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Sample records for atom transfer reactions

  1. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  2. Near-resonant versus nonresonant chemiluminescent charge-transfer reactions of atomic ions with HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenewinkel-Meyer, Th.; Ottinger, Ch.

    1994-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions of C+, O+, F+, Ar+ and some other atomic ions with hydrogen chloride were investigated at collision energies between eVc.m.. This may be due to formation of a long-lived collision complex (Ar-HCl)+.

  3. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-08

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex.

  4. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared spectra with the spectra theoretically calculated for

  5. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  6. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  7. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(morpholenyl) benzonitrile in solution: Effects of hetero atom in the donor moiety

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Harun Al Rasid Gazi; Ranjit Biswas

    2010-07-01

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule with an extra hetero atom in its donor moiety has been synthesized in order to investigate how ICT reaction is affected by hetero atom replacement. Photo-physical and photo-dynamical properties of this molecule, 4-(morpholenyl)benzonitrile (M6C), have been studied in 20 different solvents. The correlation between the reaction driving force (- ) and activation barrier ( #) has been explored in order to understand the solvent effects (static and dynamic) on the photo-excited ICT reaction in this molecule. A Kramer’s model analysis of the experimentally observed reaction rate constants indicates a solvent-averaged activation barrier of ∼ 4 in the absence of solvent dynamical control. The reaction in M6C is therefore not a barrier-less reaction but close to the limit where conventional kinetics might break down.

  8. Rate constants for 1,5- and 1,6-hydrogen atom transfer reactions of mono-, di-, and tri-aryl-substituted donors, models for hydrogen atom transfers in polyunsaturated fatty acid radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZutter, Christopher B; Horner, John H; Newcomb, Martin

    2008-03-06

    Rate constants for 1,5- and 1,6-hydrogen atom transfer reactions in models of polyunsaturated fatty acid radicals were measured via laser flash photolysis methods. Photolyses of PTOC (pyridine-2-thioneoxycarbonyl) ester derivatives of carboxylic acids gave primary alkyl radicals that reacted by 1,5-hydrogen transfer from mono-, di-, and tri-aryl-substituted positions or 1,6-hydrogen transfer from di- and tri-aryl-substituted positions to give UV-detectable products. Rate constants for reactions in acetonitrile at room temperature ranged from 1 x 10(4) to 4 x 10(6) s(-1). The activation energies for a matched pair of 1,5- and 1,6-hydrogen atom transfers giving tri-aryl-substituted radicals were approximately equal, as were the primary kinetic isotope effects, but the 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer reaction was 1 order of magnitude faster at room temperature than the 1,6-hydrogen atom transfer reaction due to a less favorable entropy of activation for the 1,6-transfer reaction. Solvent effects on the rate constants for the 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer reaction of the 2-[2-(diphenylmethyl)phenyl]ethyl radical at ambient temperature were as large as a factor of 2 with the reaction increasing in rate in lower polarity solvents. Hybrid density functional theory computations for the 1,5- and 1,6-hydrogen atom transfers of the tri-aryl-substituted donors were in qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Synthesis, characterisation, and oxygen atom transfer reactions involving the first gold(I)-alkylperoxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2013-11-25

    The synthesis of a new class of organogold species containing a peroxo moiety is reported. Complexes [Au(IPr)(OO(t)Bu)] and [Au(SIPr)(OO(t)Bu)] have been synthesised via a straightforward methodology using the parent gold(I) hydroxide complexes as synthons. These complexes have been successfully used in oxygen-transfer reactions to triphenylphosphine.

  10. Tandem catalysis of ring-closing metathesis/atom transfer radical reactions with homobimetallic ruthenium–arene complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Borguet

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tandem catalysis of ring-closing metathesis/atom transfer radical reactions was investigated with the homobimetallic ruthenium–indenylidene complex [(p-cymeneRu(μ-Cl3RuCl(3-phenyl-1-indenylidene(PCy3] (1 to generate active species in situ. The two catalytic processes were first carried out independently in a case study before the whole sequence was optimized and applied to the synthesis of several polyhalogenated bicyclic γ-lactams and lactones from α,ω-diene substrates bearing trihaloacetamide or trichloroacetate functionalities. The individual steps were carefully monitored by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies in order to understand the intimate details of the catalytic cycles. Polyhalogenated substrates and the ethylene released upon metathesis induced the clean transformation of catalyst precursor 1 into the Ru(II–Ru(III mixed-valence compound [(p-cymeneRu(μ-Cl3RuCl2(PCy3], which was found to be an efficient promoter for atom transfer radical reactions under the adopted experimental conditions.

  11. Hydrogen-atom transfer reactions from ortho-alkoxy-substituted phenols: an experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Riccardo; Menichetti, Stefano; Mileo, Elisabetta; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Viglianisi, Caterina

    2009-01-01

    The role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding (HB) on the bond-dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of the phenolic O-H and on the kinetics of H-atom transfer to peroxyl radicals (k(inh)) of several 2-alkoxyphenols was experimentally quantified by the EPR equilibration technique and by inhibited autoxidation studies. These compounds can be regarded as useful models for studying the H-atom abstraction from 2-OR phenols, such as many lignans, reduced coenzyme Q and curcumin. The effects of the various substituents on the BDE(O-H) of 2-methoxy, 2-methoxy-4-methyl, 2,4-dimethoxyphenols versus phenol were measured in benzene solution as -1.8; -3.7; -5.4 kcal mol(-1), respectively. In the case of polymethoxyphenols, significant deviations from the BDE(O-H) values predicted by the additive effects of the substituents were found. The logarithms of the k(inh) constants in cumene were inversely related to the BDE(O-H) values, obeying a linear Evans-Polanyi plot with the same slope of other substituted phenols and a y-axis intercept slightly smaller than that of 2,6-dimethyl phenols. In the cases of phenols having the 2-OR substituent included in a five-membered condensed ring (i.e, compounds 9-11), both conformational isomers in which the OH group points toward or away from the oxygen in position 2 were detected by FTIR spectroscopy and the intramolecular HB strength was thus estimated. The contribution to the BDE(O-H) of the ortho-OR substituent in 9, corrected for intramolecular HB formation, was calculated as -5.6 kcal mol(-1). The similar behaviour of cyclic and non-cyclic ortho-alkoxy derivatives clearly showed that the preferred conformation of the OMe group in ortho-methoxyphenoxyl radicals is that in which the methyl group points away from the phenoxyl oxygen, in contrast to the geometries predicted by DFT calculations.

  12. Slow hydrogen atom transfer reactions of oxo- and hydroxo-vanadium compounds: the importance of intrinsic barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waidmann, Christopher R; Zhou, Xin; Tsai, Erin A; Kaminsky, Werner; Hrovat, David A; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Mayer, James M

    2009-04-08

    Reactions are described that interconvert vanadium(IV) oxo-hydroxo complexes [V(IV)O(OH)(R(2)bpy)(2)]BF(4) (1a-c) and vanadium(V) dioxo complexes [V(V)O(2)(R(2)bpy)(2)]BF(4) (2a-c) [R(2)bpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine ((t)Bu(2)bpy), a; 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me(2)bpy), b; 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), c]. These are rare examples of pairs of isolated, sterically unencumbered, first-row metal-oxo/hydroxo complexes that differ by a hydrogen atom (H(+) + e(-)). The V(IV)-(t)Bu(2)bpy derivative 1a has a useful (1)H NMR spectrum, despite being paramagnetic. Complex 2a abstracts H(*) from organic substrates with weak O-H and C-H bonds, converting 2,6-(t)Bu(2)-4-MeO-C(6)H(2)OH (ArOH) and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-N-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOH) to their corresponding radicals ArO(*) and TEMPO, hydroquinone to benzoquinone, and dihydroanthracene to anthracene. The equilibrium constant for 2a + ArOH 1a + ArO(*) is (4 +/- 2) x 10(-3), implying that the VO-H bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) is 70.6 +/- 1.2 kcal mol(-1). Consistent with this value, 1a is oxidized by 2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2)O(*). All of these reactions are surprisingly slow, typically occurring over hours at ambient temperatures. The net hydrogen-atom pseudo-self-exchange 1a + 2b 2a + 1b, using the (t)Bu- and Me-bpy substituents as labels, also occurs slowly, with k(se) = 1.3 x 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) at 298 K, DeltaH(double dagger) = 15 +/- 2 kcal mol(-1), and DeltaS(double dagger) = 16 +/- 5 cal mol(-1) K. Using this k(se) and the BDFE, the vanadium reactions are shown to follow the Marcus cross relation moderately well, with calculated rate constants within 10(2) of the observed values. The vanadium self-exchange reaction is ca. 10(6) slower than that for the related Ru(IV)O(py)(bpy)(2)(2+)/Ru(III)OH(py)(bpy)(2)(2+) self-exchange. The origin of this dramatic difference has been probed with DFT calculations on the self-exchange reactions of 1c + 2c and on monocationic ruthenium complexes with pyrrolate or

  13. Single step synthesis of gold-amino acid composite, with the evidence of the catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction, for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Nandi, Debkumar; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    A composite architecture of amino acid and gold nanoparticles has been synthesized using a generic route of 'in-situ polymerization and composite formation (IPCF)' [1,2]. The formation mechanism of the composite has been supported by a model hydrogen atom (H•≡H++e-) transfer (HAT) type of reaction which belongs to the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The 'gold-amino acid composite' was used as a catalyst for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin.

  14. Reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with secondary amides. The influence of steric and stereoelectronic effects on the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Basili, Federica; Mele, Riccardo; Cianfanelli, Marco; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-12-19

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from secondary alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical was carried out in acetonitrile. HAT predominantly occurs from the N-alkyl α-C-H bonds, and a >60-fold decrease in kH was observed by increasing the steric hindrance of the acyl and N-alkyl groups. The role of steric and stereoelectronic effects on the reactivity and selectivity is discussed in the framework of HAT reactions from peptides.

  15. Kinetic Study of the Reaction of the Phthalimide-N-oxyl Radical with Amides: Structural and Medium Effects on the Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactivity and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; Forcina, Veronica; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea; Martin, Teo; Mazzonna, Marco; Salamone, Michela

    2016-12-02

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of secondary N-(4-X-benzyl)acetamides and tertiary amides to the phthalimide-N-oxyl radical (PINO) has been carried out. The results indicate that HAT is strongly influenced by structural and medium effects; in particular, the addition of Brønsted and Lewis acids determines a significant deactivation of C-H bonds α to the amide nitrogen of these substrates. Thus, by changing the reaction medium, it is possible to carefully control the regioselectivity of the aerobic oxidation of amides catalyzed by N-hydroxyphthalimide, widening the synthetic versatility of this process.

  16. Evidence for a Precursor Complex in C-H Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions Mediated by a Manganese(IV) Oxo Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Bosch, Isaac; Company Casadevall, Anna; Cady, Clyde W.; Styring, Stenbjörn; Browne, Wesley R; Ribas Salamaña, Xavi; Costas Salgueiro, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    HAT trick: [MnIV(OH)2(H,MePytacn)]2+ (A) and [MnIV(O)(OH)(H,MePytacn)]+ (B) differ in their reactions with CH bonds: compound A engages in typical single-step hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions, whereas B first forms a substrate–B encounter complex (C; see scheme). This equilibrium alters the relative CH reactivity from that expected from CH bond dissociation energies Aquest mateix article està publicat a l'edició alemanya d''Angewandte Chemie' (ISSN 0044-8249, EISSN 1521-3757), 2011, ...

  17. Steric Effect for Proton, Hydrogen-Atom, andHydride Transfer Reactions with Geometric Isomers of NADH-Model Ruthenium Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita E.; Cohen, B.W.; Polyansky, D.E.; Achord, P.; Cabelli, D.; Muckerman, J.T.; Tanaka, K.; Thummel, R.P.; Zong, R.

    2012-01-01

    Two isomers, [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} (Ru = Ru(bpy){sub 2}, bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1 = 2-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-1-azaacridine) and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} (2 = 3-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-4-azaacridine), are bio-inspired model compounds containing the nicotinamide functionality and can serve as precursors for the photogeneration of C-H hydrides for studying reactions pertinent to the photochemical reduction of metal-C{sub 1} complexes and/or carbon dioxide. While it has been shown that the structural differences between the azaacridine ligands of [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} have a significant effect on the mechanism of formation of the hydride donors, [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+}, in aqueous solution, we describe the steric implications for proton, net-hydrogen-atom and net-hydride transfer reactions in this work. Protonation of [Ru(2{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +} in aprotic and even protic media is slow compared to that of [Ru(1{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +}. The net hydrogen-atom transfer between *[Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) proceeds by one-step EPT, rather than stepwise electron-proton transfer. Such a reaction was not observed for *[Ru(2)]{sup 2+} because the non-coordinated N atom is not easily available for an interaction with H{sub 2}Q. Finally, the rate of the net hydride ion transfer from [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} to [Ph{sub 3}C]{sup +} is significantly slower than that of [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+} owing to steric congestion at the donor site.

  18. Reactions of the phthalimide N-oxyl radical (PINO) with activated phenols: the contribution of π-stacking interactions to hydrogen atom transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alfonso, Claudio; Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2013-02-01

    The kinetics of reactions of the phthalimide N-oxyl radical (PINO) with a series of activated phenols (2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (PMC), 2,6-dimethyl- and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-substituted phenols) were investigated by laser flash photolysis in CH(3)CN and PhCl in order to establish if the reactions with PINO can provide a useful tool for evaluating the radical scavenging ability of phenolic antioxidants. On the basis of the small values of deuterium kinetic isotope effects, the relatively high and negative ρ values in the Hammett correlations and the results of theoretical calculations, we suggest that these reactions proceed by a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism having a significant degree of charge transfer resulting from a π-stacked conformation between PINO and the aromatic ring of the phenols. Kinetic solvent effects were analyzed in detail for the hydrogen transfer from 2,4,6-trimethylphenol to PINO and the data obtained are in accordance with the Snelgrove-Ingold equation for HAT. Experimental rate constants for the reactions of PINO with activated phenols are in accordance with those predicted by applying the Marcus cross relation.

  19. Importance of π-stacking interactions in the hydrogen atom transfer reactions from activated phenols to short-lived N-oxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzonna, Marco; Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2014-06-06

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer from activated phenols (2,6-dimethyl- and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-substituted phenols, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol, caffeic acid, and (+)-cathechin) to a series of N-oxyl radical (4-substituted phthalimide-N-oxyl radicals (4-X-PINO), 6-substituted benzotriazole-N-oxyl radicals (6-Y-BTNO), 3-quinazolin-4-one-N-oxyl radical (QONO), and 3-benzotriazin-4-one-N-oxyl radical (BONO)), was carried out by laser flash photolysis in CH3CN. A significant effect of the N-oxyl radical structure on the hydrogen transfer rate constants (kH) was observed with kH values that monotonically increase with increasing NO-H bond dissociation energy (BDENO-H) of the N-hydroxylamines. The analysis of the kinetic data coupled to the results of theoretical calculations indicates that these reactions proceed by a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism where the N-oxyl radical and the phenolic aromatic rings adopt a π-stacked arrangement. Theoretical calculations also showed pronounced structural effects of the N-oxyl radicals on the charge transfer occurring in the π-stacked conformation. Comparison of the kH values measured in this study with those previously reported for hydrogen atom transfer to the cumylperoxyl radical indicates that 6-CH3-BTNO is the best N-oxyl radical to be used as a model for evaluating the radical scavenging ability of phenolic antioxidants.

  20. Photodissociation of pyrrole-ammonia clusters by velocity map imaging: mechanism for the H-atom transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Lago, L; Amaral, G A; Oldani, A N; Rodríguez, J D; González, M G; Pino, G A; Bañares, L

    2011-01-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole-ammonia clusters (PyH·(NH(3))(n), n = 2-6) has been studied using a combination of velocity map imaging and non-resonant detection of the NH(4)(NH(3))(n-1) products. The excited state hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism (ESHT) is evidenced through delayed ionization and presents a threshold around 236.6 nm, in agreement with previous reports. A high resolution determination of the kinetic energy distributions (KEDs) of the products reveals slow (∼0.15 eV) and structured distributions for all the ammonia cluster masses studied. The low values of the measured kinetic energy rule out the existence of a long-lived intermediate state, as it has been proposed previously. Instead, a direct N-H bond rupture, in the fashion of the photodissociation of bare pyrrole, is proposed. This assumption is supported by a careful analysis of the structure of the measured KEDs in terms of a discrete vibrational activity of the pyrrolyl co-fragment.

  1. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  2. Efficient transfer of francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Gorelov, Alexander; Pearson, Matt; Tandecki, Michael; Collister, Robert; Gwinner, Gerald; Shiells, Kyle; Gomez, Eduardo; Orozco, Luis; Zhang, Jiehang; Zhao, Yanting; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress of the FrPNC collaboration towards Parity Non Conservation Measurements (PNC) using francium atoms at the TRIUMF accelerator. We demonstrate efficient transfer (higher than 40%) to the science vacuum chamber where the PNC measurements will be performed. The transfer uses a downward resonant push beam from the high-efficiency capture magneto optical trap (MOT) towards the science chamber where the atoms are recaptured in a second MOT. The transfer is very robust with respect to variations in the parameters (laser power, detuning, alignment, etc.). We accumulate a growing number of atoms at each transfer pulse (limited by the lifetime of the MOT) since the push beam does not eliminate the atoms already trapped in the science MOT. The number of atoms in the science MOT is on track to meet the requirements for competitive PNC measurements when high francium rates (previously demonstrated) are delivered to our apparatus. The catcher/neutralizer for the ion beam has been tested reliably to 100,000 heating/motion cycles. We present initial tests on the direct microwave excitation of the ground hyperfine transition at 45 GHz. Support from NSERC and NRC from Canada, NSF and Fulbright from USA, and CONACYT from Mexico.

  3. The tert-butoxyl radical mediated hydrogen atom transfer reactions of the Parkinsonian proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and selected tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, N Kamrudin; Flores, Joey; Tanko, James M; Isin, Emre Mehmet; Castagnoli, Neal

    2008-09-15

    Previous studies have shown that the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions of tert-butoxyl radical from the Parkinsonian proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) occur with low selectivity at the allylic and non-allylic alpha-C-H positions. In this paper, we report a more comprehensive regiochemical study on the reactivity of the tert-butoxyl radical as well as on the associated primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects for the various hydrogen atom abstractions of MPTP. In addition, the results of a computational study to estimate the various C-H bond dissociation energies of MPTP are presented. The results of the present study show the allylic/non-allylic selectivity is approximately 73:21. The behavior of the tert-butoxyl radical mediated oxidation of MPTP contrasts with this reaction as catalyzed by monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) that occurs selectively at the allylic alpha-carbon. These observations lead to the conclusion that the tert-butoxyl radical is not a good chemical model for the MAO-B-catalyzed bioactivation of MPTP.

  4. Kinetic solvent effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with tertiary amides. Control over the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity through solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-01-16

    A laser flash photolysis study on the role of solvent effects on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-formylpyrrolidine (FPRD), and N-acetylpyrrolidine (APRD) to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. From large to very large increases in the HAT rate constant (kH) were measured on going from MeOH and TFE to isooctane (kH(isooctane)/kH(MeOH) = 5-12; kH(isooctane)/kH(TFE) > 80). This behavior was explained in terms of the increase in the extent of charge separation in the amides determined by polar solvents through solvent-amide dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding, where the latter interactions appear to play a major role with strong HBD solvents such as TFE. These interactions increase the electron deficiency of the amide C-H bonds, deactivating these bonds toward HAT to an electrophilic radical such as CumO(•), indicating that changes in solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding can provide a convenient method for deactivation of the C-H bond of amides toward HAT. With DMF, a solvent-induced change in HAT selectivity was observed, suggesting that solvent effects can be successfully employed to control the reaction selectivity in HAT-based procedures for the functionalization of C-H bonds.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Bartosz, Grzegorz [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid [Laboratoire de Nutrition et Sante, Biology Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra (Morocco); Sapin-Minet, Anne [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Leroy, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.leroy@pharma.uhp-nancy.fr [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and its product measurement by HPLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lowest limit of detection by monitoring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption problem of the radical on HPLC parts have been pointed out. - Abstract: 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH{center_dot}) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH{center_dot} absorbance at 515 nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH{center_dot} quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH{center_dot} resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH{center_dot} and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH{center_dot} and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH{center_dot} onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH{center_dot} was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH{center_dot} using standards (0.02 and 14 {mu}M, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox{sup Registered-Sign }, ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of

  6. Theoretical studies on concerted versus two steps hydrogen atom transfer reaction by non-heme Mn(IV/III)=O complexes: how important is the oxo ligand basicity in the C-H activation step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccob, Madhavan; Ansari, Azaj; Pandey, Bhawana; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2013-12-21

    High-valent metal-oxo complexes have been extensively studied over the years due to their intriguing properties and their abundant catalytic potential. The majority of the catalytic reactions performed by these metal-oxo complexes involves a C-H activation step and extensive efforts over the years have been undertaken to understand the mechanistic aspects of this step. The C-H activation by metal-oxo complexes proceeds via a hydrogen atom transfer reaction and this could happen by multiple pathways, (i) via a proton-transfer followed by an electron transfer (PT-ET), (ii) via an electron-transfer followed by a proton transfer (ET-PT), (iii) via a concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. Identifying the right mechanism is a surging topic in this area and here using [Mn(III)H3buea(O)](2-) (1) and [Mn(IV)H3buea(O)](-) (2) species (where H3buea = tris[(N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato) and its C-H activation reaction with dihydroanthracene (DHA), we have explored the mechanism of hydrogen atom transfer reactions. The experimental kinetic data reported earlier (T. H. Parsell, M.-Y. Yang and A. S. Borovik, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 2762) suggests that the mechanism between 1 and 2 is drastically different. By computing the transition states, reaction energies and by analyzing the wavefunction of the reactant and transitions states, we authenticate the proposal that the Mn(III)=O undergoes a step wise PT-ET mechanism where as the Mn(IV)=O species undergo a concerted PCET mechanism. Both the species pass through a [Mn(III)-OH] intermediate and the stability of this species hold the key to the difference in the reactivity. The electronic origin for the difference in reactivity is routed back to the strength and basicity of the Mn-oxo bond and the computed results are in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Substitution reactions at boron atoms in metallacarboranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregadze, Vladimir I; Timofeev, Sergei V; Sivaev, Igor B; Lobanova, Irina A [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-05-31

    Data on substitution reactions at boron atoms in 10-12-vertex metallacarboranes, which are of fundamental and applied significance, are generalised. The possible mechanisms of substitution reactions and the influence of the metal fragment on substitution positions in the polyhedron are discussed.

  8. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  9. H原子与CO2分子碰撞的化学反应与能量转移%Chemical Reaction and Energy Transfer Between Hot H Atoms and CO2 Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石从云; 任丽; 孔繁敖

    2006-01-01

    用时间分辨傅立叶红外发射光谱的方法对H原子与CO2分子的碰撞动力学进行了实验研究.用紫外激光光解的方法分别制备出三个不同平动能为174.7、241.0和306.2 kJ/mol的氢原子,并引发H+CO2→OH+CO反应.观察到了反应的产物,即振动激发的CO(v≤2).同时也看到了在H原子与CO2分子的碰撞中发生高效的T-V能量转移.CO2的反对称伸缩模的最高振动能级为v=4化学反应与能量转移的速率之比大约为10.%Collisions between hot H atoms and CO2 molecules were studied experimentally by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. H atoms with three translational energies, 174.7, 241.0 and 306.2 kJ/mol respectively, were generated by UV laser photolysis to initiate a chemical reaction of H+CO2→OH+CO. Vibrationally excited CO (v≤2) was observed in the spectrum, where CO was the prod uct of the reaction. The highly efficient T-V energy transfer from the hot H atoms to the CO2 was verified too. The highest vibrational level of v=4 in CO2 (v3) was found. Rate ratio of the chemical reaction to the energy transfer was estimated as 10.

  10. Carborane complexes of ruthenium(III): studies on thermal reaction chemistry and the catalyst design for atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Ivan D; D'yachihin, Dmitrii I; Piskunov, Alexander V; Dolgushin, Fedor M; Smol'yakov, Alexander F; Il'in, Mikhail M; Davankov, Vadim A; Chizhevsky, Igor T; Grishin, Dmitry F

    2011-08-15

    The heating of the 18-electron complex [3,3-(dppb)-3-H-3-Cl-closo-3,1,2-RuC(2)B(9)H(11)] (3) in benzene at 80 °C in the presence of a small amount of CCl(4) as initiator afforded paramagnetic 17-electron species [3,3-(dppb)-3-Cl-closo-3,1,2-RuC(2)B(9)H(11)] (4) along with minor amounts of two P-phenylene ortho-cycloboronated derivatives [3-Cl-3,3,8-{Ph(2)P(CH(2))(4)PPh-μ-(C(6)H(4)-ortho)}-closo-3,1,2-RuC(2)B(9)H(10)] (5) and [3,7-Cl(2)-3,3,8-{Ph(2)P(CH(2))(4)PPh-μ-(C(6)H(4)-ortho)}-closo-3,1,2-RuC(2)B(9)H(10)] (6) in total yield of ca. 80%. The heating of either 3 or 4 in toluene at 95 °C in the absence of CCl(4) led to the selective formation of 5, which was isolated in 64% and 46% yield, respectively. Thermolysis of 3 at higher temperatures (boiling toluene, 110 °C) gives novel paramagnetic species [3-Cl-3,3,7,8-{Ph(2)P(CH(2))(4)P-μ-(C(6)H(4)-ortho)(2)}-closo-3,1,2-RuC(2)B(9)H(9)] (7) featuring bis(ortho-cycloboronation) of both P-phenyl groups at the same phosphorus atom of the ruthenium-bound dppb ligand. All new paramagnetic complexes 4-7, as well as starting diamagnetic species 3, were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and, in addition, by EPR spectroscopic studies of odd-electron complexes. Ruthenacarboranes 3-5 and 7 all display high efficiency as catalysts for the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA). Complex 5 gave the best catalyst performance in terms of polydispersity; the PDI (M(w)/M(n)) of the polymer samples is as low as 1.15.

  11. The atomic and molecular reaction statics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; ZhengHe

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a new science called atomic and molecular reaction statics (AMRS). There are four parts for AMRS, i.e. the group theoretical derivation of molecular electronic states, the principle of microscopic reversibility, the principle of microscopic transitivity and the optimum energy process rule. AMRS has been developed for about twenty years.

  12. Transferable basis sets of numerical atomic orbitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Louwerse; G. Rothenberg

    2012-01-01

    We show that numerical atomic orbital basis sets that are variationally optimized for specific compounds are biased and not fully transferable to other compounds. The situation improves when the basis sets are optimized for several compounds and a compromise is made. We demonstrate this for basis se

  13. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  14. Reactivity and selectivity patterns in hydrogen atom transfer from amino acid C-H bonds to the cumyloxyl radical: polar effects as a rationale for the preferential reaction at proline residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Basili, Federica; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-04-03

    Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of N-Boc-protected amino acids to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) were measured by laser flash photolysis. With glycine, alanine, valine, norvaline, and tert-leucine, HAT occurs from the α-C-H bonds, and the stability of the α-carbon radical product plays a negligible role. With leucine, HAT from the α- and γ-C-H bonds was observed. The higher kH value measured for proline was explained in terms of polar effects, with HAT that predominantly occurs from the δ-C-H bonds, providing a rationale for the previous observation that proline residues represent favored HAT sites in the reactions of peptides and proteins with (•)OH. Preferential HAT from proline was also observed in the reactions of CumO(•) with the dipeptides N-BocProGlyOH and N-BocGlyGlyOH. The rate constants measured for CumO(•) were compared with the relative rates obtained previously for the corresponding reactions of different hydrogen-abstracting species. The behavior of CumO(•) falls between those observed for the highly reactive radicals Cl(•) and (•)OH and the significantly more stable Br(•). Taken together, these results provide a general framework for the description of the factors that govern reactivity and selectivity patterns in HAT reactions from amino acid C-H bonds.

  15. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  16. Classical helium atom with radiation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelio, G; Carati, A; Galgani, L

    2012-06-01

    We study a classical model of helium atom in which, in addition to the Coulomb forces, the radiation reaction forces are taken into account. This modification brings in the model a new qualitative feature of a global character. Indeed, as pointed out by Dirac, in any model of classical electrodynamics of point particles involving radiation reaction one has to eliminate, from the a priori conceivable solutions of the problem, those corresponding to the emission of an infinite amount of energy. We show that the Dirac prescription solves a problem of inconsistency plaguing all available models which neglect radiation reaction, namely, the fact that in all such models, most initial data lead to a spontaneous breakdown of the atom. A further modification is that the system thus acquires a peculiar form of dissipation. In particular, this makes attractive an invariant manifold of special physical interest, the zero-dipole manifold that corresponds to motions in which no energy is radiated away (in the dipole approximation). We finally study numerically the invariant measure naturally induced by the time-evolution on such a manifold, and this corresponds to studying the formation process of the atom. Indications are given that such a measure may be singular with respect to that of Lebesgue.

  17. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  18. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Saritha; M Durga Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we had suggested that the motion along the promoter mode in the first part of the IRC of proton transfer reaction enhances the delocalization of electrons on the acceptor atom into the * orbital of the donor-hydrogen covalent bond, and as a consequence weakens it. This leads to a reduction of the barrier to the proton transfer as well as the stretching frequency of donor-hydrogen bond. An extension of this to the concerted multiple proton transfer reactions implies that the kinetic isotope effect in such reaction depends exponentially on the number of protons that are being transferred. Computational evidence on three systems, (HF)3, formic acid dimer, and (H2O) clusters is provided to support this assertion.

  19. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suria, Sabartanty [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  20. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  1. 单取代氧/硫杂紫菜嗪内氢迁移反应的理论研究%Theoretical study on transfer reaction of inner hydrogen atoms in oxa-and thiaporphyrazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖玉婷; 饶火瑜; 王海江; 邹丽霞; 胡宝群

    2011-01-01

    采用B3LYP/6-31G**方法在Gaussian 03程序下,对氧杂紫菜嗪,硫杂紫菜嗪的稳定结构和能量进行优化,并寻找与内氢迁移反应相关的过渡态构型.计算结果表明,芳香性与各体系构象稳定性密切相关,但并不是决定构象稳定性的唯一因素;在中心空穴较小的紫菜嗪体系中,空间位阻,静电作用才是影响构象稳定性的关键因素.由于分子内氢键的存在,氧杂化会明显降低内氢迁移正负反应速率;而S杂化体系的IHAT速率降低则与静电斥力和空间位阻密切相关.%The theoretical study of the mechanism and kinetics of the inner hydrogen atom-transfer process in oxa- porphyrazine, thia-porphyrazine was presented. The structures and energies of reactants, products and transition-states in the transfer reaction of inner hydrogen atoms in OPzH and SPzH were calculated with B3LYP/6-31G** method under certain symmetry restriction. The results show that the relative stability of conformations are directly correlated to aromaticity, but aromaticity is not the only determining factor which affects the relative stability of conformations; while in the porphyrazine systems with smaller central holes, the steric hindrance and the electrostatic interaction are more important factors which should not be neglected. The results also represent that oxa- can reduce speeds of positive and negative reactions, which is due to the existence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds; but the decrease of NAT reaction speeds of thia-systems is resulted from steric hindrance and electrostatic interaction.

  2. Atoms of multistationarity in chemical reaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Badal

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics are dynamical systems that arise in chemical engineering and systems biology. Deciding whether a chemical reaction network admits multiple positive steady states is to determine existence of multiple positive solutions to a system of polynomials with unknown coefficients. In this work, we consider the question of whether the minimal (in a precise sense) networks, which we propose to call `atoms of multistationarity,' characterize the entire set of multistationary networks. We show that if a subnetwork admits multiple nondegenerate positive steady states, then these steady states can be extended to establish multistationarity of a larger network, provided that the two networks share the same stoichiometric subspace. Our result provides the mathematical foundation for a technique used by Siegal-Gaskins et al. of establishing bistability by way of `network ancestry.' Here, our main application is for enumerating small multistationary continuous-flow stir...

  3. Radical and Atom Transfer Halogenation (RATH): A Facile Route for Chemical and Polymer Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Yu; Liang, Mong; Liu, Ying-Ling

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a new halogenation reaction through sequential radical and halogen transfer reactions, named as "radical and atom transfer halogenation" (RATH). Both benzoxazine compounds and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) have been demonstrated as active species for RATH. Consequently, the halogenated compound becomes an active initiator of atom transfer radical polymerization. Combination of RATH and sequential ATRP provides an convenient and effective approach to prepare reactive and crosslinkable polymers. The RATH reaction opens a new window both to chemical synthesis and molecular design and preparation of polymeric materials.

  4. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  5. Transfer reactions as a doorway to fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Maciel, A.M.M.; Anjos, R.M.; Moraes, S.B.; Liguori Neto, R.; Cabezas, R.; Muri, C.; Santos, G.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Liang, J.F. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the role played by transfer reactions on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. A semiclassical formalism is used to derive the transfer form factors, that are used in coupled-channel calculations. It is shown that transfer reactions that take place at small distances may be an important doorway to fusion. The relation between this formalism and the long-range absorptive fusion potential is also discussed. Results of calculations for the {sup 16}O+{sup A}Sm, {sup 32}S+{sup 100}Mo and {sup 16}O+{sup 59}Co systems are presented. (author)

  6. Structural and medium effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with intramolecular hydrogen bonded phenols. The interplay between hydrogen-bonding and acid-base interactions on the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Amorati, Riccardo; Menichetti, Stefano; Viglianisi, Caterina; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-07-03

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded 2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (1) and 4-methoxy-2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (2) and with 4-methoxy-3-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (3) has been carried out. In acetonitrile, intramolecular hydrogen bonding protects the phenolic O-H of 1 and 2 from attack by CumO(•) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) exclusively occurs from the C-H bonds that are α to the piperidine nitrogen (α-C-H bonds). With 3 HAT from both the phenolic O-H and the α-C-H bonds is observed. In the presence of TFA or Mg(ClO4)2, protonation or Mg(2+) complexation of the piperidine nitrogen removes the intramolecular hydrogen bond in 1 and 2 and strongly deactivates the α-C-H bonds of the three substrates. Under these conditions, HAT to CumO(•) exclusively occurs from the phenolic O-H group of 1-3. These results clearly show that in these systems the interplay between intramolecular hydrogen bonding and Brønsted and Lewis acid-base interactions can drastically influence both the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The possible implications of these findings are discussed in the framework of the important role played by tyrosyl radicals in biological systems.

  7. Laser controlled charge-transfer reaction at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-temperature charge transfer reaction between a neutral atom and an ion under the influence of near-resonant laser light. By setting up a multi-channel model with field-dressed states we demonstrate that the reaction rate coefficient can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude with laser intensities of $10^6$ W/cm$^2$ or larger. In addition, depending on laser frequency one can induce a significant enhancement or suppression of the charge-exchange rate coefficient. For our intensities multi-photon processes are not important.

  8. Soliton Atom Laser with Quantum State Transfer Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiong-Jun; JING Hui; GE Mo-Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the nonlinear effects in the quantum states transfer technique from photons to matter waves in the three-level case, which may provide the formation of a soliton atom laser with nonclassical atoms. The validity of quantum transfer mechanism is confirmed in the presence of the intrinsic nonlinear atomic interactions. The accompanied frequency chirp effect is shown to have no influence on the grey solitons formed by the output atom laser and the possible quantum depletion effect is also briefly discussed.

  9. Transfer reaction code with nonlocal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, L. J.; Ross, A.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a suite of codes (NLAT for nonlocal adiabatic transfer) to calculate the transfer cross section for single-nucleon transfer reactions, (d , N) or (N , d) , including nonlocal nucleon-target interactions, within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. For this purpose, we implement an iterative method for solving the second order nonlocal differential equation, for both scattering and bound states. The final observables that can be obtained with NLAT are differential angular distributions for the cross sections of A(d , N) B or B(N , d) A. Details on the implementation of the T-matrix to obtain the final cross sections within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation method are also provided. This code is suitable to be applied for deuteron induced reactions in the range of Ed =10-70 MeV, and provides cross sections with 4% accuracy.

  10. Transfer reaction code with nonlocal interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Titus, L J; Nunes, F M

    2016-01-01

    We present a suite of codes (NLAT for nonlocal adiabatic transfer) to calculate the transfer cross section for single-nucleon transfer reactions, $(d,N)$ or $(N,d)$, including nonlocal nucleon-target interactions, within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. For this purpose, we implement an iterative method for solving the second order nonlocal differential equation, for both scattering and bound states. The final observables that can be obtained with NLAT are differential angular distributions for the cross sections of $A(d,N)B$ or $B(N,d)A$. Details on the implementation of the T-matrix to obtain the final cross sections within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation method are also provided. This code is suitable to be applied for deuteron induced reactions in the range of $E_d=10-70$ MeV, and provides cross sections with $4\\%$ accuracy.

  11. Multinucleon transfer reactions: Present status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L., E-mail: corradi@lnl.infn.it [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Szilner, S. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pollarolo, G. [INFN and Università di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Montanari, D. [INFN and Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A.M.; Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Farnea, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C.A. [INFN and Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Mijatović, T.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Soić, N. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Haas, F. [IPHC, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The last generation large solid angle magnetic spectrometers for very heavy ions. • Transfer of multiple pairs, providing valuable information on nucleon-nucleon correlations. • The study of the properties of the heavy binary partner via transfer reactions. -- Abstract: Significant advances have been achieved in the last years in the field of multinucleon transfer reactions. The advent of the last generation large solid angle magnetic spectrometers pushed the detection efficiency more than an order of magnitude above previous limits, with a significant gain in mass resolution for very heavy ions. Further, the coupling of these spectrometers to large gamma arrays allowed to perform gamma-particle coincidences. One can thus detect the transfer strength to the lowest excited levels of binary products and perform gamma spectroscopy for nuclei moderately far from stability, especially in the neutron-rich region. Via transfer of multiple pairs valuable information on nucleon-nucleon correlations can also be derived, especially from measurements performed below the Coulomb barrier. There is growing interest in the study of the properties of the heavy binary partner, since the transfer mechanism may allow the production of (moderately) neutron rich nuclei in the Pb and in the actinides regions, crucial also for astrophysics. Present studies are relevant for future studies with radioactive beams.

  12. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...... and asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended...

  13. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  14. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  15. Intramolecular energy transfer reactions in polymetallic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J.

    1990-11-01

    This report is concerned with intramolecular, energy-transfer reactions. The concept of preparing synthetically a complex molecular species, capable of absorbing a photon at one metal center (antenna fragment), transferring that energy to a second metal center (reactive fragment) via a bridging ligand was first reported by our group in 1979. It is now apparent that a major emphasis in inorganic chemistry in the future will involve these types of molecular ensembles. Complexes discussed include Rh, Ru, and Cu complexes. 23 refs., 14 tabs.

  16. Hydrogen-atom transfer in reactions of organic radicals with [Co-II(por)](center dot) (por = porphyrinato) and in subsequent addition of [Co(H)(por)] to olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, B.; Dzik, W.I.; Li, S.; Wayland, B.B.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms for hydrogen-atom transfer from the cyanoisopropyl radical C-center dot(CH3)(2)CN to [Co-II(por)](center dot) (yielding [Co-III(H)(por)] and CH2=C(CH3)(CN); por = porphyrinato) and the insertion of vinyl acetate (CH2=CHOAc) into the Co-H bond of [Co(H)(por)] (giving [Co-III{CH-(OAc)CH

  17. Reactions the private life of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Through an innovative, closely integrated design of images and text, and his characteristically clear, precise, and economical exposition, Peter Atkins explains the processes involved in chemical reactions. He begins by introducing a 'tool kit' of basic reactions, such as precipitation, corrosion, and catalysis, and concludes by showing how these building blocks are brought together in more complex processes such as photosynthesis.

  18. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  19. Transfer to the continuum and Breakup reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, A M

    2006-01-01

    A standard approach for the calculation of breakup reactions of exotic nuclei into two fragments is to consider inelastic excitations into the single particle continuum of the projectile. Alternatively one can also consider the transfer to the continuum of a system composed of the light fragment and the target. In this work we make a comparative study of the two approaches, underline the different inputs, and identify the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. Our test cases consist of the breakup of $^{11}$Be on a proton target at intermediate energies, and the breakup of $^8$B on $^{58}$Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  20. Robust population transfer in atomic beams induced by Doppler shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unanyan, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of photon momentum recoil on adiabatic population transfer in an atomic three-level lambda system is studied. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shifts, due to atomic motion, can play an important role in adiabatic population transfer processes of atomic internal states by a pair of laser fields. For the limiting case of slow atoms (Doppler shift much smaller than the photon recoil energy), the atoms occupy the same target state regardless of the order of switching of laser fields, while for the case of fast atoms interacting with the intuitive sequence of pulses, the target state is the intermediate atomic state. Furthermore, it is shown that this novel technique for adiabatic population transfer is related to a level crossing in the bright-intermediate state basis (rather than in the original atomic basis). It is shown that these processes are robust with respect to parameter fluctuations, such as the laser pulse area and the relative spatial offset (delay) of the laser beams. The obtained results can be used for the control of temporal evolution of atomic populations in cold atomic beams by externally adjustable Doppler shifts.

  1. Effects of Nonlocality on Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Titus, Luke J

    2016-01-01

    We solved the nonlocal scattering and bound state equations using the Perey-Buck type interaction, and compared to local equivalent calculations. Using the distorted wave Born approximation we construct the T-matrix for (p,d) transfer on 17O, 41Ca, 49Ca, 127Sn, 133Sn, and 209Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Additionally we studied (p,d) reactions on 40Ca using the the nonlocal dispersive optical model. We have also included nonlocality consistently into the adiabatic distorted wave approximation and have investigated the effects of nonlocality on on (d,p) transfer reactions for deuterons impinged on 16O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 126Sn, 132Sn, 208Pb at 10, 20, and 50 MeV. We found that for bound states the Perry corrected wave functions resulting from the local equation agreed well with that from the nonlocal equation in the interior region, but discrepancies were found in the surface and peripheral regions. Overall, the Perey correction factor was adequate for scattering states, with the exception for a few partial waves. Nonlocality...

  2. Hydrolysis of 4-Acetoxystyrene Polymers Prepared by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xianyi; Jankova, Katja; Kops, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Hydrolysis of 4-acetoxystyrene polymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization was carried out under various reaction conditions. It was found that hydrazinolysis of 4-acetoxystyrene homopolymers, random and block copolymers with styrene in 1,4-dioxane, afforded the corresponding narrow...

  3. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  4. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  5. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu .

  6. H atom transfer of collinear OH…O system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU, Tao(吴韬); CHEN, Xian-Yang(陈先阳); PENG, Jian-Bo(彭建波); JU, Guan-Zhi(居冠之); JU, Guan-Zhi(居冠之)

    2000-01-01

    A quantum mechanical calculation was performed to study the hydrogen atom transfer of collinear OH…O/OD…O system,for which Delves ' coordinates and R-matrix propagation method were applied in a Melius-Blint potential energy surface. The calculation result showed that the state-state H atom transfer probability comported strong oscillation phenomena and collision delay time of the title system was in the fs-ps time scale. The kinetic isotope effect was calculated in this work too.

  7. Living atom transfer radical polymerization of 4-acetoxystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Bo; Chen, Xianyi; Ivan, Bela

    1997-01-01

    Living atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-acetoxystyrene (1), a protected 4-vinylphenol, leading to poly(4-acetoxystyrene) with well-defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution was carried out in bulk with a,a'-dibromoxylene(2)/CuBr/2,2-bipyridine(bpy) as initi......Living atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-acetoxystyrene (1), a protected 4-vinylphenol, leading to poly(4-acetoxystyrene) with well-defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution was carried out in bulk with a,a'-dibromoxylene(2)/CuBr/2,2-bipyridine...

