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Sample records for atom transfer reactions

  1. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  2. Enantioselective H-atom transfer reaction: a strategy to synthesize formaldehyde aldol products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Patil, Kalyani

    2005-04-14

    [reaction: see text] Enantioselective radical alkylation of Baylis-Hillman adducts furnished aldol products in good yield and selectivity. The results illustrate that the selectivity in the hydrogen atom transfer is dependent on the size of the ester substituent, with smaller substituents providing better enantioselectivity.

  3. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ''Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH → H 2 R reactions where RH is CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , or C 3 H 8 , (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants

  4. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared spectra with the spectra theoretically calculated for

  5. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  6. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  7. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  8. Pion-transfer (n,d) and (d, 3He) reactions leading to deeply bound pionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, H.; Hirenzaki, S.; Yamazaki, T.

    1990-11-01

    Theoretical studies are given on the (n,d) and (d, 3 He) reactions leading to deeply bound pionic atoms in heavy nuclei of configuration [(nl) π ·j n -1 ]J. The cross sections for various pionic and neutron-hole configurations in the case of a 208 Pb target are calculated at incident energies 300-1000 MeV/u by using the effective number approach and the eikonal approximation for distortion. The effective number with a pion in the 1s or 2p state and a neutron hole in the i 13/2 orbit peaks around the same incident energy (T n =600 MeV) as the elementary cross section n+n→d+π - , where the momentum transfer matches the angular-momentum transfer of L=5∼7. The DWIA cross section for (n,d) producing a pion in the 1s or 2p orbit at T n =600 MeV is found to be around 42 or 75 μb/sr, respectively. At T n =350 MeV, where the momentum transfer is small, quasi-substitutional states of configurations [(2p) π (3p 1/2 ) n -1 ]L=0 and [(2p) π (3p 3/2 ) n -1 ]L=0 are preferentially populated with cross sections of 190 and 380 μb/sr, respectively. The (d, 3 He) cross sections are estimated to be an order of magnitude smaller than the (n,d) cross sections. Thus, the (n,d) and (d, 3 He) reactions are found to be suited for the production of deeply bound pionic atoms. (author)

  9. Quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setser, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The two-body, thermal quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms are reviewed using excited states of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms as examples. State-specific interstate relaxation and excitation-transfer reactions with atomic colliders are discussed first. These results then are used to discuss quenching reactions of excited-state atoms with diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the latter have large cross sections, and the reactions can proceed by excitation transfer and by reactive quenching. Excited states of molecules are not considered; however, a table of quenching rate constants is given for six excited-state molecules in an appendix

  10. Nonheme Fe(IV) Oxo Complexes of Two New Pentadentate Ligands and Their Hydrogen-Atom and Oxygen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Mainak; Nimir, Hassan; Demeshko, Serhiy; Bhat, Satish S; Malinkin, Sergey O; Haukka, Matti; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Lisensky, George C; Meyer, Franc; Shteinman, Albert A; Browne, Wesley R; Hrovat, David A; Richmond, Michael G; Costas, Miquel; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-08-03

    Two new pentadentate {N5} donor ligands based on the N4Py (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) framework have been synthesized, viz. [N-(1-methyl-2-benzimidazolyl)methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)methyl-N-(bis-2-pyridyl methyl)amine] (L(1)) and [N-bis(1-methyl-2-benzimidazolyl)methyl-N-(bis-2-pyridylmethyl)amine] (L(2)), where one or two pyridyl arms of N4Py have been replaced by corresponding (N-methyl)benzimidazolyl-containing arms. The complexes [Fe(II)(CH3CN)(L)](2+) (L = L(1) (1); L(2) (2)) were synthesized, and reaction of these ferrous complexes with iodosylbenzene led to the formation of the ferryl complexes [Fe(IV)(O)(L)](2+) (L = L(1) (3); L(2) (4)), which were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution mass spectrometry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Complexes 3 and 4 are relatively stable with half-lives at room temperature of 40 h (L = L(1)) and 2.5 h (L = L(2)). The redox potentials of 1 and 2, as well as the visible spectra of 3 and 4, indicate that the ligand field weakens as ligand pyridyl substituents are progressively substituted by (N-methyl)benzimidazolyl moieties. The reactivities of 3 and 4 in hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) and oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions show that both complexes exhibit enhanced reactivities when compared to the analogous N4Py complex ([Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+)), and that the normalized HAT rates increase by approximately 1 order of magnitude for each replacement of a pyridyl moiety; i.e., [Fe(IV)(O)(L(2))](2+) exhibits the highest rates. The second-order HAT rate constants can be directly related to the substrate C-H bond dissociation energies. Computational modeling of the HAT reactions indicates that the reaction proceeds via a high spin transition state.

  11. Single step synthesis of gold-amino acid composite, with the evidence of the catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction, for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Nandi, Debkumar; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    A composite architecture of amino acid and gold nanoparticles has been synthesized using a generic route of 'in-situ polymerization and composite formation (IPCF)' [1,2]. The formation mechanism of the composite has been supported by a model hydrogen atom (H•≡H++e-) transfer (HAT) type of reaction which belongs to the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The 'gold-amino acid composite' was used as a catalyst for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin.

  12. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  13. Low energy cross section data for ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems and for charge transfer of multiply charged ions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Kazuhiko

    2007-04-01

    Systematic cross section measurements for ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems and for charge transfer of multiply charged ions in low energy collisions with atoms and molecules have been performed continuously by the identical apparatus installed with an octo-pole ion beam guide (OPIG) since 1980 till 2004. Recently, all of accumulated cross section data for a hundred collision systems has been entered into CMOL and CHART of the NIFS atomic and molecular numerical database together with some related cross section data. In this present paper, complicated ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems are revealed and the brief outlines of specific properties in low energy charge transfer collisions of multiply charged ions with atoms and molecules are introduced. (author)

  14. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  15. Exploring possible reaction pathways for the o-atom transfer reactions to unsaturated substrates catalyzed by a [Ni-NO2 ] ↔ [Ni-NO] redox couple using DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2017-07-15

    The (nitro)(N-methyldithiocarbamato)(trimethylphospane)nickel(II), [Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] complex catalyses efficiently the O-atom transfer reactions to CO and acetylene. Energetically feasible sequence of elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle of the air oxidation of CO and acetylene are proposed promoted by the Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] ↔ Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 ) redox couple using DFT methods both in vacuum and dichloromethane solutions. The catalytic air oxidation of HC≡CH involves formation of a five-member metallacycle intermediate, via a [3 + 2] cyclo-addition reaction of HC≡CH to the Ni-N = O moiety of the Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] complex, followed by a β H-atom migration toward the C α carbon atom of the coordinated acetylene and release of the oxidation product (ketene). The geometric and energetic reaction profile for the reversible [Ni( κN1-NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] ⇌ [Ni( κO,O2-ONO)(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] linkage isomerization has also been modeled by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  17. Reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Seiichiro; Nakamura, Kazumoto; Hoshino, Takashi; Hikita, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde was investigated in a fast flow reactor equipped with a time-of-flight type mass spectrometer under reduced pressure. Main reaction products were carbon monoxide, ethylene, ethane, methane, and propanal. Consideration of the distributions of the reaction products under various reaction conditions showed that hydrogen atoms attacked the C=C double bond, especially its inner carbon side under reduced pressure. Resulting hot radicals caused subsequent reactions. The relative value of the apparent bimolecular rate constant of the reaction against that of trans-2-butene with hydrogen atoms was 1.6+-0.2, which supported the above-mentioned initial reaction. (auth.)

  18. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Our research program is concerned with the kinetics of elementary gas phase reactions and energy transfer involving polyatomic molecules. We report here on three ongoing projects: The reaction of oxygen atoms with hydrogen molecules, the electronic relaxation of NH radicals, and the vibrational relaxation of highly excited SF 6 molecules. 10 refs., 5 figs

  19. The Unimolecular Reactions of CF3CHF2 Studied by Chemical Activation: Assignment of Rate Constants and Threshold Energies to the 1,2-H Atom Transfer, 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF Elimination Reactions, and the Dependence of Threshold Energies on the Number of F-Atom Substituents in the Fluoroethane Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caleb A; Gillespie, Blanton R; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2017-11-22

    The recombination of CF 3 and CHF 2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to prepare vibrationally excited CF 3 CHF 2 * molecules with 101 kcal mol -1 of vibrational energy. The subsequent 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions were observed as a function of bath gas pressure by following the CHF 3 , CF 3 (F)C: and C 2 F 4 product concentrations by gas chromatography using a mass spectrometer as the detector. The singlet CF 3 (F)C: concentration was measured by trapping the carbene with trans-2-butene. The experimental rate constants are 3.6 × 10 4 , 4.7 × 10 4 , and 1.1 × 10 4 s -1 for the 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions, respectively. These experimental rate constants were matched to statistical RRKM calculated rate constants to assign threshold energies (E 0 ) of 88 ± 2, 88 ± 2, and 87 ± 2 kcal mol -1 to the three reactions. Pentafluoroethane is the only fluoroethane that has a competitive H atom transfer decomposition reaction, and it is the only example with 1,1-HF elimination being more important than 1,2-HF elimination. The trend of increasing threshold energies for both 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF processes with the number of F atoms in the fluoroethane molecule is summarized and investigated with electronic-structure calculations. Examination of the intrinsic reaction coordinate associated with the 1,1-HF elimination reaction found an adduct between CF 3 (F)C: and HF in the exit channel with a dissociation energy of ∼5 kcal mol -1 . Hydrogen-bonded complexes between HF and the H atom migration transition state of CH 3 (F)C: and the F atom migration transition state of CF 3 (F)C: also were found by the calculations. The role that these carbene-HF complexes could play in 1,1-HF elimination reactions is discussed.

  20. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1990-06-01

    During the past three years we have been working on four problems in the general area of gas phase kinetics and energy transfer of small molecules. These are: (1) measurements of the fine structure populations of ground state oxygen atoms produced in photodissociation reactions; (2) quenching of the Rydberg B ( 1 Σ + ) state of CO; (3) vibrational relaxation of highly excited molecules; and (4) kinetics of hydrogen molecules. The first two topics, which involve transitions between different electronic states of the parent molecule, are a departure from our previous research interests. In the accompanying renewal proposal we discuss plans to pursue these new topics vigorously during the coming year. The third topic is a continuation of our long interest in the energy dependence of the rates laws governing vibrational-to-translational energy transfer of molecules having large initial amounts of vibrational excitation. The final topic is a continuation of our studies of the reaction of O( 3 P) + H 2 . In this work we measured the rate constant for the reaction O( 3 P) with deuterium and also analyzed spectroscopically different sources of vibrationally excited hydrogen for possible future work. We discuss each of these four studies in the following sections

  1. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana; Bartosz, Grzegorz; El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid; Sapin-Minet, Anne; Leroy, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and its product measurement by HPLC. ► Lowest limit of detection by monitoring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine. ► Adsorption problem of the radical on HPLC parts have been pointed out. - Abstract: 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH· absorbance at 515 nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH· quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH· resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH· and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH· and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile–10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH· onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH· was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH· using standards (0.02 and 14 μM, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox ® , ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of higher selectivity than colorimetry, and (ii) its help to investigate the mechanisms occurring with the free radical.

  2. prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization, reverse atom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and characterization of poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization, reverse atom transfer radical polymerization and ... Zydex Industries, 25-A Gandhi Oil Mill Compound, Gorwa, Vadodara 390 016, India; Rubber Technology Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, ...

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy of deeply-bound pionic atoms in heavy nuclei by pion-transfer reactions of inverse kinematics using the GSI cooler ring ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1991-02-01

    Many studies published in the past are reviewed first in relation to high-resolution spectroscopy of deeply-bound pionic atoms in heavy nuclei. The report then describes a procedure for applying the method of inverse kinematics to the case of (d, 3 He) reactions. The (d, 3 He) reaction in inverse kinematics is feasible from practical viewpoints. Thus a discussion is made of the inverse kinematics in which a heavy-ion beam ( 208 Pb for instance) with a projectile kinetic energy hits a deuteron target and ejected recoil 3 He nuclei are measured in the forward direction. The recoil momentum is calculated as a function of the Q value. Analysis shows that the recoil spectroscopy with inverse kinematics can be applied to the case of (d, 3 He) reaction, which will yield a very high mass resolution. The experimental setup for use in the first stage is then outlined, and a simple detector configuration free of magnetic field is discussed. These investigations demonstrate that the (d, 3 He) reaction in inverse kinematics provides a promising tool for obtaining high-resolution spectra of deeply-bound pionic atoms. (N.K.)

  4. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Bartosz, Grzegorz [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid [Laboratoire de Nutrition et Sante, Biology Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra (Morocco); Sapin-Minet, Anne [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Leroy, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.leroy@pharma.uhp-nancy.fr [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and its product measurement by HPLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lowest limit of detection by monitoring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption problem of the radical on HPLC parts have been pointed out. - Abstract: 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH{center_dot}) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH{center_dot} absorbance at 515 nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH{center_dot} quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH{center_dot} resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH{center_dot} and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH{center_dot} and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH{center_dot} onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH{center_dot} was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH{center_dot} using standards (0.02 and 14 {mu}M, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox{sup Registered-Sign }, ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of

  5. Reaction of O+, CO+, and CH+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, W.; Villinger, H.; Howorka, F.; Lindinger, W.; Tosis, P.; Bassi, D.; Ferguson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Rate coefficients for reactions of the ions O + , CO + , and CH + with atomic hydrogen have been measured for the first time at 300 K. This provides basic data for the ion chemistry of planetary atmospheres, cometary atmospheres, and interstellar molecular clouds. The O + +H measurement supports quantal calculations of this reaction. The CO + +H reaction provides an example of partial spin nonconservation in a charge-transfer reaction occurring in a deep potential well. Reactions of the same ions with H 2 that have been measured elsewhere are also reported

  6. Atom transfer radical copolymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambard, G.; Klumperman, B.; Matyjaszewski, K.

    2000-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate has been investigated from a kinetic point of view. Attention is focused on the activation of the dormant species as well as on the termination that plays a role in these reactions. It has been shown that the activation of a styrene

  7. Transfer of energy in an atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemin, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In most cases the nucleus does not interact with the electron cloud because its energy range is far higher, but in some rare cases electrons from the electron cloud and the nucleus may exchange energy: an electron may de-excite by transferring a part of its energy to the nucleus that becomes itself excited (nuclear excitation by electronic transfer or NEET), conversely electrons can receive energy from the nucleus (bound internal conversion or BIC). For the first time both energy transfers have been observed: a BIC process on a tellurium-125 atom by a French team and a NEET process on a gold-197 atom by a Japanese team. (A.C.)

  8. Nucleon transfer reactions with radioactive beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, K.

    2018-03-01

    Transfer reactions are a valuable tool to study the single-particle structure of nuclei. At radioactive beam facilities transfer reactions have to be performed in inverse kinematics. This creates a number of experimental challenges, but it also has some advantages over normal kinematics measurements. An overview of the experimental and theoretical methods for transfer reactions, especially with radioactive beams, is presented. Recent experimental results and highlights on shell evolution in exotic nuclei are discussed.

  9. Scattering and transfer reactions with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    From the elastic scattering analysis the input parameters are found for the inelastic scattering analysis and the transfer reactions of the heavy ion reactions. The main theme reported is the likeness and conection among these processes. (L.C.) [pt

  10. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  11. Catalytic enantioselective alkene aminohalogenation/cyclization involving atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, Michael T; Chemler, Sherry R

    2012-04-16

    Problem solved: the title reaction was used for the synthesis of chiral 2-bromo, chloro, and iodomethyl indolines and 2-iodomethyl pyrrolidines. Stereocenter formation is believed to occur by enantioselective cis aminocupration and C-X bond formation is believed to occur by atom transfer. The ultility of the products as versatile synthetic intermediates was demonstrated, as was a radical cascade cyclization sequence. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  13. Theoretical studies of the reactions of HCN with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, R.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been made of the energetics of the important pathways involved in the reaction of hydrogen atoms with hydrogen cyanide. For each reaction ab initio GVB-CI calculations were carried out to determine the structures and vibrational frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products; then POL-CI calculations were carried out to more accurately estimate the electronic contribution to the energetics of the reactions. The hydrogen abstraction reaction is calculated to be endoergic by 24 kcal/mol [expt. ΔH (0 K) = 16--19 kcal/mol] with a barrier of 31 kcal/mol in the forward direction and 6 kcal/mol in the reverse direction. For the hydrogen addition reactions, addition to the carbon atom is calculated to be exoergic by 19 kcal/mol with a barrier of 11 kcal/mol, while addition to the nitrogen center is essentially thermoneutral with a barrier of 17 kcal/mol. Calculations were also carried out on the isomerization reactions of the addition products. The cis→trans isomerization of HCNH has a barrier of only 10 kcal/mol with the trans isomer being more stable by 5 kcal/mol. The (1,2)-hydrogen migration reaction, converting H 2 CN to trans-HCNH, is endoergic by only 14 kcal/mol, but the calculated barrier for the transfer is 52 kcal/mol. The energy of the migration pathway thus lies above that of the dissociation--recombination pathway

  14. The coordination and atom transfer chemistry of titanium porphyrin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, James Allen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-11-05

    Preparation, characterization, and reactivity of (η2- alkyne)(meso-tetratolylpoprphrinato)titanium(II) complexes are described, along with inetermetal oxygen atom transfer reactions involving Ti(IV) and Ti(III) porphyrin complexes. The η2- alkyne complexes are prepared by reaction of (TTP)TiCl2 with LiAlH4 in presence of alkyne. Structure of (OEP)Ti(η2-Ph-C≡C-Ph) (OEP=octaethylporphryin) was determined by XRD. The compounds undergo simple substitution to displace the alkyne and produce doubly substituted complexes. Structure of (TTP)Ti(4-picoline)2 was also determined by XRD. Reaction of (TTP)Ti=O with (OEP)Ti-Cl yields intermetal O/Cl exchange, which is a one-electron redox process mediated by O atom transfer. Also a zero-electron redox process mediated by atom transfer is observed when (TTP)TiCl2 is reacted with (OEP)Ti=O.

  15. The Third Dimension of a More O'Ferrall-Jencks Diagram for Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Isoelectronic Hydrogen Exchange Reactions of (PhX)(2)H(•) with X = O, NH, and CH(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembran, Alessandro; Provorse, Makenzie R; Wang, Changwei; Wu, Wei; Gao, Jiali

    2012-11-13

    A critical element in theoretical characterization of the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, including hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), is the formulation of the electron and proton localized diabatic states, based on which a More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram can be represented to determine the step-wise and concerted nature of the reaction. Although the More O'Ferrall-Jencks diabatic states have often been used empirically to develop theoretical models for PCET reactions, the potential energy surfaces for these states have never been determined directly based on first principles calculations using electronic structure theory. The difficulty is due to a lack of practical method to constrain electron and proton localized diabatic states in wave function or density functional theory calculations. Employing a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT), in which the electron and proton localized diabatic configurations are constructed through block-localization of Kohn-Sham orbitals, we show that distinction between concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) and HAT, which are not distinguishable experimentally from phenomenological kinetic data, can be made by examining the third dimension of a More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram that includes both the ground and excited state potential surfaces. In addition, we formulate a pair of effective two-state valence bond models to represent the CPET and HAT mechanisms. We found that the lower energy of the CPET and HAT effective diabatic states at the intersection point can be used as an energetic criterion to distinguish the two mechanisms. In the isoelectronic series of hydrogen exchange reaction in (PhX)(2)H(•), where X = O, NH, and CH(2), there is a continuous transition from a CPET mechanism for the phenoxy radical-phenol pair to a HAT process for benzyl radical and toluene, while the reaction between PhNH(2) and PhNH(•) has a mechanism intermediate of CPET and HAT. The electronically nonadiabatic

  16. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suria, Sabartanty [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  17. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, John Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  18. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2'-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol

  19. Proton-transfer reactions in ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.; Schmidt, R.; Schuster, R.

    1985-01-01

    Ion-molecule reactions play an important role in various radiolytic processes, e.g. gas-pulse radiolysis, environmental research. For a discussion of mechanisms rate coefficients have to be assessed. Here gas-phase rate coefficients of ion-(polar) molecule reactions are calculated using the ideas of interaction potentials, reactive cross-sections and distribution functions of the translational energies of both the reactants (ions I, molecules M). The starting point of our approach, directed especially to gas-phase proton-transfer reactions, is the idea that the rate coefficient k can be calculated as an ion-molecule capture-rate coefficient multiplied by a 'steric factor' representing the probability for proton transfer. Mutual capture of the reaction partners within a possible reaction zone is caused by the physical interaction between an ion and a polar molecule. A model is discussed. Results are presented. (author)

  20. (e,2e) reactions on atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    At high enough incident energy and for high enough momentum transfer an incident electron interacts with a single electron of a target atom or molecule, cleanly removing it and leaving the residual ion in one of its spectrum of quantum states. Under these conditions the dynamics of the reaction simply involves a two-electron collision, the target electron having a momentum given by the structure of the target and ion, and equal and opposite to the recoil momentum of the ion. Since two-electron collisions are well understood (Mott scattering) the reaction is the basis of the understanding of the energy and momentum structure of the target and ion known as electron momentum spectroscopy

  1. Ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of ions with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V.; Huntress, W.T. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of H 2 + , HeH + , and CO 2 + ions with hydrogen atoms, and the reactions of D 2 + , CO 2 + , CO + , N 2 + and HCN + with deuterium atoms, were studied using ion cyclotron resonance techniques. These reactions proceed predominantly via a charge transfer mechanism. The rate constants measured are: 6.4, 9.1, 1.1, 5.0, 0.84, 0.90, 1.2, and 0.37 x 10 -10 cm 3 /sec, respectively. Hydrocarbon ions of the types CH/sub n/ + and C 2 H/sub n/ + , where n=2--4, do not react with H or D atoms

  2. Transfer and breakup reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The origin of the quasi-elastic peak in peripheral heavy-ion reactions is discussed in terms of inelastic scattering and transfer reactions to unbound states of the primary projectile-like fragment. The situation is analogous to the use of reverse kinematics in fusion reactions, a technique in which the object of study is moving with nearly the beam velocity. It appears that several important features of the quasi-elastic peak may be explained by this approach. Projectile-breakup reactions have attractive features for the study of nuclear structure. They may also be used to determine the partition of excitation energy in peripheral reactions. At intermediate energies, neutron-pickup reactions leading to four-body final states become important. Examples of experiments are presented that illustrate these points. 15 refs., 14 figs

  3. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi

    2007-04-01

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp 3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  4. Hydropersulfides: H-Atom Transfer Agents Par Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Jean-Philippe R; Griesser, Markus; Pratt, Derek A

    2017-05-10

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are formed endogenously via the reaction of the gaseous biotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and disulfides (RSSR) and/or sulfenic acids (RSOH). RSSH have been investigated for their ability to store H 2 S in vivo and as a line of defense against oxidative stress, from which it is clear that RSSH are much more reactive to two-electron oxidants than thiols. Herein we describe the results of our investigations into the H-atom transfer chemistry of RSSH, contrasting it with the well-known H-atom transfer chemistry of thiols. In fact, RSSH are excellent H-atom donors to alkyl (k ∼ 5 × 10 8 M -1 s -1 ), alkoxyl (k ∼ 1 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 ), peroxyl (k ∼ 2 × 10 6 M -1 s -1 ), and thiyl (k > 1 × 10 10 M -1 s -1 ) radicals, besting thiols by as little as 1 order and as much as 4 orders of magnitude. The inherently high reactivity of RSSH to H-atom transfer is based largely on thermodynamic factors; the weak RSS-H bond dissociation enthalpy (∼70 kcal/mol) and the associated high stability of the perthiyl radical make the foregoing reactions exothermic by 15-34 kcal/mol. Of particular relevance in the context of oxidative stress is the reactivity of RSSH to peroxyl radicals, where favorable thermodynamics are bolstered by a secondary orbital interaction in the transition state of the formal H-atom transfer that drives the inherent reactivity of RSSH to match that of α-tocopherol (α-TOH), nature's premier radical-trapping antioxidant. Significantly, the reactivity of RSSH eclipses that of α-TOH in H-bond-accepting media because of their low H-bond acidity (α 2 H ∼ 0.1). This affords RSSH a unique versatility compared to other highly reactive radical-trapping antioxidants (e.g., phenols, diarylamines, hydroxylamines, sulfenic acids), which tend to have high H-bond acidities. Moreover, the perthiyl radicals that result are highly persistent under autoxidation conditions and undergo very rapid dimerization (k = 5 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 ) in

  5. Selectivity in heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucenna, A.

    1989-01-01

    One-two-and three-nucleon stripping reactions induced by 480 MeV 12 C and by 793 MeV 16 O have been studied on 12 C, 16 O, 28 Si, 40 Ca, and 54 Fe targets. Discrete levels are fed with cross sections up to 1 mb/sr for d-transfer reactions and one and two orders of magnitude less for 2p- and 3 He-transfers, respectively. These reactions are governed by two selection rules contained in the semi-classical model of Brink: i) Large orbital final momentum states are selectively populated and ii) The most highly populated states correspond to no-flip transitions. Two-proton transfer reactions induced by 112 MeV 12 C on even Ni and Zn isotopes are found to be less selective than two-neutron transfer reactions induced by the same projectile on the same targets in a similar incident energy range. The additional collective aspects observed in the two-proton transfers are examined in view of a semiphenomenological model of two quasi-particles coupled to a triaxial asymmetric rotor. The energy of excited states is well reproduced by simple shell model calculations. Such estimates are useful in proposing spins of newly observed states, especially as the shapes of the measured angular distributions are independant of the final spin of the residual nucleus. The experimental results of two-proton and two-neutron stripping reactions and the simple shell model allow an estimate of two-body matrix elements describing the nucleon-nucleon interaction and of the Coulomb energy [fr

  6. Hydrogen transfer reactions of interstellar Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, S.; Russ, P.; Kästner, J.; Lamberts, T.

