5%). However, predominantly graphitic carbon films or no films formed when neon, krypton, or xenon was substituted for helium or argon. The films were characterized by time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It is proposed that each of He+ and Ar+ served as a catalyst with atomic hydrogen to form an energetic plasma since only plasmas having these ions in the presence of atomic hydrogen showed significantly broadened H α lines corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of >100 eV as reported previously. It was found that not only the energy, but also the H density uniquely increases in He-H2 and Ar-H2 plasmas. Bombardment of the carbon surface by highly energetic hydrogen formed by the catalysis reaction may play a role in the formation of diamond. Then, by this novel pathway, the relevance of the CO tie line is eliminated along with other stringent conditions and complicated and inefficient techniques which limit broad application of the versatility and superiority of diamond thin film technology

  18. A highly sensitive method for the determination of mercury using vapor generation gold wire microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study introduces a new simple and highly sensitive method for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mercury. In the proposed method, a gold wire, mounted in the headspace of a sample solution in a sealed bottle, is used for collection of mercury vapor generated by addition of sodium tetrahydroborate. The gold wire is then simply inserted in the sample introduction hole of a graphite furnace of an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry instrument. By applying an atomization temperature of 600 deg. C, mercury is rapidly desorbed from the wire and determined with high sensitivity. Factorial design and response surface analysis methods were used for optimization of the effect of five different variables in order to maximize the mercury signal. By using a 0.75 mm diameter gold wire, a sample volume of about 8 ml and an extraction time of 11 min, the sensitivity of mercury determination was enhanced up to 104 times in comparison to its ordinary ETAAS determination with direct injection of 10 μl sample solutions. A detection limit of 0.006 ng ml-1 and a precision better than 4.6% (relative standard deviation) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in industrial wastewaters and tuna fish samples

  19. A highly sensitive method for the determination of mercury using vapor generation gold wire microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Payman [Department of Chemistry, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: payman_hashemi@yahoo.com; Rahimi, Akram [Department of Chemistry, Lorestan University, Khorram Abad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The study introduces a new simple and highly sensitive method for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mercury. In the proposed method, a gold wire, mounted in the headspace of a sample solution in a sealed bottle, is used for collection of mercury vapor generated by addition of sodium tetrahydroborate. The gold wire is then simply inserted in the sample introduction hole of a graphite furnace of an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry instrument. By applying an atomization temperature of 600 deg. C, mercury is rapidly desorbed from the wire and determined with high sensitivity. Factorial design and response surface analysis methods were used for optimization of the effect of five different variables in order to maximize the mercury signal. By using a 0.75 mm diameter gold wire, a sample volume of about 8 ml and an extraction time of 11 min, the sensitivity of mercury determination was enhanced up to 10{sup 4} times in comparison to its ordinary ETAAS determination with direct injection of 10 {mu}l sample solutions. A detection limit of 0.006 ng ml{sup -1} and a precision better than 4.6% (relative standard deviation) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in industrial wastewaters and tuna fish samples.

  20. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qingyang, E-mail: liuqingyang0807@yahoo.com.c [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg{sup 0}, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL{sup -1} for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury (n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  1. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D1 line of 87Rb with the current modulation at the 87Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10-11τ-1/2 for observation times 1 s≤τ≤20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  2. Determination of trace mercury in environmental samples by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive method is presented for the determination of ultra-trace levels of mercury using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry along with cloud point extraction. Preconcentration is based on the complexation of Hg(II) by dithizone, followed by micelle-mediated extraction of the complex using the surfactant Triton X-114. Foaming, which is always observed when generating vapor mercury in the presence of surfactant, was strongly reduced by using SnCl2 as a reducing reagent, and a homemade gas-liquid separator. Variables that affect the assay were optimized. These included pH value, concentration of chelating reagent, concentration of Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time. The preconcentration of a 45-mL sample gave an enhancement factor of 29. The calibration graph is linear in the range from 0. 05 to 5. 0 ng mL-1 with a correlation coefficient of 0. 9991. The limit of detection obtained under the optimal conditions is 5 pg mL-1. The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations at 0. 5 ng mL-1 level is 5. 2%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in real samples. (author)

  3. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. → Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. → Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min-1 Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl2 reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO3-H2SO4 mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml-1 or 0.08 μg g-1 in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg-1, while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  4. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Fabio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Goldschmidt Antes, Fabiane; Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: flores@quimica.ufsm.br

    2009-06-15

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L{sup - 1} KBr in 6 mol L{sup - 1} HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L{sup - 1} HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH{sub 4} solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 deg. C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 deg. C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g{sup - 1} for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  5. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min−1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m0) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m0 of 18 analytes were calculated for stopped & mini furnace gas flows. • Experimental

  6. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  7. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  8. Properties of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Barrier Coatings and Encapsulated Polymer Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report silicon oxide coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology (PECVD) on 125 μm polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces for the purpose of the shelf lifetime extension of sealed polymer solar cells. After optimization of the processing parameters, we achieved a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ca. 10−3 g/m2/day with the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) less than 0.05 cc/m2/day, and succeeded in extending the shelf lifetime to about 400 h in encapsulated solar cells. And then the chemical structure of coatings related to the properties of encapsulated cell was investigated in detail. (plasma technology)

  9. On-line preconcentration and determination of mercury in biological and environmental samples by cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An on-line procedure for the determination of traces of total mercury in environmental and biological samples is described. The present methodology combines cold vapor generation associated to atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) with preconcentration of the analyte on a minicolumn packed with activated carbon. The retained analyte was quantitatively eluted from the minicolumn with nitric acid. After that, volatile specie of mercury was generated by merging the acidified sample and sodium tetrahydroborate(III) in a continuous flow system. The gaseous analyte was subsequently introduced via a stream of Ar carrier into the atomizer device. Optimizations of both, preconcentration and mercury volatile specie generation variables were carried out using two level full factorial design (23) with 3 replicates of the central point. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 13-fold was obtained. The detection limit (3σ) was 10 ng L-1 and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.1% (n = 10) at the 5 μg L-1 level. The calibration curve using the preconcentration system for mercury was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 at levels near the detection limit up to at least 1000 μg L-1. Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of mercury in tap water and hair samples

  10. A High Temperature Calcium Vapor Cell for Spectroscopy on the 4s^2 1S0 to 4s4p 3P1 Intercombination Line

    CERN Document Server

    Erickson, C J; Durfee, D S; Erickson, Christopher J.; Neyenhuis, Brian; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a high temperature vapor cell for absorption spectroscopy on the Ca intercombination line. The cell uses a dual chamber design to achieve the high temperatures necessary for an optically dense vapor while avoiding the necessity of high temperature vacuum valves and glass-to-metal seals. We have observed over 50 percent absorption in a single pass through the cell. Although pressure broadening in the cell prevented us from performing saturated-absorption spectroscopy, the broadening resulted in higher signal-to-noise ratios by allowing us to probe the atoms with intensities much greater than the 0.2 uW/cm^2 saturation intensity of the unbroadened transition.

  11. Collapse and revival of a Dicke-type coherent narrowing in potassium vapor confined in a nanometric thin cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Armen; Pashayan-Leroy, Yevgenya; Leroy, Claude; Sarkisyan, David

    2016-04-01

    A nanometer-thin cell (in the direction of laser beam propagation) has been elaborated with the thickness of the atomic vapor column varying smoothly in the range of L=50-1500 {nm}. The cell allows one to study the behavior of the resonance absorption over the D 1 line of potassium atoms by varying the laser intensity and the cell thickness (from L=λ /2 to L=2λ with the step λ /2 where λ =770 {nm} is the resonant wavelength of the laser). It is shown that despite the huge Doppler broadening (\\gt 0.9 {GHz} at the cell temperature 170{}\\circ {{C}}), at low laser intensities a narrowing of the resonance absorption spectrum is observed for L=λ /2 (∼ 120 {MHz} at FWHM) and L=3/2λ , whereas for L=λ and L=2λ the spectrum broadens. At moderate laser intensities narrowband velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) resonances appear at L=λ and L=2λ with the linewidth close to the natural one. A comparison with saturated absorption spectra obtained in a 1.4 cm-sized K cell is presented. The developed theoretical model well describes the experiment.

  12. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10−11/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10−22 m2 s−1 Pa−1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases

  13. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence, Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel CH-2000 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  14. Review on utilization of the pervaporation membrane for passive vapor feed direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is a promising portable power source for mobile electronic devices because of its advantages including easy fuel storage, high energy density, low temperature operation and compact structure. In DMFC, methanol is used as a fuel source where it can be fed in liquid or vapor phase. However, the vapor feed DMFC has an advantage over the liquid feed system as it has the potential to have a higher operating temperature to increase the reaction rates and power outputs, to enhance the mass transfers, to reduce methanol crossover, reliable for high methanol concentration and it can increase the fuel cell performance. Methanol vapor can be delivered to the anode by using a pervaporation membrane, heating the liquid methanol or another method that compatible. Therefore, this paper is a review on vapor feed DMFC as a better energy source than liquid feed DMFC, the pervaporation membrane used to vaporize methanol feed from the reservoir and its applications in vapor feed DMFC

  15. Collapse and revival of a Dicke-type coherent narrowing in potassium vapor confined in a nanometric-thin cell

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, A; Leroy, C; Sarkisyan, D

    2015-01-01

    A nanometer-thin-cell (in the direction of laser beam propagation) has been elaborated with the thickness of the atomic vapor column varying smoothly in the range of $L = \\unit[50-1500]{nm}$. The cell allows one to study the behavior of the resonance absorption over the $D_1$ line of potassium atoms by varying the laser intensity and the cell thickness from $L = \\lambda / 2$ to $L = 2 \\lambda$ with the step $\\lambda/2$ ($\\lambda =\\unit[770]{nm}$ is the resonant wavelength of the laser). It is shown that despite the huge Doppler broadening ($>\\unit[0.9]{GHz}$ at the cell temperature $\\unit[170]{^{\\circ}C}$), at low laser intensities a narrowing of the resonance absorption spectrum is observed for $L = \\lambda/2$ ($\\sim \\unit[120]{ MHz}$ at FWHM) and $L = 3/2 \\lambda$, whereas for $L = \\lambda$ and $L =2\\lambda$ the spectrum broadens. At moderate laser intensities narrowband velocity selective optical pumping (VSOP) resonances appear at $L = \\lambda$ and $L=2\\lambda $ with the linewidth close to the natural one...

  16. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Hansma, Paul K.; Hulst, van Niek F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect imm

  17. Coherent population trapping in small- and chip-scale 87Rb vapor cells with buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermak, S. V.; Semenov, V. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Pyatyshev, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of coherent population trapping (CPT) signal were investigated in small-size glass vapor cells containing 87Rb and Ne buffer gas with narrow line-width laser pumping on D2 line. The parameters of CPT signals were measured using small-size vapor cells with Ne buffer gas pressure in the range of 200-400 Torr, cell temperature in the range of 65-120 ∘C and the values of laser pumping power of 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimal conditions, under which the minimal value of short-term instability of resonance line is achieved, were obtained in experiments. Orientation frequency shifts of CPT resonance using glass 87Rb vapor cells containing buffer gas and anti-relaxation coating were compared. CPT signals using vapor cells based on integrated technologies containing 87Rb in atmosphere of Ne were also investigated. The CPT signals with typical line widths of 2-3 kHz and signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in 1 Hz bandwidth are observed, which allows one to provide relative frequency instability of 10-11 at 100 s.

  18. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH3) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  19. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  20. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al2O2/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ∼1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al2O3 tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers

  1. Light shift averaging in paraffin-coated alkali vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zhivun, Elena; Sudyka, Julia; Pustelny, Szymon; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Light shifts are an important source of noise and systematics in optically pumped magnetometers. We demonstrate that the long spin coherence time in paraffin-coated cells leads to spatial averaging of the light shifts over the entire cell volume. This renders the averaged light shift independent, under certain approximations, of the light-intensity distribution within the sensor cell. These results and the underlying mechanism can be extended to other spatially varying phenomena in anti-relaxation-coated cells with long coherence times.

  2. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Mehrnoush [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 {mu}L, a sampling temperature of 27 {sup o}C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n = 7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 {mu}g L{sup -1} were also studied.

  3. Determination of methyl mercury by aqueous phase Eehylation, followed by gas chromatographic separation with cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wild, John F.; Olsen, Mark L.; Olund, Shane D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent national sampling of streams in the United States revealed low methyl mercury concentrations in surface waters. The resulting median and mean concentrations, calculated from 104 samples, were 0.06 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.15 ng/L, respectively. This level of methyl mercury in surface water in the United States has created a need for analytical techniques capable of detecting sub-nanogram per liter concentrations. In an attempt to create a U.S. Geological Survey approved method, the Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory has adapted a distillation/ethylation/ gas-phase separation method with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy detection for the determination of methyl mercury in filtered and unfiltered waters. This method is described in this report. Based on multiple analyses of surface water and ground-water samples, a method detection limit of 0.04 ng/L was established. Precision and accuracy were evaluated for the method using both spiked and unspiked ground-water and surface-water samples. The percent relative standard deviations ranged from 10.2 to 15.6 for all analyses at all concentrations. Average recoveries obtained for the spiked matrices ranged from 88.8 to 117 percent. The precision and accuracy ranges are within the acceptable method-performance limits. Considering the demonstrated detection limit, precision, and accuracy, the method is an effective means to quantify methyl mercury in waters at or below environmentally relevant concentrations

  4. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  5. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  6. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  7. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  8. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  9. IR study of fundamental chemical reactions in atomic layer deposition of HfO2 with tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium (TEMAH), ozone, and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental reactions in HfO2 atomic layer deposition (ALD) with the precursors tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium (TEMAH), ozone, and water vapor on Si (1 0 0) surfaces at room temperature (RT) were studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) with a multiple internal reflection geometry. The IRAS results indicated that TEMAH can be adsorbed at OH sites on Si surfaces at RT. Ozone irradiation on the TEMAH-adsorbed Si surface at RT effectively removes hydroaminocarbon adsorbates introduced in the course of TEMAH adsorption, although this treatment provides no OH-group adsorption sites for TEMAH on the Si surface at RT. For further adsorption, water-vapor treatment at around 160 °C is effective in restoring the adsorption sites. The IR study suggests that the cyclic process of TEMAH adsorption and ozone treatment at RT followed by OH restoration with water vapor at a temperature of 160 °C allows continuous HfO2 deposition.

  10. Oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition of Neutral Hole Transporting Polymer for Enhanced Solar Cell Efficiency and Lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Won Jun; Nelson, Justin T; Chang, Sehoon; Bulović, Vladimir; Gradečak, Silvija; Strano, Michael S; Gleason, Karen K

    2016-08-01

    The concept of a neutral hole-transporting polymer is realized for the first time, by integrating patterned Cl(-) -doped poly(3,4-dimethoxythiophene) thin films into organic solar cells through a vacuum-based polymer vapor printing technique. Due to this novel polymer's neutrality, high transparency, good conductivity, and appropriate energy levels, the solar-cell efficiency and lifetime are significantly enhanced. PMID:27167214

  11. A vapor feed methanol microfluidic fuel cell with high fuel and energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A microfluidic fuel cell with a vapor feed anode is investigated. • Its advantages include simpler design, direct usage of methanol and better performance. • The prototype achieves a peak power density of 55.4 mW cm−2 under room temperature. • The energy efficiency of 9.4% is much higher than its liquid feed counterpart. - Abstract: In this paper, a prototype of methanol microfluidic fuel cell with vapor feed anode configuration is proposed to improve the fuel and energy efficiency of the conventional liquid feed methanol microfluidic fuel cells. Peak power density of 55.4 mW cm−2 can be achieved with this prototype under room temperature, which is 30% higher than its conventional liquid feed counterpart. Moreover, an energy efficiency of 9.4% is achieved, which is 27.5 times higher than its liquid feed counterpart. This superiority on both cell performance and energy efficiency is directly benefitted from its vapor feed anode configuration, which alleviates the fuel crossover, eliminates the fuel depletion boundary layer, and avoids the bulk anolyte wastage. The tradeoff between cell performance and fuel utilization for conventional liquid feed microfluidic fuel cells is also evaded

  12. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  13. Unraveling the Solid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transition Dynamics at the Atomic Level with Ultrafast X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a powerful probe of electronic and atomic structures in various media, ranging from molecules to condensed matter. We show how ultrafast time resolution opens new possibilities to investigate highly nonequilibrium states of matter including phase transitions. Based on a tabletop laser-plasma ultrafast x-ray source, we have performed a time-resolved (∼3 ps) XANES experiment that reveals the evolution of an aluminum foil at the atomic level, when undergoing ultrafast laser heating and ablation. X-ray absorption spectra highlight an ultrafast transition from the crystalline solid to the disordered liquid followed by a progressive transition of the delocalized valence electronic structure (metal) down to localized atomic orbitals (nonmetal--vapor), as the average distance between atoms increases.

  14. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  15. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs

  16. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Grooth, de, B.G.; Hansma, Paul K.; Hulst, van der, R.W.M.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect immunolabeling method using the monoclonal antibody anti-CD3 and a secondary antibody (Goat-anti-Mouse) linked to 30 nm colloidal gold particles. Some of the samples were enhanced by silver deposition...

  17. Study on the application of cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of Hg and As traces in sea water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace amount of total mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) in sea water samples were quantitatively determined by using the Atomic Absorption Spectrometry connected with the hydride generation technique (HG-AAS) for As, and with the cold vapour technique (CV-AAS) for Hg. The experiments were carried out at room temperature on a Hydride System Module (HS55) combined with an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (VARIO 6, Analytik Jena AG). The effect of reductants concentration, and that of matrix on the absorption intensity of each analyzed element was studied in details. The sea water sample after fitrating through a membrane with 0.45(μm-hole size was pre-treated with an oxidant or an reductant to obtain the identical medium. The absorption intensity of each element was then measured on the VARIO-6 under the optimum parameters for spectrometer such as: maximum wavelength, current of hollow cathode lamp, and that for hydride system such as cell temperature, speed of peristaltic pump, pump time, reaction time and rewash time, ect. The analytical procedures were set-up and applied for the determination of these above mentioned elements in the synthesized sea water sample and in the real sea water samples with high precision and accuracy. (author)

  18. Genetic instability in leukemic cells from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MSI (Micro Satellite Instability) analysis was enforced for 29 patients with AML (atomic bomb survivors 13 cases, unexposed persons 16 cases) who developed from 1986 to 1994. When the cases that alterations at two or more parts were recognized in micro-satellite analyses of leukemic cell were defined as MSI, 2 of 16 unexposed persons and 10 of 13 survivors were positive, and significant high rate was recognized (p<0.01) among survivors. This result suggest genetic instability in leukemic cell of atomic bomb survivors. (K.H.)

  19. Non-heating atomic layer deposition of SiO2 using tris(dimethylamino)silane and plasma-excited water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-heating atomic layer deposition of SiO2 is developed using tris(dimethylamino)silane (TDMAS) and plasma-excited water vapor. The plasma-excited water is effective in oxidizing the TDMAS-adsorbed SiO2 surface while leaving OH sites on the growing surface at room temperature for further TDMAS adsorption. The growth rate is measured to be 0.075 nm/cycle at room temperature. SiO2 stacking directly on a Ge (100) wafer at room temperature is demonstrated, where an atomically flat interface is confirmed by transmission electron microscope observation. - Highlights: ► SiO2 non-heating atomic layer deposition is developed using tris(dimethylamino)silane. ► The oxidizing agent is plasma-excited water vapor. ► The growth rate is measured to be 0.075 nm/cycle at room temperature. ► SiO2 stacking on a Ge (100) wafer with an atomically flat interface is demonstrated.

  20. Fabrication of efficient planar perovskite solar cells using a one-step chemical vapor deposition method

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mahdi Tavakoli; Leilei Gu; Yuan Gao; Claas Reckmeier; Jin He; Rogach, Andrey L; Yan Yao; Zhiyong Fan

    2015-01-01

    Organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising materials for photovoltaic applications, which have demonstrated a rapid rise in photovoltaic performance in a short period of time. We report a facile one-step method to fabricate planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), with a solar power conversion efficiency of up to 11.1%. We performed a systematic optimization of CVD parameters such as temperature and growth time to obtain high quality films of CH...

  1. Solid phase extraction of cadmium on 2-mercaptobenzothiazole loaded on sulfur powder in the medium of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel solid phase extractor for preconcentration of cadmium at ng L-1 levels has been developed. Cadmium ions were retained on a column packed with sulfur powder modified with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBT) in the medium of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim]+PF6-) ionic liquid. The presence of ionic liquid during modification of sulfur enhanced the retention of cadmium ions on the column. The retained cadmium ions were eluted with 2 mol L-1 solution of HCl and measured by cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG-AAS). By using reaction cell-gas liquid separator (RC-GLS), gaseous cadmium vapors were produced and reached the atomic absorption spectrometer, instantaneously. The influence of different variables on both processes of solid phase extraction and CVG-AAS determination of cadmium ions was investigated. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 10-200 ng L-1of cadmium in the initial solution with r = 0.9992 (n = 8) under optimum conditions. The limit of detection based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3Sb, n = 10) was 4.6 ng L-1. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 25 and 150 ng L-1 of cadmium was 4.1 and 2.2% (n = 8), respectively. The procedure was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (DORM-3), water and fish samples.

  2. The Effect of Mercury Vapor and the Role of Green Tea Extract on Brain Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhona Afriza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a wellknown toxic metal that is capable to induce free radical-induced oxidative stress. It can cause human disease including brain disorders. Objective: To identify the effect of mercury vapor inhalation on brain cells and the role of green tea extract (Camellia sinensis as antioxidant on the brain cells exposed to mercury. Methods: Fourty-eight male Mus musculus were divided into 8 groups, which were given treatment for 3 and 6 weeks. Group A did not receive any treatment and served as a negative control. Group B was a positive control exposed to Mercury. Group C was exposed to Mercury and treated with 26μg/g green tea extract. Group D was exposed to mercury and treated with 52μg/g green tea extract. All animals in the Group B, C, D were exposed to mercury through inhalation for 4 hours daily. The effect of mercury on the brain cells were examined histopathologically. Results: The numbers of necrotic cells counted in the green tea-treated mice group were significantly lower than those untreated group (p<0,05. Conclusion: Mercury vapor inhalation may cause necrosis on brain cells. Administration of green tea extract as an antioxidant reduced the amount of mercury-induced necrotic brain cells in mice.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.151

  3. Enhanced water vapor barrier properties for biopolymer films by polyelectrolyte multilayer and atomic layer deposited Al2O3 double-coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial polylactide (PLA) films are coated with a thin (20 nm) non-toxic polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film made from sodium alginate and chitosan and additionally with a 25-nm thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 layer. The double-coating of PEM + Al2O3 is found to significantly enhance the water vapor barrier properties of the PLA film. The improvement is essentially larger compared with the case the PLA film being just coated with an ALD-grown Al2O3 layer. The enhanced water vapor barrier characteristics of the PEM + Al2O3 double-coated PLA films are attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the surface of these films.

  4. Enhanced water vapor barrier properties for biopolymer films by polyelectrolyte multilayer and atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 double-coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi; Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Harlin, Ali; Salomäki, Mikko; Areva, Sami; Korhonen, Juuso T.; Karppinen, Maarit

    2011-09-01

    Commercial polylactide (PLA) films are coated with a thin (20 nm) non-toxic polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film made from sodium alginate and chitosan and additionally with a 25-nm thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al 2O 3 layer. The double-coating of PEM + Al 2O 3 is found to significantly enhance the water vapor barrier properties of the PLA film. The improvement is essentially larger compared with the case the PLA film being just coated with an ALD-grown Al 2O 3 layer. The enhanced water vapor barrier characteristics of the PEM + Al 2O 3 double-coated PLA films are attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the surface of these films.

  5. The Effect of Mercury Vapor and the Role of Green Tea Extract on Brain Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dhona Afriza

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a wellknown toxic metal that is capable to induce free radical-induced oxidative stress. It can cause human disease including brain disorders. Objective: To identify the effect of mercury vapor inhalation on brain cells and the role of green tea extract (Camellia sinensis) as antioxidant on the brain cells exposed to mercury. Methods: Fourty-eight male Mus musculus were divided into 8 groups, which were given treatment for 3 and 6 weeks. Group A did not receive any treatment and se...

  6. Integration of polymer electrolytes in dye sensitized solar cells by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mesoporous titanium dioxide electrode of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) has been successfully filled with polymer electrolyte to replace the conventional liquid electrolyte. Polymer electrolyte was directly synthesized and deposited using the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process, and an iodide-triiodide redox couple in different redox solvents was then incorporated into the polymer. We have investigated different candidate polymer electrolytes, including poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA). The open circuit voltage of cells fabricated with iCVD PHEMA was found to be higher when compared with a liquid electrolyte that is attributed to a lower rate of electron recombination.

  7. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  8. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs

  10. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  11. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  12. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangperawong, Artit [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F., E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  13. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangperawong, Artit; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F.

    2014-10-01

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  14. Vapor of volatile oils from Litsea cubeba seed induces apoptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Seal

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC is a major killer in cancer related human death. Its therapeutic intervention requires superior efficient molecule(s as it often becomes resistant to present chemotherapy options. Here we report that vapor of volatile oil compounds obtained from Litsea cubeba seeds killed human NSCLC cells, A549, through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Vapor generated from the combined oils (VCO deactivated Akt, a key player in cancer cell survival and proliferation. Interestingly VCO dephosphorylated Akt at both Ser(473 and Thr(308; through the suppression of mTOR and pPDK1 respectively. As a consequence of this, diminished phosphorylation of Bad occurred along with the decreased Bcl-xL expression. This subsequently enhanced Bax levels permitting the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol which concomitantly activated caspase 9 and caspase 3 resulting apoptotic cell death. Impairment of Akt activation by VCO also deactivated Mdm2 that effected overexpression of p53 which in turn upregulated p21 expression. This causes enhanced p21 binding to cyclin D1 that halted G1 to S phase progression. Taken together, VCO produces two prong effects on lung cancer cells, it induces apoptosis and blocked cancer cell proliferation, both occurred due to the deactivation of Akt. In addition, it has another crucial advantage: VCO could be directly delivered to lung cancer tissue through inhalation.

  15. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Alison [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100°C for 90 minutes followed by 120°C for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulk photoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  16. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Alison J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100 degree Celsius for 90 minutes followed by 120 degree Celsius for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulkphotoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  17. Precise measurements of 203 Tl and 205 Tl excited state hyperfine splittings and isotope shifts using two-step vapor cell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, P. K.; Cheng, Sau Man; Rupasinghe, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    We have undertaken a series of high-precision atomic structure measurement in thallium to test ongoing ab initio atomic structure calculations of relevance to symmetry violation tests in this element. We are currently completing two-step spectroscopy measurements of the 8P1 / 2 and 8P3 / 2 hyperfine structure and isotope shift using a heated thallium vapor cell and two external cavity semiconductor diode lasers. One laser, locked to the thallium 6P1 / 2 --> 7S1 / 2 378 nm transition excites one or both naturally-occurring isotopes to an intermediate state. A second red laser overlaps the UV beam within the thallium vapor cell in both a co-propagating and counter-propagating configuration. Analysis of subsequent Doppler-free absorption spectra of the 7S1 / 2 --> 8P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 visible transitions allows us to extract both hyperfine and isotope shift information for these excited states with uncertainties below 1 MHz. Frequency modulation of the red laser provides convenient in situ frequency calibration. Recent measurements in our group have shown significant discrepancies from older hyperfine structure measurements in thallium excited states. Current results will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant # 1404206.

  18. Thin film cadmium telluride solar cells by two chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.

    1988-01-15

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has long been recognized as a promising thin film photovoltaic material. In this work, polycrystalline p-CdTe films have been deposited by two chemical vapor deposition techniques, namely the combination of vapors of elements (CVE) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The CVE technique is more flexible in controlling the composition of deposited films while the CSS technique can provide very high deposition rates. The resistivity of p-CdTe films deposited by the CVE and CSS techniques can be controlled by intrinsic (cadmium vacancies) or extrinsic (arsenic or antimony) doping, and the lowest resistivity obtainable is about 200 ..cap omega.. cm. Both front-wall (CdTe/TCS/glass) and back-wall (TCS/CdTe/substrate) cells have been prepared. The back-wall cells are less efficient because of the high and irreproducible p-CdTe-substrate interface resistance. The CSS technique is superior to the CVE technique because of its simplicity and high deposition rates; however, the cleaning of the substrate in situ is more difficult. The interface cleanliness is an important factor determining the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of the heterojunction. Heterojunction CdS/CdTe solar cells of area 1 cm/sup 2/ with conversion efficiencies higher than 10% have been prepared and junction properties characterized.

  19. Widefield Microwave Imaging in Alkali Vapor Cells with sub-100 um Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    We report on widefield microwave vector field imaging with sub um resolution using a microfabricated alkali vapor cell. The setup can additionally image dc magnetic fields, and can be configured to image microwave electric fields. Our camera-based widefield imaging system records 2D images with a 6x6 mm2 field of view at a rate of 10 Hz. It provides up to 50 um spatial resolution, and allows imaging of fields as close as 150 um above structures, through the use of thin external cell walls. This is crucial in allowing us to take practical advantage of the high spatial resolution, as feature sizes in near-fields are on the order of the distance from their source, and represents an order of magnitude improvement in surface-feature resolution compared to previous vapor cell experiments. We present microwave and dc magnetic field images above a selection of devices, demonstrating a microwave sensitivity of 1.4 uT/sqrt-Hz per 50x50x140 um3 voxel, at present limited by the speed of our camera system. Since we image ...

  20. Investigating the effects of methanol-water vapor mixture on a PBI-based high temperature PEM fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Nielsen, Heidi Venstrup;

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of methanol and water vapor on the performance of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC). A H3PO4-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane electrode assembly (MEA), Celtec P2100 of 45 cm2 of active surface area from BASF was employed. A...... long-term durability test of around 1250 h was performed, in which the concentrations of methanol-water vapor mixture in the anode feed gas were varied. The fuel cell showed a continuous performance decay in the presence of vapor mixtures of methanol and water of 5% and 8% by volume in anode feed....... Impedance measurements followed by equivalent circuit fitting revealed that the effects were most significant for intermediate-high frequency resistances, implying that charge transfer losses were the most significant losses. Vapor mixture of 3% in feed, however, when introduced after operation at 8...