  8. Controlled state-to-state atom-exchange reaction in an ultracold atom-dimer mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Rui, Jun; Liu, Lan; Zhang, De-Chao; Liu, Ya-Xiong; Nan, Jue; Zhao, Bo; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold molecules offer remarkable opportunities to study chemical reactions at nearly zero temperature. Although significant progresses have been achieved in exploring ultracold bimolecular reactions, the investigations are usually limited to measurements of the overall loss rates of the reactants. Detection of the reaction products will shed new light on understanding the reaction mechanism and provide a unique opportunity to study the state-to-state reaction dynamics. Here we report on the direct observation of an exoergic atom-exchange reaction in an ultracold atom-dimer mixture. Both the atom and molecule products are observed and the quantum states are characterized. By changing the magnetic field, the reaction can be switched on or off, and the reaction rate can be controlled. The reaction is efficient and we have measured a state-to-state reaction rate of up to $1.1(3)\\times10^{-9}$cm$^{3}/$s from the time evolution of the reactants and products. Our work represents the realization of a controlled q...

  9. Models for identification of erroneous atom-to-atom mapping of reactions performed by automated algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Christophe; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Aires-de-Sousa, João; Varnek, Alexandre

    2012-12-21

    Machine learning (SVM and JRip rule learner) methods have been used in conjunction with the Condensed Graph of Reaction (CGR) approach to identify errors in the atom-to-atom mapping of chemical reactions produced by an automated mapping tool by ChemAxon. The modeling has been performed on the three first enzymatic classes of metabolic reactions from the KEGG database. Each reaction has been converted into a CGR representing a pseudomolecule with conventional (single, double, aromatic, etc.) bonds and dynamic bonds characterizing chemical transformations. The ChemAxon tool was used to automatically detect the matching atom pairs in reagents and products. These automated mappings were analyzed by the human expert and classified as "correct" or "wrong". ISIDA fragment descriptors generated for CGRs for both correct and wrong mappings were used as attributes in machine learning. The learned models have been validated in n-fold cross-validation on the training set followed by a challenge to detect correct and wrong mappings within an external test set of reactions, never used for learning. Results show that both SVM and JRip models detect most of the wrongly mapped reactions. We believe that this approach could be used to identify erroneous atom-to-atom mapping performed by any automated algorithm.

  10. Nonradiative charge transfer in collisions of protons with rubidium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ling-Ling; Qu Yi-Zhi; Liu Chun-Hua; Zhang Yu; Wang Jian-Guo; Buenker Robert J

    2012-01-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer cross sections for protons colliding with Rb(5s) atoms are calculated by using the quantum-mechanical molecularorbital close-coupling method in an energy range of 10-3 keV 10 keV.The total and state-selective charge-transfer cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental data in the relatively low energy region.The importance of rotational coupling for chargetransfer process is stressed.Compared with the radiative charge-transfer process,nonradiative charge transfer is a dominant mechanism at energies above 15 eV.The resonance structures of state-selective charge-transfer cross sections arising from the competition among channels are analysed in detail.The radiative and nonradiative charge-transfer rate coefficients from low to high temperature are presented.

  11. Atomic-level insights in optimizing reaction paths for hydroformylation reaction over Rh/CoO single-atom catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Shenpeng; Gao, Zehua; Luo, Zhiheng; Wang, Xu; Zeng, Rui; Li, Aowen; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Menglin; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Zhang, Wenhua; Ma, Chao; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2016-12-22

    Rh-based heterogeneous catalysts generally have limited selectivity relative to their homogeneous counterparts in hydroformylation reactions despite of the convenience of catalyst separation in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we develop CoO-supported Rh single-atom catalysts (Rh/CoO) with remarkable activity and selectivity towards propene hydroformylation. By increasing Rh mass loading, isolated Rh atoms switch to aggregated clusters of different atomicity. During the hydroformylation, Rh/CoO achieves the optimal selectivity of 94.4% for butyraldehyde and the highest turnover frequency number of 2,065 h(-1) among the obtained atomic-scale Rh-based catalysts. Mechanistic studies reveal that a structural reconstruction of Rh single atoms in Rh/CoO occurs during the catalytic process, facilitating the adsorption and activation of reactants. In kinetic view, linear products are determined as the dominating products by analysing reaction paths deriving from the two most stable co-adsorbed configurations. As a bridge of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, single-atom catalysts can be potentially applied in other industrial reactions.

  12. Atomic-level insights in optimizing reaction paths for hydroformylation reaction over Rh/CoO single-atom catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Shenpeng; Gao, Zehua; Luo, Zhiheng; Wang, Xu; Zeng, Rui; Li, Aowen; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Menglin; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Zhang, Wenhua; Ma, Chao; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Rh-based heterogeneous catalysts generally have limited selectivity relative to their homogeneous counterparts in hydroformylation reactions despite of the convenience of catalyst separation in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we develop CoO-supported Rh single-atom catalysts (Rh/CoO) with remarkable activity and selectivity towards propene hydroformylation. By increasing Rh mass loading, isolated Rh atoms switch to aggregated clusters of different atomicity. During the hydroformylation, Rh/CoO achieves the optimal selectivity of 94.4% for butyraldehyde and the highest turnover frequency number of 2,065 h-1 among the obtained atomic-scale Rh-based catalysts. Mechanistic studies reveal that a structural reconstruction of Rh single atoms in Rh/CoO occurs during the catalytic process, facilitating the adsorption and activation of reactants. In kinetic view, linear products are determined as the dominating products by analysing reaction paths deriving from the two most stable co-adsorbed configurations. As a bridge of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, single-atom catalysts can be potentially applied in other industrial reactions.

  13. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  14. The pentafluorostyrene endeavours with atom transfer radical polymerization - quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The versatility of the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of pentafluorostyrene (FS) is comprehensively evaluated. The ATRP of a wide range of monomers derived from FS is likewise discussed with emphasis on the potential polymer applications. A large number of block and star copolymers...

  15. Reverse Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of (-)-Menthyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The reverse atom transfer radical polymerization(RATRP) of (-)-menthyl methacrylate ((-)-MnMA) with AIBN(AIBN/CuCl2/bipyridine(bipy) or (-)sparteine((-)Sp) =1/2/4) initiating system in THF has been studied. The dependence of the specific rotation on molecular weight was investigated.

  16. Synthesis of Amphiphilic Copolymwers by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Natanya Majbritt Louie

    2007-01-01

    atom transfer radikal polymerisation (ATRP) blev anvendt til alle polymerisationerne. De reaktionskinetiske forhold samt de opnåelige materialestrukturer viste, at næsten alle anvendte monomer-kombinationer kan håndteres til fremstilling af fluorholdige polymermaterialer med velkontrolleret struktur...

  17. Radical zinc-atom-transfer-based carbozincation of haloalkynes with dialkylzincs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Chemla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of alkylidenezinc carbenoids by 1,4-addition/carbozincation of dialkylzincs or alkyl iodides based on zinc atom radical transfer, in the presence of dimethylzinc with β-(propargyloxyenoates having pendant iodo- and bromoalkynes, is disclosed. Formation of the carbenoid intermediate is fully stereoselective at −30 °C and arises from a formal anti-selective carbozincation reaction. Upon warming, the zinc carbenoid is stereochemically labile and isomerizes to its more stable form.

  18. Correlated energy transfer between two ultracold atomic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krönke, Sven; Knörzer, Johannes; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We study a single atom as an open quantum system, which is initially prepared in a coherent state of low energy and oscillates in a one-dimensional harmonic trap through an interacting ensemble of NA bosons, held in a displaced trap [arXiv:1410.8676]. The non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of the total system is simulated by means of an ab-initio method, giving us access to all properties of the open system and its finite environment. In this talk, we focus on unraveling the interplay of energy exchange and correlations between the subsystems, which are coupled in such a spatio-temporally localized manner. We show that an inter-species interaction-induced level splitting accelerates the energy transfer between the atomic species for larger NA, which becomes less complete at the same time. System-environment correlations prove to be significant except for times when the excess energy distribution among the subsystems is highly imbalanced. These correlations result in incoherent energy transfer processes, which accelerate the early energy donation of the single atom. By analyzing correlations between intra-subsystem excitations, certain energy transfer channels are shown to be (dis-)favored depending on the instantaneous direction of transfer.

  19. Marcus Electron Transfer Reactions with Bulk Metallic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer organic reaction rates are considered employing the classic physical picture of Marcus wherein the heats of reaction are deposited as the energy of low frequency mechanical oscillations of reconfigured molecular positions. If such electron transfer chemical reaction events occur in the neighborhood of metallic plates, then electrodynamic interface fields must also be considered in addition to mechanical oscillations. Such electrodynamic interfacial electric fields in principle strongly effect the chemical reaction rates. The thermodynamic states of the metal are unchanged by the reaction which implies that metallic plates are purely catalytic chemical agents.

  20. Do Spin State and Spin Density Affect Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouma, Caroline T; Mayer, James M

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions in chemical and biological systems has prompted much interest in establishing and understanding the underlying factors that enable this reactivity. Arguments have been advanced that the electronic spin state of the abstractor and/or the spin-density at the abstracting atom are critical for HAT reactivity. This is consistent with the intuition derived from introductory organic chemistry courses. Herein we present an alternative view on the role of spin state and spin-density in HAT reactions. After a brief introduction, the second section introduces a new and simple fundamental kinetic analysis, which shows that unpaired spin cannot be the dominant effect. The third section examines published computational studies of HAT reactions, which indicates that the spin state affects these reactions indirectly, primarily via changes in driving force. The essay concludes with a broader view of HAT reactivity, including indirect effects of spin and other properties on reactivity. It is suggested that some of the controversy in this area may arise from the diversity of HAT reactions and their overlap with proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions.

  1. Population transfer via adiabatic passage in the Rydberg potassium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the time-dependent multilevel approach, we have calculated the coherent population transfer between the quantum states of potassium atom by a single frequency-chirped laser pulse. The result shows that a pair of sequential 'broadband' frequency-chirped laser pulses can efficiently transfer population from the initial state of the ladder system to the target state. It is also found that the population can be efficiently transferred to a target state and trapped there by using an 'intuitive' or a 'counterintuitive' frequency sweep laser pulse in the case of 'narrowband' frequency-chirped laser pulse. Our research shows that the complete population transfer is related to the pulse duration, chirp rate, and amplitude of the laser pulse.

  2. Investigating the role of atomic hydrogen on chloroethene reactions with iron using tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiankang; Farrell, James

    2003-09-01

    Metallic iron filings are commonly employed as reducing agents in permeable barriers used for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Reactions of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with zerovalent iron were investigated to determine the role of atomic hydrogen in their reductive dechlorination. Experiments simultaneously measuring dechlorination and iron corrosion rates were performed to determine the fractions of the total current going toward dechlorination and hydrogen evolution. Corrosion rates were determined using Tafel analysis, and dechlorination rates were determined from rates of byproduct generation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the number of reactions that controlled the observed rates of chlorocarbon disappearance, as well as the role of atomic hydrogen in TCE and PCE reduction. Comparison of iron corrosion rates with those for TCE reaction showed that TCE reduction occurred almost exclusively via atomic hydrogen at low pH values and via atomic hydrogen and direct electron transfer at neutral pH values. In contrast, reduction of PCE occurred primarily via direct electron transfer at both low and neutral pH values. At low pH values and micromolar concentrations, TCE reaction rates were faster than those for PCE due to more rapid reduction of TCE by atomic hydrogen. At neutral pH values and millimolar concentrations, PCE reaction rates were faster than those for TCE. This shift in relative reaction rates was attributed to a decreasing contribution of the atomic hydrogen reaction mechanism with increasing halocarbon concentrations and pH values. The EIS data showed that all the rate limitations for TCE and PCE dechlorination occurred during the transfer of the first two electrons. Results from this study show that differences in relative reaction rates of TCE and PCE with iron are dependent on the significance of the reduction pathway involving atomic hydrogen.

  3. Liquid drop effects in subbarrier transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J.

    1990-08-01

    Reaction products from a multitude of binary channels are observed to emerge at large c.m. angles at subbarrier energies for the {sup 50}Ti {plus} {sup 93}Nb system. The energy spectra of these products and the distance where they first emerge indicate that these reaction products result from the neck which is formed outside the Coulomb barrier. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Heavy ion transfer reactions: Status and perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Corradi

    2010-07-01

    With the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer (PRISMA) coupled to the -array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the properties of quasielastic and deep inelastic processes and on measurements at energies far below the Coulomb barrier.

  5. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  6. *H atom and *OH radical reactions with 5-methylcytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, A; Morell, C; Labet, V; Cadet, J; Eriksson, L A

    2007-09-20

    The reactions between either a hydrogen atom or a hydroxyl radical and 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) are studied by using the hybrid kinetic energy meta-GGA functional MPW1B95. *H atom and *OH radical addition to positions C5 and C6 of 5-MeCyt, or *OH radical induced H-abstraction from the C5 methyl group, are explored. All systems are optimized in bulk solvent. The data presented show that the barriers to reaction are very low: ca. 7 kcal/mol for the *H atom additions and 1 kcal/mol for the reactions involving the *OH radical. Thermodynamically, the two C6 radical adducts and the *H-abstraction product are the most stable ones. The proton hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC), computed at the IEFPCM/MPW1B95/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, agree well with B3LYP results and available experimental and theoretical data on related thymine and cytosine radicals.

  7. Reaction of iodine atoms with submicrometer squalane and squalene droplets: mechanistic insights into heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R

    2014-11-13

    The gas-phase reaction of iodine atoms with hydrocarbon molecules is energetically unfavorable, and there is no direct evidence for iodinated product formation by either H abstraction or I addition reactions at ambient temperature. Here we consider the possible heterogeneous reaction of I atoms with submicrometer droplets composed of a saturated alkane, squalane (Sq), and an unsaturated alkene, squalene (Sqe). The investigations are performed in an atmospheric pressure photochemical flow tube reactor in conjunction with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle sizer. Squalane, a branched alkane, is unreactive toward I atoms within the signal-to-noise, and an upper limit of the effective reactive uptake coefficient is estimated to be γI(Sq) ≤ 8.58 × 10(–7). In contrast, the reaction of I atoms with unsaturated submicrometer squalene droplets results in observable iodinated squalene products. The effective reactive uptake coefficient of I atom with squalene particles is determined to be γI(Sqe) = (1.20 ± 0.52) × 10(–4) at an average I concentration of 1.5 × 10(14) molecules·cm(–3).

  8. Imaging population transfer in atoms with ultrafast electron pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy have made significant progress recently in investigating atomic-scale structural dynamics in gas-phase and condensed materials. With these advances, direct imaging of electronic motions in atoms and molecules by ultrafast electron diffraction is anticipated. We propose imaging a laser-driven coherent population transfer in lithium atoms by femtosecond ultrafast electron pulses. Valuable information and insight can be obtained from studying such a system in order to refine ultrafast electron techniques and to interpret experimental results. Adiabatic passage by level crossing is used to transfer the electron population from the 2 s to the 2 p state. Our simulations demonstrate the ability of ultrafast electron diffraction to image this population transfer, as the time-dependent diffraction images reflect the electronic motion in the scattering intensity and angular distribution. Furthermore, asymmetric diffraction patterns indicate that even the relative phases of the electronic wave function can be resolved, provided there is sufficient temporal resolution. This work has been supported in part by DOE Award No. DE-SC0012193 [H.-C.S.] and by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492 [A.F.S.].

  9. Probing cluster structures through sub-barrier transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafferty D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer probabilities and excitation energy distributions have been measured in 16,18O, 19F + 208Pb at energies between 90% - 100% of the Coulomb barrier. A strong 2p2n enhancement is observed for all reactions, though most spectacularly in the 18O induced reaction. Results are interpreted in terms of the Semiclassical model, which seems to suggest α-cluster transfer in all studied systems. The relation to cluster-states in the projectile is discussed, with the experimental results consistent with previous structure studies. Dissipation of energy in the collisions of 18O is compared between different reaction modes, with cluster transfer associated with dissipation over a large number of internal states. Cluster transfer is shown to be a long range dissipation mechanism, which will inform the development of future models to treat these dynamic processes in reactions.

  10. Hydroxylation Reaction Mechanism for Nitrosodimethylamine by Oxygen Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lan; LIN Xiao-yan; LI Zong-he

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxylation reaction mechanism of nitrosodimethylamine(NDMA)by oxygen atom was theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G** level.It has been found that the path of the oxydation of the C-H bond is easier than the path involving a Singlet/Triplet crossing.The study of the potential surface shows that both solvent effect at B3LYP/6-31G** level and different method at more credible MP2/6-311G** level in the gas phase have no effect on the hydroxylation reaction mechanism.The oxidation hydroxylation process of NDMA by O is exothermic reaction and easy to occur.

  11. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  12. One-nucleon transfer reactions and the optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, F M; Ross, A; Titus, L J; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Mahzoon, M H; Sarich, J; Wild, S M

    2015-01-01

    We provide a summary of new developments in the area of direct reaction theory with a particular focus on one-nucleon transfer reactions. We provide a status of the methods available for describing (d,p) reactions. We discuss the effects of nonlocality in the optical potential in transfer reactions. The results of a purely phenomenological potential and the optical potential obtained from the dispersive optical model are compared; both point toward the importance of including nonlocality in transfer reactions explicitly. Given the large ambiguities associated with optical potentials, we discuss some new developments toward the quantification of this uncertainty. We conclude with some general comments and a brief account of new advances that are in the pipeline.

  13. Transfer reactions at the neutron dripline with triton target

    CERN Document Server

    Borge, M J G; Fynbo, H O U; Gomez Camacho, J; Johansen, J; Johansson, H T; Jonson, B; Krücken, R; Kurcewicz, J; Martel, I; Moro, A; Mücher, D; Nilsson, T; Nyman, G; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Riisager, K; Sambi, S; Sanchez-Benitez, AM; Tengblad, O

    2012-01-01

    Two-neutron transfer to $^{9}$Li will populate the ground state of $^{11}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in a way that is complementary to studies of these states performed at higher beam energies. We aim at detecting the charged particles from the transfer reactions as well as neutrons coming from the decay of possible $^{11}$Li resonances.

  14. Transfer reactions at the neutron dripline with triton target

    CERN Multimedia

    Two-neutron transfer to $^{9}$Li will populate the ground state of $^{11}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in a way that is complementary to studies of these states performed at higher beam energies. We aim at detecting the charged particles from the transfer reactions as well as neutrons coming from the decay of possible $^{11}$Li resonances.

  15. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using femtose

  16. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment...

  17. Links between potential energy structures and quantum cumulative reaction probabilities of double proton transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsten, H.F. von [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Olshausenstrasse 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Hartke, B. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Olshausenstrasse 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: hartke@phc.uni-kiel.de

    2007-09-25

    Double proton transfer reactions of pyrazole-guanidine species exhibit unusual energy profiles of a plateau form, different from the standard single and double barrier shapes. We have demonstrated earlier that this leads to a characteristically different quantum dynamical behavior of plateau reactions, when measured appropriately. Here we show that these differences also carry over to traditional measures of reaction probability.

  18. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); Odinokov, A. V. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow (Russian Federation); Titov, S. V. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 3-1/12, Building 6, Obuha pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the

  19. Reactant-Product Quantum Coherence in Electron Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of quantum superposition states between reactants and products in electron transfer reactions. We show that such superpositions are strongly suppressed and to leading orders of perturbation theory do not pertain in electron transfer reactions. This is because of the intermediate manifold of states separating the reactants from the products. We provide an intuitive description of these considerations with Feynman diagrams. We also discuss the relation of such quantum coherences to understanding the fundamental quantum dynamics of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions.

  20. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  1. Imaging the dynamics of chlorine atom reactions with alkenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estillore, Armando D.; Visger, Laura M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2010-08-01

    We report a study of chlorine atom reactions with a series of target monounsaturated alkene molecules: 1-pentene, 1-hexene, 2-hexene, and cyclohexene. These reactions were studied using crossed-beam dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 4 and 7 kcal/mol. Images of the reactively scattered alkenyl radical products were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm. The angular distributions at low collision energy are largely isotropic, suggesting the formation of a complex that has a lifetime comparable to or longer than its rotational period, followed by HCl elimination. At high collision energy, the distributions show a sharp forward peak superimposed on the isotropic component accounting for ˜13% of the product flux. The translational energy distributions peak near zero for the backscattered product, in sharp contrast to the results for alkanes. In the forward direction, the translational energy distributions change dramatically with collision energy. At the high collision energy, a sharp forward peak at ˜80% of the collision energy appears, quite reminiscent of results of our recent study of Cl+pentane reactions. The scattering distributions for all target molecules are similar, suggesting similarity of the reaction dynamics among these molecules. Ab initio calculations of the energetics and ionization energies for the various product channels were performed at the CBS-QB3 level to aid in interpreting the results.

  2. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics.

  3. Theoretical studies on proton transfer reaction of 3(5)-substituted pyrazoles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alireza Najafi Chermahini; Abbas Teimouri

    2014-01-01

    The inter and intra molecular proton transfer reactions of a series of pyrazole derivatives have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) andMP2 methods implementing 6-311++G(d,p) atomic basis set. The substituents have been selected to cover a wide range of electronic effects. Proton transfer process was studied for mechanisms including single proton transfer, double proton transfer and proton transfer assisted by a water or ammonia molecule. The results showed single proton transfer reactions for interconversion pyrazole derivatives need highest activation energies in the range of 45.7−51.59 and 49.4−53.96 kcal/mol at B3LYP and MP2 levels, respectively. It was found that for the 3-substituted pyrazoles, electron withdrawing groups form stronger dimers but in the 5-substituted tautomers electron donating groups form stronger hydrogen bond. The double proton transfer reactions between dimers were studied and transition states calculated. The ranges of activation energies were found to be 17.51−19.36 and 17.02−17.80 kcal/mol for the C → E and D → D reactions respectively. In addition, the activation energies for the proton transfer reaction assisted by water or ammonia molecules were found to be in the range of 26.62−31.78 and 17.25−22.46 kcal/mol, respectively, calculated at MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  4. Resonant electron transfer in slow collisions of protons with Rydberg hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Joachain, C.J.; Nedeljkovic, N.N.

    1984-05-01

    The resonant charge-transfer reaction of protons on highly excited hydrogen atoms is considered by taking into account both the tunneling (under-barrier) and the over-barrier (classically allowed) electron transitions. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of variation of the reduced ve- locity v = vn, the classical transition mechanism is predominant. Cross-section calculations for principal quantum numbers n between 10 and 50 are presented. The results for 45< or =n< or =50 are compared with the available experimental data and with other theoretical calculations.

  5. The dynamics of reaction of Cl atoms with tetramethylsilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retail, Bertrand; Rose, Rebecca A; Pearce, Julie K; Greaves, Stuart J; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2008-03-28

    Rotational state distributions and state-selected CM-frame angular distributions were measured for HCl (v' = 0, j') products from the reaction of Cl-atoms with tetramethylsilane (TMS) under single collision conditions at a collision energy, E(coll), of 8.2 +/- 2.0 kcal mol(-1). The internal excitation of these products was very low with only 2% of the total energy available partitioned into HCl rotation. A transition state with a quasi-linear C-H-Cl moiety structure was computed and used to explain this finding. A backward peaking differential cross section was also reported together with a product translational energy (T') distribution with a maximum at T' approximately E(coll). This scattering behaviour is accounted for by reactions proceeding through a tight transition state on a highly skewed potential energy surface, which favours collisions at low impact parameters with a strong kinematic constraint on the internal excitation of the products. The large Arrhenius pre-exponential factor previously reported for this reaction is reconciled with the tight differential scattering observed in our study by considering the large size of the TMS molecule.

  6. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, M. J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using femtosecond midinfrared spectroscopy, we probe the vibrational responses of HPTS, its conjugate photobase, the hydrated proton/deuteron, and chloroacetate. The measurement of these four resonances allows ...

  7. Performance of Frozen Density Embedding for Modeling Hole Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Pablo; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a thorough benchmark of the FDE-ET method for calculating hole transfer couplings. We have considered 10 exchange-correlation functionals, 3 non-additive kinetic energy functionals and 3 basis sets. Overall, we conclude that with a 7% mean relative unsigned error, the PBE functional coupled with the PW91k non-additive Kinetic energy functional and a TZP basis set constitutes the most stable, and accurate level of theory for hole-transfer coupling calculations. The FDE-ET method is found to be an excellent tool for computing diabatic couplings for hole transfer reactions.

  8. Atom-efficient metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of indium organometallics with organic electrophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, I; Sestelo, J P; Sarandeses, L A

    2001-05-09

    The novel metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of indium organometallics with organic electrophiles is described. Triorganoindium compounds (R(3)In) containing alkyl, vinyl, aryl, and alkynyl groups are efficiently prepared from the corresponding lithium or magnesium organometallics by reaction with indium trichloride. The cross-coupling reaction of R(3)In with aryl halides and pseudohalides (iodide 2, bromide 5, and triflate 4), vinyl triflates, benzyl bromides, and acid chlorides proceeds under palladium catalysis in excellent yields and with high chemoselectivity. Indium organometallics also react with aryl chlorides as under nickel catalysis. In the cross-coupling reaction the triorganoindium compounds transfer, in a clear example of atom economy, all three of the organic groups attached to the metal, as shown by the necessity of using only 34 mol % of indium. The feasibility of using R(3)In in reactions with different electrophiles, along with the high yields and chemoselectivities obtained, reveals indium organometallics to be useful alternatives to other organometallics in cross-coupling reactions.

  9. Mechanism of Photoinduced Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiangcheng; Fang, Cheng; Fantin, Marco; Malhotra, Nikhil; So, Woong Young; Peteanu, Linda A; Isse, Abdirisak A; Gennaro, Armando; Liu, Peng; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2016-02-24

    Photoinduced metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate was investigated using several phenothiazine derivatives and other related compounds as photoredox catalysts. The experiments show that all selected catalysts can be involved in the activation step, but not all of them participated efficiently in the deactivation step. The redox properties and the stability of radical cations derived from the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Laser flash photolysis (LFP) was used to determine the lifetime and activity of photoexcited catalysts. Kinetic analysis of the activation reaction according to dissociative electron-transfer (DET) theory suggests that the activation occurs only with an excited state of catalyst. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed the structures and stabilities of the radical cation intermediates as well as the reaction energy profiles of deactivation pathways with different photoredox catalysts. Both experiments and calculations suggest that the activation process undergoes a DET mechanism, while an associative electron transfer involving a termolecular encounter (the exact reverse of DET pathway) is favored in the deactivation process. This detailed study provides a deeper understanding of the chemical processes of metal-free ATRP that can aid the design of better catalytic systems. Additionally, this work elucidates several important common pathways involved in synthetically useful organic reactions catalyzed by photoredox catalysts.

  10. Development of Novel Electrode Materials for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen-Transfer and Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Brett Kimball [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, the fundamental aspects involved in the electrocatalysis of anodic O-transfer reactions and cathodic H-transfer reactions have been studied. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)[doped MnO2 films] revealed that MnO2 film electrodes prepared by a cycling voltammetry deposition show improved response for DMSO oxidation at the film electrodes vs. the Au substrate. Doping of the MnO2 films with Fe(III) further enhanced electrode activity. Reasons for this increase are believed to involve the adsorption of DMSO by the Fe(III) sites. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)-doped RuO2 films showed that the Fe(III)-doped RuO2-film electrodes are applicable for anodic detection of sulfur compounds. The Fe(III) sites in the Fe-RuO2 films are speculated to act as adsorption sites for the sulfur species while the Ru(IV) sites function for anodic discharge of H2O to generate the adsorbed OH species. The investigation into cathodic H-transfer reactions, specifically nitrate reduction, at various pure metals and their alloys demonstrated that the incorporation of metals into alloy materials can create a material that exhibits bifunctional properties for the various steps involved in the overall nitrate reduction reaction. The Sb10Sn20Ti70, Cu63Ni37 and Cu25Ni75 alloy electrodes exhibited improved activity for nitrate reduction as compared to their pure component metals. The Cu63Ni37 alloy displayed the highest activity for nitrate reduction. The final investigation was a detailed study of the electrocatalytic activity of cathodic H-transfer reactions (nitrate reduction) at various compositions of Cu-Ni alloy electrodes. Voltammetric response for NO3- at the Cu-Ni alloy electrode is superior to

  11. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  12. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  13. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  14. Neutron transfer reactions in the fp-shell region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahgoub, Mahmoud

    2008-06-26

    Neutron transfer reactions were used to study the stability of the magic number N=28 near {sup 56}Ni. On one hand the one-neutron pickup (d,p) reaction was used for precision spectroscopy of single-particle levels in {sup 55}Fe. On the other hand we investigated the two-neutron transfer mechanism into {sup 56}Ni using the pickup reaction {sup 58}Ni((vector)p,t){sup 56}Ni. In addition the reliability of inverse kinematics reactions at low energy to study exotic nuclei was tested by the neutron transfer reactions t({sup 40}Ar,p){sup 42}Ar and d({sup 54}Fe,p){sup 55}Fe using tritium and deuterium targets, respectively, and by comparing the results with those of the normal kinematics reactions. The experimental data, differential cross-section and analyzing powers, are compared to DWBA and coupled channel calculations utilizing the code CHUCK3. By performing the single-neutron stripping reaction ((vector)d,p) on {sup 54}Fe the 1f{sub 7/2} shell in the ground state configuration was found to be partly broken. The instability of the 1f{sub 7/2} shell and the magic number N=28 was confirmed once by observing a number of levels with J{sup {pi}} = 7/2{sup -} at low excitation energies, which should not be populated if {sup 54}Fe has a closed 1f{sub 7/2} shell, and also by comparing our high precision experimental data with a large scale shell model calculation using the ANTOINE code [5]. Calculations including a partly broken 1f{sub 7/2} shell show better agreement with the experiment. The instability of the 1f{sub 7/2} shell was confirmed also by performing the two-neutron pick-up reaction ((vector)p,t) on {sup 58}Ni to study {sup 56}Ni, where a considerable improvement in the DWBA calculation was observed after considering 1f{sub 7/2} as a broken shell. To prove the reliability of inverse kinematics transfer reactions at low energies ({proportional_to} 2 AMeV), the aforementioned single-neutron transfer reaction (d,p) was repeated using a beam of {sup 54}Fe ions and a

  15. Ring opening reaction dynamics in the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ethylene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S. K.; Jarek, R. L.; Böhmer, E.; Wittig, C.

    1994-10-01

    Ethylene oxide, C2H4O, is a three-membered ring with a single oxygen atom bridging the two carbons. Reactions of H and D atoms with ethylene oxide have been studied in the gas phase to provide insight into the dynamics of three-membered ring opening. H atoms were produced by photolyzing HI in the wavelength range 240-266 nm. The channel leading to OH+C2H4 was monitored via laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the OH A 2Σ←X 2Π system. The D atom reaction yields OD with no hydrogen scrambling. With an available energy of 23 000 cm-1, the average OH D rotational energy is ˜350 cm-1 for OH(v=0) and OD(v=0) and ˜250 cm-1 for OD(v=1). OH(v=1) was not observed, while the OD(v=1) population was about one-tenth that of OD(v=0). There was no apparent bias in populations between Λ doublets in each of the spin-orbit states for both OH and OD. Doppler broadening of OH(v=0) rotational lines was measured to evaluate the average center-of-mass (c.m.) translational energy, which was found to be ˜2300 cm-1. On average, the ring opening process deposits ˜10% of the available energy into c.m. translation, ˜2% into OH rotation, and ˜88% into ethylene internal energy. Comparison with CH2CH2OH unimolecular dissociation dynamics and theoretical transition state calculations leads to a likely mechanism in which hydrogen abstracts oxygen via sequential C-O bond fission without involving a long-lived CH2CH2OH intermediate.

  16. Two-Pulse Atomic Coherent Control (2PACC) Spectroscopy of Eley-Rideal Reactions. An Application of an Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, S F; Jorgensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A spectroscopic application of the atom laser is suggested. The spectroscopy termed 2PACC employs the coherent properties of matter-waves from a two pulse atom laser. These waves are employed to control a gas-surface chemical recombination reaction. The method is demonstrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction of a hydrogen or alkali atom-laser pulse where the surface target is an adsorbed hydrogen atom. The reaction yields either a hydrogen or alkali hydride molecule. The desorbed gas phase molecular yield and its internal state is shown to be controlled by the time and phase delay between two atom-laser pulses. The calculation is based on solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation in a diabatic framework. The probability of desorption which is the predicted 2PACC signal has been calculated as a function of the pulse parameters.

  17. Quenching of Cross Sections in Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, B P; Freeman, S J

    2013-01-01

    Cross sections for proton knockout observed in (e,e'p) reactions are apparently quenched by a factor of ~0.5, an effect attributed to short-range correlations between nucleons. Here we demonstrate that such quenching is not restricted to proton knockout, but a more general phenomenon associated with any nucleon transfer. Measurements of absolute cross sections on a number of targets between 16O and 208Pb were analyzed in a consistent way, with the cross sections reduced to spectroscopic factors through the distorted-wave Born approximation with global optical potentials. Across the 124 cases analyzed here, induced by various proton- and neutron-transfer reactions and with angular momentum transfer l=0-7, the results are consistent with a quenching factor of 0.55. This is an apparently uniform quenching of single-particle motion in the nuclear medium. The effect is seen not only in (d,p) reactions but also in reactions with A=3 and 4 projectiles, when realistic wave functions are used for the projectiles.

  18. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  19. Organometallic Bonding in an Ullmann-Type On-Surface Chemical Reaction Studied by High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Takeya, Jun; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-10-01

    The on-surface Ullmann-type chemical reaction synthesizes polymers by linking carbons of adjacent molecules on solid surfaces. Although an organometallic compound is recently identified as the reaction intermediate, little is known about the detailed structure of the bonded organometallic species and its influence on the molecule and the reaction. Herein atomic force microscopy at low temperature is used to study the reaction with 3,9-diiododinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-d]thiophene (I-DNT-VW), which is polymerized on Ag(111) in vacuum. Thermally sublimated I-DNT-VW picks up a Ag surface atom, forming a CAg bond at one end after removing an iodine. The CAg bond is usually short-lived, and a CAgC organometallic bond immediately forms with an adjacent molecule. The existence of the bonded Ag atoms strongly affects the bending angle and adsorption height of the molecular unit. Density functional theory calculations reveal the bending mechanism, which reveals that charge from the terminus of the molecule is transferred via the Ag atom into the organometallic bond and strengths the local adsorption to the substrate. Such deformations vanish when the Ag atoms are removed by annealing and CC bonds are established.

  20. Tem holder for sample transfer under reaction conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and temperature, which usually are far from the operando conditions of e.g. heterogeneous catalysis. Our efforts focus on bridging these gaps by establishing in situ sample transfer between complementary measurement techniques. To fully exploit the capabilities of ETEM complementary experiments...... and characterization techniques are beneficial. Normally, the complementary measurements are done in parallel with experiments separated in time and space [3] or by mimicking a reactor bed by changing the feed gas composition according to reactivity and conversion measured in dedicated catalyst set-ups [4...... (XRD) setup and subsequently successfully transferred under reaction conditions to the ETEM....

  1. Laser ion source for multi-nucleon transfer reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Van Duppen, P.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a laser ion source for the target-like fragments (TLFs) produced in multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. The operation principle of the source is based on the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) approach. In the source TLFs are thermalized and neutralized in high pressure and high purity argon gas, and are extracted after being selectively re-ionized in a multi-step laser resonance ionization process. The laser ion source has been implemented at the KEK Isotope Separation System (KISS) for β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes with N = 126 of nuclear astrophysical interest. The simulations of gas flow and ion-beam optics have been performed to optimize the gas cell for efficient thermalization and fast transporting the TLFs, and the mass-separator for efficient transport with high mass-resolving power, respectively. To confirm the performances expected at the design stage, off-line experiments have been performed by using 56Fe atoms evaporated from a filament in the gas cell. The gas-transport time of 230 ms in the argon cell and the measured KISS mass-resolving power of 900 are consistent with the designed values. The high purity of the gas-cell system, which is extremely important for efficient and highly-selective production of laser ions, was achieved and confirmed from the mass distribution of the extracted ions. After the off-line tests, on-line experiments were conducted by directly injecting energetic 56Fe beam into the gas cell. After thermalization of the injected 56Fe beam, laser-produced singly-charged 56Fe+ ions were extracted. The extraction efficiency and selectivity of the gas cell in the presence of plasma induced by 56Fe beam injection as well as the time profile of the extracted ions were investigated; extraction efficiency of 0.25%, a beam purity of >99% and an extraction time of 270 ms. It has been confirmed that the performance of the KISS laser ion source is satisfactory to start the measurements of

  2. Tape transfer atomization patterning of liquid alloys for microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-02-12

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times.

  3. The transfer of tin and germanium atoms from N-heterocyclic stannylenes and germylenes to diazadienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans-Eichler, Timo; Gudat, Dietrich; Nättinen, Kalle; Nieger, Martin

    2006-01-23

    New N-heterocyclic stannylenes and germylenes were synthesized by transamination of E[N(SiMe3)2] (E = Ge, Sn) with alpha-amino-aldimines or ethylidene-1,2-diamines and were characterized by spectroscopic methods and in the case of the germylene 10 g by X-ray diffraction. The reactions of several germylenes and stannylenes with diazadienes were studied by using dynamic NMR and computational methods. Experimental and theoretical studies confirmed that metathesis with exchange of the Group 14 atom is feasible for both stannylenes and germylenes, with exchange rates being generally higher for stannylenes. The metathesis of the diazadiene 3 b and the stannylene 1 b follows second-order kinetics and exhibits a sizeable negative entropy of activation. The transfer reaction is inhibited by bulky substituents in both reactants and surprisingly coincides with a suppression of the fragmentation of the stannylene into tin and diazadiene. A connection between oxidative addition and ring fragmentation was also observed in the reaction of 1 f with sulfur. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that all metathesis reactions proceed via transient spirocyclic [1+4] cycloaddition products, the formation of which is generally endothermic and endergonic. The spirostannanes display a distorted Psi-tbp geometry at the tin atom and their cycloreversion requires low or nearly negligible activation energies; spirogermanes exhibit distorted tetrahedral central atoms and sizeable energy barriers with respect to the same reaction. Complementary studies of cycloadditions of diazadienes to triplet germylenes or stannylenes indicate that these reactions are exothermic. The lowest triplet state in the carbene homologues results from promotion of an electron from an n(N) orbital with pi character rather than the n(C)-sigma orbital as in carbenes, and singlet-triplet excitation energies decrease from carbon to tin. Spirostannanes exhibit a triplet ground-state multiplicity that implies

  4. Investigation of the unbound 21C nucleus via transfer reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukui Tokuro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross section of the transfer reaction 20C(d,p21C at 30.0 MeV is investigated. The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC is used in order to obtain the final state wave function. The smoothing procedure of the transition matrix and the channel-coupling effect on the cross section are discussed.

  5. Pickering emulsion templated interfacial atom transfer radical polymerization for microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P; Stöver, Harald D H

    2010-12-01

    This Article describes a new microencapsulation method based on a Pickering emulsion templated interfacial atom transfer radical polymerization (PETI-ATRP). Cationic LUDOX CL nanoparticles were coated electrostatically with an anionic polymeric ATRP initiator, poly(sodium styrene sulfonate-co-2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)ethyl methacrylate) (PSB), prepared by radical copolymerization of sodium styrene sulfonate and 2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)ethyl methacrylate (BIEM). The resulting PSB-modified CL particles were surface active and could be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. ATRP of water-soluble cross-linking monomers, confined to the oil-water interface by the surface-bound PSB, then led to nanoparticle/polymer composite shells. This method allowed encapsulation of core solvents (xylene, hexadecane, perfluoroheptane) with different solubility parameters. The microcapsule (MC) wall chemistry could accommodate different monomers, demonstrating the versatility of this method. Double-walled MCs were formed by sequentially carrying out PETI-ATRP and in situ polymerization of encapsulated monomers. The double-walled structure was verified by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM).

  6. Analysis of transfer reactions: determination of spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); The Andrzej So an Institute for Nuclear Studies, Dept. of Nuclear Reactions, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    An overview of the most popular models used for the analysis of direct reaction data is given, concentrating on practical aspects. The 4 following models (in order of increasing sophistication): the distorted wave born approximation (DWBA), the adiabatic model, the coupled channels born approximation, and the coupled reaction channels are briefly described. As a concrete example, the C{sup 12}(d,p)C{sup 13} reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 30 MeV is analysed with progressively more physically sophisticated models. The effect of the choice of the reaction model on the spectroscopic information extracted from the data is investigated and other sources of uncertainty in the derived spectroscopic factors are discussed. We have showed that the choice of the reaction model can significantly influence the nuclear structure information, particularly the spectroscopic factors or amplitudes but occasionally also the spin-parity, that we wish to extract from direct reaction data. We have also demonstrated that the DWBA can fail to give a satisfactory description of transfer data but when the tenets of the theory are fulfilled DWBA can work very well and will yield the same results as most sophisticated models. The use of global rather than fitted optical potentials can also lead to important differences in the extracted spectroscopic factors.

  7. Electron Transfer Reactions: Generalized Spin-Boson Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Merkli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mathematically rigorous analysis of a generalized spin-boson system for the treatment of a donor-acceptor (reactant-product) quantum system coupled to a thermal quantum noise. The donor/acceptor probability dynamics describes transport reactions in chemical processes in presence of a noisy environment -- such as the electron transfer in a photosynthetic reaction center. Besides being rigorous, our analysis has the advantages over previous ones that (1) we include a general, non energy-conserving system-environment interaction, and that (2) we allow for the donor or acceptor to consist of multiple energy levels lying closely together. We establish explicit expressions for the rates and the efficiency (final donor-acceptor population difference) of the reaction. In particular, we show that the rate increases for a multi-level acceptor, but the efficiency does not.

  8. Neutron Transfer reactions induced by 8Li on 9Be

    CERN Document Server

    Guimarães, V; Amro, H; Assunção, M; Barioni, A; Becchetti, F D; Carmargo, O; Garcia, H; Jiang, H; Kolata, J J; Lichtenthäler, R; Lizcano, D; Martines-Quiroz, E; Jiang, Hao

    2007-01-01

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of 8Li on 9Be and the neutron transfer reactions 9Be(8Li,7Li)10Be and 9Be(8Li,9Li)8Be have been measured with a 27 MeV 8Li radioactive nuclear beam. Spectroscopic factors for 8Li|n=9Li and 7Li|n=8Li bound systems were obtained from the comparison between the experimental differential cross section and finite-range DWBA calculations with the code FRESCO. The spectroscopic factors obtained are compared to shell model calculations and to other experimental values from (d,p) reactions. Using the present values for the spectroscopic factor, cross sections for the direct neutron-capture reactions 7Li(n,g)8Li and 8Li(n,g)9Li were calculated in the framework of a potential model.

  9. Reaction of Np atom with H₂O in the gas phase: reaction mechanisms and ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Niu, Wenxia; Gao, Tao; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-10-01

    The gas-phase reaction of an Np atom with H2O was investigated using density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics. The reaction mechanisms and the corresponding potential energy profiles for different possible spin states were analyzed. Three reaction channels were found in the mechanism study: the isomerization channel, the H2 elimination channel, and the H atom elimination channel. The latter two were observed in the dynamics simulation. It was found that the branching ratio of the title reaction depends on the initial kinetic energy along the transition vector. Product energy distributions for the reaction were evaluated by performing direct classical trajectory calculations on the lowest sextet potential energy surface. The results indicate that most of the available energy appears as the translational energy of the products. The overall results indicate that the H2 elimination channel with low kinetic energy is thermodynamically favored but competes with the H atom elimination channel with higher kinetic energy.

  10. Controlled synthesis of photochromic polymer brushes by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piech, Marcin; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Long, Timothy Michael

    2005-06-01

    This work reports on the grafting of methyl methacrylate polymer brushes containing spirobenzopyran pendant groups from flat silica surfaces and colloidal particles utilizing atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to the kind of surface bound initiator, the type of halide and ligand used in the catalytic complex, the presence/absence of untethered initiator, and solvent type. This enabled synthesis of coatings up to 80 {+-} 3 nm thick with controlled spirobenzopyran content. While polymerization kinetics indicate the presence of chain termination reactions, the 'living' character of the process is confirmed by controlled formation of block copolymer brushes. UV/vis spectroscopy was used to characterize the UV-induced isomerization of spirobenzopyran to zwitterionic merocyanine and the thermal back-reaction. Spectral and kinetic analyses of this latter bleaching process points to the existence of free and associated merocyanines in the polymeric brush in both tetrahydrofuran and toluene. However, stabilization of merocyanine species by the polymer matrix is considerably greater in toluene with thermal back-reaction rates approaching those determined for solid dry films.