    2018-06-01

    Radical recombination has been proposed to lead to the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in CO-rich ices in the early stages of star formation. These COMs can then undergo hydrogen addition and abstraction reactions leading to a higher or lower degree of saturation. Here, we have studied 14 hydrogen transfer reactions for the molecules glyoxal, glycoaldehyde, ethylene glycol, and methylformate and an additional three reactions where CHnO fragments are involved. Over-the-barrier reactions are possible only if tunneling is invoked in the description at low temperature. Therefore the rate constants for the studied reactions are calculated using instanton theory that takes quantum effects into account inherently. The reactions were characterized in the gas phase, but this is expected to yield meaningful results for CO-rich ices due to the minimal alteration of reaction landscapes by the CO molecules. We found that rate constants should not be extrapolated based on the height of the barrier alone, since the shape of the barrier plays an increasingly larger role at decreasing temperature. It is neither possible to predict rate constants based only on considering the type of reaction, the specific reactants and functional groups play a crucial role. Within a single molecule, though, hydrogen abstraction from an aldehyde group seems to be always faster than hydrogen addition to the same carbon atom. Reactions that involve heavy-atom tunneling, e.g., breaking or forming a C-C or C-O bond, have rate constants that are much lower than those where H transfer is involved.

  7. Atoms in molecules, an axiomatic approach. I. Maximum transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Paul W.

    2000-12-01

    Central to chemistry is the concept of transferability: the idea that atoms and functional groups retain certain characteristic properties in a wide variety of environments. Providing a completely satisfactory mathematical basis for the concept of atoms in molecules, however, has proved difficult. The present article pursues an axiomatic basis for the concept of an atom within a molecule, with particular emphasis devoted to the definition of transferability and the atomic description of Hirshfeld.

  8. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  9. Charge transfer reactions in Xe plasma expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, C. Q.; Garscadden, A.; Ganguly, B. N.

    2007-01-01

    Charge transfer reactions of fast Xe ions with hydrocarbons including methane (CH 4 ), ethene (C 2 H 4 ), and propane (C 3 H 8 ) are studied by adding these hydrocarbon gases into a cross flowing Xe plasma expansion. Branching ratios and relative reaction rates for the charge transfers of fast Xe + with each of the three hydrocarbon gases are measured under different rf powers of the inductively coupled Xe discharge. For CH 4 /Xe system, we find that fast Xe + reacts readily with CH 4 generating CH 4 + and CH 3 + in a ratio of 1:0.56, with an estimated rate coefficient of (2.3±0.3)x10 -10 cm 3 /s at 75 W rf power which slowly increases to (2.9±0.3)x10 -10 cm 3 /s at 250 W (error bars reflect only the uncertainties due to the unknown extent of the ion recombination that follows the charge transfer reaction). These observed charge transfer reactions are made possible by the kinetically excited Xe ions produced by free expansion of the plasma. For the C 2 H 4 /Xe system product ions C 2 H 4 + and C 2 H 2 + are observed, and for C 3 H 8 /Xe, C 2 H 4 + and C 2 H 5 + and minor product ions including C 2 H 2 + and C 3 H 7 + are observed

  10. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...... and asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended...

  11. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms? This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs

  12. Atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl acrylate catalyzed by atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl acrylate catalyzed by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Linde, van der R.

    2002-01-01

    The homogeneous atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of n-butyl acrylate with CuBr/N-(n-hexyl)-2-pyridylmethanimine as a catalyst and ethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate as an initiator was investigated. The kinetic plots of ln([M]0/[M]) versus the reaction time for the ATRP systems in different

  13. Insights into the Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of the Blue Aroxyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächle, Josua; Marković, Marijana; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2017-10-19

    An experimental and theoretical study on hydrogen-atom transfer dynamics in the hydrogen-bonded substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex of the blue aroxyl (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) is presented. The experimental exchange dynamics is determined in different organic solvents from the temperature-dependent alternating line-width effect in the continuous-wave ESR spectrum. From bent Arrhenius plots, effective tunnelling contributions with parallel heavy-atom motion are concluded. To clarify the transfer mechanism, reaction paths for different conformers of the substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex are modelled theoretically. Various DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods including multireference methods are applied. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical data it is concluded that the system favours concerted hydrogen-atom transfer along a parabolic reaction path caused by heavy-atom motion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The pentafluorostyrene endeavours with atom transfer radical polymerization - quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The versatility of the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of pentafluorostyrene (FS) is comprehensively evaluated. The ATRP of a wide range of monomers derived from FS is likewise discussed with emphasis on the potential polymer applications. A large number of block and star copolymers...... centred around polypentafluorostyrene (PFS) and prepared primarily using the bromomacroinitiator concept is surveyed. Here the main emphasis is on the feasibility of the polymer design, but also the very many different applications are highlighted. The potential grafting onto PFS and PFS block copolymers...... by exploitation of the very labile para-fluorine demonstrates new material architecture possibilities through very mild reaction conditions. Finally the utility of PFS in various conducting materials is elaborated. The amphiphilic nature of PFS in triblock copolymers with polyethers has been exploited for Li+ ion...

  15. Proton-coupled electron transfer versus hydrogen atom transfer: generation of charge-localized diabatic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-03-24

    The distinction between proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms is important for the characterization of many chemical and biological processes. PCET and HAT mechanisms can be differentiated in terms of electronically nonadiabatic and adiabatic proton transfer, respectively. In this paper, quantitative diagnostics to evaluate the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity are presented. Moreover, the connection between the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity and the physical characteristics distinguishing PCET from HAT, namely, the extent of electronic charge redistribution, is clarified. In addition, a rigorous diabatization scheme for transforming the adiabatic electronic states into charge-localized diabatic states for PCET reactions is presented. These diabatic states are constructed to ensure that the first-order nonadiabatic couplings with respect to the one-dimensional transferring hydrogen coordinate vanish exactly. Application of these approaches to the phenoxyl-phenol and benzyl-toluene systems characterizes the former as PCET and the latter as HAT. The diabatic states generated for the phenoxyl-phenol system possess physically meaningful, localized electronic charge distributions that are relatively invariant along the hydrogen coordinate. These diabatic electronic states can be combined with the associated proton vibrational states to generate the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states that form the basis of nonadiabatic PCET theories. Furthermore, these vibronic states and the corresponding vibronic couplings may be used to calculate rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of PCET reactions.

  16. Reactions the private life of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Through an innovative, closely integrated design of images and text, and his characteristically clear, precise, and economical exposition, Peter Atkins explains the processes involved in chemical reactions. He begins by introducing a 'tool kit' of basic reactions, such as precipitation, corrosion, and catalysis, and concludes by showing how these building blocks are brought together in more complex processes such as photosynthesis.

  17. Single-Atom Catalysts of Precious Metals for Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2018-01-10

    Single-atom catalysts (SACs), in which metal atoms are dispersed on the support without forming nanoparticles, have been used for various heterogeneous reactions and most recently for electrochemical reactions. In this Minireview, recent examples of single-atom electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are introduced. Many density functional theory (DFT) simulations have predicted that SACs may be effective for CO 2 reduction to methane or methanol production while suppressing H 2 evolution, and those cases are introduced here as well. Single atoms, mainly Pt single atoms, have been deposited on TiN or TiC nanoparticles, defective graphene nanosheets, N-doped covalent triazine frameworks, graphitic carbon nitride, S-doped zeolite-templated carbon, and Sb-doped SnO 2 surfaces. Scanning transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement, and in situ infrared spectroscopy have been used to detect the single-atom structure and confirm the absence of nanoparticles. SACs have shown high mass activity, minimizing the use of precious metal, and unique selectivity distinct from nanoparticle catalysts owing to the absence of ensemble sites. Additional features that SACs should possess for effective electrochemical applications were also suggested. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H 2 /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C 2 H 2 /minus/> C 2 HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs

  19. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  20. Conformational dependence of a protein kinase phosphate transfer reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labute, Montiago; Henkelman, Graeme; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore, Paul; McMahon, Ben

    2007-03-01

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase have been calculated using plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 20-kJ/mol barrier, whereas phosphate transfer is unfavorable by 120 kJ/mol in the RC, with an even higher barrier. Our results demonstrate that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by changes of a few tenths of an angstrom in the catalytic site [1]. [1] G.H. Henkelman, M.X. LaBute, C.-S. Tung, P.W. Fenimore, B.H. McMahon, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA vol. 102, no. 43:15347-15351 (2005).

  1. When hydroquinone meets methoxy radical: Hydrogen abstraction reaction from the viewpoint of interacting quantum atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Milena; Nakarada, Đura; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2018-05-25

    Interacting Quantum Atoms methodology is used for a detailed analysis of hydrogen abstraction reaction from hydroquinone by methoxy radical. Two pathways are analyzed, which differ in the orientation of the reactants at the corresponding transition states. Although the discrepancy between the two barriers amounts to only 2 kJ/mol, which implies that the two pathways are of comparable probability, the extent of intra-atomic and inter-atomic energy changes differs considerably. We thus demonstrated that Interacting Quantum Atoms procedure can be applied to unravel distinct energy transfer routes in seemingly similar mechanisms. Identification of energy components with the greatest contribution to the variation of the overall energy (intra-atomic and inter-atomic terms that involve hydroquinone's oxygen and the carbon atom covalently bound to it, the transferring hydrogen and methoxy radical's oxygen), is performed using the Relative energy gradient method. Additionally, the Interacting Quantum Fragments approach shed light on the nature of dominant interactions among selected fragments: both Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are of comparable importance when considering interactions of the transferring hydrogen atom with all other atoms, whereas the exchange-correlation term dominates interaction between methoxy radical's methyl group and hydroquinone's aromatic ring. This study represents one of the first applications of Interacting Quantum Fragments approach on first order saddle points. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  3. Signatures of a quantum diffusion limited hydrogen atom tunneling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanoff, Morgan E; Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2017-12-20

    We are studying the details of hydrogen atom (H atom) quantum diffusion in highly enriched parahydrogen (pH 2 ) quantum solids doped with chemical species in an effort to better understand H atom transport and reactivity under these conditions. In this work we present kinetic studies of the 193 nm photo-induced chemistry of methanol (CH 3 OH) isolated in solid pH 2 . Short-term irradiation of CH 3 OH at 1.8 K readily produces CH 2 O and CO which we detect using FTIR spectroscopy. The in situ photochemistry also produces CH 3 O and H atoms which we can infer from the post-photolysis reaction kinetics that display significant CH 2 OH growth. The CH 2 OH growth kinetics indicate at least three separate tunneling reactions contribute; (i) reactions of photoproduced CH 3 O with the pH 2 host, (ii) H atom reactions with the CH 2 O photofragment, and (iii) long-range migration of H atoms and reaction with CH 3 OH. We assign the rapid CH 2 OH growth to the following CH 3 O + H 2 → CH 3 OH + H → CH 2 OH + H 2 two-step sequential tunneling mechanism by conducting analogous kinetic measurements using deuterated methanol (CD 3 OD). By performing photolysis experiments at 1.8 and 4.3 K, we show the post-photolysis reaction kinetics change qualitatively over this small temperature range. We use this qualitative change in the reaction kinetics with temperature to identify reactions that are quantum diffusion limited. While these results are specific to the conditions that exist in pH 2 quantum solids, they have direct implications on the analogous low temperature H atom tunneling reactions that occur on metal surfaces and on interstellar grains.

  4. Kinetics of chemical reactions initiated by hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1977-01-01

    Modern ideas about kinetics of chemical reactions of hot atoms are generalized. The main points of the phenomenological theories (''kinetic theory'' of Wolfgang-Estrup hot reactions and the theory of ''reactions integral probability'' of Porter) are given. Physico-chemical models of elastic and non-elastic collisions are considered which are used in solving Boltzmann integro-differential equations and stochastic equations in the Porter theory. The principal formulas are given describing probabilities or yields of chemical reactions, initiated with hot atoms, depending on the distribution functions of hot particles with respect to energy. Briefly described are the techniques and the results of applying the phenomenological theories for interpretation of the experimental data obtained during nuclear reactions with hot atoms, photochemical investigations, etc. 96 references are given

  5. Chemical reactions of recoil atoms and thermal atoms of tritium with haloid benzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1978-01-01

    Radiochemical yields have been determined for the products of substitution of hydrogen atoms and halides in Cl-, Br-, and I-benzenes with tritium atoms obtained during thermal dissociation of T 2 and with recoil atoms T arising in nuclear reaction 6 Li(n, P)T. It is shown that in the series of Cl-, Br-, and I-benzenes yields of the products of substitution of halides atoms with tritium grow, whereas those of hydrogen atom substitution change only little. The correlation nature of the yields of substitution products of halide atoms with tritium remains constant in a wide range of the initial kinetic energies of T atoms for the recoil atoms with E 0 =2.7 MeV and for the completely thermolized atoms during thermal dissociation of T 2

  6. Nuclear transfer in peripheral heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the whole thesis is to understand the experimental results of N. Frascaria et al. (1980), namely structures in the cross section as function of the excitation energy for the reaction 40 Ca + 40 Ca at 400 MeV incident energy. We present therefore in chapter 1 a simple model of two identical potentials with only two energy levels. On the base of statistically independent T-L excitations and by fitting a two parameters to the experiments it succeeds to reproduce sufficiently the experimental results. The next step is a microscopical treatment of these parameters for the understanding and the foundation of the fitted values. For this we develop in chapter 2 a theory of collective variables in the framework of TDHF which allows to perform in chapter 3 in a very transparent way microscopical calculations and especially to understand the transfer behaviour in peripheral heavy ion reactions. This transfer behaviour will also be the key for the understanding of the experimental structures. (orig.) [de

  7. Hydrolysis of 4-Acetoxystyrene Polymers Prepared by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xianyi; Jankova, Katja; Kops, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Hydrolysis of 4-acetoxystyrene polymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization was carried out under various reaction conditions. It was found that hydrazinolysis of 4-acetoxystyrene homopolymers, random and block copolymers with styrene in 1,4-dioxane, afforded the corresponding narrow...

  8. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  9. Spin transfer in reactions between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Pil Min.

    1980-06-01

    The model presented affords a better understanding of the manner in which the orbital angular moment can be converted into an intrinsic spin in the collision between two heavy ions. After referring to the vector fields and the collective energy of a spheroidal nucleus, the calculation of the exchange of nucleons is described and the dissipation function is constructed. The spin transfer and the reorientation of the spin during the reaction are then examined (effect of friction and vibration). The estimated calculations are compared with the results of the 63 Cu+ 197 Au and 86 Kr+ 209 Bi experiments. The sensitivity of the calculation to the parameters of the model is discussed (nuclear potential, vibrational inertial parameter) [fr

  10. Electron transfer reactions of metal complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.

    1977-01-01

    A few representative electron-transfer reactions are selected and their kinetic parameters compared with the predictions of activated complex models. Since Taube has presented an elegant treatment of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions, emphasis is on bimolecular reactions. The latter electron-transfer reactions are more complicated to treat theoretically since the geometries of their activated complexes are not as well known as for the intramolecular case. In addition in biomolecular reactions, the work required to bring the two reactants together needs to be calculated. Since both reactants generally carry charges this presents a non-trivial problem at the ionic strengths usually used to study bimolecular electron transfer

  11. Proton transfers in the Strecker reaction revealed by DFT calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamabe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Strecker reaction of acetaldehyde, NH3, and HCN to afford alanine was studied by DFT calculations for the first time, which involves two reaction stages. In the first reaction stage, the aminonitrile was formed. The rate-determining step is the deprotonation of the NH3+ group in MeCH(OH-NH3+ to form 1-aminoethanol, which occurs with an activation energy barrier (ΔE≠ of 9.6 kcal/mol. The stereochemistry (R or S of the aminonitrile product is determined at the NH3 addition step to the carbonyl carbon of the aldehyde. While the addition of CN− to the carbon atom of the protonated imine 7 appears to scramble the stereochemistry, the water cluster above the imine plane reinforces the CN− to attack the imine group below the plane. The enforcement hinders the scrambling. In the second stage, the aminonitrile transforms to alanine, where an amide Me-CH(NH2-C(=O-NH2 is the key intermediate. The rate-determining step is the hydrolysis of the cyano group of N(amino-protonated aminonitrile which occurs with an ΔE≠ value of 34.7 kcal/mol. In the Strecker reaction, the proton transfer along the hydrogen bonds plays a crucial role.

  12. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu .

  13. Labelling of macromoleculear carbohydrates by means of 'Hot Atom' reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of polysaccharides have been performed using atoms with such high kinetic energy that they can break normally very stable bindings thus permitting labelling by substitution reactions. Such atoms can be produced in nuclear transformations. We have chosen to study the labelling efficiency of 'hot atoms' ( 77 Br, 123 I and 125 I) produced in radioactive decay (β + -decay and E.C.) of noble gas nuclides ( 77 Kr, 123 Xe and 125 Xe) which easily could be brought in close contact with the molecule to be labelled. Substances to be labelled have been starch particles and high molecular weight glycogen. (author)

  14. Energy transfers between N_2(A"3Σ) nitrogen metastable molecules and oxygen atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, Antonio Rogerio

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis aims at determining reaction coefficients for energy transfers between nitrogen in its metastable status and oxygen atoms and molecules, the variation of these coefficients with respect to temperature (mainly in the 200-400 K range), products formed and more particularly branching rates of O("1S) oxygen and of NO_2. Reaction coefficients are experimentally determined by using the technique of post-discharge in flow. The experimental set-up is described and the study of the best operating conditions is reported. In the next part, the author reports the study of the energy transfer between nitrogen in its metastable status N_2(A) and oxygen molecules. Reaction coefficients are determined for the first three vibrational levels. The author then reports the study of the transfer of N_2(A) molecules on oxygen atoms in their fundamental status. Reactions coefficients and their variations are determined for the three first vibrational levels. The author describes the dissociation method and the method of detection of atomic oxygen. A kinetic model is proposed for the analysis of formed products during a post-discharge in flow, and the branching rate for the formation of O("1S) oxygen between 190 and 365 K is determined. The author finally discusses publications on the role of these reactions in the interpretation of some atmospheric phenomena

  15. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    Basic atomic-collision processes at intermediate and high energies are being studied theoretically at Penn State by Alston and Winter. In the high velocity regime, single-electron capture is treated using a high order multiple-scattering approach; extensive comparison with experiment and analysis of mechanisms have been made. Fitting the calculated amplitude with a simple analytic form, the asymptotic velocity dependence of the cross section is obtained. The effect on the capture amplitude of altering the inner part of the internuclear potential has also been explored. In the intermediate velocity regime, earlier work on collisions between protons and hydrogenic-ion targets using a coupled-state approach is being extended to the two-electron helium target. 29 refs

  16. [Electron transfer, ionization and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental atomic-collision processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation. Winter has focussed attention on intermediate and, more recently, higher collision energies -- proton energies of at least about 50 keV -- for which coupled-state approaches are appropriate. Alston has concentrated on perturbative approaches to symmetric ion-ion/atom collisions at high energies and to asymmetric collisions at intermediate to high energies

  17. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of μ -p atoms in each target. The rates λ ppμ and λ pd can be extracted

  18. Atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene under pulsed microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Zhenping; Zhu Xiulin; Zhou Nianchen; Zhu Jian; Zhang Zhengbiao

    2005-01-01

    A homogeneous solution atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) of styrene (St) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) were successfully carried out under pulsed microwave irradiation (PMI), using 1-bromo-1-phenylethane (1-PEBr)/CuCl/N,N,N',N'',N''-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) as an initiating system at 85 deg. C and 2,2'-azo-bis-isobutyrontrile (AIBN)/CuCl 2 /PMDETA as an initiating system at 95 deg. C, respectively. The polymerization rates under PMI were greatly increased in comparison with those under identical conventional heating (CH)

  19. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  20. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm-2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW-1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  1. Monomode microwave-assisted atom transfer radical polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    The first monomode microwave-assisted atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is reported. The ATRP of methyl methacrylate was successfully performed with microwave heating, which was well controlled and provided almost the same results as experiments with conventional heating, demonstrating the

  2. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF 6 , tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10 10 -10 11 /cm 3 ) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO 2 , Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films

  3. Collisions involving energy transfer between atoms with large angular moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, Yu.A.; Galitskij, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    Study is made of the collisions of excited and nonexcited atoms with a small resonance defect, assuming that the excited and ground states of each atom are bound via an allowed dipole transition and that intrinsic moments of states are great. In such an approximation the atomic interaction is defined by a dipole-dipole interaction operator. Equations for amplitudes are derived for two cases: (1) the first atom is in an excited state while the second is in the ground state and (2) the first atom is in the ground state while the second is in an excited state. The problem is solved in the approximation that the moments of the excited and ground states of each atom are equal. An expression for the excitation transfer cross section is written down. Analysis of this expression shows that the excitation transfer cross section at first increases with removal from the exact resonance and reaches resonance at lambda approximately 0.1 (lambda is a dimensionless parameter which is equal to the ratio of the resonance defect Δ to the interaction at spacings of the order of the Weisskopf radius). Only at lambda >0.16 does the cross section become smaller than the resonance one. This effect is due to the interaction Hamiltonian approximation adopted in the present study

  4. Radical zinc-atom-transfer-based carbozincation of haloalkynes with dialkylzincs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Chemla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of alkylidenezinc carbenoids by 1,4-addition/carbozincation of dialkylzincs or alkyl iodides based on zinc atom radical transfer, in the presence of dimethylzinc with β-(propargyloxyenoates having pendant iodo- and bromoalkynes, is disclosed. Formation of the carbenoid intermediate is fully stereoselective at −30 °C and arises from a formal anti-selective carbozincation reaction. Upon warming, the zinc carbenoid is stereochemically labile and isomerizes to its more stable form.

  5. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; Toth, L.M.; Yustein, J.T.; Andrews, L.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O 2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO 2 and UO 3 . In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO 2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16 O 2 / 18 O 2 experiments which failed to produce 16 OU 18 O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O 2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO 2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO 2+ 2 )(O 2- 2 ) and (UO + 2 )(O - 2 ), and a weak complex, UO 3 --O 2 , were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O 2 reactions. Similar U atom and N 2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N 2 . Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN 2 --N 2 and UN 2 --2N 2 complexes

  6. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Rodney D.; Toth, L. Mac; Yustein, Jason T.; Andrews, Lester

    1993-10-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO2 and UO3. In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16O2/18O2 experiments which failed to produce 16OU18O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO2+2)(O2-2) and (UO+2)(O-2), and a weak complex, UO3-O2, were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O2 reactions. Similar U atom and N2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N2. Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN2-N2 and UN2-2N2 complexes.

  7. Barium atoms and N20 molecular agregates reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visticot, J.P.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Alcaraz, C.; Cuvellier, J.; Berlande, J.

    1988-06-01

    The collisions between a barium atom and N20 molecular agregates are studied, for a better understanding of the solvation part in a chemical reaction. The experiments are carried out in a crossed molecular beam device. The light coming from the collision zone is scattered, and analysed by means of a photon detector. A time-of-flight technique is applied in the investigation of the beam's polymer concentration. The results show a nearly negligible chemiluminescent effect in the reaction between barium and N20 polymer. A solvated BaO formation mechanism is proposed to justify the experimental results [fr

  8. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  9. Polarization transfer in (d-vector,n-vector) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, R.L.; Tornow, W.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the measurements and the role of polarization transfer coefficients for (d/sup →/,n/sup →/) reactions is reviewed. Emphasis is given to reactions, involving light-nuclei systems. The importance of (d/sup →/,n/sup →/) reactions as sources of polarized neutrons is pointed out

  10. Droplet heat transfer and chemical reactions during direct containment heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer and chemical reaction has been adapted to evaluate the expected behavior of droplets containing unreacted Zircaloy and stainless steel moving through the containment atmosphere during postulated accidents involving direct containment heating. The model includes internal and external diffusive resistances to reaction. The results indicate that reactions will be incomplete for many conditions characteristic of direct containment heating sequences

  11. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local modes immersed in the continuum harmonic medium is formulated for both classical and quantum regimes, and accounts explicitly for the mode/medium interaction. The kinetics of the energy exchange between the local ET subsystem and the surrounding environment essentially determine the total ET rate. The efficient computer code for rate computations is elaborated on. The computations are available for a wide range of system parameters, such as the temperature, external field, local mode frequency, and characteristics of mode/medium interaction. The relation of the

  12. Bimolecular reactions of carbenes: Proton transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saleh, Abd Al-Aziz A.; Almatarneh, Mansour H.; Poirier, Raymond A.

    2018-04-01

    Here we report the bimolecular reaction of trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene conformers and the water-mediated mechanism of the 1,2-proton shift for the unimolecular trans-conformer by using quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVDZ potential-energy profile of the bimolecular reaction of cis- and trans-trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene, shows the lowest gas-phase barrier height of 13 kJ mol-1 compared to the recently reported value of 128 kJ mol-1 for the unimolecular reaction. We expect bimolecular reactions of carbene's stereoisomers will open a valuable field for new and useful synthetic strategies.