  1. Homojunction GaAs solar cells grown by close space vapor transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, Jason W. [University of Oregon; Ritenour, Andrew J. [University of Oregon; Greenaway, Ann L. [University of Oregon; Aloni, Shaul [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Boettcher, Shannon W. [University of Oregon

    2014-06-08

    We report on the first pn junction solar cells grown by homoepitaxy of GaAs using close space vapor transport (CSVT). Cells were grown both on commercial wafer substrates and on a CSVT absorber film, and had efficiencies reaching 8.1%, open circuit voltages reaching 909 mV, and internal quantum efficiency of 90%. The performance of these cells is partly limited by the electron diffusion lengths in the wafer substrates, as evidenced by the improved peak internal quantum efficiency in devices fabricated on a CSVT absorber film. Unoptimized highly-doped n-type emitters also limit the photocurrent, indicating that thinner emitters with reduced doping, and ultimately wider band gap window or surface passivation layers, are required to increase the efficiency.

  2. Characteristics of the Na/beta-alumina/Na cell as a sodium vapor pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EMF and voltage-current characteristics for a galvanic cell with the configuration Na vapor (P1)/sodium beta-alumina/Na vapor (P2) were studied. It was verified that the EMF followed the Nernst relation over a wide pressure range. For example, when P1 = 2 x 10-2 mm Hg and beta-alumina temperature = 3400C, the measured EMF agreed with the calculated value in P2 range from 10-5 to 10-2 mm Hg. At lower pressure range, the measured EMF showed a negative deviation. Coexisting argon gas did not influence the cell EMF characteristic. In an atmosphere containing oxygen, the measured EMF was very high at first. Then it decreased and finally approached a value which agreed with the Nernst equation after several hours. At low beta-alumina temperatures, current saturation was observed in the voltage versus current relation with the anode on the P2 side. Although the sodium pressure could be determined from saturating current measurement, the measurable pressure range was narrower than that for EMF measurement. At high beta-alumina temperature, current saturation was not clear. Values of 6 x 10-6 (Ω cm)-1 for the electron conductivity and 6 x 10-10 (Ω cm)-1 for the hole conductivity at 3400C were obtained for beta-alumina from the voltage-current characteristics at low sodium pressure. (Auth.)

  3. Fabrication of CdTe solar cells by laser-driven physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Liu, S.; Nguyen, M.; Aydinli, A.; Tsien, L.H.; Bohn, R.G. (Toledo Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-05-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride heterojunction solar cells were fabricated for the first time using a laser-driven physical vapor deposition method. An XeCl excimer laser was used to deposit both of the II-VI semiconductor layers in a single vacuum chamber from pressed powder targets. Results are presented from optical absorption. Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and electrical characterization of the films. Solar cells were fabricated by deposition onto SnO{sub 2}-coated glass with top contacts produced by gold evaporation. Device performance was evaluated from the spectral quantum efficiency and current-voltage measurements in the dark and with air mass 1.5 solar illumination. (orig.).

  4. Improved efficiency of a large-area Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ solar cell by a nontoxic hydrogen-assisted solid Se vapor selenization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Ta; Hu, Fan; Huang, Jyun-Hong; Chang, Chia-ho; Lai, Chih-chung; Yen, Yu-Ting; Huang, Hou-Ying; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Wang, Zhiming M; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-04-01

    A nontoxic hydrogen-assisted solid Se vapor selenization process (HASVS) technique to achieve a large-area (40 × 30 cm(2)) Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar panel with enhanced efficiencies from 7.1 to 10.8% (12.0% for active area) was demonstrated. The remarkable improvement of efficiency and fill factor comes from improved open circuit voltage (Voc) and reduced dark current due to (1) decreased interface recombination raised from the formation of a widened buried homojunction with n-type Cd(Cu) participation and (2) enhanced separation of electron and hole carriers resulting from the accumulation of Na atoms on the surface of the CIGS film. The effects of microstructural, compositional, and electrical characteristics with hydrogen-assisted Se vapor selenization, including interdiffusion of atoms and formation of buried homojunction, were examined in detail. This methodology can be also applied to CIS (CuInSe2) thin film solar cells with enhanced efficiencies from 5.3% to 8.5% (9.4% for active area) and provides a facile approach to improve quality of CIGS and stimulate the nontoxic progress in the large scale CIGS PV industry. PMID:24571825

  5. Efficient generation of volatile species for cadmium analysis in seafood and rice samples by a modified chemical vapor generation system coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xin-an, E-mail: 13087641@qq.com; Chi, Miao-bin, E-mail: 1161306667@qq.com; Wang, Qing-qing, E-mail: wangqq8812@163.com; Zhang, Wang-bing, E-mail: ahutwbzh@163.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We develop a modified chemical vapor generation method coupled with AFS for the determination of cadmium. • The response of Cd could be increased at least four-fold compared to conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. • A simple mixing sequences experiment is designed to study the reaction mechanism. • The interference of transition metal ions can be easily eliminated by adding DDTC. • The method is successfully applied in seafood samples and rice samples. - Abstract: A vapor generation procedure to determine Cd by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) has been established. Volatile species of Cd are generated by following reaction of acidified sample containing Fe(II) and L-cysteine (Cys) with sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH{sub 4}). The presence of 5 mg L{sup −1} Fe(II) and 0.05% m/v Cys improves the efficiency of Cd vapor generation substantially about four-fold compared with conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. Three experiments with different mixing sequences and reaction times are designed to study the reaction mechanism. The results document that the stability of Cd(II)–Cys complexes is better than Cys–THB complexes (THB means NaBH{sub 4}) while the Cys–THB complexes have more contribution to improve the Cd vapor generation efficiency than Cd(II)–Cys complexes. Meanwhile, the adding of Fe(II) can catalyze the Cd vapor generation. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Cd is 0.012 μg L{sup −1}; relative standard deviations vary between 0.8% and 5.5% for replicate measurements of the standard solution. In the presence of 0.01% DDTC, Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) have no significant influence up to 5 mg L{sup −1}, 10 mg L{sup −1}and 10 mg L{sup −1}, respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through analysis of the certificated reference materials and the proposed method has been applied in the determination of Cd in seafood and rice samples.

  6. Efficient generation of volatile species for cadmium analysis in seafood and rice samples by a modified chemical vapor generation system coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We develop a modified chemical vapor generation method coupled with AFS for the determination of cadmium. • The response of Cd could be increased at least four-fold compared to conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. • A simple mixing sequences experiment is designed to study the reaction mechanism. • The interference of transition metal ions can be easily eliminated by adding DDTC. • The method is successfully applied in seafood samples and rice samples. - Abstract: A vapor generation procedure to determine Cd by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) has been established. Volatile species of Cd are generated by following reaction of acidified sample containing Fe(II) and L-cysteine (Cys) with sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH4). The presence of 5 mg L−1 Fe(II) and 0.05% m/v Cys improves the efficiency of Cd vapor generation substantially about four-fold compared with conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. Three experiments with different mixing sequences and reaction times are designed to study the reaction mechanism. The results document that the stability of Cd(II)–Cys complexes is better than Cys–THB complexes (THB means NaBH4) while the Cys–THB complexes have more contribution to improve the Cd vapor generation efficiency than Cd(II)–Cys complexes. Meanwhile, the adding of Fe(II) can catalyze the Cd vapor generation. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Cd is 0.012 μg L−1; relative standard deviations vary between 0.8% and 5.5% for replicate measurements of the standard solution. In the presence of 0.01% DDTC, Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) have no significant influence up to 5 mg L−1, 10 mg L−1and 10 mg L−1, respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through analysis of the certificated reference materials and the proposed method has been applied in the determination of Cd in seafood and rice samples

  7. Investigating the Effect of Water Vapor and Residual Methanol on the Anode of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Sobi; Araya, Samuel Simon; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    The objective is to understand the effect of methanol and water vapor separately on a high temperature PEM fuel cell. An investigation was performed with different anode fuel compositions and results in terms of performance and impedance analyzed. During the initial 1000 h, cell was tested with......, which suggest an improvement of total cell resistance also supported by the impedance comparison. There is no or minimal variation in performance with the introduction of 1 % methanol along with water vapor in the anode feed at 0.2 A cm-2 and 0.6A cm-2 ....... pure hydrogen under varying current densities of 0.2 A cm-2 and 0.6 A cm-2, followed by hydrogen mixed with 15 % water vapor and then with 1 % methanol. The degradation rates at two current densities 0.2 A cm-2 and 0.6 A cm-2 were analyzed and discussed. The degradation at higher current density is...

  8. Evaluation of E-Cigarette Liquid Vapor and Mainstream Cigarette Smoke after Direct Exposure of Primary Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Scheffler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available E-cigarettes are emerging products, often described as “reduced-risk” nicotine products or alternatives to combustible cigarettes. Many smokers switch to e-cigarettes to quit or significantly reduce smoking. However, no regulations for e-cigarettes are currently into force, so that the quality and safety of e-liquids is not necessarily guaranteed. We exposed primary human bronchial epithelial cells of two different donors to vapor of e-cigarette liquid with or without nicotine, vapor of the carrier substances propylene glycol and glycerol as well as to mainstream smoke of K3R4F research cigarettes. The exposure was done in a CULTEX® RFS compact  module, allowing the exposure of the cells at the air-liquid interface. 24 h post-exposure, cell viability and oxidative stress levels in the cells were analyzed. We found toxicological effects of e-cigarette vapor and the pure carrier substances, whereas the nicotine concentration did not have an effect on the cell viability. The viability of mainstream smoke cigarette exposed cells was 4.5–8 times lower and the oxidative stress levels 4.5–5 times higher than those of e-cigarette vapor exposed cells, depending on the donor. Our experimental setup delivered reproducible data and thus provides the opportunity for routine testing of e-cigarette liquids to ensure safety and quality for the user.

  9. Atomic origin of ultrafast resistance switching in nanoscale electrometallization cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale resistance-switching cells that operate via the electrochemical formation and disruption of metallic filaments that bridge two electrodes are among the most promising devices for post-CMOS electronics. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that govern their remarkable properties are not fully understood, especially for nanoscale devices operating at ultrafast rates, limiting our ability to assess the ultimate performance and scalability of this technology. We present the first atomistic simulations of the operation of conductive bridging cells using reactive molecular dynamics with a charge equilibration method extended to describe electrochemical reactions. The simulations predict the ultrafast switching observed in these devices, with timescales ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a few nanoseconds for devices consisting of Cu active electrodes and amorphous silica dielectrics and with dimensions corresponding to their scaling limit (cross-sections below 10 nm). We find that single-atom-chain bridges often form during device operation but that they are metastable, with lifetimes below a nanosecond. The formation of stable filaments involves the aggregation of ions into small metallic clusters, followed by a progressive chemical reduction as they become connected to the cathode. Contrary to observations in larger cells, the nanoscale conductive bridges often lack crystalline order. An atomic-level mechanistic understanding of the switching process provides guidelines for materials optimization for such applications and the quantitative predictions over an ensemble of devices provide insight into their ultimate scaling and performance.

  10. Investigation of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition grown CdTe/CdS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudharsanan, R.; Rohatgi, A. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    Polycrystalline CdTe films were grown on CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for solar cell applications. Cells fabricated on these films showed efficiency of 9.7% which is the highest efficiency reported so far for MOCVD grown CdTe solar cells. The bias-dependent spectral response of the 9.7% efficient cell showed an external quantum efficiency greater than 0.85 at zero bias but a significant wavelength-independent reduction in spectral response at higher voltages. The interface recombination model was used to calculate the interface collection function term to quantify the open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) and fill factor losses in the high efficiency cell. It was found that the interface recombination reduces the V{sub oc} and fill factor by 60 mV and 0.1 respectively. It was estimated that efficiency as high as 13.5% can be achieved by improving CdTe/CdS interface quality. (orig.).

  11. Chromium vaporization from mechanically deformed pre-coated interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Sattari, Mohammad; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Cathode poisoning, associated with Cr evaporation from interconnect material, is one of the most important degradation mechanisms in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells when Cr2O3-forming steels are used as the interconnect material. Coating these steels with a thin Co layer has proven to decrease Cr vaporization. To reduce production costs, it is suggested that thin metallic PVD coatings be applied to each steel strip before pressing the material into interconnect shape. This process would enable high volume production without the need for an extra post-coating step. However, when the pre-coated material is mechanically deformed, cracks may form and lower the quality of the coating. In the present study, Chromium volatilization is measured in an air-3% H2O environment at 850 °C for 336 h. Three materials coated with 600 nm Co are investigated and compared to an uncoated material. The effect of deformation is investigated on real interconnects. Microscopy observations reveal the presence of cracks in the order of several μm on the deformed pre-coated steel. However, upon exposure, the cracks can heal and form a continuous surface oxide rich in Co and Mn. As an effect of the rapid healing, no increase in Cr vaporization is measured for the pre-coated material.

  12. Atomic MoS2 monolayers synthesized from a metal-organic complex by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Qiu, Hailong; Wang, Jingyi; Xu, Guanchen; Jiao, Liying

    2016-02-01

    The controllable synthesis of MoS2 monolayers is the key challenge for their practical applications. Here we report the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single layered MoS2 by utilizing a bifunctional precursor. This precursor is a metal-organic complex which supplies both Mo sources and organic seeding promoters for the efficient CVD growth of MoS2 monolayers. The successful growth of high quality MoS2 flakes indicates that the rational design of bifunctional precursors will open up a new way for the controllable CVD growth of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).The controllable synthesis of MoS2 monolayers is the key challenge for their practical applications. Here we report the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single layered MoS2 by utilizing a bifunctional precursor. This precursor is a metal-organic complex which supplies both Mo sources and organic seeding promoters for the efficient CVD growth of MoS2 monolayers. The successful growth of high quality MoS2 flakes indicates that the rational design of bifunctional precursors will open up a new way for the controllable CVD growth of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09089j

  13. Ultraviolet vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury in natural water with enrichment by on-line solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method, which coupled an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) enrichment with ultraviolet vapor generation (UVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), was developed to improve the sensitivity of mercury determination and to remove the interference of some anion and organics to UVG of mercury. A high mercury retention efficiency and maximum exclusion of inorganic and organic matrix in water samples were achieved by using C18 SPE mini cartridge modified with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). Fast and efficient elution from the cartridge was found by using L-cysteine mixing solution. Furthermore, through the investigation of different UV reactor designs, the most important factor was the structure of the reactor (which corresponded roughly to the photon flux) wherein the tubing was sintered into the UV lamp to give the highest UV generation efficiency. The second factor was the materials of the tubing (which roughly corresponded to the working wavelength). Synthetic quartz, characterized by the highest transparency at 185 nm, attained the highest UVG efficiency, suggesting that the most favorable wavelength for UVG was 185 nm. Under optimum conditions, the achievable detection limit (3σ) with sample loadings of 10.0 mL was 0.03 ng L−1 and 0.08 ng L−1 with different manifolds, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in tap water, river water and lake water samples. - Graphical abstract: An interference free ultraviolet vapor generation based method was applied to determine ultratrace mercury in water sample. - Highlights: • Hg was enriched by on-line solid phase extraction. • Hg was detected by ultraviolet vapor generation AFS. • The interference of some anion and some organics was removed. • The effects of details of UV set were systemically discussed

  14. Transcriptome sequencing reveals e-cigarette vapor and mainstream-smoke from tobacco cigarettes activate different gene expression profiles in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yifei; Wolkowicz, Michael J; Kotova, Tatyana; Fan, Lonjiang; Timko, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) generate an aerosol vapor (e-vapor) thought to represent a less risky alternative to main stream smoke (MSS) of conventional tobacco cigarettes. RNA-seq analysis was used to examine the transcriptomes of differentiated human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells exposed to air, MSS from 1R5F tobacco reference cigarettes, and e-vapor with and without added nicotine in an in vitro air-liquid interface model for cellular exposure. Our results indicate that while e-vapor does not elicit many of the cell toxicity responses observed in MSS-exposed HBE cells, e-vapor exposure is not benign, but elicits discrete transcriptomic signatures with and without added nicotine. Among the cellular pathways with the most significantly enriched gene expression following e-vapor exposure are the phospholipid and fatty acid triacylglycerol metabolism pathways. Our data suggest that alterations in cellular glycerophopholipid biosynthesis are an important consequences of e-vapor exposure. Moreover, the presence of nicotine in e-vapor elicits a cellular response distinct from e-vapor alone including alterations of cytochrome P450 function, retinoid metabolism, and nicotine catabolism. These studies establish a baseline for future analysis of e-vapor and e-vapor additives that will better inform the FDA and other governmental bodies in discussions of the risks and future regulation of these products. PMID:27041137

  15. Preconcentration, speciation and determination of ultra trace amounts of mercury by modified octadecyl silica membrane disk/electron beam irradiation and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (II) and methyl mercury cations at the Sub-ppb level were adsorbed quantitatively from aqueous solution onto an octadecyl-bonded silica membrane disk modified by 2-[(2-mercaptophyenylimino)methyl] phenol (MPMP). The trapped mercury was then eluted with 3 ml ethanol and Hg2+ ion was directly measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, utilizing tin (II) chloride. Total mercury (Hgt) was determined after conversion of MeHg+ into Hg2+ ion by electron beam irradiation. A sample volume of 1500 ml resulted in a preconcentration factor of 500 and the precision for a sampling volume of 500 ml at a concentration of 2.5 μg l-1 (n = 7) was 3.1%. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 3.8 ng l-1. The method was successfully applied to analysis of water samples, and the accuracy was assessed via recovery experiment

  16. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis – chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min−1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values. - Highlights: • Sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation. • Thiourea can enhance the generation efficiency and eliminate the interference of copper. • Arsenic in soil Sample can be directly determined without sample pretreatment

  17. Photoassisted vapor generation in the presence of organic acids for ultrasensitive determination of Se by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following headspace single-drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for the determination of selenium at the pg/mL level by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry using in situ photogeneration of Se vapors, headspace sequestration onto an aqueous microdrop containing Pd(II) and subsequent injection in a graphite tube. Several organic acids (formic, oxalic, acetic, citric and ethylenediaminetetraacetic) have been tried for photoreduction of Se(IV) into volatile Se compounds under UV irradiation. Experimental variables such as UV irradiation time, organic acid concentration, Pd(II) concentration in the drop, sample and drop volumes, extraction time and pH were fully optimized. Low-molecular weight acids such as formic and acetic provided optimal photogeneration of volatile Se species at a 0.6 mol/L concentration. Citric and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid allowed to use a concentration as low as 1 mmol/L, but extraction times were longer than for formic and acetic acids. Photogeneration of (CH3)2Se from Se(IV) in the presence of acetic acid provided a detection limit of 20 pg/mL, a preconcentration factor of nearly 285 and a precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, of 4%. Analytical performance seemed to depend not only on the photogeneration efficiency obtained with each acid but also on the stability of the vapors in the headspace. The method showed a high freedom from interferences caused by saline matrices, but interferences were observed for transition metals at a relatively low concentration

  18. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis – chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min{sup −1} and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values. - Highlights: • Sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation. • Thiourea can enhance the generation efficiency and eliminate the interference of copper. • Arsenic in soil Sample can be directly determined without sample pretreatment.

  19. Characteristics of n+ polycrystalline-Si/Al2O3/Si metal - oxide - semiconductor structures prepared by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition using Al(CH3)3 and H2O vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report interface and dielectric reliability characteristics of n+ polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si)/Al2O3/Si metal - oxide - semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Al2O3 films were prepared by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition using Al(CH3)3 and H2O vapor. Interface state density (Dit) and dielectric reliability properties of n+ poly-Si/Al2O3/Si MOS structures were examined by capacitance - voltage, conductance, current - voltage, and time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements. The Dit of the n+ poly-Si/Al2O3/Si MOS system near the Si midgap is approximately 8 x 1010eV-1cm-2 as determined by the conductance method. Frequency dispersion as small as ∼20 mV and hysteresis of ∼15 mV were attained under the electric field of ±8 MV/cm. The gate leakage current of ∼36 Aa effective thickness Al2O3 dielectric measured at the gate voltage of -2.5 V is ∼-5 nA/cm2, which is approximately three orders of magnitude lower than that of a controlled oxide (SiO2). Time-dependent dielectric breakdown data of Al2O3/Si MOS capacitors under the constant current/voltage stress reveal excellent charge-to-breakdown characteristics over controlled oxide. Reliable gate oxide integrity of Al2O3 gate dielectric is manifested by the excellent distribution of gate oxide breakdown voltage on 128 million MOS capacitors having isolation edges. Extracted time constant and capture cross section of the Al2O3/Si junction are discussed. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  20. Solvent Vapor Treatment Effects on Poly(3-hexylthiophene Thin Films and its Application for Interpenetrating Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Ozaki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The solvent vapor treatment (SVT for poly(3-hexylthiophene (PAT6 films and its application to interpenetrating heterojunction organic solar cells have been studied. It was found that SVT could improve the crystallinity and electrical characteristics of the PAT6 films. We fabricated organic solar cells with an interpenetrating structure of PAT6 and fullerenes utilizing the SVT process, and discuss the improved performance of the solar cells by taking the film crystallinity, optical properties, and morphology into consideration.

  1. Increased somatic cell mutant frequency in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequencies of mutant T-cells in peripheral blood, which are deficient in the activity of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were determined for atomic bomb survivors by direct clonal assay using a previously reported method. Results from 30 exposed survivors (exposed to more than 1 rad) and 17 age- and sex-matched controls (exposed to less than 1 rad) were analyzed. The mean mutant frequency (Mf) in the exposed (5.2 x 10-6; range 0.8 - 14.4 x 10-6) was significantly higher than in controls (3.4 x 10-6; range 1.3 - 9.3 x 10-6), a fact not attributable to lower nonmutant cell cloning efficiencies in the exposed group since cell cloning efficiencies were virtually identical in both groups. An initial analysis of the data did not reveal a significant correlation between individual Mfs and individual radiation dose estimates when the latter were defined by the original, tentative estimates (T65D), even though there was a significant positive correlation of Mfs with individual frequency of lymphocytes bearing chromosome aberration. However, reanalysis using the newer revised individual dose estimates (DS86) for 27 exposed survivors and 17 controls did reveal a significant but shallow positive correlation between T-cell Mf values and individual exposure doses. These results indicate that HPRT mutation in vivo in human T-cells could be detected in these survivors 40 years after the presumed mutational event. (author)

  2. Determination of the elemental composition of cyanobacteria cells and cell fractions by atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to studying the elemental composition of cyanobacteria Spirulina platensis and Nostoc commune using a set of complementary analytical methods (ICP-AES, PAAS, and ETAAS) was proposed . The procedures were adapted for the determination of macro- and microelements (Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Mo, Zn, B, and Se) in the biomass of cyanobacteria and separated cell fractions (chloroform and water-methanol extracts and precipitates). The conditions for the mineralization of biological materials were optimized for autoclave and microwave sample preparation procedures. The evaporation and atomization of Se and Mo in a graphite furnace in the presence of chloroform and methanol were studied

  3. Integrating Atomic Layer Deposition and Ultra-High Vacuum Physical Vapor Deposition for In Situ Fabrication of Tunnel Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Elliot, Alan J.; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Yiu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping; Wu, Judy Z.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of n...

  4. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63—Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor...

  5. Vapor Delivery Systems for the Study of the Effects of Reformate Gas Impurities in HT-PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2011-01-01

    on a pump and electrically heated evaporator was found to be more suitable for the typical flow rates involved in the anode feed of an H3PO4/PBI based HT-PEMFC unit cell assembly. Test stations composed of vapor delivery systems and mass flow controllers for testing the effects of methanol slip...

  6. Study of porogen removal by atomic hydrogen generated by hot wire chemical vapor deposition for the fabrication of advanced low-k thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain low-k dielectric films, a subtractive technique, which removes sacrificial porogens from a hydrogenated silicon oxycarbide (SiOC:H) film, has been used successfully by different groups in the past. In this paper, we report on the porogen removal from porogenated SiOC:H films, using a hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) equipment. Molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atomic hydrogen by the hot wires and these atoms may successfully remove the hydrocarbon groups from the porogenated SiOC:H films. The temperature of the HWCVD filaments proved to be a determining factor. By Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), ellipsometric porosimetry and capacitance-voltage analyses, it was possible to determine that for temperatures higher than 1700 °C, efficient porogen removal occurred. For temperatures higher than 1800 °C, the presence of OH groups was detected. The dielectric constant was the lowest, 2.28, for the samples processed at a filament temperature of 1800 °C, although porosity measurements showed higher porosity for the films deposited at the higher temperatures. XRR and SIMS analyses indicated densification and Tungsten (W) incorporation at the top few nanometers of the films

  7. Recyclable decoration of amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with Ni(2+) for determination of histidine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2014-01-01

    It is critically important to accurately determine histidine since it is an indicator for many diseases when at an abnormal level. Here, an inexpensive and simple method using an amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle-based Ni(2+)-histidine affinity pair system was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of histidine in human urine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry. Ni(2+) was first bound to the amine groups of the amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and then liberated to solution via the highly specific interaction between the histidine and Ni(2+) in the presence of histidine. The liberated histidine-Ni(2+) complex was exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl, which was separated from the sample matrix and determined by atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry. Compared to other methods, this approach promises high sensitivity, simplicity in design, and convenient operation. The need for organic solvents, enzymatic reactions, separation processes, chemical modification, expensive instrumentations, and sophisticated and complicated pretreatment is minimized with this strategy. A limit of detection of 1 nM was obtained and provided tens-to-hundreds of fold improvements over that achieved with conventional methods. The protocol was evaluated by analysis of several urine samples with good recoveries and showed great potential for practical application. PMID:24286112

  8. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin blocking layer for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell on nanoporous substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrathin yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) blocking layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized for improving the performance and reliability of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) supported by an anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Physical vapor-deposited YSZ and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte layers were deposited by a sputtering method. The ultrathin ALD YSZ blocking layer was inserted between the YSZ and GDC sputtered layers. To investigate the effects of an inserted ultrathin ALD blocking layer, SOFCs with and without an ultrathin ALD blocking layer were electrochemically characterized. The open circuit voltage (1.14 V) of the ALD blocking-layered SOFC was visibly higher than that (1.05 V) of the other cell. Furthermore, the ALD blocking layer augmented the power density and improved the reproducibility

  9. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin blocking layer for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell on nanoporous substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wonjong; Cho, Gu Young; Noh, Seungtak; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Cha, Suk Won, E-mail: swcha@snu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Daehak dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); An, Jihwan [Manufacturing Systems and Design Engineering Program, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    An ultrathin yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) blocking layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized for improving the performance and reliability of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) supported by an anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Physical vapor-deposited YSZ and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte layers were deposited by a sputtering method. The ultrathin ALD YSZ blocking layer was inserted between the YSZ and GDC sputtered layers. To investigate the effects of an inserted ultrathin ALD blocking layer, SOFCs with and without an ultrathin ALD blocking layer were electrochemically characterized. The open circuit voltage (1.14 V) of the ALD blocking-layered SOFC was visibly higher than that (1.05 V) of the other cell. Furthermore, the ALD blocking layer augmented the power density and improved the reproducibility.

  10. Study of solid oxide fuel cell interconnects, protective coatings and advanced physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul Edward

    High energy conversion efficiency, decreased environmentally-sensitive emissions and fuel flexibility have attracted increasing attention toward solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for stationary, transportation and portable power generation. Critical durability and cost issues, however, continue to impede wide-spread deployment. Many intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar SOFC systems employ metallic alloy interconnect components, which physically connect individual fuel cells into electric series, facilitate gas distribution to appropriate SOFC electrode chambers (fuel/anode and oxidant[air]/cathode) and provide SOFC stack mechanical support. These demanding multifunctional requirements challenge commercially-available and inexpensive metallic alloys due to corrosion and related effects. Many ongoing investigations are aimed at enabling inexpensive metallic alloys (via bulk and/or surface modifications) as SOFC interconnects (SOFC(IC)s). In this study, two advanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques: large area filtered vacuum arc deposition (LAFAD), and filtered arc plasma-assisted electron beam PVD (FA-EBPVD) were used to deposit a wide-variety of protective nanocomposite (amorphous/nanocrystalline) ceramic thin-film (1,000 hours); and, dramatically reduced Cr volatility (>30-fold). Analyses and discussions of SOFC(IC) corrosion, advanced PVD processes and protective coating behavior are intended to advance understanding and accelerate the development of durable and commercially-viable SOFC systems.

  11. A High Temperature Calcium Vapor Cell for Spectroscopy on the 4s^2 1S0 to 4s4p 3P1 Intercombination Line

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Neyenhuis, Brian; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a high temperature vapor cell for absorption spectroscopy on the Ca intercombination line. The cell uses a dual chamber design to achieve the high temperatures necessary for an optically dense vapor while avoiding the necessity of high temperature vacuum valves and glass-to-metal seals. We have observed over 50 percent absorption in a single pass through the cell. Although pressure broadening in the cell prevented us from performing saturated-absorption spectroscopy, the ...

  12. An effective analytical system based on a pulsed direct current microplasma source for ultra-trace mercury determination using gold amalgamation cold vapor atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel analysis system based on a low power atmospheric pressure pulsed direct current (Pdc) microplasma is described for the determination of ultra-trace mercury in natural water by cold vapor generation atomic emission spectrometry (CV-AES). The plasma was generated with a miniaturized home-built high-voltage Pdc power supply which decreased the volume and weight of the whole experiment setup. The CV-Pdc-AES system is based on the preconcentration of mercury vapor on a gold filament trapping micro-column prior to detection that provides fast, reproducible absorption and desorption of mercury. The micro-column is produced by winding 30 μm diameter 100 m long gold filament to a small ball and then insert it into a quartz tube of 6 mm i.d, 8 mm o.d. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the new system provides high sensitivity (detection limit: 0.08 pg mL−1) and good reproducibility (RSD 3.0%, [Hg] = 20 pg mL−1, n = 11). The calibration curve is linear at levels near the detection limit up to at least 200 pg mL−1 and the accuracy is on the order of 1–4%. The proposed method was applied to 5 real water samples for mercury ultra-trace analysis. The advantages and features of the newly developed system include high sensitivity, simple structure, low cost, and compact volume with field portable potential. - Highlights: • A novel system based on a low power pulsed dc microplasma for mercury detection. • A small home-built pulsed dc power supply was used to ignite the microplasma. • A gold filament preconcentrator followed by thermal desorption was used. • A detection limit of 0.08 pg mL−1 was achieved for sensitive mercury detection. • The system is compact, low power, and has potential for field portable application

  13. Gas diffusion ultrabarriers on polymer substrates using Al2O3 atomic layer deposition and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films grown by Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been tested as gas diffusion barriers either individually or as bilayers on polymer substrates. Single films of Al2O3 ALD with thicknesses of ≥10 nm had a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ≤5x10-5 g/m2 day at 38 deg. C/85% relative humidity (RH), as measured by the Ca test. This WVTR value was limited by H2O permeability through the epoxy seal, as determined by the Ca test for the glass lid control. In comparison, SiN PECVD films with a thickness of 100 nm had a WVTR of ∼7x10-3 g/m2 day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. Significant improvements resulted when the SiN PECVD film was coated with an Al2O3 ALD film. An Al2O3 ALD film with a thickness of only 5 nm on a SiN PECVD film with a thickness of 100 nm reduced the WVTR from ∼7x10-3 to ≤5x10-5 g/m2 day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. The reduction in the permeability for Al2O3 ALD on the SiN PECVD films was attributed to either Al2O3 ALD sealing defects in the SiN PECVD film or improved nucleation of Al2O3 ALD on SiN.