  11. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  12. Momentum Transfer of an Atom Moving in an Optical Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬涛; 徐至展

    2001-01-01

    When an atom moves in an optical cavity, the total momentum of the atom does not remain constant. We study a two-level atom moving slowly in an optical cavity, and give the time dependence of its mean momentum. It is found that when the initial momentum of the atom is larger than that of the photon, the mean momentum oscillates around a value less than the initial value. But, if the initial momentum is less than the momentum of the photon, the mean momentum of the atom is greater than its initial value in most cases.

  13. Reactions of pulsed laser produced boron and nitrogen atoms in a condensing argon stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lester; Hassanzadeh, Parviz; Burkholder, Thomas R.; Martin, J. M. L.

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of pulsed laser produced B and N atoms at high dilution in argon favored diboron species. At low laser power with minimum radiation, the dominant reaction with N2 gave BBNN (3Π). At higher laser power, reactions of N atoms contributed the B2N (2B2), BNB (2Σu+), NNBN (1Σ+), and BNBN (3Π) species. These new transient molecules were identified from mixed isotopic patterns, isotopic shifts, and ab initio calculations of isotopic spectra.

  14. Oxygen Atom Exchange Mechanism in Reaction of OH Radical with AsO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen atom exchange reaction mechanism in the reaction of OH radicals with AsO was investigated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) with 6-311++G(3df,3pd) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The calculated results suggest that the reaction between OH and AsO should make the oxygen atoms exchange rapidly because the barrier to isomerization is significantly less than the HO-AsO bond dissociation energy.

  15. Continuously transferring cold atoms in caesium double magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2006-01-01

    We have established a caesium double magneto-optical trap (MOT) system for cavity-QED experiment, and demonstrated the continuous transfer of cold caesium atoms from the vapour-cell MOT with a pressure of ~ 1 × 10-6 Pa to the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) MOT with a pressure of ~ 8 × 10-8 Pa via a focused continuous-wave transfer laser beam. The effect of frequency detuning as well as the intensity of the transfer beam is systematically investigated, which makes the transverse cooling adequate before the atoms leak out of the vapour-cell MOT to reduce divergence of the cold atomic beam. The typical cold atomic flux got from vapour-cell MOT is ~ 2 × 107 atoms/s. About 5 × 106 caesium atoms are recaptured in the UHV MOT.

  16. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate from magnetite nanoparticles at ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, G K; Dhamodharan, R

    2006-07-01

    The synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) brush from the surface of magnetite nanoparticles (core-shell structure), from initiator moieties anchored covalently to the nanoparticles, via room temperature atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is described. The surface-initiated polymerization was carried out from a surface-confined initiator containing a 2-bromoisobutyrate moiety with Cu(I)Br/PMDETA catalytic system. The initiator moiety was covalently anchored to the nanoparticles via a two step modification reaction scheme. Controlled polymerization was observed if ethyl-2-bromoisobutyrate (2-EiBrB) was added as a free/sacrificial initiator. A linear increase of molecular weight and a narrow molecular weight distribution of the PMMA formed in solution, provide evidence for a controlled surface-initiated polymerization, leading to surface-attached polymer brushes under mild conditions. The grafted PMMA provides good stability and dispersibility for the nanoparticles in organic solvents.

  17. On the nuclear $(n;t)-$reaction in the three-electron ${}^{6}$Li atom

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear $(n;t)-$reaction of the three-electron ${}^{6}$Li atom with thermal/slow neutrons is considered. An effective method has been developed for determining the probabilities of formation of various atoms and ions in different bound states. We discuss a number of fundamental questions directly related to numerical computations of the final state atomic probabilities. A few appropriate variational expansions for atomic wave functions of the incident lithium atom and final helium atom and/or tritium negatively charged ion are discussed. It appears that the final ${}^4$He atom arising during the nuclear $(n,{}^{6}$Li; ${}^4$He$,t)$-reaction in the three-electron Li atom can also be created in its triplet states. The formation of the quasi-stable three-electron $e^{-}_3$ during the nuclear $(n; t)-$reaction at the Li atom is briefly discussed. Bremsstrahlung emitted by atomic electrons accelerated by the rapidly moving fragments from this reaction is analyzed. The frequency spectrum of the emitted radiatio...

  18. A New Reaction-controlled Phase-transfer Catalyst System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Qiang LI; Xi Gao JIAN; Gui Mei WANG; Yan YU

    2004-01-01

    A new reaction-controlled phase-transfer catalyst system was designed and synthesized. In this system, heteropolytungstate [C7H7N(CH3)3]9PW9O34 was used for catalytic epoxidation of cyclohexene with H2O2 as the oxidant. The conversion of H2O2 was 100% and the yield of cyclohexene oxide was 87.1% based on cyclohexene. Infrared spectra showed that both fresh catalyst and the recovered catalyst do have completely same absorption peak, indicating the structure of catalyst is very stability and can be recycled.

  19. Pentanidium-catalyzed enantioselective phase-transfer conjugate addition reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Ting

    2011-03-09

    A new chiral entity, pentanidium, has been shown to be an excellent chiral phase-transfer catalyst. The enantioselective Michael addition reactions of tert-butyl glycinate-benzophenone Schiff base with various α,β- unsaturated acceptors provide adducts with high enantioselectivities. A successful gram-scale experiment at a low catalyst loading of 0.05 mol % indicates the potential for practical applications of this methodology. Phosphoglycine ester analogues can also be utilized as the Michael donor, affording enantioenriched α-aminophosphonic acid derivatives and phosphonic analogues of (S)-proline. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Electron transfer pathway analysis in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    CERN Document Server

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A new computational scheme to analyze electron transfer (ET) pathways in large biomolecules is presented with applications to ETs in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It consists of a linear combination of fragment molecular orbitals and an electron tunneling current analysis, which enables an efficient first-principles analysis of ET pathways in large biomolecules. The scheme has been applied to the ET from menaquinone to ubiquinone via nonheme iron complex in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. It has revealed that not only the central Fe$^{2+}$ ion but also particular histidine ligands are involved in the ET pathways in such a way to mitigate perturbations that can be caused by metal ion substitution and depletion, which elucidates the experimentally observed insensitivity of the ET rate to these perturbations.

  1. Quantum Transition State Theory for proton transfer reactions in enzymes

    CERN Document Server

    Bothma, Jacques P; McKenzie, Ross H

    2009-01-01

    We consider the role of quantum effects in the transfer of hyrogen-like species in enzyme-catalysed reactions. This study is stimulated by claims that the observed magnitude and temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects imply that quantum tunneling below the energy barrier associated with the transition state significantly enhances the reaction rate in many enzymes. We use a path integral approach which provides a general framework to understand tunneling in a quantum system which interacts with an environment at non-zero temperature. Here the quantum system is the active site of the enzyme and the environment is the surrounding protein and water. Tunneling well below the barrier only occurs for temperatures less than a temperature $T_0$ which is determined by the curvature of potential energy surface near the top of the barrier. We argue that for most enzymes this temperature is less than room temperature. For physically reasonable parameters quantum transition state theory gives a quantitative descr...

  2. A scheme for transferring an unknown atomic entangled state via cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tao; Ye Liu; Ni Zhi-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for transferring an unknown atomic entangled state via cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This scheme, which has a successful probability of 100 percent, does not require Bell-state measurement and performing any operations to reconstruct an initial state. Meanwhile, the scheme only involves atomfield interaction with a large detuning and does not require the transfer of quantum information between the atoms and cavity. Thus the scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. This scheme can also be extended to transfer ring an entangled state of n-atom.

  3. HYDROPHILIC MODIFICATION OF PPESK POROUS MEMBRANES VIA AQUEOUS SURFACE-INITIATED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuan Yi; You-yi Xu; Li-ping Zhu; Han-bang Dong; Bao-ku Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophilic surface modification of poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone)(PPESK)porous membranes was achieved via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization(ATRP)in aqueous medium.Prior to ATRP,chloromethyl groups were introduced onto PPESK main chains by chloromethylation.Chloromethylated PPESK(CMPPESK)was fabricated into porous membrane through phase inversion technique.Hydrophilic poly(poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate)(P(PEGMA))brushes were grafted from CMPPESK membrane under the initiation of benzyl chloride groups on membrane surface.The results of Fourier transform infrared(FT-IR)spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)confirmed the grafting of P(PEGMA)chains.Water contact angle measurements and protein adsorption experiments suggested that the hydrophilicity and anti-fouling ability of PPESK membrane were remarkably improved after the grafting of P(PEGMA)brushes.The addition of small amount of water in the reaction solvent apparently accelerated the progress of the grafting reaction.The use of CuCl2 in the catalyst system promoted the controllability of the ATRP reaction.

  4. The Unique Gas-Phase Chemistry of the [AuO](+) /CH4 Couple: Selective Oxygen-Atom Transfer to, Rather than Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction from, Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-08-26

    The thermal reaction of [AuO](+) with methane has been explored using FT-ICR mass spectrometry complemented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. In contrast to the previously studied congener [CuO](+) , and to [AgO](+) , [AuO](+) reacts with CH4 exclusively via oxygen-atom transfer to form CH3 OH, and a novel mechanistic scenario for this selective oxidation process has been revealed. Also, the origin of the inertness of the [AgO](+) /CH4 couple has been addressed computationally.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization, reverse atom transfer radical polymerization and radical polymerization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhruba Jyoti Haloi; Bishnu Prasad Koiry; Prithwiraj Mandal; Nikhil Kumar Singha

    2013-07-01

    This investigation reports a comparative study of poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) (PEHA) prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) and conventional free radical polymerization (FRP). The molecular weights and the molecular weight distributions of the polymers were measured by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis. Structural characterization of the polymers was carried out by 1H NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Thermal properties of the polymers were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The polymerization results and the thermal properties of PEHAs prepared via ATRP, RATRP and FRP were compared.

  6. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Tengborn, E

    Research on the structure of exotic nuclei is one of the most intriguing topics in present day nuclear physics. With the use of facilities for isotope separation on-line, such as ISOLDE at CERN, short-lived isotopes can be studied experimentally. Since 2002, the REX-ISOLDE facility enables radioactive ions produced by ISOLDE to be post-accelerated, increasing the energy of the ions enough to do nuclear transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. In this thesis, transfer reactions are used to study the structure of neutron-rich lithium isotopes through a series of experiments at REX-ISOLDE. The first experiment used a 9Li beam at 2.36 MeV/u impinging on a deuterated polyethylene target to study 10Li, 9Li and 8Li. For the (d,p)-channel the resonance ground state and a first excited state are observed and the results agree with theoretical calculations. The elastic channel agrees with Optical Model, OM, calculations. For the (d,t)-channel the shape of the angular distribution agrees with Distorted Wave Born Approx...

  7. Three-Body Model Analysis of Subbarrier alpha Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2011-01-01

    Subbarrier alpha transfer reaction 13C(6Li,d)17O(6.356 MeV, 1/2+) at 3.6 MeV is analyzed with a alpha + d + 13C three-body model, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for alpha + 13C --> 17O(6.356 MeV, 1/2+), which essentially determines the reaction rate of 13C(alpha,n)16O, is extracted. Breakup effects of 6Li in the initial channel and those of 17O in the final channel are investigated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC). The former is found to have a large back-coupling to the elastic channel, while the latter turns out significantly small. The transfer cross section calculated with Born approximation to the transition operator, including breakup states of 6Li, gives (C_{alpha 13C}{17O*})^2 =1.03 \\pm 0.29 fm^{-1}. This result is consistent with the value obtained by the previous DWBA calculation.

  8. Probing the pairing interaction through two-neutron transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margueron J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the pairing interaction in mean-field-based models is addressed. In particular, the possibility to use pair transfers as A tool to better constrain this interaction is discussed. First, pairing inter-actions with various density dependencies (surface/volume mixing are used in the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov + quasiparticle random-phase approximation model to generate the form factors to be used in reaction calculations. Cross sections for (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions are calculated in the one-step zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation for some Tin isotopes and for incident proton energies from 15 to 35 MeV. Three different surface/volume mixings of A zero-range density-dependent pairing interaction are employed in the microscopic calculations and the sensitivity of the cross sections to the different mixings is analyzed. Differences among the three different theoretical predictions are found espacially for the nucleus 136Sn and they are more important at the incident proton energy of 15 MeV. We thus indicate (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions with very neutron-rich Sn isotopes and at proton energies around 15 MeV as good experimental cases where the surface/volume mixing of the pairing interaction may be probed. In the second part of the manuscript, ground-state to ground-state transitions are investigated. Approximations made to estimate two-nucleon transfer probabilities in ground-state to ground-state transitions and the physical interpretation of these probabilities are discussed. Probabilities are often calculated by approximating both ground states of the initial nucleus A and of the final nucleus A±2 by the same quasiparticle vacuum. We analyze two improvements of this approach. First, the effect of using two different ground states with average numbers of particles A and A±2 is quantified. Second, by using projection techniques, the role of particle number restoration is analyzed. Our analysis

  9. Schwinger variational calculation of ionization of hydrogen atoms for large momentum transfers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Chakrabarti

    2002-03-01

    Schwinger variational principle is used here to study large momentum transfer cases of electron and positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen from the ground state at intermediate and moderately high energies. The results appear somewhat better compared to other theories.

  10. Determination of the Astrophysical S(E) Factors or Rates for Radiative Capture Reaction with One Nucleon Transfer Reaction%Determination of the Astrophysical S(E) Factors or Rates for Radiative Capture Reaction with One Nucleon Transfer Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志宏; 郭冰; 李云居; 苏俊; 李二涛; 白希祥; 王友宝; 曾晟; 王宝祥; 颜胜权; 李志常; 刘建成; 连钢; 金孙均; 刘鑫; 柳卫平

    2012-01-01

    The radiative capture reaction plays an important role in nuclear astrophysics. We have indirectly measured the astrophysical S(E) factors for some proton capture reactions and reaction rates for several neutron capture reactions with one nucleon transfer reactions at HI-13 tandem accelerator in recent years. Some of them are compiled into IAEA EXFOR database and JINA REACLIB project, and used in the network calculations of Big Bang nucleosynthesis and type-I X-ray bursts.

  11. Automatic generation of reaction energy databases from highly accurate atomization energy benchmark sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margraf, Johannes T; Ranasinghe, Duminda S; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2017-03-31

    In this contribution, we discuss how reaction energy benchmark sets can automatically be created from arbitrary atomization energy databases. As an example, over 11 000 reaction energies derived from the W4-11 database, as well as some relevant subsets are reported. Importantly, there is only very modest computational overhead involved in computing >11 000 reaction energies compared to 140 atomization energies, since the rate-determining step for either benchmark is performing the same 140 quantum chemical calculations. The performance of commonly used electronic structure methods for the new database is analyzed. This allows investigating the relationship between the performances for atomization and reaction energy benchmarks based on an identical set of molecules. The atomization energy is found to be a weak predictor for the overall usefulness of a method. The performance of density functional approximations in light of the number of empirically optimized parameters used in their design is also discussed.

  12. Ab initio Mechanism Study on the Reaction of Chlorine Atom with Formic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于海涛; 付宏刚; 等

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy surface(PES) for the reaction of Cl atom with HCOOH is predicted using ab initio molecular orbital calculation methods at UQCIDS(T,full)6-311++G(3df,2p)//UMP2(full)/6-311+G(d,P) level of theory with zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction.The calculated results show that the reaction mechanism of Cl atom with formic acid is a C-site hydrogen abstraction reaction from cis-HOC(H)O molecule by Cl atom with a 3.73kJ/mol reaction barrier height,leading to the formation of cis-HOCO radical which will reacts with Cl atom or other molecules in such a reaction system.Because the reaction barrier height of O-site hydrogen abstraction reaction from cis-HOC(H)O molecule by Cl atom which leads to the formation of HCO2 radical is 67.95kJ/mol,it is a secondary reaction channel in experiment,This is in good agreement with the prediction based on the previous experiments.

  13. Universal four-boson system: dimer-atom-atom Efimov effect and recombination reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Deltuva, A

    2013-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the four-boson system with resonant interactions are described. Momentum-space scattering equations for the four-particle transition operators are used. The properties of unstable tetramers with approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are determined. In addition, the three- and four-cluster recombination processes in the four-boson system are studied.

  14. Comparative Study of Cl-Atom Reactions in Solution Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Case, Amanda S; Crim, F Fleming

    2016-04-28

    A Cl atom can react with 2,3-dimethylbutane (DMB), 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (DMBE), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexadiene (DMHD) in solution via a hydrogen-abstraction reaction. The large exoergicity of the reaction between a Cl atom and alkenes (DMBE and DMHD) makes vibrational excitation of the HCl product possible, and we observe the formation of vibrationally excited HCl (v = 1) for both reactions. In CCl4, the branching fractions of HCl (v = 1), Γ (v = 1), for the Cl-atom reactions with DMBE and DMHD are 0.14 and 0.23, respectively, reflecting an increased amount of vibrational excitation in the products of the more exoergic reaction. In addition, Γ (v = 1) for both reactions is larger in the solvent CDCl3, being 0.23 and 0.40, as the less viscous solvent apparently dampens the vibrational excitation of the nascent HCl less effectively. The bimolecular reaction rates for the Cl reactions with DMB, DMBE, and DMHD in CCl4 are diffusion limited (having rate constants of 1.5 × 10(10), 3.6 × 10(10), and 17.5 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). In fact, the bimolecular reaction rate for Cl + DMHD exceeds a typical diffusion-limited reaction rate, implying that the attractive intermolecular forces between a Cl atom and a C═C bond increase the rate of favorable encounters. The 2-fold increase in the reaction rate of the Cl + DMBE reaction from that of the Cl + DMB reaction likely reflects the effect of the C═C bond, while both the number of C═C bonds and the molecular geometry likely play a role in the large reaction rate of the Cl + DMHD reaction.

  15. Kinetics of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate Initiated by Cellulose Chloroacetate in BMIMCI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-xiang; ZHAN Huai-yu; LIU Ming-hua; FU Shi-yu; LUCIA Lucian

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics of atom transfer radical polymerization(ATRP) of methyl methacrylate(MMA) initiated by cellulose based macroinitator,cellulose chloroacetate,performed in ionic liquid(1-N-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,BMIMCl),dimethyl sulfoxide(DMSO) and dimethyl formamide(DMF) were respectively studied in detail.The polymerizations were carried out under homogeneous conditions with CuBr as catalyst and 2,2'-bipyridine(bpy)as ligand.The dependences of the rate of polymerization on solvent,temperature,monomer/initiator ratio and catalyst/ligand ratio were presented.Plots of ln([M]0/[M]t) vs.time and molecular weight vs.conversion showed a linear dependence,indicating a constant number of propagating species throughout the polymerization as well as a negligible contribution of termination or transfer reactions.On the basis of an Arrhenius plot,the apparent energy of activation(△Eaapp) for ATRP of MMA in BMIMC1 was 16.6 kJ/mol which is much lower than that in diphenyl ether.

  16. Mass transfer in porous media with heterogeneous chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza S.M.A.G.Ulson de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modeling of the mass transfer process in packed-bed reactors is presented and takes into account dispersion in the main fluid phase, internal diffusion of the reactant in the pores of the catalyst, and surface reaction inside the catalyst. The method of volume averaging is applied to obtain the governing equation for use on a small scale. The local mass equilibrium is assumed for obtaining the one-equation model for use on a large scale. The closure problems are developed subject to the length-scale constraints and the model of a spatially periodic porous medium. The expressions for effective diffusivity, hydrodynamic dispersion, total dispersion and the Darcy's law permeability tensors are presented. Solution of the set of final equations permits the variations of velocity and concentration of the chemical species along the packed-bed reactors to be obtained.

  17. Exclusive photon-induced hadronic reactions at large momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Schweiger, W

    1995-01-01

    It is generally assumed that due to factorization of long- and short-distance dynamics perturbative QCD can be applied to exclusive hadronic reactions at large momentum transfers. Within such a perturbative approach diquarks turn out to be a useful phenomenological device to model non-perturbative effects still observable in the kinematic range accessible by present-days experiments. The basic ingredients of the perturbative formalism with diquarks, i.e. Feynman rules for diquarks and quark-diquark wave functions of baryons, are briefly summarized. Applications of the diquark model to the electromagnetic form factors of the proton in the space- as well as time-like region, Compton-scattering off protons, gamma-gamma -> p-pbar, and photoproduction of Kaons are discussed.

  18. Controlled Reactions between Ultracold Alkali and Metastable Helium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Knoop, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In an ultracold, optically trapped mixture of $^{87}$Rb and metastable triplet $^4$He atoms we have studied trap loss for different spin-state combinations, for which interspecies Penning ionization is the main two-body loss process. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the purely quartet spin-state combination, indicating strong suppression of Penning ionization loss by at least two orders of magnitude. For the other spin-mixtures we observe short lifetimes that depend linearly on the doublet character of the entrance channel. We compare the extracted loss rate coefficient with recent predictions of multichannel quantum-defect theory for reactive collisions involving a strong exothermic loss channel and find near-universal loss for doublet scattering. Our work demonstrates control of reactive collisions by internal atomic state preparation, which also implies magnetic field tunability.

  19. Growth and Destruction of PAH Molecules in Reactions with Carbon Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    A very high abundance of atomic carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and the high reactivity of these species toward different hydrocarbon molecules including benzene, raise questions regarding the stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in space. To test the efficiency of destruction of PAH molecules via reactions with atomic carbon, we performed a set of laboratory and computational studies of the reactions of naphthalene, anthracene, and coronene molecules with carbon atoms in the ground state. The reactions were investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K and by quantum chemical computations. Our studies suggest that all small and all large catacondensed PAHs react barrierlessly with atomic carbon, and therefore should be efficiently destroyed by such reactions in a broad temperature range. At the same time, large compact pericondensed PAHs should be more inert toward such a reaction. In addition, taking into account their higher photostability, much higher abundances of pericondensed PAHs should be expected in various astrophysical environments. The barrierless reactions between carbon atoms and small PAHs also suggest that, in the ISM, these reactions could lead to the bottom-up formation of PAH molecules.

  20. Formation of hyperbranched polymers in atom transfer radical copolymerization of MMA and DVB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hyperbranched poly(methyl methacrylate)s (HPMMAs) have been successfully prepared by atom transfer radical copolymerization of MMA and divinylbenzene (DVB).Kinetic study shows complete consumption of the initiator in 0.5 h,and relatively low polymerization rate when DVB content in the feed was high.By analyzing MALDI-TOF spectra of the resulting copolymers,the linear A n B (n=0,1,2,3) oligomers were formed in 0.5 h of polymerization,and then the oligomers reacted each other to form dimers,further reactions produced HPMMA.The SEC and NMR spectroscopies were used to trace the polymerization,and the results demonstrate that small amount of the branching reactions occur in the initial polymerization,and the branched polymers are significantly generated past a certain conversion depending upon the feed ratios.Raising the content of DVB in the monomer mixture can increase the pendent vinyl groups of the linear oligo-inimers,leading to gelation at low MMA conversion.

  1. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  2. Coherent population transfer in Rydberg potassium atom by a single frequency-chirped laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xian-Zhou; Ma Qiao-Zhi; Li Xiao-Hong

    2006-01-01

    By using the time-dependent multilevel approach, we have calculated the coherent population transfer among the quantum states of potassium atom by a single frequency-chirped laser pulse. The results show that the population can be efficiently transferred to a target state and be trapped there by using an ‘intuitive’ or a ‘counter-intuitive’ frequency sweep laser pulse in the case of ‘narrowband’ frequency-chirped laser pulse. It is also found that a pair of sequential ‘broadband’ frequency-chirped laser pulses can efficiently transfer population from one ground state of the A atom to the other one.

  3. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  4. Quantum Diffusion-Controlled Chemistry: Reactions of Atomic Hydrogen with Nitric Oxide in Solid Parahydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2015-12-17

    Our group has been working to develop parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy as a method to study low-temperature condensed-phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with various reaction partners. Guided by the well-defined studies of cold atom chemistry in rare-gas solids, the special properties of quantum hosts such as solid pH2 afford new opportunities to study the analogous chemical reactions under quantum diffusion conditions in hopes of discovering new types of chemical reaction mechanisms. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) isolated in solid pH2 over the 1.8 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term in situ irradiation the NO readily undergoes photolysis to yield HNO, NOH, NH, NH3, H2O, and H atoms. We map the postphotolysis reactions of mobile H atoms with NO and document first-order growth in HNO and NOH reaction products for up to 5 h after photolysis. We perform three experiments at 4.3 K and one at 1.8 K to permit the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics to be quantified. We observe Arrhenius-type behavior with a pre-exponential factor of A = 0.036(2) min(-1) and Ea = 2.39(1) cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to previous H atom reactions we have studied in solid pH2 that display definitively non-Arrhenius behavior. The contrasting temperature dependence measured for the H + NO reaction is likely related to the details of H atom quantum diffusion in solid pH2 and deserves further study.

  5. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity.

  6. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  7. Efficient scheme for entangled states and quantum information transfer with trapped atoms in a resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng-Bo; Li Fu-Li

    2011-01-01

    A protocol is proposed to generate atomic entangled states and implement quantum information transfer in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system. It utilizes Raman transitions or stimulated Raman adiabatic passages between two systems to entangle the ground states of two three-state A-type atoms trapped in a single mode cavity. It does not need the measurements on cavity field nor atomic detection and can be implemented in a deterministic fashion. Since the present protocol is insensitive to both cavity decay and atomic spontaneous emission,it may have some interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  8. Deformylation Reaction by a Nonheme Manganese(III)-Peroxo Complex via Initial Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Upadhyay, Pranav; Faponle, Abayomi S; Kumar, Jitendra; Nag, Sayanta Sekhar; Kumar, Devesh; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-09-05

    Metal-peroxo intermediates are key species in the catalytic cycles of nonheme metalloenzymes, but their chemical properties and reactivity patterns are still poorly understood. The synthesis and characterization of a manganese(III)-peroxo complex with a pentadentate bispidine ligand system and its reactivity with aldehydes was studied. Manganese(III)-peroxo can react through hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions instead of the commonly proposed nucleophilic addition reaction. Evidence of the mechanism comes from experiments which identify a primary kinetic isotope effect of 5.4 for the deformylation reaction. Computational modeling supports the established mechanism and identifies the origin of the reactivity preference of hydrogen-atom abstraction over nucleophilic addition.

  9. Ultra-Low-Temperature Reactions of Carbon Atoms with Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnokutski, S A; Renzler, M; Jäger, C; Henning, Th; Scheier, P

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of carbon atoms with dihydrogen have been investigated in liquid helium droplets at $T$ = 0.37 K. A calorimetric technique was applied to monitor the energy released in the reaction. The barrierless reaction between a single carbon atom and a single dihydrogen molecule was detected. Reactions between dihydrogen clusters and carbon atoms have been studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The formation of hydrocarbon cations of the type C$_m$H$_n^+$, with $m$ = 1-4 and $n$ = 1-15 was observed. With enhanced concentration of dihydrogen, the mass spectra demonstrated the main "magic" peak assigned to the CH$_5^+$ cation. A simple formation pathway and the high stability of this cation suggest its high abundance in the interstellar medium.

  10. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical method for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen atom system, is presented. The calculation of potentials and non-adiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wavefunctions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H, Na+H, and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20000 K.

  11. Atomization mechanisms and gas phase reactions in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frech, W.; Lindberg, A.O.; Lundberg, E.; Cedergren, A.

    1986-04-01

    The amounts of carbon monoxide as well as the total amounts of hydrocarbons generated in different types of graphite tubes were investigated under various experimental conditions. Depending on whether or not a matrix like 50 ..mu..g of sodium nitrate was added the amount of carbon monoxide formed during atomization at 1,700 K in a pyrocoated tube was in the range 60 to 600 nmoles when using a thermal pretreatment temperature of 1,200 K. The corresponding values for an uncoated tube were 250 to 1,300 nmoles. The effect of carbon monoxide on the atomization behaviour of silver, bismuth, chromium, copper and lead was investigated experimentally and the results were evaluated by means of thermodynamically based models. In accordance with theoretical predications, only lead, bismuth and chromium, which are assumed to be atomized by oxide decomposition, showed substantial shifts in their appearance temperatures in different gas mixtures, and changes in activation energies.

  12. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  13. Effect of Trapping Agent and Polystyrene Chain End Functionality on Radical Trap-Assisted Atom Transfer Radical Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Carnicom

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling reactions were performed to gauge the effect of the inclusion of a radical trap on the success of coupling reactions of monohalogenated polystyrene (PSX chains in atom transfer radical coupling (ATRC type reactions. The effect of both the specific radical trap chosen and the structure of the polymer chain end were evaluated by the extent of dimerization observed in a series of analogous coupling reactions. The commonly used radical trap 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP showed the highest amounts of dimerization for PSX (X = Br, Cl compared to coupling reactions performed in its absence or with a different radical trap. A dinitroxide coupling agent was also studied with the extent of coupling nearly matching the effectiveness of MNP in RTA (Radical trap-assisted-ATRC reactions, while N-nitroso and electron rich nitroso coupling agents were the least effective. (2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-piperin-l-yloxyl-capped PS (PS-TEMPO, prepared by NMP, was subjected to a coupling sequence conceptually similar to RTA-ATRC, but dimerization was not observed regardless of the choice of radical trap. Kinetic experiments were performed to observe rate changes on the coupling reaction of PSBr as a result of the inclusion of MNP, with substantial rate enhancements found in the RTA-ATRC coupling sequence compared to traditional ATRC.

  14. Intramolecular proton transfer and tunnelling reactions of hydroxyphenylbenzoxazole derivatives in Xenon at 15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walla, Peter J. [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department 010, Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany) and Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Technical University of Brunswick, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommerstr. 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: pwalla@gwdg.de; Nickel, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department 010, Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-06-06

    We investigated the site dependence and the tunnelling processes of the intramolecular proton and deuteron transfer in the triplet state of the compounds 2-(2'-hydroxy-4'-methylphenyl)benzoxazole (m-MeHBO) and 2-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methylphenyl)benzoxazoles (o-MeHBO) and their deuterio-oxy analogues in a solid xenon matrix. After singlet excitation there occurs an ultrafast intramolecular enol {yields} keto proton transfer and subsequent intersystem crossing mainly to the keto triplet state. In the triplet state of m-MeHBO, the proton transfer back to the lower enol triplet state is governed by tunnelling processes. In o-MeHBO, however, the enol triplet state is higher and therefore normally no tunnel reaction can be observed. Because of the external heavy atom-effect in a xenon matrix, we were able to investigate the reverse enol-keto-tunnelling after exciting directly the enol triplet state of deuterated o-MeHBO. The time constants of the reverse enol-keto tautomerization are similar to those of the normal keto-enol tautomerization. In a xenon matrix, the observed site-selective phosphorescence spectra are very well-resolved vibrationally. This allowed the study of the tunnel rates in different well-defined sites. The vibrational energies obtained in the spectra are in good agreement with vibrational energies found in resonant Raman and IR spectra of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO)

  15. Population transfer by femtosecond laser pulses in a ladder-type atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Xi-Jun; Li Ai-Yun; Tong Dian-Min; Liu Cheng-Pu

    2008-01-01

    The population transfer in a ladder-type atomic system driven by linearly polarized sech-shape femtosecond laser pulses is investigated by numerically solving Schrodinger equation without including the rotating wave approximation (RWA). It is shown that population transfer is mainly determined by the Rabi frequency (strength) of the driving laser field and the chirp rate, and that the ratio of the dipole moments and the pulse width also have a prominent effect on the population transfer. By choosing appropriate values of the above parameters, complete population transfer can be realized.

  16. AIM Study on the Reaction of CH2SH Radical with Fluorine Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-hong Sun; Yan-li Zeng; Ling-peng Meng; Shi-jun Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of CH2SH radical with fluorine atom was studied at the levels of B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP2(Full)/6-311G(d,p).The computational results show that the reaction has three channels and proceeds by the addition of fluorine atoms on carbon or sulfur sites of CH2SH,forming initial intermediates.The calculated results show that the channel,in which fluorine attaches to the carbon atom to form CH2S and HF,is the most likely reaction pathway.Topological analysis of electron density was carried out for the three channels.The change trends of the chemical bonds on the reaction paths were discussed.The energy transition states and the structure transition regions (states) of the three channels were found.The calculated results show that the structure transition regions axe broad in unobvions exothermic reactions or unobvions endothermic reactions,and are narrow in obvious exothermic reactions or obvious endothermic reactions.

  17. Correlation Between Energy Transfer Rate and Atomization Energy of Some Trinitro Aromatic Explosive Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-hong Ge; Xin-lu Cheng; Zheng-lai Liu; Xiang-dong Yang; Fang-fang Dong

    2008-01-01

    An assumptive theoretical relationship is suggested to describe the property of molecular atomization energy and energy transfer rate in the initiation of explosions. To investigate the relationship between atomization energy and energy transfer rate, the number of doorway modes of explosives is estimated by the theory of Dlott and Fayer in which the rate is proportional to the number of normal mode vibrations. It was evaluated frequencies of normal mode vibrations of eight molecules by means of density functional theory (DFT) at the b3p86/6-31G(d,p) level. It is found that the number of doorway modes shows a linear correlation to the atomization energies of the molecules, which were also calculated by means of the same method. A mechanism of this correlation is discussed. It is also noted that in those explosives with similar molecular structure and molecular weight, the correlation between the atomization energy and the number of doorway modes is higher.

  18. Entrance Channel Stereospecificity of Photoinitiated H-Atom Reactions in Weakly Bonded Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Koo; Chen, Y.; Oh, D.; Wittig, C.

    1990-08-01

    Hot H-atom reactions photoinitiated in T-shaped CO2-HBr and nearly-linear CO2-HCl complexes show remarkably different reaction probabilities. Broadside H-atom approaches in CO2-HBr complexes are greatly favoured over the relatively endon approaches of CO2-HCl complexes, a striking steric effect. Photoinitiated hot H-atom reactions with N2O result in a much lower [NH]/[OH] ratio with N2O-HI complexes than under single-collision conditions at the same photolysis wavelength. In addition, OH rotational distributions differ markedly between bulk and complexed conditions, while NH rotational distributions are similar. These results can be interpreted in terms of entrance channel stereospecificity influencing chemically distinct product channels.

  19. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  20. Quantum state transfer and logic gates with two 3-level atoms in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Chu, Shih-I.

    2004-08-01

    We present a new way to implement quantum controlled phase-shift gate, quantum exchange gate (SWAP gate), and quantum state transfer with two 3-level atoms in cavity QED. The method does not involve real excitation of a cavity photon during the operation, thus decoherence induced due to the cavity-photon decay is minimized. In addition, it is remarkable that for all present purposes, no auxiliary atoms or any measurement is needed. Therefore, the operation is significantly simplified.

  1. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Li; XU Xin-Ye

    2011-01-01

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp.The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition.

  2. Atomic capture and transfer of negative pions stopped in binary mixtures of hydrogen with polyatomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyev, V.A.; Levay, B.; Minkova, A.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Horvath, D.

    1985-12-01

    The atomic capture and transfer of stopped negative pions have been studied in binary gas mixtures of H/sub 2/+M, where M is CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/, CClF/sub 3/, CBrF/sub 3/ or SF/sub 6/. The ..pi../sup 0/ yield, versus relative atomic concentration Csub(A) of M, goes through a maximum at Csub(A)proportional0.1 and levels off at zero at high concentrations. This phenomenon together with other observed characteristics of the atomic capture and transfer of pions in these systems is interpreted in the frame of a phenomenological model. The average transfer coefficients anti ..lambda..sub(Z) exhibit a weak concentration dependence. The estimated average atomic capture ratios anti A(Z/H) are lower than those found for noble gases, probably because of the mutual screening of the constituent atoms in the molecules. The probability of pion capture in an atomic orbit is not proportional to the stopping power of the components of the mixture. (orig.).

  3. Is H Atom Abstraction Important in the Reaction of Cl with 1-Alkenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M P; Vijayakumar, S; Sharma, A; Rajakumar, B; Dhanya, S

    2016-06-23

    The relative yields of products of the reaction of Cl atoms with 1-alkenes (C4-C9) were determined to see whether H atom abstraction is an important channel and if it is to identify the preferred position of abstraction. The presence of all the possible positional isomers of long chain alkenones and alkenols among the products, along with chloroketones and chloroalcohols, confirms the occurrence of H atom abstraction. A consistent pattern of distribution of abstraction products is observed with oxidation at C4 (next to allyl) being the lowest and that at CH2 groups away from the double bond being the highest. This contradicts with the higher stability of allyl (C3) radical. For a better understanding of the relative reactivity, ab initio calculations at MP2/6-311+G (d,p) level of theory are carried out in the case of 1-heptene. The total rate coefficient, calculated using conventional transition state theory, was found to be in good agreement with the experimental value at room temperature. The preferred position of Cl atom addition is predicted to be the terminal carbon atom, which matches with the experimental observation, whereas the rate coefficients calculated for individual channels of H atom abstraction do not explain the observed pattern of products. The distribution of abstraction products except at C4 is found to be better explained by reported structure activity relationship, developed from experimental rate coefficient data. This implies the reactions to be kinetically dictated and emphasizes the importance of secondary reactions.

  4. Functionalization of nylon membranes via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F J; Zhao, J P; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G; Li, J

    2007-07-31

    The ability to manipulate and control the surface properties of nylons is of crucial importance to their widespread applications. In this work, surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is employed to tailor the functionality of the nylon membrane and pore surfaces in a well-controlled manner. A simple two-step method, involving the activation of surface amide groups with formaldehyde and the reaction of the resulting N-methylol polyamide with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, was first developed for the covalent immobilization of ATRP initiators on the nylon membrane and its pore surfaces. Functional polymer brushes of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(ethylene glycol)monomethacrylate (PEGMA) were prepared via surface-initiated ATRP from the nylon membranes. A kinetics study revealed that the chain growth from the membranes was consistent with a "controlled" process. The dormant chain ends of the grafted HEMA polymer (P(HEMA)) and PEGMA polymer (P(PEGMA)) on the nylon membranes could be reactivated for the consecutive surface-initiated ATRP to produce the corresponding nylon membranes functionalized by P(HEMA)-b-P(PEGMA) and P(PEGMA)-b-P(HEMA) diblock copolymer brushes. In addition, membranes with grafted P(HEMA) and P(PEGMA) brushes exhibited good resistance to protein adsorption and fouling under continuous-flow conditions.

  5. Constructing Functional Ionic Membrane Surface by Electrochemically Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Ran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sodium polyacrylate (PAANa contained polyethersulfone membrane that was fabricated by preparation of PES-NH2 via nonsolvent phase separation method, the introduction of bromine groups as active sites by grafting α-Bromoisobutyryl bromide, and surface-initiated electrochemically atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-eATRP of sodium acrylate (AANa on the surface of PES membrane. The polymerization could be controlled by reaction condition, such as monomer concentration, electric potential, polymerization time, and modifier concentration. The membrane surface was uniform when the monomer concentration was 0.9 mol/L, the electric potential was −0.12 V, the polymerization time was 8 h, and the modifier concentration was 2 wt.%. The membrane showed excellent hydrophilicity and blood compatibility. The water contact angle decreased from 84° to 68° and activated partial thromboplastin increased from 51 s to 84 s after modification of the membranes.

  6. Surface modification of nanodiamond through metal free atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Shi, Kexin; Heng, Chunning; Mao, Liucheng; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-12-01

    Surface modification of nanodiamond (ND) with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [poly(MPC)] has been achieved by using metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The ATRP initiator was first immobilized on the surface of ND through direct esterification reaction between hydroxyl group of ND and 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The initiator could be employed to obtain ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites through SI-ATRP using an organic catalyst. The final functional materials were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis in detailed. All of these characterization results demonstrated that ND-poly(MPC) have been successfully obtained via metal free photo-initiated SI-ATRP. The ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites shown enhanced dispersibility in various solvents as well as excellent biocompatibility. As compared with traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP is rather simple and effective. More importantly, this preparation method avoided the negative influence of metal catalysts. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a promising strategy for fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with great potential for different applications especially in biomedical fields.

  7. Investigation of Surface Reaction and Degradation Mechanism of Kapton during Atomic Oxygen Exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuwang DUO; Meishuan LI; Yanchun ZHOU; Jingyu TONG; Gang SUN

    2003-01-01

    The erosion behavior of Kapton when exposed to atomic oxygen (AO) environment in the ground-based simulation facility was studied. The chemical and physical changes of sample surfaces after exposed to AO fluxes were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that Kapton underwent dramatically degradation, including much mass loss and change of surface morphologies; vacuum outgassing effect of Kapton was the key factor for initial mass loss in the course of atomic oxygen beam exposures. XPS analysis showed that the carbonyl group in Kapton reacted with oxygen atoms to generate CO2, then CO2 desorbed from Kapton surface. In addition, PMDA in the polyimide structure degraded due to the reaction with atomic oxygen of 5 eV.

  8. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  9. Cation-modulated electron-transfer channel: H-atom transfer vs proton-coupled electron transfer with a variable electron-transfer channel in acylamide units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2007-08-08

    The mechanism of proton transfer (PT)/electron transfer (ET) in acylamide units was explored theoretically using density functional theory in a representative model (a cyclic coupling mode between formamide and the N-dehydrogenated formamidic radical, FF). In FF, PT/ET normally occurs via a seven-center cyclic proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism with a N-->N PT and an O-->O ET. However, when different hydrated metal ions are bound to the two oxygen sites of FF, the PT/ET mechanism may significantly change. In addition to their inhibition of PT/ET rate, the hydrated metal ions can effectively regulate the FF PT/ET cooperative mechanism to produce a single pathway hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) or a flexible proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism by changing the ET channel. The regulation essentially originates from the change in the O...O bond strength in the transition state, subject to the binding ability of the hydrated metal ions. In general, the high valent metal ions and those with large binding energies can promote HAT, and the low valent metal ions and those with small binding energies favor PCET. Hydration may reduce the Lewis acidity of cations, and thus favor PCET. Good correlations among the binding energies, barrier heights, spin density distributions, O...O contacts, and hydrated metal ion properties have been found, which can be used to interpret the transition in the PT/ET mechanism. These findings regarding the modulation of the PT/ET pathway via hydrated metal ions may provide useful information for a greater understanding of PT/ET cooperative mechanisms, and a possible method for switching conductance in nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Fast adiabatic quantum state transfer and entanglement generation between two atoms via dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2017-01-01

    We propose a dressed-state scheme to achieve shortcuts to adiabaticity in atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics for speeding up adiabatic two-atom quantum state transfer and maximum entanglement generation. Compared with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the dressed-state scheme greatly shortens the operation time in a non-adiabatic way. By means of some numerical simulations, we determine the parameters which can guarantee the feasibility and efficiency both in theory and experiment. Besides, numerical simulations also show the scheme is robust against the variations in the parameters, atomic spontaneous emissions and the photon leakages from the cavity.

  11. The $^{136}$Xe + $^{208}$Pb reaction: A test of models of multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, J S; Loveland, W; Zhu, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Carpenter, M P; Greene, J P; Janssens, R V F; Lauritsen, T; McCutchan, E A; Sonzogni, A A; Chiara, C J; Harker, J L; Walters, W B

    2015-01-01

    The yields of over 200 projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) from the interaction of (E$_{c.m.}$=450 MeV) $^{136}$Xe with a thick target of $^{208}$Pb were measured using Gammasphere and off-line $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy, giving a comprehensive picture of the production cross sections in this reaction.The measured yields were compared to predictions of the GRAZING model and the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner using a quantitative metric, the theory evaluation factor, {\\bf tef}. The GRAZING model predictions are adequate for describing the yields of nuclei near the target or projectile but grossly underestimate the yields of all other products. The predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner correctly describe the magnitude and maxima of the observed TLF transfer cross sections for a wide range of transfers ($\\Delta$Z = -8 to $\\Delta$Z = +2). However for $\\Delta$Z =+4, the observed position of the maximum in the distribution is four neutrons richer than the predicted maximum. The pre...