  13. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  14. Fe electron transfer and atom exchange in goethite: influence of Al-substitution and anion sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Drew E; Bachman, Jonathan E; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-10-02

    The reaction of Fe(II) with Fe(III) oxides and hydroxides is complex and includes sorption of Fe(II) to the oxide, electron transfer between sorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III), reductive dissolution coupled to Fe atom exchange, and, in some cases mineral phase transformation. Much of the work investigating electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides has been done under relatively simple aqueous conditions in organic buffers to control pH and background electrolytes to control ionic strength. Here, we investigate whether electron transfer is influenced by cation substitution of Al(III) in goethite and the presence of anions such as phosphate, carbonate, silicate, and natural organic matter. Results from (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy indicate that both Al-substitution (up to 9%) and the presence of common anions (PO(4)(3-), CO(3)(2-), SiO(4)(4-), and humic acid) does not inhibit electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) in goethite under the conditions we studied. In contrast, sorption of a long-chain phospholipid completely shuts down electron transfer. Using an enriched isotope tracer method, we found that Al-substitution in goethite (10%), does, however, significantly decrease the extent of atom exchange between Fe(II) and goethite (from 43 to 12%) over a month's time. Phosphate, somewhat surprisingly, appears to have little effect on the rate and extent of atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite. Our results show that electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and solid Fe(III) in goethite can occur under wide range of geochemical conditions, but that the extent of redox-driven Fe atom exchange may be dependent on the presence of substituting cations such as Al.

  15. Transfer matrix treatment of atomic chemisorption on transition metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariz, A.M.; Koiller, B.

    1980-05-01

    The atomic adsorption of hydrogen on paramagnetic nickel 100 surface is studied, using the Green's function formalism and the transfer matrix technique, which allows the treatment of the geometry of the system in a simple manner. Electronic correlation at the adatom orbital in a self consistent Hartree-Fock approach is incorporated. The adsorption energy, local density of states and charge transfer between the solid and the adatom are calculated for different crystal structures (sc and fcc) and adatom positions at the surface. The results are discussed in comparison with other theories and with available experimental data, with satisfactory agreement. (Author) [pt

  16. Living atom transfer radical polymerization of 4-acetoxystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Bo; Chen, Xianyi; Ivan, Bela

    1997-01-01

    Living atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-acetoxystyrene (1), a protected 4-vinylphenol, leading to poly(4-acetoxystyrene) with well-defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution was carried out in bulk with a,a'-dibromoxylene(2)/CuBr/2,2-bipyridine(bpy) as initi......Living atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-acetoxystyrene (1), a protected 4-vinylphenol, leading to poly(4-acetoxystyrene) with well-defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution was carried out in bulk with a,a'-dibromoxylene(2)/CuBr/2,2-bipyridine......(bpy) as initiating system. A linear (M) over bar(n), versus monomer conversion plot was found in good accordance with the theoretical line, indicating 100% initiating efficiency. The polymerization is first order in respect to monomer up to about 70% monomer conversion. Deviations from linearity at higher conversion...

  17. Kinematical coincidence method in transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, L.; Amorini, F. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Berceanu, I. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Cardella, G., E-mail: cardella@ct.infn.it [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Chatterjiee, M.B. [Saha Institute for Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); De Filippo, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Francalanza, L.; Gianì, R. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Grzeszczuk, A. [Institut of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); La Guidara, E. [INFN—Sezione di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Facoltà di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lombardo, I. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Loria, D.; Minniti, T. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina (Italy); Pagano, E.V. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-07-01

    A new method to extract high resolution angular distributions from kinematical coincidence measurements in binary reactions is presented. Kinematics is used to extract the center of mass angular distribution from the measured energy spectrum of light particles. Results obtained in the case of {sup 10}Be+p→{sup 9}Be+d reaction measured with the CHIMERA detector are shown. An angular resolution of few degrees in the center of mass is obtained. The range of applicability of the method is discussed.

  18. Symmetric large momentum transfer for atom interferometry with BECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We develop and demonstrate a novel scheme for a symmetric large momentum transfer beam splitter for interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates. Large momentum transfer beam splitters are a key technique to enhance the scaling factor and sensitivity of an atom interferometer and to create largely delocalized superposition states. To realize the beam splitter, double Bragg diffraction is used to create a superposition of two symmetric momentum states. Afterwards both momentum states are loaded into a retro-reflected optical lattice and accelerated by Bloch oscillations on opposite directions, keeping the initial symmetry. The favorable scaling behavior of this symmetric acceleration, allows to transfer more than 1000 ℏk of total differential splitting in a single acceleration sequence of 6 ms duration while we still maintain a fraction of approx. 25% of the initial atom number. As a proof of the coherence of this beam splitter, contrast in a closed Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer has been observed with up to 208 ℏk of momentum separation, which equals a differential wave-packet velocity of approx. 1.1 m/s for 87Rb. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1128 geo-Q and the DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm).

  19. Alkyl hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of the CN radical with ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of the abstraction of alkyl hydrogen atoms from the β and α positions of ethanol by the CN radical in solution using the Empirical Valence Bond (EVB) method. We have built separate 2 × 2 EVB models for the Hβ and Hα reactions, where the atom transfer is parameterized using ab initio calculations. The intra- and intermolecular potentials of the reactant and product molecules were modelled with the General AMBER Force Field, with some modifications. We have carried out the dynamics in water and chloroform, which are solvents of contrasting polarity. We have computed the potential of mean force for both abstractions in each of the solvents. They are found to have a small and early barrier along the reaction coordinate with a large energy release. Analyzing the solvent structure around the reaction system, we have found two solvents to have little effect on either reaction. Simulating the dynamics from the transition state, we also study the fate of the energies in the HCN vibrational modes. The HCN molecule is born vibrationally hot in the CH stretch in both reactions and additionally in the HCN bends for the Hα abstraction reaction. In the early stage of the dynamics, we find that the CN stretch mode gains energy at the expense of the energy in CH stretch mode.

  20. Probing cluster structures through sub-barrier transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafferty D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleon transfer probabilities and excitation energy distributions have been measured in 16,18O, 19F + 208Pb at energies between 90% - 100% of the Coulomb barrier. A strong 2p2n enhancement is observed for all reactions, though most spectacularly in the 18O induced reaction. Results are interpreted in terms of the Semiclassical model, which seems to suggest α-cluster transfer in all studied systems. The relation to cluster-states in the projectile is discussed, with the experimental results consistent with previous structure studies. Dissipation of energy in the collisions of 18O is compared between different reaction modes, with cluster transfer associated with dissipation over a large number of internal states. Cluster transfer is shown to be a long range dissipation mechanism, which will inform the development of future models to treat these dynamic processes in reactions.

  1. Search for low spin superdeformed states by transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blons, J; Goutte, D; Lepretre, A; Lucas, R; Meot, V; Paya, D; Phan, X H [DAPNIA SPhN CE Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barreau, G; Doan, T P; Pedemay, G [CENBG, 33175 Gradignan (France); Becker, J A; Stoyer, M A [LLNL, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    We present a specific experimental technique aiming to observe superdeformed isomeric states. Preliminary results on two proton transfer reaction on platinum targets leading to {sup 194}Hg are shown. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Activation barriers for series of exothermic homologous reactions. VI. Reactions of lanthanide and transition metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Alan S.; Fontijn, Arthur

    2001-09-01

    Semiempirical configuration interaction (SECI) theory to predict activation barriers, E, as given by k(T)=ATn exp(-E(RT), has been applied to homologous series of lanthanide (LN) and transition metal (TM) atom oxidation reactions. This was achieved by considering as homologous series reactions of elements differing only by the number of electrons in one subshell. Comparison between SECI and experimental results leads to an average deviation for the LN+N2O reactions of 0.66 kJ mol-1, and up to 5.5 kJ mol-1 for other series. Thirty-one activation barriers are reported.

  3. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  4. Coherent and semi-coherent neutron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions are proposed to account for anomalies reported in Pons-Fleischmann experiments. The prototypical reaction involves the transfer of a neutron (mediated by low frequency electric or magnetic fields) from a donor nucleus to virtual continuum states, followed by the capture of the virtual neutron by an acceptor nucleus. In this work we summarize basic principles, recent results and the ultimate goals of the theoretical effort. (author)

  5. Coherent and semi-coherent neutron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions are proposed to account for anomalies reported in Pons-Fleischmann experiments. The prototypical reaction involves the transfer of a neutron (mediated by low frequency electric or magnetic fields) from a donor nucleus to virtual continuum states, followed by the capture of the virtual neutron by an acceptor nucleus. In this work we summarize basic principles, recent results and the ultimate goals of the theoretical effort

  6. One-nucleon transfer reactions and the optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, F M; Ross, A; Titus, L J; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Mahzoon, M H; Sarich, J; Wild, S M

    2015-01-01

    We provide a summary of new developments in the area of direct reaction theory with a particular focus on one-nucleon transfer reactions. We provide a status of the methods available for describing (d,p) reactions. We discuss the effects of nonlocality in the optical potential in transfer reactions. The results of a purely phenomenological potential and the optical potential obtained from the dispersive optical model are compared; both point toward the importance of including nonlocality in transfer reactions explicitly. Given the large ambiguities associated with optical potentials, we discuss some new developments toward the quantification of this uncertainty. We conclude with some general comments and a brief account of new advances that are in the pipeline.

  7. Tem holder for sample transfer under reaction conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) studies are usually performed using conventional sample holders in a dedicated ETEM [1] or in a traditional TEM by use of a dedicated high-pressure cell sample holder [2]. In both cases, the setup defines the conditions regarding gas, pressure......]. Furthermore, dedicated transfer holders have been used to transfer catalyst samples between reactor set-ups and TEM at room temperature in inert atmosphere [5]. To take the full advantage of complementary in situ techniques, transfer under reactions conditions is essential. This study introduces the in situ...... transfer concept by use of a dedicated TEM transfer holder capable of enclosing the sample in a gaseous environment at temperatures up to approx. 900C. By oxidation and reduction experiments of Cu nanoparticles it is shown possible to keep the reaction conditions during transfer outside the microscope...

  8. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using

  9. Transfer reactions at the neutron dripline with triton target

    CERN Multimedia

    Two-neutron transfer to $^{9}$Li will populate the ground state of $^{11}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in a way that is complementary to studies of these states performed at higher beam energies. We aim at detecting the charged particles from the transfer reactions as well as neutrons coming from the decay of possible $^{11}$Li resonances.

  10. Transfer reactions at the neutron dripline with triton target

    CERN Document Server

    Borge, M J G; Fynbo, H O U; Gomez Camacho, J; Johansen, J; Johansson, H T; Jonson, B; Krücken, R; Kurcewicz, J; Martel, I; Moro, A; Mücher, D; Nilsson, T; Nyman, G; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Riisager, K; Sambi, S; Sanchez-Benitez, AM; Tengblad, O

    2012-01-01

    Two-neutron transfer to $^{9}$Li will populate the ground state of $^{11}$Li as well as low-lying resonances in a way that is complementary to studies of these states performed at higher beam energies. We aim at detecting the charged particles from the transfer reactions as well as neutrons coming from the decay of possible $^{11}$Li resonances.

  11. Mass transfer with chemical reaction in multiphase systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, E.

    1983-01-01

    These volumes deal with the phenomenon of 'mass transfer with chemical reaction' which is of industrial, biological and physiological importance. In process engineering, it is encountered both in separation processes and in reaction engineering and both aspects are covered here in four sections: introduction; gas-liquid system; liquid-liquid system; and gas-liquid-solid system

  12. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1: 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one elec- tron reduced heteropoly ...

  13. Counter-transference reactions contributing to completed suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestin, J

    1987-12-01

    Counter-transference reactions are frequently elicited while treating suicidal patients and they may contribute to the patient's committing suicide. Therapeutic constellations including the failure of the therapist to (1) cope with the patient's aggressiveness, (2) tolerate the patient's dependency, (3) handle the erotic transference adequately and (4) preserve loyalty towards the patient; they have all been identified as being responsible for a therapeutic impasse with fatal consequences. Knowledge of the therapeutic constellations especially prone to facilitate negative counter-transference reactions may help the therapist to master them effectively.

  14. Charge transfer between O6+ and atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.; Schultz, D. R.; Hui, Y.

    2011-05-01

    The charge exchange process has been found to play a dominant role in the production of X-rays and/or EUV photons observed in cometary and planetary atmospheres and from the heliosphere. Charge transfer cross sections, especially state-selective cross sections, are necessary parameters in simulations of X-ray emission. In the present work, charge transfer due to collisions of ground state O6+(1s2 1 S) with atomic hydrogen has been investigated theoretically using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method (QMOCC). The multi-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach (MRDCI) has been applied to compute the adiabatic potential and nonadiabatic couplings, and the atomic basis sets used have been optimized with the method proposed previously to obtain precise potential data. Total and state-selective cross sections are calculated for energies between 10 meV/u and 10 keV/u. The QMOCC results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data as well as to new atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations. A recommended set of cross sections, based on the MOCC, AOCC, and CTMC calculations, is deduced which should aid in X-ray modeling studies.

  15. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.

    2013-01-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ 0 =ℏω 0 /k B T where ω 0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ 0 0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the

  16. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Mitina, E. A. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); Odinokov, A. V. [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, Novatorov ul., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow (Russian Federation); Titov, S. V. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, 3-1/12, Building 6, Obuha pereulok, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ{sub 0}=ℏω{sub 0}/k{sub B}T where ω{sub 0} is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ{sub 0} < 1 − 3) and for low (ξ{sub 0}≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T→ 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the

  17. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local

  18. Direct nuclear reactions and the structure of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterfeld, F.

    1985-01-01

    The present thesis deals with two different aspects of direct nuclear reactions, namely on the one hand with the microscopic calculation of the imaginary optical potential for the elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering as well as on the other hand with the microscopic analysis of giant magnetic resonances in atomic nuclei which are excited by (p,n) charge-exchange reactions. In the first part of the thesis the imaginary part of the optical potential for the elastic proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering is microscopically calculated in the framework of the so called nuclear-structure approximation to the optical potential. The calculations are performed in the Feshbach formalism in second-order perturbation theory corresponding to an effective projectile-target-nucleon interaction. In the second part of this thesis in the framework of microscopic nuclear models a complete analysis of different A(p,n)B charge-exchange reactions at high incident energies 160 MeV 90 Zr(p,n) reaction three collective spin-isospin resonances could be uniquely identified. (orig./HSI) [de

  19. Nitrogen atom transfer mediated by a new PN3P-pincer nickel core via a putative nitrido nickel intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Changguang

    2018-02-13

    A 2nd generation PN3P-pincer azido nickel complex (PN3P)Ni(N3) reacts with isocyanides to afford monosubstituted carbodiimides under irradiation, presumably via a transient nitrido intermediate. The resulting species can further generate unsymmetrical carboddimides and the PN3P nickel halide complex, accomplishing a synthetic cycle for a complete nitrogen atom transfer reaction.

  20. Nitrogen atom transfer mediated by a new PN3P-pincer nickel core via a putative nitrido nickel intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Changguang; Wang, Xiufang; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-01-01

    A 2nd generation PN3P-pincer azido nickel complex (PN3P)Ni(N3) reacts with isocyanides to afford monosubstituted carbodiimides under irradiation, presumably via a transient nitrido intermediate. The resulting species can further generate unsymmetrical carboddimides and the PN3P nickel halide complex, accomplishing a synthetic cycle for a complete nitrogen atom transfer reaction.

  1. Graphene Charge Transfer, Spectroscopy, and Photochemical Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brus, Louis [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This project focused on the special electronic and optical properties of graphene and adsorbed molecular species. Graphene makes an excellent substrate for current collection in nanostructured photovoltaic designs. Graphene is almost transparent, and can be used as a solar cell window. It also has no surface states, and thus current is efficiently transported over long distances. Progress in graphene synthesis indicates that there will soon be practical methods for making large pieces of graphene for devices. We now need to understand exactly what happens to both ground state and electronically excited molecules and Qdots near graphene, if we are going to use them to absorb light in a nano-structured photovoltaic device using graphene to collect photocurrent. We also need to understand how to shift the graphene Fermi level, to optimize the kinetics of electron transfer to graphene. And we need to learn how to convert local graphene areas to semiconductor structure, to make useful spatially patterned graphenes. In this final report, we describe how we addressed these goals. We explored the question of possible Surface Enhanced Raman spectroscopy from molecular Charge Transfer onto Graphene substrates. We observed strong hole doping of graphene by adsorbed halogens as indicated by the shift of the graphene G Raman band. In the case of iodine adsorption, we also observed the anionic species made by hole doping. At low frequency in the Raman spectrum, we saw quite intense lines from I3- and I5- , suggesting possible SERS. We reported on Fresnel calculations on this thin film system, which did not show any net electromagnetic field enhancement.

  2. Two-neutron transfer reactions with heavy-deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.; Landowne, S.; Esbensen, H.

    1988-01-01

    In a recent communication we pointed out that one can combine the macroscopic model for two-particle transfer reactions on deformed nuclei with the sudden limit approximation for rotational excitation, and thereby obtain a practical method for calculating transfer reactions leading to high-spin states. As an example, we presented results for the reaction 162 Dy( 58 Ni, 60 Ni) 160 Dy populating the ground-state rotational band up to the spin I = 14 + state. We have also tested the validity of the sudden limit for the inelastic excitation of high spin states and we have noted how the macroscopic model may be modified to allow for more microscopic nuclear structure effects in an application to diabolic pair-transfer processes. This paper describes our subsequent work in which we investigated the systematic features of pair-transfer reactions within the macroscopic model by using heavier projectiles to generate higher spins and by decomposing the cross sections according to the multipolarity of the transfer interaction. Particular attention is paid to characteristic structures in the angular distributions for the lower spin states and how they depend on the angular momentum carried by the transferred particles. 11 refs., 3 figs

  3. The mechanism of three-body process of energy transfer from excited xenon atoms to molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, K.; Forys, M.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of energy transfer from Xe(6 s[3/2] 1 ) resonance state (E=8.44 eV) and higher excited Xe(6p, 6p', 6 d) atoms produced in pulse radiolysis to molecules have been discussed. The analysis of the kinetic data for these processes shows that in the sensitized photolysis and radiolysis of Xe-M mixtures the excited atoms decay in 'ordinary' two-body reaction: Xe(6s[3/2] 1 0 )+M→products (r.1) and in fast 'accelerated' third order process: Xe(6s[3/2] 1 0 )+M+Xe→products (r.2) The discussion shows that three-body process occurs via reactions: Xe(6s[3/2] 1 0 )+Xe k w ↔ k d Xe 2 ** (r.2a) Xe 2 **+M k q →[Xe 2 M]*→products (r.2b) It was shown that this mechanism concerns also higher excited Xe atoms and can explain a similar process in He-M mixtures and suggests that it is a general mechanism of energy transfer in all irradiated rare gas-molecule systems

  4. Cyanide Ligand Assembly by Carbon Atom Transfer to an Iron Nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Jorge L.; Pink, Maren

    2017-01-01

    The new iron(IV) nitride complex PhB( i Pr 2 Im) 3 Fe≡N reacts with two equivalents of bis(diisopropylamino)cyclopropenylidene (BAC) to provide PhB( i Pr 2 Im) 3 Fe(CN)(N 2 )(BAC). This unusual example of a four-electron reaction involves carbon atom transfer from BAC to create a cyanide ligand along with the alkyne i Pr 2 N-C≡C-N i Pr 2 . The iron complex is in equilibrium with an N 2 - free species. Further reaction with CO leads to formation of a CO analogue, which can be independently prepared using NaCN as the cyanide source, while reaction with B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 provides the cyanoborane derivative.

  5. Carbene Transfer Reactions Catalysed by Dyes of the Metalloporphyrin Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário M. Q. Simões

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbene transfer reactions are very important transformations in organic synthesis, allowing the generation of structurally challenging products by catalysed cyclopropanation, cyclopropenation, carbene C-H, N-H, O-H, S-H, and Si-H insertion, and olefination of carbonyl compounds. In particular, chiral and achiral metalloporphyrins have been successfully explored as biomimetic catalysts for these carbene transfer reactions under both homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions. In this work the use of synthetic metalloporphyrins (MPorph, M = Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir, Sn as homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts for carbene transfer reactions in the last years is reviewed, almost exclusively focused on the literature since the year 2010, except when reference to older publications was deemed to be crucial.

  6. Study of charge transfer reactions in a microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique; National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.; Tartakovsky, B. [National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer reactions in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) were evaluated. The MFC was inoculated with anaerobic mesophilic sludge and operated with carbon felt, carbon cloth, and platinum (Pt) coated carbon cloth. The MFC was then fed with either acetate or glucose as a source of fuel and operated at a temperature of 25 degrees C and a pH of 7. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated that the micro-organisms colonized the anodes. Cyclic voltammetry and polarization tests were conducted using different fractions of the anodophilic biofilm in order to determine charge transfer routes. The study characterized the electron transfer mechanisms used by the exoelectrogenic micro-organisms to produce electricity. It was concluded that further research is needed to characterize reaction transfer routes. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Two-pulse atomic coherent control spectroscopy of Eley-Rideal reactions: An application of an atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A spectroscopic application of the atom laser is suggested. The spectroscopy termed 2PACC (two-pulse atomic coherent control) employs the coherent properties of matter waves from a two-pulse atom laser. These waves are employed to control a gas-surface chemical recombination reaction. The method is demonstrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction of a hydrogen or alkali atom-laser pulse where the surface target is an adsorbed hydrogen atom. The reaction yields either a hydrogen or alkali hydride molecule. The desorbed gas-phase molecular yield and its internal state is shown to be controlled by the time and phase delay between two atom-laser pulses. The calculation is based on solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in a diabatic framework. The probability of desorption which is the predicted 2PACC signal has been calculated as a function of the pulse parameters

  8. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions. II: Parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Geert; van Beckum, F.P.H.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and

  9. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions. II: parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, van F.P.H.; van Swaaij, W.P.M.

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and

  10. Effect of electrostatic interactions on electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    Fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulsed radiolysis. By this technique radicals and ionic radicals with high redox potentials are created homogeneously in the solution in about 10 -8 second. For solvated electron effect of electrostatic interaction on kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is obtained with a good approximation by the Debye equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from the theory occurs in ion pair formation, which is evidenced experimentally in reactions between anions when cations are complexed by a cryptate. Slow reactions k 8 M -1 s -1 are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than reactions limited by diffusion. When there is no ion pair formation the velocity constant depends upon dielectric constant of the solvent and reaction distance. 17 refs

  11. High transfer cross sections from reactions with 254Es

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaedel, M.; Bruechle, W.; Bruegger, M.; Gaeggeler, H.; Moody, J.; Schardt, D.; Suemmerer, K.; Hulet, E.K.; Dougan, A.D.; Dougan, R.J.; Landrum, J.H.; Lougheed, R.W.; Wild, J.F.; O'Kelly, G.D.

    1985-08-01

    We report radiochemically determined cross sections for the heaviest known actinides produced in transfer reactions of 101 MeV 16 O, 98 MeV 18 O and 127 MeV 22 Ne with 254 Es as a target. A comparison with data for similar transfers from 248 Cm targets is made. Transfer cross sections are extrapolated for the production of unknown, neutron-rich isotopes of elements 101 through 105, and the unique potential of 254 Es as a target to make these exotic nuclei accessible is demonstrated. (orig.)

  12. Single proton transfer reactions on odd-even nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, N.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of one proton transfer reactions, performed with the use of the magnetic spectrograph QMG/2 of the KVI, in two regions of the mass table. Stripping and pickup reactions on the odd-A target nuclei 193 Ir and 197 Au are described in the first part. The experimental spectroscopic factors obtained are used to test several collective models that are based on coupling between bosons (phonons) and fermions. In the second part, the proton stripping reactions on 113 In and 115 In are studied. Shell model calculations are performed and applied to the experimental results. (Auth.)

  13. Development of Novel Electrode Materials for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen-Transfer and Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Brett Kimball [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, the fundamental aspects involved in the electrocatalysis of anodic O-transfer reactions and cathodic H-transfer reactions have been studied. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)[doped MnO2 films] revealed that MnO2 film electrodes prepared by a cycling voltammetry deposition show improved response for DMSO oxidation at the film electrodes vs. the Au substrate. Doping of the MnO2 films with Fe(III) further enhanced electrode activity. Reasons for this increase are believed to involve the adsorption of DMSO by the Fe(III) sites. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)-doped RuO2 films showed that the Fe(III)-doped RuO2-film electrodes are applicable for anodic detection of sulfur compounds. The Fe(III) sites in the Fe-RuO2 films are speculated to act as adsorption sites for the sulfur species while the Ru(IV) sites function for anodic discharge of H2O to generate the adsorbed OH species. The investigation into cathodic H-transfer reactions, specifically nitrate reduction, at various pure metals and their alloys demonstrated that the incorporation of metals into alloy materials can create a material that exhibits bifunctional properties for the various steps involved in the overall nitrate reduction reaction. The Sb10Sn20Ti70, Cu63Ni37 and Cu25Ni75 alloy electrodes exhibited improved activity for nitrate reduction as compared to their pure component metals. The Cu63Ni37 alloy displayed the highest activity for nitrate reduction. The final investigation was a detailed study of the electrocatalytic activity of cathodic H-transfer reactions (nitrate reduction) at various compositions of Cu-Ni alloy electrodes. Voltammetric response for NO3- at the Cu-Ni alloy electrode is superior to

  14. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  15. Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins and chlorophyll a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.; Scherz, A.; Levanon, H.