  14. Light-induced atomic desorption from siloxane film loaded with Rb and Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observe Light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) of Rb and Cs atoms from a PDMS-coated cell containing both atoms at the same time. The desorption rate and the relative vapor density variation have been simultaneously measured for both alkali atoms as a function of the desorbing light intensity and frequency. They show the same behaviour upon the different illumination conditions. This work demonstrates the possibility to provide light controlled atomic dispenser delivering different atomic species using the LIAD effect

  15. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress

  16. Measurement of molecular stopping cross sections of vaporous sulfur compounds and calculation of the atomic stopping cross section of sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular stopping cross sections of hydrogen sulfide, methyl sulfide, methyl disulfide, carbon disulfide, ethylene sulfide, proplene sulfide, trimethylene sulfide, thiophene, and sulfur hexafluoride have beem measured for 0.3--2.0 MeV He+ ions. It is shown that the bond order correlation for the third period element sulfur is qualitatively in agreement with its second row counterpart, oxygen, but that the stopping cross-section dependence on bond order is considerably less (approx. =5% in sulfur compared to approx. =17% in oxygen). In the energy region where the stopping contribution of the valence electrons is largest, the atomic stopping cross sections of sulfur for double-bonded, ring-structured, and single-bonded compounds decrease in the order epsilon/sub DB/(S)>epsilon/sub RING/(S)>epsilon/sub SB/(S), a trend consistent with that observed for oxygen and carbon. The experimental results suggest a minimum d-orbital involvement in SF6 and reveal a lower peak energy E/sub peak/ and width delta when S exists in the compound than when C, O, or F are present

  17. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  18. Steep dispersion and coherent control of Faraday rotation in a potassium vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Lampis, Andreas; Megyeri, Balázs; Goldwin, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) was studied in a heated vapor cell of potassium without buffer gas or anti-relaxation coating. Transparency windows 60 times narrower than the natural line width and group indices exceeding 6000 were generated using a simple optical setup with a single free-running laser and an acousto-optic modulator. A longitudinal magnetic field was used to split the EIT feature into three components for either lin-perp-lin or lin-par-lin polarizations of probe and coupling beams. Measurements of polarization rotation revealed that only the lin-par-lin configuration leads to circular birefringence, an effect which we attribute to quantum interference between the multiple \\Lambda-type subsystems contributing to the signal. The Verdet constant of the EIT medium was measured to be (2.33+/-0.10)x10^5 rad/T/m, and a novel measurement of group index based on birefringence was demonstrated. For larger fields, where the individual peaks were well resolved, resonant polarization rotati...

  19. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Jin, Yan; Han, Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi, Shuping

    2006-07-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h - 1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l - 1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l - 1 for CH 3Hg +. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l - 1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  20. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jin Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han Weiying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Miao, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bi Shuping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: bisp@nju.edu.cn

    2006-07-15

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH{sub 4} solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h{sup -1} with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l{sup -1} for Hg{sup 2+} and 2.0 ng l{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  1. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h-1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l-1 for Hg2+ and 2.0 ng l-1 for CH3Hg+. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l-1 of Hg2+ and CH3Hg+ were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples

  2. A study of vapor CdCl{sub 2} treatment by CSS in CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Flores, A.; Pena, J.L.; Castro-Pena, V.; Ares, O.; Castro-Rodriguez, R. [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN Merida, C.P. 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Bosio, A. [University of Parma, Department of Physics, v.le G.P. Usberti 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    We report the effect of CdCl{sub 2} vapor treatment on the photovoltaic parameters of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Vapor treatment allows combining CdCl{sub 2} exposure time and annealing in one step. In this alternative treatment, the CdS/CdTe substrates were treated with CdCl{sub 2} vapor in a close spaced sublimation (CSS) configuration. The substrate temperature and CdCl{sub 2} powder source temperature were 400 C. The treatment was done by varying the treatment time (t) from 15 to 90 min. Such solar cells are examined by measuring their current density versus voltage (J-V) characteristics. The open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and fill factor (FF) of our best cell, fabricated and normalized to the area of 1 cm{sup 2}, were V{sub oc} = 663 mV, J{sub sc} = 18.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and FF = 40%, respectively, corresponding to a total area conversion efficiency of {eta} = 5%. In cells of minor area (0.1 cm{sup 2}) efficiencies of 8% have been obtained. (author)

  3. Fabrication of solid state dye sensitized solar cells utilizing vapor phase polymerized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) hole conducting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorenko, Kenneth H.

    There is a need for sustainable and renewable energy sources that can be used in both grid and off-grid structured systems. Photovoltaic devices have been used to generate electrical energy by capturing and converting photons from the sun. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have gained attention due to their consistent energy generation during indirect sunlight. Furthermore, DSSC can be applied as a flexible device and gain benefits from the low cost roll to roll manufacturing. With this in mind, we have taken steps toward optimizing a DSSC device for use as a solid state solar cell using conducting polymers. Typically DSSC use a liquid electrolyte as a hole conducting layer used to direct the separation of electron -- hole pairs. This liquid electrolyte comes with problems that can be subverted using conducting polymers. Poly(3,4 -- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), is a conducting thiophene that is tailored to have enhanced conductivity. We show that a vapor phase polymerization (VPP) of PEDOT can be used as a hole conducting layer in a solid state DSSC device. To this end we have investigated the electrical properties of the VPP PEDOT films in order to understand how the morphology and conductive domains relate to a polymers conductivity. Using 4 point probe we have measure the sheet resistance of the film, as well as how the films resistance is altered during stress tests. Scanning electron microscopy has been utilized to compare morphologies of different PEDOT films and see how surface morphology impacts the conductance measured. Using conductive atomic force microscopy we can look at the conductive domains between VPP PEDOT and PEDOT:PSS films. We saw that conductive domains of the VPP PEDOT are not only more conductive but also much larger in size and widespread throughout the film. We show that there is formation of PEDOT through optical spectroscopy and structural characterization such as UV/Vis and Raman spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction. When

  4. Work function variation of MoS2 atomic layers grown with chemical vapor deposition: The effects of thickness and the adsorption of water/oxygen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical properties of two-dimensional atomic sheets exhibit remarkable dependences on layer thickness and surface chemistry. Here, we investigated the variation of the work function properties of MoS2 films prepared with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on SiO2 substrates with the number of film layers. Wafer-scale CVD MoS2 films with 2, 4, and 12 layers were fabricated on SiO2, and their properties were evaluated by using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. In accordance with our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, our Kelvin probe force microscopy investigation found that the surface potential of the MoS2 films increases by ∼0.15 eV when the number of layers is increased from 2 to 12. Photoemission spectroscopy (PES) with in-situ annealing under ultra high vacuum conditions was used to directly demonstrate that this work function shift is associated with the screening effects of oxygen or water molecules adsorbed on the film surface. After annealing, it was found with PES that the surface potential decreases by ∼0.2 eV upon the removal of the adsorbed layers, which confirms that adsorbed species have a role in the variation in the work function

  5. Atomic layer deposition of SiO2 from Tris(dimethylamino)silane and ozone by using temperature-controlled water vapor treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic layer deposition of SiO2 from tris(dimethylamino)silane (TDMAS) and ozone as precursors on Si(100) surfaces at near-room temperatures was studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy with a multiple internal reflection geometry. TDMAS can be adsorbed at OH sites on hydroxylated Si surfaces at room temperature. Ozone oxidation of the TDMAS-treated Si surface is effective in removing hydroaminocarbon adsorbates introduced during TDMAS adsorption at room temperature. After oxidation by ozone, treatment with H2O vapor at a substrate temperature of around 160 oC causes regeneration of OH sites for TDMAS adsorption. Cycles involving TDMAS adsorption and ozonization at room temperature followed by H2O treatment at 160 oC permit the buildup of layers of SiO2. The amount of residual hydroaminocarbon at the interface between the growing SiO2 film and the substrate can be reduced with the ozone treated Si surface as a starting surface.

  6. Ultraviolet vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury in natural water with enrichment by on-line solid phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Deyuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Liqian; Liu, Jixin; Ye, Jianping; Li, Junwei; Zheng, Fengxi

    2013-10-01

    A novel method, which coupled an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) enrichment with ultraviolet vapor generation (UVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), was developed to improve the sensitivity of mercury determination and to remove the interference of some anion and organics to UVG of mercury. A high mercury retention efficiency and maximum exclusion of inorganic and organic matrix in water samples were achieved by using C18 SPE mini cartridge modified with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). Fast and efficient elution from the cartridge was found by using L-cysteine mixing solution. Furthermore, through the investigation of different UV reactor designs, the most important factor was the structure of the reactor (which corresponded roughly to the photon flux) wherein the tubing was sintered into the UV lamp to give the highest UV generation efficiency. The second factor was the materials of the tubing (which roughly corresponded to the working wavelength). Synthetic quartz, characterized by the highest transparency at 185 nm, attained the highest UVG efficiency, suggesting that the most favorable wavelength for UVG was 185 nm. Under optimum conditions, the achievable detection limit (3σ) with sample loadings of 10.0 mL was 0.03 ng L- 1 and 0.08 ng L- 1 with different manifolds, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in tap water, river water and lake water samples.

  7. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap. The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS. The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically investigated. The factors influencing, the complex formation and extraction of DLLME-SFO method such as type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, concentration of salt, centrifuging time and concentration of the chelating agent were optimized. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in drinking and natural water and satisfactory relative recoveries (95–105% were achieved. The proposed procedure was based on very low consumption of organic solvents. The other benefits of the system were sensitive, simple, friendly to the environment, rejection of matrix constituent, low cost, the time consuming and high enrichment factor.

  8. Analysis of trace mercury in water by solid phase extraction using dithizone modified nanometer titanium dioxide and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new method for analysis of trace mercury in water samples was developed, based on the combination of preconcentration/separation using dithizone-modified nanometer titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a solid phase extractant and determination by cold vapor atomic adsorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Dithizone was dissolved with alcohol and loaded on the surface of nano-sized TiO2 powders by stirring. The static adsorption behavior of Hg2+ on the dithizone-modified nanoparticles was investigated in detail. It was found that excellent adsorption ratio for Hg2+ could be obtained in the pH range of 7-8 with an oscillation time of 15 min, and a 5 mL of 3.5 mol·L-1 HCl solution could quantitatively elute Hg2+ from nanometer TiO2 powder. Common coexisting ions caused no obvious influence on the determination of mercury. The mechanisms for the adsorption and desorption were discussed. The detection limit (3σ) for Hg2+ was calculated to be 5 ng·L-1. The proposed method was applied to the determination of Hg2+ in a mineral water sample and a Zhujiang River water sample. By the standard addition method, the average recoveries were found to be 94.4%-108.3% with RSD (n = 5) of 2.9%-3.5%.

  9. Preconcentration, speciation and determination of ultra trace amounts of mercury by modified octadecyl silica membrane disk/electron beam irradiation and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenani, Hamid [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazduni.ac.ir; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Jaffari, Abbas Ali [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjat, Abbas [Department of physics, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Mercury (II) and methyl mercury cations at the Sub-ppb level were adsorbed quantitatively from aqueous solution onto an octadecyl-bonded silica membrane disk modified by 2-[(2-mercaptophyenylimino)methyl] phenol (MPMP). The trapped mercury was then eluted with 3 ml ethanol and Hg{sup 2+} ion was directly measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, utilizing tin (II) chloride. Total mercury (Hgt) was determined after conversion of MeHg{sup +} into Hg{sup 2+} ion by electron beam irradiation. A sample volume of 1500 ml resulted in a preconcentration factor of 500 and the precision for a sampling volume of 500 ml at a concentration of 2.5 {mu}g l{sup -1} (n = 7) was 3.1%. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 3.8 ng l{sup -1}. The method was successfully applied to analysis of water samples, and the accuracy was assessed via recovery experiment.

  10. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  11. Work function variation of MoS{sub 2} atomic layers grown with chemical vapor deposition: The effects of thickness and the adsorption of water/oxygen molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Park, Jeong Young, E-mail: peterlee@skku.edu, E-mail: jeongypark@kaist.ac.kr [Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305–701 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of EEWS, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305–701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jinhwan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, C. C. [Beamline Research Division, Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changgu, E-mail: peterlee@skku.edu, E-mail: jeongypark@kaist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-22

    The electrical properties of two-dimensional atomic sheets exhibit remarkable dependences on layer thickness and surface chemistry. Here, we investigated the variation of the work function properties of MoS{sub 2} films prepared with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on SiO{sub 2} substrates with the number of film layers. Wafer-scale CVD MoS{sub 2} films with 2, 4, and 12 layers were fabricated on SiO{sub 2}, and their properties were evaluated by using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. In accordance with our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, our Kelvin probe force microscopy investigation found that the surface potential of the MoS{sub 2} films increases by ∼0.15 eV when the number of layers is increased from 2 to 12. Photoemission spectroscopy (PES) with in-situ annealing under ultra high vacuum conditions was used to directly demonstrate that this work function shift is associated with the screening effects of oxygen or water molecules adsorbed on the film surface. After annealing, it was found with PES that the surface potential decreases by ∼0.2 eV upon the removal of the adsorbed layers, which confirms that adsorbed species have a role in the variation in the work function.

  12. Use of Ni/NixB Nanoparticles as a Novel Adsorbent for the Preconcentration of Mercury Species prior to Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometric Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayayürük, Onur; Henden, Emür

    2016-01-01

    A selective matrix separation/enrichment method, utilizing a simple batch procedure with nickel/nickel boride (Ni/NixB) nanoparticles was proposed for the determination of inorganic mercury(II), Hg(2+) and methyl mercury(I), CH3Hg(+) in waters prior to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). The Ni/NixB nanoparticles, were synthesized by the chemical reduction of Ni(II) to Ni/NixB. The novel adsorbent was selective to Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) species between pH values of 4 - 10. Both of the mercury species were recovered from the adsorbent using 1.0 mol L(-1) hot HNO3 with high efficiency. It was observed that the adsorbent selectively removed Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) from the bulk solution in the presence of several competitor ions (As(3+), Sb(3+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Fe(3+)) with ≥96% adsorption. The limit of detection (3σ above blank) was found to be 1.8 ng L(-1) with a preconcentration factor of 20. The validation of the method was tested through spike recovery experiments with several water samples (tap and seawater) at μg L(-1) concentration levels, and all recovery values were found to vary between 95 and 105%. PMID:27506713

  13. Evaluation of different extraction procedures for determination of organic Mercury species in petroleum by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Zhaojun; He, Bin; Wang, Zhenhua; Wang, Thanh; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-03-15

    An extraction procedure for extracting organic mercury species including methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg) from petroleum samples was developed. Three extraction methods (shaking, ultrasonic and microwave assisted extraction) using different extraction solvents (TMAH, KOH/CH3OH, HCl and acidic CuSO4/KBr) were investigated by comparing the extraction efficiency of the organic mercury species. Microwave assisted extraction at 60 W for 5 min using TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, 25%, m/v) provided the most satisfactory extraction efficiency for MeHg and EtHg in petroleum at 86.7% ± 3.4% and 70.6% ± 5.9%, respectively. Speciation analysis of mercury was done by on-line coupling of high performance liquid chromatography with cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CV-AFS). The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze several crude oil and light oil samples. The concentrations of MeHg ranged from under detection limit to 0.515 ng g(-1), whereas EtHg was not detected in the samples. This method can be a very useful tool in evaluating the risk of mercury emissions from petroleum. PMID:23598095

  14. The Influence of Physical and Physiological Cues on Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Cell Stiffness Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wei Chiou; Hsiu-Kuan Lin; Ming-Jer Tang; Hsi-Hui Lin; Ming-Long Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All...

  15. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  16. Series of Multifluorine Substituted Oligomers for Organic Solar Cells with Efficiency over 9% and Fill Factor of 0.77 by Combination Thermal and Solvent Vapor Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Liang; Liu, Kai-Kai; Yan, Jun; Wu, Zhuo; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Fei; Chang, Zheng-Feng; Wu, Hong-Bin; Cao, Yong; Russell, Thomas P

    2016-06-22

    We report the synthesis of a family of multifluorine substituted oligomers and the corresponding polymer that have the same backbones but different conjugation lengths and amounts of fluorine atoms on the backbone. The physical properties and photovoltaic performances of these materials were systematically investigated using optical absorption, charge mobility, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, resonant soft X-ray scattering methods, and photovoltaic devices. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on oligomers were much higher than that in the polymer. Moreover, the devices based on BIT6F and BIT10F, which have an axisymmetric electron-deficient difluorobenzothiadiazole as the central unit, gave slightly higher PCEs than those with centrosymmetric electron-rich indacenodithiophene (IDT) as the central unit (BIT4F or BIT8F). Using proper solvent vapor annealing (SVA), particularly using thermal annealing (TA) followed by SVA, the device performance could be significantly improved. Notably, the best PCE of 9.1% with a very high FF of 0.76 was achieved using the medium-sized oligomer BIT6F with the optimized film morphology. This efficiency is the highest value reported for organic solar cells from small-molecules without rhodanine terminal group. More excitingly, devices from the shortest oligomer BIT4F showed an impressively high FF of 0.77 (the highest FF value reported for solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells). These results indicate that photovoltaic performances of oligomers can be modulated through successive change in chain-length and fluorine atoms, alternating spatial symmetric core, and combined post-treatments. PMID:27225322

  17. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  18. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs. PMID:27306098

  19. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  20. Ionic liquid-based zinc oxide nanofluid for vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction of inorganic mercury in environmental waters prior to cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amde, Meseret; Liu, Jing-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Bekana, Deribachew

    2016-03-01

    Zinc oxide nanofluid (ZnO-NF) based vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction (ZnO-NF VA-LLME) was developed and employed in extraction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in environmental water samples, followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Unlike other dispersive liquid liquid microextraction techniques, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is free of volatile organic solvents and dispersive solvent consumption. Analytical signals were obtained without back-extraction from the ZnO-NF phase prior to CV-AFS determination. Some essential parameters of the ZnO-NF VA-LLME and cold vapor generation such as composition and volume of the nanofluid, vortexing time, pH of the sample solution, amount of the chelating agent, ionic strength and matrix interferences have been studied. Under optimal conditions, efficient extraction of 1ng/mL of Hg(2+) in 10mL of sample solution was achieved using 50μL of ZnO-NF. The enrichment factor before dilution, detection limits and limits of quantification of the method were about 190, 0.019 and 0.064ng/mL, respectively. The intra and inter days relative standard deviations (n=8) were found to be 4.6% and 7.8%, respectively, at 1ng/mL spiking level. The accuracy of the current method was also evaluated by the analysis of certified reference materials, and the measured Hg(2+) concentration of GBW08603 (9.6ng/mL) and GBW(E)080392 (8.9ng/mL) agreed well with their certified value (10ng/mL). The method was applied to the analysis of Hg(2+) in effluent, influent, lake and river water samples, with recoveries in the range of 79.8-92.8% and 83.6-106.1% at 1ng/mL and 5ng/mL spiking levels, respectively. Overall, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is fast, simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly and it can be employed for efficient enrichment of the analyte from various water samples. PMID:26717850

  1. Apparatus for determination of vapor pressures at ambient temperatures employing a Knudsen effusion cell and quartz crystal microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an apparatus for the measurement of vapor pressures of solids or liquids at ambient temperatures (260 K −2–10−6 Torr (1–10−4 Pa), but capable of being extended to lower pressures by at least an order of magnitude. It employs a Knudsen cell to produce an effusive molecular beam, only a small fraction of which is deposited on a cooled (225 K) quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Vapor pressure values are derived from the mass gain rate determined by the QCM, Knudsen cell temperature, and fixed geometric factors. The accuracy and precision of the measurements are improved by locating the apparatus within an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (base pressure −9 Torr) with high pumping speed (2000 l s−1). A beam flag is used to interrupt the beam and allow for the subtraction of signal caused by the deposition of background molecules. The temperatures of both the microbalance and Knudsen cell are controlled to ±0.2 K using thermoelectric heaters/coolers. Measurements of the vapor pressure of benzoic acid, used as a primary reference material, agreed with literature reports over the entire temperature range to within the expected experimental uncertainty. In addition, the vapor pressure curves as a function of temperature (∼270–340 K) were determined for four isomers of dinitrotoluene (DNT). These curves can be readily expressed using the Clausius–Clapeyron relationship: log 10 P(Torr) = a - b/T(K), where a and b coefficients are listed below. Also listed is the heat of sublimation derived from these data. (Uncertainties are quoted as 2σ.)

  2. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to HgII. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL−1 (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL−1. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C9H9HgNaO2S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH4 solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H2 miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL−1 range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL−1. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL−1

  3. Polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction for trace inorganic and organic mercury determination in water samples by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Leticia B; Olsina, Roberto A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2013-11-15

    A simple and green technique named polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction (PSIL-SPE) was developed for mercury (Hg) species determination. Inorganic Hg (InHg) species was complexed with chloride ions followed by its introduction into a flow injection on-line system to quantitatively retain the anionic chlorocomplex (HgCl4(2-)) in a column packed with CYPHOS(®) IL 101-impregnated resin. The trapped InHg was then reduced with stannous chloride (SnCl2) and eluted with the same flow of reducing agent followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) detection. Organic mercury species (OrgHg) did not interact with the impregnated resin and were not retained into the column. Total concentration of OrgHg was evaluated by difference between total Hg and InHg concentration. A 95% extraction efficiency was achieved for InHg when the procedure was developed under optimal experimental conditions. The limit of detection obtained for preconcentration of 40 mL of sample was 2.4 ng L(-1) InHg. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% (at 1 µg L(-1) InHg and n=10) calculated from the peak height of absorbance signals (Gaussian-shape and reproducible peaks). This work reports the first polymer-supported IL solid phase extraction approach implemented in a flow injection on-line system for determination of Hg species in mineral, tap and river water samples. PMID:24148384

  4. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L-1 with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L-1. The obtained results fall into a range

  5. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3

  6. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  7. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Chen, Bin; Corns, Warren T. [PS Analytical, Arthur House, Crayfields Industrial Estate, Main Road, Orpington, Kent BR5 3HP (United Kingdom); Feldmann, Jörg [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Krupp, Eva M., E-mail: e.krupp@abdn.ac.uk [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography–cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that a novel mixture of thiourea-thiolsilica shows an excellent trapping of MeHg between a broad pH range 1–6. • We develop the method so that it can potentially be automated for inorganic and methyl-mercury. • The method is matrix independent with highly accurate results for MeHg in hair CRM extracts and spiked water samples • The limit of detection is around 40 pg/L when just 200 mL sample is used, without any intensive preparation.

  8. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography–cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that a novel mixture of thiourea-thiolsilica shows an excellent trapping of MeHg between a broad pH range 1–6. • We develop the method so that it can potentially be automated for inorganic and methyl-mercury. • The method is matrix independent with highly accurate results for MeHg in hair CRM extracts and spiked water samples • The limit of detection is around 40 pg/L when just 200 mL sample is used, without any intensive preparation

  9. Highly sensitive and interference-free determination of bismuth in environmental samples by electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry after hydride trapping on iridium-coated tungsten coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuthine was on-line trapped on tungsten coil and subsequently electrothermally vaporized for the determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Several noble metals, including Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ir, were explored as permanent chemical modifier for tungsten coil on-line trapping. Investigation showed that Ir gave the best performance, in which bismuthine was on-line trapped on Ir-coated tungsten coil at 560 oC, and then released at 1550 oC for subsequent transfer to AFS by a mixture of Ar and H2. Under optimum instrumental conditions, the trapping efficiency was found to be 73 ± 3%. With 120 s (12 mL sample volume) trapping time, a limit of detection (LOD) of 4 ng L-1 was obtained, compared to conventional hydride generation AFS (0.09 μg L-1); the LOD can be lowered down to 1 ng L-1 by increasing the trapping time to 480 s. The LOD was found to be better or at least comparable to literature levels involving on-line trapping and some other sophisticated instrumental methods such as ICP-MS and GF-AAS. A comprehensive interference study involving conventional hydride-forming elements and some transition metals was carried out, and the result showed that the gas phase interference from other hydride-forming elements was largely reduced, thanks to the use of on-line tungsten coil trapping. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of bismuth in several biological and environmental standard reference materials, and a t-test shows that the analytical results by the proposed method have no significant difference from the certified values at the confidence level of 95%

  10. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  11. Amorphous silicon carbonitride diaphragm for environmental-cell transmission electron microscope fabricated by low-energy ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Takaomi; Yamasaki, Kayo; Imaeda, Norihiro; Kawasaki, Tadahiro

    2015-12-01

    An amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN) diaphragm for an environmental-cell transmission electron microscope (E-TEM) was fabricated by low-energy ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition (LEIBICVD) with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN). The films were prepared by using gaseous HMDSN and N2+ ions with energies ranging from 300 to 600 eV. The diaphragms were applied to Si (1 0 0) and a Cu grid with 100-μm-diameter holes. With increasing ion energy, these diaphragms became perfectly smooth surfaces (RMS = 0.43 nm at 600 eV), as confirmed by atomic force microscopy and TEM. The diaphragms were amorphous and transparent to 200 kV electrons, and no charge-up was observed. Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed that the elimination of organic compounds and formation of Si-N and C-N bonds can be promoted in diaphragms by increasing the ion impact energy. The resistance to electron beams and reaction gases in the E-cell was improved when the diaphragm was formed with high ion energy.

  12. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  13. Vaporization of materials in the operation of high temperature fuel cells (SOFCs); Verdampfung von Werkstoffen beim Betrieb von Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzellen (SOFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, M.

    2006-07-01

    One of the main problems concerning the development of state of the art planar SOFCs are the occurrence of ageing effects in long term application. To a great deal these effects are caused by the release of volatile Cr-species from metallic interconnects which leads to an inhibition of the electrochemical processes at the cathode resulting in a rapid degradation of the cell performance. A goal in further development of SOFC-systems is the reduction of the operation temperature of the cell from currently 800 C to 700 C and below. For this purpose alternative electrolyte materials with higher oxygen ion conductivities have to be developed. Doped lanthanum gallates have been identified as promising materials. However for these materials a depletion of Ga by vaporization has been observed under anodic conditions which may lead to a destruction of their electrolyte properties. The aim of this work is the study of the vaporization processes leading to the mentioned degradation effects. For this purpose an experimental setup according to the transpiration method has been developed. Concerning the vaporization of chromium the Cr release rates of the main ferritic interconnect alloys, namely Crofer 22 APU, ZMG 232, E-Brite, IT-10, IT-11, IT-14 and Ducrolloy as well as a variety of Ni- and Co-base superalloys and stainless steels with different contents of Al, Si, Ti, Mn, W, Ni and Co were measured at 800 C in air and compared to each other. The alloys that form an upper layer of Cr-Mn-spinel on top of the grown chromia scale showed a reduction of the Cr release by 61-75 % compared to pure chromia scales whereas alloys with an outer Co3O4(s) scale had a by more than 90 % reduced Cr release. For the former alloys a significant vaporization of Mn under anodic conditions could be detected. Concerning the vaporization of doped lanthanum gallates the vaporization rates of the elements Ga, Mg, Sr and La were measured as function time, temperature, gas flow rate and stoichiometry

  14. Torque and atomic forces for Cartesian tensor atomic multipoles with an application to crystal unit cell optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M

    2016-08-15

    New equations for torque and atomic force are derived for use in flexible molecule force fields with atomic multipoles. The expressions are based on Cartesian tensors with arbitrary multipole rank. The standard method for rotating Cartesian tensor multipoles and calculating torque is to first represent the tensor with n indexes and 3(n) redundant components. In this work, new expressions for directly rotating the unique (n + 1)(n + 2)/2 Cartesian tensor multipole components Θpqr are given by introducing Cartesian tensor rotation matrix elements X(R). A polynomial expression and a recursion relation for X(R) are derived. For comparison, the analogous rotation matrix for spherical tensor multipoles are the Wigner functions D(R). The expressions for X(R) are used to derive simple equations for torque and atomic force. The torque and atomic force equations are applied to the geometry optimization of small molecule crystal unit cells. In addition, a discussion of computational efficiency as a function of increasing multipole rank is given for Cartesian tensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349179

  15. High-efficiency CdTe thin-film solar cells using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Stirn, R. J.; Meyers, P. V.; Liu, C. H.

    1989-06-01

    Energy conversion efficiency of metalorganic chemical vapor deposited CdTe as an intrinsic active layer in n-i-p solar cell structures is reported. Small-area devices with efficiencies over 9 percent have been demonstrated. I-V characteristics, photospectral response, and the results of Auger profiling of structural composition for typical devices will be presented. Also presented are preliminary results on similar photovoltaic devices having Cd(0.85)Mn(0.15)Te in place of CdTe as an i layer.

  16. High-efficiency CdTe thin-film solar cells using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouhi, A.; Stirn, R.J.; Meyers, P.V.; Liu, C.H.

    1989-05-01

    Energy conversion efficiency of metalorganic chemical vapor deposited CdTe as an intrinsic active layer in n-i-p solar cell structures is reported. Small-area devices with efficiencies over 9% have been demonstrated. I--V characteristics, photospectral response, and the results of Auger profiling of structural composition for typical devices will be presented. Also presented are preliminary results on similar photovoltaic devices having Cd/sub 0.85/Mn/sub 0.15/Te in place of CdTe as an i layer.

  17. High-efficiency CdTe thin-film solar cells using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Stirn, R. J.; Meyers, P. V.; Liu, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiency of metalorganic chemical vapor deposited CdTe as an intrinsic active layer in n-i-p solar cell structures is reported. Small-area devices with efficiencies over 9 percent have been demonstrated. I-V characteristics, photospectral response, and the results of Auger profiling of structural composition for typical devices will be presented. Also presented are preliminary results on similar photovoltaic devices having Cd(0.85)Mn(0.15)Te in place of CdTe as an i layer.