  12. Doping Reaction of some Nanotubes with Aluminium Atom: A Thermodynamic PM6 and ONIOM Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zeighami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The doping reaction of boron nitride and carbon nanotubes with aluminium atom was theoretically investigated. ONIOM method and PM6 method have been used to evaluate the thermochemistry of doping reactions of single walled boron nitride nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. The enthalpy changes, Gibbs free energy changes, of studied doping reactions were evaluated at different temperatures. All nanotubes were single-walled and finite length with hydrogen saturation in the terminal atoms. The thermodynamic calculations based on the ONIOM and PM6 levels results showed (8,0CNT is the best candidate for Al-doping reaction.result suggest the aluminum doped boron nitride nanotubes and carbon nanotubes may be considered the proper carries for the drug delivery.

  13. The reaction of nitromethane with hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the gas phase. A mechanistic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Thomsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction between H and CH3NO2, has been studied in a discharge flow system using electron paramagnetic resonance and modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry for the detection of reactants and products. Deuterium atoms have, in addition to CD3NO2, been used to support...... the proposed reaction mechanism. The reaction was studied with the atomic reactant in slight excess at 298 K and a total pressure of 2 Torr. Two concurrent reaction channels: (1a) H+CH3NO2-->HONO+.CH3 and (1b) H+CH3NO2-->CH3NO+.OH were observed. The branching ratio, k1a/(k1a+k1b), is 0.7+/-0.2....

  14. Oxygen-atom transfer chemistry and thermolytic properties of a di-tert-butylphosphate-ligated Mn4O4 cubane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allsburg, Kurt M; Anzenberg, Eitan; Drisdell, Walter S; Yano, Junko; Tilley, T Don

    2015-03-16

    [Mn4O4{O2P(OtBu)2}6] (1), an Mn4O4 cubane complex combining the structural inspiration of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex with thermolytic precursor ligands, was synthesized and fully characterized. Core oxygen atoms within complex 1 are transferred upon reaction with an oxygen-atom acceptor (PEt3), to give the butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(OtBu)2}6(OPEt3)2]. The cubane structure is restored by reaction of the latter complex with the O-atom donor PhIO. Complex 1 was investigated as a precursor to inorganic Mn metaphosphate/pyrophosphate materials, which were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the fate of the Mn4O4 unit. Under the conditions employed, thermolyses of 1 result in reduction of the manganese to Mn(II) species. Finally, the related butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(pin)}6(bpy)2] (pin = pinacolate) is described.

  15. Kinetic Studies of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerisations of Styrene and Chloromethylstyrene with Poly(3-hexyl thiophene Macroinitiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattawoot Rattanathamwat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hexyl thiophene-b-poly(styrene-co-chloromethylstyrene copolymers, to be used as a prepolymer for preparing donor-acceptor block copolymers for organic solar cells, have been synthesised by reacting P3HT macroinitiators with styrene and chloromethylstyrene via three types of atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP systems, which are (1 a normal ATRP, (2 activators generated by electron transfer (AGET, and (3 a simultaneous reverse and normal initiation (SR&NI. The kinetics of these ATRP systems were studied as a function of monomers to the macroinitiator molar ratio. It was found that all of the three types of ATRP systems led to first order kinetics with respect to monomers. The highest rate constant (k of 3.4 × 10−3 s−1 was obtained from the SR&NI ATRP system. The molecular weights of the product determined by the GPC were lower than were the theoretical values. The result was discussed in light of the chain transfer reaction to the poly(chloromethylstyrene repeating units. Morphology of the synthesized block copolymers, examined by an atomic force microscopy (AFM, were also compared and discussed.

  16. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-07-17

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (k(t)) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt(147) and Pt(55)). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high k(t) conditions with simultaneous detection of H(2)O(2). At low k(t) (0.02 to 0.12 cm s(-1)) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, n(eff), is 3.7 for Pt(147) and 3.4 for Pt(55). As k(t) is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H(2)O(2) detected remains constant, such that n(eff) barely changes over the entire k(t) range explored (0.02 cm s(-1)). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect n(eff), which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in n(eff) for the two sizes of Pt DENs (n(eff) = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt(147) and Pt(55), respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect.

  17. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with hydrogen peroxide as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundström, T.; Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependence for the reaction of H atoms with H2O2 at pH 1 has been determined using pulse radiolysis technique. The reaction was studied in the temperature range 10-120 degreesC. The rate constant at 25 degreesC was found to be 5.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and the activa...

  18. Ultracold chemical reactions of a single Rydberg atom in a dense gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Engel, Felix; Kleinbach, Kathrin S; Böttcher, Fabian; Westphal, Karl M; Gaj, Anita; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Within a dense environment ($\\rho \\approx 10^{14}\\,$atoms/cm$^3$) at ultracold temperatures ($T 140$ compared to $1\\,\\mu\\text{s}$ at $n=90$. In addition, a second observed reaction mechanism, namely Rb$_2^+$ molecule formation, was studied. Both reaction products are equally probable for $n=40$ but the fraction of Rb$_2^+$ created drops to below 10$\\,$% for $n\\ge90$.

  19. Reactions of atomic cations with methane: gas phase room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayesteh, Alireza; Lavrov, Vitali V; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2009-05-14

    Reactions of methane have been measured with 59 atomic metal cations at room temperature in helium bath gas at 0.35 Torr using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. The atomic cations were produced at approximately 5500 K in an ICP source and allowed to decay radiatively and to thermalize by collisions with argon and helium atoms prior to reaction. Rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions of fourth-row atomic cations from K(+) to Se(+), of fifth-row atomic cations from Rb(+) to Te(+) (excluding Tc(+)), of sixth-row atomic cations from Cs(+) to Bi(+), and of the lanthanide cations from La(+) to Lu(+) (excluding Pm(+)). Two primary reaction channels were observed: C-H bond insertion with elimination of H(2), and CH(4) addition. The bimolecular H(2) elimination was observed in the reactions of CH(4) with As(+), Nb(+), and some sixth-row metal cations, i.e., Ta(+), W(+), Os(+), Ir(+), Pt(+); secondary and higher-order H(2) elimination was observed exclusively for Ta(+), W(+), and Ir(+) ions. All other transition-metal cations except Mn(+) and Re(+) were observed to react with CH(4) exclusively by addition, and up to two methane molecules were observed to add sequentially to most transition-metal ions. CH(4) addition was also observed for Ge(+), Se(+), La(+), Ce(+), and Gd(+) ions, while the other main-group and lanthanide cations did not react measurably with methane.

  20. Role of transfer reactions in heavy-ion collisions at the Coulomb barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollarolo Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One and two neutron transfer reactions are discussed in the semiclassical formalism. The twoneutrons transfer cross sections are calculated in the successive approximation. Comparisons with new experimental data below the Coulomb barrier are discussed in term of transfer probabilities as a function of the distance of closest approach for Coulomb scattering.

  1. Coupled-channels description of the 40Ca+58,64Ni transfer and fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Scamps, G; Hagino, K; Haas, F; Courtin, S

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary experimental data for nucleon transfer reactions of the 40Ca+58Ni and 40Ca+64Ni systems are analyzed with the coupled- channels approach. It is shown that a simple treatment for the transfer in the coupled-channels method cannot reproduce simultaneously the transfer probabilities and the sub-barrier enhancement of fusion cross sections.

  2. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals.

  3. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  4. Effect of atomic transfer on the decay of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Zin, P; Charzynski, S; Herschbach, N; Tol, P; Hogervorst, W; Vassen, W; Zin, Pawel; Dragan, Andrzej; Charzynski, Szymon; Herschbach, Norbert; Tol, Paul; Hogervorst, Wim; Vassen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    We present a model describing the decay of a Bose-Einstein condensate, which assumes the system to remain in thermal equilibrium during the decay. We show that under this assumption transfer of atoms occurs from the condensate to the thermal cloud enhancing the condensate decay rate.

  5. Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization from Electrospun Mats: An Alternative to Nafion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Tynelius, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications are synthesized by surface-initiated(SI) atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene)is electrospun into 50 μm thick mat, which is then employed as multifunctionalinitiator for copper...

  6. Acrylamide Homopolymers and Acrylamide-N-Isopropylacrylamide Block Copolymers by Atomic Transfer Radical Polymerization in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, D. A. Z.; Raffa, P.; Picchioni, F.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylamide has been accomplished in aqueous media at room temperature. By using methyl 2-chloropropionate (MeClPr) as the initiator and tris[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-amine (Me6TREN)/copper halogenide (CuX) as the catalyst system, different linear polya

  7. Polymer coating comprising 2-methoxyethyl acrylate units synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012184029A The present invention relates to preparation of a polymer coating comprising or consisting of polymer chains comprising or consisting of units of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate synthesized by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI ATRP) such as ARGET SI ATRP...... or AGET SI ATRP and uses of said polymer coating....

  8. Novel fluorinated block copolymer architectures fuelled by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Block copolymers based on poly(pentafluorostyrene), PFS, in various numbers and of different lengths, and polystyrene are prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Di- and triblock copolymers with varying amounts of PFS were synthesized employing either I phenylethylbromide or 1,4-...

  9. Novel Polymers Based on Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of 2-Methoxyethyl Acrylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bednarek, Melania; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been employed in the polymerization of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate (MEA) initiated by ethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate in bulk or in toluene solution at 90– 95 C with the catalytic systems Cu(I)Br/PMDETA or HMTETA. Kinetics investigations revealed that ATRP...

  10. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated Ionomers by Chemical Modification and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller

    of hydrocarbon macromolecular architectures, PSU with postsulfonated polystyrene (PS) grafts are investigated. Here, IEC is controlled through the degree of substitution, the graft length and DS. The grafting is performed with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The third assessment is dedicated...

  11. Protein repellent hydrophilic grafts prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization from polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Eskimergen, Rüya

    2012-01-01

    Grafting of poly(ethylene glycol)methacrylate (PEGMA) and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm) from UV-initiator modified polypropylene (PP) was performed by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP). The modification and hydrophilization of the PP substrates were confirmed...

  12. Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization - a Technique to Develop Biofunctional Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The initial formation of initiating sites for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on various polymer surfaces and numerous inorganic and metallic surfaces is elaborated. The subsequent ATRP grafting of a multitude of monomers from such surfaces to generate thin covalently linked polymer...

  13. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, an experimental approach for fission investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Derkx, X; Caamaño, M; Delaune, O; Schmidt, K -H; Clément, E; Dijon, A; Heinz, A; Roger, T; Audouin, L; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Cortina, D; Doré, D; Fernández-Domínguez, B; Jacquot, B; Jurado, 1 B; Navin, A; Paradela, C; Ramos, D; Romain, P; Salsac, M D; Schmitt, C

    2013-01-01

    Inelastic and multi-nucleon transfer reactions between a $^{238}$U beam, accelerated at 6.14 MeV/u, and a $^{12}$C target were used for the production of neutron-rich, fissioning systems from U to Cm. A Si telescope, devoted to the detection of the target-like nuclei, provided a characterization of the fissioning systems in atomic and mass numbers, as well as in excitation energy. Cross-sections, angular and excitation-energy distributions were measured for the inelastic and transfer channels. Possible excitations of the target-like nuclei were experimentally investigated for the first time, by means of g -ray measurements. The decays from the first excited states of $^{12}$C, $^{11}$B and $^{10}$Be were observed with probabilities of 0.12 - 0.14, while no evidence for the population of higher-lying states was found. Moreover, the fission probabilities of $^{238}$U, $^{239}$Np and $^{240,241,242}$Pu and $^{244}$Cm were determined as a function of the excitation energy.

  14. A new class of rhodium complexes containing free donor atoms and their intramolecular substitution reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG, Hua; YUAN, Guo-Qing; ZHANG, Shu-Feng; PAN, Ping-Lai; DIAO, Kai-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    A new class of rhodium complexes with high catalytic activity as well as excellent stability, which was used as catalyst for carlbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, is reported. It con tains free donor (namely un-coordinated donor) atoms which enable to improve its stability by intramolecular substitution rearction. Its synthesis, characteristic and catalytic reaction were discussed here.

  15. Learning about Regiochemistry from a Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears-Dundes, Christopher; Huon, Yoeup; Hotz, Richard P.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment has been developed in which the hydrogen-atom abstraction and the coupling of propionitrile, using Fenton's reagent, are investigated. Students learn about the regiochemistry of radical formation, the stereochemistry of product formation, and the interpretation of GC-MS data, in a safe reaction that can be easily completed in one…

  16. Modeling Mechanism and Growth Reactions for New Nanofabrication Processes by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Simon D; Dey, Gangotri; Maimaiti, Yasheng; Ablat, Hayrensa; Filatova, Ekaterina A; Fomengia, Glen N

    2016-07-01

    Recent progress in the simulation of the chemistry of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented for technologically important materials such as alumina, silica, and copper metal. Self-limiting chemisorption of precursors onto substrates is studied using density functional theory so as to determine reaction pathways and aid process development. The main challenges for the future of ALD modeling are outlined.

  17. Neutron Transfer Reactions for Deformed Nuclei Using Sturmian Basis

    CERN Document Server

    Gueorguiev, V G; Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2007-01-01

    We study the spin-parity distribution P(J$^{\\pi}$,E) of $^{156}$Gd excited states above the neutron separation energy that are expected to be populated via the neutron pickup reaction $^{157}$Gd($^{3}$He,$^{4}$He)$^{156}$Gd. In general, modeling of the spin-parity distribution is important for the applicability of the surrogate reaction technique as a method of deducing reaction cross sections. We model excited states in $^{156}$Gd as rotational states built on intrinsic states consisting of a hole in the core where the hole represents neutron removal form a deformed single particle state. The reaction cross section to each excited state is calculated using standard reaction code that uses spherical reaction form-factor input. The spectroscopic factor associated with each form-factor is the expansion coefficient of the deformed neutron state in a spherical Sturmian basis consisting of the spherical reaction form-factors.

  18. Muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms; Transfert de charge muonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupays, A

    2004-06-01

    This work concerns muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms. Recently, a method of measurement of the hyperfine structure of ground-state muonic hydrogen based on the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to oxygen has been proposed. This proposal is based on measurements which where performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute in the early nineties which indicate that the muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to oxygen increases by a factor of 4 going from thermal to 0.12 eV energies. The motivation of our calculations was to confirm this behaviour. To study the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate, we have used a time-independent close-coupling method. We have set up an hyperspherical elliptic formalism valid for nonzero total angular momentum which allows accurate computations of state-to-state reactive and charge exchange processes. We have applied this formalism to muon-transfer process to oxygen and neon. The comparison with experimental results is in both cases excellent. Finally, the neon transfer rate dependence with energy suggests to use neon instead of oxygen to perform a measurement of the hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen. The results of accurate calculations of the muon transfer rates from muonic protium and deuterium atoms to nitrogen, oxygen and neon are also reported. Very good agreement with measured rates is obtained and for the three systems, the isotopic effect is perfectly reproduced. (author)

  19. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.

  20. The effect of moderators on the reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with methane

    CERN Document Server

    Estrup, Peder J.

    1960-01-01

    The reaction of recoil tritium with methane has been examined in further detail. The previous hypothesis that this system involves a hot displacement reaction of high kinetic energy hydrogen to give CH$_{3}$T, CH$_{2}$T and HT is confirmed. The effect of moderator on this process is studied by the addition of noble gases. As predicted these gases inhibit the hot reaction action, their efficiency in this respect being He > Ne > A > Se. The data are quantitatively in accord with a theory of hot atom kinetics. The mechanism of the hot displacement process is briefly discussed.

  1. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...... vibrational frequency changes, local mode anharmonicity, and rotational reorganization, in both diabatic and adiabatic limits. Systems for which this formalism is appropriate are discussed....

  2. The electronic behavior of a photosynthetic reaction center monitored by conductive atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikayama, Takeshi; Iida, Kouji; Suemori, Yoshiharu; Dewa, Takehisa; Miyashita, Tokuji; Nango, Mamoru; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    The conductivity of a photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was measured with conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) on SAM-modified Au(111) substrates. 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME), 2-mercaptoacetic acid (MAC), 2-mercaptopyridine (2MP) and 4-mercaptopyridine (4MP) were prepared as SAM materials to investigate the stability and morphology of RCs on the substrate by using near-IR absorption spectroscopy and AFM, respectively. The clear presence of the three well known RC near-IR absorption peaks indicates that the RCs were native on the SAM-modified Au(111). Dense grains with various diameters of 5-20 nm, which corresponded to mixtures of single RCs up to aggregates of 10, were observed in topographs of RCs adsorbed on all the different SAM-modified Au(111) substrates. The size of currents obtained from the RC using a bare conductive cantilever were produced in the following order for SAM molecules: 2MP > 2ME > 4MP > MAC. A clear rectification of this current was observed for the modification of the Au(111) substrate with the pi-conjugated thiol, 2MP, indicating that 2MP was effective in both promoting the specific orientation of the RCs on the electrode and electron injection into the RC. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that the 2MP is better mediator for the electron transfer between a quinone and substrate. The current with 2MP-modified cantilever was twice as high as that obtained with the Au-coated one alone, indicating that 2MP has an important role in lowering the electron injection barrier between special pair side of RC and gold electrode.

  3. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J; Hutson, Jeremy M

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH3X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH3X + A → CH3 + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  4. Photoinduced Charge Transfer at Metal Oxide/Oxide Interfaces Prepared with Plasma Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpuneet

    LiNbO3 and ZnO have shown great potential for photochemical surface reactions and specific photocatalytic processes. However, the efficiency of LiNbO3 is limited due to recombination or back reactions and ZnO exhibits a chemical instability in a liquid cell. In this dissertation, both materials were coated with precise thickness of metal oxide layers to passivate the surfaces and to enhance their photocatalytic efficiency. LiNbO 3 was coated with plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) ZnO and Al2O3, and molecular beam deposited TiO2 and VO2. On the other hand, PEALD ZnO and single crystal ZnO were passivated with PEALD SiO2 and Al2O3. Metal oxide/LiNbO3 heterostructures were immersed in aqueous AgNO3 solutions and illuminated with ultraviolet (UV) light to form Ag nanoparticle patterns. Alternatively, Al2O3 and SiO2/ZnO heterostructures were immersed in K3PO 4 buffer solutions and studied for photoelectrochemical reactions. A fundamental aspect of the heterostructures is the band alignment and band bending, which was deduced from in situ photoemission measurements. This research has provided insight to three aspects of the heterostructures. First, the band alignment at the interface of metal oxides/LiNbO 3, and Al2O3 or SiO2/ZnO were used to explain the possible charge transfer processes and the direction of carrier flow in the heterostructures. Second, the effect of metal oxide coatings on the LiNbO3 with different internal carrier concentrations was related to the surface photochemical reactions. Third is the surface passivation and degradation mechanism of Al2O 3 and SiO2 on ZnO was established. The heterostructures were characterized after stability tests using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that limited thicknesses of ZnO or TiO2 on polarity patterned LiNbO3 (PPLN) enhances the Ag+ photoinduced reduction process. ZnO seems more efficient

  5. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  6. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from dioxygen to phosphines via a bridging sulfur dioxide in a trinuclear cluster complex of rhenium, [(Ph(3)P)(2)N][Re(3)(mu(3)-S)(mu-S)(2)(mu-SO(2))Cl(6)(PMe(2)Ph)(3)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taro; Sunaga, Tomoaki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Saori; Iriuchijima, Daisuke; Yoza, Kenji

    2005-06-13

    A trinuclear rhenium sulfide cluster complex, [(Ph(3)P)(2)N][Re(3)(mu(3)-S)(mu-S)(3)Cl(6)(PMe(2)Ph)(3)], synthesized from Re(3)S(7)Cl(7), dimethylphenylphosphine, and [(Ph(3)P)(2)N]Cl is readily converted to a bridging SO(2) complex, [(Ph(3)P)(2)N][Re(3)(mu(3)-S)(mu-S)(2)(mu-SO(2))Cl(6)(PMe(2)Ph)(3)], by reaction with O(2). The oxygen atoms on the SO(2) ligand react with phosphines or phosphites to form phosphine oxides or phosphates, and the original cluster complex is recovered. The reaction course has been monitored by (31)P NMR as well as by UV-vis spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygenation of PMePh(2) in the presence of the SO(2) complex shows that turnovers are 8 per hour at 23 degrees C in CDCl(3). The X-ray structures of the cluster complexes are described.

  7. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  8. Charge transfer reactions at interfaces between neutral gas and plasma: Dynamical effects and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2012-04-01

    Charge-transfer is the main process linking neutrals and charged particles in the interaction regions of neutral (or partly ionized) gas with a plasma. In this paper we illustrate the importance of charge-transfer with respect to the dynamics and the structure of neutral gas-plasma interfaces. We consider the following phenomena: (1) the heliospheric interface - region where the solar wind plasma interacts with the partly-ionized local interstellar medium (LISM) and (2) neutral interstellar clouds embedded in a hot, tenuous plasma such as the million degree gas that fills the so-called ``Local Bubble". In (1), we discuss several effects in the outer heliosphere caused by charge exchange of interstellar neutral atoms and plasma protons. In (2) we describe the role of charge exchange in the formation of a transition region between the cloud and the surrounding plasma based on a two-component model of the cloud-plasma interaction. In the model the cloud consists of relatively cold and dense atomic hydrogen gas, surrounded by hot, low density, fully ionized plasma. We discuss the structure of the cloud-plasma interface and the effect of charge exchange on the lifetime of interstellar clouds. Charge transfer between neutral atoms and minor ions in the plasma produces X-ray emission. Assuming standard abundances of minor ions in the hot gas surrounding the cold interstellar cloud, we estimate the X-ray emissivity consecutive to the charge transfer reactions. Our model shows that the charge-transfer X-ray emission from the neutral cloud-plasma interface may be comparable to the diffuse thermal X-ray emission from the million degree gas cavity itself.

  9. State-to-state dynamics of elementary chemical reactions using Rydberg H-atom translational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming

    In this review, a few examples of state-to-state dynamics studies of both unimolecular and bimolecular reactions using the H-atom Rydberg tagging TOF technique were presented. From the H2O photodissociation at 157 nm, a direction dissociation example is provided, while photodissociation of H2O at 121.6 has provided an excellent dynamical case of complicated, yet direct dissociation process through conical intersections. The studies of the O(1D) + H2 → OH + H reaction has also been reviewed here. A prototype example of state-to-state dynamics of pure insertion chemical reaction is provided. Effect of the reagent rotational excitation and the isotope effect on the dynamics of this reaction have also been investigated. The detailed mechanism for abstraction channel in this reaction has also been closely studied. The experimental investigations of the simplest chemical reaction, the H3 system, have also been described here. Through extensive collaborations between theory and experiment, the mechanism for forward scattering product at high collision energies for the H + HD reaction was clarified, which is attributed to a slow down mechanism on the top of a quantized barrier transition state. Oscillations in the product quantum state resolved different cross sections have also been observed in the H + D2 reaction, and were attributed to the interference of adiabatic transition state pathways from detailed theoretical analysis. The results reviewed here clearly show the significant advances we have made in the studies of the state-to-state molecular reaction dynamics.

  10. Lewis acid-water/alcohol complexes as hydrogen atom donors in radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povie, Guillaume; Renaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Water or low molecular weight alcohols are, due to their availability, low price and low toxicity ideal reagents for organic synthesis. Recently, it was reported that, despite the very strong BDE of the O-H bond, they can be used as hydrogen atom donors in place of expensive and/or toxic group 14 metal hydrides when boron and titanium(III) Lewis acids are present. This finding represents a considerable innovation and uncovers a new perspective on the paradigm of hydrogen atom transfers to radicals. We discuss here the influence of complex formation and other association processes on the efficacy of the hydrogen transfer step. A delicate balance between activation by complex formation and deactivation by further hydrogen bonding is operative.

  11. Examining the effect of nonlocality in (d ,n ) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Titus, L. J.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    Background: In the past year we have been exploring the effect of the explicit inclusion of nonlocality in (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: The goal of this paper is to extend previous studies to (d ,n ) reactions, which, although similar to (d ,p ) reactions, have specific properties that merit inspection. Method: We apply our methods (both the distorted-wave Born approximation and the adiabatic wave approximation) to (d ,n ) reactions on 16O,40Ca,48Ca,126Sn,132Sn , and 208Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Results: We look separately at the modifications introduced by nonlocality in the final bound and scattering states as well as the consequences reflected on the differential angular distributions. The cross sections obtained when using nonlocality explicitly are significantly different than those using the local approximation, just as in (d ,p ) reactions. Due to the particular role of the Coulomb force in the bound state, often we found the effects of nonlocality to be larger in (d ,n ) than in (d ,p ) reactions. Conclusions: Our results confirm the importance of including nonlocality explicitly in deuteron-induced reactions.

  12. Atom Interferometry with up to 24-Photon-Momentum-Transfer Beam Splitters

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Holger; Long, Quan; Herrmann, Sven; Chu, Steven

    2007-01-01

    We present multi- (up to 24-)photon Bragg diffraction as beam splitter to achieve the largest splitting in momentum space in any light-pulse atom interferometer thus far. Relative to the 2-photon processes used in the most sensitive present interferometers, these large momentum transfer beam splitters increase the phase shift 12-fold for Mach-Zehnder and 144-fold for Ramsey-Borde geometries. As the atom's internal state is not changed, important systematic effects can cancel. This dramatic increase in sensitivity and precision opens the door to improved measurements of the fine-structure constant, inertial forces, and tests of relativity and quantum electrodynamics.

  13. Hydrophilization of Poly(ether ether ketone) Films by Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    -modified PEEK using Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI ATRP). Surface reduction of PEEK to form hydroxyl groups [1, 2, 3] was .performed prior to the attachment of 2-bromoisobutyrate initiating groups. Each modification step of PEEK as well as the polymer grafting was followed...... and confirmed by ATR FTIR, water contact ang;le, and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The surface topography was evaluated by "Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the degree of functionalization. The performed modification allowed for successful...

  14. Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer from tertiary amides to the cumyloxyl radical: evaluating the role of stereoelectronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. With N,N-dialkylformamides HAT preferentially occurs from the formyl C-H bond, while in N-formylpyrrolidine HAT mostly occurs from the ring α-C-H bonds. With the acetamides and the alkanamides almost exclusive HAT from the C-H bonds that are α to nitrogen was observed. The results obtained show that alignment between the C-H bond being broken and the amide π-system can lead to significant increases in the HAT rate constant (kH). This finding points toward the important role of stereoelectronic effects on the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The highest kH values were measured for the reactions of CumO(•) with N-acylpyrrolidines. These substrates have ring α-C-H bonds that are held in a conformation that is optimally aligned with the amide π-system, thus allowing for the relatively facile HAT reaction. The lowest kH value was measured for the reaction of N,N-diisobutylacetamide, wherein the steric bulk associated with the N-isobutyl groups increases the energy barrier required to reach the most suitable conformation for HAT. The experimental results are well supported by the computed BDEs for the C-H bonds of the most representative substrates.

  15. Ph(i-PrO)SiH2: An Exceptional Reductant for Metal-Catalyzed Hydrogen Atom Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, Carla; Martinez, Ruben M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2016-04-13

    We report the discovery of an outstanding reductant for metal-catalyzed radical hydrofunctionalization reactions. Observations of unexpected silane solvolysis distributions in the HAT-initiated hydrogenation of alkenes reveal that phenylsilane is not the kinetically preferred reductant in many of these transformations. Instead, isopropoxy(phenyl)silane forms under the reaction conditions, suggesting that alcohols function as important silane ligands to promote the formation of metal hydrides. Study of its reactivity showed that isopropoxy(phenyl)silane is an exceptionally efficient stoichiometric reductant, and it is now possible to significantly decrease catalyst loadings, lower reaction temperatures, broaden functional group tolerance, and use diverse, aprotic solvents in iron- and manganese-catalyzed hydrofunctionalizations. As representative examples, we have improved the yields and rates of alkene reduction, hydration, hydroamination, and conjugate addition. Discovery of this broadly applicable, chemoselective, and solvent-versatile reagent should allow an easier interface with existing radical reactions. Finally, isotope-labeling experiments rule out the alternative hypothesis of hydrogen atom transfer from a redox-active β-diketonate ligand in the HAT step. Instead, initial HAT from a metal hydride to directly generate a carbon-centered radical appears to be the most reasonable hypothesis.

  16. Chemical Reaction of Ultracold Atoms and Ions in a Hybrid Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Rellergert, Wade G; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Petrov, Alexander; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between cold ions and atoms have been proposed for use in implementing quantum gates\\cite{Idziaszek2007}, probing quantum gases\\cite{Sherkunov2009}, observing novel charge-transport dynamics\\cite{Cote2000}, and sympathetically cooling atomic and molecular systems which cannot be laser cooled\\cite{Smith2005,Hudson2009}. Furthermore, the chemistry between cold ions and atoms is foundational to issues in modern astrophysics, including the formation of stars, planets, and interstellar clouds\\cite{Smith1992}, the diffuse interstellar bands\\cite{Reddy2010}, and the post-recombination epoch of the early universe\\cite{Stancil1996b}. However, as pointed out in refs 9 and 10, both experimental data and a theoretical description of the ion-atom interaction at low temperatures, reached in these modern atomic physics experiments and the interstellar environment, are still largely missing. Here we observe a chemical reaction between ultracold $^{174}$Yb$^+$ ions and $^{40}$Ca atoms held in a hybrid trap. We me...

  17. Chapter 11 Computational Study of the Reaction of n-Bromopropane with OH Radicals and Cl Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Reyes, Claudette M.; Martínez-Avilés, Mónica; Francisco, Joseph S.

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory is utilized to study the hydrogen abstraction reaction of n-bromopropane with hydroxyl radical and chlorine atom. The stability of the trans and gauche isomers of n-bromopropane is explored. The potential energy surface of both reactions is characterized by pre- and post-reactive complexes, as well as transition state structures in both trans and gauche isomeric forms. The importance of these two reactions relies on the ultimate product distribution from both reactions. Differences in the reactivity of 1-bromopropane toward OH and Cl are observed. The reaction of n-bromopropane with OH radical favors the abstraction of [beta] hydrogen atoms while the reaction with Cl atoms favors the abstraction of hydrogen atoms at the [alpha] and [beta] carbon sites.

  18. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  19. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb; Kettenreaktion. Die Geschichte der Atombombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-07-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  20. On the theory of (e, 2e) reactions in atomic hydrogen and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, F. W.; Joachain, C. J.; Piraux, B.

    1984-12-01

    We compare the results of eikonal-Born series calculations which we have performed for the (e, 2e) reaction in atomic hydrogen with recent absolute measurements of triple differential cross sections for that process, carried out in the asymmetric coplanar geometry. We find that second-order effects play a crucial role in understanding both the angular positions and the magnitudes of the binary and recoil peaks. The implications of our analysis for the case of (e, 2e) reactions in helium are also discussed.

  1. Role of core excitation in (d ,p ) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltuva, A.; Ross, A.; Norvaišas, E.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    Background: Recent work found that core excitations can be important in extracting structure information from (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d ,p ) reactions and to understand the origin of the dynamical effects. Method: Based on the particle-rotor model of n +10Be , we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies (Sn=0.1 -5.0 MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space-based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the 10Be(d ,p )11Be -like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies Ed=15 -90 MeV. Results: We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, and that of the original structure model. We also explore how different partial waves affect the final cross section. Conclusions: Our results show a strong beam-energy dependence of the extracted spectroscopic factors that become smaller for intermediate beam energies. This dependence increases for loosely bound systems.

  2. Role of core excitation in (d,p) transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Deltuva, A; Norvaišas, E; Nunes, F M

    2016-01-01

    [Background:] Recent work found that core excitation can be important in extracting structure information from (d,p) reactions. [Purpose:] Our objective is to systematically explore the role of core excitation in (d,p) reactions, and understand the origin of the dynamical effects. [Method:] Based on the particle-rotor model of $n+^{10}$Be, we generate a number of models with a range of separation energies ($S_n=0.1-5.0$ MeV), while maintaining a significant core excited component. We then apply the latest extension of the momentum-space based Faddeev method, including dynamical core excitation in the reaction mechanism to all orders, to the $^{10}$Be(d,p)$^{11}$Be like reactions, and study the excitation effects for beam energies from $E_d=15-90$ MeV. [Results:] We study the resulting angular distributions and the differences between the spectroscopic factor that would be extracted from the cross sections, when including dynamical core excitation in the reaction, to that of the original structure model. We al...

  3. Temperature dependence of the OH(-) + CH3I reaction kinetics. experimental and simulation studies and atomic-level dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Kohale, Swapnil C; Hase, William L; Ard, Shaun G; Melko, Joshua J; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A

    2013-12-27

    Direct dynamics simulations and selected ion flow tube (SIFT) experiments were performed to study the kinetics and dynamics of the OH(-) + CH3I reaction versus temperature. This work complements previous direct dynamics simulation and molecular beam ion imaging experiments of this reaction versus reaction collision energy (Xie et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 7162). The simulations and experiments are in quite good agreement. Both identify the SN2, OH(-) + CH3I → CH3OH + I(-), and proton transfer, OH(-) + CH3I → CH2I(-) + H2O, reactions as having nearly equal importance. In the experiments, the SN2 pathway constitutes 0.64 ± 0.05, 0.56 ± 0.05, 0.51 ± 0.05, and 0.46 ± 0.05 of the total reaction at 210, 300, 400, and 500 K, respectively. For the simulations this fraction is 0.56 ± 0.06, 0.55 ± 0.04, and 0.50 ± 0.05 at 300, 400, and 500 K, respectively. The experimental total reaction rate constant is (2.3 ± 0.6) × 10(-9), (1.7 ± 0.4) × 10(-9), (1.9 ± 0.5) × 10(-9), and (1.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1) at 210, 300, 400, and 500 K, respectively, which is approximately 25% smaller than the collision capture value. The simulation values for this rate constant are (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10(-9), (1.8 ± 0.1) × 10(-9), and (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10(-9) cm(3)s(-1) at 300, 400, and 500 K. From the simulations, direct rebound and stripping mechanisms as well as multiple indirect mechanisms are identified as the atomic-level reaction mechanisms for both the SN2 and proton-transfer pathways. For the SN2 reaction the direct and indirect mechanisms have nearly equal probabilities; the direct mechanisms are slightly more probable, and direct rebound is more important than direct stripping. For the proton-transfer pathway the indirect mechanisms are more important than the direct mechanisms, and stripping is significantly more important than rebound for the latter. Calculations were performed with the OH(-) quantum number J equal to 0, 3, and 6 to investigate the effect of

  4. Recyclable Polystyrene-Supported Siloxane-Transfer Agent for Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The rational design, synthesis, and validation of a significantly improved insoluble polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent has been achieved that permits efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The cross-linked polystyrene support facilitates product purification with excellent siloxane recycling. Drawbacks of a previous polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent, relating to reaction efficiency and polymer stability after repeated cycles, have been addressed. PMID:24661113

  5. ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF 2,5-BIS[(4-HEXYLOXYPHENYL)OXYCARBONYL]STYRENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Yi; Xing-he Fan; Yong-feng Zhao; Xiao-fang Chen; Xin-hua Wan; Qi-feng Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A side-on liquid crystalline monomer, 2,5-bis[(4-hexyloxyphenyl)oxycarbonyl]styrene) (HPCS), was successfully polymerized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The polymerization was catalyzed by CuBr/PMDETA in chlorobenzene at 90℃ with (1-bromoethyl)benzene as the initiator. The polymers have narrow MWD. It is the second example of mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymer (MJLCP) prepared by ATRP.

  6. Local group modes and the dynamics of intramolecular energy transfer across a heavy atom

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Vicente; Fairen, Victor; Lederman, Steven M.; Marcus, R.A

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of energy transfer is discussed for a model system in which two ligands are separated by a heavy atom. Numerical and analytical results are given for the case that each ligand is a CC. In the quasiperiodic regime, the dynamics are interpreted using perturbation theory. Local group modes involved in an intramolecular energy localization which can occur in this regime are identified. An approximate separation of the primarily ligand–ligand motions from the primarily ligand–metal–li...

  7. Hydrophilization of poly(ether ether ketone) films by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP) has been exploited to hydrophilize PEEK. The ketone groups on the PEEK surface were reduced to hydroxyl groups which were converted to bromoisobutyrate initiating sites for SI-ATRP. The modification steps were followed by contact an...... in the surface topography. Two possible applications arose from the hydrophilization of PEEK, metal deposition and protein repellency. The performed modification allowed for successful electroless deposition and good adhesion of nickel as well as copper....

  8. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions. Updated 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawara, H.

    1997-04-01

    Following our previous compilations (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990), NIFS-DATA-20 (1993)), bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1954-1996 are listed in the order of the publication year. For easy finding of the references for a combination of collision partners, a simple list is provided. (author)

  9. The selectivity of charged phenyl radicals in hydrogen atom abstraction reactions with isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Linhong; Guler, Leonard P; Pates, George; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2008-10-09

    The vertical electron affinity is demonstrated to be a key factor in controlling the selectivity of charged phenyl radicals in hydrogen atom abstraction from isopropanol in the gas phase. The measurement of the total reaction efficiencies (hydrogen and/or deuterium atom abstraction) for unlabeled and partially deuterium-labeled isopropanol, and the branching ratios of hydrogen and deuterium atom abstraction, by using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer, allowed the determination of the selectivity for each site in the unlabeled isopropanol. Examination of hydrogen atom abstraction from isopropanol by eight structurally different radicals revealed that the preferred site is the CH group. The selectivity of the charged phenyl radicals correlates with the radical's vertical electron affinity and the reaction efficiency. The smaller the vertical electron affinity of a radical, the lower its reactivity, and the greater the preference for the thermodynamically favored CH group over the CH3 group or the OH group. As the vertical electron affinity increases from 4.87 to 6.28 eV, the primary kinetic isotope effects decrease from 2.9 to 1.3 for the CD group, and the mixture of primary and alpha-secondary kinetic isotopes decreases from 6.0 to 2.4 for the CD3 group.

  10. Coherence preservation of a single neutral atom qubit transferred between magic-intensity optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jiaheng; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of $^{87}$Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to $225 \\pm 21\\,\\mathrm{ms}$. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity to be parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain ...

  11. Ultracold, radiative charge transfer in hybrid Yb ion - Rb atom traps

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, B M; Lane, I C; McCann, J F

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold hybrid ion-atom traps offer the possibility of microscopic manipulation of quantum coherences in the gas using the ion as a probe. However, inelastic processes, particularly charge transfer can be a significant process of ion loss and has been measured experimentally for the Yb$^{+}$ ion immersed in a Rb vapour. We use first-principles quantum chemistry codes to obtain the potential energy curves and dipole moments for the lowest-lying energy states of this complex. Calculations for the radiative decay processes cross sections and rate coefficients are presented for the total decay processes. Comparing the semi-classical Langevin approximation with the quantum approach, we find it provides a very good estimate of the background at higher energies. The results demonstrate that radiative decay mechanisms are important over the energy and temperature region considered. In fact, the Langevin process of ion-atom collisions dominates cold ion-atom collisions. For spin dependent processes \\cite{kohl13} the...

  12. Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization and Electrografting Technique as a Means For Attaining Tailor-Made Polymer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chernyy, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization initiated from a surface of various substrates (SI-ATRP) has become a progressively popular technique for obtaining thin polymer films with predetermined properties. The present work addresses the main features of SI-ATRP with respect to the controllability......, rates of polymerization, suitable monomers, reaction mixture compositions etc. An alternative potential-driven polymerization approach is discussed, although to a smaller extent. Chapter 1 provides an overview of controlled/living polymerization techniques with an accent made on ATRP. Different...... strategies for initiator grafting, physicochemical properties of polymer brushes and basic principles of quartz crystal microbalance technique (QCM) are discussed. In Chapter 2 various ATRP conditions are probed. The effects of solvent polarity, monomer concentration, initiator surface density, ligand nature...

  13. Synthesis and Reactions of Five-Membered Heterocycles Using Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase transfer catalysts (PTCs have been widely used for the synthesis of organic compounds particularly in both liquid-liquid and solid-liquid heterogeneous reaction mixtures. They are known to accelerate reaction rates by facilitating formation of interphase transfer of species and making reactions between reagents in two immiscible phases possible. Application of PTC instead of traditional technologies for industrial processes of organic synthesis provides substantial benefits for the environment. On the basis of numerous reports it is evident that phase-transfer catalysis is the most efficient way for generation and reactions of many active intermediates. In this review we report various uses of PTC in syntheses and reactions of five-membered heterocycles compounds and their multifused rings.

  14. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel, E-mail: luisma.frutos@uah.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Acuña, A. Ulises [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, C.S.I.C., Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  15. H{sup .} atom and OH{sup .} radical reactions with 5-methyl-cytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, A.; Morell, C.; Labet, V.; Cadet, J. [CEA Grenoble, Lab Les Acides Nucl, DRFMC/SCIB, UMR-E 3, CEA-UJF, F-38054 Grenoble, (France); Eriksson, L.A. [Univ Orebro, Dept Nat Sci and Orebro Life Sci Ctr, S-70182 Orebro, (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    The reactions between either a hydrogen atom or a hydroxyl radical and 5-methyl-cytosine (5-MeCyt) are studied by using the hybrid kinetic energy meta-GGA functional MPW1B95. H{sup .} atom and OH{sup .} radical addition to positions C5 and C6 of 5-MeCyt, or OH{sup .} radical induced H-abstraction from the C5 methyl group, are explored. All systems are optimized in bulk solvent. The data presented show that the barriers to reaction are very low: ca. 7 kCal/mol for the H{sup .} atom additions and 1 kCal/mol for the reactions involving the OH{sup .} radical. Thermodynamically, the two C6 radical adducts and the H{sup .}- abstraction product are the most stable ones. The proton hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC), computed at the IEFPCM/MPW1B95/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, agree well with B3LYP results and available experimental and theoretical data on related thymine and cytosine radicals. (authors)

  16. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed addenda heteropolytungstovanadophosphates with NADH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2009-03-01

    The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) undergoes facile electron transfer reaction with vanadium (V) substituted Keggin-type heteropolyanions (HPA) [PVVW11O40]4- (PV1) and [PV$^{V}_{2}$W10O40]5- (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1 : 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one electron reduced heteropoly blues (HPB), viz. [PVIVW11O40]5- and [PVIVVVW10O40]6-. Oxygraph measurements show that there is no uptake of molecular oxygen during the course of reaction. The reaction proceeds through multi-step electron-proton-electron transfer mechanism, with rate limiting initial one electron transfer from NADH to HPA by outer sphere electron transfer process. Bimolecular rate constant for electron transfer reaction between NADH and PV2 in phosphate buffer of pH = 6 has been determined spectrophotometrically.

  17. Neutron transfer reactions with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizewski, J.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States)]. E-mail: cizewski@physics.rutgers.edu; Jones, K.L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Pain, S.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Thomas, J.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Baktash, C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bardayan, D.W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blackmon, J.C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gross, C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Liang, J.F. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Shapira, D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Smith, M.S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kozub, R.L.; Moazen, B.H.; Nesaraja, C.D. [Department of Physics, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Carter, H.K. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Johnson, M.S. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Fitzgerald, R.P.; Visser, D.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Greife, U.; Livesay, R.J. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Catford, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU27XH, UK (United Kingdom); Ma, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    Initial measurements are presented of the (d,p) reactions on neutron-rich N = 50 isotones along the r-process path of nucleosynthesis with radioactive ion beams of {sup 82}Ge and {sup 84}Se. Prospects for measurements with unstable {sup 130,132}Sn beams are discussed.