    1979-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins (P) and quinones (Q) have been studied by pulse radiolysis. The porphyrins used were tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 TPP), its tetracarboxy derivative (H 2 TCPP), the sodium and zinc compounds (Na 2 TPP and ZnTPP), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). These compounds were found to be rapidly reduced by electron transfer from (CH 3 ) 2 CO - . Reduction by (CH 3 ) 2 COH was rapid in aqueous solutions but relatively slow in i-PrOH solutions. Transient spectra of the anion radicals were determined and, in the case of H 2 TCPP - ., a pK = 9.7 was derived for its protonation. Electron-transfer reactions from the anion radical of H 2 TCPP to benzoquinone, duroquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone 2-sulfonate, and methylviologen occur in aqueous solutions with rate constants approx. 10 7 -10 9 M -1 s -1 which depend on the pH and the quinone reduction potential. Reactions of Na 2 TPP - ., ZnTPP - ., and Chl a - . with anthraquinone in basic i-PrOH solutions occur with rate constants approx. 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The spectral changes associated with these electron-transfer reactions as observed over a period of approx. 1 ms indicated, in some cases, the formation of an intermediate complex [P...Q - .]. 8 figures, 2 tables

  16. Charge Transfer Processes in Collisions of Si4+ Ions with He Atoms at Intermediate Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, R.; Watanabe, A.; Sato, H.; Gu, J. P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.; Stancil, P. C.

    Charge transfer in collisions of Si4+ ions with He atoms below 100 keV/u is studied by using a molecular orbital representation within both the semiclassical and quantal representations. Single transfer reaction Si4++He →Si3++He+ has been studied by a number of theoretical investigations. In addition to the reaction (1), the first semiclassical MOCC calculations are performed for the double transfer channel Si4++HE→Si2++He2+ Nine molecular states that connect both with single and double electron transfer processes are considered in the present model. Electronic states and corresponding couplings are determined by the multireference single- and double- excitation configuration interaction method. The present cross sections tie well with the earlier calculations of Stancil et al., Phys. Rev. A 55, 1064 (1997) at lower energies, but show a rather different magnitude from those of Bacchus-Montabonel and Ceyzeriat, Phys. Rev. A 58, 1162 (1998). The present rate constant is found to be significantly different from the experimental finding of Fang and Kwong, Phys. Rev. A 59, 342 (1996) at 4,600 K, and hence does not support the experiment.

  17. Charge transfer of O3+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.; Turner, A.R.; Cooper, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state O 3+ (2s 2 2p 2 P) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with existing experimental and theoretical data shows our results to be in better agreement with the measurements than the previous calculations, although problems with some of the state-selective measurements are noted. Our calculations demonstrate that rotational coupling is not important for the total cross section, but for state-selective cross sections, its relevance increases with energy. For the ratios of triplet to singlet cross sections, significant departures from a statistical value are found, generally in harmony with experiment

  18. Charge transfer of O3+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state O3+(2s22p 2P) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with existing experimental and theoretical data shows our results to be in better agreement with the measurements than the previous calculations, although problems with some of the state-selective measurements are noted. Our calculations demonstrate that rotational coupling is not important for the total cross section, but for state-selective cross sections, its relevance increases with energy. For the ratios of triplet to singlet cross sections, significant departures from a statistical value are found, generally in harmony with experiment.

  19. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described

  20. Effect of Inhibitors on Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of MMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鸿; 徐冬梅; 张可达

    2005-01-01

    Effect of a series of inhibitors as additives on atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) with FeCl2/PPh3 as catalyst system was studied, including 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP), 4-methoxyphenol (4-MP), hydroquinone (HQ) and nitrobenzene (NB). It was found that TNP was the only. efficient additive for ATRP among these inhibitors. In the presence of small amounts of TNP, the polymerization proceeded rapidly after induction period to yield the polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions (MWD). The initiating efficiency of the modified catalyst system with TNP was increased. The mechanism was proposed and confirmed by the end group analysis of the polymer.

  1. Functionalization of lanthanum hydroxide nanowires by atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mi; Yuan Jinying; Yuan Weizhong; Yin Yingwu; Hong Xiaoyin

    2007-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been used to prepare a core-shell hybrid nanostructure successfully: a hard core of single-crystalline lanthanum hydroxide nanowires and a soft shell of polystyrene (PS) brushes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated that the resulting products presented special structures and different thicknesses of polymer layers. The chemical components and grafted PS quantities of the samples were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The polymers showed narrow polydispersity, which proved that the lanthanum hydroxide nanowires initiated the 'living'/controlled polymerization of styrene. With the modifiability of lanthanum hydroxide nanowires, the solubility increased, which affords a new way to functionalize nanowires

  2. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He + collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential

  3. Single-particle and collective states in transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhenry, I.; Suomijaervi, T.; Giai, N. van

    1993-01-01

    The possibility to excite collective states in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions is studied. Collective states are described within the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and the collectivity is defined according to the number of configurations contributing to a given state. The particle transfer is described within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). Calculations are performed for two different stripping reactions: 207 Pb( 20 Ne, 19 Ne) 208 Pb and 59 Co( 20 Ne, 19 F) 60 Ni at 48 MeV/nucleon for which experimental data are available. The calculation shows that a sizeable fraction of collective strength can be excited in these reactions. The comparison with experiment shows that this parameter-free calculation qualitatively explains the data. (author) 19 refs.; 10 figs

  4. Neutron transfer reactions in the fp-shell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahgoub, Mahmoud

    2008-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions were used to study the stability of the magic number N=28 near 56 Ni. On one hand the one-neutron pickup (d,p) reaction was used for precision spectroscopy of single-particle levels in 55 Fe. On the other hand we investigated the two-neutron transfer mechanism into 56 Ni using the pickup reaction 58 Ni(vectorp,t) 56 Ni. In addition the reliability of inverse kinematics reactions at low energy to study exotic nuclei was tested by the neutron transfer reactions t( 40 Ar,p) 42 Ar and d( 54 Fe,p) 55 Fe using tritium and deuterium targets, respectively, and by comparing the results with those of the normal kinematics reactions. The experimental data, differential cross-section and analyzing powers, are compared to DWBA and coupled channel calculations utilizing the code CHUCK3. By performing the single-neutron stripping reaction (vectord,p) on 54 Fe the 1f 7/2 shell in the ground state configuration was found to be partly broken. The instability of the 1f 7/2 shell and the magic number N=28 was confirmed once by observing a number of levels with J π = 7/2 - at low excitation energies, which should not be populated if 54 Fe has a closed 1f 7/2 shell, and also by comparing our high precision experimental data with a large scale shell model calculation using the ANTOINE code [5]. Calculations including a partly broken 1f 7/2 shell show better agreement with the experiment. The instability of the 1f 7/2 shell was confirmed also by performing the two-neutron pick-up reaction (vectorp,t) on 58 Ni to study 56 Ni, where a considerable improvement in the DWBA calculation was observed after considering 1f 7/2 as a broken shell. To prove the reliability of inverse kinematics transfer reactions at low energies (∝ 2 AMeV), the aforementioned single-neutron transfer reaction (d,p) was repeated using a beam of 54 Fe ions and a deuteron target. From this inverse kinematics experiment we were able to reproduce the absolute cross-section and angular

  5. Neutron transfer reactions in the fp-shell region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahgoub, Mahmoud

    2008-06-26

    Neutron transfer reactions were used to study the stability of the magic number N=28 near {sup 56}Ni. On one hand the one-neutron pickup (d,p) reaction was used for precision spectroscopy of single-particle levels in {sup 55}Fe. On the other hand we investigated the two-neutron transfer mechanism into {sup 56}Ni using the pickup reaction {sup 58}Ni((vector)p,t){sup 56}Ni. In addition the reliability of inverse kinematics reactions at low energy to study exotic nuclei was tested by the neutron transfer reactions t({sup 40}Ar,p){sup 42}Ar and d({sup 54}Fe,p){sup 55}Fe using tritium and deuterium targets, respectively, and by comparing the results with those of the normal kinematics reactions. The experimental data, differential cross-section and analyzing powers, are compared to DWBA and coupled channel calculations utilizing the code CHUCK3. By performing the single-neutron stripping reaction ((vector)d,p) on {sup 54}Fe the 1f{sub 7/2} shell in the ground state configuration was found to be partly broken. The instability of the 1f{sub 7/2} shell and the magic number N=28 was confirmed once by observing a number of levels with J{sup {pi}} = 7/2{sup -} at low excitation energies, which should not be populated if {sup 54}Fe has a closed 1f{sub 7/2} shell, and also by comparing our high precision experimental data with a large scale shell model calculation using the ANTOINE code [5]. Calculations including a partly broken 1f{sub 7/2} shell show better agreement with the experiment. The instability of the 1f{sub 7/2} shell was confirmed also by performing the two-neutron pick-up reaction ((vector)p,t) on {sup 58}Ni to study {sup 56}Ni, where a considerable improvement in the DWBA calculation was observed after considering 1f{sub 7/2} as a broken shell. To prove the reliability of inverse kinematics transfer reactions at low energies ({proportional_to} 2 AMeV), the aforementioned single-neutron transfer reaction (d,p) was repeated using a beam of {sup 54}Fe ions and a

  6. Excitation functions for quasielastic transfer reactions induced with heavy ions in bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, D.; Bimbot, R.; Maison, J.; de Reilhac, L.; Rivet, M.F.; Fleury, A.; Hubert, F.; Llabador, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation functions for the production of 210 Bi, 210 Po, /sup 207-211/At, and 211 Rn through quasielastic transfer reactions induced with heavy ions in 209 Bi have been measured. The corresponding reactions involved the transfer of one neutron, one proton, two charges, and three charges from projectile to target. The projectiles used were 12 C, 14 N, 16 O, 19 F, 20 Ne, 40 Ar, 40 Ca, 56 Fe, and 63 Cu. The experimental techniques involved target irradiations and off-line α and γ activity measurements. Chemical separations were used to solve specific problems. Careful measuremnts of incident energies and cross sections were performed close to the reaction thresholds. All excitation functions exhibit the typical features of quasielastic transfer reactions: a sharp increase at low energy, and a constant value at high incident energy. The position of the thresholds are strongly influenced by the energetics of the reaction: High cross sections are observed under the strong interaction barrier if the energy balance at the minimum distance of approach is positive. This balance is equal to the difference between the interaction potentials in the entrance and exit channels, corrected for the mass balance. The constant cross sections observed for the high energy part of a given excitation function are consistent with the assumption that the curve P (R) which represents the transfer probability versus the distance between the nucleus centers does not vary with incident energy. This assumption implies the constancy of the optimum distance of approach R/sub opt/, of the R window ΔR for which P (R) is significant, and of the magnitude of P (R). Moreover the data show that the high energy cross sections for one-proton transfer are independent of the projectile, while odd-even effects of the projectile atomic number Z on the two-charge transfer cross sections are observed for the lightest incident ions 14 N to 20 Ne

  7. Flat Graphene-Enhanced Electron Transfer Involved in Redox Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Meilan; Zhang, Yanyang; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Gao, Guandao; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is easily warped in the out-of-plane direction because of its high in-plane Young's modulus, and exploring the influence of wrinkled graphene on its properties is essential for the design of graphene-based materials for environmental applications. Herein, we prepared wrinkled graphene (WGN-1 and WGN-2) by thermal treatment and compared their electrochemical properties with those of flat graphene nanosheets (FGN). FGN exhibit activities that are much better than those of wrinkled graphene nanosheets (WGN), not only in the electrochemical oxidation of methylene blue (MB) but also in the electrochemical reduction of nitrobenzene (NB). Transformation ratios of MB and NB in FGN, WGN-1, and WGN-2 were 97.5, 80.1, and 57.9% and 94.6, 92.1, and 81.2%, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the surface resistance of the graphene samples increased in the following order: FGN reaction charges transfer faster across the reaction interfaces and along the surface of FGN than that of WGN, and wrinkles restrict reaction charge transfer and reduce the reaction rates. This study reveals that the morphology of the graphene (flat or wrinkle) greatly affects redox reaction activities and may have important implications for the design of novel graphene-based nanostructures and for our understanding of graphene wrinkle-dependent redox reactions in environmental processes.

  8. Many-nucleon transfer reactions at the coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegmann, H.

    1974-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the many-nucleon transfer with heavy ion radiation near the coulomb barrier. The neutron-rich targets 76 Ge, sup(92,94,96)Zr and 100 Mo were thus irradiated with 32 S and 34 S radiation. By measuring the activity of the back-scattered light reaction products in the transfer, total cross sections were determined for the 3p, 4p, 3pn, 4pn, 3n, 4n and 6n transfer. Excitation functions for the 3p, 4p, 3pn and 4pn transfer were measured for the target-projectile combination 96 Zr- 32 S. Differential cross sections could be determined with 96 Zr and 100 Mo. The results were compared with various theoretical calculations. (orig./LH) [de

  9. Theory of nuclear heavy-ion direct transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, B.J.B.

    1979-01-01

    We review the distorted-wave approach to direct transfer reactions and draw attention to some of the shortcomings of current theories. We show that a reformulated form of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) for transfer can lead to important simplifications of the theory, which are valid for nuclear heavy-ion induced reactions at energies > or approx. =MeV/nucleon. In particular, in the semiclassical limit, it leads to a new and simple formula for the transfer t-matrix which includes all the essential physics while offering several important advantages over standard ''full-recoil finite-range'' DWBA. One such advantage is that the new formula is more transparent in that it is amendable to interpretation and analytical manipulation. At high-energy it is shown to reduce to one earlier deduced using eikonal-DWBA. The conditions for the validity of the new theory are discussed in detail. They are shown to be generally well satisfied for small-mass transfer between heavy-ions at energies at or above those particularly favour transfer (> or approx. =10 MeV/nucleon for transfer of valence nucleons). The restriction to small mass is not due to any recoil approximation; in fact, it is only a necessary restriction at certain energies. The theory treats recoil exactly. Consideration of the optimum dynamical conditions for transfer leads to a set of matching conditions. The presence of hitherto neglected absorption, arising from dynamical effects of poor matching, it suggested and qualitatively discussed. Condition under which such absorption may be neglected are derived. Results of numerical calculations are presented showing that the theory is capable of good agreement with standard full-recoil finite-range DWBA, and that it is capable of giving at least as good an account of experimental data for nucleon-transfer between heavy-ions at energies approx.10 MeV/nucleon

  10. Effects of electrostatic interactions on electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    The fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulse radiolysis. This technique allows the creation in about 10 -8 second radicals and radical ions with high redox potentials. For solvated electrons electrostatic interaction on the kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is described by Debye's equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from theory can occur in ion pairs formation. This is evidenced experimentally for anions by cation complexation with a cryptate. Relatively slow reactions are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than limited by diffusion. If ion pairs are not formed kinetics constant depends on dielectric constant of solvent and reaction radius. Experimentally is studied the effect of electrostatic interaction on the rate constants of solvated electrons with anions and cations in water-ethanol mixtures where the dielectric constant change from 80 to 25 at room temperature. 17 refs

  11. Reaction mechanism and spectroscopy of transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The specific features displayed by data on heavy ion elastic and inelastic angular distributions are discussed, and their physical origin is pointed out from semi-classical calculations in counterpart ambiguities in the phenomenological description of the optical potential appear. Two nucleon transfer reactions induced by heavy ions successfully point out important contributions of a two-step process where the transfer is proceeding via target and residual nucleus inelastic excitation. At incident energies not too high above the Coulomb barrier, such process produces clear shape changes between different final state angular distributions. At higher incident energy, the angular distributions are forward peaked and display oscillations for both mechanisms. As for four-nucleon transfer reactions, the existing data suggest that the nucleons are well transferred into a Os relative

  12. Isotopic resolution of fission fragments from 238U + 12C transfer and fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caamano, M.; Rejmund, F.; Derkx, X.; Schmidt, K. H.; Andouin, L.; Bacri, C. O.; Barreau, G.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Gaudefroy, L.; Golabek, C.; Jurado, B.; Lemasson, A.; Navin, A.; Rejmund, M.; Roger, T.; Shrivastava, A.; Schmitt, C.; Taieb, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent results from an experiment at GANIL, performed to investigate the main properties of fission-fragment yields and energy distributions in different fissioning nuclei as a function of the excitation energy, in a neutron-rich region of actinides, are presented. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics between a 238 U beam and a 12 C target produced different actinides, within a range of excitation energy below 30 MeV. These fissioning nuclei are identified by detecting the target-like recoil, and their kinetic and excitation energy are determined from the reconstruction of the transfer reaction. The large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS was used to identify the mass, atomic number and charge state of the fission fragments in flight. As a result, the characteristics of the fission-fragment isotopic distributions of a variety of neutron-rich actinides are observed for the first time over the complete range of fission fragments. (authors)

  13. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  14. Stepwise O-Atom Transfer in Heme-Based Tryptophan Dioxygenase: Role of Substrate Ammonium in Epoxide Ring Opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Inchul; Ambler, Brett R; Wherritt, Daniel; Griffith, Wendell P; Maldonado, Amanda C; Altman, Ryan A; Liu, Aimin

    2018-03-28

    Heme-based tryptophan dioxygenases are established immunosuppressive metalloproteins with significant biomedical interest. Here, we synthesized two mechanistic probes to specifically test if the α-amino group of the substrate directly participates in a critical step of the O atom transfer during catalysis in human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Substitution of the nitrogen atom of the substrate to a carbon (probe 1) or oxygen (probe 2) slowed the catalytic step following the first O atom transfer such that transferring the second O atom becomes less likely to occur, although the dioxygenated products were observed with both probes. A monooxygenated product was also produced from probe 2 in a significant quantity. Analysis of this new product by HPLC coupled UV-vis spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies concluded that this monooxygenated product is a furoindoline compound derived from an unstable epoxyindole intermediate. These results prove that small molecules can manipulate the stepwise O atom transfer reaction of TDO and provide a showcase for a tunable mechanism by synthetic compounds. The product analysis results corroborate the presence of a substrate-based epoxyindole intermediate during catalysis and provide the first substantial experimental evidence for the involvement of the substrate α-amino group in the epoxide ring-opening step during catalysis. This combined synthetic, biochemical, and biophysical study establishes the catalytic role of the α-amino group of the substrate during the O atom transfer reactions and thus represents a substantial advance to the mechanistic comprehension of the heme-based tryptophan dioxygenases.

  15. An integrated high temperature environmental cell for atom probe tomography studies of gas-surface reactions: Instrumentation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.R.; Bagot, P.A.J.; Rajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated environmental cell has been designed and developed for the latest generation of Atom Probe Tomography LEAP™ instruments, allowing controlled exposure of samples to gases at high temperatures. Following treatment, samples can be transferred through the LEAP vacuum system for subsequent APT analysis, which provides detailed information on changes to chemical microstructures following the reactions with near-atomic resolution. A full description of the cell is presented, along with some sample results on the oxidation of aluminum and two platinum-group alloys, demonstrating the capability of combining exposure/characterization functionality in a single instrument. - Highlights: • Designed and built atom probe environmental cell for in situ reactions. • Investigated Al oxidation, and demonstrated improvement with new cell. • in situ APT analysis of Pt-alloys showed surface segregation of Rh and Ir

  16. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development

  17. Alpha-transfer reactions and the pairing-vibration model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The pairing-vibration model with isospin is extended to include α-transfer reactions. Selection rules and expressions for transition strengths are derived and compared with experimental results for A = 40--66 nuclei. The selection rules are found to be followed quite well in the examples studied. The systematics of ground-state transition strengths are qualitatively quite well reproduced although the quantitative agreement is poor. When the changing nature of the pairing quanta is incorporated using two-particle transfer data the agreement becomes quantitatively good. Evidence is presented for clustering other than that due to pairing in 40 Ca and 44 Ti

  18. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  19. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen atom abstraction from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Prajakta Rajaram; Heufer, K Alexander; Fernandes, Ravi Xavier

    2018-04-25

    Isopentanol is a potential next-generation biofuel for future applications to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine concepts. To provide insights into the combustion behavior of isopentanol, especially to its auto-ignition behavior which is linked both to efficiency and pollutant formation in real combustion systems, detailed quantum chemical studies for crucial reactions are desired. H-Abstraction reaction rates from fuel molecules are key initiation steps for chain branching required for auto-ignition. In this study, rate constants are determined for the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical by implementing the CBS-QB3 composite method. For the treatment of the internal rotors, a Pitzer-Gwinn-like approximation is applied. On comparing the computed reaction energies, the highest exothermicity (ΔE = -46 kJ mol-1) is depicted for Hα abstraction by the H atom whereas the lowest endothermicity (ΔE = 29 kJ mol-1) is shown for the abstraction of Hα by the HO2˙ radical. The formation of hydrogen bonding is found to affect the kinetics of the H atom abstraction reactions by the HO2˙ radical. Further above 750 K, the calculated high pressure limit rate constants indicate that the total contribution from delta carbon sites (Cδ) is predominant for hydrogen atom abstraction by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

  20. Halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1975--February 14, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1976-02-01

    High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, are being studied in gaseous, high pressure, and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and other organic systems. Experimental and theoretical data are presented in the following areas: systematics of iodine hot atom reactions in halomethanes, reactions and systematics of iodine reactions with pentene and butene isomers, radiative neutron capture activated reactions of iodine with acetylene, gas to liquid to solid transition in hot atom chemistry, kinetic theory applications of hot atom reactions and the mathematical development of caging reactions, solvent dependence of the stereochemistry of the 38 Cl for Cl substitution following 37 Cl(n,γ) 38 Cl in liquid meso and dl-(CHFCl) 2 . A technique was also developed for the radioassay of Al in urine specimens

  1. Comparative evaluation of atom mapping algorithms for balanced metabolic reactions: application to Recon 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciat Gonzalez, German A; El Assal, Lemmer R P; Noronha, Alberto; Thiele, Ines; Haraldsdóttir, Hulda S; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2017-06-14

    The mechanism of each chemical reaction in a metabolic network can be represented as a set of atom mappings, each of which relates an atom in a substrate metabolite to an atom of the same element in a product metabolite. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions typically represent biochemistry at the level of reaction stoichiometry. However, a more detailed representation at the underlying level of atom mappings opens the possibility for a broader range of biological, biomedical and biotechnological applications than with stoichiometry alone. Complete manual acquisition of atom mapping data for a genome-scale metabolic network is a laborious process. However, many algorithms exist to predict atom mappings. How do their predictions compare to each other and to manually curated atom mappings? For more than four thousand metabolic reactions in the latest human metabolic reconstruction, Recon 3D, we compared the atom mappings predicted by six atom mapping algorithms. We also compared these predictions to those obtained by manual curation of atom mappings for over five hundred reactions distributed among all top level Enzyme Commission number classes. Five of the evaluated algorithms had similarly high prediction accuracy of over 91% when compared to manually curated atom mapped reactions. On average, the accuracy of the prediction was highest for reactions catalysed by oxidoreductases and lowest for reactions catalysed by ligases. In addition to prediction accuracy, the algorithms were evaluated on their accessibility, their advanced features, such as the ability to identify equivalent atoms, and their ability to map hydrogen atoms. In addition to prediction accuracy, we found that software accessibility and advanced features were fundamental to the selection of an atom mapping algorithm in practice.

  2. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  3. Palladium-Catalyzed Atom-Transfer Radical Cyclization at Remote Unactivated C(sp3 )-H Sites: Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of Hybrid Vinyl Palladium Radical Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushnyy, Maxim; Parasram, Marvin; Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    A novel mild, visible-light-induced palladium-catalyzed hydrogen atom translocation/atom-transfer radical cyclization (HAT/ATRC) cascade has been developed. This protocol involves a 1,5-HAT process of previously unknown hybrid vinyl palladium radical intermediates, thus leading to iodomethyl carbo- and heterocyclic structures. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Tape transfer atomization patterning of liquid alloys for microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-02-12

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times.

  5. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  6. Investigation of the unbound 21C nucleus via transfer reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukui Tokuro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross section of the transfer reaction 20C(d,p21C at 30.0 MeV is investigated. The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC is used in order to obtain the final state wave function. The smoothing procedure of the transition matrix and the channel-coupling effect on the cross section are discussed.

  7. Reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein with electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, J.D.; Frerman, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative half-reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), electron transfer from ETF to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO), is dependent on complementary surface charges on the two proteins. ETF is the positively charged member of the redox pair. The evidence is based on the pH and ionic strength dependencies of the comproportionation of oxidized ETF and ETF hydroquinone catalyzed by ETF-QO and on the effects of chemical modification of ETF on the comproportionation reaction. Acetylation of one and five epsilon-amino groups of lysyl residues results in 3- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in the K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF but no change in V/sub max/. Amidination, which maintains positive charge at modified loci, has no effect on steady-state kinetic constants. These chemical modifications have no effect on the equilibrium constant for equilibration of ETF redox states. The K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF is pH dependent above pH 8.5, suggesting titration of lysyl residues. The ionic strength dependence of TN/KmETF for the reaction follows the limiting Bronsted equation. The ETF-QO-catalyzed comproportionation reaction exhibits a primary deuterium isotope effect in D 2 O, perhaps indicating the participation of solvent water in the electron-transfer reaction

  8. Analysis of transfer reactions: determination of spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); The Andrzej So an Institute for Nuclear Studies, Dept. of Nuclear Reactions, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    An overview of the most popular models used for the analysis of direct reaction data is given, concentrating on practical aspects. The 4 following models (in order of increasing sophistication): the distorted wave born approximation (DWBA), the adiabatic model, the coupled channels born approximation, and the coupled reaction channels are briefly described. As a concrete example, the C{sup 12}(d,p)C{sup 13} reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 30 MeV is analysed with progressively more physically sophisticated models. The effect of the choice of the reaction model on the spectroscopic information extracted from the data is investigated and other sources of uncertainty in the derived spectroscopic factors are discussed. We have showed that the choice of the reaction model can significantly influence the nuclear structure information, particularly the spectroscopic factors or amplitudes but occasionally also the spin-parity, that we wish to extract from direct reaction data. We have also demonstrated that the DWBA can fail to give a satisfactory description of transfer data but when the tenets of the theory are fulfilled DWBA can work very well and will yield the same results as most sophisticated models. The use of global rather than fitted optical potentials can also lead to important differences in the extracted spectroscopic factors.