  18. Transcriptome sequencing reveals e-cigarette vapor and mainstream-smoke from tobacco cigarettes activate different gene expression profiles in human bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yifei Shen; Michael J. Wolkowicz; Tatyana Kotova; Lonjiang Fan; Timko, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) generate an aerosol vapor (e-vapor) thought to represent a less risky alternative to main stream smoke (MSS) of conventional tobacco cigarettes. RNA-seq analysis was used to examine the transcriptomes of differentiated human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells exposed to air, MSS from 1R5F tobacco reference cigarettes, and e-vapor with and without added nicotine in an in vitro air-liquid interface model for cellular exposure. Our results indicate that while e...

  19. Light-pulse atom interferometric device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Schwindt, Peter; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-03-22

    An atomic interferometric device useful, e.g., for measuring acceleration or rotation is provided. The device comprises at least one vapor cell containing a Raman-active chemical species, an optical system, and at least one detector. The optical system is conformed to implement a Raman pulse interferometer in which Raman transitions are stimulated in a warm vapor of the Raman-active chemical species. The detector is conformed to detect changes in the populations of different internal states of atoms that have been irradiated by the optical system.

  20. Study of the disulfide reduction of denatured proteins by liquid chromatography coupled with on-line cold-vapor-generation atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (LC-CVGAFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Emilia; Lomonte, Cristina; Onor, Massimo; Zamboni, Roberto; Raspi, Giorgio; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2004-09-01

    Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography coupled on-line with chemical-vapor-generation atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HIC-CVGAFS), optimized recently for the analysis of thiol-containing proteins under denaturing conditions, has been used to study the chemical reduction of denatured proteins. Four proteins chosen as models (human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-Lac) from bovine milk, and lysozyme from chicken egg (Lys)) were denatured with urea and reduced with dithiothreitol (DTT), with selenol as catalyst. The method is based on derivatization of the -SH groups of proteins with p-hydroxymercurybenzoate (PHMB), followed by HIC separation and post-column on-line reaction of the derivatized reduced, denatured proteins with bromine generated in situ. HgII, derived from rapid conversion of uncomplexed and protein-complexed PHMB, is selectively detected by AFS in an Ar/H2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride (NaBH4) reduction to Hg degrees . The yield of the reduction was studied as a function of reductant concentration, reduction time (tred), and urea concentration. Results showed that the optimum values for DTT and selenol concentrations and for tred were between 1 and 100 mmol L(-1) and between 1 and 20 min, respectively, depending on the protein studied. The percentage disulfide bond reduction increases as the urea concentration used for protein denaturation increases, giving a single-step sigmoid increment for single-domain, low-MW proteins (alpha-Lac and Lys), and a two-step sigmoid increment for multi-domain, high MW proteins (HSA and BSA). The shapes of plots of percentage reduced disulfide against urea concentration are characteristic of each protein and are correlated with the location of S-S in the protein. Under the adopted conditions complete protein denaturation is the conditio sine qua non for obtaining 100% S-S reduction. The detection limit for denatured, reduced proteins examined under the optimized

  1. Application of a multi-pass absorption cell for measurement of sputtered tungsten atoms' density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated gas discharge tube equipped with a hollow cathode made of tungsten is setup for sputtering of W atoms. A multi-pass White type absorption cell is designed to increase the sensitivity of the absorption method. The optical system consists of three externally mounted aluminium-coated spherical mirrors with 70 cm radius of curvature. Measurements of the cell relative transmittance in the UV and visible spectral regions are carried out. Time-resolved measurements of sputtered ground-state tungsten atoms' density in 2-pass configuration, as well as assessment of the diffusion coefficient of these atoms in argon at 350 K temperature are made.

  2. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL−1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL−1)−1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL−1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01–4 μg mL−1 and sample throughput: 72 h−1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided. - Highlights: ► Quartz tubes as furnaces in TS-FFAAS. ► Small tubes for controlling radial dispersion. ► Improved figures of merit for gold determination. ► Analysis of homeopathic medicines.

  3. Light conversion materials for solar cells by atomic layer deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    There are many different solar cell technologies which aim at producing electricity from sunlight cheap and/or efficient. As the efficiency of silicon cells is slowly but continuously climbing, price plummeting, and production skyrocketing, there is in my opinion little room for other technologies unless they can beat silicon on efficiency. Commercial cells at over 20 % efficiency are available and lab cells have been reported at above 27 %. Comparing this to the theoretical maximum efficienc...

  4. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. PMID:25368422

  5. VLE measurements using a static cell vapor phase manual sampling method accompanied with an empirical data consistency test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We use a new, simple static cell vapor phase manual sampling method (SCVMS) for VLE (x, y, T) measurement. • The method is applied to non-azeotropic, asymmetric and two-liquid phase forming azeotropic binaries. • The method is approved by a data consistency test, i.e., a plot of the polarity exclusion factor vs. pressure. • The consistency test reveals that with the new SCVMS method accurate VLE near ambient temperature can be measured. • Moreover, the consistency test approves that the effect of air in the SCVMS system is negligible. - Abstract: A new static cell vapor phase manual sampling (SCVMS) method is used for the simple measurement of constant temperature x, y (vapor + liquid) equilibria (VLE). The method was applied to the VLE measurements of the (methanol + water) binary at T/K = (283.2, 298.2, 308.2 and 322.9), asymmetric (acetone + 1-butanol) binary at T/K = (283.2, 295.2, 308.2 and 324.2) and two-liquid phase forming azeotropic (water + 1-butanol) binary at T/K = (283.2 and 298.2). The accuracy of the experimental data was approved by a data consistency test, that is, an empirical plot of the polarity exclusion factor, β, vs. the system pressure, P. The SCVMS data are accurate, because the VLE data converge to the same lnβ vs. lnP straight line determined from conventional distillation-still method and a headspace gas chromatography method

  6. Cell biological study in multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was undertaken to determine differences in the expression of cell surface antigens in normal plasma cells and mature myeloma cells. The subjects were 20 patients with multiple myeloma, including 5 A-bomb survivors. Seven normal persons, four with chronic tonsillitis, one with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and two with chronic lymphadenitis served as controls. In the group of myeloma cells, 12 showed mature myeloma cells of VLA-4+/VLA-5+/MPC-1+, and the other 8 showed precursor myeloma cells of VLA-4+/VLA-5-/MPC-1-. In terms of CD56 and CD19, CD56+/CD19- were seen in 13 patients, CD56-/CD19- in 5, and CD56+/CD19+ in 2; none of the patients showed phenotype of CD56-/CD19+. In the control group, all showed VLA-4+/VLA-5+/MPC-1+/CD44+/CD56-/CD19+; phenotype of normal plasma cells was CD38++/CD56-/CD19+ alone, which was not seen in the group of mature myeloma cells. Thus, this type is considered characteristic to normal plasma cells. These findings revealed that the difference in the expression of CD56 and CD19 aids in the identification of myeloma cells from normal plasma cells. (N.K.)

  7. Enhanced endocytosis of nano-curcumin in nasopharyngeal cancer cells: An atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, R.; Nair, Greshma; Girish, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies in drug development have shown that curcumin can be a good competent due to its improved anticancer, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammatory activities. A detailed real time characterization of drug (curcumin)-cell interaction is carried out in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells using atomic force microscopy. Nanocurcumin shows an enhanced uptake over micron sized drugs attributed to the receptor mediated route. Cell membrane stiffness plays a critical role in the drug endocytosis in nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

  8. Detecting and extracting clusters in atom probe data: A simple, automated method using Voronoi cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfer, P., E-mail: peter.felfer@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ceguerra, A.V., E-mail: anna.ceguerra@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, S.P., E-mail: simon.ringer@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The analysis of the formation of clusters in solid solutions is one of the most common uses of atom probe tomography. Here, we present a method where we use the Voronoi tessellation of the solute atoms and its geometric dual, the Delaunay triangulation to test for spatial/chemical randomness of the solid solution as well as extracting the clusters themselves. We show how the parameters necessary for cluster extraction can be determined automatically, i.e. without user interaction, making it an ideal tool for the screening of datasets and the pre-filtering of structures for other spatial analysis techniques. Since the Voronoi volumes are closely related to atomic concentrations, the parameters resulting from this analysis can also be used for other concentration based methods such as iso-surfaces. - Highlights: • Cluster analysis of atom probe data can be significantly simplified by using the Voronoi cell volumes of the atomic distribution. • Concentration fields are defined on a single atomic basis using Voronoi cells. • All parameters for the analysis are determined by optimizing the separation probability of bulk atoms vs clustered atoms.

  9. Detecting and extracting clusters in atom probe data: A simple, automated method using Voronoi cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the formation of clusters in solid solutions is one of the most common uses of atom probe tomography. Here, we present a method where we use the Voronoi tessellation of the solute atoms and its geometric dual, the Delaunay triangulation to test for spatial/chemical randomness of the solid solution as well as extracting the clusters themselves. We show how the parameters necessary for cluster extraction can be determined automatically, i.e. without user interaction, making it an ideal tool for the screening of datasets and the pre-filtering of structures for other spatial analysis techniques. Since the Voronoi volumes are closely related to atomic concentrations, the parameters resulting from this analysis can also be used for other concentration based methods such as iso-surfaces. - Highlights: • Cluster analysis of atom probe data can be significantly simplified by using the Voronoi cell volumes of the atomic distribution. • Concentration fields are defined on a single atomic basis using Voronoi cells. • All parameters for the analysis are determined by optimizing the separation probability of bulk atoms vs clustered atoms

  10. Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation, Zeeman and hyperfine relaxation of potassium atoms in a paraffin-coated cell

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman, J S; Stalnaker, J E; Tsigutkin, K; Wojciechowski, A; Yashchuk, V V

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear magneto-optical Faraday rotation (NMOR) on the potassium D1 and D2 lines was used to study Zeeman relaxation rates in an antirelaxation paraffin-coated 3-cm diameter potassium vapor cell. Intrinsic Zeeman relaxation rates of $\\gamma^{NMOR}/2\\pi=2.0(6) {\\rm Hz}$ were observed. The relatively small hyperfine intervals in potassium lead to significant differences in NMOR in potassium compared to rubidium and cesium. Using laser optical pumping, widths and frequency shifts were also determined for transitions between ground-state hyperfine sublevels of $^{39}$K atoms contained in the same paraffin-coated cell. The intrinsic hyperfine relaxation rate of $\\gamma^{hf}_{expt}/2\\pi = 10.6(7) $Hz and a shift of $-9.1(2) $Hz were observed. These results show that adiabatic relaxation gives only a small contribution to the overall hyperfine relaxation in the case of potassium, and the relaxation is dominated by other mechanisms similar to those observed in previous studies with rubidium.

  11. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, M.; Riet, J. te; Wolf, K. van der

    2013-01-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness toge

  12. Muonium formation in vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fractions of positive muons thermalizing in vapors as either the muonium atom (fsub(M)) or in diamagnetic environments (fsub(D)) have been measured in water, methanol, hexane, c-hexane, the chlorinated methanes and in TMS, in the pressure range from approximately 0.1 to approximately 2.5 atm. There is a marked difference in every case in comparison with the corresponding fractions (Psub(M),Psub(D)) measured in condensed media, with approximately 80 percent of incident muons forming muonium in the vapor phase compared to approximately 20 percent in the corresponding condensed phases. CClsub(4) appears somewhat anomalous in that it shows an unusually small muonium fraction in the vapor (fsub(D) approximately fsub(M)=0.5) and an unusually large diamagnetic fraction in the liquid (Psub(D)=1.0); these results can be attributed to large hot atom cross sections extending to the thermal regime, manifest as a relatively fast thermal rate constant for Mu + CClsub(4) (ksub(MU)=(2.9+-0.8) x 10sup(8) Msup(-1) ssup(-1)). The vapor phase results can be understood in terms of a charge exchange/hot atom (ion) model, providing also a likely explanation for observed pressure dependent fsub(D)'s in hexane, c-hexane and TMS at low (<0.5 atm) pressures in terms of termolecular processes, in analogy with some hot tritium studies. In the condensed phase, however, the present vapor phase results indicate that hot atom reactions cannot account for more than about 30 percent of the much larger diamagnetic fractions seen, strongly suggesting therefore that radiation induced spur effects play a dominant role in determining thermal muon fractions in condensed media

  13. Analysis of Immunolabeled Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy, Optical Microscopy, and Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Neagu, C.; Werf, van der, W.; Putman, C.A.J.; Kraan, Y.M.; Grooth, de, B.G.; Hulst, van der, R.W.M.; Greve, J de

    1994-01-01

    In this study we investigated the applicability of the (silver- enhanced) immunogold labeling method for atomic force microscopy. Human lymphocytes were labeled with anti-CD3 conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate and a secondary antibody (goat anti-mouse) linked with 1- or 30-nm colloidal gold particles. Silver enhancement was applied o­n these labeled cells to increase the size of the labels. In a setup combining an inverted optical microscope and a stand-alone atomic force microscope, a ...

  14. Microfabricated rubidium vapour cell with a thick glass core for small-scale atomic clock applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new fabrication method to manufacture alkali reference cells having dimensions larger than standard micromachined cells and smaller than glass-blown ones, for use in compact atomic devices such as vapour-cell atomic clocks or magnetometers. The technology is based on anodic bonding of silicon and relatively thick glass wafers and fills a gap in cell sizes and technologies available up to now: on one side, microfabrication technologies with typical dimensions ≤ 2 mm and on the other side, classical glass-blowing technologies for typical dimensions of about 6–10 mm or larger. The fabrication process is described for cells containing atomic Rb and spectroscopic measurements (optical absorption spectrum and double resonance) are reported. The analysis of the bonding strength of our cells was performed and shows that the first anodic bonding steps exhibit higher bonding strengths than the later ones. The spectroscopic results show a good quality of the cells. From the double-resonance signals, we predict a clock stability of ≈3 × 10−11 at 1 s of integration time, which compares well to the performance of compact commercial Rb atomic clocks. (paper)

  15. Photo-stability of a-Si solar cells fabricated by “Liquid-Si printing method” and treated with catalytic generated atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Hiroko, E-mail: murayama.hiroko5@jp.panasonic.com [Device Solutions Center, Panasonic Corporation, 3-1-1 Yagumo-naka-machi, Moriguchi City, Osaka 570-8501 (Japan); Ohyama, Tatsushi; Yoshida, Isao; Terakawa, Akira [Device Solutions Center, Panasonic Corporation, 3-1-1 Yagumo-naka-machi, Moriguchi City, Osaka 570-8501 (Japan); Masuda, Takashi [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi City, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); JST-ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi City, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Ohdaira, Keisuke [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi City, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi City, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); JST-ERATO Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi City, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    The film properties and solar cell performances of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) fabricated by a newly developed non-vacuum process “Liquid-Si printing method” were systematically investigated by comparing to the conventional plasma-chemical vapor deposition method. The as-printed a-Si:H films showed relatively high Urbach-tail characteristic energy (E{sub ch}), high [Si–H{sub 2}]/[Si–H], and low photoconductivity (~ 10{sup −7} S/cm). However, the [Si–H{sub 2}]/[Si–H] decreased, and the photoconductivity was improved to the device grade level (~ 10{sup −5} S/cm) after appropriate catalytic-generated atomic hydrogen treatment. It was also found that the light-induced degradation of the photoconductivity and solar cell efficiency of the printed samples were less than half of the conventional a-Si:H case.

  16. Photo-stability of a-Si solar cells fabricated by “Liquid-Si printing method” and treated with catalytic generated atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The film properties and solar cell performances of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) fabricated by a newly developed non-vacuum process “Liquid-Si printing method” were systematically investigated by comparing to the conventional plasma-chemical vapor deposition method. The as-printed a-Si:H films showed relatively high Urbach-tail characteristic energy (Ech), high [Si–H2]/[Si–H], and low photoconductivity (~ 10−7 S/cm). However, the [Si–H2]/[Si–H] decreased, and the photoconductivity was improved to the device grade level (~ 10−5 S/cm) after appropriate catalytic-generated atomic hydrogen treatment. It was also found that the light-induced degradation of the photoconductivity and solar cell efficiency of the printed samples were less than half of the conventional a-Si:H case

  17. Temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms inside a wall-coated glass cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄家强; 张建伟; 王时光; 王力军

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study on the temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms diffusively cooled inside a wall-coated glass cell by measuring the absorption profile of the 62S1/2 (F=4)→62P3/2(F0=5) transition line with a weak probe laser in the evolution process. We found that the temperature of the cold atoms first gradually decreases from 16 mK to 9 mK, and then rapidly increases. The number of cold atoms first declines slowly from 2.1 × 109 to 3.7 × 108 and then falls drastically. A theoretical model for the number evolution is built and includes the instantaneous temperature of the cold atoms and a fraction p, which represents the part of cold cesium atoms elastically reflected by the coated cell wall. The theory is overall in good agreement with the experimental result, and a nonzero value is obtained for the fraction p, which indicates that the cold cesium atoms are not all heated to the ambient temperature by a single collision with the coated cell wall. These results can provide helpful insight for precision measurements based on diffuse laser cooling.

  18. Detection of metabolic fluxes of O and H atoms into intracellular water in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J; Hegg, Eric L

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue. PMID:22848359

  19. Performance improvement of inverted organic solar cells by adding ultrathin Al2O3 as an electron selective layer and a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of SiOx encapsulating layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the performance improvement of inverted organic solar cells by adding an ultrathin electron selective layer of Al2O3 prepared between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and the active transport layer through atomic layer deposition (ALD). We evaluated the cell shelf-life after encapsulating with SiOx-coated polyethylene terephthalate, where the SiOx layer was made by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). It was found that the devices with ALD Al2O3 have a higher open circuit voltage than those without the ALD Al2O3 layer. Al2O3 deposited on an ITO electrode decreased the work function of ITO. Furthermore, based on the current density–voltage curves of the initial devices showing a pronounced S-shape, we soaked the cells with the ultraviolet (UV) light process. Then we obtained a higher efficiency in these ALD Al2O3 treated devices. With a careful analysis by atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we believe that the UV light soaking process affected both ITO and Al2O3. Further, after the encapsulation by PECVD SiOx, our devices achieved a shelf-life of over 500 h for 50% retained cell efficiency. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 improved the property of inverted organic solar cells. • Ultraviolet light soaking affected electrode work function and Al2O3 conductivity. • SiOx coating enveloped cells can achieve a 500 h shelf-life

  20. Position-Controlled III–V Compound Semiconductor Nanowire Solar Cells by Selective-Area Metal–Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Takashi; Yoshimura, Masatoshi; Nakai, Eiji; Tomioka, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate position-controlled III–V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) by using selective-area metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy and their application to solar cells. Efficiency of 4.23% is achieved for InP core–shell NW solar cells. We form a ‘flexible NW array’ without a substrate, which has the advantage of saving natural resources over conventional thin film photovoltaic devices. Four junction NW solar cells with over 50% efficiency are proposed and discussed.

  1. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  2. ZnO/Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 solar cells prepared by vapor phase Zn doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Kannan; Hasoon, Falah S.; Asher, Sarah E.; Dolan, James; Keane, James C.

    2007-02-20

    A process for making a thin film ZnO/Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 solar cell without depositing a buffer layer and by Zn doping from a vapor phase, comprising: depositing Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 layer on a metal back contact deposited on a glass substrate; heating the Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 layer on the metal back contact on the glass substrate to a temperature range between about 100.degree. C. to about 250.degree. C.; subjecting the heated layer of Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 to an evaporant species from a Zn compound; and sputter depositing ZnO on the Zn compound evaporant species treated layer of Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2.

  3. In-situ vapor small angle neutron scattering of sulfonated polyarylenethioethersulfone random copolymer (SPTES 70) fuel cells membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly sulfonated polyarylenethioethersulfone copolymer (SPTES 70) with excellent thermal stability, high proton conductivity and good mechanical properties is an excellent candidate as high temperature fuel cells membrane. The morphology of the SPTES 70 was examined with in situ vapor small angle neutron scattering (iVSANS), and transmission electron microscopy. An experimental neutron contrast match point was obtained with swelling SPTES 70 in a series of D2O/H2O ratios and compared with the calculated scattering contrast. The calculated scattering length density of SPTES 70 was in excellent agreement with the experiment scattering length density. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data of the magnesium, calcium, and silver exchanged hydrated SPTES 70 membranes exhibited nanostructured morphology which was compared with the reported nanostructure of D2O hydrated SPTES 70. SANS data showed that the average ionic domain size changes with the size and valence of the counter ion. (paper)

  4. Influence of N atomic percentages on cell attachment for CN$_x$ coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D J Li; L F Niu

    2003-06-01

    Carbon film is an excellent candidate for use as a biocompatible coating due to its excellent properties. However, considerable attention has just been focused on the biocompatibility of diamond-like carbon (DLC) in recent years. It is difficult to find reports on the investigations of the biocompatibility of CN$_x$ so far. It is well known that CN$_x$ has similar structural characteristics as that of DLC. Its excellent mechanical and tribological properties are comparable to that of DLC. In addition, it is probable that the presence of nitrogen leads to a positive effect on biocompatibility. So, this work focusses on cell attachment of CN$_x$ coating and the relation between nitrogen atomic percentage and cell attachment. CN$_x$ coatings were prepared using magnetron sputtering under two N2 partial pressures for the evaluation of relation between nitrogen atomic percentage and cell attachment. Cell culture tests using human endothelial cells and mouse fibroblasts were performed. Both coatings resulted in no adverse effects on the cells in culture. Compared with CN$_x$ ( = 0.088), CN$_x$ ( = 0.149) film provided a better surface for normal cellular attachment, spreading and proliferation without apparent impairment of cell physiology. At the same time, the coatings exhibited excellent tribological and corrosion performance. XPS and AES analyses showed that higher nitrogen atomic percentage might lead to a positive effect on the cell attachment.

  5. Observations of xenon gas-treated barley cells in solution by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, T; Sotome, I; Ohtani, T; Isobe, S; Oshita, S; Maekawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Barley cells cut from a sprout were exposed to either air or high-pressure xenon gas for 3 days and the surface of those cells was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to examine the effect of the gas treatment. This method enabled the direct observation of the fresh surface of the barley cells in solution at high resolution. The cuticle layer was preserved on the primary cell wall of 0.48 MPa xenon gas-treated barley cells, while air-treated barley cells lost the cuticle layer from the primary cell wall. These findings indicate that the high-pressure xenon gas treatment is effective to preserve the cuticle layer attached to the primary cell wall. AFM is a powerful tool for the observation of the surface structure of living plant cells in solution. PMID:11108038

  6. Gas cell based on optical contacting for fundamental spectroscopy studies with initial reference absorption spectrum of H2O vapor at 1723 K and 0.0235 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Scott T.; Sanders, Scott T.

    2016-09-01

    A gas cell, using optically contacted sapphire windows to form a hot vapor seal, has been created for high temperature fundamental spectroscopy studies. It is designed to operate at temperatures from 280-2273 K and pressures from vacuum to 1.3 bar. Using the cell in conjunction with an external cavity diode laser spectrometer, a reference H2O vapor absorption spectrum at P=0.0235±0.0036 bar and T=1723±6 K was measured with 0.0001 cm-1 resolution over the 7326-7598 cm-1 range. Comparison of the measured spectrum to simulations reveals errors in both the HITEMP and BT2 databases. This work establishes heated static cell capabilities at temperatures well above the typical limit of approximately 1300 K set by quartz material properties. This paper addresses the design of the cell as well as the cell's limitations.

  7. Vector light shift averaging in paraffin-coated alkali vapor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivun, Elena; Wickenbrock, Arne; Sudyka, Julia; Patton, Brian; Pustelny, Szymon; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    Light shifts are an important source of noise and systematics in optically pumped magnetometers. We demonstrate that the long spin coherence time in paraffin-coated cells leads to spatial averaging of the light shifts over the entire cell volume. This renders the averaged light shift independent, under certain approximations, of the light-intensity distribution within the sensor cell. These results and the underlying mechanism can be extended to other spatially varying phenomena in anti-relaxation-coated cells with long coherence times.

  8. Temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms inside a glass cell

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, J Q; Wang, S G; Wang, Z B; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study on the temperature and number evolution of the cold cesium atoms diffusively cooled inside a wall-coated glass cell by measuring the absorption profile of the 62S1/2 (F=4)-62P3/2 (F'=5) transition line with a weak probe laser in the evolution process. We found that the temperature of the cold atoms first gradually decreases from 16 mK to 9 mK, and then rapidly increases. A theoretical model of the number evolution is built, which includes the temperature of the cold atoms and the fraction p of the cold cesium atoms elastically reflected by the cell wall. The theoretical model is consistent with the experimental result very well, and the fraction p is obtained to be (0.58 +/- 0.03), which reveals that the cold cesium atoms are not all heated to the ambient temperature by a single collision with the cell wall.

  9. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  10. Investigation of penetration force of living cell using an atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Eun Young; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Dae Eun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    Recently, the manipulation of a single cell has been receiving much attention in transgenesis, in-vitro fertilization, individual cell based diagnosis, and pharmaceutical applications. As these techniques require precise injection and manipulation of cells, issues related to penetration force arise. In this work the penetration force of living cell was studied using an atomic force microscope (AFM). L929, HeLa, 4T1, and TA3 HA II cells were used for the experiments. The results showed that the penetration force was in the range of 2{approx}22 nN. It was also found that location of cell penetration and stiffness of the AFM cantilever affected the penetration force significantly. Furthermore, double penetration events could be detected, due to the multi-membrane layers of the cell. The findings of this work are expected to aid in the development of precision micro-medical instruments for cell manipulation and treatment

  11. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  12. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed

  13. Development of High-Bandgap AlGaInP Solar Cells Grown by Organometallic Vapor-Phase Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2016-05-01

    AlGaInP solar cells with bandgaps between 1.9 and 2.2 eV are investigated for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This quaternary alloy is of great importance to the development of III-V solar cells with five or more junctions and for cells optimized for operation at elevated temperatures because of the high bandgaps required in these designs. In this work, we explore the conditions for the organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. Initial efforts focused on developing -2.0-eV AlGaInP solar cells with a nominal aluminum composition of 12%. Under the direct spectrum at 1000 W/m2 (AM1.5D), the best of these samples had an open-circuit voltage of 1.59 V, a bandgap-voltage offset of 440 mV, a fill factor of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. We then varied the aluminum composition of the alloy from 0% to 24% and were able to tune the bandgap of the AlGaInP layers from -1.9 to -2.2 eV. While the samples with a higher aluminum composition exhibited a reduced quantum efficiency and increased bandgap-voltage offset, the bandgap-voltage offset remained at 500 mV or less, up to a bandgap of -2.1 eV.

  14. Thin-film solar cells from sputtered and vapor-deposited amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.; Ruebel, H.; Iselborn, S.; Arenas, G.; Wagner, C.; Schroeder, B.; Geiger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of sputtered and evaporated a-Si:H, and the application of this material for the preparation of solar cells were investigated. Correlations are found between the photoelectrical properties of the films and the amount and bonding configuration of the hydrogen incorporated, both influencing the film structure. Optimally passivated sputtered material containing 10 at % hydrogen is deposited for preparation of Schottky and pin-type solar cells. Conversion efficiencies 2% are measured. A possible efficiency of 5% is calculated taking the best values obtained for cell parameters. Progress in the defect passivation of reactively evaporated a-Si:H films is reported. (ESA)

  15. Thin film coatings which inhibit spin relaxation of polarized potassium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype of a polarized deuterium target which employs the spin exchange method is being developed. The mixing cell for mixing deuterium atoms and potassium vapor requires a surface that will reflect these atoms without being destroyed by the corrosive potassium. Thin film coating methods and a technique for coating pyrex are described. Results of spin relaxation measurements are given

  16. Atomic force microscope elastography reveals phenotypic differences in alveolar cell stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Azeloglu, Evren U.; Bhattacharya, Jahar; COSTA, KEVIN D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the connection between alveolar mechanics and key biochemical events such as surfactant secretion, one first needs to characterize the underlying mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma and its cellular constituents. In this study, the mechanics of three major cell types from the neonatal rat lung were studied; primary alveolar type I (AT1) and type II (AT2) epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts were isolated using enzymatic digestion. Atomic force microscopy indentation wa...

  17. Novel platinum nanoparticles/vapor grown carbon fibers composite counter electrodes for high performance dye sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) are highly dispersed on vapor grown carbon fibers (VGCFs). • The power conversion efficiency of DSSCs depends substantially on the relative content of VGCFs to PtNPs. • Electrocatalytic activities of PtNPs/VGCFs are examined using impedance, cyclic voltammetry, and Tafel polarization techniques. • Moderate combination of PtNPs and VGCFs exhibits higher power conversion efficiency of DSSCs than that of PtNPs or VGCFs alone. - Abstract: A composite film composed of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) and vapor grown carbon fibers (VGCFs) was coated on FTO glass acted as a counter electrode (CE) for high performance dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) via a facially thermal approach. The PtNP/VGCF hybrid film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, and X-ray photoelectroscopy (XPS). In addition, cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were measured to correlate electrocatalytic activity to photovoltaic performance of DSSCs based on these PtNP/VGCF hybrid counter electrodes (CEs). Results indicated that PtNPs can enhance the thermal stability of VGCFs and were uniformly distributed over VGCFs with high porosity to provide large exposed surface area for redox reactions occurring within the films. VGCFs were found to benefit Pt reduction during annealing at 450 °C. A DSSC comprising the hybrid CE with a weight ratio of PtNPs to VGCFs of 3:7 (PV37) illustrated a higher solar-to-electricity efficiency of 7.77% in comparison to 7.31% for a conventional Pt CE or 3.79% for a pure VGCF CE. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated that PV37 CE featured the strongest electrocatalytic ability for the reduction of I3− to I− and the lowest Nernst diffusion resistance, confirming the highest power conversion efficiency among the samples evaluated

  18. Magnetometry with millimeter-scale anti-relaxation-coated alkali-metal vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Balabas, M V; Kitching, J; Schwindt, P D D; Stalnaker, J E

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic nonlinear magneto-optical-rotation signals with frequency- and amplitude-modulated laser light have been observed and investigated with a spherical glass cell of 3-mm diameter containing Cs metal with inner walls coated with paraffin. Intrinsic Zeeman relaxation rates of $\\gamma/(2\\pi)\\approx 20 $Hz and lower have been observed. Favorable prospects of using millimeter-scale coated cells in portable magnetometers and secondary frequency references are discussed.