  18. Atomic alignment effect on reactivity and on product alignment in the energy-transfer reaction of oriented Ar (3P2, 4s [3/2]2, M(J) = 2) + Kr (4p6, 1S0) → Ar (3p6, 1S0) + Kr (5p [3/2]2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohoyama, H

    2015-03-12

    Steric effect for the formation of Kr (5p [3/2]₂) in the energy transfer reaction of Ar (³P₂, 4s [3/2]₂) + Kr has been studied by using an oriented Ar (³P₂, 4s [3/2]₂, M(J) = 2) beam at a collision energy of ∼0.09 eV. The emission intensity of Kr (5p [3/2]₂) is ca. 2 times enhanced when the angular momentum (J(Ar)) of Ar (³P₂) is aligned perpendicular to the relative velocity vector (v(R)). In addition, the Kr (5p [3/2]₂) emission is highly polarized parallel to v(R) (I(∥)/I(⊥) ∼ 1.2) when JAr is aligned perpendicular to v(R). The observed polarization moments indicate that the alignment of the unpaired Ar (3p) orbital of Ar (³P₂) to v(R), (Σ (|L′| = 0), Π (|L′| = 1)), dominates the energy transfer probability (σ(Π)(∥): σ(Σ)(∥): σ(Π)(⊥): σ(Σ)(⊥) = 0.49:1.33:0.55:1.23) and also the alignment of the Kr (5p) orbital of Kr (5p [3/2]₂) to v(R): the Σ-configuration of the Ar (3p) orbital leads to the parallel alignment (Σ-configuration) of the Kr(5p) orbital to v(R), conversely, the Π-configuration of Ar (3p) orbital leads to the perpendicular alignment (Π-configuration) of the Kr(5p) orbital. In addition, the selectivity of the alignment of the Kr (5p) orbital turns out to vary from perpendicular to parallel as the collision energy increases after a threshold down to 0.03 eV.

  19. Isotopic Yield Distributions of Transfer- and Fusion-Induced Fission from 238U+12C Reactions in Inverse Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Caamaño, M; Farget, F; Derkx, X; Schmidt, K -H; Audouin, L; Bacri, C -O; Barreau, G; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Chbihi, A; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Gaudefroy, L; Golabek, C; Jurado, B; Lemasson, A; Navin, A; Rejmund, M; Roger, T; Shrivastava, A; Schmitt, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to access the complete identification in atomic number Z and mass A of fragments produced in low-energy fission of actinides is presented. This method, based on the use of multi- nucleon transfer and fusion reactions in inverse kinematics, is applied in this work to reactions between a 238U beam and a 12C target to produce and induce fission of moderately excited actinides. The fission fragments are detected and fully identified with the VAMOS spectrometer of GANIL, allowing the measurement of fragment yields of several hundreds of isotopes in a range between A ~ 80 and ~ 160, and from Z ~ 30 to ~ 64. For the first time, complete isotopic yield distributions of fragments from well-defined fissioning systems are available. Together with the precise measurement of the fragment emission angles and velocities, this technique gives further insight into the nuclear-fission process.

  20. Hydroperoxyl Radicals (HOO(.) ): Vitamin E Regeneration and H-Bond Effects on the Hydrogen Atom Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrowski, Jakub; Litwinienko, Grzegorz; Baschieri, Andrea; Amorati, Riccardo

    2016-11-07

    Hydroperoxyl (HOO(.) ) and alkylperoxyl (ROO(.) ) radicals show a different behavior in H-atom-transfer processes. Both radicals react with an analogue of α-tocopherol (TOH), but HOO(.) , unlike ROO(.) , is able to regenerate TOH by a fast H-atom transfer: TO(.) +HOO(.) →TOH+O2 . The kinetic solvent effect on the H-atom transfer from TOH to HOO(.) is much stronger than that observed for ROO(.) because noncovalent interactions with polar solvents (Solv⋅⋅⋅HOO(.) ) destabilize the transition state.

  1. STM observation of the chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen on the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takuma; Yamada, Masamichi; Komori, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen with the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surfaces was investigated at room temperature by scanning tunnel microscopy. At the low exposure of atomic hydrogen, it reacted with the N atoms and turned to be the NH species on the surface. The reaction rate is proportional to the amount of the unreacted N atoms. By increasing the exposure of atomic hydrogen from this condition, the amount of nitrogen species on the surface decreased. This is attributed to the formation of ammonia and its desorption from the surface. The NH species on the surface turn to NH3 through the surface NH2 species by atomic hydrogen. Coexistence of the clean Cu surface enhances the rate of ammonia formation owing to atomic hydrogen migrating on the clean surface.

  2. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  3. A semiclassical theory of electron transfer reactions in Condon approximation and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Sokolov, V. V.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of the electronic wave functions by configurational fluctuations of the molecular environment on the kinetic parameters of electron transfer reactions is discussed. A self-consistent algorithm for the calculation of the potential profile along the reaction coordinate ...

  4. Two-neutron transfer reactions investigating shell stability and inverse kinematics capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahgoub, Mahmoud; Bildstein, Vinzenz; Faestermann, Thomas; Gernhaeuser, Roman; Kroell, Thorsten; Kruecken, Reiner; Maier, Ludwig; Wirth, Hans [Physik-Department E12, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Bohlen, Hans-Gerhard; Kokalova, Tzanka; Oertzen, Wolfram von; Wheldon, Carl [HMI, Berlin (Germany); Bucurescu, Dorel [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); Dorsch, Tatiana [Physik-Department E12, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); HMI, Berlin (Germany); Hertenberger, Ralf [Sektion Physik, LMU Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Neutron transfer reactions were used to study the stability of the magic number N=28. We investigated neutron pairing correlations using the two-neutron pickup reaction {sup 58}Ni((vector)p,t){sup 56}Ni depending on the fact that nuclei with high neutron pairing are good magic nuclei. The capability of inverse kinematics reactions to study exotic nuclei was tested by the neutron transfer reactions t({sup 40}Ar,p){sup 42} Ar using a tritium target and comparing the results and conclusions with the normal kinematics reactions. The results for the reactions on Ni and Ar compared to DWBA calculations will be presented. Future possibilities for the use of inverse kinematics to study exotic nuclei with radioactive beams are discussed.

  5. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  6. Observation of new neutron-deficient isotopes with Z≥92 in multinucleon transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Devaraja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions of 48Ca + 248Cm we observed about 100 residual nuclei with proton numbers between Z=82 and Z=100. Among them, there are five new neutron-deficient isotopes: 216U, 219Np, 223Am, 229Am and 233Bk. As separator for the transfer products we used the velocity filter SHIP of GSI while the isotope identification was performed via the α decay chains of the nuclei. These first results reveal that multinucleon transfer reactions together with here applied fast and sensitive separation and detection techniques are promising for the synthesis of new isotopes in the region of heaviest nuclei.

  7. Back-Influence of Molecular Motion on Energy Transfer in the Landau-Teller Model of Atom Molecule Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-07-21

    This year we celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Landau-Teller model for energy exchange in a collinear collision of an atom with a harmonic diatomic molecule. Even after 80 years though, the analytic theory to date has not included in it the back-influence of the oscillator's motion on the energy transfer between the approaching particle and the molecule. This is the topic of the present paper. The back-influence can be obtained by employing classical second-order perturbation theory. The second-order theory is used in both a classical and semiclassical context. Classically, analytic expressions are derived for the final phase and action of the diatom, after the collision. The energy loss of the atom is shown to decrease linearly with the increasing energy of the oscillator. The magnitude of this decrease is a direct consequence of the back-reaction of the oscillator on the translational motion. The qualitative result is universal, in the sense that it is not dependent on the details of the interaction of the atom with the oscillator. A numerical application to a model collision of an Ar atom with a Br2 diatom demonstrates the importance and accuracy of the second-order perturbation theory. The same results are then used to derive a second-order perturbation theory semiclassical expression for the quantum transition probability from initial vibrational state ni to final vibrational state nf of the oscillator. A comparison of the theory with exact quantum data is presented for a model collision of Br2 with a hydrogen molecule, where the hydrogen molecule is considered as a single approaching particle.

  8. Atomic layer deposition by reaction of molecular oxygen with tetrakisdimethylamido-metal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J, E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Torgersen, Jan; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Karnthaler, Hans-Peter [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Tetrakisdimethylamido (TDMA) based precursors are commonly used to deposit metal oxides such as TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and HfO{sub 2} by means of chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) have been demonstrated with TDMA-metal precursors. While the reactions of TDMA-type precursors with water and oxygen plasma have been studied in the past, their reactivity with pure O{sub 2} has been overlooked. This paper reports on experimental evaluation of the reaction of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) and several metal organic precursors based on TDMA ligands. The effect of O{sub 2} exposure duration and substrate temperature on deposition and film morphology is evaluated and compared to thermal reactions with H{sub 2}O and PEALD with O{sub 2} plasma.

  9. ARTICLE Crossed Beams Study on the Dynamics of F Atom Reaction with 1,2-Butadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chong-fa; Shen, Guan-lin; Wang, Xiu-yan; Yang, Xue-ming

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the F+C4H6 reaction using the universal crossed molecular beam method. The C4H5F+H reaction channel was observed in this experiment. Angular resolved time-of-flight spectra have been measured for the C4H5F product. Product angular distributions as well as kinetic energy distributions were determined for this product channel. Experimental results show that the C4H5F product is largely backward scattered with considerable forward scattering signal, relative to the F atom beam direction. This suggests that the reaction channel mainly proceeds via a long-lived complex formation mechanism, with possible contribution from a direct SN2 type mechanism.

  10. Multiply Confined Nickel Nanocatalysts Produced by Atomic Layer Deposition for Hydrogenation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhe; Dong, Mei; Wang, Guizhen; Sheng, Pei; Wu, Zhiwei; Yang, Huimin; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Guofu; Wang, Jianguo; Qin, Yong

    2015-07-27

    To design highly efficient catalysts, new concepts for optimizing the metal-support interactions are desirable. Here we introduce a facile and general template approach assisted by atomic layer deposition (ALD), to fabricate a multiply confined Ni-based nanocatalyst. The Ni nanoparticles are not only confined in Al2 O3 nanotubes, but also embedded in the cavities of Al2 O3 interior wall. The cavities create more Ni-Al2 O3 interfacial sites, which facilitate hydrogenation reactions. The nanotubes inhibit the leaching and detachment of Ni nanoparticles. Compared with the Ni-based catalyst supported on the outer surface of Al2 O3 nanotubes, the multiply confined catalyst shows a striking improvement of catalytic activity and stability in hydrogenation reactions. Our ALD-assisted template method is general and can be extended for other multiply confined nanoreactors, which may have potential applications in many heterogeneous reactions.

  11. Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, A.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becker, J. A.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Erikson, L.; Gaddis, A.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Howard, J.; Jandel, M.; Johnson, M. S.; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, F.; Livesay, R. J.; Ma, Z.; Matei, C.; Matthews, C.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, D.; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, K.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, M. S.; Swan, T.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, G. L.

    2009-03-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on 130,132Sn, 134Te and 75As are discussed.

  12. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Peters, W. A. [Rutgers University; Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Allen, J. [Rutgers University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Becker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Gaddis, A. L. [Furman University; Harlin, Christopher W [ORNL; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Howard, Joshua A [ORNL; Jandel, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnson, Micah [ORNL; Kapler, R. [University of Tennessee; Krolas, W. [University of Warsaw; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Matthews, C. [Rutgers University; Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; O' Malley, Patrick [Rutgers University; Patterson, N. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Paulauskas, Stanley [University of Tennessee; Pelham, T. [University of Surrey, UK; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Radford, David C [ORNL; Rogers, J. [Tennessee Technological University; Schmitt, Kyle [University of Tennessee; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Sissom, D. J. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Swan, T. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Vieira, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wilhelmy, J. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wilson, Gemma L [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  13. Synthesis of new transuranium isotopes in multinucleon transfer reactions using a velocity filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, S.; Beliuskina, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Devaraja, H.M.; Gupta, M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Comas, V.; Hofmann, S.; Muenzenberg, G.; Ackermann, D.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hornung, C. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Henderson, R.A.; Moody, K.J.; Shaughnessy, D.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hessberger, F.P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Ibaraki (Japan); Popeko, A.G.; Yeremin, A.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Recently, we reported the observation of several new isotopes with proton numbers Z ≥ 92 in low-energy collisions of {sup 48}Ca + {sup 248}Cm. The peculiarity is that the nuclei were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions, a method which is presently discussed as a possible new way to enter so far unknown regions in the upper part of the Chart of Nuclides. For separation of the transfer products we used a velocity filter, the Separator for Heavy Ion Reaction Products SHIP at GSI. The resulting strong background suppression allowed us to detect nuclei with cross-sections down to the sub-nanobarn scale. Beside the new isotopes we identified about 100 further target-like transfer products and determined their cross-sections. The results together with previous measurements strongly indicate that multinucleon transfer reactions are a viable pathway to the production of new transuranium isotopes. (orig.)

  14. 9,10-Diphenylanthracene as a matrix for MALDI-MS electron transfer secondary reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutaghou, M Nazim; Cole, Richard B

    2012-08-01

    The most common secondary-ionization mechanism in positive ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) involves a proton transfer reaction to ionize the analyte. Peptides and proteins are molecules that have basic (and acidic) sites that make them susceptible to proton transfer. However, non-polar, aprotic compounds that lack basic sites are more difficult to protonate, and creating charged forms of this type of analyte can pose a problem when conventional MALDI matrices are employed. In this case, forming a radical molecular ion through electron transfer is a viable alternative, and certain matrices may facilitate the process. In this work, we investigate the performance of a newly developed electron-transfer secondary reaction matrix: 9,10-diphenylanthracene (9,10-DPA). The use of 9,10-DPA as matrix for MALDI analysis has been tested using several model compounds. It appears to promote ionization through electron transfer in a highly efficient manner as compared to other potential matrices. Thermodynamic aspects of the observed electron transfers in secondary-ionization reactions were also considered, as was the possibility for kinetically controlled/endothermic, electron-transfer reactions in the MALDI plume.

  15. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbard, Jemma A

    2016-01-01

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the Rydberg atom. We show that `handshake' electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films, have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given...

  16. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  17. Water O-H bond activation by gas-phase plutonium atoms: reaction mechanisms and ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Niu, Wenxia; Gao, Tao; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-10-06

    A thorough description of the reaction mechanisms, taking into account different possible spin states, offers insights into the gas-phase reaction of plutonium atoms with water. Two possible reactions (isomerization and dehydrogenation) are presented. These reactions are found to be exothermic, with the best thermochemical conditions observed for the dehydrogenation reaction at around 23.5 kcal mol(-1). The nature of the chemical-bonding evolution along the reaction pathways are investigated by employing various methods including electron localization function, atoms in molecules, and Mayer bond order. Total, partial, and overlap population density of state diagrams and analyses are also presented. Reaction rates at elevated temperatures (T=298-2 000 K) are calculated by using variational transition-state theory with one-dimensional tunneling effects. In dynamics simulations, only the dehydrogenation reaction is observed, and found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  18. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  19. What is the "best" atomic charge model to describe through-space charge-transfer excitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Denis; Le Bahers, Tangui; Adamo, Carlo; Ciofini, Ilaria

    2012-04-28

    We investigate the efficiency of several partial atomic charge models (Mulliken, Hirshfeld, Bader, Natural, Merz-Kollman and ChelpG) for investigating the through-space charge-transfer in push-pull organic compounds with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory approaches. The results of these models are compared to benchmark values obtained by determining the difference of total densities between the ground and excited states. Both model push-pull oligomers and two classes of "real-life" organic dyes (indoline and diketopyrrolopyrrole) used as sensitisers in solar cell applications have been considered. Though the difference of dipole moments between the ground and excited states is reproduced by most approaches, no atomic charge model is fully satisfactory for reproducing the distance and amount of charge transferred that are provided by the density picture. Overall, the partitioning schemes fitting the electrostatic potential (e.g. Merz-Kollman) stand as the most consistent compromises in the framework of simulating through-space charge-transfer, whereas the other models tend to yield qualitatively inconsistent values.

  20. Significance Of Deuteron Breakup In A Halo Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yilmaz, M; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Gonul, Bulent

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the quasi-adiabatic approximations to the three-body wavefunction in breakup processes, clarifying the assumptions underlying the model. This suggests alternative approximation schemes. Using different theoretical three-body models, calculated differential cross section angular distributions for the Be-11(p,d) reaction,for which new preliminary data have been reported at 35 MeV, are presented. We show that calculations are sensitive to the inclusion of deuteron breakup and to the breakup model used, particularly if used to deduce absolute spectroscopic information on the 0{+} and 2{+} Be-10 core state parentages. There is also considerable sensitivity to the model used in calculations of the relative cross sections to the two states.

  1. Dynamics of interfacial reactions between O(3 P) atoms and long-chain liquid hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Mhairi; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Köhler, Sven P. K.; Reed, Stewart K.; Westacott, Robin E.; Costen, Matthew L.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2007-09-01

    Recent progress that has been made towards understanding the dynamics of collisions at the gas-liquid interface is summarized briefly. We describe in this context a promising new approach to the experimental study of gas-liquid interfacial reactions that we have introduced. This is based on laser-photolytic production of reactive gas-phase atoms above the liquid surface and laser-spectroscopic probing of the resulting nascent products. This technique is illustrated for reaction of O(3P) atoms at the surface of the long-chain liquid hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane). Laser-induced fluorescence detection of the nascent OH has revealed mechanistically diagnostic correlations between its internal and translational energy distributions. Vibrationally excited OH molecules are able to escape the surface. At least two contributions to the product rotational distributions are identified, confirming and extending previous hypotheses of the participation of both direct and trapping-desorption mechanisms. We speculate briefly on future experimental and theoretical developments that might be necessary to address the many currently unanswered mechanistic questions for this, and other, classes of gas-liquid interfacial reaction.

  2. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  3. Reactions of hot deuterium atoms with OCS in the gas phase and in OCS-DI complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, E.; Mikhaylichenko, K.; Wittig, C.

    1993-11-01

    Reactions of photolytically prepared hot deuterium atoms with OCS have been investigated: (i) under gas phase, single collision, arrested relaxation (i.e., bulk) conditions; and (ii) by photoinitiating reactions within weakly bound OCS-DI complexes. Nascent SD(X 2Π, v=0) rotational, spin-orbit, and Λ-doublet populations were obtained for the photolysis wavelengths 250, 225, and 223 nm by using A 2Σ←X 2Π laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The reason for using deuterium is strictly experimental: A 2Σ predissociation rates are considerably smaller for SD than for SH. The SD (v=0) rotational distribution was found to be very cold and essentially the same for both bulk and complexed conditions; the most probable rotational energy is ˜180 cm-1. No bias in Λ-doublet populations was detected. Spin-orbit excitation for bulk conditions was estimated to be [2Π1/2]/[2Π3/2]˜0.25, where 2Π1/2 is the upper spin-orbit component. This ratio could not be obtained with complexes because of limited S/N. The complete set of present and past experimental findings, combined with recent theoretical results of Rice, Cartland, and Chabalowski suggest a mechanism in which SD derives from a very short lived HSCO precursor. This can result from direct hydrogen attack at the sulfur and/or the transfer of hydrogen from carbon to sulfur via the HCOS intermediate.

  4. Control and Transfer of Entanglement between Two Atoms Driven by Classical Fields under Dressed-State Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qing-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Juan; Yan, Qiu-Rong; Liu, Ye; Chen, An

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the dynamics and transfer of the entanglement of the two identical atoms simultaneously interacting with vacuum field by employing the dressed-state representation. The two atoms are driven by classical fields. The influence of the initial entanglement degree of two atoms, the coupling strength between the atom and the classical field and the detuning between the atomic transition frequency and the frequency of classical field on the entanglement and atomic linear entropy is discussed. The initial entanglement of the two atoms can be transferred into the entanglement between the atom and cavity field when the dissipation is neglected. The maximally entangled state between the atoms and cavity field can be obtained under some certain conditions. The time of disentanglement of two atoms can be controlled and manipulated by adjusting the detuning and classical driving fields. Moreover, the larger the cavity decay rate is, the more quickly the entanglement of the two atoms decays. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11247213, 61368002, 11304010, 11264030, 61168001, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2013M531558, Jiangxi Postdoctoral Research Project under Grant No. 2013KY33, the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province under Grant No. 20142BAB217001, the Foundation for Young Scientists of Jiangxi Province (Jinggang Star) under Grant No. 20122BCB23002, the Research Foundation of the Education Department of Jiangxi Province under Grant Nos. GJJ13051, GJJ13057, and the Graduate Innovation Special Fund of Nanchang University under Grant No. cx2015137

  5. Removal of Hg~0 with sodium chlorite solution and mass transfer reaction kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The absorption behavior of Hg0 was studied experimentally by using sodium chlorite solution(NaClO2) as the absorbent in a bubble reactor.Primary influencing factors on removal efficiency of Hg0 such as NaClO2 concentration,pH,reaction temperature and the concentration of Hg0 were investigated.The results indicated that 72.91% of Hg0 removal efficiency could be achieved in acidic NaClO2 solution.The removal mechanism of Hg0 was proposed by analyzing of Hg2+ concentration in ab-sorption solution after reaction and comparing the electrode potentials between NaClO2 species and Hg2+/Hg0.The experimental results of mass transfer-reaction kinetics on oxidation of Hg0 by NaClO2 solution showed that with the increase of NaClO2 concentration and the decrease of pH value,the enhancement factor(E) and ratio of KG(Hg0)/kG(Hg0) increased and the liquid phase mass transfer resistance decreased,which is benefit to the mass transfer adsorption reaction.Although the increase of reaction temperature could improve the enhancement factor(E),but the ratio of KG(Hg0)/kG(Hg0) decreased;as a result,the liquid phase mass transfer resistance increased,therefore,the reaction rate for removal of Hg0 decreased.

  6. Disentangling the transfer and breakup contributions from the inclusive ^{8}Li+ ^{208}Pb reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, A M; García-Martínez, H; Aguilera, E F; Martínez-Quiroz, E; Gómez-Camacho, J

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the elastic and one-neutron removal channel for the reaction (^{8})Li+(^{208})Pb reaction at energies around the Coulomb barrier is presented. For the elastic scattering, an optical model analysis of the experimental data is performed. The observed (^{7})Li is interpreted as the superposition of the one-neutron transfer reaction, (^{208})Pb((^{8})Li,(^{7} )Li)(^{209})Pb, and the breakup reaction. The separate contribution of each one of these processes has been calculated within the DWBA formalism. The sum of both contributions explains adequately the experimental angular distribution of (^{7})Li.

  7. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile: Solvent isotope effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Piue Ghoshal; Ranjit Biswas

    2009-01-01

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other properties such as quantum yield and radiative rates have been found to be insensitive to the solvent isotope substitution in all these solvents. The origin of the solvent isotope insensitivity of the reaction is discussed and correlated with the observed slowing down of the solvation dynamics upon isotope substitution.

  8. Demystifying Introductory Chemistry. Part 4: An Approach to Reaction Thermodynamics through Enthalpies, Entropies, and Free Energies of Atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, James N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching reaction thermodynamics in introductory chemistry courses using calculations of enthalpies, entropies, and free energies of atomization. Uses a consistent concept, that of decomposition of a compound to its gaseous atoms, to discuss not only thermodynamic parameters but also equilibrium and…

  9. Mechanistic Details of Surface Reactions in Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Menno; Bouman; Christopher; Clark; Hugo; Tiznado; Francisco; Zaera

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The reaction mechanisms of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes used for thin-film growth have been characterized by a combination of surface sensitive techniques. Our early studies focused on the deposition of TiN films from TiCl4 and ammonia,starting with the independent characterization of each of the two half steps comprising the ALD process. It was found that exposure of the substrate to TiCl4 leads to the initial deposition of titanium in the +3 oxidation state; only at a later st...

  10. Reverse atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene in emulsion initiated by AIBN or V50

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kai; ZHANG Hongwen; LI Hongtu; WANG Jingyuan

    2005-01-01

    Reverse atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene was conducted in emulsion by using Cu(II)/2,2′- bipydine or Cu(II)/phen complexes, AIBN or V50 as the initiator, Brij-98 or OP-10 as the surfactant. The results of GPC showed that both polymerization processes exhibit living characters when using AIBN as the initiator. However, when V50 was used, the monomer conversion was fairly low and the whole polymerization was not controlled well. The measurement of particle size and its distribution told us that the latex particles were mean and stable when using Brij-98 as the surfactant.

  11. Optimization of transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole magnetic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Ram; S K Tiwari; S R Mishra; H S Rawat

    2014-02-01

    We present here our experimental results on transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole magnetic trap. We show that by choosing appropriately the ratio of potential energy in magnetic trap to kinetic energy of cloud in molasses, we can obtain the maximum phase-space density in the magnetic trap. These results guide us to choose the value of current to be switched in the quadrupole coils used for magnetic trapping for a given temperature of the cloud after molasses. This study is also useful to set the initial phase-space density of the cloud before evaporative cooling.

  12. Nonradiative transfer of excitation in coherent decay from a Gaussian atomic distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Richard, E-mail: rfriedberg1@nyc.rr.com [Physics Department, Columbia University, NY (United States)

    2011-09-14

    Coherent decay of a spherically symmetric ensemble of initially resonantly phased two-level atoms is studied in the scalar photon model, in the continuum and Markov approximations. Emphasis is on the Gaussian distribution, where nonradiative transfer of excitation to excited states orthogonal to the initial one is found to be nonzero even in the limit of short wavelength, whether or not the scalar kernel exp(ik{sub 0}R)/ik{sub 0}R is replaced by its real part. Numerical results are compared to known values for the uniform distribution.

  13. A NOVEL PHOTO-INITIATING SYSTEM FOR ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-hui Qin; Dong-qi Qin; Kun-yuan Qiu

    2001-01-01

    A novel photo-induced initiating system, 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone (DMPA)/ferric tri(N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate) [Fe(DC)3], was developed and used for the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene in toluene. The polymerization proceeds with DMPA as photo-initiator, Fe(DC)3 as catalyst and DC as a reversible transfer group, while the halogen and ligands are free. Well-defined PSt was prepared and the polymerization mechanism revealed by end group analysis belongs to a reverse ATRP. Block copolymer was prepared by using thus obtained PSt as macroinitiator and Fe(DC)2 as catalyst under UV light irradiation via a conventional ATRP process.``

  14. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order.

  15. Near resonant charge transfer in the reaction F(+) + CO - F + CO(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, I.; Ishikawa, T.

    1985-06-01

    Charge transfer reactions in the F(+) + CO system were investigated using a F(+) ion beam in the energy range 10-300 eVlab. The electronically excited product CO(+) A2Pi(i) was observed by the emission from the A-X transitions. At low collisional energy the dominant product is in the vibrational level v' = 5. The reaction cross section sigma(5) is about 1 A-sq at 12 eVc.m. and decreases with increasing collision energy. The large cross section at v' = 5 can be interpreted by near-resonant charge-transfer reactions. The rotational temperature of the product is about 300 K, which is the temperature of the reactant CO gas. For the resonant charge transfer, the translational energy is not effective, but the electronic and vibrational energy couple with each other strongly.

  16. Quantum Coherence as a Witness of Vibronically Hot Energy Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Paleček, David; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins have evolved over billions of years so as to undergo optimal energy transfer to the sites of charge separation. Based on spectroscopically detected quantum coherences, it has been suggested that this energy transfer is partially wavelike. This conclusion critically depends on assignment of the coherences to the evolution of excitonic superpositions. Here we demonstrate for a bacterial reaction centre protein that long-lived coherent spectroscopic oscillations, which bear canonical signatures of excitonic superpositions, are essentially vibrational excited state coherences shifted to the ground state of the chromophores . We show that appearance of these coherences is brought about by release of electronic energy during the energy transfer. Our results establish how energy migrates on vibrationally hot chromophores in the reaction centre and they call for a re-examination of claims of quantum energy transfer in photosynthesis.

  17. Theoretical study of the reaction kinetics of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod

    2015-02-12

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the reaction of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran (THP, C5H10O) was performed using several ab initio methods and statistical rate theory calculations. Initial geometries of all species involved in the potential energy surface of the title reaction were obtained at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. These molecular geometries were reoptimized using three different meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) functionals. Single-point energies of the stationary points were obtained by employing the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD) and fourth-order Møller-Plesset (MP4 SDQ) levels of theory. The computed CCSD and MP4(SDQ) energies for optimized structures at various DFT functionals were found to be consistent within 2 kJ mol-1. For a more accurate energetic description, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory were performed for the minimum structures and transition states optimized at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Similar to other ether + Br reactions, it was found that the tetrahydropyran + Br reaction proceeds in an overall endothermic addition-elimination mechanism via a number of intermediates. However, the reactivity of various ethers with atomic bromine was found to vary substantially. In contrast with the 1,4-dioxane + Br reaction, the chair form of the addition complex (c-C5H10O-Br) for THP + Br does not need to undergo ring inversion to form a boat conformer (b-C4H8O2-Br) before the intramolecular H-shift can occur to eventually release HBr. Instead, a direct, yet more favorable route was mapped out on the potential energy surface of the THP + Br reaction. The rate coefficients for all relevant steps involved in the reaction mechanism were computed using the energetics of coupled cluster calculations. On the basis of the results of the CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory, the calculated overall rate coefficients can be expressed as kov.,calc.(T) = 4.60 × 10

  18. Structure sensitivity and photocatalytic reactions of semiconductors. Effect of the last layer atomic arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jarod N; Idriss, Hicham

    2002-09-25

    Photocatalytic reactions of heterogeneous systems, probably the most complex catalytic reactions, are central to a wide variety of phenomena including those of evolution theory, energy conversion, and environmental cleanup. Although catalytic reactions are essentially surface driven, the effect of bulk structure is particularly important for the photo processes in solid materials because it directly affects the excitation and charge transfer mechanisms. To treat surface photocatalytic reactions, it is necessary to differentiate between surface and bulk effects. We have successfully decoupled the surface-bulk effects by using a TiO2 (001) single crystal. This was achieved by allowing for surface reconstruction and measuring the rate of reaction for the two thermodynamically stable reconstructed surfaces of the oxide single crystal in ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A considerable difference, in the quantum yield of the photoreaction of acetic acid, between the two reconstructed surfaces was found. This large difference (due to different surface electron-hole recombination rates) between both reconstructed surfaces could not be seen without decoupling the surface from bulk effects.

  19. Deceleration of the electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre as a manifestation of its structure fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knox P. P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To extract information on the nature of protein structural relaxation from the kinetics of electron transfer reaction in the photosynthetic reaction centre (RC. Methods. The kinetic curves obtained by absorption spectroscopy are processed by a maximum entropy method to get the spectrum of relaxation times. Results. A series of distinctive peaks of this spectrum in the interval from 0.1 s to hundreds of seconds is revealed. With the time of exposure of the sample to actinic light increasing, the positions of the peak maxima grow linearly. Conclusions. Theoretical analysis of these results reveals the formation of several structural states of the RC protein. Remarkably, in each of these states the slow reaction kinetics follow the same fractional power law that reflects the glass-like properties of the protein.

  20. Excitation of heavy hydrogen-like ions by light atoms in relativistic collisions with large momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Najjari, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for excitation of heavy hydrogen-like projectile-ions by light target-atoms in collisions where the momentum transfers to the atom are very large on the atomic scale. It is shown that in this process the electrons and the nucleus of the atom behave as (quasi-) free particles with respect to each other and that their motion is governed by the field of the nucleus of the ion. The effect of this field on the atomic particles can be crucial for the contribution to the excitation of the ion caused by the electrons of the atom. Due to comparatively very large nuclear mass, however, this field can be neglected in the calculation of the contribution to the excitation due to the nucleus of the atom.

  1. Revisiting the Dielectric Constant Effect on the Nucleophile and Leaving Group of Prototypical Backside Sn2 Reactions: a Reaction Force and Atomic Contribution Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-González, Laura Milena; Galindo, Johan Fabian; Gonzalez, Ronald; Reyes, Andrés

    2016-10-09

    The solvent effect on the nucleophile and leaving group atoms of the prototypical F(-) + CH3Cl → CH3F + Cl(-) backside bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction (SN2) is analyzed employing the reaction force and the atomic contributions methods on the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC). Solvent effects were accounted for using the polarizable continuum solvent model. Calculations were performed employing eleven dielectric constants, ε, ranging from 1.0 to 78.5, to cover a wide spectrum of solvents. The reaction force data reveals that the solvent mainly influences the region of the IRC preceding the energy barrier, where the structural rearrangement to reach the transition state occurs. A detailed analysis of the atomic role in the reaction as a function of ε reveals that the nucleophile and the carbon atom are the ones that contribute the most to the energy barrier. In addition, we investigated the effect of the choice of nucleophile and leaving group on the ΔE0 and ΔE(↕) of Y(-) + CH3X → YCH3 + X(-) (X,Y= F, Cl, Br, I) in aqueous solution. Our analysis allowed us to find relationships between the atomic contributions to the activation energy and leaving group ability and nucleophilicity.

  2. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-01-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron "breakup" reaction 2H(e,e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the quasielast

  3. Selective Hydrogen Transfer Reaction in FCC Process:Characterization and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Beiyan; He Mingyuan; Da Zhijian

    2003-01-01

    The product distribution and gasoline quality of FCC process, especially the olefin content,heavily depends on the catalyst performance in terms of selective/non-selective hydrogen transfer reaction selectivity. A reliable experimental protocol has been established by using n-dodecane as a probe molecule to characterize the selective hydrogen transfer ability of catalytic materials. The results obtained have been correlated with the performance of the practical catalysts.

  4. Rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with dimethyl ether and dimethyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Machen, R. C.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1981-03-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with dimethyl ether (DME) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were obtained using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, rate constants for the H+DME reaction over the temperature range 273-426 K are well represented by the Arrhenius expression k1=(4.38±0.59)×10-12 exp(-1956±43/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The corresponding Arrhenius expression for the H+DMS reaction over the temperature range 212-500 K is k2=(1.30±0.43)×10-11exp(-1118±81/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The Arrhenius plot for k2 shows signs of curvature, however, and separate Arrhenius expressions are derived for the data above and below room temperature. These results are discussed and comparisons are made with previous determinations which employed flow discharge and product analysis techniques.

  5. A Novel Micro-hole Electrode Used to Investigate Electron Transfer Reactions at ITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel micro-hole electrode was fabricated to investigate the electron transfer reaction at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The electron transfer reaction between ferro/ferricyanide in aqueous phase (W) and ferrocene in 1, 2-dichloroethane (O) phase was studied as a test experiment. The results showed that the diffusion coefficient obtained from the micro-hole electrode was consistent with that obtained at macro-interface. Due to its simplicity and the very small IR drop it will be a useful tool for the study of ITIES systems.

  6. A Novel Micro—hole Electrode Used to Investigate Electron Transfer Reactions at ITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongPingZHAN; BingLiangWU

    2002-01-01

    A novel micro-hole electrode was fabricated to investigate the electron transfer reaction at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES). The electron transfer reaction between feero/ferricyanide in aqueous phase(W) and ferrocene in 1,2-dichloroethane (O) phase was studied as a test experiment. The results showed that the diffusion coefficient obtained from the micro-hole electrode was consistent with that obtained at macro-interface. Due to its simplicity and the very small IR drop it will be a useful tool for the study of ITIES systems.

  7. Diagnostic criteria for the characterization of quasireversible electron transfer reactions by cyclic square wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Megan A; Helfrick, John C; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2014-08-19

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of quasireversible electron transfer reactions is presented and experimentally verified. The impact of empirical parameters on the shape of the current-voltage curve is examined. From the trends, diagnostic criteria enabling the use of this waveform as a tool for mechanistic analysis of electrode reaction processes are presented. These criteria were experimentally confirmed using Eu(3+)/Eu(2+), a well-established quasireversible analyte. Using cyclic square wave voltammetry, both the electron transfer coefficient and rate were calculated for this analyte and found to be in excellent agreement with literature. When properly applied, these criteria will enable nonexperts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure electrode reaction kinetics.

  8. Theoretical Study on the NO2 + NO2- Electron Transfer Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Zheng-Yu(周正宇); GAO,Hong-Wei(高洪伟); XING,Yu-Mei(邢玉梅); GUO,Li(郭丽); QU,Yu-Hui(曲玉辉)

    2002-01-01

    The NO2 + NO2- electron transfer reaction was studied with DFT-B3LYP method at 6-311 + G* basis set level for the eight selected structures: four species favor the strucure of "head to head". The geometry of transition state was obtained by the linear coordinate method. Three parameters, non-adiahatic activation energy (Ead), coupling matrix element (Hif) and reorganization energy (λ) for electron transfer reaction can be calculated. According to the reorganization energy of the ET reaction, the values obtained from George-Griffith-Marcus (GGM) method (the contribution only from diagonal elements of force constant matrix) are larger than those obtained from Hessian matrix method (including the contribution from both diagonal and off-diagonal elements), which suggests that the coupling interactions between different vibrational modes are important to the inner-sphere reogrganization energy for the ET reactions in gaseous phase. The value of rate constant was obtained by using above three activation parameters.

  9. Atomic-Scale Observations of Catalyst Structures under Reaction Conditions and during Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Crozier, Peter A

    2016-03-23

    Heterogeneous catalysis is a chemical process performed at a solid-gas or solid-liquid interface. Direct participation of catalyst atoms in this chemical process determines the significance of the surface structure of a catalyst in a fundamental understanding of such a chemical process at a molecular level. High-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) have been used to observe catalyst structure in the last few decades. In this review, instrumentation for the two in situ/operando techniques and scientific findings on catalyst structures under reaction conditions and during catalysis are discussed with the following objectives: (1) to present the fundamental aspects of in situ/operando studies of catalysts; (2) to interpret the observed restructurings of catalyst and evolution of catalyst structures; (3) to explore how HP-STM and ETEM can be synergistically used to reveal structural details under reaction conditions and during catalysis; and (4) to discuss the future challenges and prospects of atomic-scale observation of catalysts in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This Review focuses on the development of HP-STM and ETEM, the in situ/operando characterizations of catalyst structures with them, and the integration of the two structural analytical techniques for fundamentally understanding catalysis.

  10. Quantum Chemical Evaluation of the Astrochemical Significance of Reactions between S Atom and Acetylene or Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Addition-elimination reactions of S atom in its P-3 ground state with acetylene (C2H2) and ethylene (C2H4) were characterized with both molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations employing correlation consistent basis sets in order to assess the likelihood either reaction might play a general role in astrochemistry or a specific role in the formation of S2 (X (sup 3 SIGMA (sub g) (sup -)) via a mechanism proposed by Saxena and Misra (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 1995, 272, 89). The acetylene and ethylene reactions proceed through C2H2S ((sup 3)A")) and C2H4S ((sup 3)A")) intermediates, respectively, to yield HCCS ((sup 2)II)) and C2H3S ((sup 2)A')). Substantial barriers were found in the exit channels for every combination of method and basis set considered in this work, which effectively precludes hydrogen elimination pathways for both S + C2H2 and S + C2H4 in the ultracold interstellar medium where only very modest barriers can be surmounted and processes without barriers tend to predominate. However, if one or both intermediates is formed and stabilized efficiently under cometary or dense interstellar cloud conditions, they could serve as temporary reservoirs for S atom and participate in reactions such as S + C2H2S (right arrow) S2 = C2H2 or S + C2H4S (right arrow) S2 + C2H4. For formation and stabilization to be efficient, the reaction must possess a barrier height small enough to be surmountable at low temperatures yet large enough to prevent redissociation to reactants. Barrier heights computed with B3LYP and large basis sets are very low, but more rigorous QCISD(T) and RCCSD(T) results indicate that the barrier heights are closer to 3-4 kcal/mol. The calculations therefore indicate that S + C2H2 or S + C2H4 could contribute to the formation of S2 in comets and may serve as a means to gauge coma temperature. The energetics of the ethylene reaction are more favorable.

  11. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  12. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  14. Rate constants and isotope effects for the reaction of H-atom abstraction from RH substrates by PINO radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opeida, I. A.; Litvinov, Yu. E.; Kushch, O. V.; Kompanets, M. A.; Shendrik, A. N.; Matvienko, A. G.; Novokhatko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen atom abstraction from the C-H bonds of substrates of different structures by phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals is studied. The rate constants of this reaction are measured and the kinetic isotope effects are determined. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic factor, Coulomb forces and donor-acceptor interactions affect the reaction between phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals and substrate molecules, altering the shape of the transition state. This favors the tunneling of hydrogen atoms and leads to a substantial reduction in the activation energy of the process.

  15. Large Density-Functional and Basis-Set Effects for the DMSO Reductase Catalyzed Oxo-Transfer Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Lai; Mata, Ricardo A; Ryde, Ulf

    2013-03-12

    The oxygen-atom transfer reaction catalyzed by the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR) has attracted considerable attention through both experimental and theoretical studies. We show here that this reaction is more sensitive to details of quantum mechanical calculations than what has previously been appreciated. Basis sets of at least triple-ζ quality are needed to obtain qualitatively correct results. Dispersion has an appreciable effect on the reaction, in particular the binding of the substrate or the dissociation of the product (up to 34 kJ/mol). Polar and nonpolar solvation effects are also significant, especially if the enzyme can avoid cavitation effects by using a preformed active-site cavity. Relativistic effects are considerable (up to 22 kJ/mol), but they are reasonably well treated by a relativistic effective core potential. Various density-functional methods give widely different results for the activation and reaction energy (differences of over 100 kJ/mol), mainly reflecting the amount of exact exchange in the functional, owing to the oxidation of Mo from +IV to +VI. By calibration toward local CCSD(T0) calculations, we show that none of eight tested functionals (TPSS, BP86, BLYP, B97-D, TPSSH, B3LYP, PBE0, and BHLYP) give accurate energies for all states in the reaction. Instead, B3LYP gives the best activation barrier, whereas pure functionals give more accurate energies for the other states. Our best results indicate that the enzyme follows a two-step associative reaction mechanism with an overall activation enthalpy of 63 kJ/mol, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Mechanistic aspects of gas-phase hydrogen-atom transfer from methane to [CO](·+) and [SiO](·+) : why do they differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Nicolas; Troiani, Anna; Schlangen, Maria; Ursini, Ornella; Angelini, Giancarlo; Apeloig, Yitzhak; de Petris, Giulia; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-05-17

    The reactivity of the two diatomic congeneric systems [CO](·+) and [SiO](·+) towards methane has been investigated by means of mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical calculations. While [CO](·+) gives rise to three different reaction channels, [SiO](·+) reacts only by hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) from methane under thermal conditions. A theoretical analysis of the respective HAT processes reveals two distinctly different mechanistic pathways for [CO](·+) and [SiO](·+), and a comparison to the higher metal oxides of Group 14 emphasizes the particular role of carbon as a second-row p element.

  17. Chapter 13 Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Gas-Phase Cl-Atom Initiated Reactions of Benzene and Toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkov, A.; Ariya, P. A.; Raofie, F.; Niki, H.; Harris, G. W.

    The reactions of benzene (Bz) and toluene (PhMe) with chlorine atoms in the gas phase have been studied using both theoretical and experimental techniques. Energy and geometry of reaction complexes and transition states were calculated in the Cl-atom initiated reaction of benzene and toluene using modern hybrid functional PBE0 method with the aug-pc1 basis set with an additional CCSD(T)/aug-CC-pVDZ energy single point calculation. Three stationary structures have been found for the Bz...Cl complex: hexahapto-complex, [pi]-complex and [sigma]-complex. The first one is a transition state between two opposite [pi]-complexes. PhMe...Cl has additional structures due to ipso-, ortho-, meta- and para-isomerization. The stability of all calculated complexes was determined and compared. Two reaction pathways for benzene and toluene with a Cl atom were evaluated: (a) the hydrogen abstraction of benzene and toluene by Cl atom, which is seemingly barrierless and endothermic, and (b) the hydrogen substitution reaction that in contrast has a relatively high energy of activation. Rate coefficients for these same reactions were measured using ethane, n-butane, and chloro-, dichloro- and trichloromethane, as reference compounds, with gas chromatography equipped with mass detection spectrometry and flame ionization detection (GC-MSD and GC-FID). The reaction rates were estimated as (5.57±0.15)×10-11 and for benzene and toluene, respectively. Chlorinated products of the reactions were analyzed by GS-MS. Chlorobenzene was the only identified product between a reaction of benzene and the Cl atom. The major products of the PhMe + Cl reaction were chloromethylbenzene with ortho- and para-chlorotoluenes.