  9. Reaction mechanism of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons by the crossed molecular beams method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Baseman, R.J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  10. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  11. Selective Production of Renewable para-Xylene by Tungsten Carbide Catalyzed Atom-Economic Cascade Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tao; Li, Changzhi; Li, Lin; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Zhang, Bo; Cong, Yu; Wang, Aiqin

    2018-02-12

    Tungsten carbide was employed as the catalyst in an atom-economic and renewable synthesis of para-xylene with excellent selectivity and yield from 4-methyl-3-cyclohexene-1-carbonylaldehyde (4-MCHCA). This intermediate is the product of the Diels-Alder reaction between the two readily available bio-based building blocks acrolein and isoprene. Our results suggest that 4-MCHCA undergoes a novel dehydroaromatization-hydrodeoxygenation cascade process by intramolecular hydrogen transfer that does not involve an external hydrogen source, and that the hydrodeoxygenation occurs through the direct dissociation of the C=O bond on the W 2 C surface. Notably, this process is readily applicable to the synthesis of various (multi)methylated arenes from bio-based building blocks, thus potentially providing a petroleum-independent solution to valuable aromatic compounds. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Gas-Phase Reaction of Selected Carbonyls with Cl Atoms between 250 and 340 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, A. S.; Algrim, L.; Abdelhamid, A.; Tyndall, G. S.; Orlando, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonyls are important products from the gas phase degradation of most volatile organic compounds. Their atmospheric reactions therefore have a significant impact on atmospheric composition, particularly in aged air masses. While the reactions of short-chain linear carbonyls are well understood, the chemistry of larger (> C6) and branched carbonyl is more uncertain. To provide insight into these reactions, the reactions of three carbonyls (methyl isopropyl ketone, MIK; di-isopropyl ketone, DIK; and diethyl ketone, DEK) with chlorine atoms were investigated between 250 and 340 K and 1 atm in the presence and absence of NOx and an HO2 source (methanol). Experiments were performed in a photochemical reactor using a combination of long-path Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The kinetics were studied using the relative rate technique with butanone and isopropanol as the reference compounds. The Arrhenius expression for the three rate coefficients was determined to be k(DEK+Cl) = 3.87 x 10-11e(2 × 7 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 , k(MIPK+Cl) = 7.20 x 10-11e(0.2× 8 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 , and k(DIPK+Cl) = 3.33 x 10-10e(-3× 8 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 . Measured reaction products accounted for 38-72 % of the reacted carbon and were consistent with strong deactivation of the carbon atom adjacent to the carbonyl group with respect to H-atom abstraction by Cl atoms. The product distributions also provide insight into radical recycling from the organic peroxy + HO2 reaction, and the relative rates of isomerization, fragmentation and reaction with O2 for carbonyl-containing alkoxy radicals. Implications of these results will be discussed.

  13. Reactions of sulfur atoms. XV. Absolute rate parameters for the S(3P210) + alkyne reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Roodselaar, A.; Safarik, I.; Strausz, O.P.; Gunning, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Using flash photolysis with vacuum uv kinetic absorption spectroscopy, absolute rate constants and Arrhenius parameters have been measured for the addition of ground state S( 3 P 2 , 1 , 0 ) atoms to alkynes. The decay of sulfur atoms in COS, alkyne, and CO 2 -diluent mixtures is first order in sulfur atom concentration and the first-order decay rate constants are proportional to the alkyne concentration. The following rate constants were determined at room temperature: k(C 2 H 2 ) = k(C 2 D 2 ) + (2.3 +- 0.4) x 10 8 ; k(CHCCH 3 ) = (4.8 +- 0.2) x 10 9 ; k(CHCC 2 H 5 ) = (3.3 +- 0.2) x 10 9 ; k(CH 3 CCCH 3 ) = 1.6 +- 0.2) x 10 10 ; k(CH 3 CCC 2 C 5 ) = 1.8 +- 0.3) x 10 10 ; and k(CF 3 CCCF 3 ) = (2.1 +- 0.4) x 10 8 L mol -1 s -1 . The Arrhenius parameters determined are k(C 2 H 2 ) = (3.4 +- 1.9) x 10 10 exp[(-3000 +- 400)/RT] L mol -1 s -1 and k(CHCCH 3 ) = (2.0 +- 1.2) x 10 10 exp[(-900 +- 200)/RT] L mol -1 s -1 where error limits represent standard deviations. The rate parameters are compared to those obtained for the addition of other electrophilic reagents to alkynes and the results discussed in terms of structural and kinetic factors. Theoretical treatment of the secondary H/D isotope effect in the acetylene reaction satisfactorily reproduces the experimental value. 5 tables, 4 figures, 59 references

  14. Theoretical study of chain transfer to solvent reactions of alkyl acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Nazanin; Srinivasan, Sriraj; Grady, Michael C; Rappe, Andrew M; Soroush, Masoud

    2014-07-24

    This computational and theoretical study deals with chain transfer to solvent (CTS) reactions of methyl acrylate (MA), ethyl acrylate (EA), and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) self-initiated homopolymerization in solvents such as butanol (polar, protic), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) (polar, aprotic), and p-xylene (nonpolar). The results indicate that abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the methylene group next to the oxygen atom in n-butanol, from the methylene group in MEK, and from a methyl group in p-xylene by a live polymer chain are the most likely mechanisms of CTS reactions in MA, EA, and n-BA. Energy barriers and molecular geometries of reactants, products, and transition states are predicted. The sensitivity of the predictions to three hybrid functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-2X) and three different basis sets (6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) is investigated. Among n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol, tert-butanol has the highest CTS energy barrier and the lowest rate constant. Although the application of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) does not affect the predicted CTS kinetic parameter values, the application of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) results in higher CTS energy barriers. This increase in the predicted CTS energy barriers is larger for butanol and MEK than for p-xylene. The higher rate constants of chain transfer to n-butanol reactions compared to those of chain transfer to MEK and p-xylene reactions suggest the higher CTS reactivity of n-butanol.

  15. Post-prior equivalence for transfer reactions with complex potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jin; Moro, Antonio M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of the post-prior equivalence in the calculation of inclusive breakup and transfer cross sections. For that, we employ the model proposed by Ichimura et al. [Phys. Rev. C 32, 431 (1985), 10.1103/PhysRevC.32.431], conveniently generalized to include the part of the cross section corresponding the transfer to bound states. We pay particular attention to the case in which the unobserved particle is left in a bound state of the residual nucleus, in which case the theory prescribes the use of a complex potential, responsible for the spreading width of the populated single-particle states. We see that the introduction of this complex potential gives rise to an additional term in the prior cross-section formula, not present in the usual case of real binding potentials. The equivalence is numerically tested for the 58Ni(d ,p X ) reaction.

  16. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  17. Relative mobility of 1-H atoms of carbohydrates in heterogeneous isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskii, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The method of competitive reactions was used to determine the relative mobilities of the 1-H atoms of carbohydrates in reactions of heterogeneous isotope exchange, using various reference standards, catalysts, and buffer systems. On the basis of the results obtained, the investigated carbohydrates are ranged in a series of decreasing mobility of the hydrogen atoms exchanged in heterogeneous isotope exchange reactions. It was demonstrated that the mobility of the 1-H atoms is related to the concentration of the acyclic forms of the carbohydrates

  18. Pentanidium-catalyzed enantioselective phase-transfer conjugate addition reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Ting

    2011-03-09

    A new chiral entity, pentanidium, has been shown to be an excellent chiral phase-transfer catalyst. The enantioselective Michael addition reactions of tert-butyl glycinate-benzophenone Schiff base with various α,β- unsaturated acceptors provide adducts with high enantioselectivities. A successful gram-scale experiment at a low catalyst loading of 0.05 mol % indicates the potential for practical applications of this methodology. Phosphoglycine ester analogues can also be utilized as the Michael donor, affording enantioenriched α-aminophosphonic acid derivatives and phosphonic analogues of (S)-proline. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Chaotic scattering in heavy-ion reactions with mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Padron, Emilio; Guzman Martinez, Fernando

    1998-01-01

    The role of the mass transfer in heavy ion collisions is analyzed in the framework of a simple semi phenomenological model searching for chaotic scattering effects. The model couples the relative motion of the ions to a collective degree of freedom. The collective degree of freedom is identified by the mass asymmetry of the system. A Saxon-Woods potential is used for nucleus-nucleus interaction whiles a harmonic potential rules the temporal behaviour of the collective degree of freedom. This model shows chaotic scattering which could be an explanation for certain types of cross-section fluctuations observed in this kind of reactions

  20. Radiolytic and electron-transfer reactions in supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, D. M.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Takahashi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Using supercritical fluids as solvents is useful for both practical and theoretical reasons. It has been proposed to use supercritical CO 2 as a solvent for synthesis because it eliminates the air pollution arising from other solvents. The properties of supercritical fluids can be easily varied with only modest changes in temperature and density, so they provide a way of testing theories of chemical reactions. It has also been proposed to use supercritical fluids for the treatment of hazardous mixed waste. For these reasons the authors have studied the production of radiolytic species in supercritical CO 2 and have measured their reactivity as a function of density. They have shown that the C 2 O 4 + is formed. They also have shown that the electron transfer reactions of dimethylaniline to C 2 O 4 + and CO 2 (e - ) to benzoquinone are diffusion controlled over a considerable density range

  1. Determination of S17(0) from transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribble, R.E.; Azhari, A.; Clark, H.L.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Lui, Y.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Sattarov, A.; Trache, L.; Burjan, V.; Cejpek, J.; Kroha, V.; Piskor, S.; Vincour, J.

    1998-01-01

    The S-factor for the direct capture reaction 7 Be(p,γ) 8 B can be found at astrophysical energies from the asymptotic normalization coefficients which provide the normalization of the tails of the overlap functions for 8 B→ 7 Be+p. Peripheral transfer reactions offer a technique to determine these asymptotic normalization coefficients. As a test of the technique, the 16 O( 3 He,d) 17 F reaction has been used to determine asymptotic normalization coefficients for transitions to the ground and first excited states of 17 F. The S-factors for 16 O(p,γ) 17 F calculated from these 17 F→ 16 O+p asymptotic normalization coefficients are found to be in very good agreement with recent measurements. Following the same technique, the 10 B( 7 Be, 8 B) 9 Be reaction has been used to measure the asymptotic normalization coefficient for 7 Be(p,γ) 8 B. This result provides an indirect determination of S 17 (0). copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  2. Prediction of reacting atoms for the major biotransformation reactions of organic xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudik, Anastasia V; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of drug metabolite structures is essential at the early stage of drug discovery to understand the potential liabilities and risks connected with biotransformation. The determination of the site of a molecule at which a particular metabolic reaction occurs could be used as a starting point for metabolite identification. The prediction of the site of metabolism does not always correspond to the particular atom that is modified by the enzyme but rather is often associated with a group of atoms. To overcome this problem, we propose to operate with the term "reacting atom", corresponding to a single atom in the substrate that is modified during the biotransformation reaction. The prediction of the reacting atom(s) in a molecule for the major classes of biotransformation reactions is necessary to generate drug metabolites. Substrates of the major human cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases from the Biovia Metabolite database were divided into nine groups according to their reaction classes, which are aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylation, N- and O-glucuronidation, N-, S- and C-oxidation, and N- and O-dealkylation. Each training set consists of positive and negative examples of structures with one labelled atom. In the positive examples, the labelled atom is the reacting atom of a particular reaction that changed adjacency. Negative examples represent non-reacting atoms of a particular reaction. We used Labelled Multilevel Neighbourhoods of Atoms descriptors for the designation of reacting atoms. A Bayesian-like algorithm was applied to estimate the structure-activity relationships. The average invariant accuracy of prediction obtained in leave-one-out and 20-fold cross-validation procedures for five human isoforms of cytochrome P450 and all isoforms of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase varies from 0.86 to 0.99 (0.96 on average). We report that reacting atoms may be predicted with reasonable accuracy for the major classes of metabolic reactions

  3. A phenomenological model for collisional coherence transfer in an optically pumped atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbekyan, K; Bevilaqua, G; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [Universita degli Studi di Siena, Siena, 53100 (Italy); Khanbekyan, A; Papoyan, A, E-mail: karen.khanbekyan@gmail.com [Institute for Physical Research, National Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak 2 (Armenia)

    2011-03-14

    We consider a dual {Lambda}-system under double laser excitation to investigate the possibility of indirect coherence transfer between atomic ground states through an excited state. The atomic system is excited by a frequency modulated pump laser and probed by a low-power cw laser. All the decoherence mechanisms are discussed and taken into account. Adjustment of parameters of the two radiations aimed at maximization of coherence transfer is addressed. The study can help to understand the phenomena as collisional transfer of coherence and can find application in the experimental realization of atomic sensors.

  4. Fluorine atom subsurface diffusion and reaction in photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Frank; Fraser, D.; Coburn, J.W.; Graves, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic studies of fluorine and deuterium atoms interacting with an OiR 897 10i i-line photoresist (PR) are reported. All experiments were conducted at room temperature. Films of this PR were coated on quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates and exposed to alternating fluxes of these atoms in a high vacuum apparatus. Mass changes of the PR were observed in situ and in real time during the atom beam exposures using the QCM. A molecular-beam sampled differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) was used to measure the species desorbing from the PR surface during the F and D atom exposures. During the D atom exposures, hydrogen abstraction and etching of the PR was observed, but no DF formation was detected. However, during the F atom exposures, the major species observed to desorb from the surface was DF, formed from fluorine abstraction of deuterium from the photoresist. No evidence of film etching or fluorine self-abstraction was observed. The film mass increased during F atom exposure, evidently due to the replacement of D by F in the film. The rate of DF formation and mass uptake were both characterized by the same kinetics: An initially rapid step declining exponentially with time (e -t/τ ), followed by a much slower step following inverse square root of time (t -1/2 ) kinetics. The initially rapid step was interpreted as surface abstraction of D by F to form DF, which desorbs, with subsequent F impacting the surface inserted into surface C dangling bonds. The slower step was interpreted as F atoms diffusing into the fluorinated photoresist, forming DF at the boundary of the fluorinated carbon layer. The t -1/2 kinetics of this step are interpreted to indicate that F diffusion through the fluorinated carbon layer is much slower than the rate of F abstraction of D to form DF, or the rate of F insertion into the carbon dangling bonds left behind after DF formation. A diffusion-limited growth model was formulated, and the model parameters are

  5. 179Ta and 180Ta structure by transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, Elias.

    1979-01-01

    Transfer reactions (α,t); ( 3 He,d); (p,t) and (p,d) have been used to study the nuclear spectroscopy of 179 Ta and 180 Ta. In 179 Ta, 5/2 - and 9/2 - states of the 1/2(541) configuration have been identified. The core-quasiproton interaction has to be taken into account in order to explain the two-nucleon transfer intensities in the 181 Ta(p,t) 179 Ta reaction. A level scheme has been proposed for 180 Ta for the first time. Especially the ground state is identified with the (1 + ,1) level of the [7/2 + (404)sub(p), 9/2 + (624)sub(n)] configuration and spin (9 - ,9) of the configuration [9/2 - (514)sub(p), 9/2 + (624)sub(n)] has been assigned to the long-lived isomer. From the observed configurations in 180 Ta, the matrix elements of the effective residual interaction vsub(np) have been deduced and compared to theoretical predictions [fr

  6. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Tengborn, E

    Research on the structure of exotic nuclei is one of the most intriguing topics in present day nuclear physics. With the use of facilities for isotope separation on-line, such as ISOLDE at CERN, short-lived isotopes can be studied experimentally. Since 2002, the REX-ISOLDE facility enables radioactive ions produced by ISOLDE to be post-accelerated, increasing the energy of the ions enough to do nuclear transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. In this thesis, transfer reactions are used to study the structure of neutron-rich lithium isotopes through a series of experiments at REX-ISOLDE. The first experiment used a 9Li beam at 2.36 MeV/u impinging on a deuterated polyethylene target to study 10Li, 9Li and 8Li. For the (d,p)-channel the resonance ground state and a first excited state are observed and the results agree with theoretical calculations. The elastic channel agrees with Optical Model, OM, calculations. For the (d,t)-channel the shape of the angular distribution agrees with Distorted Wave Born Approx...

  7. Electron transfer reactions to probe the electrode/solution interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitanio, F.; Guerrini, E.; Colombo, A.; Trasatti, S. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2008-07-01

    The reactions that occur at the interface between an electrode and an electrolyte were examined with particular reference to the interaction of different electrode surfaces with redox couples. A semi-integration or convolution technique was used to study the kinetics of electron transfer on different electrode materials with different hydrophilic behaviour, such as Boron-Doped-Diamond (BDD), Au and Pt. Standard reversible redox couples were also investigated, including (Fe3+/2+, Fe(CN)63-/4-, Ru(NH3)63+/2+, Co(NH3)63+/2+, Ir4+/3+, V4+/5+ and V3+/2+). The proposed method proved to be simple, straightforward and reliable since the obtained kinetic information was in good agreement with data in the literature. It was concluded that the kinetics of the electrode transfer reactions depend on the chemical nature of the redox couple and electrode material. The method should be further extended to irreversible couples and other electrode materials such as mixed oxide electrodes. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  8. A comparison of pulsed and continuous atom transfer between two magneto-optical traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Mishra, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a comparison between pulsed and continuous transfer of cold 87 Rb atoms between a vapor chamber magneto-optical trap (VC-MOT) and an ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap (UHV-MOT) when using a resonant push beam. We find that employing repetitive cycles of a pulsed and unfocused push beam on an unsaturated VC-MOT cloud results in a significantly higher number of atoms transferred to the UHV-MOT than the number obtained with a continuous push beam focused on a continuous VC-MOT. In pulsed transfer, we find that both the VC-MOT loading duration and the push beam duration play important roles in the transfer process and govern the number of atoms transferred to the UHV-MOT. The parameters and processes affecting the transfer have been investigated and are discussed.

  9. Quadrupole type mass spectrometric study of the abstraction reaction between hydrogen atoms and ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakçeken, Fuat

    2008-02-01

    The reactions of photochemically generated deuterium atoms of selected initial translational energy with ethane have been investigated. At each initial energy the relative probability of the atoms undergoing reaction or energy loss on collision with ethane was investigated, and the phenomenological threshold energy was measured as 30+/-5kJmol(-1) for the abstraction from the secondary C-H bonds. The ratio of relative yields per bond, secondary:primary was approximately 3 at the higher energies studied. The correlation of threshold energies with bond dissociation energies, heats of reaction and activation energies is discussed for abstraction reactions with several hydrocarbons.

  10. Intramolecular energy transfer and mode-specific effects in unimolecular reactions of 1,2-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    1989-06-01

    The unimolecular decomposition reactions of 1,2-difluoroethane upon mode-specific excitation to a total internal energy of 7.5 eV are investigated using classical trajectory methods and a previously formulated empirical potential-energy surface. The decomposition channels for 1,2-difluoroethane are, in order of importance, four-center HF elimination, C-C bond rupture, and hydrogen-atom dissociation. This order is found to be independent of the particular vibrational mode excited. Neither fluorine-atom nor F2 elimination reactions are ever observed even though these dissociation channels are energetically open. For four-center HF elimination, the average fraction of the total energy partitioned into internal HF motion varies between 0.115-0.181 depending upon the particular vibrational mode initially excited. The internal energy of the fluoroethylene product lies in the range 0.716-0.776. Comparison of the present results with those previously obtained for a random distribution of the initial 1,2-difluoroethane internal energy [J. Phys. Chem. 92, 5111 (1988)], shows that numerous mode-specific effects are present in these reactions in spite of the fact that intramolecular energy transfer rates for this system are 5.88-25.5 times faster than any of the unimolecular reaction rates. Mode-specific excitation always leads to a total decomposition rate significantly larger than that obtained for a random distribution of the internal energy. Excitation of different 1,2-difluoroethane vibrational modes is found to produce as much as a 51% change in the total decomposition rate. Mode-specific effects are also seen in the product energy partitioning. The rate coefficients for decomposition into the various channels are very sensitive to the particular mode excited. A comparison of the calculated mode-specific effects with the previously determined mode-to-mode energy transfer rate coefficients [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 5680 (1988)] shows that, to some extent, the presence of mode

  11. Pulse radiolysis studies of the reactions of bromine atoms and dimethyl sulfoxide bromine atom complexes with alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Katagiri, Miho; Sawamura, Sadashi

    2007-05-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-Br complexes were generated by pulse radiolysis of DMSO/bromomethane mixtures and the formation mechanism and spectral characteristics of the formed complexes were investigated in detail. The rate constant for the reaction of bromine atoms with DMSO and the extinction coefficient of the complex were obtained to be 4.6×10 9 M -1 s -1 and 6300 M -1 cm -1 at the absorption maximum of 430 nm. Rate constants for the reaction of bromine atoms with a series of alcohols were determined in CBrCl 3 solutions applying a competitive kinetic method using the DMSO-Br complex as the reference system. The obtained rate constants were ˜10 8 M -1 s -1, one or two orders larger than those reported for highly polar solvents. Rate constants of DMSO-Br complexes with alcohols were determined to be ˜ 10 7 M -1 s -1. A comparison of the reactivities of Br atoms and DMSO-Br complexes with those of chlorine atoms and chlorine atom complexes which are ascribed to hydrogen abstracting reactants strongly indicates that hydrogen abstraction from alcohols is not the rate determining step in the case of Br atoms and DMSO-Br complexes.

  12. Theoretical study of the reaction kinetics of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod; Lo, John M H; Roscoe, John M.; Alquaity, Awad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the reaction of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran (THP, C5H10O) was performed using several ab initio methods and statistical rate theory calculations. Initial geometries of all species involved in the potential

  13. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  14. Probing the pairing interaction through two-neutron transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margueron J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the pairing interaction in mean-field-based models is addressed. In particular, the possibility to use pair transfers as A tool to better constrain this interaction is discussed. First, pairing inter-actions with various density dependencies (surface/volume mixing are used in the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov + quasiparticle random-phase approximation model to generate the form factors to be used in reaction calculations. Cross sections for (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions are calculated in the one-step zero-range distorted-wave Born approximation for some Tin isotopes and for incident proton energies from 15 to 35 MeV. Three different surface/volume mixings of A zero-range density-dependent pairing interaction are employed in the microscopic calculations and the sensitivity of the cross sections to the different mixings is analyzed. Differences among the three different theoretical predictions are found espacially for the nucleus 136Sn and they are more important at the incident proton energy of 15 MeV. We thus indicate (p,t two-neutron transfer reactions with very neutron-rich Sn isotopes and at proton energies around 15 MeV as good experimental cases where the surface/volume mixing of the pairing interaction may be probed. In the second part of the manuscript, ground-state to ground-state transitions are investigated. Approximations made to estimate two-nucleon transfer probabilities in ground-state to ground-state transitions and the physical interpretation of these probabilities are discussed. Probabilities are often calculated by approximating both ground states of the initial nucleus A and of the final nucleus A±2 by the same quasiparticle vacuum. We analyze two improvements of this approach. First, the effect of using two different ground states with average numbers of particles A and A±2 is quantified. Second, by using projection techniques, the role of particle number restoration is analyzed. Our analysis

  15. The role of the achiral template in enantioselective transformations. Radical conjugate additions to alpha-methacrylates followed by hydrogen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Sausker, Justin B

    2002-02-13

    We have evaluated various achiral templates (1a-g, 10, and 16) in conjunction with chiral Lewis acids in the conjugate addition of nucleophilic radicals to alpha-methacrylates followed by enantioselective H-atom transfer. Of these, a novel naphthosultam template (10) gave high enantioselectivity in the H-atom-transfer reactions with ee's up to 90%. A chiral Lewis acid derived from MgBr(2) and bisoxazoline (2) gave the highest selectivity in the enantioselective hydrogen-atom-transfer reactions. Non-C(2) symmetric oxazolines (20-25) have also been examined as ligands, and of these, compound 25 gave optimal results (87% yield and 80% ee). Insights into rotamer control in alpha-substituted acrylates and the critical role of the tetrahedral sulfone moiety in realizing high selectivity are discussed.

  16. Universal Four-Boson System: Dimer-Atom-Atom Efimov Effect and Recombination Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the four-boson system with resonant interactions are described. Momentum-space scattering equations for the four-particle transition operators are used. The properties of unstable tetramers with approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are determined. In addition, the three- and four-cluster recombination processes in the four-boson system are studied. (author)

  17. Vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions to the resonance dipole-dipole interaction between two atoms near a reflecting boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the resonance dipole-dipole interaction energy between two identical atoms, one in the ground state and the other in the excited state, interacting with the electromagnetic field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The atoms are prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) Bell-type state. Following a procedure due to Dalibard et al. [J. Dalibard et al., J. Phys. (Paris) 43, 1617 (1982);, 10.1051/jphys:0198200430110161700 J. Phys. (Paris) 45, 637 (1984), 10.1051/jphys:01984004504063700], we separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction (source) field to the resonance interaction energy between the two atoms and show that only the source field contributes to the interatomic interaction, while vacuum field fluctuations do not. By considering specific geometric configurations of the two-atom system with respect to the mirror and specific choices of dipole orientations, we show that the presence of the mirror significantly affects the resonance interaction energy and that different features appear with respect to the case of atoms in free space, for example, a change in the spatial dependence of the interaction. Our findings also suggest that the presence of a boundary can be exploited to tailor and control the resonance interaction between two atoms, as well as the related energy transfer process. The possibility of observing these phenomena is also discussed.