  19. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Christopher [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    The goal of this research is to determine procedures for creating ultra-high capacity supercapacitors by using nanofabrication techniques and high k-value dielectrics. One way to potentially solve the problem of climate change is to switch the source of energy to a source that doesn’t release many tons of greenhouse gases, gases which cause global warming, into the Earth’s atmosphere. These trap in more heat from the Sun’s solar energy and cause global temperatures to rise. Atomic layer deposition will be used to create a uniform thin-film of dielectric to greatly enhance the abilities of our capacitors and will build them on the nanoscale.

  20. Immobilization method of yeast cells for intermittent contact mode imaging using the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used for studying the surface morphology and growth of live cells. There are relatively fewer reports on the AFM imaging of yeast cells (Kasas and Ikai, 1995), (Gad and Ikai, 1995). Yeasts have thick and mechanically strong cell walls and are therefore difficult to attach to a solid substrate. In this report, a new immobilization technique for the height mode imaging of living yeast cells in solid media using AFM is presented. The proposed technique allows the cell surface to be almost completely exposed to the environment and studied using AFM. Apart from the new immobilization protocol, for the first time, height mode imaging of live yeast cell surface in intermittent contact mode is presented in this report. Stable and reproducible imaging over a 10-h time span is observed. A significant improvement in operational stability will facilitate the investigation of growth patterns and surface patterns of yeast cells.

  1. Preconcentration and in-situ photoreduction of trace selenium using TiO2 nanoparticles, followed by its determination by slurry photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a method for the determination of trace levels of total selenium in water samples. It integrates preconcentration, in-situ photoreduction and slurry photochemical vapor generation using TiO2 nanoparticles, and the determination of total selenium by AFS. The Se(IV) and Se(VI) species were adsorbed on a slurry of TiO2 nanoparticles which then were exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form volatile selenium species. The detection limits were improved 17-fold compared to hydride generation and 56-fold compared to photochemical vapor generation, both without any preconcentration. No significant difference was found in the limits of detection (LODs) for Se(IV) and Se(VI). The LOD is as low as 0.8 ng L−1, the precision is better than 4.5 % (at a level of 0.1 μg L−1 of selenium). The method gave good recoveries when applied to the determination of total selenium in a certified tissue reference material (DORM-3) and in spiked drinking water and wastewater samples containing high concentrations of transition and noble metal ions. It also excels by very low LODs, a significant enhancement of sample throughput, reduced reagent consumption and sample loss, and minimal interference by transition and noble metal ions. (author)

  2. Effects of getters on hermetically sealed micromachined cesium–neon cells for atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wafer-level integration technique of PageWafer® (SAES Getters’ solution for getter film integration into wafer to wafer bonded devices) has been tested in hermetically sealed miniature glass-Si-glass cells filled with Cs and Ne, e.g. for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) atomic clock applications. Getter effects on the cell atmosphere are analyzed by quadruple mass spectroscopy and coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The quadruple mass spectroscopy revealed that the residual gases (H2, O2, N2 and CO2) that are attributed to anodic bonding process are drastically reduced by the getter films while desirable gases such as Ne seem to remain unaffected. The impurity pressure in the getter-integrated cells was measured to be less than 4 × 10−2 mbar, i.e. pressure 50 times lower than the one measured in the cells without getter (2 mbar). Consequently, the atmosphere of the getter-integrated cells is much more pure than that of the getter-free cells. CPT signals obtained from the getter-integrated cells are stable and are, in addition, similar to each other within a cell batch, suggesting the strong potential of applications of this getter film and especially for its wafer-level integration to MEMS atomic clocks and magnetometers. (paper)

  3. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  4. Analytical investigation of the feasibility of sacrificial microchannel sealing for Chip-Scale Atomic Magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujimoto, Kazuya; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Koji; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; TABATA, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    An alkali metal vapor cell is a crucial component of the highly sensitive Chip Scale Atomic Magnetometers (CSAMs) that are increasingly deployed in a variety of electronic devices. Herein, we propose a novel microfabrication technique utilizing an array of microchannels at a bonded interface, to enable gas feedthrough for evacuation of unwanted gases from a vapor cell and subsequent introduction of an inert gas, followed by permanent sealing of the microchannels by reflow of a glass frit. The...

  5. Alteration of natural killer(NK) cells in atomic bomb survivors of hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the alteration of natural killer(NK) cells and their responsiveness to IL-2 observed in 125 atomic-bomb survivors. It is found no difference in the number and activity of NK cells among different dose groups with the same age ATB. But there was of difference in NK activity in different age ATB groups with same dose, especially in the g roups 25 years, the old with doses of 0.01-1 Gy (P < 0.05). This result suggests that there is an obvious late effect of ionizing radiation on activity of NK cells in children

  6. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong

    2012-04-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Microrheology of human lung epithelial cells measured by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Buscemi, Lara; Grabulosa, Mireia; Trepat, Xavier; Fabry, Ben; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Lung epithelial cells are subjected to large cyclic forces from breathing. However, their response to dynamic stresses is poorly defined. We measured the complex shear modulus (G*(ω)) of human alveolar (A549) and bronchial (BEAS-2B) epithelial cells over three frequency decades (0.1–100 Hz) and at different loading forces (0.1–0.9 nN) with atomic force microscopy. G*(ω) was computed by correcting force-indentation oscillatory data for the tip-cell contact geometry and for the hydrodynamic vis...

  8. Surface engineering of nanoporous substrate for solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghoon Ji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited thin film electrolytes supported on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO are electrochemically characterized with varying thickness of bottom electrode catalyst (BEC; BECs which are 0.5 and 4 times thicker than the size of AAO pores are tested. The thicker BEC ensures far more active mass transport on the BEC side and resultantly the thicker BEC cell generates ≈11 times higher peak power density than the thinner BEC cell at 500 °C.

  9. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  10. CdTe-based solar cells prepared by physical vapor deposition and close-spaced sublimation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : In the photovoltaic material family, cadmium telluride is regarded as one of the most promising material for fabrication of high efficiency polycrystalline CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells because of its near-optimum band gap of about 1.46 eV and high optical absorption coefficient in visible range. The maximum efficiency of about 16.5 percent of the laboratory samples of polycrystalline CdTe based thin film solar cells was achieved by using nanostructured CdS:O window layer and the modified device structure. In spite of the large lattice mismatch between cubic CdTe and hexagonal CdS (nearly 9.7 percent) the CdTe/CdS solar cells are characterized by essentially high efficiencies caused by interdiffusion at the junction interface removing the lattice mismatch. To identify the structural mechanisms leading to the solar cell efficiency increase we have studied the effect of CdCl2 treatment on the output parameters of CdS/CdTe-based solar cells and crystal structure of the base layers deposited on glass substrates by different ways. In the first way both of CdS and CdTe layers were deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method meanwhile in the second way the chemical bath deposition (CBD) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS) methods were used for CdS and CdTe films deposition, respectively. For the PVD structures. The average grain size of the film increases from 1 μm to 4 μm due to the lattice strain caused by macrodeformations and stacking faults. The maximum efficiency (ηA=10.3 percent) of solar cells on the basis of cadmium telluride layers deposited by PVD method corresponds to 0,35 μm CdRl2 thickness at CdCl2 treatment. CBD/CSS samples were exposed to CdCl2 vapor at 400 degrees Celsium for 5-7 min in vacuum chamber in the presence of 100 torr oxygen and 400 torr helium. As-grown CdTe films were characterized by clearly faceted surface morphology and an average grain size of about 3-4 μm. Unlike the thermally evaporated CdTe films, no

  11. Growth of Cu2ZnSnSe4 Film under Controllable Se Vapor Composition and Impact of Low Cu Content on Solar Cell Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Hongxia; Wu, Li; Chen, Cheng; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fangfang; Sun, Yun; Han, Junbo; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-27

    It is a challenge to fabricate high quality Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) film with low Cu content (Cu/(Zn + Sn) CZTSe films under different Se vapor composition are investigated by DC-sputtering and a postselenization approach. The composition of Se vapor has important influence on the compactability of the films and the diffusion of elements in the CZTSe films. By adjusting the composition of Se vapor during the selenization process, an optimized two step selenization process is proposed and highly crystallized CZTSe film with low Cu content (Cu/(Zn + Sn) = 0.75) is obtained. Further study of the effect of Cu content on the morphology and photovoltaic performance of the corresponding CZTSe solar cells has shown that the roughness of the CZTSe absorber film increases when Cu content decreases. As a consequence, the reflection loss of CZTSe solar cells reduces dramatically and the short circuit current density of the cells improve from 34.7 mA/cm(2) for Cu/(Zn + Sn) = 0.88 to 38.5 mA/cm(2) for Cu/(Zn + Sn) = 0.75. In addition, the CZTSe solar cells with low Cu content show longer minority carrier lifetime and higher open circuit voltage than the high Cu content devices. A champion performance CZTSe solar cell with 10.4% efficiency is fabricated with Cu/(Zn + Sn) = 0.75 in the CZTSe film without antireflection coating. PMID:27058738

  12. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Cort [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Adolphi, Natalie L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Butler, Kimberly L.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard [Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico, Cancer Research and Treatment Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Schwindt, Peter D.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Flynn, Edward R., E-mail: seniorsci@comcast.net [Senior Scientific, LLC, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic relaxometry is used to study antibody targeted nanoparticles and cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensor performances are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sensitivity of magnetic relaxometry for cancer cell detection is demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic relaxometry decay curves from cancer cells are fit by a log function.

  13. Magnetic relaxometry with an atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensors on targeted cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic relaxometry methods have been shown to be very sensitive in detecting cancer cells and other targeted diseases. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are one of the primary sensor systems used in this methodology because of their high sensitivity with demonstrated capabilities of detecting fewer than 100,000 magnetically-labeled cancer cells. The emerging technology of atomic magnetometers (AMs) represents a new detection method for magnetic relaxometry with high sensitivity and without the requirement for cryogens. We report here on a study of magnetic relaxometry using both AM and SQUID sensors to detect cancer cells that are coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles through antibody targeting. The AM studies conform closely to SQUID sensor results in the measurement of the magnetic decay characteristics following a magnetization pulse. The AM and SQUID sensor data are well described theoretically for superparamagnetic particles bound to cells and the results can be used to determine the number of cells in a cell culture or tumor. The observed fields and magnetic moments of cancer cells are linear with the number of cells over a very large range. The AM sensor demonstrates very high sensitivity for detecting magnetically labeled cells, does not require cryogenic cooling and is relatively inexpensive. - Highlights: ► Magnetic relaxometry is used to study antibody targeted nanoparticles and cells. ► Atomic magnetometer and SQUID sensor performances are compared. ► High sensitivity of magnetic relaxometry for cancer cell detection is demonstrated. ► Magnetic relaxometry decay curves from cancer cells are fit by a log function.

  14. Structural dynamics and activity of nanocatalysts inside fuel cells by in operando atomic pair distribution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shan, Shiyao; Ren, Yang; Wu, Jinfang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) we tracked the evolution of the atomic structure and activity of noble metal-transition metal (NM-TM) nanocatalysts for ORR as they function at the cathode of a fully operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Experimental HE-XRD data were analysed in terms of atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) and compared to the current output of the PEMFC, which was also recorded during the experiments. The comparison revealed that under actual operating conditions, NM-TM nanocatalysts can undergo structural changes that differ significantly in both length-scale and dynamics and so can suffer losses in their ORR activity that differ significantly in both character and magnitude. Therefore we argue that strategies for reducing ORR activity losses should implement steps for achieving control not only over the length but also over the time-scale of the structural changes of NM-TM NPs that indeed occur during PEMFC operation. Moreover, we demonstrate how such a control can be achieved and thereby the performance of PEMFCs improved considerably. Last but not least, we argue that the unique capabilities of in operando HE-XRD coupled to atomic PDF analysis to characterize active nanocatalysts inside operating fuel cells both in a time-resolved manner and with atomic level resolution, i.e. in 4D, can serve well the ongoing search for nanocatalysts that deliver more with less platinum.Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE

  15. Quantum correlations by four-wave mixing in an atomic vapor in a non-amplifying regime: a quantum beam splitter for photons

    CERN Document Server

    Glorieux, Quentin; Guibal, Samuel; Likforman, Jean-Pierre; Coudreau, Thomas; 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.053826

    2011-01-01

    We study the generation of intensity quantum correlations using four-wave mixing in a rubidium vapor. The absence of cavity in these experiments allows to deal with several spatial modes simultaneously. In the standard, amplifying, configuration, we measure relative intensity squeezing up to 9.2 dB below the standard quantum limit. We also theoretically identify and experimentally demonstrate an original regime where, despite no overall amplification, quantum correlations are generated. In this regime a four-wave mixing set-up can therefore play the role of a photonic beam splitter with non--classical properties, i.e. a device that splits a coherent state input into two quantum correlated beams.

  16. Structural dynamics and activity of nanocatalysts inside fuel cells by in operando atomic pair distribution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shan, Shiyao; Ren, Yang; Wu, Jinfang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-05-19

    Here we present the results from a study aimed at clarifying the relationship between the atomic structure and activity of nanocatalysts for chemical reactions driving fuel cells, such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, using in operando high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) we tracked the evolution of the atomic structure and activity of noble metal-transition metal (NM-TM) nanocatalysts for ORR as they function at the cathode of a fully operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Experimental HE-XRD data were analysed in terms of atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) and compared to the current output of the PEMFC, which was also recorded during the experiments. The comparison revealed that under actual operating conditions, NM-TM nanocatalysts can undergo structural changes that differ significantly in both length-scale and dynamics and so can suffer losses in their ORR activity that differ significantly in both character and magnitude. Therefore we argue that strategies for reducing ORR activity losses should implement steps for achieving control not only over the length but also over the time-scale of the structural changes of NM-TM NPs that indeed occur during PEMFC operation. Moreover, we demonstrate how such a control can be achieved and thereby the performance of PEMFCs improved considerably. Last but not least, we argue that the unique capabilities of in operando HE-XRD coupled to atomic PDF analysis to characterize active nanocatalysts inside operating fuel cells both in a time-resolved manner and with atomic level resolution, i.e. in 4D, can serve well the ongoing search for nanocatalysts that deliver more with less platinum. PMID:27160891

  17. Biophysical measurements of cells, microtubules, and DNA with an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenica, Luka M.; Contee, Clay; Cabrejo, Raysa; Kurek, Matthew; Deveney, Edward F.; Carter, Ashley R.

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are ubiquitous in research laboratories and have recently been priced for use in teaching laboratories. Here, we review several AFM platforms and describe various biophysical experiments that could be done in the teaching laboratory using these instruments. In particular, we focus on experiments that image biological materials (cells, microtubules, and DNA) and quantify biophysical parameters including membrane tension, persistence length, contour length, and the drag force.

  18. Atomic force microscopy reveals differences in cell membrane properties in nuclear myosin I mutant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Rohožková, Jana; Kalendová, Alžběta; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : ČSMS, 2013. s. 25-25. [Mikroskopie 2013. 13.05.2013-14.05.2013, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I

  19. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26666911

  20. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  1. Vapor and healing treatment for CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films toward large-area perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Laxman; Gottesman, Ronen; Tirosh, Shay; Haltzi, Eynav; Hu, Jiangang; Ginsburg, Adam; Keller, David A.; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Zaban, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Hybrid methyl-ammonium lead trihalide perovskites are promising low-cost materials for use in solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. With a certified photovoltaic conversion efficiency record of 20.1%, scale-up for commercial purposes is already underway. However, preparation of large-area perovskite films remains a challenge, and films of perovskites on large electrodes suffer from non-uniform performance. Thus, production and characterization of the lateral uniformity of large-area films is a crucial step towards scale-up of devices. In this paper, we present a reproducible method for improving the lateral uniformity and performance of large-area perovskite solar cells (32 cm2). The method is based on methyl-ammonium iodide (MAI) vapor treatment as a new step in the sequential deposition of perovskite films. Following the MAI vapor treatment, we used high throughput techniques to map the photovoltaic performance throughout the large-area device. The lateral uniformity and performance of all photovoltaic parameters (Voc, Jsc, Fill Factor, Photo-conversion efficiency) increased, with an overall improved photo-conversion efficiency of ~100% following a vapor treatment at 140 °C. Based on XRD and photoluminescence measurements, We propose that the MAI treatment promotes a ``healing effect'' to the perovskite film which increases the lateral uniformity across the large-area solar cell. Thus, the straightforward MAI vapor treatment is highly beneficial for large scale commercialization of perovskite solar cells, regardless of the specific deposition method.Hybrid methyl-ammonium lead trihalide perovskites are promising low-cost materials for use in solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. With a certified photovoltaic conversion efficiency record of 20.1%, scale-up for commercial purposes is already underway. However, preparation of large-area perovskite films remains a challenge, and films of perovskites on large electrodes suffer from non

  2. Physical vapor deposition of CdTe thin films at low temperature for solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride is successfully utilized as an absorber material for thin film solar cells. Industrial production makes use of high substrate temperatures for the deposition of CdTe absorber layers. However, in order to exploit flexible substrates and to simplify the manufacturing process, lower deposition temperatures are beneficial. Based on the phase diagram of CdTe, predictions on the stoichiometry of CdTe thin films grown at low substrate temperatures are made in this work. These predictions were verified experimentally using additional sources of Cd and Te during the deposition of the CdTe thin films at different substrate temperatures. The deposited layers were analyzed with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In case of CdTe layers which were deposited at substrate temperatures lower than 200 C without usage of additional sources we found a non-stoichiometric growth of the CdTe layers. The application of the additional sources leads to a stoichiometric growth for substrate temperatures down to 100 C which is a significant reduction of the substrate temperature during deposition.

  3. Relationship between cell stiffness and stress fiber amount, assessed by simultaneous atomic force microscopy and live-cell fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin stress fibers, one of the main components of the cell's cytoskeleton, provide mechanical stability to adherent cells by applying and transmitting tensile forces onto the extracellular matrix (ECM) at the sites of cell-ECM adhesion. While it is widely accepted that changes in spatial and temporal distribution of stress fibers affect the cell's mechanical properties, there is no quantitative knowledge on how stress fiber amount and organization directly modulate cell stiffness. We address this key open question by combining atomic force microscopy with simultaneous fluorescence imaging of living cells, and combine for the first time reliable quantitative parameters obtained from both techniques. We show that the amount of myosin and (to a lesser extent) actin assembled in stress fibers directly modulates cell stiffness in adherent mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3). In addition, the spatial distribution of stress fibers has a second-order modulatory effect. In particular, the presence of either fibers located in the cell periphery, aligned fibers or thicker fibers gives rise to reinforced cell stiffness. Our results provide basic and significant information that will help design optimal protocols to regulate the mechanical properties of adherent cells via pharmacological interventions that alter stress fiber assembly or via micropatterning techniques that restrict stress fiber spatial organization. PMID:26206449

  4. [Comparison of cell elasticity analysis methods based on atomic force microscopy indentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Hao, Fengtao; Chen, Xiaohu; Yang, Zhouqi; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate in greater detail the two methods based on Hertz model for analyzing force-distance curve obtained by atomic force microscopy, we acquired the force-distance curves of Hela and MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation in this study. After the determination of contact point, Young's modulus in different indentation depth were calculated with two analysis methods of "two point" and "slope fitting". The results showed that the Young's modulus of Hela cell was higher than that of MCF-7 cell,which is in accordance with the F-actin distribution of the two types of cell. We found that the Young's modulus of the cells was decreased with increasing indentation depth and the curve trends by "slope fitting". This indicated that the "slope fitting" method could reduce the error caused by the miscalculation of contact point. The purpose of this study was to provide a guidance for researcher to choose an appropriate method for analyzing AFM indentation force-distance curve. PMID:25764725

  5. Three-dimensional atomic mapping of hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Pareige, Philippe; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is a nanostructured material consisting of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon matrix. Its use as the intrinsic layer in thin film p-i-n solar cells has led to good cell properties in terms of stability and efficiency. Here, we have been able to assess directly the concentration and distribution of nanocrystals and impurities (dopants) in p-i-n solar cells, by using femtosecond laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). An effective sample preparation method for APT characterization is developed. Based on the difference in atomic density between hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon, we are able to distinguish the nanocrystals from the amorphous matrix by using APT. Moreover, thanks to the three-dimensional reconstruction, we demonstrate that Si nanocrystals are homogeneously distributed in the entire intrinsic layer of the solar cell. The influence of the process pressure on the incorporation of nanocrystals and their distribution is also investigated. Thanks to APT we could determine crystalline fractions as low as 4.2% in the pm-Si:H films, which is very difficult to determine by standard techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Moreover, we also demonstrate a sharp p/i interface in our solar cells.

  6. Selective deposition contact patterning using atomic layer deposition for the fabrication of crystalline silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective deposition contact (SDC) patterning was applied to fabricate the rear side passivation of crystalline silicon (Si) solar cells. By this method, using screen printing for contact patterning and atomic layer deposition for the passivation of Si solar cells with Al2O3, we produced local contacts without photolithography or any laser-based processes. Passivated emitter and rear-contact solar cells passivated with ozone-based Al2O3 showed, for the SDC process, an up-to-0.7% absolute conversion-efficiency improvement. The results of this experiment indicate that the proposed method is feasible for conversion-efficiency improvement of industrial crystalline Si solar cells. - Highlights: • We propose a local contact formation process. • Local contact forms a screen print and an atomic layer deposited-Al2O3 film. • Ozone-based Al2O3 thin film was selectively deposited onto patterned silicon. • Selective deposition contact patterning method can increase cell-efficiency by 0.7%

  7. Atomic-scale modeling of chemical vapor deposition processes from new complicated gas-phase mixtures for micro- and nanoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhviladze, T. M.; Sarychev, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the most important processes for obtaining thin films widely used in semiconductor and in IC technology. Because of the baffling complexity of deposition process the usually-used approaches in CVD modeling include a great number of empiric non-calculated parameters, and this drawback becomes a grave disadvantage if one needs to model the process with new reagents and materials which were not used before. So we place primary emphasis upon the development of non-empirical deposition models that rely on phenomenological theories and experimental data only to a minimal extent. We are presenting the atomistic-scale models and software package throughout the entire deposition process that are based mainly on the first principles and ab initio methods. The main modeling stages are studied and discussed in detail, namely: atomistic modeling of gas-phase and surface reactions, determination of the basic chemical and physical mechanisms for the considered gas mixtures, calculations of the reactions rates for elementary reactions and acts, Monte Carlo and/or molecular dynamics simulation of the thin film growth, and modeling of macrokinetic processes in realistic deposition flow-reactor chamber. The modeling results for thin films deposition from actual gas mixtures are given. The physical properties of films as well as their stoichiometric composition and structure in dependence of process conditions are discussed.

  8. The relation of apple texture with cell wall nanostructure studied using an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Zdunek, Artur; Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna M; Stokke, Bjørn T

    2013-01-30

    In this study, the relation of the nanostructure of cell walls with their texture was investigated for six different apple cultivars. Cell wall material (CWM) and cellulose microfibrils were imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The mean diameter of cellulose microfibrils for each cultivar was estimated based on the AFM height topographs obtained using the tapping mode of dried specimens. Additionally, crystallinity of cellulose microfibrils and pectin content was determined. Texture of apple cultivars was evaluated by sensory and instrumental analysis. Differences in cellulose diameter as determined from the AFM height topographs of the nanostructure of cell walls of the apple cultivars are found to relate to the degree of crystallinity and pectin content. Cultivars with thicker cellulose microfibrils also revealed crisper, harder and juicier texture, and greater acoustic emission. The data suggest that microfibril thickness affects the mechanical strength of cell walls which has consequences for sensory and instrumental texture. PMID:23218275

  9. Ti–Al–O nanocrystal charge trapping memory cells fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge trapping memory cells using Ti–Al–O (TAO) film as charge trapping layer and amorphous Al2O3 as the tunneling and blocking layers were fabricated on Si substrates by atomic layer deposition method. As-deposited TAO films were annealed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 3 min in N2 with a rapid thermal annealing process to form nanocrystals. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and band diagram of the heterostructures. The electrical characteristics and charge storage properties of the Al2O3/TAO/Al2O3/Si stack structures were also evaluated. Compared to 700 °C and 900 °C samples, the memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance with larger memory window of 4.8 V at ± 6 V sweeping, higher program/erase speed and excellent endurance. - Highlights: • The charge trapping memory cells were fabricated by atomic layer deposition method. • The anneal temperature plays a key role in forming nanocrystals. • The memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance. • The band alignment is beneficial to enhance the retention characteristics

  10. Atomic force microscopy analysis of progenitor corneal epithelial cells fractionated by a rapid centrifugation isolation technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM to image the three groups of corneal epithelial cells fractionated by a novel rapid centrifugation isolation technique. METHODS: Epithelial cells harvested from primary cultures of rabbit limbal rings were centrifuged onto uncoated dishes, first at 1400 rpm and then at 1800 rpm. The adherent cells after centrifugation at 1400 rpm (ATC1, the adherent cells at 1800 rpm (ATC2 and the non-adherent cells at 1800 rpm (NAC were investigated for BrdU retention and were subjected to contact mode AFM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. RESULTS: Compared with unfractionated cells, the ATC1 group, accounting for about 10% of the whole population, was enriched in BrdU label-retaining cells. There were dramatic overall shape, surface membrane and intra-cellular ultrastructure differences noted among ATC1, ATC2 and NAC populations. The whole cell roughness measurements were 21.1±1.5 nm, 79.5±3.4 nm and 103±4.6 nm for the ATC1, ATC2 and NAC groups, respectively. The mero-nucleus roughness measurements were 34.2±1.7 nm, 13.0±0.8 nm and 8.5±0.5 nm in the ATC1, ATC2 and NAC populations, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: AFM was found to be a good tool for distinguishing among the three groups of cells. BrdU label retention, the AFM parameters and TEM together suggest that the ATC1, ATC2 and NAC populations may be progenitor corneal epithelial cells, transit amplifying cells and terminal differentiation cells, respectively.

  11. Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Aging Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    It is not yet known whether hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are compromised in the aging population of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors after their exposure nearly 70 years ago. To address this, we evaluated age- and radiation-related changes in different subtypes of circulating HSPCs among the CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34(+)Lin(-)) cell population in 231 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. We enumerated functional HSPC subtypes, including: cobblestone area-forming cells; long-term culture-initiating cells; erythroid burst-forming units; granulocyte and macrophage colony-forming units; and T-cell and natural killer cell progenitors using cell culture. We obtained the count of each HSPC subtype per unit volume of blood and the proportion of each HSPC subtype in CD34(+)Lin(-) cells to represent the lineage commitment trend. Multivariate analyses, using sex, age and radiation dose as variables, showed significantly decreased counts with age in the total CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population and all HSPC subtypes. As for the proportion, only T-cell progenitors decreased significantly with age, suggesting that the commitment to the T-cell lineage in HSPCs continuously declines with age throughout the lifetime. However, neither the CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population, nor HSPC subtypes showed significant radiation-induced dose-dependent changes in counts or proportions. Moreover, the correlations of the proportions among HSPC subtypes in the survivors properly revealed the hierarchy of lineage commitments. Taken together, our findings suggest that many years after exposure to radiation and with advancing age, the number and function of HSPCs in living survivors as a whole may have recovered to normal levels. PMID:26720799

  12. Study of atomic layer deposition of indium oxy-sulfide films for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores the growth mechanism of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of In2(S,O)3 films. The films were deposited using indium acetylacetonate (In(acac)3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and Ar/O2 plasma as oxygen precursor. The films were characterized using X-ray reflectometry, spectrophotometry, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To understand the growth mechanism and especially the interactions between Ar/O2 plasma and In2(S,O)3 growing film, in-situ analyses were performed using quadrupole mass spectrometry. In-situ qualitative analysis revealed good correlation between the species detected in vapor phase and thin film properties. High concentrations of atomic and molecular oxygen were measured in the vapor phase during O2 plasma pulses. Significant decrease of these species could be observed by varying the plasma power from 2600 to 300 W, while the optical band gap remained at high values (> 2.6 eV). The analysis of the O2-free/Ar plasma process showed that some of these oxygen species originate either from the indium precursor or from the substrate surface. This study explains the high oxygen content of the films, and allows us to reduce and control it. Generally, this report provides keys to understand the effect of plasma reactivity for the elaboration of oxide based materials. - Highlights: • In2(S,O)3 films were synthesized by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. • Growth mechanism was studied via gas phase analysis by Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry. • Good correlation between the vapor phase species and thin films properties was observed. • The film compositions and band gaps can be controlled by varying the plasma power

  13. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Futoshi; Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka

    2015-10-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  14. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Futoshi, E-mail: iwata.futoshi@shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2015-10-07

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  15. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system

  16. Rapid recognition and functional analysis of membrane proteins on human cancer cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the physicochemical properties of cell surface signalling molecules is important for us to uncover the underlying mechanisms that guide the cellular behaviors. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a powerful tool for detecting the molecular interactions on individual cells with nanometer resolution. In this paper, AFM peak force tapping (PFT) imaging mode was applied to rapidly locate and visually map the CD20 molecules on human lymphoma cells using biochemically sensitive tips. First, avidin-biotin system was used to test the effectiveness of using PFT imaging mode to probe the specific molecular interactions. The adhesion images obtained on avidin-coated mica using biotin-tethered tips obviously showed the recognition spots which corresponded to the avidins in the simultaneously obtained topography images. The experiments confirmed the specificity and reproducibility of the recognition results. Then, the established procedure was applied to visualize the nanoscale organization of CD20s on the surface of human lymphoma Raji cells using rituximab (a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody)-tethered tips. The experiments showed that the recognition spots in the adhesion images corresponded to the specific CD20-rituximab interactions. The cluster sizes of CD20s on lymphoma Raji cells were quantitatively analyzed from the recognition images. Finally, under the guidance of fluorescence recognition, the established procedure was applied to cancer cells from a clinical lymphoma patient. The results showed that there were significant differences between the adhesion images obtained on cancer cells and on normal cells (red blood cell). The CD20 distributions on ten cancer cells from the patient were quantified according to the adhesion images. The experimental results demonstrate the capability of applying PFT imaging to rapidly investigate the nanoscale biophysical properties of native membrane proteins on the cell surface, which is of potential significance in

  17. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM. PMID:26683826

  18. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G.; Yousafzai, M. S.; Ma, W.; Ndoye, F.; Venturelli, L.; Hussain, I.; Bonin, S.; Niemela, J.; Scoles, G.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.