  18. Proton transfer reactions in carbon nanotubes endohedrally functionalized with selected polar amino acid sidechains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi, T.G. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Taraphder, Srabani, E-mail: srabani@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2012-09-11

    Graphical abstract: Free Energies of activation and reaction for intramolecular proton transfer between polar amino acid sidechains and hydroxyl groups inside the core of endohedrally functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EVB based free energy simulation of proton transfer in hydrophobic confinement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aminoacid sidechain and OH group suspended within carbon nanotube act as reactants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Donors like His and Glu are efficient in confinement aided by local hydrogen bonds. -- Abstract: We use the empirical-valence-bond (EVB) theory to investigate intramolecular proton transfer reactions between a selected set of polar amino acid sidechains and hydroxyl groups suspended inside carbon nanotubes to model the effect of hydrophobic confinement on the energetics of proton transfer involving (i) translocation of an excess protonic charge (with protonated histidine sidechain as donor) and (ii) transformation of a neutral reactant state to a charge-separated product state (with sidechains of Asp, Glu, Ser and Thr as donor). In both the cases, confinement in hydrophobic medium is found to change the associated free energies compared to their respective values in the bulk solution phase. Presence of stable hydrogen bonding within the pore is found to have a significant effect on both free energies of reaction and activation and thus governs the thermodynamic and kinetic feasibilities of these intramolecular reactions in hydrophobic confinement.

  19. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  20. Long-range proton transfer in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siwick, B.J.; Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) in the aqueous acid−base reaction between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and acetate by probing the vibrational resonances of HPTS, acetate, and the hydrated proton with femtosecond mid-infrared laser pulses. We find that PT

  1. Offline thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry to study composition of organic aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timkovsky, J.; Dusek, U.; Henzing, J. S.; Kuipers, T. L.; Röckmann, T.; Holzinger, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to study the organic composition of aerosol filter samples using thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS) in the laboratory. The method is tested and validated based on the comparison with in situ TD-PTR-MS measurements. In general, we obs

  2. Mechanism of the Primary Charge Transfer Reaction in the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M; Schulten, Klaus; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    , the quinol-protein interaction, which initiates the Q-cycle, has not yet been completely described. Furthermore, the initial charge transfer reactions of the Q-cycle lack a physical description. The present investigation utilizes classical molecular dynamics simulations in tandem with quantum density...

  3. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: a spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086156; Raabe, Riccardo; Bracco, Angela

    In this thesis work, an exploratory experiment to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier, as a possible mean to perform $\\gamma$ spectroscopy studies of exotic neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high energies and spins. The experiment was performed at ISOLDE (CERN), employing the heavy-ion reaction $^{98}$Rb + $^{7}$Li at 2.85 MeV/A. Cluster-transfer reaction channels were studied through particle-$\\gamma$ coincidence measurements, using the MINIBALL Ge array coupled to the charged particle Si detectors T-REX. Sr, Y and Zr neutron-rich nuclei with A $\\approx$ 100 were populated by either triton- or $\\alpha$ transfer from $^{7}$Li to the beam nuclei and the emitted complementary charged fragment was detected in coincidence with the $\\gamma$ cascade of the residues, after few neutrons evaporation. The measured $\\gamma$ spectra were studied in detail and t...

  4. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the forced convective diffusion-reaction problem for convection inside and outside a droplet by a recirculating flow field hydrodynamically coupled at the droplet interface with an external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented and results are shown here for the case of no reaction and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  5. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhua; Zhang, Xintong; Liu, Yichun

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  6. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Reaction between Poly-guanylic Acid (5`) with Anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The electron transfer reaction between triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate with poly-guanylic acid (5) (poly[G]) in acetonitrile-H2O has been investigated by 248 nm laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra of radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraqunione-2-sulfonate(AQS) arising from electron transfer reaction has been observed simultaneously for the first time. The formation processes of radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate as well as the decay processes of triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate have also been observed, the apparent rate constants for the formation and decay of transient species have been determined. The free energy changes in the process of the electron transfer was also calculated.

  7. Two-neutron transfer analysis of the 16O(18O,16O)18O reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermamatov, M. J.; Cappuzzello, F.; Lubian, J.; Cubero, M.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Ferreira, J. L.; Foti, A.; Garcia, V. N.; Gargano, A.; Lay, J. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Santagati, G.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Recently a quantitative description of the two-neutron transfer reaction 12C(18O,16O)14C was performed and the measured cross sections were successfully reproduced [M. Cavallaro et al., Phys. Rev. C 88, 054601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.054601]. This task was accomplished by combining nuclear structure calculations of spectroscopic amplitudes and a full quantum description of the reaction mechanism. Verification of such a theoretical approach to other heavy nuclear systems is mandatory in order to use (18O,16O ) reactions to assess pair configurations in nuclear states. In this work we apply this methodology to the 16O(18O,16O)18O reaction at 84 MeV. Experimental angular distributions for the two-neutron transfer to the ground state and 21+ state of 18O were obtained using the MAGNEX spectrometer at INFN-LNS. The roles of one- and two-step processes are analyzed under the exact finite range coupled reaction channel and the second order distorted wave Born approximation. We conclude that the one-step transfer mechanism is dominant in this system.

  8. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2016-06-01

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  9. Structure and mechanism of styrene monooxygenase reductase: new insight into the FAD-transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Eliot; Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T; Sazinsky, Matthew H

    2013-09-03

    The two-component flavoprotein styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida S12 catalyzes the NADH- and FAD-dependent epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer from the reductase (SMOB) to the epoxidase (NSMOA) component and report our findings in light of the 2.2 Å crystal structure of SMOB. Upon rapidly mixing with NADH, SMOB forms an NADH → FADox charge-transfer intermediate and catalyzes a hydride-transfer reaction from NADH to FAD, with a rate constant of 49.1 ± 1.4 s(-1), in a step that is coupled to the rapid dissociation of NAD(+). Electrochemical and equilibrium-binding studies indicate that NSMOA binds FADhq ∼13-times more tightly than SMOB, which supports a vectoral transfer of FADhq from the reductase to the epoxidase. After binding to NSMOA, FADhq rapidly reacts with molecular oxygen to form a stable C(4a)-hydroperoxide intermediate. The half-life of apoSMOB generated in the FAD-transfer reaction is increased ∼21-fold, supporting a protein-protein interaction between apoSMOB and the peroxide intermediate of NSMOA. The mechanisms of FAD dissociation and transport from SMOB to NSMOA were probed by monitoring the competitive reduction of cytochrome c in the presence and absence of pyridine nucleotides. On the basis of these studies, we propose a model in which reduced FAD binds to SMOB in equilibrium between an unreactive, sequestered state (S state) and more reactive, transfer state (T state). The dissociation of NAD(+) after the hydride-transfer reaction transiently populates the T state, promoting the transfer of FADhq to NSMOA. The binding of pyridine nucleotides to SMOB-FADhq shifts the FADhq-binding equilibrium from the T state to the S state. Additionally, the 2.2 Å crystal structure of SMOB-FADox reported in this work is discussed in light of the pyridine nucleotide-gated flavin-transfer and electron-transfer reactions.

  10. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  11. Barrier heights of hydrogen-transfer reactions with diffusion quantum monte carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Fan

    2017-04-30

    Hydrogen-transfer reactions are an important class of reactions in many chemical and biological processes. Barrier heights of H-transfer reactions are underestimated significantly by popular exchange-correlation functional with density functional theory (DFT), while coupled-cluster (CC) method is quite expensive and can be applied only to rather small systems. Quantum Monte-Carlo method can usually provide reliable results for large systems. Performance of fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte-Carlo method (FN-DMC) on barrier heights of the 19 H-transfer reactions in the HTBH38/08 database is investigated in this study with the trial wavefunctions of the single-Slater-Jastrow form and orbitals from DFT using local density approximation. Our results show that barrier heights of these reactions can be calculated rather accurately using FN-DMC and the mean absolute error is 1.0 kcal/mol in all-electron calculations. Introduction of pseudopotentials (PP) in FN-DMC calculations improves efficiency pronouncedly. According to our results, error of the employed PPs is smaller than that of the present CCSD(T) and FN-DMC calculations. FN-DMC using PPs can thus be applied to investigate H-transfer reactions involving larger molecules reliably. In addition, bond dissociation energies of the involved molecules using FN-DMC are in excellent agreement with reference values and they are even better than results of the employed CCSD(T) calculations using the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-07

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  13. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO 2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble and entanglement transfer in coupled optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Dong-Yang; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme for the creation of robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble at the macroscopic level in coupled optomechanical system. We numerically simulate the degree of entanglement of the bipartite macroscopic entanglement and show that it depends on the coupling strength between the cavities and is robust with respect to the certain environment temperature. Inspiringly and surprisingly, according to the reported relation between the mechanical damping rate and the mechanical frequency of the movable mirror, the numerical simulation result shows that such bipartite macroscopic entanglement persists for environment temperature up to 170 K, which breaks the liquid nitrogen cooling and liquid helium cooling and largely lowers down the experiment cost. We also investigate the entanglement transfer based on this coupled system. The scheme can be used for the realization of quantum memories for continuous variable quantum information processing and quantum-limited displacement measurements.

  15. Radiative charge transfer in cold and ultracold Sulfur atoms colliding with Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, G; Wang, J G; McCann, J F; McLaughlin, B M

    2015-01-01

    Radiative decay processes at cold and ultra cold temperatures for Sulfur atoms colliding with protons are investigated. The MOLPRO quantum chemistry suite of codes was used to obtain accurate potential energies and transition dipole moments, as a function of internuclear distance, between low-lying states of the SH$^{+}$ molecular cation. A multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation together with the Davidson correction is used to determine the potential energy curves and transition dipole moments, between the states of interest, where the molecular orbitals (MO's) are obtained from state-averaged multi configuration-self-consistent field (MCSCF) calculations. The collision problem is solved approximately using an optical potential method to obtain radiative loss, and a fully two-channel quantum approach for radiative charge transfer. Cross sections and rate coefficients are determined for the first time for temperatures ranging from 10 $\\mu$ K up to 10,000 K. Results are obtained for all ...

  16. Modification of Jute Fibers with Polystyrene via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Jankova, Katja Atanassova; Egsgaard, Helge;

    2005-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated as a method of covalently bonding polystyrene to jute (Corchorus capsularis) and as a possible approach to fiber composites with enhanced properties. Jute fibers were modified with a brominated initiator and subsequently ATRP modified...... to attach polystyrene and then examined using SEM, DSC, TGA, FTIR, XPS, elemental analysis, and Py-GC-MS. These techniques confirmed that polystyrene had been covalently bound to the fibers and consequently ATRP-modified jute fiber mats were used to prepare hot-pressed polystyrene composites. Composite...... applications, we conclude that further optimization of the ATRP method is required, possibly targeting higher and more uniform loading of polystyrene on the fibers....

  17. Robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble and entanglement transfer in coupled optomechanical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Dong-Yang; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-14

    We propose a scheme for the creation of robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble at the macroscopic level in coupled optomechanical system. We numerically simulate the degree of entanglement of the bipartite macroscopic entanglement and show that it depends on the coupling strength between the cavities and is robust with respect to the certain environment temperature. Inspiringly and surprisingly, according to the reported relation between the mechanical damping rate and the mechanical frequency of the movable mirror, the numerical simulation result shows that such bipartite macroscopic entanglement persists for environment temperature up to 170 K, which breaks the liquid nitrogen cooling and liquid helium cooling and largely lowers down the experiment cost. We also investigate the entanglement transfer based on this coupled system. The scheme can be used for the realization of quantum memories for continuous variable quantum information processing and quantum-limited displacement measurements.

  18. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  19. Preparation of polystyrene-grafted titanate nanotubes by in situ atom transfer radical polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This work successfully prepared nanohybrids by in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene from titanate nanotubes (TNTs). Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), pronton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to verify the successful graft of polystyrene (PS) chains from TNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) dis-played that the obtained PS-g-TNTs nanohybrids had a core-shell structure of TNT core and PS shell. The grafted PS content was well controlled and increased with increasing of the monomer/initiator ratio. Further copolymerization of tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) from the surface of PS-g-TNTs was studied, illus-trating the "living" characteristics of the surface-induced ATRP method used in this work.

  20. A New Initiator Cholesteryl Chloroformate for Cupper-Based Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹健; 楚娟; 张可达

    2004-01-01

    The polymerization of metyl methacrylate (MMA) was studied in detail by use of CuCl/L as a catalyst and cholesteryl chloroformate (CC) as an initiator. It was found that the atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA could proceed when L equals to a multidentate aliphatic amine ligand, N,N,N',N",N"-penta(methyl acrylate)diethylenetriamine (MA5-DETA), and no polymerization was occurred while L=2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. The linear proportionality of the molecular weights to the conversions and straight lines observed in ln[M]0/[M] versus time plots indicated that the present polymerization system had the typical controlled polymerization characteristics.

  1. SYNTHESIS OF BLOCK COPOLYMER BY INTEGRATED LIVING ANIONIC POLYMERIZATION-ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION (ATRP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Liu; Feng Liu; Ning Luo; Sheng-kang Ying; Qing Liu

    2000-01-01

    Alpha-trichloroacetoxy terminated polystyrene oligomer (PS-CH2CH2OCOCCl3) and poly-(styrene-b-butadiene)oligomer [P(S-b-B)-CH2CH2OCOCCl3)] were synthesized by living anionic polymeri-zation using n-butyllithium as initiator.Then the PS-CH2CH2OCOCCl3 (PS-Cl3) or P(S-b-B)-CH2CH2O-COCCl3 (PSB-Cl3) was used as the macroinitiator in the polymerization of (meth)acrylates in the presence of CuX/bpy. AB diblock and ABC triblock copolymers were prepared by the integrated living anionic polymerization (LAP)-atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The structures of the PSB-Cl3 and the P(S-b-MMA) were identified by FTIR and 1H-NMR spectrum, respectively. A new way to design block copolymers (the combination of LAP and ATRP) was developed.

  2. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1989--June 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-08-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  3. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. [Pennsylvania State Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He[sup +] collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  4. THERMOSENSITIVITY OF NARROW-DISPERSED POLY(N-N-PROPYLACRYLAMIDE) PREPARED BY ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-yong Hu; Jing Du; Qing-bin Meng; Zhan-yong Li; Xiao-xia Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Controlled polymerization of N-n-propylacrylamide was achieved by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)in a N,N-dimethylformamide-water mixture (50 vol%) at room temperature with methyl 2-chloropropinonate as initiator andCuCl/tris(2-dimethylaminoethyl)amine as the catalytic system in a ratio of 1:1:1. High molecular weight homopolymers (upto 3.7×104) with narrow molecular weight distribution (less than 1.2) were obtained. The living character of thepolymerization was further demonstrated by self-blocking experiment. An inverse molecular weight dependence of the cloudpoint of narrow-dispersed poly(N-n-propylacrylamide) aqueous solution was determined by turbidimetry and differentialscanning calorimetry, especially for the low molecular weight samples.

  5. Synthesis of End Functional Polymers via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization in Immobilized Catalytic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cross-linked polystyrene with azo-crown ether functional side chain (PSt-1, 10-dicarbonyl-3,6,9-trizaocylcodecane) was prepared under microwave irradiation and the structure was characterized through FT-IR and element analysis. The functionalized cross-linked polystyrene (cross-link degree, 3.5%) combining with immobilized catalyst system (CuBr and ethyl α-bromo-isobutyrate) can catalyze atom transfer radical polymerization of Styrene. Neat polymer products can be obtained then. Complex of La and the polymer end group (EBiB) was synthesized. The third order nonlinear optical property of the polymer-La complex was investigated and the structure was also characterized by FT-IR and XPS.

  6. General model of depolarization and transfer of polarization of singly ionized atoms by collisions with hydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of the generation of the atomic polarization is necessary for interpreting the second solar spectrum. For this purpose, it is important to rigorously determine the effects of the isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen on the atomic polarization of the neutral atoms, ionized atoms and molecules. Our aim is to treat in generality the problem of depolarizing isotropic collisions between singly ionized atoms and neutral hydrogen in its ground state. Using our numerical code, we computed the collisional depolarization rates of the $p$-levels of ions for large number of values of the effective principal quantum number $n^{*}$ and the Uns\\"old energy $E_p$. Then, genetic programming has been utilized to fit the available depolarization rates. As a result, strongly non-linear relationships between the collisional depolarization rates, $n^{*}$ and $E_p$ are obtained, and are shown to reproduce the original data with accuracy clearly better than 10\\%. These relationships allow quick calculations of the ...

  7. Stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions: toward a unified understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R

    2013-07-16

    Many mechanistic and stereochemical studies have focused on the breaking of the C-H bond through base-catalyzed elimination reactions. When we began our research, however, chemists knew almost nothing about the stereospecificity of addition-elimination reactions involving conjugated acyclic carbonyl compounds, even though the carbonyl group is a pivotal functional group in organic chemistry. Over the last 25 years, we have studied the addition-elimination reactions of β-substituted acyclic esters, thioesters, and ketones in order to reach a comprehensive understanding of how electronic effects influence their stereochemistry. This Account brings together our understanding of the stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions, describing how each study has built upon previous work and contributed to our understanding of this field. When we began, chemists thought that anti stereospecificity in base-catalyzed 1,2-elimination reactions occurred via concerted E2 mechanisms, which provide a smooth path for anti elimination. Unexpectedly, we discovered that some E1cBirrev reactions produce the same anti stereospecificity as E2 reactions even though they proceed through diffusionally equilibrated, "free" enolate-anion intermediates. This result calls into question the conventional wisdom that anti stereochemistry must result from a concerted mechanism. While carrying out our research, we developed insights ranging from the role of historical contingency in the evolution of hydratase-dehydratase enzymes to the influence of buffers on the stereochemistry of H/D exchange in D2O. Negative hyperconjugation is the most important concept for understanding our results. This idea provides a unifying view for the largely anti stereochemistry in E1cBirrev elimination reactions and a basis for understanding the stereoelectronic influence of electron-withdrawing β-substituents on proton-transfer reactions.

  8. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer to carbon atoms: nonadiabatic surface-hopping dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-21

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) between two highly electronegative atoms, for example, oxygen and nitrogen, has been intensely studied experimentally and computationally, whereas there has been much less theoretical work on ESIPT to other atoms such as carbon. We have employed CASSCF, MS-CASPT2, RI-ADC(2), OM2/MRCI, DFT, and TDDFT methods to study the mechanistic photochemistry of 2-phenylphenol, for which such an ESIPT has been observed experimentally. According to static electronic structure calculations, irradiation of 2-phenylphenol populates the bright S1 state, which has a rather flat potential in the Franck-Condon region (with a shallow enol minimum at the CASSCF level) and may undergo an essentially barrierless ESIPT to the more stable S1 keto species. There are two S1/S0 conical intersections that mediate relaxation to the ground state, one in the enol region and one in the keto region, with the latter one substantially lower in energy. After S1 → S0 internal conversion, the transient keto species can return back to the S0 enol structure via reverse ground-state hydrogen transfer in a facile tautomerization. This mechanistic scenario is verified by OM2/MRCI-based fewest-switches surface-hopping simulations that provide detailed dynamic information. In these trajectories, ESIPT is complete within 118 fs; the corresponding S1 excited-state lifetime is computed to be 373 fs in vacuum. Most of the trajectories decay to the ground state via the S1/S0 conical intersection in the keto region (67%), and the remaining ones via the enol region (33%). The combination of static electronic structure computations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations is expected to be generally useful for understanding the mechanistic photophysics and photochemistry of molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  9. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with fluorobenzene at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Hurley, MD;

    2002-01-01

    constant for the reaction of C6H5F with Cl atoms. The equilibrium between Cl atoms, C6H5F, and the C6H5F-Cl adduct is established rapidly and has an equilibrium constant estimated to be K-5b=[C6H5F]/[Cl]/[C6H5F][Cl] = (3.2 +/- 2.4) x 10(-1)8 cm(3) molecule(-1). An upper limit of k(9)

  11. Rapid cellular internalization of multifunctional star polymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hong Y; Gao, Haifeng; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Hong, Joanna; Bencherif, Sidi A; Siegwart, Daniel J; Paik, Hyun-Jong; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-09-13

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) star polymers containing GRGDS (Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide sequences on the star periphery were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA), GRGDS modified poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (GRGDS-PEG-Acryl), fluorescein o-methacrylate (FMA), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) via an "arm-first" method. Star polymers were approximately 20 nm in diameter, as measured by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Conjugation of FMA to the stars was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, and successful attachment of GRGDS segments to the star periphery was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both fluorescent PEG star polymers with and without peripheral GRGDS peptide segments were cultured with MC3T3-E1.4 cells. These star polymers were biocompatible with ≥ 90% cell viability after 24 h of incubation. Cellular uptake of PEG star polymers in MC3T3-E1.4 cells was observed by confocal microscopy. Rapid uptake of PEG star polymers with GRGDS peptides (∼ 100% of FITC-positive cells in 15 min measured by flow cytometry) was observed, suggesting enhanced delivery potential of these functional star polymers.

  12. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer...... reactions of trHb-Bs were electrochemically studied in solution and at graphite electrodes. Spectrophotometrical potentiometric titration and direct electrochemical measurements gave a heme iron redox potential of −103 ± 4 mV and −108 ± 2 mV vs. NHE, at pH 7, respectively. The redox potential of the heme...... in trHb-Bs shifted −59 mV per pH unit at pH higher than 7, consistently with a 1e−/1 H+ – transfer reaction. The heterogeneous rate constant ks for a quasi-reversible 1e− – 1H+ – transfer reaction between graphite and trHb-Bs was 10.1 ± 2.3 s−1. Upon reversible cyanide binding the ks doubled, while...

  13. Probing surface distribution of $\\alpha$-cluster in $^{20}$Ne via $\\alpha$-transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of the $\\alpha$-cluster development in bound states has not been obtained yet although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of $\\alpha$-transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. We aim to verify the development of the $\\alpha$-cluster structure from observables. As the first application, it is argued to extract the spatial information of the cluster structure of the $^{20}$Ne nucleus in its ground state through the cross section of the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,~$d$)$^{20}$Ne. For the analysis of the transfer reaction, we work with the coupled-channels Born approximation (CCBA) approach, in which the breakup effect of $^6$Li is explicitly taken into account by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) based on the three-body $\\alpha + d + {}^{16}$O mo...

  14. Surface modification of glycidyl-containing poly(methyl methacrylate) microchips using surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuefei; Liu, Jikun; Lee, Milton L

    2008-02-01

    Fabrication of microfluidic systems from polymeric materials is attractive because of simplicity and low cost. Unfortunately, the surfaces of many polymeric materials can adsorb biological samples. Therefore, it is necessary to modify their surfaces before these polymeric materials can be used for separation and analysis. Oftentimes it is difficult to modify polymeric surfaces because of their resistance to chemical reaction. Recently, we introduced a surface-reactive acrylic polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) (PGMAMMA), which can be modified easily and is suitable for fabrication of microfluidic devices. Epoxy groups on the surface can be activated by air plasma treatment, hydrolysis, or aminolysis. In this work, the resulting hydroxyl or amino groups were reacted with 2-bromoisobutylryl bromide to introduce an initiator for surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) layers grown on the surface using this method were uniform, hydrophilic, stable, and resistant to protein adsorption. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize activated polymer surfaces, initiator-bound surfaces, and PEG-grafted surfaces. We obtained excellent capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations of proteins and peptides with the PEG-modified microchips. A separation efficiency of 4.4 x 10(4) plates for a 3.5 cm long separation channel was obtained.

  15. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    CERN Document Server

    Miyauchi, N; Chigai, T; Nagaoka, A; Watanabe, N; Kouchi, A

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  16. Diagnostic Criteria for the Characterization of Electrode Reactions with Chemically Coupled Reactions Preceding the Electron Transfer by Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrick, John C; Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2016-08-18

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of electrode reactions with chemical reactions preceding the electron transfer is presented. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure reaction kinetics.

  17. Minor actinide fission induced by multi-nucleon transfer reaction in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taieb J.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of nuclear waste incineration and design of new generation nuclear reactors, experimental data on fission probabilities and on fission fragment yields of minor actinides are crucial to design prototypes. Transfer-induced fission has proven to be an efficient method to study fission probabilities of actinides which cannot be investigated with standard techniques due to their high radioactivity. We report on the preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL that investigates fission probabilities with multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics between a 238U beam on a 12C target. Actinides from U to Cm were produced with an excitation energy range from 0 to 30 MeV. In addition, inverse kinematics allowed to characterize the fission fragments in mass and charge. A key point of the analysis resides in the identification of the actinides produced in the different transfer channels. The new annular telescope SPIDER was used to tag the target-like recoil nucleus of the transfer reaction and to determine the excitation energy of the actinide. The fission probability for each transfer channel is accessible and the preliminary results for 238U are promising.

  18. Product polarization distribution: Stereodynamics of the reaction of atom H and radical NH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The product angular momentum polarization of the reaction of H+NH is calculated via the quasiclassical trajectory method(QCT)based on the extended London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato(LEPS)potential energy surface(PES)at a collision energy of 5.1 kcal/mol.The calculated results of the vector correlations are denoted by using the angular distribution functions.The polarization-dependent differential cross sections(PDDCSs)demonstrate that the rotational angular momentum of the product H2 is aligned and oriented along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane.Vector correlation shows that the angular momentum of the product H2 is aligned in the plane perpendicular to the velocity vector.It suggests that the reaction proceeds preferentially when the reactant velocity vector lies in a plane containing all three atoms.The orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum affects the scattering direction of the product molecules.The polarization-dependent differential cross sections(PDDCSs)reveal that scattering is predominantly in the backward hemisphere.

  19. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  20. Dynamics of the gas-liquid interfacial reaction of O(3P) atoms with hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Hailey; Köhler, Sven P. K.; Henderson, David A.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2003-11-01

    We describe an experimental approach to the determination of the nascent internal state distribution of gas-phase products of a gas-liquid interfacial reaction. The system chosen for study is O(3P) atoms with the surface of liquid deuterated squalane, a partially branched long-chain saturated hydrocarbon, C30D62. The nascent OD products are detected by laser-induced fluorescence. Both OD (v'=0) and (v'=1) were observed in significant yield. The rotational distributions in both vibrational levels are essentially the same, and are characteristic of a Boltzmann distribution at a temperature close to that of the liquid surface. This contrasts with the distributions in the corresponding homogeneous gas-phase reactions. We propose a preliminary interpretation in terms of a dominant trapping-desorption mechanism, in which the OD molecules are retained at the surface sufficiently long to cause rotational equilibration but not complete vibrational relaxation. The significant yield of vibrationally excited OD also suggests that the surface is not composed entirely of -CD3 endgroups, but that secondary and/or tertiary units along the backbone are exposed.

  1. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10-tungstodivanadophosphate by thioglycolic acid in aqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Natarajan Mariselvi; Kandasamy Venkateshwari; Arunachalam Sarathi; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2010-05-01

    Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggintype heteropolyanion, [PVVVVW10O40]5-, in acetate-acetic acid buffers have been measured spectrophotometrically at 25°C. The order of the reaction with respect to substrate and oxidant is unity. The reaction shows simple second order kinetics at constant pH. The rate of the reaction increases with increase of pH of the medium. The mono-anion HSCH2COO- and di-anion -SCH2COO- are found to be the reactive species. Rate constants for mono-anion and di-anion are evaluated from rate law derived from the mechanism. By applying Rehm-Weller relationship, self exchange rate constant for the -SCH2COO-/S$^{\\bullet}$ CH2COO- couple was evaluated as 3.3 × 103 dm3 mol-1 s-1 at 25°C.

  2. Antioxidant activities of [60]fullerene derivatives from chalcone, flavone and flavanone: A ONIOM approach via H-atom and electron transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Nguyen Minh; Dao, Duy Quang; Ngo, Thi Chinh; Huyen, Trinh Le; Nam, Pham Cam

    2016-05-01

    Antioxidant properties of C60 flavonoid conjugates were computationally examined via their O-H bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) and ionization energies (IEs) using two-layer ONIOM and PM6 methods, respectively. Eight ONIOM((RO)B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p):PM6) models were evaluated by computing BDE(O-H)s of a series of polyphenol. Synthetic mechanism of C60 flavonoid conjugates was also explored via the potential energy surfaces of reaction between C60 and malonate flavonoid derivatives (chalcone, flavone and flavanone) at the B3LYP/6-31G(d)//PM6. Antioxidant activities of C60 flavonoid conjugates were discussed via hydrogen atom transfer, single electron transfer mechanisms and the effect of C60 on the BDE(O-H)s and IEs of these compounds.

  3. Discovery of the shape coexisting 0$^{+}$ state in $^{32}$Mg by a two neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, K; Krücken, R; Bildstein, V; Gernhäuser, R; Bastin, B; Bree, N; Diriken, J; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Patronis, N; Vermaelen, P; Voulot, D; Van de Walle, J; Wenander, F; Fraile, L M; Chapman, R; Hadinia, B; Orlandi, R; Smith, J F; Lutter, R; Thirolf, P G; Labiche, M; Blazhev, A; Kalkühler, M; Reiter, P; Seidlitz, M; Warr, N; Macchiavelli, A O; Jeppesen, H B; Fiori, E; Georgiev, G; Schrieder, G; Gupta, S Das; Bianco, G Lo; Nardelli, S; Butterworth, J; Johansen, J; Riisager, K

    2010-01-01

    The Island of Inversion nucleus $^{32}$Mg has been studied by a (t,p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0$^{+}$ state in $^{32}$Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the $\\Delta$L = 0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low $\\gamma$-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0$^{+}$ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell model calculations.

  4. Theoretical Study on the Kinetics of Electron Transfer for Bond-breaking Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING,Yu-Mei(邢玉梅); ZHOU,Zheng-Yu(周正宇); GAO,Hong-Wei(高洪伟)

    2002-01-01

    To test the theory of dissociative electron transfer, a simple model describing the kinetics of electron transfer bond-breaking reactions was used. The Hamiltonian of the system was given.The homogeneous and heterogeneous kinetic data fit reasonably well with an activation-driving force relatiobship derived from the Marcus quadratic theory. In the heterogeneous case, there is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation amd the experimental result, while in the homogeneous case, a good a greement is only observed for the tertiary halides. This is due to the stability of tertiary radical resulting from the sterical effect.

  5. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.;

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete demonstrat...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  6. Analysis of the role of neutron transfer in asymmetric fusion reactions at subbarrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogloblin, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Zhang, H. Q.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Khlebnikov, S. V. [Khlopin Radium Institute (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, E. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Demyanova, A. S. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. H. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland); Xu, X. X. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Yang, F. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Sargsyan, V. V., E-mail: sargsyan@theor.jinr.ru; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institüt für Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universität (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The excitation functions were measured for the {sup 28}Si + {sup 208}Pb complete-fusion (capture) reaction at deep subbarrier energies. The results were compared with the cross sections predicted within the quantum diffusion approach. The role of neutron transfer in the case of positive Q values in the {sup 28}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 30}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 20}Ne + {sup 208}Pb; {sup 40}Ca + {sup 96}Zr; and {sup 134}Te + {sup 40}Ca complete-fusion (capture) reactions is discussed.

  7. GALS - setup for production and study of multinucleon transfer reaction products: present status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyanoy, S.; Zagrebaev, V.; Kozulin, E.; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.

    2016-06-01

    This is a brief report on the current status of the new GAs cell based Laser ionization Setup (GALS) at Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) - JINR, Dubna. GALS is planned to exploit available beams from the U-400M cyclotron in low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions to study exotic neutron-rich nuclei located in the "north-east" region of nuclear map. Products from 4.5 to 9 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion collisions, such as 136Xe on 208Pb, are to be captured in a gas cell and selectively laser-ionized in a sextupole (quadrupole) ion guide extraction system.

  8. Cathodic Aromatic C,C Cross-Coupling Reaction via Single Electron Transfer Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Yoshimasa; Kashiwagi, Tsuneo; Atobe, Mahito

    2017-03-07

    We have successfully developed a novel cathodic cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides with arenes. Utilization of the cathodic single electron transfer (SET) mechanism for activation of aryl halides enables the cross-coupling reaction to proceed without the need for any transition metal catalysts or single electron donors in a mild condition. The SET from a cathode to an aryl halide initiates a radical chain by giving an anion radical of the aryl halide. The following propagation cycle also consists entirely of anion radical intermediates.

  9. Cathodic Aromatic C,C Cross-Coupling Reaction via Single Electron Transfer Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed a novel cathodic cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides with arenes. Utilization of the cathodic single electron transfer (SET mechanism for activation of aryl halides enables the cross-coupling reaction to proceed without the need for any transition metal catalysts or single electron donors in a mild condition. The SET from a cathode to an aryl halide initiates a radical chain by giving an anion radical of the aryl halide. The following propagation cycle also consists entirely of anion radical intermediates.

  10. Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine infrared CH intensities of hydrocarbons: a quantum theory of atoms in molecules model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Meneses, Helen G C; Bruns, Roy E

    2014-11-14

    Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine most of the infrared fundamental CH intensities of simple hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene, ethane, propyne, cyclopropane and allene. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux model predicted the values of 30 CH intensities ranging from 0 to 123 km mol(-1) with a root mean square (rms) error of only 4.2 km mol(-1) without including a specific equilibrium atomic charge term. Sums of the contributions from terms involving charge flux and/or dipole flux averaged 20.3 km mol(-1), about ten times larger than the average charge contribution of 2.0 km mol(-1). The only notable exceptions are the CH stretching and bending intensities of acetylene and two of the propyne vibrations for hydrogens bound to sp hybridized carbon atoms. Calculations were carried out at four quantum levels, MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p), MP2/cc-pVTZ, QCISD/6-311++G(3d,3p) and QCISD/cc-pVTZ. The results calculated at the QCISD level are the most accurate among the four with root mean square errors of 4.7 and 5.0 km mol(-1) for the 6-311++G(3d,3p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These values are close to the estimated aggregate experimental error of the hydrocarbon intensities, 4.0 km mol(-1). The atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effect is much larger than the charge effect for the results of all four quantum levels. Charge transfer-counter polarization effects are expected to also be important in vibrations of more polar molecules for which equilibrium charge contributions can be large.

  11. Two-Phase Reactions in Microdroplets without the Use of Phase-Transfer Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Cheng, Heyong; Zare, Richard N

    2017-02-22

    Many important chemical transformations occur in two-phase reactions, which are widely used in chemical, pharmaceutical, and polymer manufacturing. We present an efficient method for performing two-phase reactions in microdroplets sheared by sheath gas without using a phase-transfer catalyst. This avoids disadvantages such as thermal instability, high cost, and, especially, the need to separate and recycle the catalysts. We show that various alcohols can be oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones within milliseconds in moderate to good yields (50-75 %). The scale-up of the present method was achieved at an isolated rate of 1.2 mg min(-1) for the synthesis of 4-nitrobenzylaldehyde from 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol in the presence of sodium hypochlorite. The biphasic nature of this process, which avoids use of a phase-transfer catalyst, greatly enhances synthetic effectiveness.

  12. Solvent Effects on Simple Electron Transfer Reactions. A Comparison of Results for Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Electroanalytical Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California . Davis, CA 95616 \\ JUN2 0 1989 May 1, 1989 C2 E Reproduction in whole or in...0541 Davis, CA 95616 . O 0 Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 Prepared for Publication in: Journal of Electroanalytical ... Chemistry 1& A (U fm M Solvent effects on the rate constants for both homogeneous and hetero- geneous electron transfer reactions have been analyzed on

  13. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Solvent Effects in Alcohol Solutions for Electron Transfer Reactions Involving the Metallocenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-15

    Transfer Reactions Involving the Metallocenes by W.R. Fawcett and C.A. Foss, Jr. Prepared for Presentation at The Electrochemical Society Meeting...Technical 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 &UL OWaep "W" Prepared for presentation at The" Electrochemical Society Meeting, Montreal Canada, tlay...Extended Abstract must be submitted with the 75-Ward Abstract by December 1, 1969 Montreal, Quebec, Canada-May 6-11, 1990 Submit to: The Electrochemical

  15. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction for xanthene dye-sensitized formation of methyl viologen radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Y.; Misawa, H.; Sakuragi, H.; Tokumaru, K.

    1987-05-01

    Sensitized reduction of methyl viologen, MV/sup 2 +/, occurs efficiently through electron transfer from triplet xanthene dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ followed by electron transfer to the resulting semioxidized dyes from a reductant like triethanolamine. Unreactive ion pair complexes between these dyes and MV/sup 2 +/ are formed (formation constant: 1.2 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ for Eosine Y and MV/sup 2 +/ in 50% aqueous ethanol solution). The quantum yield for the reduced methyl viologen radical depends on the concentrations of MV/sup 2 +/ and the amine and on the ionic strength of solution. The efficiency of the electron transfer from triplet dyes to MV/sup 2 +/ is increased by addition of alcohol, and solvent effects on the reaction mechanism are discussed. 38 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions at modified lead dioxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Yun-Lin.

    1990-09-21

    The electrocatalytic activities were compared for pure and chloride-doped beta-PbO{sub 2} (Cl-PbO{sub 2}) films on gold and platinum substrates. Rate constants were increased significantly for oxidations of Mn{sup 2+}, toluene, benzyl alcohol, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and benzaldehyde in acidic media by the incorporation of Cl{sup {minus}} into the oxide films. These reactions are concluded to occur by the electrocatalytic transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the reaction products. Results of x-ray diffraction studies indicate the Cl-PbO{sub 2} film continues to have the slightly distorted rutile structure of pure beta-PbO{sub 2}. The observed electrocatalytic phenomena are concluded to be the beneficial consequence of surface defects generated when Cl{sup {minus}} serves for charge compensation within the surface matrix and, thereby, increases the number of surface sites capable of adsorbing hydroxyl radicals which are transferred in the electrocatalytic O-transfer reactions. 91 refs., 44 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. General model of depolarization and transfer of polarization of singly ionized atoms by collisions with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouich, M.

    2017-02-01

    Simulations of the generation of the atomic polarization is necessary for interpreting the second solar spectrum. For this purpose, it is important to rigorously determine the effects of the isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen on the atomic polarization of the neutral atoms, ionized atoms and molecules. Our aim is to treat in generality the problem of depolarizing isotropic collisions between singly ionized atoms and neutral hydrogen in its ground state. Using our numerical code, we computed the collisional depolarization rates of the p-levels of ions for large number of values of the effective principal quantum number n* and the Unsöld energy Ep. Then, genetic programming has been utilized to fit the available depolarization rates. As a result, strongly non-linear relationships between the collisional depolarization rates, n* and Ep are obtained, and are shown to reproduce the original data with accuracy clearly better than 10%. These relationships allow quick calculations of the depolarizing collisional rates of any simple ion which is very useful for the solar physics community. In addition, the depolarization rates associated to the complex ions and to the hyperfine levels can be easily derived from our results. In this work we have shown that by using powerful numerical approach and our collisional method, general model giving the depolarization of the ions can be obtained to be exploited for solar applications.

  18. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what exten

  19. Single crystal to single crystal transformation and hydrogen-atom transfer upon oxidation of a cerium coordination compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ursula J; Mahoney, Brian D; Lewis, Andrew J; DeGregorio, Patrick T; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-04-15

    Trivalent and tetravalent cerium compounds of the octamethyltetraazaannulene (H2omtaa) ligand have been synthesized. Electrochemical analysis shows a strong thermodynamic preference for the formal cerium(IV) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) congener Ce(Homtaa)(omtaa) occurs by hydrogen-atom transfer that includes a single crystal to single crystal transformation upon exposure to an ambient atmosphere.

  20. Versatile procedure for site-specific grafting of polymer brushes on patchy particles via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the preparation of chemically anisotropic colloidal dumbbells of which one lobe is functionalized with chemical handles in the form of chlorine groups. The chlorines are easily converted to azides and subsequently to active initiators for Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) by Clic

  1. Ion conducting solid polymer electrolytes based on polypentafluorostyrene-b-polyether-b-polypentafluorostyrene prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova, Katja; Jannasch, P.; Hvilsted, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Novel triblock copolymers based on central poly( ethylene glycol) ( PEG) or poly( ethylene glycol-co-propylene glycol) (PEGPG) blocks with poly( pentafluorostyrene) (PFS) outer blocks were prepared by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) with polydispersities on the order of 1.2 - 1...

  2. Transient W-band EPR study of sequential electron transfer in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Utschig, L.M.; Poluektov, O.; Thurnauer, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1999-06-17

    The key reaction of photosynthetic solar energy conversion involves the photoexcitation of a primary donor (P) followed by rapid, sequential electron transfer to a series of acceptors resulting in charge separation. Electron-spin polarized (ESP) EPR spectra at W-band (95 GHz) were obtained for deuterated Fe-removed/Zn-substituted photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers (RCs) to investigate the influence of the rate of charge separation on the observed P{sup +}Q{sub A}{sup {minus}} charge separated state. Temperature dependent ESP EPR spectra for kinetically characterized Zn-substituted RCs from Rb. sphaeroides R-26 having different rates (k{sub Q}) of the electron transfer from the bacteriopheophytin to the quinone acceptor were obtained. The Zn-RCs exhibited either the native fast (200 ps){sup {minus}1} k{sub Q} or a slow (3--6 ns){sup {minus}1} k{sub Q} at 298 K as determined from transient optical measurements. Sequential electron-transfer polarization modeling of the polarized W-band EPR spectra obtained with these samples was used to address the reason for the differences in the electron-transfer rates. Here, the authors report the k{sub Q} rate constant, the temperature dependence of k{sub Q}, and the reorganization energy for the P{sup +}H{sup {minus}}Q{sub A} and P{sup +}HQ{sub A}{sup {minus}} electron-transfer step determined from SETP modeling of the experimental spectra. The reorganization energy for the electron-transfer process between P{sup +}H{sup {minus}}Q{sub A} and P{sup +}HQ{sub A}{sup {minus}}, and not structural changes in the donor or acceptor, was found to be the dominant factor that is altered during Fe-removal procedures.

  3. Application of Magnetic Dicationic Ionic Liquid Phase Transfer Catalyst in Nuclophilic Substitution Reactions of Benzyl Halids in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Manouchehr Aghajeri; Ali Reza Kiasat; Bijan Mombeni Goodajdar

    2016-01-01

    magnetic dicationic ionic liquid (MDIL) was successfully prepared and evaluated as phase-transfer catalyst for nucleophilic substitution reactions. The reactions was occurred in water and furnished the corresponding benzyl derivatives in high yields. No evidence for the formation of by-product for example benzyl alcohol of the reaction was observed and the products were obtained in pure form without further purification.

  4. Total reaction cross sections for 20-30 MeV pions and the anomaly of pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Meirav, O.; Vetterli, D.; Weber, P.; Altman, A.

    1991-03-01

    Total reaction cross sections of 20 MeV π- and 30 MeV π+ and π- have been measured for carbon and nickel targets. The experimental results are in very good agreement with calculations based on commonly accepted pion-nucleus potentials but disagree with calculations based on the potentials associated with the so-called pionic atom anomaly.

  5. Nafion®-catalyzed microwave-assisted Ritter reaction: An atom-economic solvent-free synthesis of amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    An atom-economic solvent-free synthesis of amides by the Ritter reaction of alcohols and nitriles under microwave irradiation is reported. This green protocol is catalyzed by solid supported Nafion®NR50 with improved efficiency and reduced waste production.