  18. Collective charge and mass transfer in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the dynamics of the charge and mass asymmetry degree of freedom was studied in the framework of the fragmentation theory by means of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation. New is the introduction of a friction potential which describes the coupling of these collective degrees of freedom to the not explicitely treated other collective respectively internal degrees of freedom. Thereby it was shown that the measured widths of the isobaric charge distributions in the 86 Kr+sup(92,98)Mo reaction can be explained mainly by the quantum mechanical uncertainty in the charge asymmetry degree of freedom. The charge equilibration occurring at the begin of a deep inelastic collision can therefore by considered as a quantum mechanical, collective, damped motion which is connected with the excitation of the isovector giant dipole resonance of the nucleus-nucleus system. The study of the mass transfer in the reactions 132 Xe+ 120 Sn and 86 Kr+ 166 Er shows, how important at the begin of a deep inelastic collision shell structures and their conservation are for a large part of the reaction, even if the elemental distribution show no maxima in the region of magic shell closures. The experimental width are up to 10 MeV/A well described under conservation of the shell structure. (orig./HSI) [de

  19. TRANSITION METAL CATALYSIS IN CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION: ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel and diversified macromolecular structures, which include polymers with designed topologies (top), compostions (middle), and functionalities (bottom), can be prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization processes. These polymers can be synthesized from a large variety of...

  20. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  1. Electron and Oxygen Atom Transfer Chemistry of Co(II) in a Proton Responsive, Redox Active Ligand Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brian J; Pink, Maren; Pal, Kuntal; Caulton, Kenneth G

    2018-05-21

    The bis-pyrazolato pyridine complex LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 serves as a masked form of three-coordinate Co II and shows diverse reactivity in its reaction with several potential outer sphere oxidants and oxygen atom transfer reagents. N-Methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMO) oxidizes coordinated PEt 3 from LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 , but the final cobalt product is still divalent cobalt, in LCo(NMO) 2 . The thermodynamics of a variety of oxygen atom transfer reagents, including NMO, are calculated by density functional theory, to rank their oxidizing power. Oxidation of LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 with AgOTf in the presence of LiCl as a trapping nucleophile forms the unusual aggregate [LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 Cl(LiOTf) 2 ] 2 held together by Li + binding to very nucleophilic chloride on Co(III) and triflate binding to those Li + . In contrast, Cp 2 Fe + effects oxidation to trivalent cobalt, to form (HL)Co(PEt 3 ) 2 Cl + ; proton and the chloride originate from solvent in a rare example of CH 2 Cl 2 dehydrochlorination. An unexpected noncomplementary redox reaction is reported involving attack by 2e reductant PEt 3 nucleophile on carbon of the 1e oxidant radical Cp 2 Fe + , forming a P-C bond and H + ; this reaction competes in the reaction of LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 with Cp 2 Fe + .

  2. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1990-05-01

    This program, which has been supported for twenty-four years by the Us Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, has produced significant advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of chemical activation by nuclear processes; the stereochemistry of radioactivity for solution of specific problems. This program was contributed to the training of approximately seventy scientists at various levels. This final report includes a review of the areas of research and chronological tabulation of the publications

  3. Growth and Destruction of PAH Molecules in Reactions with Carbon Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    A very high abundance of atomic carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and the high reactivity of these species toward different hydrocarbon molecules including benzene, raise questions regarding the stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in space. To test the efficiency of destruction of PAH molecules via reactions with atomic carbon, we performed a set of laboratory and computational studies of the reactions of naphthalene, anthracene, and coronene molecules with carbon atoms in the ground state. The reactions were investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K and by quantum chemical computations. Our studies suggest that all small and all large catacondensed PAHs react barrierlessly with atomic carbon, and therefore should be efficiently destroyed by such reactions in a broad temperature range. At the same time, large compact pericondensed PAHs should be more inert toward such a reaction. In addition, taking into account their higher photostability, much higher abundances of pericondensed PAHs should be expected in various astrophysical environments. The barrierless reactions between carbon atoms and small PAHs also suggest that, in the ISM, these reactions could lead to the bottom-up formation of PAH molecules.

  4. Charged-particle transfer reactions and nuclear astrophysics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, S.V.; Yarmukhamedov, R.; Yuldashev, B.S.; Burtebaev, N.; Duysebaev, A.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.

    2002-01-01

    In the report a review of the recent results of calculation of the astrophysical S-factors S(E) for the D(α, γ) 6 Li, 3 He(α, γ) 7 Be, 7 Be(p, γ) 8 Be, 12,13 C(p, γ) 13, 14 N and 12 C(p,γ) 16 O* reactions at extremely low energies E, including value E=0 , performed within the framework of a new method taking into account the additional information about the nuclear vertex constant (Nc) (or the respective asymptotic normalization coefficient) are presented. The required values of Nc can be obtained from an analysis of measured differential cross-sections of proton and α-particle transfer reactions (for example A( 3 He,d)B, 6 Li(d, 6 Li)d, 6 Li(α, 6 Li)α, 12 C( 6 Li, d) 16 O* etc.). A comparative analysis between the results obtained by different authors is also done. Taking into account an important role of the NVC's values for the nuclear astrophysical A(p, γ)B and A(α, γ)B reactions, a possibility of obtaining the reliable NVC values for the virtual decay B→A+p and B→A+α from the analysis of differential cross sections both sub- and above-barrier A( 3 He, d) and A( 6,7 Li, 2,3 H)B reactions is discussed in detail. In this line the use the isochronous cyclotron U-150 M, the 'DC-60' heavy ion machine and electrostatic charge-exchanging accelerator UKP-2-1 of Institute of Nuclear Physics of National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan for carrying out the needed experiments is considered and the possibility of the obtained data application for the astrophysical interest is also discussed

  5. Optical emissions from oxygen atom reactions with adsorbates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, David B.; Fraser, Mark E.; Gauthier-Beals, Mitzi; Holtzclaw, Karl W.; Malonson, Mark; Gelb, Alan H.

    1992-12-01

    Although most optical materials are inert to the ambient low earth orbit environment, high velocity oxygen atoms will react with adsorbates to produce optical emissions from the ultraviolet into the infrared. The adsorbates arise from chemical releases or outgassing from the spacecraft itself. We have been investigating kinetic and spectral aspects of these phenomenon by direct observation of the 0.2 to 13 micrometers chemiluminescence from the interaction of a fast atomic oxygen beam with a continuously dosed surface. The dosing gases include fuels, combustion products and outgassed species such as unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), NO, H2O and CO. The surface studied include gold and magnesium fluoride. In order to relate the results to actual spacecraft conditions these phenomena have been explored as a function of O atom velocity, dosant flux and substrate temperature. UDMH dosed surfaces exhibit spectra typical (wavelength and intensity) of carbonaceous surfaces. The primary emitters are CO, CO2, and OH. H2O dosed surfaces are dominated by OH and /or H2O emission while CO dosed surfaces are dominated by CO and CO2 emissions. The nitric oxide dosed surface produces a glow from 0.4 to 5.4 micrometers due to NO2* continuum emission. The emission was observed to increase by a factor of two upon cooling the surface from 20 degree(s)C to -35 degree(s)C.

  6. The population transfer of high excited states of Rydberg lithium atoms in a microwave field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lijuan; Zhang Xianzhou; Ma Huanqiang; Jia Guangrui; Zhang Yonghui; Xia Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA), the properties of high excited Rydberg lithium atom have been obtained in the microwave field. The population transfer of lithium atom are studied on numerical calculation, quantum states are controlled and manipulated by microwave field. It shows that the population can be completely transferred to the target state by changing the chirped rate and field amplitude. (authors)

  7. Dynamical interaction of He atoms with metal surfaces: Charge transfer processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, F.; Garcia Vidal, F.J.; Monreal, R.

    1993-01-01

    A self-consistent Kohn-Sham LCAO method is presented to calculate the charge transfer processes between a He * -atom and metal surfaces. Intra-atomic correlation effects are taken into account by considering independently each single He-orbital and by combining the different charge transfer processes into a set of dynamical rate equations for the different ion charge fractions. Our discussion reproduces qualitatively the experimental evidence and gives strong support to the method presented here. (author). 24 refs, 4 figs

  8. Atomic nuclei and nuclear reactions. Theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.G.; Tartakovsky, V.K.; Kenjebaev, K.K.; Shunkeyev, K.Sh.; Ismatov, E.I.; Mukhammedov, S.; Comsan, M.N.H.; Djuraev, Sh.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The short description of the book preparation by the collective authors from Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Egypt is given. The present book is the expanded course of lectures on the theory of nuclei, nuclear reactions and their applications delivered by the authors for a number of years in the Ukrainian National University, Aktubinsk State University of the Kazakhstan Republic, Tashkent National University, Samarkand and Termez State Universities of Uzbekistan Republic, Egyptian National Universities (Al-Az'har, Menoufeya, Suez-Canal and Tanta) and the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan. The lectures present foundations of the modern concepts of the structure of nuclei, on the nature of nuclear processes and nuclear transformations. Main attention in the book was paid to the presentation of the basics and some modern achievements in the field of the theory of nuclei and nuclear reactions. A number of problems was investigated in original works and were not presented in the physics textbooks. The book presents the non-relativistic theory of nuclear reactions, questions of relativistic nuclear physics were not considered here. Non-relativistic theory of nuclear reactions is based on the notions of collision matrix or S-matrix. In absence of consequent microscopic theory, the scattering matrix can be found phenomenological based on definite assumptions on the character of nuclear interactions. Modern applications of nuclear reactions for the development of nuclear methods of analysis are presented. The delayed and nuclear techniques with nuclear reactor, accelerators and radioisotopic sources are considered. The book is designed as a textbook for bachelor and postgraduate students of physical faculties of universities and engineering-physical institutions, lecturers and researchers, working in the field of nuclear physics. The book gives an up-to-date list of references on nuclear reaction theory and

  9. Dynamics of the F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) Proton Transfer Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxu; Xie, Jing; Hase, William L

    2015-12-17

    Direct chemical dynamics simulations, at collision energies Erel of 0.32 and 1.53 eV, were performed to obtain an atomistic understanding of the F(-) + CH3I reaction dynamics. There is only the F(-) + CH3I → CH3F + I(-) bimolecular nucleophilic substitution SN2 product channel at 0.32 eV. Increasing Erel to 1.53 eV opens the endothermic F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) proton transfer reaction, which is less competitive than the SN2 reaction. The simulations reveal proton transfer occurs by two direct atomic-level mechanisms, rebound and stripping, and indirect mechanisms, involving formation of the F(-)···HCH2I complex and the roundabout. For the indirect trajectories all of the CH2I(-) is formed with zero-point energy (ZPE), while for the direct trajectories 50% form CH2I(-) without ZPE. Without a ZPE constraint for CH2I(-), the reaction cross sections for the rebound, stripping, and indirect mechanisms are 0.2 ± 0.1, 1.2 ± 0.4, and 0.7 ± 0.2 Å(2), respectively. Discarding trajectories that do not form CH2I(-) with ZPE reduces the rebound and stripping cross sections to 0.1 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.5 Å(2). The HF product is formed rotationally and vibrationally unexcited. The average value of J is 2.6 and with histogram binning n = 0. CH2I(-) is formed rotationally excited. The partitioning between CH2I(-) vibration and HF + CH2I(-) relative translation energy depends on the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE. Without a CH2I(-) ZPE constraint the energy partitioning is primarily to relative translation with little CH2I(-) vibration. With a ZPE constraint, energy partitioning to CH2I(-) rotation, CH2I(-) vibration, and relative translation are statistically the same. The overall F(-) + CH3I rate constant at Erel of both 0.32 and 1.53 eV is in good agreement with experiment and negligibly affected by the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE, since the SN2 reaction is the major contributor to the total reaction rate constant. The potential energy surface and reaction dynamics for F

  10. Mass transfer in porous media with heterogeneous chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza S.M.A.G.Ulson de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modeling of the mass transfer process in packed-bed reactors is presented and takes into account dispersion in the main fluid phase, internal diffusion of the reactant in the pores of the catalyst, and surface reaction inside the catalyst. The method of volume averaging is applied to obtain the governing equation for use on a small scale. The local mass equilibrium is assumed for obtaining the one-equation model for use on a large scale. The closure problems are developed subject to the length-scale constraints and the model of a spatially periodic porous medium. The expressions for effective diffusivity, hydrodynamic dispersion, total dispersion and the Darcy's law permeability tensors are presented. Solution of the set of final equations permits the variations of velocity and concentration of the chemical species along the packed-bed reactors to be obtained.

  11. Membrane introduction proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, M.; Boscaini, E.; Maerk, T.; Lindinger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a rapidly expanding field with multiple applications in ion physics, atmospheric chemistry, food chemistry, volatile organic compounds monitoring and biology. Initial studies that combine PTR-MS and membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) were researched and outlined. First using PTR-MS, certain fundamental physical properties of a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane including solubilities and diffusion coefficients were measured. Second, it was shown how the chemical selectivity of the (PDMS) can be used to extend the capabilities of the PTR-MS instrument by eliminating certain isobaric interferences and excluding water from volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Experiments with mixtures of several VOCs (toluene, benzene, acetone, propanal, methanol) are presented. (nevyjel)

  12. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  13. Charge-transfer modified embedded atom method dynamic charge potential for Li-Co-O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fantai; Longo, Roberto C; Liang, Chaoping; Nie, Yifan; Zheng, Yongping; Zhang, Chenxi; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2017-11-29

    To overcome the limitation of conventional fixed charge potential methods for the study of Li-ion battery cathode materials, a dynamic charge potential method, charge-transfer modified embedded atom method (CT-MEAM), has been developed and applied to the Li-Co-O ternary system. The accuracy of the potential has been tested and validated by reproducing a variety of structural and electrochemical properties of LiCoO 2 . A detailed analysis on the local charge distribution confirmed the capability of this potential for dynamic charge modeling. The transferability of the potential is also demonstrated by its reliability in describing Li-rich Li 2 CoO 2 and Li-deficient LiCo 2 O 4 compounds, including their phase stability, equilibrium volume, charge states and cathode voltages. These results demonstrate that the CT-MEAM dynamic charge potential could help to overcome the challenge of modeling complex ternary transition metal oxides. This work can promote molecular dynamics studies of Li ion cathode materials and other important transition metal oxides systems that involve complex electrochemical and catalytic reactions.

  14. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Formation of hyperbranched polymers in atom transfer radical copolymerization of MMA and DVB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hyperbranched poly(methyl methacrylate)s (HPMMAs) have been successfully prepared by atom transfer radical copolymerization of MMA and divinylbenzene (DVB).Kinetic study shows complete consumption of the initiator in 0.5 h,and relatively low polymerization rate when DVB content in the feed was high.By analyzing MALDI-TOF spectra of the resulting copolymers,the linear A n B (n=0,1,2,3) oligomers were formed in 0.5 h of polymerization,and then the oligomers reacted each other to form dimers,further reactions produced HPMMA.The SEC and NMR spectroscopies were used to trace the polymerization,and the results demonstrate that small amount of the branching reactions occur in the initial polymerization,and the branched polymers are significantly generated past a certain conversion depending upon the feed ratios.Raising the content of DVB in the monomer mixture can increase the pendent vinyl groups of the linear oligo-inimers,leading to gelation at low MMA conversion.

  16. Isotope effects in the reactions of atomic ions with H2, D2, and HD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armentrout, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions of various atomic ions with H 2 , D 2 , and HD have been studied as a function of kinetic energy by using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. For exothermic reactions, the dependence on translational and rotational energy and the effect of angular momentum conservation are illustrated. For endothermic reactions, the observed behavior falls into several distinct groups (statistical, direct and impulsive) that can be used to characterize the potential energy surfaces for the reactions. The characteristic behavior of each of these groups is illustrated and then used to understand more complex reaction systems

  17. Molecular Beam Chemistry: Reactions of Oxygen Atoms with Halogen Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-15

    nonlinear one has s = 3, r = 1, and n = 3/2. In the "loose" complex the bending modes go over to free rotation of the product diatomit molecule; thus s...contains no adjustable parameters. All observable properties *l of the reaction may be predicted including product velocity and angular dis- tributions...example, P. R. Bevington, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences (McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1969). 65. Equation (3) is strictly

  18. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wen-Li; Xu Xin-Ye

    2011-01-01

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (atomic and molecular physics)

  19. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  20. Chromium 51 em K2CrO4: reactions of dopant atoms in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valim, J.B.; Nascimento, R.L.G. do; Collins, C.H.; Collins, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    The study of the chemistry of 'dopant' 51 Cr(III) atoms in crystalline Cr(VI) compounds began as a sub-field of Hot Atom Chemistry. We shall review the attempts to use 'dopant' chromium-51 atoms as surrogate chromium recoil atoms with the special property of having a low-energy, recoil-dam-age-free history. These dopant atoms have shown behaviors very similar to those of high energy recoil 51 Gr atoms, thus offering little hope of learning about special damage site structures and reactions by behavioral differences. Recent work has shown that at least some of the 'dopant' 51 Cr(III) is present as a second, non-chromate solid phase in 'doped crystal' experiments. Monodisperse 51 Cr(OH) 3 particles mixed with pure K 2 CrO 4 are very reactive. (Author) [pt

  1. Computational study of chain transfer to monomer reactions in high-temperature polymerization of alkyl acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Nazanin; Liu, Shi; Srinivasan, Sriraj; Grady, Michael C; Soroush, Masoud; Rappe, Andrew M

    2013-03-28

    This article presents a computational study of chain transfer to monomer (CTM) reactions in self-initiated high-temperature homopolymerization of alkyl acrylates (methyl, ethyl, and n-butyl acrylate). Several mechanisms of CTM are studied. The effects of the length of live polymer chains and the type of monoradical that initiated the live polymer chains on the energy barriers and rate constants of the involved reaction steps are investigated theoretically. All calculations are carried out using density functional theory. Three types of hybrid functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-2X) and four basis sets (6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) are applied to predict the molecular geometries of the reactants, products and transition sates, and energy barriers. Transition state theory is used to estimate rate constants. The results indicate that abstraction of a hydrogen atom (by live polymer chains) from the methyl group in methyl acrylate, the methylene group in ethyl acrylate, and methylene groups in n-butyl acrylate are the most likely mechanisms of CTM. Also, the rate constants of CTM reactions calculated using M06-2X are in good agreement with those estimated from polymer sample measurements using macroscopic mechanistic models. The rate constant values do not change significantly with the length of live polymer chains. Abstraction of a hydrogen atom by a tertiary radical has a higher energy barrier than abstraction by a secondary radical, which agrees with experimental findings. The calculated and experimental NMR spectra of dead polymer chains produced by CTM reactions are comparable. This theoretical/computational study reveals that CTM occurs most likely via hydrogen abstraction by live polymer chains from the methyl group of methyl acrylate and methylene group(s) of ethyl (n-butyl) acrylate.

  2. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  3. Oxygen atom transfer from a trans-dioxoruthenium(VI) complex to nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Ng, Siu-Mui; Tsang, Wenny Y K; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2012-01-02

    In aqueous acidic solutions trans-[Ru(VI)(L)(O)(2)](2+) (L=1,12-dimethyl-3,4:9,10-dibenzo-1,12-diaza-5,8-dioxacyclopentadecane) is rapidly reduced by excess NO to give trans-[Ru(L)(NO)(OH)](2+). When ≤1 mol equiv NO is used, the intermediate Ru(IV) species, trans-[Ru(IV)(L)(O)(OH(2))](2+), can be detected. The reaction of [Ru(VI)(L)(O)(2)](2+) with NO is first order with respect to [Ru(VI)] and [NO], k(2)=(4.13±0.21)×10(1) M(-1) s(-1) at 298.0 K. ΔH(≠) and ΔS(≠) are (12.0±0.3) kcal mol(-1) and -(11±1) cal mol(-1) K(-1), respectively. In CH(3)CN, ΔH(≠) and ΔS(≠) have the same values as in H(2)O; this suggests that the mechanism is the same in both solvents. In CH(3)CN, the reaction of [Ru(VI)(L)(O)(2)](2+) with NO produces a blue-green species with λ(max) at approximately 650 nm, which is characteristic of N(2)O(3). N(2)O(3) is formed by coupling of NO(2) with excess NO; it is relatively stable in CH(3)CN, but undergoes rapid hydrolysis in H(2)O. A mechanism that involves oxygen atom transfer from [Ru(VI)(L)(O)(2)](2+) to NO to produce NO(2) is proposed. The kinetics of the reaction of [Ru(IV)(L)(O)(OH(2))](2+) with NO has also been investigated. In this case, the data are consistent with initial one-electron O(-) transfer from Ru(IV) to NO to produce the nitrito species [Ru(III)(L)(ONO)(OH(2))](2+) (k(2)>10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), followed by a reaction with another molecule of NO to give [Ru(L)(NO)(OH)](2+) and NO(2)(-) (k(2)=54.7 M(-1) s(-1)). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Reaction of the H atom in gamma-irradiated ferrous sulphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, R.W.

    1977-10-01

    The effect of sulphuric acid, ferrous and ferric ion, and oxygen concentrations on G(Fe 3+ ) values from cobalt-60 gamma-irradiated soltuions has been studied. Kinetic expressions were derived for reaction models involving reactions of various forms of the H atom and additional reactions postulated to be of importance at high solute concentration. Three models were assumed invoking the additional reactions: (1) an independent yield of an excited water species; (2) increasing contributions from interspur reactions of well established species at increasing solute concentration; (3) inhibition of charge pair recombination by acid and scavenger species. The calculated G(Fe 3+ ) values from the various models were compared by the least squares method with experimental G(Fe 3+ ) values from over 600 irradiations. Model 3 provided the best fit to the data for the least number of adjustable parameters. No evidence for more than one form of H atom was found with this model. (J.R.)

  5. Olefin copolymerization using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venkatesh, R.; Klumperman, B.

    2003-01-01

    Olefin copolymers of alpha-olefins with polar monomers with various architectures remain an ultimate goal in polyolefin engineering. The present paper is a more detailed study on the copolymn. of alpha-olefins (1-octene) with acrylates (Me acrylate). Comparison of reaction kinetics between free

  6. Synthesis of 3-Alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via Diels-Alder and Electron Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vanelle

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A convenient route to 3-alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via a hetero Diels-Alder reaction between an azadiene and naphthoquinone, a free radical chlorination and an electron transfer reaction is reported.

  7. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  8. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry. [Production by sputtering; reaction with butenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O(/sup 3/P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated. (DLC)

  9. Reaction of hydrogen atoms produced by radiolysis and photolysis in solid phase at 4 and 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of H atoms in the solid phase has been reviewed with special attention to comparison of H atoms produced by radiolysis with those produced by photolysis. The paper consists of three parts. I -Production of H atoms: (1) the experimental results which indicate H-atom formation in the radiolysis of solid alkane are summarized; (2) ESR saturation behavior of trapped H atoms depends upon the method of H-atom-production, i.e. photolysis or radiolysis, and upon the initial energy of H atoms in the photolysis. II - Diffusion of H atoms: (1) activation energies for thermally-activated diffusion of H atoms are shown; (2) quantum diffusion of H atoms in solid H 2 is explained in terms of repetition of tunneling reaction H 2 + H → H + H 2 . III -Reaction of H atoms: (1) reactions and trapping processes of hot H atoms have been shown in solid methane and argon by use of hot H atoms with specified initial energy; (2) when H atoms are produced by the radiolysis of solvent alkane or by the photolysis of HI in the alkane mixtures at 77 K, the H atoms react very selectively with solute alkane at low concentration. The selective reaction of the H atom has been found in eight matrices; (3) activation energy for a hydrogen-atom-abstraction reaction by thermal H atoms at low temperatures is less than than several kJ mol -1 because of quantum tunneling. The absolute rate constants for H 2 (D 2 , HD) + H(D) tunneling reactions have been determined experimentally in solid hydrogen at 4.2K; (4) theoretical studies for tunneling reactions H 2 (D 2 ,HD) + H(D) at ultralow temperatures were reviewed. The calculated rate constants were compared with the rate constants obtained experimentally. (author)

  10. Is H Atom Abstraction Important in the Reaction of Cl with 1-Alkenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M P; Vijayakumar, S; Sharma, A; Rajakumar, B; Dhanya, S

    2016-06-23

    The relative yields of products of the reaction of Cl atoms with 1-alkenes (C4-C9) were determined to see whether H atom abstraction is an important channel and if it is to identify the preferred position of abstraction. The presence of all the possible positional isomers of long chain alkenones and alkenols among the products, along with chloroketones and chloroalcohols, confirms the occurrence of H atom abstraction. A consistent pattern of distribution of abstraction products is observed with oxidation at C4 (next to allyl) being the lowest and that at CH2 groups away from the double bond being the highest. This contradicts with the higher stability of allyl (C3) radical. For a better understanding of the relative reactivity, ab initio calculations at MP2/6-311+G (d,p) level of theory are carried out in the case of 1-heptene. The total rate coefficient, calculated using conventional transition state theory, was found to be in good agreement with the experimental value at room temperature. The preferred position of Cl atom addition is predicted to be the terminal carbon atom, which matches with the experimental observation, whereas the rate coefficients calculated for individual channels of H atom abstraction do not explain the observed pattern of products. The distribution of abstraction products except at C4 is found to be better explained by reported structure activity relationship, developed from experimental rate coefficient data. This implies the reactions to be kinetically dictated and emphasizes the importance of secondary reactions.