    2016-02-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young’s modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines’ elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  19. Atomic force microscopy observation on nuclear reassembly in a cell-free system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ning; CHEN Zhongcai; ZHANG Zhaohui; ZHU Xing; ZHAI Zhonghe; TANG Xiaowei

    2003-01-01

    Cell-free system is interesting and useful for studying nuclear assembly in mitosis. Atomic force micro- scopy (AFM), which is a simple way for imaging fixed reassemble nuclei with high resolution, has not been used in the cell-free system. In this paper, we put forward an air-drying sample preparation for AFM. Using AFM, we observed nuclear reassembly process within 100 nm resolution ina cell-free system. As a result, we found that the images were artifact-free, and with higher resolution compared with fluorescent optical microscope images. Furthermore, the morphology of membrane vesicles was obtained clearly, and a dynamic change of morphology during the vesicles' approaching to nuclear envelope was also observed, which is enlightened to understand the mechanism of nuclear envelope assembly.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis. PMID:27359352

  1. Observation on Surface and Cross Section of Thin Film Solar Cells Using Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Liang-huan; WU Li-li; CAI Wei; CAI Ya-ping; ZHENG Jia-gui; ZHANG Jing-quan; LI Bing; LI Wei

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) is able to produce three-dimensional digital data in both forcemode and height-mode and its applications are not limited to map the surfaces of conducting materials. It can use the force-mode to image the repulsive and attractive force patterns. The cross sections of polycrystalline CdS/CdTe and amorphous silicon heterojunction solar cells are observed with AFM. In case of short circuit,the microstructures of different layers in the samples are clearly displayed. When the cells are open circuit, the topographical images are altered, the potential outline due to the space charge in junction region is observed.Obviously, AFM can be employed to investigate experimentally built-in potential in junction of semiconductor devices, such as solar cells.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Morphological and Nanomechanical Properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell Pollas

    2008-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is unique in the aspect of studying living biological sample under physiological conditions. AFM was invented in 1986 by Binnig and Gerber and began in the early 1990’s to be implemented in life science. AFM can give a detailed three dimensional image of an intact cell......, but also be used to examine the nanomechanical properties on single cell level. These qualities make AFM a powerful tool in biology and can be used to examine both morphological and nanomechanical response to various liquids environments, such as osmotic pressure, but also the effects of e...... cells and nanostructures such as pili and flagella was obvious. The morphological effect of colistin and ciprofloxacin treatment was examined for dehydrated bacteria, and noticeable effects were observed. It is however, not possible to distinguish between primary effects of the antibiotic treatment and...

  3. Vapor extractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronder, G.A.; Bronder, L.R.

    1924-10-21

    A vapor extractor is described comprising a conveyer having compartments open at their top and bottom sides for a material to be conveyed, a plate forming a support for the conveyer and its compartments, means to move the conveyer over the plate with the material in the compartments, the movements of the conveyer forming ridges in the material that project above the walls of the compartments and means to remove the peaks of the ridges and thereby distribute the material composing the ridges into the bottom portion of the conveyer.

  4. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy [Corrigendum

    OpenAIRE

    Lee SY; Zaske AM; Novellino T; Danila D; Ferrari M.; Conyers J; Decuzzi P

    2014-01-01

    Lee SY, Zaske AM, Novellino T, et al. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy. Int J Nanomedicine. 2011;6:179–195.The authors apologize that the referencing for Table 1 on page 186 was incorrect, the following corrections should be noted:   8 should be 4240 should be 4318 should be 4442 should be 45  9 should be 4612 should be 4729 should be 4844 should be 4923 should be 5036 should be 1637 should be 18Read th...

  5. (Invited) Atomic Layer Deposition for Novel Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present the latest fabrication and characterization techniques for atomic layer deposition of Al 2O 3, ZnO, SnO 2, Nb 2O 5, HfO 2, Ga 2O 3 and TiO 2 for research on dye-sensitized solar cell. In particular, we review the fabrication of state-of-the-art 3D host-passivation-guest photoanodes and ZnO nanowires as well as characterize the deposited thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction, Hall effect, J-V curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  6. Atomic force microscopy reveals differences in cell membrane properties in nuclear myosin I mutant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Rohožková, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : Society for Histochemistry, 2013. [55th Symposium of the Society for Histochemistry. 11.06.2013-14.06.2013, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Light-induced atomic desorption for loading a sodium magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report studies of photon-stimulated desorption, also known as light-induced atomic desorption, of sodium atoms from a vacuum-cell glass surface used for loading a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Fluorescence detection was used to record the trapped atom number and the desorption rate. We observed a steep wavelength dependence of the desorption process above 2.6 eV photon energy, a result significant for estimations of sodium vapor density in the lunar atmosphere. Our data fit well to a simple model for the loading of the MOT dependent only on the sodium desorption rate and residual gas density. Up to 3.7x107 Na atoms were confined under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, creating promising loading conditions for a vapor-cell-based atomic Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium.

  8. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements of the Mechanical Properties of Cell Walls on Living Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Richard; Mullin, Nic; Turner, Robert; Foster, Simon; Hobbs, Jamie

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infection in humans, including the Methicillin resistant strain, MRSA. However, very little is known about the mechanical properties of these cells. Our investigations use AFM to examine live S. aureus cells to quantify mechanical properties. These were explored using force spectroscopy with different trigger forces, allowing the properties to be extracted at different indentation depths. A value for the cell wall stiffness has been extracted, along with a second, higher value which is found upon indenting at higher forces. This higher value drops as the cells are exposed to high salt, sugar and detergent concentrations, implying that this measurement contains a contribution from the internal turgor pressure. We have monitored these properties as the cells progress through the cell cycle. Force maps were taken over the cells at different stages of the growth process to identify changes in the mechanics throughout the progression of growth and division. The effect of Oxacillin has also been studied, to better understand its mechanism of action. Finally mutant strains of S. aureus and a second species Bacillus subtilis have been used to link the mechanical properties of the cell walls with the chain lengths and substructures involved.

  10. Spring constants and adhesive properties of native bacterial biofilm cells measured by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, C B; Ferguson, M A; Aidala, K E; Spain, E M; Núñez, M E

    2008-11-15

    Bacterial biofilms were imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their elasticity and adhesion to the AFM tip were determined from a series of tip extension and retraction cycles. Though the five bacterial strains studied included both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria and both environmental and laboratory strains, all formed simple biofilms on glass surfaces. Cellular spring constants, determined from the extension portion of the force cycle, varied between 0.16+/-0.01 and 0.41+/-0.01 N/m, where larger spring constants were measured for Gram-positive cells than for Gram-negative cells. The nonlinear regime in the extension curve depended upon the biomolecules on the cell surface: the extension curves for the smooth Gram-negative bacterial strains with the longest lipopolysaccharides on their surface had a larger nonlinear region than the rough bacterial strain with shorter lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Adhesive forces between the retracting silicon nitride tip and the cells varied between cell types in terms of the force components, the distance components, and the number of adhesion events. The Gram-negative cells' adhesion to the tip showed the longest distance components, sometimes more than 1 microm, whereas the shortest distance adhesion events were measured between the two Gram-positive cell types and the tip. Fixation of free-swimming planktonic cells by NHS and EDC perturbed both the elasticity and the adhesive properties of the cells. Here we consider the biochemical meaning of the measured physical properties of simple biofilms and implications to the colonization of surfaces in the first stages of biofilm formation. PMID:18815013

  11. Speciation analysis of mercury in sediments using ionic-liquid-based vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Geng; Chen, Wenjin; Wang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    An improved novel method based on ionic liquid vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction has been developed for the extraction of methylmercury, ethylmercury and inorganic mercury in sediment samples prior to analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. In this work, mercury species were firstly complexed with dithizone, and the complexes were extracted into 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate. Key factors that affect the extraction efficiency of mercury species, such as type and amount of ionic liquid and chelatants, extraction time, sample pH, salt effect and matrix effect were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linearity was found in the concentration range from 0.1-70 ng/g. Limits of detection ranged from 0.037-0.061 ng/g. Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by extracting a series of six independent sediment samples that were spiked with different concentration levels. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied in analysis of real sediment samples. In this work, ionic liquids vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction was for the first time used for the extraction of mercury species in sediment samples. The proposed method was proved to be much simpler and more rapid, as well as more environmentally friendly and efficient compared with the previous methods. PMID:25998155

  12. T and B cells and PHA response of peripheral lymphocytes among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about immune compretence in atomic bomb survivors. The following results were observed from this study. T and B cells showed no change in proportion by age or exposure dose. The percentage of T cells was slightly lower in malignant tumor patients than in the control group. However, it was significantly higher in the group with chromosomal aberrations than in the control group. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) response of peripheral lymphocytes decreased significantly with age in the 0 rad control group and the 200+ rad exposure group, particularly so in the latter. The malignant tumor group also showed lower PHA response than the control group. The PHA response of the chromosomal aberration group was significantly depressed compared with that of the control group. (author)

  13. Atomic force microscopy combined with human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes for biomechanical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesl, Martin; Pribyl, Jan; Acimovic, Ivana; Vilotic, Aleksandra; Jelinkova, Sarka; Salykin, Anton; Lacampagne, Alain; Dvorak, Petr; Meli, Albano C; Skladal, Petr; Rotrekl, Vladimir

    2016-11-15

    Cardiomyocyte contraction and relaxation are important parameters of cardiac function altered in many heart pathologies. Biosensing of these parameters represents an important tool in drug development and disease modeling. Human embryonic stem cells and especially patient specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are well established as cardiac disease model.. Here, a live stem cell derived embryoid body (EB) based cardiac cell syncytium served as a biorecognition element coupled to the microcantilever probe from atomic force microscope thus providing reliable micromechanical cellular biosensor suitable for whole-day testing. The biosensor was optimized regarding the type of cantilever, temperature and exchange of media; in combination with standardized protocol, it allowed testing of compounds and conditions affecting the biomechanical properties of EB. The studied effectors included calcium , drugs modulating the catecholaminergic fight-or-flight stress response such as the beta-adrenergic blocker metoprolol and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Arrhythmogenic effects were studied using caffeine. Furthermore, with EBs originating from patient's stem cells, this biosensor can help to characterize heart diseases such as dystrophies. PMID:27266660

  14. Fast Stiffness Mapping of Cells Using High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Vijayraghavan, Karthik; Solgaard, Olav; Butte, Manish J

    2016-01-26

    The cytoskeleton controls cellular morphology and mediates the mechanical interactions between a cell and its environment. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability to map cytoskeletal mechanics and structures with nanometer resolution. However, whole-cell cytomechanical imaging with conventional AFM techniques is limited by low imaging speed. Here, we present fast nanomechanical mapping of cells using high-bandwidth AFM (HB-AFM), where >10(6) nanoindentation measurements were acquired in ∼10 min-a task that would take weeks to finish using conventional AFM. High-bandwidth measurements enabled capture of the entire tip-sample interaction for each tap on cells, engendering a new measurement ("force phase") that exceeds the contrast of conventional tapping mode and enabling spectral visualization of >10 harmonics. The abundance of measurements allowed discovery of subtle cytomechanical features, including the stiffness of fibers of the cellular spectrin network in situ. This approach bridges HB-AFM and high-harmonic imaging and opens future opportunities for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of living cells. PMID:26554581

  15. Determination of the elastic properties of tomato fruit cells with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdunek, Artur; Kurenda, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Since the mechanical properties of single cells together with the intercellular adhesive properties determine the macro-mechanical properties of plants, a method for evaluation of the cell elastic properties is needed to help explanation of the behavior of fruits and vegetables in handling and food processing. For this purpose, indentation of tomato mesocarp cells with an atomic force microscope was used. The Young's modulus of a cell using the Hertz and Sneddon models, and stiffness were calculated from force-indentation curves. Use of two probes of distinct radius of curvature (20 nm and 10,000 nm) showed that the measured elastic properties were significantly affected by tip geometry. The Young's modulus was about 100 kPa ± 35 kPa and 20 kPa ± 14 kPa for the sharper tip and a bead tip, respectively. Moreover, large variability regarding elastic properties (>100%) among cells sampled from the same region in the fruit was observed. We showed that AFM provides the possibility of combining nano-mechanical properties with topography imaging, which could be very useful for the study of structure-related properties of fruits and vegetables at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. PMID:24030683

  16. Determination of the Elastic Properties of Tomato Fruit Cells with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kurenda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the mechanical properties of single cells together with the intercellular adhesive properties determine the macro-mechanical properties of plants, a method for evaluation of the cell elastic properties is needed to help explanation of the behavior of fruits and vegetables in handling and food processing. For this purpose, indentation of tomato mesocarp cells with an atomic force microscope was used. The Young’s modulus of a cell using the Hertz and Sneddon models, and stiffness were calculated from force-indentation curves. Use of two probes of distinct radius of curvature (20 nm and 10,000 nm showed that the measured elastic properties were significantly affected by tip geometry. The Young’s modulus was about 100 kPa ± 35 kPa and 20 kPa ± 14 kPa for the sharper tip and a bead tip, respectively. Moreover, large variability regarding elastic properties (>100% among cells sampled from the same region in the fruit was observed. We showed that AFM provides the possibility of combining nano-mechanical properties with topography imaging, which could be very useful for the study of structure-related properties of fruits and vegetables at the cellular and sub-cellular scale.

  17. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy as a Technique for the Identification of Cancerous Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monograph presents the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a tool for the identification of cancerous cells by studies of the expression of different types of molecules directly on the surface of living cells. The full quantitative description (that is not accessible by other techniques) performed for a given type of molecular interactions has been obtained by using the following quantities: an unbinding force, probability, rupture length and the effective spring constant taking into account the stiffness of a single complex. All, these parameters were extracted from AFM measurements The analysis of the interaction forces performed by AFM allows the quantitative determination of: i) the static properties of a single molecular complex where its strength of interaction and stiffness of the studied complex can be obtained, ii) dynamic properties, on the basis of which the kinetic properties of the unbinding process can be delivered, and iii) properties of adhesion clusters, where the interrelation between single complexes can be characterized, in particular the mechanism of the unbinding can be obtained. The presented characterization of the interaction force between single molecules demonstrates that atomic force microscopy can be used as exceptional technique to study the expression of molecules on a cell surface. Such measurements are not limited to a typical interactions occurring between single molecules but also it is possible to study the interactions between parts of molecules. The results presented in this monograph point to a novel approach to identify cancer-related changes in a quantitative way what can be used for describing and confirming the pathological state of a single cell. (author)

  18. Investigation of integrin expression on the surface of osteoblast-like cells by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a human cytokine which has been demonstrated to modulate cell surface integrin repertoire. In this work integrin expression in response to TGF-β1 stimulation has been investigated on the surface of human osteoblast-like cells. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to assess integrin expression and to evaluate their distribution over the dorsal side of the plasma membrane. AFM probes have been covalently functionalised with monoclonal antibodies specific to the β1 integrin subunit. Force curves have been collected in order to obtain maps of the interaction between the immobilized antibody and the respective cell membrane receptors. Adhesion peaks have been automatically detected by means of an ad hoc developed data analysis software. The specificity of the detected interactions has been assessed by adding free antibody in the solution and monitoring the dramatic decrease in the recorded interactions. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 treatment on both the fluorescence signal and the adhesion events has been tested. The level of expression of the β1 integrin subunit was enhanced by TGF-β1. As a further analysis, the adhesion force of the single living cells to the substrate was measured by laterally pushing the cell with the AFM tip and measuring the force necessary to displace it. The treatment with TGF-β1 resulted in a decrease of the cell/substrate adhesion force. Results obtained by AFM have been validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy thus demonstrating the high potential of the AFM technique for the investigation of cell surface receptors distribution and trafficking at the nanoscale.

  19. Atomic force microscopy analysis of central nervous system cell morphology on silicon carbide and diamond substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frewin, C L; Jaroszeski, M; Weeber, E; Muffly, K E; Kumar, A; Peters, M; Oliveros, A; Saddow, S E

    2009-01-01

    Brain machine interface (BMI) devices offer a platform that can be used to assist people with extreme disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease. Silicon (Si) has been the material of choice used for the manufacture of BMI devices due to its mechanical strength, its electrical properties and multiple fabrication techniques; however, chronically implanted BMI devices have usually failed within months of implantation due to biocompatibility issues and the fact that Si does not withstand the harsh environment of the body. Single crystal cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) are semiconductor materials that have previously shown good biocompatibility with skin and bone cells. Like Si, these materials have excellent physical characteristics, good electrical properties, but unlike Si, they are chemically inert. We have performed a study to evaluate the general biocompatibility levels of all of these materials through the use of in vitro techniques. H4 human neuroglioma and PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell lines were used for the study, and polystyrene (PSt) and amorphous glass were used as controls or for morphological comparison. MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide] assays were performed to determine general cell viability with each substrate and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the general cell morphology on the substrate surface along with the substrate permissiveness to lamellipodia extension. 3C-SiC was the only substrate tested to have good viability and superior lamellipodia permissiveness with both cell lines, while NCD showed a good level of viability with the neural H4 line but a poor viability with the PC12 line and lower permissiveness than 3C-SiC. Explanations pertaining to the performance of each substrate with both cell lines are presented and discussed along with future work that must be performed to further evaluate specific cell reactions on

  20. Experimental validation of atomic force microscopy-based cell elasticity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew R.; Charras, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used for measuring the elasticity of living cells yielding values ranging from 100 Pa to 100 kPa, much larger than those obtained using bead-tracking microrheology or micropipette aspiration (100-500 Pa). AFM elasticity measurements appear dependent on tip geometry with pyramidal tips yielding elasticities 2-3 fold larger than spherical tips, an effect generally attributed to the larger contact area of spherical tips. In AFM elasticity measurements, experimental force-indentation curves are analyzed using contact mechanics models that infer the tip-cell contact area from the tip geometry and indentation depth. The validity of these assumptions has never been verified. Here we utilize combined AFM-confocal microscopy of epithelial cells expressing a GFP-tagged membrane marker to directly characterize the indentation geometry and measure the indentation depth. Comparison with data derived from AFM force-indentation curves showed that the experimentally measured contact area for spherical tips agrees well with predicted values, whereas for pyramidal tips, the contact area can be grossly underestimated at forces larger than ~ 0.2 nN leading to a greater than two-fold overestimation of elasticity. These data suggest that a re-examination of absolute cellular elasticities reported in the literature may be necessary and we suggest guidelines for avoiding elasticity measurement artefacts introduced by extraneous cantilever-cell contact.

  1. Experimental validation of atomic force microscopy-based cell elasticity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Andrew R; Charras, G T, E-mail: g.charras@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used for measuring the elasticity of living cells yielding values ranging from 100 Pa to 100 kPa, much larger than those obtained using bead-tracking microrheology or micropipette aspiration (100-500 Pa). AFM elasticity measurements appear dependent on tip geometry with pyramidal tips yielding elasticities 2-3 fold larger than spherical tips, an effect generally attributed to the larger contact area of spherical tips. In AFM elasticity measurements, experimental force-indentation curves are analyzed using contact mechanics models that infer the tip-cell contact area from the tip geometry and indentation depth. The validity of these assumptions has never been verified. Here we utilize combined AFM-confocal microscopy of epithelial cells expressing a GFP-tagged membrane marker to directly characterize the indentation geometry and measure the indentation depth. Comparison with data derived from AFM force-indentation curves showed that the experimentally measured contact area for spherical tips agrees well with predicted values, whereas for pyramidal tips, the contact area can be grossly underestimated at forces larger than {approx} 0.2 nN leading to a greater than two-fold overestimation of elasticity. These data suggest that a re-examination of absolute cellular elasticities reported in the literature may be necessary and we suggest guidelines for avoiding elasticity measurement artefacts introduced by extraneous cantilever-cell contact.

  2. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  3. Quantification of the lateral detachment force for bacterial cells using atomic force microscope and centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the lateral detachment force for individual bacterial cells, a quantitative method using the contact mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM) was developed in this study. Three key factors for the proposed method, i.e. scan size, scan rate and cantilever choice, were evaluated and optimized. The scan size of 40x40 μm2 was optimal for capturing sufficient number of adhered cells in a microscopic field and provide adequate information for cell identification and detachment force measurement. The scan rate affected the measurement results significantly, and was optimized at 40 μm/s considering both force measurement accuracy and experimental efficiency. The hardness of applied cantilevers also influenced force determination. The proposed protocol for cantilever selection is to use those with the lowest spring constant first and then step up to a harder cantilever until all cells are detached. The lateral detachment force of Escherichia coli cells on polished stainless steel and a glass-slide coated with poly-L-lysine were measured as 0.763±0.167 and 0.639±0.136 nN, respectively. The results showed that the established method had good repeatability and sensitivity to various bacteria/substrata combinations. The detachment force quantified by AFM (0.639±0.136 nN) was comparable to that measured by the centrifugation method (1.12 nN). -- Research highlights: → A quantitative method via AFM is developed to measure the lateral detachment force of an attached cell. → The parameters of AFM operation for this method are optimized. → The tests using E. coli on different substrata show that the method has good repeatability and sensitivity. → The method could obtain reliable results that are comparable to those using the centrifugation approach.

  4. Study of DNA damage and cell death rate in presence of gadolinium nanoparticles irradiated by fast atomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of our work is to study the enhancement, and its mechanisms, of the cells death rate when they are loaded with high-Z atoms and irradiated by fast ions. Previous works have shown that cell death rate is increased by irradiation with atomic ions when molecules containing platinum are added in the cell. The choice of the radiosensitizer is and important guess. Ideally the radiosensitizer should target the tumour for hadrontherapy purpose. The nanoparticles, made of heavy atoms, offer the possibility to load the cells with high-Z atoms and when functionalized to target with a good selectivity the tissues of the tumour. In the present report we give the results obtained during 2010 with nanoparticules made of gadolinium atoms. The choice of these nanoparticles (NP-Gd) stem from the fact that they are made of a relatively high-Z atom (Z=64). A significant fraction of the isotope have a non zero spin allowing imaging by MRI. In addition the NP-Gd have been found non cytotoxic even at a large concentration (0.5 mM). Study of the number of DNA breaks in plasmids versus the concentration of the nanoparticles has been made. It is thus shown that the sensitization in nanoparticles is enhanced due to auto-amplified electronic cascades inside the nanoparticles, which reinforces the energy deposition in the close vicinity of the metal. The second part of this report presents the survival fraction of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K-1) cells incubated during 6 hours in a non-cytotoxic solution of NP-Gd. Subsequent irradiation by carbon ions 290 MeV/amu (linear energy transfer (LET)=13.6 keV/μm) was performed. A significant enhancement in the cell death rate is observed when nanoparticles are present. (author)

  5. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  6. Second quantization of propagation of light through Rb vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhihao; Lanning, Robert; Zhang, Mi; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Dowling, Jonathan

    We model the propagation of squeezed light, in Laguerre-Gaussian spatial modes, through a non-linear medium such as Rb vapor. We examine the changes in both quantum state and spatial modes. We simulate the injection into a Rb vapor cell a linearly polarized laser beam to create squeezed vacuum state of light linearly polarized in the perpendicular direction. We fully quantize the optical field's propagation which is originally based on semi-classical calculation. The Rb atomic structure is simplified to a three-level system. We reveal the mechanism that how squeezed state of light is generated in this process and compare the theory with our experiment. We further investigate the impact on squeezing due to the change of parameters and produce schemes which improve the squeezing in the desired spatial modes.

  7. Local Viscoelastic Properties of Live Cells Investigated Using Dynamic and Quasi-Static Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Cartagena, Alexander; Raman, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of viscoelasticity of cells in physiological environments with high spatio-temporal resolution is a key goal in cell mechanobiology. Traditionally only the elastic properties have been measured from quasi-static force-distance curves using the atomic force microscope (AFM). Recently, dynamic AFM-based methods have been proposed to map the local in vitro viscoelastic properties of living cells with nanoscale resolution. However, the differences in viscoelastic properties estima...

  8. Biophysical Measurements of Cells, Microtubules, and DNA with an Atomic Force Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Devenica, Luka M; Cabrejo, Raysa; Kurek, Matthew; Deveney, Edward F; Carter, Ashley R

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are ubiquitous in research laboratories and have recently been priced for use in teaching laboratories. Here we review several AFM platforms (Dimension 3000 by Digital Instruments, EasyScan2 by Nanosurf, ezAFM by Nanomagnetics, and TKAFM by Thorlabs) and describe various biophysical experiments that could be done in the teaching laboratory using these instruments. In particular, we focus on experiments that image biological materials and quantify biophysical parameters: 1) imaging cells to determine membrane tension, 2) imaging microtubules to determine their persistence length, 3) imaging the random walk of DNA molecules to determine their contour length, and 4) imaging stretched DNA molecules to measure the tensional force.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of titanium sulfide and its application in extremely thin absorber solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiS2 is investigated with titanium tetrachloride and hydrogen sulfide precursors. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance and ex-situ x-ray reflectivity measurements are carried out to study self-limiting deposition chemistry and material growth characteristics. The saturated growth rate is found to be ca. 0.5 Å/cycle within the ALD temperature window of 125–200 °C. As grown material is found poorly crystalline. ALD grown TiS2 is applied as a photon harvesting material for solid state sensitized solar cells with TiO2 as electron transport medium. Initial results with Spiro-OMeTAD as hole conducting layer show ca. 0.6% energy conversion efficiency under 1 sun illumination

  10. Electrical properties of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal–organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Aoki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD, with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD. The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm−2 eV−1. Using a (111A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  11. Electrical properties of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal–organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm−2 eV−1. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces

  12. Electrical properties of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal-organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  13. Gasoline vapor biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paca, J.; Halecky, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Department of Fermentation Chemistry and Bioengineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Maryska, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Department of Glass and Ceramics, Prague (Czech Republic); Jones, K. [South Texas Environmental Institute, Texas A and M University-Kingsville, Kingsville (United States)

    2007-10-15

    While gasoline vapor emissions are common sources of air pollution, very few results have been published on the biofilter biodegradation of gasoline vapors in flowing waste gases. This investigation reports on a bench-scale biofilter of an ID of 50 mm and a bed height of 850 mm with an inexpensive fire clay chip medium as a packing material. The biofilter was inoculated with a concentrate of a mixed culture of the common microflora. After an acclimatization period of three weeks, loading tests were carried out at increasing gasoline inlet concentrations at a constant Empty Bed Retention Time (EBRT) of 16 min. Evaluating the removal rate and efficiency of aliphatic and aromatic fractions of the gasoline vapor, it was found that in a range of overall organic loading (OL{sub TPH}) up to 33.6 g/m{sup 3} h the removal efficiency of aromatic hydrocarbons decreased from 90 to 70 %, while that of the aliphatic components decreased much more significantly from 60 to 10 % after six months of operation. The removal rate and efficiency achieved for total petroleum hydrocarbons were 13 g/m{sup 3} h and 45 %, respectively. The microbial strains and genera of culturable cells in the inoculum and in the biofilm after six months of gasoline degradation were evaluated. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei-Young Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sei-Young Lee1,2, Ana-Maria Zaske3, Tommaso Novellino1,4*, Delia Danila3, Mauro Ferrari1,5*, Jodie Conyers3, Paolo Decuzzi1,6*1Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 3CeTIR – Center for Translational Injury Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Campus University of Rome, Italy; 5MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 6BioNEM – Center of Bio-Nanotechnology and Engineering for Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy; *Currently at Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates the permeability of blood and lymphatic vessels. The plasma concentration of TNF-α is elevated (> 1 pg/mL in several pathologies, including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, pre-eclampsia; in obese individuals; and in trauma patients. To test whether circulating TNF-α could induce similar alterations in different districts along the vascular system, three endothelial cell lines, namely HUVEC, HPMEC, and HCAEC, were characterized in terms of 1 mechanical properties, employing atomic force microscopy; 2 cytoskeletal organization, through fluorescence microscopy; and 3 membrane overexpression of adhesion molecules, employing ELISA and immunostaining. Upon stimulation with TNF-α (10 ng/mL for 20 h, for all three endothelial cells, the mechanical stiffness increased by about 50% with a mean apparent elastic modulus of E ~5 ± 0.5 kPa (~3.3 ± 0.35 kPa for the control cells; the density of F-actin filaments increased in the apical and median planes; and the ICAM-1 receptors were overexpressed compared with

  15. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main effort in the field of Isotopic Separation Research and Development in France is devoted since 1985 to the 'SILVA' process. A structured organization has been set up, including the following elements: Specific Research and Development for all the functions and components of the process: this work is supported by numerous benches located in Saclay and Pierrelatte. Each bench is mainly devoted to one process function; regarding process and operating performances are optimized. Integrated Experiences in a Pilot facility. Qualified components are integrated in a pilot facility located in Saclay, the capacity of which is steadily increased. At each stage, complete separative experiments demonstrate the improvements attained. Focused Basic Research for each field, often linked with various and relatively original phenomenas. Models have been built up, supported by specific experiments and values attained for intrinsical parameters. An aggregated process performance computing code integrates all the models, possibly under simplified form. Technical, operating and economical data are gradually added. A general assessment will take place in the middle of the nineties with several technical demonstrations and a complete evaluation of the French AVLIS process

  16. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of L...

  17. The fabrication of a double-layer atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a double-layer atom chip that provides users with increased diversity in the design of the wire patterns and flexibility in the design of the magnetic field. It is more convenient for use in atomic physics experiments. A negative photoresist, SU-8, was used as the insulating layer between the upper and bottom copper wires. The electrical measurement results show that the upper and bottom wires with a width of 100 µm can sustain a 6 A current without burnout. Another focus of this study is the double-layer atom chips integrated with the through silicon via (TSV) technique, and anodically bonded to a Pyrex glass cell, which makes it a desired vacuum chamber for atomic physics experiments. Thus, the bonded glass cell not only significantly reduces the overall size of the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) chamber but also conducts the high current from the backside to the front side of the atom chip via the TSV under UHV (9.5 × 10−10 Torr). The TSVs with a diameter of 70 µm were etched through by the inductively coupled plasma ion etching and filled by the bottom-up copper electroplating method. During the anodic bonding process, the electroplated copper wires and TSVs on atom chips also need to pass the examination of the required bonding temperature of 250 °C, under an applied voltage of 1000 V. Finally, the UHV test of the double-layer atom chips with TSVs at room temperature can be reached at 9.5 × 10−10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under an UHV environment. (paper)

  18. In Situ Roughness Measurements for the Solar Cell Industry Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higinio González-Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production.