  6. Thermal proton transfer reactions in ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kuan Yu; Lee, Sheng; Tsai, Ming-Tsang; Lu, I-Chung; Dyakov, Yuri A; Lai, Yin Hung; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2014-03-01

    One of the reasons that thermally induced reactions are not considered a crucial mechanism in ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (UV-MALDI) is the low ion-to-neutral ratios. Large ion-to-neutral ratios (10(-4)) have been used to justify the unimportance of thermally induced reactions in UV-MALDI. Recent experimental measurements have shown that the upper limit of the total ion-to-neutral ratio is approximately 10(-7) at a high laser fluence and less than 10(-7) at a low laser fluence. Therefore, reexamining the possible contributions of thermally induced reactions in MALDI may be worthwhile. In this study, the concept of polar fluid was employed to explain the generation of primary ions in MALDI. A simple model, namely thermal proton transfer, was used to estimate the ion-to-neutral ratios in MALDI. We demonstrated that the theoretical calculations of ion-to-neutral ratios exhibit the same trend and similar orders of magnitude compared with those of experimental measurements. Although thermal proton transfer may not generate all of the ions observed in MALDI, the calculations demonstrated that thermally induced reactions play a crucial role in UV-MALDI.

  7. Photochemical Hydrogen Abstraction and Electron Transfer Reactions of Tetrachlorobenzoquinone with Pyrimidine Nucleobases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-hui Liu; Li-dan Wu; Xiao-ran Zou; Wen Yang; Qian Du; Hong-mei Su

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol,a widespread environmental pollutant that is possibly carcinogenic to humans,is metabolically oxidized to tetrachloroquinone (TCBQ) which can result in DNA damage.We have investigated the photochemical reaction dynamics of TCBQ with two pyrimidine type nucleobases (thymine and uracil) upon UVA (355 nm) excitation using the technique of nanosecond time-resolved laser flash photolysis.It has been found that 355 nm excitation populates TCBQ molecules to their triplet state 3TCBQ*,which are highly reactive towards thymine or uracil and undergo two parallel reactions,the hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer,leading to the observed photoproducts of TCBQH.and TCBQ.- in transient absorption spectra.The concomitantly produced nucleobase radicals and radical cations are expected to induce a series of oxidative or strand cleavage damage to DNA afterwards.By characterizing the photochemical hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer reactions,our results provide potentially important molecular reaction mechanisms for understanding the carcinogenic effects of pentachlorophenol and its metabolites TCBQ.

  8. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential.

  9. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  10. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2002-11-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (1) its structural and chemical simplicity, (2) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (3) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This final report covers the overall progress of this grant.

  11. Dinuclear Tetrapyrazolyl Palladium Complexes Exhibiting Facile Tandem Transfer Hydrogenation/Suzuki Coupling Reaction of Fluoroarylketone

    KAUST Repository

    Dehury, Niranjan

    2016-07-18

    Herein, we report an unprecedented example of dinuclear pyrazolyl-based Pd complexes exhibiting facile tandem catalysis for fluoroarylketone: Tetrapyrazolyl di-palladium complexes with varying Pd-Pd distances efficiently catalyze the tandem reaction involving transfer hydrogenation of fluoroarylketone to the corresponding alcohol and Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction of the resulting fluoroarylalcohol under moderate reaction conditions, to biaryl alcohol. The complex with the shortest Pd-Pd distance exhibits the highest tandem activity among its di-metallic analogues, and exceeds in terms of activity and selectivity the analogous mononuclear compound. The kinetics of the reaction indicates clearly that reductive transformation of haloarylketone into haloaryalcohol is the rate determining step in the tandem reaction. Interestingly while fluoroarylketone undergoes the multistep tandem catalysis, the chloro- and bromo-arylketones undergo only a single step C-C coupling reaction resulting in biarylketone as the final product. Unlike the pyrazole based Pd compounds, the precursor PdCl2 and the phosphine based relevant complexes (PPh3)2PdCl2 and (PPh3)4Pd are found to be unable to exhibit the tandem catalysis.

  12. Effects of acid concentration on intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(azetidinyl) benzonitrile in solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Guchhait; Tuhin Pradhan; Ranjit Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Effects of acid concentration on excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in aprotic (acetonitrile and ethyl acetate) and protic (ethanol) solvents have been studied by means of steady state absorption and fluorescence, and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. While absorption and fluorescence bands of P4C have been found to be shifted towards higher energy with increasing acid concentration in acetonitrile and ethyl acetate, no significant dependence has been observed in ethanolic solutions. Reaction rate becomes increasingly slower with acid concentration in acetonitrile and ethyl acetate. In contrast, acid in ethanolic solutions does not produce such an effect on reaction rate. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations have been performed to understand the observed spectroscopic results.

  13. Charge-transfer reactions between C{sub 60} and hydrophilic solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijevic, N.M.; Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Saponjic, Z.V. [Institute for Nuclear Sciences ``Vinca``, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1998-10-01

    Two different procedures for dissolving fullerene molecule C{sub 60} into aqueous solutions have been developed. Embedding C{sub 60} clusters into a water-soluble host molecule of {gamma}-cyclodextrin resulted in relatively low concentration of C{sub 60} (5-10 {mu}M). Prepare of a stable ionic surfactant/water/oil microemulsion provided a method for dissolving C{sub 60} in relatively high concentrations (1 mM). In both cases charge-transfer reactions between hydrophobic molecule of C{sub 60} and hydrophilic solutes were examined. Anion radical C{sub 60}{sup -} was detected in reaction with radiolytically produced radicals (e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COH or MV{sup +}), and in reaction with excess electrons stored onto nanometer-sized metal (Ag) or quantized semiconductor (TiO{sub 2}) particles. (orig.) 33 refs.

  14. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  15. Charge-transfer energy in closed-shell ion-atom interactions. [for H and Li ions in He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Rizzatti, M.; Mason, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    The importance of charge-transfer energy in the interactions between closed-shell ions and atoms is investigated. Ab initio calculations on H(plus)-He and Li(plus)-He are used as a guide for the construction of approximate methods for the estimation of the charge-transfer energy for more complicated systems. For many alkali ion-rate gas systems the charge-transfer energy is comparable to the induction energy in the region of the potential minimum, although for doubly charged alkaline-earth ions in rare gases the induction energy always dominates. Surprisingly, an empirical combination of repulsion energy plus asymptotic induction energy plus asymptotic dispersion energy seems to give a fair representation of the total interaction, especially if the repulsion energy is parameterized, despite the omission of any explicit charge-transfer contribution. More refined interaction models should consider the charge-transfer energy contribution.

  16. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  17. Proton transfer reactions associated with the reaction of the fully reduced, purified cytochrome C oxidase with molecular oxygen and ferricyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Nazzareno; Capitanio, Giuseppe; De Nitto, Emanuele; Boffoli, Domenico; Papa, Sergio

    2003-04-29

    A study is presented on proton transfer associated with the reaction of the fully reduced, purified bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase with molecular oxygen or ferricyanide. The proton consumption associated with aerobic oxidation of the four metal centers changed significantly with pH going from approximately 3.0 H(+)/COX at pH 6.2-6.3 to approximately 1.2 H(+)/COX at pH 8.0-8.5. Rereduction of the metal centers was associated with further proton uptake which increased with pH from approximately 1.0 H(+)/COX at pH 6.2-6.3 to approximately 2.8 H(+)/COX at pH 8.0-8.5. Anaerobic oxidation of the four metal centers by ferricyanide resulted in the net release of 1.3-1.6 H(+)/COX in the pH range 6.2-8.2, which were taken up by the enzyme on rereduction of the metal centers. The proton transfer elicited by ferricyanide represents the net result of deprotonation/protonation reactions linked to anaerobic oxidoreduction of the metal centers. Correction for the ferricyanide-induced pH changes of the proton uptake observed in the oxidation and rereduction phase of the reaction of the reduced oxidase with oxygen gave a measure of the proton consumption in the reduction of O(2) to 2H(2)O. The results show that the expected stoichiometric proton consumption of 4H(+) in the reduction of O(2) to 2H(2)O is differently associated, depending on the actual pH, with the oxidation and reduction phase of COX. Two H(+)/COX are initially taken up in the reduction of O(2) to two OH(-) groups bound to the binuclear Fe a(3)-Cu(B) center. At acidic pHs the third and fourth protons are also taken up in the oxidative phase with formation of 2H(2)O. At alkaline pHs the third and fourth protons are taken up with formation of 2H(2)O only upon rereduction of COX.

  18. Sensitive detection of n-alkanes using a mixed ionization mode proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Muñoz, Omar; Misztal, Pawel K.; Weber, Robin; Worton, David R.; Zhang, Haofei; Drozd, Greg; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2016-11-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a technique that is widely used to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with proton affinities higher than water. However, n-alkanes generally have a lower proton affinity than water and therefore proton transfer (PT) by reaction with H3O+ is not an effective mechanism for their detection. In this study, we developed a method using a conventional PTR-MS to detect n-alkanes by optimizing ion source and drift tube conditions to vary the relative amounts of different primary ions (H3O+, O2+, NO+) in the reaction chamber (drift tube). There are very few studies on O2+ detection of alkanes and the mixed mode has never been proposed before. We determined the optimum conditions and the resulting reaction mechanisms, allowing detection of n-alkanes from n-pentane to n-tridecane. These compounds are mostly emitted by evaporative/combustion process from fossil fuel use. The charge transfer (CT) mechanism observed with O2+ was the main reaction channel for n-heptane and longer n-alkanes, while for n-pentane and n-hexane the main reaction channel was hydride abstraction (HA). Maximum sensitivities were obtained at low E / N ratios (83 Td), low water flow (2 sccm) and high O2+ / NO+ ratios (Uso = 180 V). Isotopic 13C contribution was taken into account by subtracting fractions of the preceding 12C ion signal based on the number of carbon atoms and the natural abundance of 13C (i.e., 5.6 % for n-pentane and 14.5 % for n-tridecane). After accounting for isotopic distributions, we found that PT cannot be observed for n-alkanes smaller than n-decane. Instead, protonated water clusters of n-alkanes (M ṡ H3O+) species were observed with higher abundance using lower O2+ and higher water cluster fractions. M ṡ H3O+ species are probably the source for the M + H+ species observed from n-decane to n-tridecane. Normalized sensitivities to O2+ or to the sum of O2++ NO+ were determined to be a good metric with which to

  19. Observation of Spontaneous C=C Bond Breaking in the Reaction between Atomic Boron and Ethylene in Solid Neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jiwen; Lin, Hailu; Luo, Mingbiao; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2016-07-11

    A ground-state boron atom inserts into the C=C bond of ethylene to spontaneously form the allene-like compound H2 CBCH2 on annealing in solid neon. This compound can further isomerize to the propyne-like HCBCH3 isomer under UV light excitation. The observation of this unique spontaneous C=C bond insertion reaction is consistent with theoretical predictions that the reaction is thermodynamically exothermic and kinetically facile. This work demonstrates that the stronger C=C bond, rather than the less inert C-H bond, can be broken to form organoboron species from the reaction of a boron atom with ethylene even at cryogenic temperatures.

  20. Stereodynamical Origin of Anti-Arrhenius Kinetics: Negative Activation Energy and Roaming for a Four-Atom Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Silva, Valter H C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-05-07

    The OH + HBr → H2O + Br reaction, prototypical of halogen-atom liberating processes relevant to mechanisms for atmospheric ozone destruction, attracted frequent attention of experimental chemical kinetics: the nature of the unusual reactivity drop from low to high temperatures eluded a variety of theoretical efforts, ranking this one among the most studied four-atom reactions. Here, inspired by oriented molecular-beams experiments, we develop a first-principles stereodynamical approach. Thermalized sets of trajectories, evolving on a multidimensional potential energy surface quantum mechanically generated on-the-fly, provide a map of most visited regions at each temperature. Visualizations of rearrangements of bonds along trajectories and of the role of specific angles of reactants' mutual approach elucidate the mechanistic change from the low kinetic energy regime (where incident reactants reorient to find the propitious alignment leading to reaction) to high temperature (where speed hinders adjustment of directionality and roaming delays reactivity).

  1. Tests of stratospheric models - The reactions of atomic chlorine with O3 and CH4 at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demore, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    The rate-constant ratio of the photochemical reactions of atomic chlorine with O3 and CH4 was determined using data from laboratory experiments on competitive chlorination of O3/CH4 mixtures at stratospheric temperatures (197-217 K). Two experimental approaches were used: (1) measuring the k1/k2 ratio for the reactions of atomic chlorine with ozone and methane and (2) testing for some of the ClO/CH3O2 chemistry. The chlorine and ozone concentrations were monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy, and the CH3Cl concentration was measured by FTIR. The results on the k1/k2 ratio are in excellent agreement with the current NASA recommendation (DeMore et al., 1990), being only 12 percent higher. On the other hand, results on the ClO + CH3O2 reaction do not support the rate constant suggested by Simon et al. (1989).

  2. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  3. Colorful Polyelectrolytes: An Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Route to Fluorescent Polystyrene Sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Wayne; Tong, Xiaowei; Balamurugan, Sreelatha; Deville, Kyle; Russo, Paul S; Zhang, Donghui

    2016-03-01

    A labeled green fluorescent polystyrene sulfonate (LNaPSS) has been synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization of a styrene sulfonate monomer with a fluorescent co-monomer, fluorescein thiocyanate-vinyl aniline. As a result this 100 % sulfonated polymer contains no hydrophobic patches along the chain backbone besides the fluorescent marker itself. The concentration of the fluorescent monomer was kept low to maintain the characteristic properties of the anionic polyelectrolyte, LNaPSS. ATRP conditions facilitated the production of polymers spanning a range of molecular weights from 35,000 to 175,000 in gram-scale batches with polydispersity indices of 1.01-1.24. Molecular weight increased with the monomer to initiator ratio. Gel permeation chromatography results show a unimodal distribution, and the polymer structure was also confirmed by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed covalent bonding of fluorescein isothiocyanate to the polymer, indicating that the polymer is suitable as a probe in fluorescence microscopy. To demonstrate this ability, the polymer was used to locate structural features in salt crystals formed during drying, as in the evaporation of sea mist. A second application to probe diffusion studies is also demonstrated.

  4. Removal of cefalexin using yeast surface-imprinted polymer prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxiu; Pan, Jianming; Dai, Jiangdong; Dai, Xiaohui; Ou, Hongxiang; Xu, Longcheng; Li, Chunxiang; Zhang, Rongxian

    2012-10-01

    The first use of yeast as a support in the molecular imprinting field combined with atom transfer radical polymerization was described. Then, the as-prepared molecularly imprinted polymers were characterized by Fourier transmission infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, and elemental analysis. The obtained imprinted polymers demonstrated elliptical-shaped particles with the thickness of imprinting layer of 0.63 μm. The batch mode experiments were adopted to investigate the adsorption equilibrium, kinetics, and selectivity. The kinetic properties of imprinted polymers were well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, indicating the chemical process was the rate-limiting step for the adsorption of cefalexin (CFX). The equilibrium data were well fitted by the Freundlich isotherm, and the multimolecular layers adsorption capacity of imprinted polymers was 34.07 mg g(-1) at 298 K. The selectivity analysis suggested that the imprinted polymers exhibited excellent selective recognition for CFX in the presence of other compounds with related structure. Finally, the analytical method based on the imprinted polymers extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatograph was successfully used for CFX analysis in spiked pork and water samples.

  5. Multinucleon transfer reactions for the sup 50 Ti+ sup 93 Nb system at sub- and near-barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Shapira, D.; Stelson, P.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Napoli, D.; Scarlassara, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro); D' Onofrio, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy)); Wieleczko, J.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1990-06-01

    A significant yield of multinucleon-transfer products is observed at back angles in quasielastic reactions between {sup 50}Ti and {sup 93}Nb at sub- and near-barrier energies. A variety of nuclidic species that require transfers of up to four nucleons are observed for E{sub c.m.} {ge} 103.9 MeV. The internuclear separation distance where the multinucleon-transfer products first emerge nearly coincides with the closest approach distance of the experimentally established fusion threshold energy, indicating a common origin for the fusion enhancement and multinucleon-transfer reactions.

  6. Entropy production and efficiency analysis of the Bunsen reaction in the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical hydrogen production cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.E.; Conger, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    An entropy production and efficiency analysis of the first reaction in the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical hydrogen production cycle has been carried out by simulating the reaction including the mixing of reactants and separation of the resulting phases. The reaction: 2H/sub 2/O(L) + SO/sub 2/(g) + (excess) I/sub 2/(g) = H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (sol)(Phase I) + 2 HI core (Phase II) was simulated at 388 K, which is slightly above the melting point of I/sup 2/. Analysis of only this reaction shows that the reaction should be run at 15 to 25% I/sub 2/ reacted and the greatest excess of H/sub 2/O which will produce two product phases. Actual operating conditions are however dependent on the total processing scheme. An entropy production and efficiency analysis along with economic factors for the entire process is necessary to obtain these conditions.

  7. A MATLAB-based finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. I. Collinear atom-diatom reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warehime, Mick; Alexander, Millard H

    2014-07-14

    We restate the application of the finite element method to collinear triatomic reactive scattering dynamics with a novel treatment of the scattering boundary conditions. The method provides directly the reactive scattering wave function and, subsequently, the probability current density field. Visualizing these quantities provides additional insight into the quantum dynamics of simple chemical reactions beyond simplistic one-dimensional models. Application is made here to a symmetric reaction (H+H2), a heavy-light-light reaction (F+H2), and a heavy-light-heavy reaction (F+HCl). To accompany this article, we have written a MATLAB code which is fast, simple enough to be accessible to a wide audience, as well as generally applicable to any problem that can be mapped onto a collinear atom-diatom reaction. The code and user's manual are available for download from http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM.

  8. Cold heteronuclear atom-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zipkes, Christoph; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We study cold heteronuclear atom ion collisions by immersing a trapped single ion into an ultracold atomic cloud. Using ultracold atoms as reaction targets, our measurement is sensitive to elastic collisions with extremely small energy transfer. The observed energy-dependent elastic atom-ion scattering rate deviates significantly from the prediction of Langevin but is in full agreement with the quantum mechanical cross section. Additionally, we characterize inelastic collisions leading to chemical reactions at the single particle level and measure the energy-dependent reaction rate constants. The reaction products are identified by in-trap mass spectrometry, revealing the branching ratio between radiative and non-radiative charge exchange processes.

  9. The electron-transfer reaction between azurin and the cytochrome c oxidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, S R; Barber, D; Greenwood, C; Brunori, M

    1977-11-01

    A stopped-flow investigation of the electron-transfer reaction between oxidized azurin and reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase and between reduced azurin and oxidized Ps. aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase was performed. Electrons leave and enter the oxidase molecule via its haem c component, with the oxidation and reduction of the haem d1 occurring by internal electron transfer. The reaction mechanism in both directions is complex. In the direction of oxidase oxidation, two phases assigned on the basis of difference spectra to haem c proceed with rate constants of 3.2 X 10(5)M-1-S-1 and 2.0 X 10(4)M-1-S-1, whereas the haem d1 oxidation occurs at 0.35 +/- 0.1S-1. Addition of CO to the reduced enzyme profoundly modifies the rate of haem c oxidation, with the faster process tending towards a rate limit of 200S-1. Reduction of the oxidase was similarly complex, with a fast haem c phase tending to a rate limit of 120S-1, and a slower phase with a second-order rate of 1.5 X 10(4)M-1-S-1; the internal transfer rate in this direction was o.25 +/- 0.1S-1. These results have been applied to a kinetic model originally developed from temperature-jump studies.

  10. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in {approximately}240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a {approximately}350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  11. Catalytic role of TiO(2) terminal oxygen atoms in liquid-phase photocatalytic reactions: oxidation of aromatic compounds in anhydrous acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Juan F; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Peral, José; Salvador, Pedro

    2014-08-04

    On the basis of experiments carried out with controlled amounts of residual oxygen and water, or by using oxygen-isotope-labeled Ti(18) O2 as the photocatalyst, we demonstrate that (18) Os atoms behave as real catalytic species in the photo-oxidation of acetonitrile-dissolved aromatic compounds such as benzene, phenol, and benzaldehyde with TiO2 . The experimental evidence allows a terminal-oxygen indirect electron-transfer (TOIET) mechanism to be proposed, which is a new pathway that involves the trapping of free photogenerated valence-band holes at Os species and their incorporation into the reaction products, with simultaneous generation of oxygen vacancies at the TiO2 surface and their subsequent healing with oxygen atoms from either O2 or H2 O molecules that are dissolved in the liquid phase. According to the TOIET mechanism, the TiO2 surface is not considered to remain stable, but is continuously changing in the course of the photocatalytic reaction, challenging earlier interpretations of TiO2 photocatalytic phenomena.

  12. A reaction-diffusion model for atomic oxygen interacting with spacecraft surface protective materials in low earth orbit environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LaiWen; WANG JingHua; LEE Chun-Hian

    2009-01-01

    When hyperthermal atomic oxygen collides with a silicon surface, an ultrathin oxidation regime characterized by fractional atomic-oxygen anions having low diffusive and reactive barriers, along with their enhanced diffusion due to both the electric field and image potential, will form on the surface. In accordance with these properties, an attempt was made in the present study to modify the AlmeidaGoncalves-Baumvol (AGB) model by setting the diffusivity and reaction rate constant to be diffusion-length dependence. According to the modified model, numerical parametric studies for oxidation thin growth were performed. The dependencies of the diffusion coefficient, the reaction rate constant,the attenuation length, and the adjustable parameter upon the translational kinetic energy, flux, temperature, and tangential flux of atomic oxygen were analyzed briefly via the fitting of the experimental data given by Tagawa et al. The numerical results confirmed the rationality of the modified diffusion-reaction model. The model together with the computer code developed in this study would be a useful tool for thickness evaluation of the protective film against the oxidation of atomic oxygen toward spacecraft surface materials in LEO environment.

  13. A reaction-diffusion model for atomic oxygen interacting with spacecraft surface protective materials in low earth orbit environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; Chun-Hian

    2009-01-01

    When hyperthermal atomic oxygen collides with a silicon surface, an ultrathin oxidation regime characterized by fractional atomic-oxygen anions having low diffusive and reactive barriers, along with their enhanced diffusion due to both the electric field and image potential, will form on the surface. In ac- cordance with these properties, an attempt was made in the present study to modify the Almeida- Goncalves-Baumvol (AGB) model by setting the diffusivity and reaction rate constant to be diffu- sion-length dependence. According to the modified model, numerical parametric studies for oxidation thin growth were performed. The dependencies of the diffusion coefficient, the reaction rate constant, the attenuation length, and the adjustable parameter upon the translational kinetic energy, flux, tem- perature, and tangential flux of atomic oxygen were analyzed briefly via the fitting of the experimental data given by Tagawa et al. The numerical results confirmed the rationality of the modified diffu- sion-reaction model. The model together with the computer code developed in this study would be a useful tool for thickness evaluation of the protective film against the oxidation of atomic oxygen toward spacecraft surface materials in LEO environment.

  14. Gamma ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich actinides after multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Andreas; Birkenbach, Benedikt; Reiter, Peter; Hess, Herbert; Lewandowski, Lars; Steinbach, Tim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: LNL 11.22-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich Th and U nuclei were investigated after multi-nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest in the actinide region. Beam-like reaction products in the Xe-Ba-region were identified and selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. Kinematic coincidences between the binary reaction products of beam-like and target-like nuclei are detected with an additional MCP detector. Those coincidences allow clean conditions for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy. Background contributions from excited fission fragments are successfully discriminated. γ-rays from excited states in beam- and target-like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved energy resolution after Doppler correction is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique which was successfully exploited to increase the quality of the γ-spectra. γ-ray spectra of the produced beam-like isotopes in the one-proton and two-proton transfer channels will be presented. Corresponding results from the hard-to-reach neutron-rich isotopes beyond {sup 232}Th will focus on their collective properties and cross section limits for their production.

  15. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary dipicolinatochromium(III) complex involving oxalate as secondary ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hassan Amroun Ewais; Iqbal Mohamed Ibrhium Ismail

    2013-09-01

    Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary Mechanism of the oxidation of [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(H2O)]− (DPA = dipicolinate and OX = oxalate) by periodate in aqueous acidic medium has been studied spectrophotometrically over the pH range of 4.45-5.57 at different temperatures. The reaction is first order with respect to both [IO$^{−}_{4}$] and the complex concentration, and it obeys the following rate law: $$d[{\\text Cr}^{\\text{VI}}]/dt = k_6K_4K_6[{\\text IO}^−_4][{\\text{Cr}}^{\\text{III}}]_{\\text{T}}/\\{([H^+] + K_4) + (K_5[H+] + K_6K_4)[{\\text{IO}}^{−}_{4}]\\}.$$ The rate of the reaction increases with increasing pH due to the deprotonation equilibria of the complex. The experimental rate law is consistent with a mechanism in which the deprotonated form [CrIII(DPA)(OX)(OH)]2− is more reactive than the conjugated acid. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an inner-sphere mechanism via coordination of IO$^{−}_{4}$ to chromium(III). Thermodynamic activation parameters were calculated using the transition state theory equation.dipicolinatochromium(III) complex involving oxalate as secondary ligand

  16. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VKQ, prepared by coupling vitamin K3, also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VKQ is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VKQH2, BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VKQ as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  17. From gas-phase to liquid-water chemical reactions: the fluorine atom plus water trimer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-09-14

    The potential energy profile for the F+(H2 O)3 →HF+(H2 O)2 OH reaction has been investigated using the "gold standard" CCSD(T) method with correlation-consistent basis sets up to cc-pVQZ. Four different reaction pathways have been found and these are related, both geometrically and energetically. The entrance complexes F⋅⋅⋅(H2 O)3 for all four reaction pathways are found lying ca. 7 kcal mol(-1) below the separated reactants F+(H2 O)3 . The four reaction barriers on their respective reaction coordinates lie ca. 4 kcal mol(-1) below the reactants. There are also corresponding exit complexes HF⋅⋅⋅(H2 O)2 OH, lying about 13 kcal mol(-1) below the separated products HF+(H2 O)2 OH. Compared with analogous F+(H2 O)2 and F+H2 O reactions, the F+(H2 O)3 reaction is somewhat similar to the former but qualitatively different from the latter. It may be reasonable to predict that the reactions between atomic fluorine and water tetramer (or even larger water clusters) may be similar to the F+(H2 O)3 reaction.

  18. Synthesis and Properties of Fe3O4@SiO2-g-PDMAEMA Prepared via Combination of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization and "Click" Reaction%原子转移自由基聚合与“Click”反应相结合制备Fe3O4@SiO2-g-PDMAEMA及其性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世华; 朱汇雯; 张明祖; 倪沛红

    2011-01-01

    Poly[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate](PDMAEMA) was prepared and grafted onto Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated with SiO2(Fe3O4@SiO2) via combination of ATRP and "Click" reaction.So the magnetic nanoparticles grafted with PDMAEMA(Fe3O4@SiO2-g-PDMAEMA) on the sur-face were obtained.1H NMR and GPC tests were carried out to study the structure,molecular weight and polydispersity index(PDI) of alkynyl-capped PDMAEMA.TEM,FT-IR,TGA,DLS and Zeta potential tests were used to study the structures,morphologies,particle diameters and surface properties of Fe3O4@SiO2 and Fe3O4@SiO2-g-PDMAEMA,respectively.%结合原子转移自由基聚合(ATRP)与点击反应("Click"reaction),在SiO2包裹的Fe3O4磁性纳米粒子(Fe3O4@SiO2)表面接枝聚[甲基丙烯酸-2-(N,N-二甲氨基)乙酯](PDMAEMA),得到了表面接枝PDMAEMA的磁性纳米粒子(Fe3O4@SiO2-g-PDMAEMA).通过1H NMR和GPC测试,研究炔基封端的PDMAEMA的结构、分子量及分子量分布.通过透射电镜(TEM)、红外光谱(FT-IR)、热重分析(TGA)、动态光散射(DLS)和Zeta电位测试,研究了Fe3O4@SiO2和Fe3O4@SiO2-g-PDMAEMA的结构、形貌、粒径及表面性质.

  19. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with Diethyl Ethylphosphonate and Triethyl Phosphate

    KAUST Repository

    Laversin, H.

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, the relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rate coefficients for the reaction of two organophosphorus compounds: Triethyl phosphate (TEP) and Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) with OH radicals and Cl atoms at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298 – 352 K. The following expressions (in cm3molecule-1s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP and TEP: kOH+DEEP= (7.84±0.65)x10-14exp((1866±824)/T), kOH+TEP = (6.54±0.42)x10-14exp((1897±626)/T), kCl+DEEP = (5.27± 0.80)x10−11exp(765±140/T) and kCl+TEP = (5.23± 0.80)x10−11exp(736± 110/T). These results show that the reaction of the studied compounds with Cl atoms proceeds more rapidly than that with OH radicals. The related tropospheric lifetimes suggest that once emitted into the atmosphere, TEP and DEEP can be removed within a few hours in areas close to their emission sources. TEP and DEEP are principally removed by OH radicals. However, in coastal areas where the Cl atoms’ concentration is higher, TEP and DEEP removal by reaction with Cl atoms could be a competitive process.

  20. Reaction layer growth and reaction heat of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels using centrifugally atomized powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Han, Young Soo; Park, Jong Man; Park, Soon Dal; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2003-09-01

    The growth behavior of reaction layers and heat generation during the reaction between U-Mo powders and the Al matrix in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels were investigated. Annealing of 10 vol.% U-10Mo/Al dispersion fuels at temperatures from 500 to 550 °C was carried out for 10 min to 36 h to measure the growth rate and the activation energy for the growth of reaction layers. The concentration profiles of reaction layers between the U-10Mo vs. Al diffusion couples were measured and the integrated interdiffusion coefficients were calculated for the U and Al in the reaction layers. Heat generation of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels with 10-50 vol.% of U-Mo fuel during the thermal cycle from room temperature to 700 °C was measured employing the differential scanning calorimetry. Exothermic heat from the reaction between U-Mo and the Al matrix is the largest when the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel is about 30 vol.%. The unreacted fraction in the U-Mo powders increases as the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel increases from 30 to 50 vol.%.

  1. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  2. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Peira

    Full Text Available Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  3. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Pourtois, Gilles; Fredrikson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i) short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii) the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  4. On the theory of electron transfer reactions at semiconductor electrode/liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi Qin; Georgievskii, Yuri; Marcus, R. A.

    2000-02-01

    Electron transfer reaction rate constants at semiconductor/liquid interfaces are calculated using the Fermi Golden Rule and a tight-binding model for the semiconductors. The slab method and a z-transform method are employed in obtaining the electronic structures of semiconductors with surfaces and are compared. The maximum electron transfer rate constants at Si/viologen2+/+ and InP/Me2Fc+/0 interfaces are computed using the tight-binding type calculations for the solid and the extended-Hückel for the coupling to the redox agent at the interface. These results for the bulk states are compared with the experimentally measured values of Lewis and co-workers, and are in reasonable agreement, without adjusting parameters. In the case of InP/liquid interface, the unusual current vs applied potential behavior is additionally interpreted, in part, by the presence of surface states.

  5. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  6. Atmospheric reactions between E,E-2,4-hexadienal and OH, NO3 radicals and Cl atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martín, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martínez, E.

    2014-12-01

    E,E-2,4-Hexadienal is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde whose presence in the atmosphere can arise from different sources. The rate coefficients for the reaction of this compound with Cl atoms, OH and NO3 radicals and for the photolysis process have been determined at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. A relative method has been developed with a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) or Solid Phase Micro Extraction fiber/chromatography-mass spectrometer (SPME/GC-MS) used as sampling/detection techniques. The absolute rate coefficients k (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) obtained for Cl, OH and NO3 were (3.98 ± 0.44) × 10-10, (6.78 ± 0.47) × 10-11 and (1.34 ± 0.56) × 10-12, respectively. An estimation of the rate coefficient for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with OH and NO3 radicals and Cl atoms has been carried out using correlations and SAR methods. The SAR substituent factor for the -C(O)H group, [G-(C(O)H)] = 3.58 × 10-3, has been obtained. This group reactivity factor allows the rate coefficients to be estimated for the reaction of unsaturated aldehydes with NO3 radicals. The results of this study confirm that the reaction of unsaturated aldehydes with Cl atoms is very fast and that the structure of the compound has little influence, with the influence of the structure being more marked in the case of the OH radical reaction and relatively large for the NO3 reaction. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which the first stage is addition of an atom or radical to the double bond of E,E-2,4-hexadienal as the main reaction channel and, to a minor extent, the abstraction of aldehydic hydrogen. These are the first data reported for the atmospheric reactions of this compound and this study therefore contributes to the database of rate coefficients for atmospheric reactions.

  7. New Oxime Ligand with Potential for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deville, Claire; Sundberg, Jonas; McKenzie, Christine Joy

    .2 Metal complex of ligands possessing both H-donor and H-acceptor sites in the second coordination sphere should be interesting candidates for proton transfer reactions induced by photooxidation of the metal ion. We have prepared new oxime-containing ligands which coordinate to metal ions...... such that a pyridine group is sterically restricted so it does not coordinate. Instead it can act as proximal base for accepting the oxime proton. [1] M. H. V. Huynh, T. J. Meyer, Chem. Rev. 2007, 107, 5004-5064. [2] T. Irebo, O. Johansson, L. Hammarström, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 9194-9195....

  8. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz G Awad

    Full Text Available In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations.

  9. Effects of mass transfer on MHD flow of casson fluid with chemical reaction and suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shehzad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of mass transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic flow of a Casson fluid over a porous stretching sheet is addressed in the presence of a chemical reaction. A series solution for the resulting nonlinear flow is computed. The skin friction coefficient and local Sherwood number are analyzed through numerical values for various parameters of interest. The velocity and concentration fields are illustrated for several pertinent flow parameters. We observed that the Casson parameter and Hartman number have similar effects on the velocity in a qualitative sense. We further analyzed that the concentration profile decreases rapidly in comparison to the fluid velocity when we increased the values of the suction parameter.

  10. Studies of Nuclei Close to 132Sn Using Single-Neutron Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Pain, S. D. [Rutgers University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Catford, Wilton N [ORNL; Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Gaddis, A. L. [Furman University; Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Grzywacz, R. K. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harlin, Christopher W [ORNL; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Howard, Joshua A [ORNL; James, J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Kapler, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Krolas, W. [University of Warsaw; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Matei, Catalin [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; O' Malley, Patrick [Rutgers University; Patterson, N. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Paulauskas, Stanley [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; ShrinerJr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological University; Sikora, M. [Rutgers University; Sissom, D. J. [Tennessee Technological University; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Swan, T. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Thomas, J. S. [Rutgers University; Wilson, Gemma L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions were performed in inverse kinematics using radioactive ion beams of 132Sn, 130Sn, and 134Te and deuterated polyethylene targets. Preliminary results are presented. The Q-value spectra for 133Sn, 131Sn and 135Te reveal a number of previously unobserved peaks. The angular distributions are compatible with the expected lf7/2 nature of the ground state of 133Sn, and 2p3/2 for the 3.4 MeV state in 131Sn.

  11. Characterization of ferritin core on redox reactions as a nanocomposite for electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang Min [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Watt, Richard K.; Watt, Gerald D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Choi, Sang H. [Advanced Materials and Processing Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Kim, Hyug-Han [Department of Chemistry, School of Advanced Science, Dankook University, Chonan 330-180 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun I. [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong, E-mail: sjk@hanyang.ac.k [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-01

    The kinetics of the change in mass related to the release from and deposition onto the cavities of a ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite by electrochemical redox reactions, and the effects of the SWCNT on the kinetics of the variation in mass of the ferritin nanocomposite were characterized using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. The change in mass of reconstituted ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite shows reversible variation and stability of the ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite on redox reactions was confirmed by using a coreless apoferritin and a Fe{sup 2+} chelating agent. The ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite is a good candidate for applications based on electron transfer, such as biosensor, biobatteries and electrodes for biofuel cell.

  12. Relayed 13C magnetization transfer: Detection of malate dehydrogenase reaction in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2007-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase catalyzes rapid interconversion between dilute metabolites oxaloacetate and malate. Both oxaloacetate and malate are below the detection threshold of in vivo MRS. Oxaloacetate is also in rapid exchange with aspartate catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, the latter metabolite is observable in vivo using 13C MRS. We hypothesized that the rapid turnover of oxaloacetate can effectively relay perturbation of magnetization between malate and aspartate. Here, we report indirect observation of the malate dehydrogenase reaction by saturating malate C2 resonance at 71.2 ppm and detecting a reduced aspartate C2 signal at 53.2 ppm due to relayed magnetization transfer via oxaloacetate C2 at 201.3 ppm. Using this strategy the rate of the cerebral malate dehydrogenase reaction was determined to be 9 ± 2 μmol/g wet weight/min (means ± SD, n = 5) at 11.7 Tesla in anesthetized adult rats infused with [1,6- 13C 2]glucose.

  13. Transfer of spin squeezing and particle entanglement between atoms and photons in coupled cavities via two-photon exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer of spin squeezing and particle entanglement between atoms and photons in coupled cavities via two-photon exchange Ali Ü. C. Hardal and Özgür E. Müstecaplıoğlu* Department of Physics, Koç University, Sarıyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey *Corresponding author: Received March 15, 2012; revised May 19, 2012; accepted May 20, 2012; posted May 22, 2012 (Doc. ID 164811); published June 27, 2012 We examine transfer of particle entanglement and spin sque...

  14. A Stefan model for mass transfer in a rotating disk reaction vessel

    KAUST Repository

    BOHUN, C. S.

    2015-05-04

    Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015. In this paper, we focus on the process of mass transfer in the rotating disk apparatus formulated as a Stefan problem with consideration given to both the hydrodynamics of the process and the specific chemical reactions occurring in the bulk. The wide range in the reaction rates of the underlying chemistry allows for a natural decoupling of the problem into a simplified set of weakly coupled convective-reaction-diffusion equations for the slowly reacting chemical species and a set of algebraic relations for the species that react rapidly. An analysis of the chemical equilibrium conditions identifies an expansion parameter and a reduced model that remains valid for arbitrarily large times. Numerical solutions of the model are compared to an asymptotic analysis revealing three distinct time scales and chemical diffusion boundary layer that lies completely inside the hydrodynamic layer. Formulated as a Stefan problem, the model generalizes the work of Levich (Levich and Spalding (1962) Physicochemical hydrodynamics, vol. 689, Prentice-Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ) and will help better understand the natural limitations of the rotating disk reaction vessel when consideration is made for the reacting chemical species.

  15. Conformity between IBM and TQM (SU(6) quadrupole phonon model) in treating two-nucleon transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrchev, G.; Paar, V.

    1983-03-01

    It is shown that TQM is capable of treating two-nucleon transfer (TNT) reactions in an analogous manner to IBM. A proof that the IBM two-nucleon transfer amplitudes can be identically converted into standard matrix elements for TQM, is presented, using the relation between the Schwinger and Holstein-Primakoff representations of the SU(6) generators.

  16. Conformational gating of the electron transfer reaction QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅ in bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides determined by a driving force assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graige, M. S.; Feher, G.; Okamura, M. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of the electron transfer reaction, QA−⋅QB → QAQB−⋅, was studied in isolated reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by replacing the native Q10 in the QA binding site with quinones having different redox potentials. These substitutions are expected to change the intrinsic electron transfer rate by changing the redox free energy (i.e., driving force) for electron transfer without affecting other events that may be associated with the electron transfer (e.g., protein dynamics or protonation). The electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB was measured by three independent methods: a functional assay involving cytochrome c2 to measure the rate of QA−⋅ oxidation, optical kinetic spectroscopy to measure changes in semiquinone absorption, and kinetic near-IR spectroscopy to measure electrochromic shifts that occur in response to electron transfer. The results show that the rate of the observed electron transfer from QA−⋅ to QB does not change as the redox free energy for electron transfer is varied over a range of 150 meV. The strong temperature dependence of the observed rate rules out the possibility that the reaction is activationless. We conclude, therefore, that the independence of the observed rate on the driving force for electron transfer is due to conformational gating, that is, the rate limiting step is a conformational change required before electron transfer. This change is proposed to be the movement, controlled kinetically either by protein dynamics or intermolecular interactions, of QB by ≈5 Å as observed in the x-ray studies of Stowell et al. [Stowell, M. H. B., McPhillips, T. M., Rees, D. C., Soltis, S. M., Abresch, E. & Feher, G. (1997) Science 276, 812–816]. PMID:9751725

  17. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  18. Suppression of angular momentum transfer in cold collisions of transition metal atoms in ground States with nonzero orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, Cindy I; Doret, S Charles; Hummon, Matthew T; Krems, Roman V; Doyle, John M

    2005-01-14

    The Zeeman relaxation rate in cold collisions of Ti(3d(2)4s(2) 3F2) with He is measured. We find that collisional transfer of angular momentum is dramatically suppressed due to the presence of the filled 4s(2) shell. The degree of electronic interaction anisotropy, which is responsible for Zeeman relaxation, is estimated to be about 200 times smaller in the Ti-He complex than in He complexes with typical non-S-state atoms.

  19. Synthesis of Highly Branched Poly(ε-caprolactone) by Self-condensing Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Macroinimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Branched poly(ε-caprolactone) was synthesized by self-condensing atom transfer radical polymerization of macroinimer, α-acryloyoxy-ω-2-bromopropionyloxy poly(ε-caprolactone),which was prepared by enzyme-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone with 2-hydroxylethyl acrylate as initiator and esterification of the ω-hydroxyl group of the obtained poly(ε-caprolactone) by 2-bromopropionyl bromide.

  20. A manganese(V)-oxo π-cation radical complex: influence of one-electron oxidation on oxygen-atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Katharine A; Neu, Heather M; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2011-10-12

    One-electron oxidation of Mn(V)-oxo corrolazine 2 affords 2(+), the first example of a Mn(V)(O) π-cation radical porphyrinoid complex, which was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, LDI-MS, and DFT methods. Access to 2 and 2(+) allowed for a direct comparison of their reactivities in oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions. Both complexes are capable of OAT to PPh(3) and RSR substrates, and 2(+) was found to be a more potent oxidant than 2. Analysis of rate constants and activation parameters, together with DFT calculations, points to a concerted OAT mechanism for 2(+) and 2 and indicates that the greater electrophilicity of 2(+) likely plays a dominant role in enhancing its reactivity. These results are relevant to comparisons between Compound I and Compound II in heme enzymes.

  1. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  2. Pro duction of Exotic Nuclei in Low-Energy Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VI Zagrebaev; Walter Greiner

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleon transfer processes in low-energy heavy ion collisions open a new field of re-search in nuclear physics, namely, production and studying properties of heavy neutron rich nuclei. This not-yet-explored area of the nuclear map is extremely important for understanding the astrophysical nu-cleosynthesis and the origin of heavy elements. Beams of very heavy U-like ions are needed to produce new long-living isotopes of transfermium and superheavy elements located very close to the island of sta-bility. The calculated cross sections are high enough to perform the experiments at available accelerators. Beams of medium-mass ions (such as 136Xe, 192Os, 198Pt) can be used for the production of neutron rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126 (the last waiting point) having the largest impact on the astrophysical r-process. The Low-energy multinucleon transfer reactions is a very efficient tool also for the production and spectroscopic study of light exotic nuclei. The corresponding cross sections are 2 or 3 orders of magnitude larger as compared with high energy fragmentation reactions.

  3. Excited-state charge coupled proton transfer reaction in dipole-functionalized salicylideneaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kew-Yu, E-mail: kyuchen@fcu.edu.tw; Hu, Jiun-Wei

    2015-03-15

    Based on design and synthesis of salicylideneaniline derivatives 1–4, we demonstrate an exceedingly useful system to investigate the excited-state intramolecular charge transfer (ESICT) coupled with excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction via the dipolar functionality of Schiff base salicylideneaniline. In solid and aprotic solvents 1–4 exist mainly as E conformers that possess a strong intramolecular six-membered-ring hydrogen bond. Compounds 2–4 exhibit solely a long-wavelength proton-transfer tautomer emission, while dipole-functionalized Schiff base 1 exhibits remarkable dual emission due to the different solvent-polarity environments between ESICT and ESIPT states. Moreover, the geometric structures, frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and the potential energy curves for 1–4 in the ground and the first singlet excited state were fully rationalized by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations. - Highlights: • A dipole-functionalized salicylideneaniline derivative was synthesized. • The Schiff base exhibits remarkable dual emission. • A novel ESICT/ESIPT coupled system was created.