  11. Nuclear structure effects in multi-nucleon transfer and sequential fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    The role of the nuclear structure in multi-nucleon transfer and sequential fission reactions has been discussed. The recent results on multi-nucleon transfer and transfer induced fission reaction, have brought out many interesting features in understanding the reaction mechanism and collective dynamics of heavy ion reactions. The structure of the projectile nucleus has strong influence on the transfer of multi-nucleons and/or clusters from the projectile to the target. The mechanism of multi-nucleon transfer between two heavy nuclei is a complex process which has a strong dependence on the ground state Q-value of the reaction as well as on the number of transferred nucleons

  12. Multi-nucleon transfer: a probe to investigate the reaction mechanism around the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Samit K.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of multi-nucleon transfer mechanism offers valuable information on the pairing interactions that enhance the transfer of nucleon pairs across heavy ions involved in the reaction. These reactions are also a useful tool to study exotic nuclei far from the stability line, which can be explored with the new generation radioactive beam facility. In this talk, multi-nucleon transfer reaction mechanisms between heavy ions and their effect on the reaction dynamics around the coulomb barrier energies have been discussed. Experimental results will be presented with a semi classical description of multi nucleon transfer reaction calculation. One and two nucleon transfer cross sections reproduced using a quantum mechanical coupled channel calculations will also be discussed. A feasibility of investigation of multi-nucleon transfer mechanism to explore the pairing correlation at moderate spin states with radioactive beams will be discussed. (author)

  13. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H 2 , rovibrational excitation of H 2 produced by the reaction H + HBr → H 2 + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr

  14. Experimental evidence of state-selective charge transfer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    State-selective charge-transfer behavior was observed for Fe, Cr, Mn and Cu in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-atomic emission spectrometry. Charge transfer from Ar + to Fe, Cr and Mn is state-selective because of inefficient collisional mixing of the quasiresonant charge-transfer energy levels with nearby levels. This low efficiency is the consequence of differences in electronic configuration of the core electrons. The reason for state-selective charge-transfer behavior to Cu is not clear, although a tentative explanation based on efficiency of intramultiplet and intermultiplet mixing for this special case is offered

  15. Isotopic effects in the muon transfer from pmu and dmu to heavier atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupays, Arnaud

    2004-07-23

    The results of accurate hyperspherical calculations of the muon-transfer rates from muonic protium and deuterium atoms to nitrogen, oxygen, and neon are reported. Very good agreement with measured rates is obtained and, for the three systems, the isotopic effect is perfectly reproduced. The transfer rate is higher for deuterium in the cases of nitrogen and neon due to constructive interferences between two transfer paths. The lower transfer rate for deuterium in the case of oxygen results from a large resonant contribution. Copyright 2004 The American Physical Society

  16. Primary processes and ionic reactions in the chemistry of recoiling silicon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Boo, B.H.; Stewart, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry has permitted the elucidation of the chemistry of free atoms, and these include the polyvalent atoms of refractory group 14 elements, that is, carbon, silicon and germanium. Since no more than two bonds are formed normally in a single reactive collision of free atoms, the study on the chemistry of atoms like C, Si and Ge that require the formation of more than two bonds to saturate their chemical valence necessarily involves the study of reactive intermediates. By the studies on the chemistry of recoiling 31 Si atoms, the mechanistic conclusions reached are reported. The most important unanswered questions concerning the reaction of recoiling 31 Si atoms in the systems are shown, and progress has been made toward the answering. By using tetramethyl silane as a trapping agent for silicon ions, it has been established that the reaction of 31 Si ions contributes significantly to the formation of products in recoil systems. The studies by various researchers on this theme are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Charge transfer processes in collisions of Si{sup 4+} ions with He atoms at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, R. [Hitotsubashi Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Computer Center; Watanabe, A. [Dept. of Information Sciences, Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Sato, H. [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Gu, J.P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R.J. [Wuppertal Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Lehrgebiet Theoretische Chemie; Kimura, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan); Stancil, P.C. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    Charge transfer in collisions of Si{sup 4+} ions with He atoms below 100 keV/u is studied by using a molecular orbital representation within both the semiclassical and quantal representations. Single transfer reaction Si{sup 4+} + He {yields} Si{sup 3+} + He{sup +} has been studied by a number of theoretical investigations. In addition to the reaction (1), the first semiclassical MOCC calculations are performed for the double transfer channel Si{sup 4+} + He {yields} Si{sup 2+} + He{sup 2+}. Nine molecular states that connect both with single and double electron transfer processes are considered in the present model. Electronic states and corresponding couplings are determined by the multireference single- and double- excitation configuration interaction method. The present cross sections tie well with the earlier calculations of Stancil et al., (1997) at lower energies, but show a rather different magnitude from those of Bacchus-Montabonel and Ceyzeriat, (1998). The present rate constant is found to be significantly different from the experimental finding of Fang and Kwong, (1996) at 4,600 K, and hence does not support the experiment. (orig.)

  18. The reaction of nitromethane with hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the gas phase. A mechanistic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Thomsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction between H and CH3NO2, has been studied in a discharge flow system using electron paramagnetic resonance and modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry for the detection of reactants and products. Deuterium atoms have, in addition to CD3NO2, been used to support...... the proposed reaction mechanism. The reaction was studied with the atomic reactant in slight excess at 298 K and a total pressure of 2 Torr. Two concurrent reaction channels: (1a) H+CH3NO2-->HONO+.CH3 and (1b) H+CH3NO2-->CH3NO+.OH were observed. The branching ratio, k1a/(k1a+k1b), is 0.7+/-0.2....

  19. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with hydrogen peroxide as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundström, T.; Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependence for the reaction of H atoms with H2O2 at pH 1 has been determined using pulse radiolysis technique. The reaction was studied in the temperature range 10-120 degreesC. The rate constant at 25 degreesC was found to be 5.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and the activa......The temperature dependence for the reaction of H atoms with H2O2 at pH 1 has been determined using pulse radiolysis technique. The reaction was studied in the temperature range 10-120 degreesC. The rate constant at 25 degreesC was found to be 5.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1...

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Ponomarev, DA; Nielsen, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene (C6H5I) in 20-700 Torr of N-2, air, or O-2 diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds with a rate constant k(Cl + QH(5)I) = (3.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) to give...

  1. Capturing Chemistry in Action with Electrons: Realization of Atomically Resolved Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, Anatoly A; Weber, Peter M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-08-23

    One of the grand challenges in chemistry has been to directly observe atomic motions during chemical processes. The depiction of the nuclear configurations in space-time to understand barrier crossing events has served as a unifying intellectual theme connecting the different disciplines of chemistry. This challenge has been cast as an imaging problem in which the technical issues reduce to achieving not only sufficient simultaneous space-time resolution but also brightness for sufficient image contrast to capture the atomic motions. This objective has been met with electrons as the imaging source. The review chronicles the first use of electron structural probes to study reactive intermediates, to the development of high bunch charge electron pulses with sufficient combined spatial-temporal resolution and intensity to literally light up atomic motions, as well as the means to characterize the electron pulses in terms of temporal brightness and image reconstruction. The use of femtosecond Rydberg spectroscopy as a novel means to use internal electron scattering within the molecular reference frame to obtain similar information on reaction dynamics is also discussed. The focus is on atomically resolved chemical reaction dynamics with pertinent references to work in other areas and forms of spectroscopy that provide additional information. Effectively, we can now directly observe the far-from-equilibrium atomic motions involved in barrier crossing and categorize chemistry in terms of a power spectrum of a few dominant reaction modes. It is this reduction in dimensionality that makes chemical reaction mechanisms transferrable to seemingly arbitrarily complex (large N) systems, up to molecules as large as biological macromolecules (N > 1000 atoms). We now have a new way to reformulate reaction mechanisms using an experimentally determined dynamic mode basis that in combination with recent theoretical advances has the potential to lead to a new conceptual basis for

  2. Constructing Functional Ionic Membrane Surface by Electrochemically Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Ran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sodium polyacrylate (PAANa contained polyethersulfone membrane that was fabricated by preparation of PES-NH2 via nonsolvent phase separation method, the introduction of bromine groups as active sites by grafting α-Bromoisobutyryl bromide, and surface-initiated electrochemically atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-eATRP of sodium acrylate (AANa on the surface of PES membrane. The polymerization could be controlled by reaction condition, such as monomer concentration, electric potential, polymerization time, and modifier concentration. The membrane surface was uniform when the monomer concentration was 0.9 mol/L, the electric potential was −0.12 V, the polymerization time was 8 h, and the modifier concentration was 2 wt.%. The membrane showed excellent hydrophilicity and blood compatibility. The water contact angle decreased from 84° to 68° and activated partial thromboplastin increased from 51 s to 84 s after modification of the membranes.

  3. Surface modification of nanodiamond through metal free atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Shi, Kexin; Heng, Chunning; Mao, Liucheng; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Surface modification of ND with water soluble and biocompatible polymers. • Functionalized ND through metal free surface initiated ATRP. • The metal free surface initiated ATRP is rather simple and effective. • The ND-poly(MPC) showed high dispersibility and desirable biocompatibility. - Abstract: Surface modification of nanodiamond (ND) with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [poly(MPC)] has been achieved by using metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The ATRP initiator was first immobilized on the surface of ND through direct esterification reaction between hydroxyl group of ND and 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The initiator could be employed to obtain ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites through SI-ATRP using an organic catalyst. The final functional materials were characterized by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis in detailed. All of these characterization results demonstrated that ND-poly(MPC) have been successfully obtained via metal free photo-initiated SI-ATRP. The ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites shown enhanced dispersibility in various solvents as well as excellent biocompatibility. As compared with traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP is rather simple and effective. More importantly, this preparation method avoided the negative influence of metal catalysts. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a promising strategy for fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with great potential for different applications especially in biomedical fields.

  4. Surface modification of nanodiamond through metal free atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Shi, Kexin; Heng, Chunning; Mao, Liucheng; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface modification of ND with water soluble and biocompatible polymers. • Functionalized ND through metal free surface initiated ATRP. • The metal free surface initiated ATRP is rather simple and effective. • The ND-poly(MPC) showed high dispersibility and desirable biocompatibility. - Abstract: Surface modification of nanodiamond (ND) with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [poly(MPC)] has been achieved by using metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The ATRP initiator was first immobilized on the surface of ND through direct esterification reaction between hydroxyl group of ND and 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The initiator could be employed to obtain ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites through SI-ATRP using an organic catalyst. The final functional materials were characterized by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis in detailed. All of these characterization results demonstrated that ND-poly(MPC) have been successfully obtained via metal free photo-initiated SI-ATRP. The ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites shown enhanced dispersibility in various solvents as well as excellent biocompatibility. As compared with traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP is rather simple and effective. More importantly, this preparation method avoided the negative influence of metal catalysts. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a promising strategy for fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with great potential for different applications especially in biomedical fields.

  5. Surface modification of nanodiamond through metal free atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Shi, Kexin; Heng, Chunning; Mao, Liucheng; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-12-01

    Surface modification of nanodiamond (ND) with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [poly(MPC)] has been achieved by using metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The ATRP initiator was first immobilized on the surface of ND through direct esterification reaction between hydroxyl group of ND and 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The initiator could be employed to obtain ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites through SI-ATRP using an organic catalyst. The final functional materials were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis in detailed. All of these characterization results demonstrated that ND-poly(MPC) have been successfully obtained via metal free photo-initiated SI-ATRP. The ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites shown enhanced dispersibility in various solvents as well as excellent biocompatibility. As compared with traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP is rather simple and effective. More importantly, this preparation method avoided the negative influence of metal catalysts. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a promising strategy for fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with great potential for different applications especially in biomedical fields.

  6. Charge transfer and excitation in high-energy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Berkner, K.H.; McDonald, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    Coincidence measurements of charge transfer and simultaneous projectile electron excitation provide insight into correlated two-electron processes in energetic ion-atom collisions. Projectile excitation and electron capture can occur simultaneously in a collision of a highly charged ion with a target atom; this process is called resonant transfer and excitation (RTE). The intermediate excited state which is thus formed can subsequently decay by photon emission or by Auger-electron emission. Results are shown for RTE in both the K shell of Ca ions and the L shell of Nb ions, for simultaneous projectile electron loss and excitation, and for the effect of RTE on electron capture

  7. Auto transfer to Rydberg states during ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachau, H.; Harel, C.; Barat, M.; Roncin, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Benhenni, M.

    1993-01-01

    Electron capture by slow multiply charged ions colliding on rare-gas targets is known to populate highly excited states of the projectile. On the basis of experimental measurement of energy and angle differential cross-sections we have shown that capture to a resonant doubly excited state may lead to Autoionizing Double Capture (ADC) as well as to True Double Capture (TDC). In this model TDC appears as a two step post-collisional process, the state populated by the collision decays to (or delutes into) a dense adjacent Rydberg series, followed by radiative deexcitation of the inner electron of the (3,n) Rydberg states. We report here new experimental observations in electron spectra measured in N 7+ +He. Auto transfer to Rydber states has also important consequences on the determination of the lifetime of the autoionizing states, some discrepancies between theoretical width values for low N 5+ (4,4) resonant states will be discussed and partially resolved

  8. What's new in the proton transfer reaction from pyranine to water? A femtosecond study of the proton transfer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, C.; Gustavsson, T.; Tran-Thi, T.-H.

    1996-01-01

    The proton transfer from excited pyranine to water is studied by the femtosecond fluorescence upconversion technique. It is shown for the first time that the proton transfer reaction in water proceeds by three successive steps: the solvent cage relaxation, the specific solute-solvent hydrogen-bond formation and finally the ion pair dissociation/diffusion

  9. Splendor and misery of the distorted wave method applied to heavy ions transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    The success and failure of the Distorted Wave Method (DWM) applied to heavy ion transfer reactions are illustrated by few examples: one and multi-nucleon transfer reactions induced by 15 N and 18 O on 28 Si target nucleus performed on the vicinity of Coulomb barrier respectively at 44 and 56 MeV incident energy

  10. New Oxime Ligand with Potential for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deville, Claire; Sundberg, Jonas; McKenzie, Christine Joy

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) is found in a range of oxidation-reduction reactions in biology.1 This mechanism is of interest for applications in energy conversion processes. The PCET reaction has been shown to be facilitated when the proton is transferred to an intramolecular basic sit...

  11. Electrochemical Water Oxidation and Stereoselective Oxygen Atom Transfer Mediated by a Copper Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafentzi, Maria-Chrysanthi; Papadakis, Raffaello; Gennarini, Federica; Kochem, Amélie; Iranzo, Olga; Le Mest, Yves; Le Poul, Nicolas; Tron, Thierry; Faure, Bruno; Simaan, A Jalila; Réglier, Marius

    2018-04-06

    Water oxidation by copper-based complexes to form dioxygen has attracted attention in recent years, with the aim of developing efficient and cheap catalysts for chemical energy storage. In addition, high-valent metal-oxo species produced by the oxidation of metal complexes in the presence of water can be used to achieve substrate oxygenation with the use of H 2 O as an oxygen source. To date, this strategy has not been reported for copper complexes. Herein, a copper(II) complex, [(RPY2)Cu(OTf) 2 ] (RPY2=N-substituted bis[2-pyridyl(ethylamine)] ligands; R=indane; OTf=triflate), is used. This complex, which contains an oxidizable substrate moiety (indane), is used as a tool to monitor an intramolecular oxygen atom transfer reaction. Electrochemical properties were investigated and, upon electrolysis at 1.30 V versus a normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), both dioxygen production and oxygenation of the indane moiety were observed. The ligand was oxidized in a highly diastereoselective manner, which indicated that the observed reactivity was mediated by metal-centered reactive species. The pH dependence of the reactivity was monitored and correlated with speciation deduced from different techniques, ranging from potentiometric titrations to spectroscopic studies and DFT calculations. Water oxidation for dioxygen production occurs at neutral pH and is probably mediated by the oxidation of a mononuclear copper(II) precursor. It is achieved with a rather low overpotential (280 mV at pH 7), although with limited efficiency. On the other hand, oxygenation is maximum at pH 8-8.5 and is probably mediated by the electrochemical oxidation of an antiferromagnetically coupled dinuclear bis(μ-hydroxo) copper(II) precursor. This constitutes the first example of copper-centered oxidative water activation for a selective oxygenation reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Oxygen-atom transfer chemistry and thermolytic properties of a di-tert-butylphosphate-ligated Mn4O4 cubane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allsburg, Kurt M; Anzenberg, Eitan; Drisdell, Walter S; Yano, Junko; Tilley, T Don

    2015-03-16

    [Mn4O4{O2P(OtBu)2}6] (1), an Mn4O4 cubane complex combining the structural inspiration of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex with thermolytic precursor ligands, was synthesized and fully characterized. Core oxygen atoms within complex 1 are transferred upon reaction with an oxygen-atom acceptor (PEt3), to give the butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(OtBu)2}6(OPEt3)2]. The cubane structure is restored by reaction of the latter complex with the O-atom donor PhIO. Complex 1 was investigated as a precursor to inorganic Mn metaphosphate/pyrophosphate materials, which were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the fate of the Mn4O4 unit. Under the conditions employed, thermolyses of 1 result in reduction of the manganese to Mn(II) species. Finally, the related butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(pin)}6(bpy)2] (pin = pinacolate) is described. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Quantum state population transfer of lithium atoms induced by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Huanqiang; Zhang Xianzhou; Jia Guangrui; Zhang Yonghui; Jiang Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA) and B-splines function, we have calculated the five quantum state population transfer of rydberg lithium atoms. We also analyse the influence of the four major parameters of the frequency-chirped laser pulses field on transition. The result shows that the population can be completely transferred to the target state by changing the parameters of the laser pulse and achieve manual controls to a certain degree. (authors)

  14. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  15. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  16. Learning about Regiochemistry from a Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears-Dundes, Christopher; Huon, Yoeup; Hotz, Richard P.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment has been developed in which the hydrogen-atom abstraction and the coupling of propionitrile, using Fenton's reagent, are investigated. Students learn about the regiochemistry of radical formation, the stereochemistry of product formation, and the interpretation of GC-MS data, in a safe reaction that can be easily completed in one…

  17. Surface reactions during atomic layer deposition of Pt derived from gas phase infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, W.M.M.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Dielissen, S.A.F.; Mackus, A.J.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to obtain absolute number information on the reaction products during atomic layer deposition of Pt from (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethylplatinum [(MeCp)PtMe3] and O2. From the detection of CO2 and H2O it was established that the precursor ligands are oxidatively

  18. The (3He,α) reaction mechanism. A study of the angular momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bergholt, L.; Ingebretsen, F.; Loevhoeiden, G.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Tveter, T.S.; Helstrup, H.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    The γ-rays emitted after the 163 Dy( 3 He,αxn) reactions at E( 3 He) = 45 MeV have been measured. The transferred angular momentum in the reaction is deduced from the side-feeding γ-intensities of the ground bands in the residual 162-x Dy isotopes. With decreasing α-energy the average spin transfer increases from similar 5h to similar 11h. The ( 3 He,α) reaction at these energies is dominated by direct processes. Even at the highest spin transfer the contribution from the compound reaction channel is negligible. ((orig.))

  19. Selective population of high-j states via heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early hopes of heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions was to populate states not seen easily or at all by other means. To date, however, I believe it is fair to say that spectroscopic studies of previously unknown states have had, at best, limited success. Despite the early demonstration of selectivity with cluster transfer to high-lying states in light nuclei, the study of heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions has emphasized the reaction mechanism. The value of using two of these reactions for spectroscopy of high spin states is demonstrated: 143 Nd( 16 O, 15 O) 144 Nd and 170 Er( 16 O, 15 Oγ) 171 Er

  20. The effect of moderators on the reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with methane

    CERN Document Server

    Estrup, Peder J.

    1960-01-01

    The reaction of recoil tritium with methane has been examined in further detail. The previous hypothesis that this system involves a hot displacement reaction of high kinetic energy hydrogen to give CH$_{3}$T, CH$_{2}$T and HT is confirmed. The effect of moderator on this process is studied by the addition of noble gases. As predicted these gases inhibit the hot reaction action, their efficiency in this respect being He > Ne > A > Se. The data are quantitatively in accord with a theory of hot atom kinetics. The mechanism of the hot displacement process is briefly discussed.

  1. Auto transfer to Rydberg states during ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachau, H.; Harel, C. (Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques, Unite Propre de Recherche 260 du CNRS, Universite Bordeaux I, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)); Barat, M.; Roncin, P. (Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, Unite associee 281 du CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, Batiment 351, 91405 Orsay (France)); Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Benhenni, M. (IRSAMC, Unite associee 770 du CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France))

    1993-06-05

    Electron capture by slow multiply charged ions colliding on rare-gas targets is known to populate highly excited states of the projectile. On the basis of experimental measurement of energy and angle differential cross-sections we have shown that capture to a resonant doubly excited state may lead to Autoionizing Double Capture (ADC) as well as to True Double Capture (TDC). In this model TDC appears as a two step post-collisional process, the state populated by the collision decays to (or delutes into) a dense adjacent Rydberg series, followed by radiative deexcitation of the inner electron of the (3,n) Rydberg states. We report here new experimental observations in electron spectra measured in [ital N][sup 7+]+[ital He]. Auto transfer to Rydber states has also important consequences on the determination of the lifetime of the autoionizing states, some discrepancies between theoretical width values for low [ital N][sup 5+](4,4) resonant states will be discussed and partially resolved.

  2. High spin levels populated in multinucleon transfer reaction with 480 MeV 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, L.; Boucenna, A.; Linck, I.

    1988-01-01

    Two- and three-nucleon stripping reactions induced by 480 MeV 12 C have been studied on 12 C, 16 O, 28 Si, 40 Ca and 54 Fe target nuclei. Discrete levels are fed with cross sections up to 1 mb/sr for d-transfer reactions and one order and two orders of magnitude less for 2p- and 3 He-transfer reactions, respectively. These reactions preferentially populate high spin states with stretched configurations. Several spin assignments were known from transfer reactions induced by lighter projectiles at incident energies well above the Coulomb barrier. In the case of two-nucleon transfer reactions, the energy of these states is well reproduced by crude shell model calculations. Such estimates are of use in proposing spins of newly observed states especially as the shapes of the measured angular distributions are independent of the final spin of the residual nucleus

  3. Hydrogen Transfer during Liquefaction of Elbistan Lignite to Biomass; Total Reaction Transformation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyunoglu, Cemil; Karaca, Hüseyin

    2017-12-01

    Given the high cost of the tetraline solvent commonly used in liquefaction, the use of manure with EL is an important factor when considering the high cost of using tetraline as a hydrogen transfer source. In addition, due to the another cost factor which is the catalyst prices, red mud (commonly used, produced as a byproduct in the production of aluminium) is reduced cost in the work of liquefaction of coal, biomass, even coal combined biomass, corresponding that making the EL liquefaction an agenda for our country is another important factor. Conditions for liquefaction experiments conducted for hydrogen transfer from manure to coal; Catalyst concentration of 9%, liquid/solid ratio of 3/1, reaction time of 60 min, fertilizer/lignite ratio of 1/3, and the reaction temperature of 400 °C, the stirred speed of 400 rpm and the initial nitrogen pressure of 20 bar was fixed. In order to demonstrate the hydrogen, transfer from manure to coal, coal is used solely, by using tetraline (also known as a hydrogen carrier) and distilled water which is not hydrogen donor as a solvent in the co-liquefaction of experiments, and also the liquefaction conditions are carried out under an inert (N2) gas atmosphere. According to the results of the obtained liquefaction test; using tetraline solvent the total liquid product conversion percentage of the oil + gas conversion was 38.3 %, however, the results of oil+gas conversion obtained using distilled water and EL combined with manure the total liquid product conversion percentage was 7.4 %. According to the results of calorific value and elemental analysis, only the ratio of (H/C)atomic of coal obtained by using tetraline increased with the liquefaction of manure and distilled water. The reason of the increase in the amount of hydrogen due to hydrogen transfer from the manure on the solid surface of the coal, and also on the surface of the inner pore of the coal during the liquefaction, brings about the evaluation of the coal as a

  4. Role of transfer reactions in heavy-ion collisions at the Coulomb barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollarolo Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One and two neutron transfer reactions are discussed in the semiclassical formalism. The twoneutrons transfer cross sections are calculated in the successive approximation. Comparisons with new experimental data below the Coulomb barrier are discussed in term of transfer probabilities as a function of the distance of closest approach for Coulomb scattering.

  5. Regge parametrization of angular distributions for heavy-ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.V.; McVoy, K.W.

    1977-01-01

    A two-pole one-zero Regge parametrization of the l-window for transfer reactions is employed in conjunction with a chi-squared search program to obtain high-quality fits to a wide variety of transfer data. The data employed include both direct and multi-step transfers. (Auth.)

  6. Highly Durable Platinum Single-Atom Alloy Catalyst for Electrochemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Roh, Chi-Woo; Sahoo, Suman Kalyan

    2018-01-01

    Single atomic Pt catalyst can offer efficient utilization of the expensive platinum and provide unique selectivity because it lacks ensemble sites. However, designing such a catalyst with high Pt loading and good durability is very challenging. Here, single atomic Pt catalyst supported on antimony...... functional theory calculations show that replacing Sb sites with Pt atoms in the bulk phase or at the surface of SbSn or ATO is energetically favorable. The Pt1/ATO shows superior activity and durability for formic acid oxidation reaction, compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The single atomic Pt...... structure is retained even after a harsh durability test, which is performed by repeating cyclic voltammetry in the range of 0.05–1.4 V for 1800 cycles. A full cell is fabricated for direct formic acid fuel cell using the Pt1/ATO as an anode catalyst, and an order of magnitude higher cell power is obtained...