  19. Double minute chromosomes in mouse methotrexate-resistant cells studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double minute chromosomes (DMs) are acentric, autonomously replicating extra-chromosomes and frequently mediate gene amplification in tumor and drug resistant cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool in microbiology. We used AFM to explore the ultrastructure of DMs in mouse fibroblasts 3T3R500. DMs in various phases of cell cycle were also studied in order to elucidate the mechanisms of their duplication and separation. Metaphase spread and induced premature condensed chromosomes (PCCs) were observed under the AFM. DMs were detected to be composed of two compact spheres linked by fibers. The fibers of DMs directly connected with metaphase chromosomes were observed. Many single-minutes and few DMs were detected in G1 PCCs, while more DMs were detected in S PCCs than in G1 PCCs. Besides, all of the DMs in G2 PCCs were coupled. Our present results suggested that DMs might divide into single-minutes during or before G1-phase, followed by duplication of the single-minutes in S-phase. Moreover, we introduced a new powerful tool to study DMs and got some ideal results

  20. Comparison of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Feiyue; Wang, Jiongkun; Hu, Mingqian; Yu, Yu; Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Jing

    2011-07-01

    A comparative study of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was first performed through an atomic force microscope (AFM) to clarify differences of their nanostructure and adhesion force. AFM images revealed that the immature BMDCs treated by granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor plus IL-4 mainly appeared round with smooth surface, whereas the mature BMDCs induced by lipopolysaccharide displayed an irregular shape with numerous pseudopodia or lamellapodia and ruffles on the cell membrane besides becoming larger, flatter, and longer. AFM quantitative analysis further showed that the surface roughness of the mature BMDCs greatly increased and that the adhesion force of them was fourfold more than that of the immature BMDCs. The nano-features of the mature BMDCs were supported by a high level of IL-12 produced from the mature BMDCs and high expression of MHC-II on the surface of them. These findings provide a new insight into the nanostructure of the immature and mature BMDCs.

  1. Atomic force microscopy analysis of enveloped and non-enveloped viral entry into, and egress from, cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its invention, the atomic force microscope has been used to image a wide variety of biological samples, including viruses. Viral entry into, and egress from, cultured cells has been extensively studied using numerous scientific techniques and to a limited extent using atomic force microscopy. One of the main structural differences that can exist between viruses is the absence, or presence, of an envelope and this factor has consequences for the mode of viral entry and egress. In this study, the entry into, and egress from, cultured cells of enveloped and non-enveloped viruses were investigated using atomic force microscopy. No significant cell surface changes were observed following infection with enveloped or non-enveloped viruses. Although roughness analysis of viral entry revealed cell smoothing post-infection, no differences between the roughness values of enveloped and non-enveloped viral entry were observed. Line analysis of viral entry revealed minor differences between cells infected with an enveloped rather than a non-enveloped virus. These differences may represent a distinction between the uptake processes of enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. Studies of viral egress revealed that infected cells were undergoing cytopathic changes. Whilst topographic, height and roughness differences clearly occurred between virally- and mock-infected cells, no significant differences were elucidated between enveloped and non-enveloped viral egress

  2. Comparison of the viscoelastic properties of cells from different kidney cancer phenotypes measured with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The viscoelastic properties of human kidney cell lines from different tumor types (carcinoma (A-498) and adenocarcinoma (ACHN)) are compared to a non-tumorigenic cell line (RC-124). Our methodology is based on the mapping of viscoelastic properties (elasticity modulus E and apparent viscosity η) over the surface of tens of individual cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The viscoelastic properties are averaged over datasets as large as 15000 data points per cell line. We also propose a model to estimate the apparent viscosity of soft materials using the hysteresis observed in conventional AFM deflection–displacement curves, without any modification to the standard AFM apparatus. The comparison of the three cell lines show that the non-tumorigenic cells are less deformable and more viscous than cancerous cells, and that cancer cell lines have distinctive viscoelastic properties. In particular, we obtained that ERC−124 > EA−498 > EACHN and ηRC−124 > ηA−498 > ηACHN. (paper)

  3. Characterization of electrochemical photovoltaic cells using polycrystalline CdSe and CdTe electrodes grown by a liquid metal-vapor reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline CdSe and CdTe layers were fabricated by putting liquid Cd in contact with Se or Te vapors under constant Ar flow. The crystalline structure, surface properties, and semiconducting properties of these materials have been determined. Both materials were found to be n-type semiconductors. The results show that, under the proper experimental conditions, the liquid metal-vapor reaction enables the synthesis of polycrystalline CdSe photoelectrodes with a 6.9% energy conversion efficiency when used in an electrochemical photovoltaic cell under 80 mW/cm2 of white light illumination. This efficiency rates amongst the highest ones measured under similar conditions using polycrystalline CdSe. These CdSe layers have a majority charge carrier density of ND=2.6x1017 cm-3 and possess a highly textured surface which is assumed to be mainly responsible for the high photovoltaic efficiency. The highly textured CdTe samples obtained by this process, however, show a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of only 0.2%, and this is seen to be mainly due to their high majority charge carrier density of ND=7.8x1019 cm-3

  4. Characterization of electrochemical photovoltaic cells using polycrystalline CdSe and CdTe electrodes grown by a liquid metal-vapor reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z.; Cinquino, M.; Lawrence, M.F. (Laboratories for Inorganic Materials, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve Bld. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1M8 (CA))

    1991-06-01

    Polycrystalline CdSe and CdTe layers were fabricated by putting liquid Cd in contact with Se or Te vapors under constant Ar flow. The crystalline structure, surface properties, and semiconducting properties of these materials have been determined. Both materials were found to be {ital n}-type semiconductors. The results show that, under the proper experimental conditions, the liquid metal-vapor reaction enables the synthesis of polycrystalline CdSe photoelectrodes with a 6.9% energy conversion efficiency when used in an electrochemical photovoltaic cell under 80 mW/cm{sup 2} of white light illumination. This efficiency rates amongst the highest ones measured under similar conditions using polycrystalline CdSe. These CdSe layers have a majority charge carrier density of {ital N}{sub {ital D}}=2.6{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} and possess a highly textured surface which is assumed to be mainly responsible for the high photovoltaic efficiency. The highly textured CdTe samples obtained by this process, however, show a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of only 0.2%, and this is seen to be mainly due to their high majority charge carrier density of {ital N}{sub {ital D}}=7.8{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}.

  5. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. Inverse Associations between Obesity Indicators and Thymic T-Cell Production Levels in Aging Atomic-Bomb Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kubo, Yoshiko; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, ...

  7. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, José; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod’homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; i Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-01-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 10...

  8. Micronuclei and Chromosome Aberrations Found 1n Bone Marrow Cells and Lymphocytes from Thorotrast Patients and Atomic Bomb Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kimio; Izumi, Takaki; Ohkita, Takeshi; Kamada, Nanao

    1984-01-01

    As two cytogenetic parameters of radiation exposure, the frequency of micronucleus in erythroblasts, lymphocytes and red cells (Howell-Jolly body) as well as chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and in lymphocytes were studied in 24 thorotrast patients and in 32 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors who were exposed within one kilometer from the Hiroshima hypocenter. The incidence of both micronucleus and chromosome aberrations in these two exposed groups were significantly higher than that i...

  9. Cs2 ‘diffuse bands’ emission from superheated cesium vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Kokaj, J.; Thomas, N.; Mathew, J.; Beuc, R.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal emission from superheated cesium vapor was studied to very high temperatures from 700 °C to 1000 °C. This was performed in the vapor condition only and with no liquid cesium present in the all-sapphire cell. We observed a number of atomic and molecular spectral features simultaneously in emission and absorption, especially peculiar thermal emission of cesium dimer diffuse bands (2 3Πg → a 3∑u + transitions) around 710 nm coexisting with absorption bands around first resonance lines at 852 and 894 nm. We performed appropriate calculations of the diffuse band emission profiles and compared them with measured profiles. We also performed absorption measurements and compared observed diffuse band profiles with calculated ones. Possible applications of the observed phenomena will be discussed in terms of the solar energy conversion using dense cesium vapor.

  10. Computation of three-dimensional temperature distribution in diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-06-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers, a comprehensive physical model with a cyclic iterative approach for calculating the three-dimensional temperature distribution of the vapor cell is established. Taking into account heat generation, thermal conductivity and convection, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels, and their losses due to ionization in the gain medium, the thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained. The results are in good agreement with those of the measurement in a static rubidium vapor amplifier. Influences of gas velocity on radial and axial temperature profiles are simulated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that thermal problems in gaseous gain medium can be significantly reduced by flowing the gain medium with sufficiently high velocity.

  11. Evidence for strong van der Waals-type Rydberg-Rydberg interaction in thermal vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Baluktsian, T; Löw, R; Pfau, T

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence for Rydberg-Rydberg interaction in a gas of rubidium atoms above room temperature. Rabi oscillations on the nanosecond timescale to different Rydberg states are investigated in a vapor cell experiment. Analyzing the atomic time evolution and comparing to a dephasing model we find a scaling with the Rydberg quantum number n that is consistent with van der Waals interaction. Our results show that the interaction strength can be larger than the kinetic energy scale (Doppler width) which is the requirement for realization of thermal quantum devices in the GHz regime.

  12. Supportless Platinum Nanotubes Array by Atomic Layer Deposition as PEM Fuel Cell Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A simple process for the fabrication of Pt nanotubes arrays has been developed. • The nanotubes array is stuck on a Nafion membrane and is coated by thin Nafion film. • Demonstration of the Pt nanotubes array MEA towards ORR in half-cell. - Abstract: This work reports the fabrication and the test of a novel type of electrode for polymer electrolyte fuel cells, based on an array of oriented and self-supported platinum nanotubes. The dense array of nanotubes is produced by coating the surface of a porous Anodized Aluminum Oxide template by Pt using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique. The nanotubes have a length of around 2 μm, an external diameter of around 180 nm and 20 nm thick Pt walls. As a consequence the tubes are stiff and self-standing with no need for a supporting structure. The array of nanotubes has a density of approximately 109 tubes cm−2 and is stuck onto a Nafion® membrane with excellent adhesion. The electrochemical response of the platinum nanotubes array electrode is investigated by means of half-cell tests and it is compared with the response of a conventional electrode based on a Pt/C dispersion. The nanotubes array shows excellent surface utilization and gas accessibility. The surface specific activity of the nanotubes array towards oxygen reduction reaction is comparable to the one of the conventional electrode: 37 μA cmPt−2 vs 28 μA cmPt−2 of the Pt/C dispersion. Conversely, the mass activity still remains low: 5.5 A/gPt vs 15 A/gPt of the Pt/C dispersion, therefore future actions to decrease the Pt loading and increase the mass activity are outlined. The scale-up of this prototype of supportless nanotubes array electrode from half–cell to fuel cell size is also demonstrated, opening the way to its test under real operating conditions

  13. Vapors produced by electronic cigarettes and e-juices with flavorings induce toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells and in mouse lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Lerner

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS may be inhaled directly into the lung during a "vaping" session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used, and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292 in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that

  14. Vapors produced by electronic cigarettes and e-juices with flavorings induce toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells and in mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Chad A; Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Gerloff, Janice; Ossip, Deborah J; McIntosh, Scott; Robinson, Risa; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS)/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS) may be inhaled directly into the lung during a "vaping" session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used), and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292) in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that could lead to

  15. Ecofriendly and Nonvacuum Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Thin Film Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Anower; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2015-10-14

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) thin films have been deposited by a novel, nonvacuum, and cost-effective electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposition (ESAVD) method. The generation of a fine aerosol of precursor solution, and their controlled deposition onto a molybdenum substrate, results in adherent, dense, and uniform Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) films. This is an essential tool to keep the interfacial area of thin film solar cells to a minimum value for efficient charge separation as it helps to achieve the desired surface smoothness uniformity for subsequent cadmium sulfide and window layer deposition. This nonvacuum aerosol based approach for making the CIGSSe film uses environmentally benign precursor solution, and it is cheaper for producing solar cells than that of the vacuum-based thin film solar technology. An optimized CIGSSe thin film solar cell with a device configuration of molybdenum-coated soda-lime glass substrate/CIGSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/AZO shows the photovoltaic (j-V) characteristics of Voc=0.518 V, jsc=28.79 mA cm(-2), fill factor=64.02%, and a promising power conversion efficiency of η=9.55% under simulated AM 1.5 100 mW cm(-2) illuminations, without the use of an antireflection layer. This demonstrates the potential of ESAVD deposition as a promising alternative approach for making thin film CIGSSe solar cells at a lower cost. PMID:26390182

  16. Alternate methods of applying diffusants to silicon solar cells. [screen printing of thick-film paste materials and vapor phase transport from solid sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, T. W.; Field, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Low-melting phosphate and borate glasses were screen printed on silicon wafers and heated to form n and p junctions. Data on surface appearance, sheet resistance and junction depth are presented. Similar data are reported for vapor phase transport from sintered aluminum metaphosphate and boron-containing glass-ceramic solid sources. Simultaneous diffusion of an N(+) layer with screen-printed glass and a p(+) layer with screen-printed Al alloy paste was attempted. No p(+) back surface field formation was achieved. Some good cells were produced but the heating in an endless-belt furnace caused a large scatter in sheet resistance and junction depth for three separate lots of wafers.

  17. Atomically thin two-dimensional materials as hole extraction layers in organolead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Geun; Kwon, Ki Chang; Le, Quyet Van; Hong, Kootak; Jang, Ho Won; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and graphene oxide (GO) are used as hole extraction layers (HEL) in organolead halide perovskites solar cells (PSCs) instead of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HEL. MoS2 and WS2 layers with a polycrystalline structure were synthesized by a chemical deposition method using a uniformly spin-coated (NH4)MoS4 and (NH4)WS4 precursor solution. GO was synthesized by the oxidation of natural graphite powder using Hummers' method. The work functions of MoS2, WS2, and GO are measured to be 5.0, 4.95, and 5.1 eV, respectively. The X-ray diffraction spectrum indicated that the synthesized perovskite material is CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. The PSCs with the p-n junction structure were fabricated based on the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite layer. The power conversion efficiencies of the MoS2, WS2, and GO-based PSCs were 9.53%, 8.02%, and 9.62%, respectively, which are comparable to those obtained from PEDOT:PSS-based devices (9.93%). These results suggest that two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and GO can be promising candidates for the formation of HELs in the PSCs.

  18. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Microscopically controlled surgical excision combined with ultrapulse CO2 vaporization in the management of a patient with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krunic, A L; Viehman, G E; Madani, S; Clark, R E

    1998-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, skeletal abnormalities and sometimes mental retardation. The large number of tumors, which are often disfiguring, presents extreme difficulties in the treatment of these patients. Microscopically controlled excision, compared to other modalities (radiation therapy, photodynamic therapy, intralesional interferon alpha-2b) offers the highest cure rate. However, because of the large size and involvement of wide areas of the skin, this approach is sometimes impractical. The ultrapulse CO2 laser with high energy and short pulses achieves char-free ablation of the tumors, bloodless surgical field, minimal nonspecific thermal damage, rapid healing and diminished postoperative pain. Also, a number of lesions can be removed in a single session. We present a 48-year-old man with a 6.5 x 4.5 cm large basal cell carcinoma involving the anterior abdomen and navel area. The central thick portion of the tumor was resected by microscopically controlled excision with 3 stages, and wide thinner peripheral crescentic plaque vaporized with ultrapulse CO2 laser. The laser settings were 300 mJ energy/pulse and 100 W average power, which corresponds to the fluence of 7.5 J/cm2. Computerized pattern generator (ultrascan handpiece) was adjusted to patterns of 3 (circle) and 1 (square) with sizes varying from 5 to 7, and density of 9 (60% overlapping). The tumor was vaporized with 6 passes, all the way to deep reticular dermis. A fifteen month-follow up disclosed no recurrent disease. Subsequent biopsies revealed only a scar with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Our experience indicates that combined treatment with microscopically controlled excision and ultrapulse CO2 laser ablation is a suitable modality for the large tumor plaques involving concave and convex areas of the skin respectively. Microscopically controlled excision of thicker, concave portions of basal

  20. Longitudinal trends of total white blood cell and differential white blood cell counts of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studying the late health effects of atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors, earlier findings were that white blood cell (WBC) count increased with radiation dose in cross-sectional studies. However, a persistent effect of radiation on WBC count and other risk factors has yet to be confirmed. The objectives of the present study were to examine the longitudinal relationship between A-bomb radiation dose and WBC and differential WBC counts among A-bomb survivors and to investigate the potential confounding risk factors (such as age at exposure and smoking status) as well as modification of the radiation dose-response. A total of 7,562 A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were included in this study from 1964-2004. A linear mixed model was applied using the repeated WBC measurements. During the study period, a secular downward trend of WBC count was observed. Radiation exposure was a significant risk factor for elevated WBC and differential WBC counts over time. A significant increase of WBC counts among survivors with high radiation dose (>2 Gy) was detected in men exposed below the age of 20 and in women regardless of age at exposure. Effects on WBC of low dose radiation remain unclear, however. Cigarette smoking produced the most pronounced effect on WBC counts and its impact was much larger than that of radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Longitudinal trends of total white blood cell and differential white blood cell counts of atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Neriishi, Kazuo; Yamada, Michiko; Cologne, John; Fujiwara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    In studying the late health effects of atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors, earlier findings were that white blood cell (WBC) count increased with radiation dose in cross-sectional studies. However, a persistent effect of radiation on WBC count and other risk factors has yet to be confirmed. The objectives of the present study were 1) to examine the longitudinal relationship between A-bomb radiation dose and WBC and differential WBC counts among A-bomb survivors and 2) to investigate the potential confounding risk factors (such as age at exposure and smoking status) as well as modification of the radiation dose-response. A total of 7,562 A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were included in this study from 1964-2004. A linear mixed model was applied using the repeated WBC measurements. During the study period, a secular downward trend of WBC count was observed. Radiation exposure was a significant risk factor for elevated WBC and differential WBC counts over time. A significant increase of WBC counts among survivors with high radiation dose (> 2 Gy) was detected in men exposed below the age of 20 and in women regardless of age at exposure. Effects on WBC of low dose radiation remain unclear, however. Cigarette smoking produced the most pronounced effect on WBC counts and its impact was much larger than that of radiation exposure. PMID:20543527

  2. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina para espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10{mu}g.L{sup -1}. The

  3. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method’s performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 ± 11,70)μg.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L{sup −1}. The obtained

  4. Performance Improvement of Microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si Thin Film Solar Cells by Using Laser-Assisted Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si thin film solar cells treated with hydrogen plasma were fabricated at low temperature using a CO2 laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD system. According to the micro-Raman results, the i-Si films shifted from 482 cm−1 to 512 cm−1 as the assisting laser power increased from 0 W to 80 W, which indicated a gradual transformation from amorphous to crystalline Si. From X-ray diffraction (XRD results, the microcrystalline i-Si films with (111, (220, and (311 diffraction were obtained. Compared with the Si-based thin film solar cells deposited without laser assistance, the short-circuit current density and the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with assisting laser power of 80 W were improved from 14.38 mA/cm2 to 18.16 mA/cm2 and from 6.89% to 8.58%, respectively.

  5. Influence of alkali metals (Na, Li, Rb) on the performance of electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposited Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Giovanni; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition (ESAVD) is a non-vacuum and cost-effective method to deposit metal oxide, various sulphide and chalcogenide at large scale. In this work, ESAVD was used to deposit Cu2ZnSn(S1-xSex)4 (CZTSSe) absorber. Different alkali metals like Na, Li and Rb were incorporated in CZTSSe compounds to further improve the photovoltaic performances of related devices. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental study has been carried out to test the effect of Li and Rb incorporation in CZTSSe solar cells. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and glow discharge spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phase purity, morphology and composition of as-deposited CZTSSe thin films. Photovoltaic properties of the resulting devices were determined by completing the solar cells as follows: Mo/CZTSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/Al:ZnO/Ni/Al. The results showed that Li, Na and Rb incorporation can increase power conversion efficiency of CZTS devices up to 5.5%. The introduction of a thiourea treatment, has improved the quality of the absorber|buffer interface, pushed the device efficiency up to 6.3% which is at the moment the best reported result for ESAVD deposited CZTSSe solar cells.

  6. Influence of alkali metals (Na, Li, Rb) on the performance of electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposited Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Giovanni; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition (ESAVD) is a non-vacuum and cost-effective method to deposit metal oxide, various sulphide and chalcogenide at large scale. In this work, ESAVD was used to deposit Cu2ZnSn(S1-xSex)4 (CZTSSe) absorber. Different alkali metals like Na, Li and Rb were incorporated in CZTSSe compounds to further improve the photovoltaic performances of related devices. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental study has been carried out to test the effect of Li and Rb incorporation in CZTSSe solar cells. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and glow discharge spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phase purity, morphology and composition of as-deposited CZTSSe thin films. Photovoltaic properties of the resulting devices were determined by completing the solar cells as follows: Mo/CZTSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/Al:ZnO/Ni/Al. The results showed that Li, Na and Rb incorporation can increase power conversion efficiency of CZTS devices up to 5.5%. The introduction of a thiourea treatment, has improved the quality of the absorber(|)buffer interface, pushed the device efficiency up to 6.3% which is at the moment the best reported result for ESAVD deposited CZTSSe solar cells. PMID:26916212

  7. Observation of electromagnetically induced Talbot effect in an atomic system with nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Dan; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the Talbot effect resulting from the repeatedly self-reconstruction of a spatially intensity-modulated probe field under the Fresnel near-field regime. By launching the probe beam into an optically induced atomic lattice (established by interfering two coupling fields) inside a thermal rubidium vapor cell, we can obtain an electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) on probe beam in a coherent three-level $\\Lambda$-type Doppler-free atomic configuration with the assistance of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window, which can modify and greatly enhance the Kerr nonlinearity near atomic resonance. The EIG patterns out of the cell can repeat the image at the output plane of the cell at integer multiples of Talbot length, which agree well with the theoretical prediction [Appl. Phys. Lett., 98, 081108 (2011)]. Such first demonstrated EIT Talbot effect in a coherent atomic system may pave a lensless and nondestructive way for imaging ultracold atoms or molecules.

  8. Validação de metodologia analítica para determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorção atômica com geração de vapor frio (CV-AAS: estudo de caso Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Neusatz Guilhen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a toxic metal used in a variety of substances over the course history. One of its more dubious uses is in dental amalgam restorations. It is possible to measure very small concentrations of this metal in the urine of exposed subjects by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique. The present work features the validation as an essential tool to confirm the suitability of the analytical method chosen to accomplish such determination. An initial analysis will be carried out in order to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in 39 members of the auxiliary dental staff at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaína (TO.

  9. The development of an atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development, fabrication and examination of an atom chip through silicon vias (TSV), which is anodically bonded with a Pyrex glass cell to form an ultra-high-vacuum system for the application of Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. The silicon via is etched by the inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etch and filled by copper plating technology. The metal wires on both sides of the atom chips are patterned by the lithography process. Three different sizes of TSV are made and tested by continuously applying a maximum current of 17 A under the vacuum (70 Torr) and in air. In addition, after the thermal cycling of an anodic bonding process (requested at 350 °C) and a high electric field of 1000 V m−1, the TSV on atom chips can still hold the ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The conductive and vacuum yields of the TSV improved from 50% to 100% and from 75% to 81.25%, respectively after the modification of the fabrication process. Finally, the UHV test of TSV on atom chips at room temperature can be reached at 8 × 10−10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under the UHV environment. (paper)

  10. Calculation of vapor pressure of fission product fluorides and oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium diagrams of the condensed phases - solid and liquid - and vapor phase are collected for the principal fluorides and oxyfluorides of fission product elements (atomic number from 30 to 66). These diagrams are used more particularly in fuel reprocessing by fluoride volatility process. Calculations and curves (vapor pressure in function of temperature) are processed using a computer program given in this report

  11. Sub-doppler spectroscopy based on the transit relaxation of atomic particles in a thin gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the review of methods, achievements, and possibilities of the recently elaborated high-resolution laser spectroscopy based on sub-doppler absorption, fluorescence and polarization resonances (on centers of quantum transitions), which arise because of the specific optical selection of comparatively slow-speed atoms or molecules in a thin cell with a rarefied gas. It is considered two following mechanisms of such velocity selection of atomic particles connected with their flight durations between walls of the thin cell : 1) optical pumping of sublevels of the ground atomic term and 2) optical excitation of long-lived metastable quantum levels. Theoretical bases of elaborated spectroscopy methods are presented. In case of the optical pumping mechanism, experimental technique and results on the record of sub-doppler spectral structure of Cs and Rb atoms and on the frequency stabilization of diode lasers by given methods are described. Perspectives of further development and applications of this new direction of the high-resolution spectroscopy are discussed

  12. Selective Metal-vapor Deposition on Organic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Selective metal-vapor deposition signifies that metal-vapor atoms are deposited on a hard organic surface, but not on a soft (low glass transition temperature, low Tg ) surface. In this paper, we introduce the origin, extension, and applications of selective metal-vapor deposition. An amorphous photochromic diarylethene film shows light-controlled selective metal-vapor deposition, which is caused by a large Tg change based on photoisomerization, but various organic surfaces, including organic crystal and polymers, can be utilized for achieving selective metal-vapor deposition. Various applications of selective metal-vapor deposition, including cathode patterning of organic light-emitting devices, micro-thin-film fuses, multifunctional diffraction gratings, in-plane electrical bistability for memory devices, and metal-vapor integration, have been demonstrated. PMID:26663735

  13. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  14. Atomic force microscopy of 3T3 and SW-13 cell lines: An investigation of cell elasticity changes due to fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of single cells are of increasing interest both from a fundamental cell biological perspective and in the context of disease diagnostics. In this respect, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a powerful tool for imaging and assessing mechanical properties of biological samples. However, while these tests are typically carried out on chemically fixed cells, the most important data is that on living cells. The present study applies AFM technique to assess the Young's modulus of two cell lines: mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) and human epithelial cancer cells (SW-13). Both living cells and those fixed with paraformaldehyde were investigated. This analysis quantifies the difference between Young's modulus for these two conditions and provides a coefficient to relate them. Knowing the relation between Young's modulus of living and fixed cells, allows carrying out and comparing data obtained during steady-state measurements on fixed cells that are more frequently available in the clinical and research settings and simpler to maintain and probe. - Highlights: • The influence of fixation process on NIH/3T3 and SW13 cell elasticity was studied. • The two cell lines have been chosen for their different cytoskeletal structures. • There is a difference between AFM data collected at 37 °C and room temperature. • At RT, the longer the time out of the incubator the softer the cells appear. • A coefficient to relate elasticity between fixed and leaving cells is provided

  15. Spectroscopy of 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atom in an external absorption cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Baraulya, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Goncharov, A. N.; Seydaliev, M. R.

    2001-09-01

    The results of saturated absorption spectroscopy of the intercombination 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atoms at 457 nm in an external absorption cell are presented. A laser system based on a Ti:Sa laser with frequency doubling in a LBO nonlinear crystal was used in these experiments. Saturated absorption resonances of magnesium in an external cell at the 1S0- 3P1 transition have been obtained for the first time. Pressure broadening of resonances equal to 12.5±1.5 kHz/mTorr has been measured.

  16. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  17. Three-step laser induced ionization of Ir and Hg atoms in an air-acetylene flame and a gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility and the application of three-step excitation and ionization schemes with excimer-pumped, pulsed dye lasers have been studied in the case of Iridium atoms in an air acetylene flame and of Mercury atoms in a gas cell. The detection limits obtained were 0.2 ng/ml in the case of Ir and 107 atoms per cubic centimeter of air

  18. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  19. Morphological changes in living cell cultures following α-particle irradiation studied by optical and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shape of the cells and the released material (traces) from migrating adherent cells depends on the cell type, the surface coating of the culture plate, the extracellular matrix, and some other parameters. In our studies we investigated the effect of α-exposure (7-28 particle/cell/h) on cell cultures. C6 glioma cells and 3T3 cell-lines were grown on a 20 μm thick, chemically modified polypropylene foil and exposed to α-particles of an 241Am (37 kBq) source through the foil. The average energy of the α particles was calculated by Monte-Carlo simulation of the whole collision cascade through the given pathway in air and in the foil. The α-dose was measured by CR-39 track detectors. Morphological changes of the cells were investigated by phase-contrast optical microscopy and by atomic force microscopy in low force contact mode. The static traces give information about the dynamics of cell migration and about the quality of the extracellular matrix

  20. Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy Prior to and Following Treatment from Gas Discharge Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, K. G.; Joaquin, J. C.; Kwan, C.; Bray, J. D.; Torrico, R.; Abramzon, N.; Brelles-Marino, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In addition, cell wall elasticity was studied by measuring force distance curves as the AFM tip was pressed into the cell surface. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  1. Light-induced atomic desorption and related phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review some recent studies on light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) from dielectric surfaces. Alkali-metal atoms adsorbed either on organic films or on porous glass are released into the vapor phase under illumination. The measurements were performed in Pyrex resonance cells either coated with siloxane films or containing a porous glass sample. In both cases, the experimental results show that LIAD can be used to produce atomic densities suitable for most atomic physics experiments. Moreover, we find that photoinduced effects, correlated with LIAD, produce reversible formation and evaporation of alkali-metal clusters in porous glass. These processes depend on the light frequency, making the porous glass transmittance controllable by light.

  2. The Growth of InGaAsN for High Efficiency Solar Cells by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    InGaAsN alloys are a promising material for increasing the efficiency of multi-junction solar cells now used for satellite power systems. However, the growth of these dilute N containing alloys has been challenging with further improvements in material quality needed before the solar cell higher efficiencies are realized. Nitrogen/V ratios exceeding 0.981 resulted in lower N incorporation and poor surface morphologies. The growth rate was found to depend on not only the total group III transport for a fixed N/V ratio but also on the N/V ratio. Carbon tetrachloride and dimethylzinc were effective for p-type doping. Disilane was not an effective n-type dopant while SiCl4 did result in n-type material but only a narrow range of electron concentrations (2-5e17cm(sup -3)) were achieved

  3. Improving low pressure chemical vapor deposited zinc oxide contacts for thin film silicon solar cells by using rough glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhauser, J., E-mail: jerome.steinhauser@oerlikon.com; Boucher, J.-F.; Omnes, E.; Borrello, D.; Vallat-Sauvain, E.; Monteduro, G.; Marmelo, M.; Orhan, J.-B.; Wolf, B.; Bailat, J.; Benagli, S.; Meier, J.; Kroll, U.

    2011-12-01

    Compared to zinc oxide grown (ZnO) on flat glass, rough etched glass substrates decrease the sheet resistance (R{sub sq}) of zinc oxide layers grown on it. We explain this R{sub sq} reduction from a higher thickness and an improved electron mobility for ZnO layers deposited on rough etched glass substrates. When using this etched glass substrate, we also obtain a large variety of surface texture by changing the thickness of the ZnO layer grown on it. This new combination of etched glass and ZnO layer shows improved light trapping potential compared to ZnO films grown on flat glass. With this new approach, Micromorph thin film silicon tandem solar cells with high total current densities (sum of the top and bottom cell current density) of up to 26.8 mA cm{sup -2} were fabricated.