  4. Theoretical study of intermolecular proton transfer reaction in isolated 5-hydroxyisoxazole-water complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ping G. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Liang, Yong H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China)], E-mail: yonghliang@hotmail.com; Tang, Zhen Q. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China)

    2006-03-20

    A systematic investigation in isolated 5-hydroxyisoxazole-water complexes (5-HIO . (H{sub 2}O) {sub n} n = 1-3) is performed at the DFT level, employing B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) basis set. Single-point energy calculations are also performed at the MP2 level using B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) optimized geometries and the 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. The computational results show that the keto tautomer K{sub 2} is the most stable isomer in the gas phase, and the tautomer K{sub 1} to be the next most stable tautomer. Hydrogen bonding between HIO and the water molecule(s) will dramatically lower the barrier by a concerted multiple proton transfer mechanism. The proton transfer process of 3WE {sub cis} {r_reversible} 3WK{sub 1} and 2WE {sub trans} {r_reversible} 2WK{sub 2} is found to be more efficient in two tautomerization, and the barrier heights are 7.03 and 14.15 kcal/mol at B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) level, respectively. However, the proton transfer reaction between E {sub cis} and K{sub 1} cannot happen without solvent-assisted.

  5. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, Tarek S.; El-Kafrawy, Dina S.; Mahrous, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M.; Abo-Gharam, Amira H.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524 nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490 nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415 nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361 nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8 μg/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method.

  6. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 2. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT)-Based, Mixed-Mode (Electron Transfer (ET)/HAT), and Lipid Peroxidation Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    Measuring the antioxidant activity/capacity levels of food extracts and biological fluids is useful for determining the nutritional value of foodstuffs and for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of numerous oxidative stress-related diseases. Biologically, antioxidants play their health-beneficial roles via transferring a hydrogen (H) atom or an electron (e(-)) to reactive species, thereby deactivating them. Antioxidant activity assays imitate this action; that is, antioxidants are measured by their H atom transfer (HAT) or e(-) transfer (ET) to probe molecules. Antioxidant activity/capacity can be monitored by a wide variety of assays with different mechanisms, including HAT, ET, and mixed-mode (ET/HAT) assays, generally without distinct boundaries between them. Understanding the principal mechanisms, advantages, and disadvantages of the measurement assays is important for proper selection of method for valid evaluation of antioxidant properties in desired applications. This work provides a general and up-to-date overview of HAT-based, mixed-mode (ET/HAT), and lipid peroxidation assays available for measuring antioxidant activity/capacity and the chemistry behind them, including a critical evaluation of their advantages and drawbacks.

  7. Effect of Hetero Atom on the Hammett’s Reaction Constant (ρ from the Physical Basis of Dissociation Equilibriums of (Dithio Benzoic Acids and (Thio Phenols and Its Application to Solvolysis Reactions and Some Free Radical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannadham Vandanapu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of putative Hammett equation in mid 1930s was a boon to physical-organic chemists to elucidate the reaction mechanisms of several organic reactions. Based on the concept of this equation several hundreds of papers have emerged in chemical literature in the last century on the effect of structure, on reactivity, and very few on thermodynamic stability and kinetic reactivity of intermediates. In this article an attempt is made to explain the effect of hetero atom on Hammett’s reaction constant (ρ taking the dissociation equilibriums of benzoic acids, dithiobenzoic acids, phenols, and thiophenols.

  8. Application of Magnetic Dicationic Ionic Liquid Phase Transfer Catalyst in Nuclophilic Substitution Reactions of Benzyl Halids in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Aghajeri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available magnetic dicationic ionic liquid (MDIL was successfully prepared and evaluated as phase-transfer catalyst for nucleophilic substitution reactions. The reactions was occurred in water and furnished the corresponding benzyl derivatives in high yields. No evidence for the formation of by-product for example benzyl alcohol of the reaction was observed and the products were obtained in pure form without further purification.

  9. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming, E-mail: gmhuang@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-31

    Graphical abstract: Direct and humidity independent mass spectrometry analysis of gas phase chemicals could be achieved via ambient proton transfer ionization, ion intensity was found to be stable with humidity ranged from ∼10% to ∼100%. - Highlights: • A humidity independent mass spectrometric method for gas phase samples analysis. • A universal and good sensitivity method. • The method can real time identify plant released raw chemicals. - Abstract: In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m{sup −3}, ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  10. Highly regioselective hydride transfer, oxidative dehydrogenation, and hydrogen-atom abstraction in the thermal gas-phase chemistry of [Zn(OH)](+)/C3H8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Hai-Tao; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2014-12-28

    The thermal reactions of [Zn(OH)](+) with C3H8 have been studied by means of gas-phase experiments and computational investigation. Two types of C-H bond activation are observed in the experiment, and pertinent mechanistic features include inter alia: (i) the metal center of [Zn(OH)](+) serves as active site in the hydride transfer to generate [i-C3H7](+) as major product, (ii) generally, a high regioselectivity is accompanied by remarkable chemoselectivity: for example, the activation of a methyl C-H bond results mainly in the formation of water and [Zn(C3,H7)](+). According to computational work, this ionic product corresponds to [HZn(CH3CH=CH2)](+). Attack of the zinc center at a secondary C-H bond leads preferentially to hydride transfer, thus giving rise to the generation of [i-C3H7](+); (iii) upon oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH), liberation of CH3CH2=CH2 occurs to produce [HZn(H2O)](+). Both, ODH as well as H2O loss proceed through the same intermediate which is characterized by the fact that a methylene hydrogen atom from the substrate is transferred to the zinc and one hydrogen atom from the methyl group to the OH group of [Zn(OH)](+). The combined experimental/computational gas-phase study of C-H bond activation by zinc hydroxide provides mechanistic insight into related zinc-catalyzed large-scale processes and identifies the crucial role that the Lewis-acid character of zinc plays.

  11. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions.

  12. Transferable potentials for phase equilibria-united atom description of five- and six-membered cyclic alkanes and ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keasler, Samuel J; Charan, Sophia M; Wick, Collin D; Economou, Ioannis G; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2012-09-13

    While the transferable potentials for phase equilibria-united atom (TraPPE-UA) force field has generally been successful at providing parameters that are highly transferable between different molecules, the polarity and polarizability of a given functional group can be significantly perturbed in small cyclic structures, which limits the transferability of parameters obtained for linear molecules. This has motivated us to develop a version of the TraPPE-UA force field specifically for five- and six-membered cyclic alkanes and ethers. The Lennard-Jones parameters for the methylene group obtained from cyclic alkanes are transferred to the ethers for each ring size, and those for the oxygen atom are common to all compounds for a given ring size. However, the partial charges are molecule specific and parametrized using liquid-phase dielectric constants. This model yields accurate saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures, critical temperatures and densities, normal boiling points, heat capacities, and isothermal compressibilities for the following molecules: cyclopentane, tetrahydrofuran, 1,3-dioxolane, cyclohexane, oxane, 1,4-dioxane, 1,3-dioxane, and 1,3,5-trioxane. The azeotropic behavior and separation factor for the binary mixtures of 1,3-dioxolane/cyclohexane and ethanol/1,4-dioxane are qualitively reproduced.

  13. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  14. One nucleon transfer reactions around $^{68}$Ni at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Blazhev, A A; Kruecken, R; Mertzimekis, T; Darby, I G; Lagogiannis, A; Habs, D; Diriken, J V J; Patronis, N

    2008-01-01

    We intend to investigate the single particle properties of the neutron-rich Ni isotopes in the mass region around $^{68}$Ni and at a later stage towards the doubly-magic $^{78}$Ni. As a first experiment we propose to study the single particle character of the ground and first excited states of $^{67}$Ni. This nucleus will be the projectile-like reaction product for the one-neutron transfer reaction. A $^{66}$Ni beam at 3A MeV delivered from REX-ISOLDE will be directed on a CD$_{2}$ target. Protons produced from the (d,p) reaction will be detected either in singles or in coincidence with ${\\gamma}$-rays recorded by the MINIBALL array. The particles will be detected by the newly-built Si position-sensitive barrel configuration. The objectives of this work are the unambiguous determination of the spins and parities of the first excited states of $^{67}$Ni and measurement of the relative spectroscopic factors of those states as well as of the ground state. The experimental results will be compared with those from...

  15. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  16. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Effects of aluminum additions to gas atomized reaction synthesis produced oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicher, Alexander Lee

    The production of an aluminum containing ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy was investigated. The production method used in this study was gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). GARS was chosen over the previously commercial method of mechanical alloying (MA) process due to complications from this process. The alloy compositions was determined from three main components; corrosion resistance, dispersoid formation, and additional elements. A combination of Cr and Al were necessary in order to create a protective oxide in the steam atmosphere that the boiler tubing in the next generation of coal-fired power plants would be exposed to. Hf and Y were chosen as dispersoid forming elements due to their increased thermal stability and potential to avoid decreased strength caused by additions of Al to traditional ODS materials. W was used as an additive due to benefits as a strengthener as well as its benefits for creep rupture time. The final composition chosen for the alloy was Fe-16Cr-12Al-0.9W-0.25Hf-0.2Y at%. The aforementioned alloy, GA-1-198, was created through gas atomization with atomization gas of Ar-300ppm O2. The actual composition created was found to be Fe-15Cr-12.3Al-0.9W-0.24Hf-0.19Y at%. An additional alloy that was nominally the same without the inclusion of aluminum was created as a comparison for the effects on mechanical and corrosion properties. The actual composition of the comparison alloy, GA-1-204, was Fe-16Cr-0Al-0.9W-0.25Hf-0.24Y at%. An investigation on the processing parameters for these alloys was conducted on the GA-1-198 alloy. In order to predict the necessary amount of time for heat treatment, a diffusion study was used to find the diffusion rate of oxygen in cast alloys with similar composition. The diffusion rate was found to be similar to that of other GARS compositions that have been created without the inclusion of aluminum. The effect of heat treatment time was investigated with temperatures of 950°C, 1000

  18. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  19. Femtosecond Dynamics of Fundamental Reaction Processes in Liquids: Proton Transfer, Geminate Recombination, Isomerization and Vibrational Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin Joel

    Femtosecond and picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy are used to probe several fundamental aspects of chemical reactivity in the condensed phase including proton transfer, germinate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured for the first time, and the effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied in detail. The proton transfer takes place in ~240 fsec in non-polar environments, but becomes faster than the instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solutions. A simple model is proposed to explain these results. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH _2I_2 and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of germinate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a ~350 fsec time scale. Results also show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the molecular details of the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with the surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. The data show no simple correlation between the hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes. This strongly implies that the isomerization of these systems does not provide a suitable testing ground for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in the photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial

  20. Structural and dynamical control of the reaction rate in protein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya A.

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in proteins are key steps in many vital bioenergetic processes, and the reaction rate is known to be highly sensitive to the protein structure in some cases. For most bioenergetic reactions, as described by the Fermi Golden rule, the rate is proportional to a product of the average square of the effective electronic donor to acceptor coupling and a Franck-Condon factor, which accounts for the nuclear control of the energy gap. The nuclear factor is reasonably well described in Marcus theory and its modifications, and this work is focused on the mechanisms that control the effective coupling. About ten years ago, the Pathways model described for the first time how protein environment may control the effective coupling. In this work, a novel theoretical approach is developed to explore the mechanisms of structural and dynamical control beyond the qualitative level of the Pathways model. In Chapter 1, the assumptions of the Pathways model, its limitations and effects of the structure and the electronic Hamiltonian are investigated for model chain-like bridges using the Dyson's equations. In Chapter II, the framework to explore the sensitivity of the effective coupling to quality of the electronic Hamiltonian, the interference among the dominant pathways and the bridge dynamics is presented. This analysis employs the Green's function technique and includes combined molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Finally, in Chapter III, this framework is tested on the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, and the mechanisms of the structural and dynamical control for different ET steps are discussed.

  1. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer in liquid-solid reaction by a new computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qingbin; Bayanheshig; Tan, Xin; Zhu, Jiwei

    2014-03-01

    Mass transfer coefficient is an important parameter in the process of mass transfer. It can reflect the degree of enhancement of mass transfer process in liquid-solid reaction and in non-reactive systems like dissolution and leaching, and further verify the issues by experiments in the reaction process. In the present paper, a new computational model quantitatively solving ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer coefficient in liquid-solid reaction is established, and the mass transfer coefficient on silicon surface with a transducer at frequencies of 40 kHz, 60 kHz, 80 kHz and 100 kHz has been numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate that mass transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of ultrasound power, and the maximum value of mass transfer coefficient is 1.467 × 10(-4) m/s at 60 kHz and the minimum is 1.310 × 10(-4) m/s at 80 kHz in the condition when ultrasound power is 50 W (the mass transfer coefficient is 2.384 × 10(-5) m/s without ultrasound). The extrinsic factors such as temperature and transducer diameter and distance between reactor and ultrasound source also influence the mass transfer coefficient on silicon surface. Mass transfer coefficient increases with the increasing temperature, with the decreasing distance between silicon and central position, with the decreasing of transducer diameter, and with the decreasing of distance between reactor and ultrasound source at the same ultrasonic power and frequency. The simulation results indicate that the computational model can quantitatively solve the ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer coefficient.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum–classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S., E-mail: okazaki@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum–classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute–solvent interactions.

  3. Neutron spectroscopic factors of {sup 55}Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanetullaev, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Tsang, M.B., E-mail: tsang@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lynch, W.G.; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Chan, K.P. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Physics Department, Hong Kong Chinese University, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Rogers, A.M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sun, Z.Y. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Youngs, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G. [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Famiano, M. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Hudan, S. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Shapira, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Peters, W.A. [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Barbieri, C. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-09-07

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of {sup 55}Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei ({sup 55}Ni, {sup 57}Ni, {sup 55}Co and {sup 57}Cu), one nucleon away from {sup 56}Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the {sup 1}H({sup 56}Ni,d){sup 55}Ni transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f{sub 7/2}, p{sub 3/2} and the s{sub 1/2} hole-states of {sup 55}Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s{sub 1/2} hole-state below Fermi energy.

  4. Neutron spectroscopic factors of $^{55}$Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sanetullaev, A; Lynch, W G; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D; Chan, K P; Coupland, D; Henzl, V; Henzlova, D; Kilburn, M; Rogers, A M; Sun, Z Y; Youngs, M; Charity, R J; Sobotka, L G; Famiano, M; Hudan, S; Shapira, D; Peters, W A; Barbieri, C; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Horoi, M; Otsuka, T; Suzuki, T; Utsuno, Y

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of $^{55}$Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei ($^{55}$Ni, $^{57}$Ni, $^{55}$Co and $^{57}$Co), one neutron away from $^{56}$Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the $^{1}$H($^{56}$Ni,d)$^{55}$Ni transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f$_{7/2}$, p$_{3/2}$ and the s$_{1/2}$ hole-states of $^{55}$Ni. This new data provides a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s$_{1/2}$ hole-state below Fermi energy.

  5. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 55Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D.; Chan, K. P.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Shapira, D.; Peters, W. A.; Barbieri, C.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Horoi, M.; Otsuka, T.; Suzuki, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei (55Ni, 57Ni, 55Co and 57Cu), one nucleon away from 56Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the H1(Ni56,d)Ni55 transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s1/2 hole-state below Fermi energy.

  6. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 55Ni hole-states from (p,d transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sanetullaev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei (55Ni, 57Ni, 55Co and 57Cu, one nucleon away from 56Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the H1(Ni56,dNi55 transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s1/2 hole-state below Fermi energy.

  7. New recoil transfer chamber for thermalization of heavy ions produced in fusion–evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, M.C. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77842 (United States); Tereshatov, E.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); DeVanzo, M.J. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Sefcik, J.A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics and Geosciences, Angelo State University, San Angelo, TX 76909 (United States); Bennett, M.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Mayorov, D.A.; Werke, T.A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77842 (United States); Folden, C.M., E-mail: Folden@comp.tamu.edu [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    A new Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC) has been designed, fabricated, and characterized at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The design is based on a gas stopper that was previously in routine use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. This new RTC uses He gas to stop ions, and a combination of a static electric field and gas flow to maximize the extraction efficiency. In offline experiments, a {sup 228}Th source was used to produce {sup 216}Po which was successfully extracted even though it has a short half-life. In online experiments using the products of the {sup 118}Sn({sup 40}Ar, 6n){sup 152}Er reaction, an efficiency of several tens of percent was measured.

  8. Determination of Reactive Intermediates During Anodic Oxygen-transfer Reactions at Lead Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Shi-yun; ZHANG Wen; GAO Meng-nan; GU Fen-lin; WANG Qing-jiang; JIN Li-tong

    2004-01-01

    The anodic discharge of water to produce adsorbed hydroxyl free radicals(*OH) is considered to be a prerequisite to anodic O-transfer reactions at a PbO2 electrode. In this work, a method was studied by means of high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) combined with electrochemical detection(ED) so as to investigate the production of hydroxyl free radicals(*OH) in the process of the anodic discharge of H2O at a PbO2 electrode. The voltammetric data obtained at the PbO2 electrode for the oxidation of salicylic acid to salicylate hydroxylation products(DHBAs) and the detection of DHBAs by means of HPLC-ED confirm the proposed mechanism.

  9. Effect of phenol and halogenated phenols on energy transfer reactions of rat liver mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izushi,Fumio

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro effects of phenol and p-halogenated phenols on mitochondrial energy transfer reactions were examined using isolated rat liver mitochondria. The relationship between physiochemical properties of phenolic compounds and their effects on mitochondria were studied. Phenol and p-halogenated phenols induced the release of K+ ions from mitochondria, suggesting a change in permeability to K+ ions. A decrease in the respiratory control index, an increase in K+ release and stimulation of latent ATPase activity were observed with these compounds in the descending order of p-iodophenol, p-bromophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-fluorophenol and phenol. The concentrations of the phenolic compounds resulting in fifty percent inhibition of the respiratory control index and those resulting in fifty percent release of K+ ions significantly correlated with Hammett's substituent constant (sigma and the hydrophobic binding constant (pi of the compounds.

  10. Optical pumping and population transfer of nuclear-spin states of caesium atoms in high magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Jun; Sun Xian-Ping; Zeng Xi-Zhi; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear-spin states of gaseous-state Cs atoms in the ground state are optically manipulated using a Ti:sapphire laser in a magnetic field of 1.516 T, in which optical coupling of the nuclear-spin states is achieved through hyperfine interactions between electrons and nuclei. The steady-state population distribution in the hyperfine Zeeman sublevels of the ground state is detected by using a tunable diode laser. Furthermore, the state population transfer among the of Cs in the ground state due to stochastic collisions between Cs atoms and buffer-gas molecules, is studied at different of the hyperfine interaction can strongly cause the state population transfer and spin-state interchange among the hyperfine Zeeman sublevels. The calculated results maybe explain the steady-state population in hyperfine Zeeman sublevels in terms of rates of optical-pumping, electron-spin flip, nuclear spin flip, and electron-nuclear spin flip-flop transitions among the hyperfine Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of Cs atoms. This method may be applied to the nuclear-spin-based solid-state quantum computation.

  11. Charge-transfer-to-solvent reactions from I- to water, methanol, and ethanol studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Haruki; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Karashima, Shutaro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2016-08-01

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) reactions from iodide (I-) to H2O, D2O, methanol, and ethanol were studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid microjets using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer with variable pass energy. Photoexcited iodide dissociates into a weak complex (a contact pair) of a solvated electron and an iodine atom in similar reaction times, 0.3 ps in H2O and D2O and 0.5 ps in methanol and ethanol, which are much shorter than their dielectric relaxation times. The results indicate that solvated electrons are formed with minimal solvent reorganization in the long-range solvent polarization field created for I-. The photoelectron spectra for CTTS in H2O and D2O—measured with higher accuracy than in our previous study [Y. I. Suzuki et al., Chem. Sci. 2, 1094 (2011)]—indicate that internal conversion yields from the photoexcited I-* (CTTS) state are less than 10%, while alcohols provide 2-3 times greater yields of internal conversion from I-*. The overall geminate recombination yields are found to be in the order of H2O > D2O > methanol > ethanol, which is opposite to the order of the mutual diffusion rates of an iodine atom and a solvated electron. This result is consistent with the transition state theory for an adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer process, which predicts that the recombination reaction rate has a pre-exponential factor inversely proportional to a longitudinal solvent relaxation time.

  12. Charge-transfer-to-solvent reactions from I(-) to water, methanol, and ethanol studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Haruki; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Karashima, Shutaro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2016-08-21

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) reactions from iodide (I(-)) to H2O, D2O, methanol, and ethanol were studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid microjets using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer with variable pass energy. Photoexcited iodide dissociates into a weak complex (a contact pair) of a solvated electron and an iodine atom in similar reaction times, 0.3 ps in H2O and D2O and 0.5 ps in methanol and ethanol, which are much shorter than their dielectric relaxation times. The results indicate that solvated electrons are formed with minimal solvent reorganization in the long-range solvent polarization field created for I(-). The photoelectron spectra for CTTS in H2O and D2O-measured with higher accuracy than in our previous study [Y. I. Suzuki et al., Chem. Sci. 2, 1094 (2011)]-indicate that internal conversion yields from the photoexcited I(-*) (CTTS) state are less than 10%, while alcohols provide 2-3 times greater yields of internal conversion from I(-*). The overall geminate recombination yields are found to be in the order of H2O > D2O > methanol > ethanol, which is opposite to the order of the mutual diffusion rates of an iodine atom and a solvated electron. This result is consistent with the transition state theory for an adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer process, which predicts that the recombination reaction rate has a pre-exponential factor inversely proportional to a longitudinal solvent relaxation time.

  13. Probing the resonance potential in the F atom reaction with hydrogen deuteride with spectroscopic accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zefeng; Che, Li; Qiu, Minghui; Wang, Xingan; Dong, Wenrui; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming; Sun, Zhigang; Fu, Bina; Lee, Soo-Y.; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Dong H.

    2008-01-01

    Reaction resonances are transiently trapped quantum states along the reaction coordinate in the transition state region of a chemical reaction that could have profound effects on the dynamics of the reaction. Obtaining an accurate reaction potential that holds these reaction resonance states and eventually modeling quantitatively the reaction resonance dynamics is still a great challenge. Up to now, the only viable way to obtain a resonance potential is through high-level ab initio calculations. Through highly accurate crossed-beam reactive scattering studies on isotope-substituted reactions, the accuracy of the resonance potential could be rigorously tested. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the resonance-mediated F + HD → HF + D reaction at the full quantum state resolved level, to probe the resonance potential in this benchmark system. The experimental result shows that isotope substitution has a dramatic effect on the resonance picture of this important system. Theoretical analyses suggest that the full-dimensional FH2 ground potential surface, which was believed to be accurate in describing the resonance picture of the F + H2 reaction, is found to be insufficiently accurate in predicting quantitatively the resonance picture for the F + HD → HF + D reaction. We constructed a global potential energy surface by using the CCSD(T) method that could predict the correct resonance peak positions as well as the dynamics for both F + H2 → HF + H and F + HD → HF + D, providing an accurate resonance potential for this benchmark system with spectroscopic accuracy. PMID:18687888

  14. Matter, energy, and heat transfer in a classical ballistic atom pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Tommy A; Das, Kunal K; Mitchell, Kevin A; Aubin, Seth; Delos, John B

    2014-11-01

    A ballistic atom pump is a system containing two reservoirs of neutral atoms or molecules and a junction connecting them containing a localized time-varying potential. Atoms move through the pump as independent particles. Under certain conditions, these pumps can create net transport of atoms from one reservoir to the other. While such systems are sometimes called "quantum pumps," they are also models of classical chaotic transport, and their quantum behavior cannot be understood without study of the corresponding classical behavior. Here we examine classically such a pump's effect on energy and temperature in the reservoirs, in addition to net particle transport. We show that the changes in particle number, of energy in each reservoir, and of temperature in each reservoir vary in unexpected ways as the incident particle energy is varied.

  15. Proton-transfer reaction dynamics and energetics in calcification and decalcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Ryota; Hatta, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-13

    CaCO3 -saturated saline waters at pH values below 8.5 are characterized by two stationary equilibrium states: reversible chemical calcification/decalcification associated with acid dissociation, Ca(2+) +HCO3 (-) ⇌CaCO3 +H(+) ; and reversible static physical precipitation/dissolution, Ca(2+) +CO3 (2-) ⇌CaCO3 . The former reversible reaction was determined using a strong base and acid titration. The saturation state described by the pH/PCO2 -independent solubility product, [Ca(2+) ][CO3 (2-) ], may not be observed at pH below 8.5 because [Ca(2+) ][CO3 (2-) ]/([Ca(2+) ][HCO3 (-) ]) ≪1. Since proton transfer dynamics controls all reversible acid dissociation reactions in saline waters, the concentrations of calcium ion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were expressed as a function of dual variables, pH and PCO2 . The negative impact of ocean acidification on marine calcifying organisms was confirmed by applying the experimental culture data of each PCO2 /pH-dependent coral polyp skeleton weight (Wskel) to the proton transfer idea. The skeleton formation of each coral polyp was performed in microspaces beneath its aboral ectoderm. This resulted in a decalcification of 14 weight %, a normalized CaCO3 saturation state Λ of 1.3 at PCO2 ≈400 ppm and pH ≈8.0, and serious decalcification of 45 % and Λ 2.5 at PCO2 ≈1000 ppm and pH ≈7.8.

  16. Porphyrin Cobalt(III) "Nitrene Radical" Reactivity; Hydrogen Atom Transfer from Ortho-YH Substituents to the Nitrene Moiety of Cobalt-Bound Aryl Nitrene Intermediates (Y = O, NH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Monalisa; Rebreyend, Christophe; de Bruin, Bas

    2016-02-20

    In the field of cobalt(II) porphyrin-catalyzed metallo-radical reactions, organic azides have emerged as successful nitrene transfer reagents. In the pursuit of employing ortho-YH substituted (Y = O, NH) aryl azides in Co(II) porphyrin-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions, unexpected hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the OH or NH₂ group in the ortho-position to the nitrene moiety of the key radical-intermediate was observed. This leads to formation of reactive ortho-iminoquinonoid (Y = O) and phenylene diimine (Y = NH) species. These intermediates convert to subsequent products in non-catalyzed reactions, as is typical for these free organic compounds. As such, the observed reactions prevent the anticipated cobalt-mediated catalytic radical-type coupling of the nitrene radical intermediates to alkynes or alkenes. Nonetheless, the observed reactions provide valuable insights into the reactivity of transition metal nitrene-radical intermediates, and give access to ortho-iminoquinonoid and phenylene diimine intermediates from ortho-YH substituted aryl azides in a catalytic manner. The latter can be employed as intermediates in one-pot catalytic transformations. From the ortho-hydroxy aryl azide substrates both phenoxizinones and benzoxazines could be synthesized in high yields. From the ortho-amino aryl azide substrates azabenzene compounds were obtained as the main products. Computational studies support these observations, and reveal that HAT from the neighboring OH and NH₂ moiety to the nitrene radical moiety has a low energy barrier.

  17. Differentiation of diastereotopic bromine atoms in SN2 reactions of gem-dibromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster, Niels; Harms, Klaus; Koert, Ulrich

    2012-02-11

    A novel directed S(N)2 reaction of conformationally biased gem-dibromides and an arenesulfinate anion is described. The reaction results in the diastereoselective formation of α-bromosulfones. The selectivity originates from pre-coordination of the nucleophile to a free hydroxyl group in the γ-position.

  18. A multi-atom and resonant interaction scheme for quantum state transfer and logical gates between two remote cavities via an optical fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Z; Yin, Zhang-qi; Li, Fu-li

    2007-01-01

    A system consisting of two single-mode cavities spatially separated and connected by an optical fibre and multi two-level atoms trapped in the cavities is considered. If the atoms resonantly and collectively interact with the local cavity fields but there is no direct interaction between the atoms, we show that an ideal quantum state transfer, and highly reliable quantum swap, entangling and controlled-Z gates can be deterministically realized between the distant cavities. We find that the operation of the state-transfer, and swap, entangling and controlled-Z gates can be greatly speeded up as number of the atoms in the cavities increases. We also notice that the effects of spontaneous emission of atoms and photon leakage out of cavity on the quantum processes can also be greatly diminished in the multi-atom case.

  19. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  20. A Langevin equation approach to electron transfer reactions in the diabatic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, XiaoGeng; Wang, Haobin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-10-14

    A linear Langevin equation that governs the population dynamics of electron transfer reactions is derived. The noise in the Langevin equation is eliminated by treating the diabatic population fluctuations as the relevant variables, leaving only the memory kernel responsible for the population relaxation. Within the memory kernel, the diabatic coupling is treated perturbatively and a second order expansion is found to give a simple closed form expression for the kernel. The accuracy of the second order truncation is maximized by performing a fixed rotation of the diabatic electronic states that minimizes the first order free energy of the system and thus minimizes the effect of the perturbation on the thermodynamics. The resulting two-hop Langevin equation (THLE) is then validated by applying it to a simple spin-boson model, where exact results exist. Excellent agreement is found in a wide parameter range, even where the perturbation is moderately strong. Results obtained in the rotated electronic basis are found to be consistently more accurate than those from the unrotated basis. These benchmark calculations also allow us to demonstrate the advantage of treating the population fluctuations instead of the populations as the relevant variables, as only the former lead to reliable results at long time. Thus, the THLE appears to provide a viable alternative to established methods--such as Ehrenfest dynamics or surface hopping--for the treatment of nonadiabatic effects in electron transfer simulations.

  1. Influence of mass transfer and chemical reaction on ozonation of azo dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, I.S.; Wiesmann, U. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Technical Univ. of Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Azo dyes can be only mineralised by chemical oxidation. In this paper the oxidation of reactive black 5 (RB 5) and reactive orange 96 (RO 96) with concentrations between 35 and 5700 mgL{sup -1} (RB 5) and between 20 and 2050 mgL{sup -1} (RO 96) is investigated. A lab scale bubble column was used, which was gassed by a mixture of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. The oxidation rate was influenced by mass transfer for all dye concentrations used. For lower dye concentrations mass transfer alone was decisive for reaction rate showing an enhancement factor of E {approx} 1. However, in the region of higher dye concentrations, the slope of the decreasing ozone concentration inside the liquid boundary layer increases more and more with increasing dye concentration as a result of a chemical oxidation. Therefore, the enhancement factor depends on the kind and concentration of the azo dyes. For RB 5 as an diazo dye an enhancement factor of E = 9 was observed for 3800 mgL{sup -1}, RO 96 as a mono azo dye with a remarkable higher chemical oxidation rate shows an E = 17 already for 2050 mgL{sup -1}. (orig.)

  2. The protein's role in triplet energy transfer in bacterial reaction centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laible, P. D.

    1998-08-14

    When photosynthetic organisms are subjected to high-light conditions in nature, electron transfer becomes blocked as the rate of conversion of light into charge-separated states in the reaction center (RC) exceeds the capacity of the soluble carriers involved in cyclic electron transfer. In that event, a well-characterized T{sub 0}-polarized triplet state {sup T}P, is formed on the primary donor, P, from the P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} state (reviewed in [1]). In an aerobic or semi-aerobic environment, the major role of the carotenoid (C), also bound by the RC, is to quench {sup T}P prior to its sensitization of the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} singlet state of oxygen--a potentially damaging biological oxidant. The carotenoid performs this function efficiently in most bacterial RCs by rapidly accepting the triplet state from P and dissipating this excited-state energy into heat through internal conversion. The lowest-lying triplet states of P and the carotenoid are sufficiently different that {sup T}P can promote oxygen to its excited singlet state whereas {sup T}C can quench the {sup T}P state (reviewed in [2]).

  3. Three-Body Model Calculation of Spin Distribution in Two-Nucleon Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The differential cross sections of two-nucleon transfer reactions 238U(18O,16O)240U around 10 MeV per nucleon are calculated by one-step Born-approximation with a 16O+2n+238U three-body model. The three-body wave function in the initial channel is obtained with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method, and that in the final channel is evaluated with adiabatic approximation. The resulting cross sections have a peak around the grazing angle, and the spin distribution, i.e., the cross section at the peak as a function of the transferred spin, is investigated. The shape of the spin distribution is found not sensitive to the incident energies, optical potentials, and treatment of the breakup channels both in the initial and final states, while it depends on the excitation energy of the residual nucleus 240U. The peak of the spin distribution moves to the large-spin direction as the excitation energy increases. To fulfill the condition that the peak position should not exceeds 10 hbar, which is necessary f...

  4. Proton-transfer reactions of acridine in water-containing ionic-liquid-rich mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2013-12-02

    To assess the potential of ionic liquids (ILs) as a solubilizing media that facilitates proton-transfer reactions, acridine prototropism is investigated using UV/Vis molecular absorbance as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence with different ILs in the presence of a small amount of dilute acid or base. It is found that protonation and deprotonation of acridine, when dissolved in different ILs, can be triggered by the addition of a small amount of dilute aqueous HCl and NaOH, respectively, in both the ground and excited states, irrespective of the identity of the IL. However, the amount of dilute acid/base needed to protonate/deprotonate acridine dissolved in different ILs is found to vary from one IL to another. Steady-state fluorescence measurements also imply the presence of interactions between the acidic proton(s) of IL cation and excited acridine. The interconversion of neutral and protonated acridine, as well as the presence of a weakly fluorescent complex between excited acridine and the acidic proton(s) of the IL cation, is further corroborated by the parameters recovered from the fitting of the excited-state intensity-decay data. It is established that ILs as solubilizing media readily support facile proton transfer in both ground and excited states.

  5. Observation of three behaviors in confined liquid water within a nanopool hosting proton-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Angulo, Gonzalo; Gil, Michal; Organero, Juan Angel; Sanz, Mikel; Tormo, Laura

    2007-05-17

    In this contribution, we report on studies of rotational and diffusional dynamics of 7-hydroxyquinoline (7HQ) within a reverse micelle (RM) containing different amounts of water. Analyzed in terms of the wobbling-in-a-cone model, the data reveal structural and dynamical properties of the nanopool. We clearly observed three regions in the behavior of confined water molecules within the RM hosting a double proton-transfer reaction between the probe and water. This observation remarkably reproduces the change of calculated water density within this life-mimicking medium. The number of water molecules per AOT head in the transition regions changes from 2 to 5, the latter being very near to the full solvation number (6) of the RM heads. Moreover, the H-bonds breaking and making within the RM to give new structures of the probe strongly affect the environment fluidization in different extents, reflected in different relaxation times of these structures; however, they are of similar sizes. We discuss the role of RM confinement and the proton-transfer dynamics on the behavior of water and their relationships to the packing of water molecules in the studied range of concentrations.

  6. Atomic-scale study of transformation paths in unmixing and ordering reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D.; Pareige-Schmuck, C.; Danoix, F. [CNRS, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Fac. des Sci. de Rouen; Stiller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The tomographic atom-probe (TAP) is a new high resolution nanoanalytical microscope, which provides three-dimensional maps of chemical heterogeneities in a metallic material on a near-atomic scale. Application of the TAP to unmixing and ordering in metallic alloys is discussed and illustrated through various examples (spinodal decomposition in FeCr ferritic phases, nucleation and growth of LI{sub 2} ordered precipitates in nickel based alloys, precipitation in maraging steels). The role of the TAP in the investigation of transformation paths in these systems is discussed. (orig.). 17 refs.

  7. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-04-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron breakup reaction 2H(e, e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the quasielastic region to just below the Delta(1232)-resonance, and for proton polar angles up to Thetanp = 145 o in the center-of-momentum system. This angular range represents missing momenta up to pm = 1000 MeV/c. By detecting the scattered protons in two segmented 3 3 m2 scintillator time-of-flight detectors, we have covered a considerable part of the out-of-plane region. The clearly visible variation of the cross section with the proton azimuthal angle fnp has enabled us to extract values for the longitudinal-transverse interference form factor fLT and for a combination of the non-interference form factors fL and fT for proton angles up to Thetanp = 40o in the center-of-momentum system. The experimental results have been compared to the full model calculations by Arenhövel et al. For the major part of our kinematical range the shape of the cross section and of the form factors is reproduced by the model, but some differences remain in the normalization, especially at higher energy transfers. Our results corroborate the conclusions from other recent experiments concerning the importance of subnuclear degrees-of-freedom beyond the quasielastic region, but the discrepancy indicates that the model can still be improved

  8. Dynamics of interfacial reactions between O({sup 3} P) atoms and long-chain liquid hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Mhairi [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bagot, Paul A J [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Koehler, Sven P K [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Reed, Stewart K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Westacott, Robin E [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Costen, Matthew L [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); McKendrick, Kenneth G [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Recent progress that has been made towards understanding the dynamics of collisions at the gas-liquid interface is summarized briefly. We describe in this context a promising new approach to the experimental study of gas-liquid interfacial reactions that we have introduced. This is based on laser-photolytic production of reactive gas-phase atoms above the liquid surface and laser-spectroscopic probing of the resulting nascent products. This technique is illustrated for reaction of O({sup 3}P) atoms at the surface of the long-chain liquid hydrocarbon squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane). Laser-induced fluorescence detection of the nascent OH has revealed mechanistically diagnostic correlations between its internal and translational energy distributions. Vibrationally excited OH molecules are able to escape the surface. At least two contributions to the product rotational distributions are identified, confirming and extending previous hypotheses of the participation of both direct and trapping-desorption mechanisms. We speculate briefly on future experimental and theoretical developments that might be necessary to address the many currently unanswered mechanistic questions for this, and other, classes of gas-liquid interfacial reaction.

  9. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-01-01

    Interquinone QA− → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions. PMID:28300167

  10. Pore to Core Scale Simulation of the Mass Transfer with Mineral Reaction in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekri S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pore Network Model (PNM is used to simulate mass transfer with mineral reaction in a single phase flow through porous medium which is here a sandstone sample from the reservoir formation of the Pakoslaw gas field. The void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore-bodies joined by pore-throats. Parameters defining the pore-bodies and the pore-throats distribution are determined by an optimization process aiming to match the experimental Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure (MICP curve and petrophysical properties of the rock such as intrinsic permeability and formation factor. The generated network is used first to simulate the multiphase flow by solving Kirchhoff’s laws. The capillary pressure and relative permeability curves are derived. Then, reactive transport is addressed under asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. The porosity/permeability relationship and the three phenomenological coefficients of transport, namely the solute velocity, the dispersion and the mean reaction rate are determined as functions of Peclet and Peclet-Damköhler dimensionless numbers. Finally, the role of the dimensionless numbers on the reactive flow properties is highlighted.

  11. Study of fluorescence characteristics of the charge-transfer reaction of quinolone agents with bromanil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Xuan, Chun-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method was discussed for the determination of three antibacterial quinolone derivatives, ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) through charge-transfer complexation (CTC) with 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone (bromanil, TBBQ). The method was based on the reaction of these drugs as n-electron donors with the π-acceptor TBBQ. TBBQ was found to react with these drugs to produce a kind of yellow complexes and the fluorescence intensities of the complexes were enhanced by 29-36 times more than those of the corresponding monomers. UV-vis, 1H NMR and XPS techniques were used to study the complexes formed. The various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were studied and optimized. Under optimal reaction conditions, the rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.021-2.42 μg mL -1, 0.017-2.63 μg mL -1 and 0.019-2.14 μg mL -1 for OFL, NOR and CIP, respectively. The methods developed were applied successfully to the determination of the subject drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  12. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmet, P.; Dommen, J.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Tritscher, T.; Praplan, A. P.; Platt, S. M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-03-01

    The hydroxyl free radical (OH) is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA) were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP) secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as a potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time) dimension: the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  13. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barmet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl free radical (OH is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88 · 10−12 cm3molecule−1s−1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time dimension:~the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  14. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barmet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl free radical (OH is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as a potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88 × 10−12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time dimension: the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  15. Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guenther

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24 by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS was investigated. SQT calibration standards were prepared by a capillary diffusion method and the PTR-MS-estimated mixing ratios were derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants. These values were compared with mixing ratios determined by a calibrated Gas Chromatograph (GC coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID. Product ion distributions from soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+, out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+, are accounted for. Considerable fragmentation of bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, cause the accuracy to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205+ is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport research station in 2005. Inferred average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT, and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m−3 (4.5 mg m−2 h−1, 1.2 μg m−3 (0.21 mg m−2 h−1, and 0.0016 μg m−3 (0.10 mg m−2 h−1, respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly

  16. Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24 by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS was investigated with SQT standards, prepared by a capillary diffusion method, and the estimated mixing ratios, derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants were intercompared with measured mixing ratios, measured by a complementary Gas Chromatograph (GC coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID. Product ion distributions due to soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+ out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+ are accounted for. Bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, showed considerable fragmentation causing the accuracy of their analysis to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205 is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport research station in 2005. Inferred Average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT, and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m−3 (4.5 mg m−2 h−1, 1.2 μg m−3 (0.21 mg m−2 h−1 and 0.0016 μg m−3 (0.10 mgm−2 h−1 respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly underestimated OH

  17. Water-Soluble Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes Supported by Pentapyridine Ligands: Axial Ligand Effects on Hydrogen Atom and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarojsiri, Teera; Sun, Yujie; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-06-15

    We report the photochemical generation and study of a family of water-soluble iron(IV)-oxo complexes supported by pentapyridine PY5Me2-X ligands (PY5Me2 = 2,6-bis(1,1-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)pyridine; X = CF3, H, Me, or NMe2), in which the oxidative reactivity of these ferryl species correlates with the electronic properties of the axial pyridine ligand. Synthesis of a systematic series of [Fe(II)(L)(PY5Me2-X)](2+) complexes, where L = CH3CN or H2O, and characterizations by several methods, including X-ray crystallography, cyclic voltammetry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, show that increasing the electron-donating ability of the axial pyridine ligand tracks with less positive Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potentials and quadrupole splitting parameters. The Fe(II) precursors are readily oxidized to their Fe(IV)-oxo counterparts using either chemical outer-sphere oxidants such as CAN (ceric ammonium nitrate) or flash-quench photochemical oxidation with [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer and K2S2O8 as a quencher. The Fe(IV)-oxo complexes are capable of oxidizing the C-H bonds of alkane (4-ethylbenzenesulfonate) and alcohol (benzyl alcohol) substrates via hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and an olefin (4-styrenesulfonate) substrate by oxygen atom transfer (OAT). The [Fe(IV)(O)(PY5Me2-X)](2+) derivatives with electron-poor axial ligands show faster rates of HAT and OAT compared to their counterparts supported by electron-rich axial donors, but the magnitudes of these differences are relatively modest.

  18. Ultracold magnetically tunable interactions without radiative charge transfer losses between Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$, and Yb$^+$ ions and Cr atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-01-01

    The Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$, and Yb$^+$ ions immersed in an ultracold gas of the Cr atoms are proposed as experimentally feasible heteronuclear systems in which ion-atom interactions at ultralow temperatures can be controlled with magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances without charge transfer and radiative losses. \\textit{Ab initio} techniques are applied to investigate electronic-ground-state properties of the (CaCr)$^+$, (SrCr)$^+$, (BaCr)$^+$, and (YbCr)$^+$ molecular ions. The potential energy curves, permanent electric dipole moments, and static electric dipole polarizabilities are computed. The spin restricted open-shell coupled cluster method restricted to single, double, and noniterative triple excitations, RCCSD(T), and the multireference configuration interaction method restricted to single and double excitations, MRCISD, are employed. The scalar relativistic effects are included within the small-core energy-consistent pseudopotentials. The leading long-range induction and dispersion interaction co...

  19. Elastic, charge transfer, and related transport cross sections for proton impact of atomic hydrogen for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu; Stancil, P. C.; Zaman, T.

    2016-04-01

    Updating and extending previous work (Krstić and Schultz 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3458 and other references) comprehensive calculations were performed for elastic scattering and charge transfer in proton—atomic hydrogen collisions. The results, obtained for 1301 collision energies in the center-of-mass energy range of 10-4-104 eV, are provided for integral and differential cross sections relevant to transport modeling in astrophysical and other plasma environments, and are made available through a website. Use of the data is demonstrated through a Monte Carlo transport simulation of solar wind proton propagation through atomic hydrogen gas representing a simple model of the solar wind interaction with heliospheric neutrals.

  20. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...