  4. The large-area CdTe thin film for CdS/CdTe solar cell prepared by physical vapor deposition in medium pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Run; Liu, Bo; Yang, Xiaoyan; Bao, Zheng; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film has been prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD), the Ar + O2 pressure is about 0.9 kPa. This method is a newer technique to deposit CdTe thin film in large area, and the size of the film is 30 × 40 cm2. This method is much different from the close-spaced sublimation (CSS), as the relevance between the source temperature and the substrate temperature is weak, and the gas phase of CdTe is transferred to the substrate by Ar + O2 flow. Through this method, the compact and uniform CdTe film (30 × 40 cm2) has been achieved, and the performances of the CdTe thin film have been determined by transmission spectrum, SEM and XRD. The film is observed to be compact with a good crystallinity, the CdTe is polycrystalline with a cubic structure and a strongly preferred (1 1 1) orientation. Using the CdTe thin film (3 × 5 cm2) which is taken from the deposited large-area film, the 14.6% efficiency CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell has been prepared successfully. The structure of the cell is glass/FTO/CdS/CdTe/graphite slurry/Au, short circuit current density (Jsc) of the cell is 26.9 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) is 823 mV, and filling factor (FF) is 66.05%. This technique can be a quite promising method to apply in the industrial production, as it has great prospects in the fabricating of large-area CdTe film.

  5. Premelting-Induced Smoothening of the Ice-Vapor Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Jorge; Llombart, Pablo; Sanz, Eduardo; MacDowell, Luis G

    2016-08-26

    We perform computer simulations of the quasiliquid layer of ice formed at the ice-vapor interface close to the ice Ih-liquid-vapor triple point of water. Our study shows that the two distinct surfaces bounding the film behave at small wavelengths as atomically rough and independent ice-water and water-vapor interfaces. For long wavelengths, however, the two surfaces couple, large scale parallel fluctuations are inhibited, and the ice-vapor interface becomes smooth. Our results could help explain the complex morphology of ice crystallites. PMID:27610864

  6. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  7. Inverse associations between obesity indicators and thymic T-cell production levels in aging atomic-bomb survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Yoshida

    Full Text Available Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, i.e., T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC numbers in CD4 and CD8 T cells. The number of TRECs showed a strong positive correlation with naive T cell numbers, and lower TREC numbers were associated with higher age. We found that the TREC number was inversely associated with levels of obesity indicators (BMI, hemoglobin A1c and serum CRP levels. Development of type-2 diabetes and fatty liver was also associated with lower TREC numbers. This population study suggests that obesity with enhanced inflammation is involved in aging of the human T-cell immune system. Given the fact that obesity increases the risk of numerous age-related diseases, attenuated immune competence is a possible mechanistic link between obesity and disease development among the elderly.

  8. Inverse associations between obesity indicators and thymic T-cell production levels in aging atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kubo, Yoshiko; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, i.e., T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) numbers in CD4 and CD8 T cells. The number of TRECs showed a strong positive correlation with naive T cell numbers, and lower TREC numbers were associated with higher age. We found that the TREC number was inversely associated with levels of obesity indicators (BMI, hemoglobin A1c) and serum CRP levels. Development of type-2 diabetes and fatty liver was also associated with lower TREC numbers. This population study suggests that obesity with enhanced inflammation is involved in aging of the human T-cell immune system. Given the fact that obesity increases the risk of numerous age-related diseases, attenuated immune competence is a possible mechanistic link between obesity and disease development among the elderly. PMID:24651652

  9. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion.

  10. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Jack R; Doss, Bryant L; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion. PMID:26813872

  11. Development of Earth-Abundant Tin(II) Sulfide Thin-Film Solar Cells by Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert

    2013-01-01

    To sustain future civilization, the development of alternative clean-energy technologies to replace fossil fuels has become one of the most crucial and challenging problems of the last few decades. The thin film solar cell is one of the major photovoltaic technologies that is promising for renewable energy. The current commercial thin film PV technologies are based on \\(Cu(In,Ga)Se_2\\) and CdTe. Despite their success in reducing the module cost below $1/Wp, these absorber materials face limit...

  12. Study of atomic layer deposition of indium oxy-sulfide films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugot, Cathy, E-mail: cathy-externe.bugot@edf.fr [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France); Schneider, Nathanaelle [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France); Bouttemy, Muriel; Etcheberry, Arnaud [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 (CNRS-UVSQ), Versailles (France); Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France)

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores the growth mechanism of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} films. The films were deposited using indium acetylacetonate (In(acac){sub 3}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and Ar/O{sub 2} plasma as oxygen precursor. The films were characterized using X-ray reflectometry, spectrophotometry, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To understand the growth mechanism and especially the interactions between Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} growing film, in-situ analyses were performed using quadrupole mass spectrometry. In-situ qualitative analysis revealed good correlation between the species detected in vapor phase and thin film properties. High concentrations of atomic and molecular oxygen were measured in the vapor phase during O{sub 2} plasma pulses. Significant decrease of these species could be observed by varying the plasma power from 2600 to 300 W, while the optical band gap remained at high values (> 2.6 eV). The analysis of the O{sub 2}-free/Ar plasma process showed that some of these oxygen species originate either from the indium precursor or from the substrate surface. This study explains the high oxygen content of the films, and allows us to reduce and control it. Generally, this report provides keys to understand the effect of plasma reactivity for the elaboration of oxide based materials. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} films were synthesized by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. • Growth mechanism was studied via gas phase analysis by Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry. • Good correlation between the vapor phase species and thin films properties was observed. • The film compositions and band gaps can be controlled by varying the plasma power.

  13. A case of squamous cell carcinoma on back skin developed 50 years after the exposure to the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 65-year-old man, who was exposed to an atomic bomb in Nagasaki 1945, developed an ulcerated tumor on his right upper back in 1995. A squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was ascertained histopathologically, not only in the back skin but also the right axillary lymph node. Neither of his face nor back skin showed characteristic color changes responsible for actinic damage. Furthermore it is well-known that SCC occurs rarely in the trunk. These facts do not explain any susceptability of the occurrence of SCC to his back skin. Even though it has passed as many as fifty years after the tragedy by the atomic bomb, the exposure of the extremely huge amount of rays might cause a tumorigenesis. (author)

  14. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  15. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S M; K. H. Rosenlof

    2013-01-01

    We show observational evidence for a stratospheric water vapor feedback—a warmer climate increases stratospheric water vapor, and because stratospheric water vapor is itself a greenhouse gas, this leads to further warming. An estimate of its magnitude from a climate model yields a value of +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), suggesting that this feedback plays an important role in our climate system.

  16. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, T D; McFerran, J J; Jouin, J; Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Thomas, P; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of ground state atomic polarization relaxation tile of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core shape Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom's dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with convetional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by the atom-wall collisional relaxation from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  17. Comparison between power-law rheological parameters of living cells in frequency and time domains measured by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu

    2016-08-01

    We investigated how stress relaxation mapping is quantified compared with the force modulation mapping of confluent epithelial cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using a multi-frequency AFM technique, we estimated the power-law rheological behaviors of cells simultaneously in time and frequency domains. When the power-law exponent α was low ( 0.1), α in the time domain was underestimated relative to that in the frequency domain, and the difference increased with α, whereas the cell modulus was overestimated in the time domain. These results indicate that power-law rheological parameters estimated by stress relaxation are sensitive to lag time during initial indentation, which is inevitable in time-domain AFM experiments.

  18. Mapping power-law rheology of living cells using multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mapping the complex shear modulus G* of living cells as a function of frequency over the range of 50–500 Hz in the same measurement time as the single-frequency force modulation measurement. The AFM technique enables us to reconstruct image maps of rheological parameters, which exhibit a frequency-dependent power-law behavior with respect to G*. These quantitative rheological measurements reveal a large spatial variation in G* in this frequency range for single cells. Moreover, we find that the reconstructed images of the power-law rheological parameters are much different from those obtained in force-curve or single-frequency force modulation measurements. This indicates that the former provide information about intracellular mechanical structures of the cells that are usually not resolved with the conventional force measurement methods

  19. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, Jose; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod'homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; i Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-02-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 100-μm distance in order to compare data from the same area and provide a consistent interpretation. In both measurements, modifications under illumination are observed in accordance with the theory of PIN junctions. Moreover, an unintentional doping during the deposition of the epitaxial silicon intrinsic layer in the solar cell is suggested from the comparison between photovoltage and photocurrent measurements.

  20. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, Jose; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod'homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; I Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-12-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 100-μm distance in order to compare data from the same area and provide a consistent interpretation. In both measurements, modifications under illumination are observed in accordance with the theory of PIN junctions. Moreover, an unintentional doping during the deposition of the epitaxial silicon intrinsic layer in the solar cell is suggested from the comparison between photovoltage and photocurrent measurements. PMID:26831693

  1. Mapping power-law rheology of living cells using multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu, E-mail: okajima@ist.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku N14 W9, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan)

    2015-10-26

    We present multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mapping the complex shear modulus G* of living cells as a function of frequency over the range of 50–500 Hz in the same measurement time as the single-frequency force modulation measurement. The AFM technique enables us to reconstruct image maps of rheological parameters, which exhibit a frequency-dependent power-law behavior with respect to G{sup *}. These quantitative rheological measurements reveal a large spatial variation in G* in this frequency range for single cells. Moreover, we find that the reconstructed images of the power-law rheological parameters are much different from those obtained in force-curve or single-frequency force modulation measurements. This indicates that the former provide information about intracellular mechanical structures of the cells that are usually not resolved with the conventional force measurement methods.

  2. Atom-probe tomographic study of interfaces of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, S., E-mail: e0954@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Asahi, R.; Itoh, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Ohishi, K. [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Isheim, D.; Seidman, D. N. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3108 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The heterophase interfaces between the CdS buffer layer and the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) absorption layers are one of the main factors affecting photovoltaic performance of CZTS cells. We have studied the compositional distributions at heterophase interfaces in CZTS cells using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The results demonstrate: (a) diffusion of Cd into the CZTS layer; (b) segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface; and (c) a change of oxygen and hydrogen concentrations in the CdS layer depending on the heat treatment. Annealing at 573 K after deposition of CdS improves the photovoltaic properties of CZTS cells probably because of the formation of a heterophase epitaxial junction at the CdS/CZTS interface. Conversely, segregation of Zn at the CdS/CZTS interface after annealing at a higher temperature deteriorates the photovoltaic properties.

  3. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence reveals polarized distribution of atomic elements during differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone C Cardoso

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying pluripotency and differentiation in embryonic and reprogrammed stem cells are unclear. In this work, we characterized the pluripotent state towards neural differentiated state through analysis of trace elements distribution using the Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Naive and neural-stimulated embryoid bodies (EB derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem (ES and iPS cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 µm to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. Results show that these embryo-like aggregates exhibit self-organization at the atomic level. Metallic elements content rises and consistent elemental polarization pattern of P and S in both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells were observed, indicating that neural differentiation and elemental polarization are strongly correlated.

  4. Cell biological study in multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors, 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In part of studies on the mechanism of M-proteinemia (including myeloma) in A-bomb survivors, an attempt was made to identify precursor plasma cells in the peripheral blood by determining the expression of CD38 antigen on the surface of cells. Two-color analysis with FITC-labeled anti-CD38 antibody revealed the expression of moderately CD38-positive (CD38++) cells, i.e. CD38++CD19+CD56-VLA-5-MPC-1-. These cells were similar to immature plasma cells in bone marrow (CD38+++CD19+CD56-VLA-5-MPC-1-), which showed extremely CD38-positive (CD38+++) cells. Because germinal center B cells is slightly CD38-positive (CD38+), plasma cells in the peripheral blood was identified as precursor plasma cells that lie between germinal center B cells and bone marrow-derived immature plasma cells. These precursor plasma cells were scarcely seen in the peripheral blood from patients with myeloma, suggesting that malignant clones of myeloma cells may not be supplied by precursor plasma cells but originate from bone marrow. (N.K.)

  5. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 on crystalline silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al2O3 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al2O3 passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al2O3 passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al2O3 shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al2O3 surface passivation

  6. High-flux beam source for cold, slow atoms or molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, S. E.; Brahms, N.; deCarvalho, R.; Helton, J.; Nguyen, S V; Patterson, D; Doyle, J. M.; Glenn, D. R.; Petricka, J.; DeMille, D.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate and characterize a high-flux beam source for cold, slow atoms or molecules. The desired species is vaporized using laser ablation, then cooled by thermalization in a cryogenic cell of buffer gas. The beam is formed by particles exiting a hole in the buffer gas cell. We characterize the properties of the beam (flux, forward velocity, temperature) for both an atom (Na) and a molecule (PbO) under varying buffer gas density, and discuss conditions for optimizing these beam paramete...

  7. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  8. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  9. Stress relaxation and creep on living cells with the atomic force microscope: a means to calculate elastic moduli and viscosities of cell components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis [Biosurfaces Unit, CIC BiomaGUNE, Paseo Miramon 182, E-20009 San Sebastian-Donostia (Spain); Benitez, Rafael [Departamento Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida Virgen del Puerto 2, E-10600 Plasencia (Spain); Vivanco, Maria dM, E-mail: jltocaherrera@cicbiomagune.es, E-mail: jose.toca-herrera@boku.ac.at [Cell Biology and Stem Cells Unit, CIC BioGUNE, Parque tecnologico de Bizkaia, Ed. 801A, E-48160 Derio (Spain)

    2010-11-05

    In this work we present a unified method to study the mechanical properties of cells using the atomic force microscope. Stress relaxation and creep compliance measurements permitted us to determine, the relaxation times, the Young moduli and the viscosity of breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The results show that the mechanical behaviour of MCF-7 cells responds to a two-layered model of similar elasticity but differing viscosity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with an actin-depolymerising agent results in an overall decrease in both cell elasticity and viscosity, however to a different extent for each layer. The layer that undergoes the smaller decrease (36-38%) is assigned to the cell membrane/cortex while the layer that experiences the larger decrease (70-80%) is attributed to the cell cytoplasm. The combination of the method presented in this work, together with the approach based on stress relaxation microscopy (Moreno-Flores et al 2010 J. Biomech. 43 349-54), constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study cell mechanics. This methodology can also be extended to study the mechanical properties of biomaterials in general.

  10. Generation and multi-pass propagation of a squeezed vacuum field in hot Rb vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mi; Lanning, R. Nicholas; Xiao, Zhihao; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.

    2016-05-01

    We study a squeezed vacuum field generated in hot Rb vapor via the polarization self-rotation effect. By propagating the strong laser beam through a vapor cell once, we were able to achieve a noise suppression of 2 dB below shot noise. Our previous experiments showed that the amount of observed squeezing may be limited by the contamination of the squeezed vacuum output with higher-order spatial modes, also generated inside the cell. Here, we investigate whether or not the squeezing can be improved by making the light interact several times with a less dense atomic ensemble. We carry out a comparison of various conditions, e.g. injection power, atomic density, passing numbers etc., and studied their effect on squeezing level and the spatial structure of the output squeezed vacuum field. We observe that multiple passages of beam through the medium can lead to an improvement of squeezing, and minimum noise occurs at almost the same effective atomic density for all setups. We show optimization of the conditions can lead to higher achievable squeezing which would be very useful for precision metrology and quantum memory applications. We acknowledge support from AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-13-1- 0098, ARO Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0381, NSF Grant No. 1403105, and the Northrop Grumman Corporation.

  11. Influence of atomic layer deposition Al2O3 nano-layer on the surface passivation of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stack of Al2O3/SiNx dual layer was applied for the back side surface passivation of p-type multi-crystalline silicon solar cells, with laser-opened line metal contacts, forming a local aluminum back surface field (local Al-BSF) structure. A slight amount of Al2O3, wrapping around to the front side of the wafer during the thermal atomic layer deposition process, was found to have a negative influence on cell performance. The different process flow was found to lead to a different cell performance, because of the Al2O3 wrapping around the front surface. The best cell performance, with an absolute efficiency gain of about 0.6% compared with the normal full Al-BSF structure solar cell, was achieved when the Al2O3 layer was deposited after the front surface of the wafer had been covered by a SiNx layer. We discuss the possible reasons for this phenomenon, and propose three explanations as the Ag paste, being hindered from firing through the front passivation layer, degraded the SiNx passivation effect and the Al2O3 induced an inversion effect on the front surface. Characterization methods like internal quantum efficiency and contact resistance scanning were used to assist our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. (semiconductor physics)

  12. A New cell design for Potentiostatically Controlled In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Lithen; Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Ulstrup, Jens

    We describe the design and construction of a new type of AFM cell for in situ imaging under potentiostatic control. The cell is specifically designed for a Rasterscope 4000TM AFM instrument with no need for instrumental modification, but can easily be adapted to other commercial instruments. The...... cell is a closed system with insignificant sample evaporation. It is a chemically and mechanically robust two-component system which enables fast assembly and testing prior to insertion and minimizes leakage problems. The cell is also laterally flexible, facilitating scanning of large areas, holds...

  13. Corollary from the Exact Expression for Enthalpy of Vaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sobko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem on determining effective volumes for atoms and molecules becomes actual due to rapidly developing nanotechnologies. In the present study an exact expression for enthalpy of vaporization is obtained, from which an exact expression is derived for effective volumes of atoms and molecules, and under certain assumptions on the form of an atom (molecule it is possible to find their linear dimensions. The accuracy is only determined by the accuracy of measurements of thermodynamic parameters at the critical point.

  14. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  15. THE SPECTROSCOPY OF URANIUM ATOM WITHIN THE "SILVA" PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, R.; Ebrardt, J.; Petit, A.; Viala, F.; Vors, E.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (SILVA) has been recognized as beeing an attractive powerful technique for the enrichment of uranium for light water reactor fuel. Since the heart of the AVLIS process is based on selective multistep photoionization of an uranium atomic vapor stream, the development of this process in France, has stimulated intensive studies in the field of uranium spectroscopy.

  16. Evaluation of β1-integrin expression on chondrogenically differentiating human adipose-derived stem cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisenberry, Chrystal R; Nazempour, Arshan; Van Wie, Bernard J; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2016-06-01

    The expression of β1-integrin on human adipose-derived stem cells, differentiating toward a chondrogenic lineage, is hypothesized to decrease when cells are grown under in vivo-like environments due to sufficient extracellular matrix (ECM) buildup in the engineered tissues. The opposite is true when cells are grown in static cultures such as in pellet or micromass. To probe β1-integrin distribution on cellular surfaces, atomic force microscopy cantilevers modified with anti-β1-integrin antibodies were used. Specific antibody-antigen adhesion forces were identified and indicated the locations of β1-integrins on cells. ECM properties were assessed by estimating the Young's modulus of the matrix. Specific single antibody-antigen interactions averaged 78 ± 10 pN with multiple bindings occurring at approximate multiples of 78 pN. The author's results show that upregulated β1-integrin expression coincided with a less robust ECM as assessed by mechanical properties of tissues. In micromass and pellet cultures, transforming growth factor β3(TGF-β3) elicited a decrease in Young's modulus by 3.7- and 4.4-fold while eliciting an increase in β1-integrin count by 1.1- and 1.3-fold, respectively. β1-integrin counts on cells grown in the presence of TGF-β3 with oscillating hydrostatic pressure decreased by a 1.1-fold while the Young's modulus increased by a 1.9-fold. Collectively, our results suggest that cells in insufficiently robust ECM express more integrin perhaps to facilitate cell-ECM adhesion and compensate for a looser less robust ECM. PMID:27106564

  17. Low-Velocity Intense Source of Atoms from a Magneto-optical Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have produced and characterized an intense, slow, and highly collimated atomic beam extracted from a standard vapor cell magneto-optical trap (MOT).The technique used is dramatically simpler than previous methods for producing very cold atomic beams. We have created a 0.6mm diameter rubidium atomic beam with a continuous flux of 5x109/s and a pulsed flux 10times greater. Its longitudinal velocity distribution is centered at 14 m/s with a FWHM of 2.7 m/s. Through an efficient recycling process, 70% of the atoms trapped in the MOT are loaded into the atomic beam. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Age-related alteration in the composition of immunocompetent blood cells in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1328 survivors of Hiroshima were studied for alterations in the number of blood lymphocytes belonging to T-cell subpopulations, CD19 antigen-positive B cells and Leu 7 and CD16 antigen-positive lymphocytes. With increasing age, significant decreasing trends in the numbers of some lymphocytes in T-cell subpopulations and of B-cells were seen. The number of blood lymphocytes positive for CD5 antigen was significantly lower in those exposed to radiation (> 1Gy) in the older age group (more than 30 years at the time of bombing) and a similar tendency for decreases in the numbers of CD4, CD8, and CD19 antigen-positive cells was observed, but differences were not significant. The results suggest aging of the T-cell related immune system is accelerated in the irradiated people of advanced age, explained by the age-related decrease in thymic function in those subjects. The number of Leu 7 or CD19 antigen-positive cells was found to be increased significantly in the older age group compared to the younger, although there was little dose dependence. (U.K.)

  19. Development of the work on fuel cells in the Ministry for Atomic Energy of Russian Federation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubovin, B.Y.; Novitski, E.Z.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes research on fuel cells in the Russian Federation. The beginning of the practical work on fuel cells in Russia dates back to the 50`s and 60`s when the Ural Electrochemical Plant and the Ural Electromechanical Plant of the Ministry of Medium Machine-Building of the USSR, all Russian Research Institute of the power sources and many other institutes of the Ministry of Electrotechnical Industry of the USSR got to the development of the alkaline fuel cells for the spaceships according to the tasks of the SPC `Energy` and for the submarines on the tasks of the Ministry of Defense.

  20. Anti-Parity-Time Symmetric Optics via Flying Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Peng; Shen, Ce; Qu, Weizhi; Wen, Jianming; Jiang, Liang; Xiao, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    The recently-developed notion of 'parity-time (PT) symmetry' in optical systems with a controlled gain-loss interplay has spawned an intriguing way of achieving optical behaviors that are presently unattainable with standard arrangements. In most experimental studies so far, however, the implementations rely highly on the advances of nanotechnologies and sophisticated fabrication techniques to synthesize solid-state materials. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of optical anti-PT symmetry, a counterpart of conventional PT symmetry, in a warm atomic-vapor cell. By exploiting rapid coherence transport via flying atoms, our scheme illustrates essential features of anti-PT symmetry with an unprecedented precision on phase-transition threshold, and substantially reduces experimental complexity and cost. This result represents a significant advance in non-Hermitian optics by bridging a firm connection with the field of atomic, molecular and optical physics, where novel phenomena and applications i...

  1. Light propagation in an atomic medium with steep and sign-reversible dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that ground-state Zeeman coherence prepared by two-photon Raman transitions in alkali atoms results in steep controllable and sign-reversible dispersion. Pulse propagation with small negative as well as positive group velocity of light (-c/5100 and c/41 000) in a Cs vapor cell is reported. Energy exchange between copropagating light components through long-lived Zeeman coherence with enhanced absorption or transmission has been observed

  2. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification

  3. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification.

  4. Second Vapor-Level Sensor For Vapor Degreaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Nance M.; Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Second vapor-level sensor installed at lower level in vapor degreaser makes possible to maintain top of vapor at that lower level. Evaporation reduced during idle periods. Provides substantial benefit, without major capital cost of building new vapor degreaser with greater freeboard height.

  5. Measurement of the Kerr nonlinear refractive index of Cs vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, Michelle O; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; de Silans, Thierry Passerat; Castro, Romeu; Moretti, Danieverton

    2014-01-01

    Atomic vapors are systems well suited for nonlinear optics studies but very few direct measurements of their nonlinear refractive index have been reported. Here we use the z-scan technique to measure the Kerr coefficient, $n_2$, for a Cs vapor. Our results are analyzed through a four-level model, and we show that coherence between excited levels as well as cross-population effects contribute to the Kerr-nonlinearity.

  6. R-22 vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of R-22 vapor explosions are reviewed. Results from two experimental investigations of vapor explosions in a medium scale R-22/water system are reported. Measurements following the drop of an unrestrained mass of R-22 into a water tank demonstrated the existence of two types of interaction behavior. Release of a constrained mass of R-22 beneath the surface of a water tank improved the visual resolution of the system thus allowing identification of two interaction mechansims: at low water temperatures, R-22/water contact would produce immediate violent boiling; at high water temperatures a vapor film formed around its R-22 as it was released, explosions were generated by a surface wave which initiated at a single location and propagated along the vapor film as a shock wave. A new vapor explosion model is proposed, it suggests explosions are the result of a sequence of three independent steps: an initial mixing phase, a trigger and growth phase, and a mature phase where a propagating shock wave accelerates the two liquids into a collapsing vapor layer causing a high velocity impact which finely fragments and intermixes the two liquids

  7. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor

  8. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  9. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C, 1983963113 Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemehrezaei@kntu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, 15875-4416 Shariati, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  10. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    (ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings on titanium. We investigate the ability of a high density poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) coating to resist bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from three clinically relevant bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus...... cultures. The high density PLL-g-PEG coatings completely resisted bacterial colonization, whereas conventional coatings couldn’t resist colonization by S. epidermidis. The unique ability of S. epidermidis to colonize conventional PLL-g-PEG coatings was investigated by looking into the composition of S......Bacteria initiate attachment to the surfaces with the aid of different extracellular polymers. To quantitatively study how these polymers mediate bacterial adhesion and possibly their interactions, it is essential to go down to single cell level, with in mind that cell-to-cell variation should be...

  11. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Xu, Hongwu [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zhu, Jinlong [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, USA and National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Page, Katharine, E-mail: pagekl@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  12. Cell biological study in multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine how quantitative changes and qualitative abnormalities of IL-6R receptor (IL-6R) is involved in proliferation promotion of myeloma cells, the expression of IL-6R and recomposition of IL-6R genes were examined in myeloma cells obtained from a total of 37 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) or plasma cell leukemia, including 6 A-bomb survivors. Among 6 A-bomb survivors, 4 had been directly exposed and the other two had entered the city after A-bombing. Binding assay performed in 10 patients revealed binding ability in all of them; the number of bound IL-6R was 31-2440/cell and Kd value was 1.2-3.7 x 10-10 M. Northern blot test revealed noticeable IL-6R mRNA expression in only one MM patient. Nor was definitive IL-6R expression observed by flow cytometry. There was no recomposition of IL-6R genes in any of 20 MM patients, including A-bomb survivors. This may deny extensively structural abnormality in the genetic area that activates IL-6R genes. Regarding the expression of IL-6R of myeloma cells, such as the number of IL-6R, Kd value, the expression of IL-6R mRNA, and the recomposition of IL-6R genes, there was no difference between the exposed and non-exposed groups. In elucidating the occurrence of M protenemia in A-bomb survivors, further studies are required concerning IL-6 and IL-6R involved in proliferation mechanism of myeloma cells. (N.K.)

  13. Method of removal of metal atoms and explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be use in treating waste directly. (author)

  14. Atomic force microscopy indentation and inverse analysis for non-linear viscoelastic identification of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Shao, Yue; Wineman, Alan; Fu, Jianping; Waas, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MCF-10A) are studied through indentation with spherical borosilicate glass particles in atomic force microscopy (AFM) contact mode in fluid. Their mechanical properties are obtained by analyzing the recorded reaction force-time response. The analysis is based on comparing experimental data with predictions from finite element (FE) simulation. Here, FE modeling is employed to simulate the AFM indentation experiment which is neither a displacement nor a force controlled test. This approach is expected to overcome many underlying problems of the widely used models such as Hertz contact model due to its capability to capture the contact behaviors between the spherical indentor and the cell, account for cell geometry, and incorporate with large strain theory. In this work, a non-linear viscoelastic (NLV) model in which the viscoelastic part is described by Prony series terms is used for the constitutive model of the cells. The time-dependent material parameters are extracted through an inverse analysis with the use of a surrogate model based on a Kriging estimator. The purpose is to automatically extract the NLV properties of the cells with a more efficient process compared to the iterative inverse technique that has been mostly applied in the literature. The method also allows the use of FE modeling in the analysis of a large amount of experimental data. The NLV parameters are compared between MCF-7 and MCF-10A and MCF-10A treated and untreated with the drug Cytochalasin D to examine the possibility of using relaxation properties as biomarkers for distinguishing these types of breast cancer cells. The comparisons indicate that malignant cells (MCF-7) are softer and exhibit more relaxation than benign cells (MCF-10A). Disrupting the cytoskeleton using the drug Cytochalasin D also results in a larger amount of relaxation in the cell's response. In addition, relaxation properties indicate larger differences as compared to the elastic moduli

  15. Stability of standard reference samples reagents in vapors of chemical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on stability of reference samples for atomic-emission analysis on the basis of graphite powder and beryllium oxide in vapors of distilled water, nitric acid, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids and ammonia. It is shown that effect of vapors of these substances under extreme conditions leads to sufficient chage of sample composition. The data of gravimetric analysis show that above 70 and 90 % of initial BeO are converted into beryllium chlorides and fluorides respectively after holding in saturated HCl and HF vapors during one week. Recommendations on reference sample storage are given

  16. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  17. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al2O3 on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiOx) layer was detected at the Si/Al2O3 interface. The SiOx formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al2O3 and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al2O3 and avoid the SiOx generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al2O3 interface states

  18. Experimental Study on Fabrication of AZO Transparent Electrode for Organic Solar Cell Using Selective Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AZO (aluminum-doped zinc oxide) is one of the best candidate materials to replace Into (indium tin oxide) for TKOs (transparent conductive oxides) used in flat panel displays, organic light-emitting diodes (OLDS), and organic solar cells (OCSS). In the present study, to apply an AZO thin film to the transparent electrode of an organic solar cell, a low temperature selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) process was adopted to deposit an AZO thin film on a flexible polyethylene-naphthanate (Pen) substrate. The reactive gases for the ALD process were di-ethyl-zinc (De) and tri-methylaluminum (Tma) as precursors and H2O as an oxidant. The structural, electrical, and optical characteristics of the AZO thin film were evaluated. From the measured results of the electrical and optical characteristics of the AZO thin films deposited on the Pen substrates by Ald, it was shown that the Azo thin film appeared to be comparable to a commercially used Into thin film, which confirmed the feasibility of AZO as a TCO for flexible organic solar cells in the near future

  19. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  20. Comparative atomic force and scanning electron microscopy: an investigation on fenestrated endothelial cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braet, F.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Zanger, de R.B.; Grooth, de B.G.; Raap, A.K.; Tanke, H.J.; Wisse, E.

    1996-01-01

    Rat liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LEC) contain fenestrae, which are clustered in sieve plates. Fenestrae control the exchange of fluids, solutes and particles between the sinusoidal blood and the space of Disse, which at its back side is flanked by the microvillous surface of the parenchymal c