  7. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive...... theory of charge transfer in polar media offers convenient tools for the treatment of experimental data for such systems, with due account of large-amplitude strongly anharmonic intramolecular reorganization. Equations for the activation barrier and free energy relationships are provided, incorporating...

  8. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Novel fluorinated block copolymer architectures fuelled by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Block copolymers based on poly(pentafluorostyrene), PFS, in various numbers and of different lengths, and polystyrene are prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Di- and triblock copolymers with varying amounts of PFS were synthesized employing either I phenylethylbromide or 1,4-...

  10. Atom-transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using CuSCN as the catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singha, N.K.; Klumperman, B.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of CuSCN as a catalyst in atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated. CuSCN can successfully be used for the ATRP of MMA. Substituted bipyridines as well as imines can be used to stabilize the copper complex in solution. CuSCN induces faster polymerization compared to

  11. Optimization of transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology,. Indore 452 013 ... Laser cooling; optical molasses; double-MOT; magnetic trapping; phase-space density. PACS Nos 52.55. ... this method, the transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to magnetic trap is an important step,.

  12. On Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Using Diazonium Chemistry To Introduce the Initiator Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iruthayaraj, Joseph; Chernyy, Sergey; Lillethorup, Mie

    2011-01-01

    This work features the controllability of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate, initiated by a multilayered 2-bromoisobutyryl moiety formed via diazonium chemistry. The thickness as a function of polymerization time has been studied by varying di...

  13. Optimization of transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... We present here our experimental results on transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole magnetic trap. We show that by choosing appropriately the ratio of potential energy in magnetic trap to kinetic energy of cloud in molasses, we can obtain the maximum phase-space density in the magnetic trap.

  14. The effect of reducing monosaccharides on the atom transfer radical polymerization of butyl methacrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Andrew; Klumperman, B.; Wet-Roos, de D.; Sanderson, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of various reducing monosaccharides on the rate of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of butyl methacrylate is reported in this study. The addition of reducing sugars affects the rate of ATRP positively with a 100% increase in the rate of polymerization in some cases. In

  15. Charge transfer to the continuum by heavy ions in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Design and installation of an atomic hydrogen target for measurements of charge transfer to the continuum by heavy ions are discussed. The design consists of a tungsten gas cell operated at temperatures of 2500 to 2600 0 K. Initial testing is underway

  16. Polymer coating comprising 2-methoxyethyl acrylate units synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012184029A The present invention relates to preparation of a polymer coating comprising or consisting of polymer chains comprising or consisting of units of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate synthesized by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI ATRP) such as ARGET SI ATRP...

  17. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions (updated 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1993-04-01

    Following our previous compilations [IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990)], bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1980-1992 are included. For easy finding references for particular combination of collision partners, a simple list is also provided. (author) 1542 refs

  18. Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization - a Technique to Develop Biofunctional Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The initial formation of initiating sites for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on various polymer surfaces and numerous inorganic and metallic surfaces is elaborated. The subsequent ATRP grafting of a multitude of monomers from such surfaces to generate thin covalently linked polymer...

  19. Organic thin film transistors with polymer brush gate dielectrics synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, J.C.; Whiting, G.L.; Khodabakhsh, S.

    2008-01-01

    , synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), were used to fabricate low voltage OFETs with both evaporated pentacene and solution deposited poly(3-hexylthiophene). The semiconductor-dielectric interfaces in these systems were studied with a variety of methods including scanning force microscopy...

  20. Charge transfer between hydrogen(deuterium) ions and atoms in metal vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez T, I.; Cisneros G, C.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of the experiments on charge transfer between hydrogen (deuterium) ions and atoms in metal vapors are given. Emphasis is given to describing different experimental techniques. The results of calculations if available, are compared with existing experimental data. (author)

  1. Muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms; Transfert de charge muonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupays, A

    2004-06-01

    This work concerns muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms. Recently, a method of measurement of the hyperfine structure of ground-state muonic hydrogen based on the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to oxygen has been proposed. This proposal is based on measurements which where performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute in the early nineties which indicate that the muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to oxygen increases by a factor of 4 going from thermal to 0.12 eV energies. The motivation of our calculations was to confirm this behaviour. To study the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate, we have used a time-independent close-coupling method. We have set up an hyperspherical elliptic formalism valid for nonzero total angular momentum which allows accurate computations of state-to-state reactive and charge exchange processes. We have applied this formalism to muon-transfer process to oxygen and neon. The comparison with experimental results is in both cases excellent. Finally, the neon transfer rate dependence with energy suggests to use neon instead of oxygen to perform a measurement of the hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen. The results of accurate calculations of the muon transfer rates from muonic protium and deuterium atoms to nitrogen, oxygen and neon are also reported. Very good agreement with measured rates is obtained and for the three systems, the isotopic effect is perfectly reproduced. (author)

  2. New aspects of high energy heavy-ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.K.

    1975-03-01

    New aspects of heavy ion reactions at incident energies in the region of 10 MeV/nucleon are discussed with an emphasis on the peripheral nature of the collisions, which leads to simplicities in the differential cross sections. The distortion of the peripheral distribution through the interference of direct and multistep processes is used to illustrate aspects of high energy reactions unique to heavy ions. The simplicities of the distributions for reactions on lighter nuclei are exploited to give new information about nuclear structure from direct and compound reactions at high energy. (16 figures, 32 references) (U.S.)

  3. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  4. Studies of the reactions of hydrogen atoms by time-resolved E. S. R. spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, R W; Verma, N C [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    Time-resolved e.s.r. spectroscopy has been used to follow directly the reactions of H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of acid solutions. Detailed analysis of the time profile of the e.s.r. signal was carried out by means of modified Bloch equations. The increased signal found when a scavenger for OH such as t-butyl alcohol is present is shown to be mainly the result of slower H atom decay by radical-radical reaction. The reaction H + OH does not appear to produce any signal polarization. The decay curves observed in the presence of solute are readily accounted for by the treatment, and good plots of pseudo first-order rate constant against solute concentration are obtained. The absolute rate constants for reaction with H atoms are for methanol 2.5 x10/sup 6/, for ethanol 2.1 X 10/sup 7/, for isopropanol 6.8 x 10/sup 7/, and for succinic acid 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/s/sup -1/. These values are in good agreement with the earlier chemical measurements.

  5. Reaction (γ,2e) and (e,3e) as probe of electron correlation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Cross sections of the (γ,2e) and (e,3e) reactions contain information about the two vacancy-energy spectrum and electron-pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. The simplest mechanisms are discussed, demonstrating some features which await experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and the relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from the nonrelativistic case. The origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms, and possible means of their detection, are discussed. In addition, the role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feshbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are considered, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules, and clusters. The modification of these reactions due to photon emission is discussed. The future of the domain is outlined

  6. Reactions (γ,2e) and (e,3e) as probes of electronic correlations in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1993-01-01

    Cross sections of the (γ,2e) and (e,3e) reactions carry information on two vacancy energy spectrum and on electron pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. Simplest mechanisms of them are discussed, demonstrating some features which are waiting for experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and even to relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from what it is for the nonrelativistic case. Origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms and possible means of their detection are discussed. Role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feschbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are mentioned, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules and clusters. Modification of the type of these reactions due to rather probable emission of the photon is discussed. Future of the domain is outlined. (orig.)

  7. Reaction kinetics in open reactors and serial transfers between closed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis, Alex; Lacoste, David; Gaspard, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics of reaction networks are extended to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and serial transfers. On the basis of their stoichiometry matrix, the conservation laws and the cycles of the network are determined for both dynamics. It is shown that the CSTR and serial transfer dynamics are equivalent in the limit where the time interval between the transfers tends to zero proportionally to the ratio of the fractions of fresh to transferred solutions. These results are illustrated with a finite cross-catalytic reaction network and an infinite reaction network describing mass exchange between polymers. Serial transfer dynamics is typically used in molecular evolution experiments in the context of research on the origins of life. The present study is shedding a new light on the role played by serial transfer parameters in these experiments.

  8. Synthesis of Well-Defined Three-Arm Star-Branched Polystyrene through Arm-First Coupling Approach by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Shahabuddin, Syed; Hamime Ismail, Fatem; Mohamad, Sharifah; Muhamad Sarih, Norazilawati

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a simple route to synthesize three-arm star-branched polystyrene. Atom transfer radical polymerization technique has been utilized to yield branched polystyrene involving Williamson coupling strategy. Initially a linear polymeric chain of predetermined molecular weight has been synthesized which is further end-functionalized into a primary alkyl bromide moiety, a prime requisition for Williamson reaction. The end-functionalized polymer is then coupled using 1,1,1-tris(4-hydro...

  9. Complementary Strategies for Directed C(sp3 )-H Functionalization: A Comparison of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Activation, Hydrogen Atom Transfer, and Carbene/Nitrene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John C K; Rovis, Tomislav

    2018-01-02

    The functionalization of C(sp 3 )-H bonds streamlines chemical synthesis by allowing the use of simple molecules and providing novel synthetic disconnections. Intensive recent efforts in the development of new reactions based on C-H functionalization have led to its wider adoption across a range of research areas. This Review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of three main approaches: transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation, 1,n-hydrogen atom transfer, and transition-metal-catalyzed carbene/nitrene transfer, for the directed functionalization of unactivated C(sp 3 )-H bonds. For each strategy, the scope, the reactivity of different C-H bonds, the position of the reacting C-H bonds relative to the directing group, and stereochemical outcomes are illustrated with examples in the literature. The aim of this Review is to provide guidance for the use of C-H functionalization reactions and inspire future research in this area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  11. Direct Measurements of Half-Cycle Reaction Heats during Atomic Layer Deposition by Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lownsbury, James M. [Department; Gladden, James A. [Department; Campbell, Charles T. [Department; Department; Kim, In Soo [Materials; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials

    2017-10-05

    We introduce a new high-temperature adsorption calorimeter that approaches the ideal limit of a heat detector whereby the signal at any time is proportional to the heat power being delivered to the sample and prove its sensitivity for measuring pulse-to-pulse heats of half-reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 400 K. The heat dynamics of amorphous Al2O3 growth via sequential self-limiting surface reaction of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O is clearly resolved. Calibration enables quantitation of the exothermic TMA and H2O half-reactions with high precision, -343 kJ/mol TMA and -251 kJ/mol H2O, respectively. A time resolution better than 1 ms is demonstrated, allowing for the deconvolution of at least two distinct surface reactions during TMA microdosing. It is further demonstrated that this method can provide the heat of reaction versus extent of reaction during each precursors half-reaction, thus providing even richer mechanistic information on the surface processes involved. The broad applicability of this novel calorimeter is demonstrated through excellent signal-to-noise ratios of less exothermic ALD half-reactions to produce TiO2 and MnO.

  12. Electron transfer reactions in structural units of copper proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M.

    1975-01-01

    In previous pulse radiolysis studies it was suggested that the reduction of the Cu(II) ions in copper proteins by the hydrated electron is a multi-step electron migration process. The technique has been extended to investigate the reduction of some structural units of these proteins. These studies include: the reaction of the hydrated electron with peptides, the reaction of the disulphide bridge with formate radical ion and radicals produced by the reduction of peptides, and the reaction of Cu(II)-peptide complex with esub(aq)sup(-) and CO 2 - . Using these results the reduction mechanism of copper and other proteins will be discussed. (author)

  13. The hydrogen atom-deuterium molecule reaction: Experimental determination of product quantum state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinnen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The H + H 2 atom exchange reaction (and its isotopic analogs) is the simplest neutral bimolecular chemical reaction because of the small number of electrons in the system and the lightness of the nuclei. The H 3 potential energy surface (PES) is the most accurately known reactive surface (LSTH surface); there have been both quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and quantal calculations performed on it. This is one of the few systems for which theory is ahead of experiment, and many theoretical predictions await experimental comparison. The H + D 2 → HD + D reaction is studied using thermal D 2 (∼298 K) and translationally hot hydrogen atoms. Photolysis of HI at 266 nm generates H atoms with center-of-mass collision energies of 1.3 and 0.55 eV, both of which are above the classical reaction barrier of 0.42 eV. The rovibrational population distribution of the molecular product is measured by (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). A major effort has been directed toward calibrating the (2+1) REMPI detection procedure, to determine quantitatively the relationship between ion signals and relative quantum state populations for HD. An effusive, high-temperature nozzle has been constructed to populate thermally the high rovibrational levels observed in the reaction. The results are compared to theoretical calculations of the E,F 1 Σ g + - X 1 Σ g + two-photon transition moments. For the H + D 2 reaction, the populations of all energetically accessible HD product levels are measured. Specifically, the following levels are observed: HD(v = 0, J = 0-15), HD(v = 1, J = 0-12), and HD(v = 2, J = 0-8). Of the available energy, 73% is partitioned into product translation, 18% into HD rotation, and 9% into HD vibration

  14. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-05-01

    Data for inelastic processes due to hydrogen atom collisions with iron are needed for accurate modelling of the iron spectrum in late-type stars. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy Fe+H collisions is studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model. An extensive calculation including 166 covalent states and 25 ionic states is presented and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K. The largest rates are found for charge transfer processes to and from two clusters of states around 6.3 and 6.6 eV excitation, corresponding in both cases to active 4d and 5p electrons undergoing transfer. Excitation and de-excitation processes among these two sets of states are also significant. Full Tables and rate coefficient data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A90

  15. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in ...

  16. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuming, E-mail: ymsun@ytu.edu.cn; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-20

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C{sub 2}-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What’s more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  17. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    cal reactions to the determination of paleotempera- tures from isotopic ... ordered liquid than H2O due to stronger H-bond in- teractions in the deuterated water ... layer chromatography and monitoring the excitation wavelength dependence of ...

  18. Quantum chemical study of the elementary reactions in zirconium oxide atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widjaja, Yuniarto; Musgrave, Charles B.

    2002-01-01

    Elementary reactions in atomic layer deposition of zirconia using zirconium tetrachloride and water are investigated using the density functional theory. The atomistic mechanisms of the two deposition half cycles on the Zr-OH and Zr-Cl surface sites are investigated. Both half reactions proceed through the formation of stable intermediates, resulting in high barriers for HCl formation. We find that the intermediate stability is lowered as the surface temperature is raised. However, increasing temperature also increases the dissociation free-energy barrier, which in turn results in increased desorption of adsorbed precursors

  19. An abnormally slow proton transfer reaction in a simple HBO derivative due to ultrafast intramolecular-charge transfer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcos, Noemí; Gutierrez, Mario; Liras, Marta; Sánchez, Félix; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2015-07-07

    We report on the steady-state, picosecond and femtosecond time-resolved studies of a charge and proton transfer dye 6-amino-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-HBO) and its methylated derivative 6-amino-2-(2'-methoxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-MBO), in different solvents. With femtosecond resolution and comparison with the photobehaviour of 6A-MBO, we demonstrate for 6A-HBO in solution, the photoproduction of an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) process at S1 taking place in ∼140 fs or shorter, followed by solvent relaxation in the charge transferred species. The generated structure (syn-enol charge transfer conformer) experiences an excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction to produce a keto-type tautomer. This subsequent proton motion occurs in 1.2 ps (n-heptane), 14 ps (DCM) and 35 ps (MeOH). In MeOH, it is assisted by the solvent molecules and occurs through tunneling for which we got a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of about 13. For the 6A-DBO (deuterated sample in CD3OD) the global proton-transfer reaction takes place in 200 ps, showing a remarkable slow KIE regime. The slow ESIPT reaction in DCM (14 ps), not through tunnelling as it is not sensitive to OH/OD exchange, has however to overcome an energy barrier using intramolecular as well as solvent coordinates. The rich ESIPT dynamics of 6A-HBO in the used solutions is governed by an ICT reaction, triggered by the amino group, and it is solvent dependent. Thus, the charge injection to a 6A-HBO molecular frame makes the ICT species more stable, and the phenol group less acidic, slowing down the subsequent ESIPT reaction. Our findings bring new insights into the coupling between ICT and ESIPT reactions on the potential-energy surfaces of several barriers.

  20. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  1. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb; Kettenreaktion. Die Geschichte der Atombombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-07-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  2. State-selective charge transfer cross sections for light ion impact of atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D. R. [University of North Texas; Stancil, Phillip C. [University of Georgia, Athens; Havener, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the utility of diagnosing plasma properties such as impurity concentration and spatial distribution, and plasma temperature and rotation, by detection of photon emission following capture of electrons from atomic hydrogen to excited states of multiply charged ions, new calculations of state-selective charge transfer involving light ions have been carried out using the atomic orbital close-coupling and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. By comparing these with results of other approaches applicable in a lower impact energy regime, and by benchmarking them using key experimental data, knowledge of the cross sections can be made available across the range parameters needed by fusion plasma diagnostics.

  3. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Transfer reactions with very heavy ions. Quarterly report 3. quarter 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juutinen, Sakari.

    1988-03-01

    This thesis deals with the reaction mechanism of the few-nucleon transfer reactions between the 58 Ni projectiles and the Dy targets. A series of transfer experiments utilizing the particle-γ coincidence technique was performed. Particle detection was used to give the scattering angles of two reaction products and the reaction channel was selected by the discrete γ-rays in the Ge detectors. Total γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions were measured by the Spin Spectrometer. Total γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions, γ-ray spectra obtained by the Ge and NaI detectors and angular distributions of the projectile-like ions are discussed. For one- and two-neutron transfer the experimental results provide direct evidence of a cold mechanism populating high-spin states near the yrast line. A schematic model for the transfer mechanism is proposed. This model accounts for the prominent features of one- and two-neutron pickup

  5. Energy transfer and reaction dynamics of matrix-isolated 1,2-difluoroethane-d4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    1990-09-01

    The molecular dynamics of vibrationally excited 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 isolated in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices at 12 K are investigated using trajectory methods. The matrix model is an fcc crystal containing 125 unit cells with 666 atoms in a cubic (5×5×5) arrangement. It is assumed that 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 is held interstitially within the volume bounded by the innermost unit cell of the crystal. The transport effects of the bulk are simulated using the velocity reset method introduced by Riley, Coltrin, and Diestler [J. Chem. Phys. 88, 5934 (1988)]. The system potential is written as the separable sum of a lattice potential, a lattice-molecule interaction and a gas-phase potential for 1,2-difluoroethane. The first two of these are assumed to have pairwise form while the molecular potential is a modified form of the global potential previously developed for 1,2-difluoroethane [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 3266 (1987)]. Calculated sublimation energies for the pure crystals are in good accord with the experimental data. The distribution of metastable-state energies for matrix-isolated 1,2-difluoroethane-d4 is Gaussian in form. In krypton, the full width at half maximum for the distribution is 0.37 eV. For a total excitation energy of 6.314 eV, the observed dynamic processes are vibrational relaxation, orientational exchange, and four-center DF elimination reactions. The first of these processes is characterized by a near linear, first-order decay curve with rate coefficients in the range 1.30-1.48×1011 s-1. The average rates in krypton and xenon are nearly equal. The process is slightly slower in argon. The decay curves exhibit characteristic high-frequency oscillations that are generally seen in energy transfer studies. It is demonstrated that these oscillations are associated with the frequencies for intramolecular energy transfer so that the entire frequency spectrum for such transfer processes can be obtained from the Fourier transform of the decay curve. Orientational

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with fluorobenzene at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Hurley, MD

    2002-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with fluorobenzene, C6H5F, in 700 Torr of N-2 or air diluent at 296 K. Reaction of Cl atoms with C6H5F proceeds via two pathways: H-atom abstraction to give HCl and the C6H4F...... with Cl atoms via a mechanism which, at least in part, leads neither to production of C6H5Cl nor to reformation of C6H5F. As the steady-state Cl atom concentration is increased, the fraction of the C6H5F-Cl adduct undergoing reaction with Cl atoms increases causing an increase in the effective rate...

  7. The influence of phase transfer catalyst structure on reaction selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demlov, Eh.V.

    1995-01-01

    A concise review is given of systematic studies which are concerned with the tuning of regio, frequentio-, chemo-, and diastereoselectivity by the structure or type of phase transfer catalyst. Use of MEI as an alkylating agent is described. Refs. 36, figs. 11

  8. Mass transfer and slag-metal reaction in ladle refining : a CFD approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ramström, Eva

    2009-01-01

      In order to optimise the ladle treatment mass transfer modelling of aluminium addition and homogenisation time was carried out. It was stressed that incorporating slag-metal reactions into the mass transfer modelling strongly would enhance the reliability and amount of information to be analyzed from the CFD calculations.   In the present work, a thermodynamic model taking all the involved slag metal reactions into consideration was incorporated into a 2-D fluid flow model of an argon stirr...

  9. Activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene in the presence of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khezri, Khezrollah, E-mail: kh.khezri@ut.ac.ir [School of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, PO Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, PO Box 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-41) on the activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) is investigated. Decrement of conversion and number average molecular weight and also increment of polydispersity index (PDI) values are three main results of addition of MCM-41 nanoparticles. Incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles in the polystyrene matrix can clearly increase thermal stability and decrease glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites. - Highlights: • Spherical morphology, hexagonal structure, and high surface area with regular pore diameters of the synthesized MCM-41 nanoparticles are examined. • AGET ATRP of styrene in the presence of MCM-41 nanoparticles is performed. • Effect of MCM-41 nanoparticles addition on the polymerization rate, conversion and molecular weights of the products are discussed. • Improvement in thermal stability of the nanocomposites and decreasing T{sub g} values was also observed by incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles. - Abstract: Activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization was employed to synthesize well-defined mesoporous silica nanoparticles/polystyrene composites. Inherent features of spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques. Conversion and molecular weight evaluations were carried out using gas and size exclusion chromatography respectively. By the addition of only 3 wt% mesoporous silica nanoparticles, conversion decreases from 81 to 58%. Similarly, number average molecular weight decreases from 17,116 to 12,798 g mol{sup −1}. However, polydispersity index (PDI) values increases from 1.24 to 1.58. A peak around 4.1–4.2 ppm at proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results clearly confirms the living nature of the polymerization. Thermogravimetric

  10. Rate Constants and H-Atom Product Yields for the Reactions of O(1D) Atoms with Ethane and Acetylene from 50 to 296 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Reyes, Dianailys; Hickson, Kevin M

    2018-05-01

    The gas phase reactions of atomic oxygen in its first excited state with ethane and acetylene have been investigated in a continuous supersonic flow reactor over the temperature range 50 K to 296 K. O(1D) atoms were produced by pulsed laser photolysis of ozone at 266 nm. Two different types of experiments, kinetics measurements and H-atom product yield determinations, were performed by detecting O(1D) atoms and H(2S) atoms respectively by vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence. The measured rate constants are in agreement with previous work at room temperature and little or no temperature dependence was observed as the temperature is decreased to 50 K. H-atoms yields were found to be independent of temperature for the reaction of O(1D) with ethane. These product yields are discussed in the context of earlier dynamics measurements at higher temperature. Due to the influence of secondary reactions, no H-atom yields could be obtained for the reaction of O(1D) with acetylene.

  11. Synthesis and Reactions of Five-Membered Heterocycles Using Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase transfer catalysts (PTCs have been widely used for the synthesis of organic compounds particularly in both liquid-liquid and solid-liquid heterogeneous reaction mixtures. They are known to accelerate reaction rates by facilitating formation of interphase transfer of species and making reactions between reagents in two immiscible phases possible. Application of PTC instead of traditional technologies for industrial processes of organic synthesis provides substantial benefits for the environment. On the basis of numerous reports it is evident that phase-transfer catalysis is the most efficient way for generation and reactions of many active intermediates. In this review we report various uses of PTC in syntheses and reactions of five-membered heterocycles compounds and their multifused rings.

  12. 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction in the NCSM/RGM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, F.; Hupin, G.; Navrátil, P.; Quaglioni, S.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, we applied an ab initio method, the no-core shell model combined with the resonating group method, to the transfer reactions with light p-shell nuclei as targets and deuteron as the projectile. In particular, we studied the elastic scattering of deuterium on 7Li and the 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction starting from a realistic two-nucleon interaction. In this contribution, we review of our main results on the 7Li(d,p)8Li transfer reaction, and we extend the study of the relevant reaction channels, by showing the dominant resonant phase shifts of the scattering matrix. We assess also the impact of the polarization effects of the deuteron below the breakup on the positive-parity resonant states in the reaction. For this purpose, we perform an analysis of the convergence trend of the phase and eigenphase shifts, with respect to the number of deuteron pseudostates included in the model space.

  13. Muon transfer rates in collisions of hydrogen isotope mesic atoms on 'bare' nuclei. Multichannel adiabatic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobov, V.I.; Melezhik, V.S.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical scheme for solving the problem of slow collisions in the three-body adiabatic approach is applied for calculation of muon transfer rates in collisions of hydrogen isotope atoms on bare nuclei. It is demonstrated that the multichannel adiabatic approach allows one to reach high accuracy results (∼3%) estimating the cross sections of charge transfer processes which are the best ones up to date. The method is appliable in a wide range of energies (0.001-50 eV) which is of interest for analysis of muon catalysed fusion experiments. 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  14. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  15. Nuclear prehistory influence on transfer velocity of 54Mn impurity 'hot' atoms in irradiated metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Influence of nuclear prehistory on transfer velocity of 54 Mn impurity 'hot'-atoms - got by different nuclear channels: 56 Fe(d, α), 54 Fe(n,p) in irradiated metallic iron - is studied. Irradiation of targets were carried out in U-120 accelerator (energy range 7.3/5.3 MeV, deuteron beam current makes up 5 μA). Mean density of thermal neutron (WWR-M reactor) makes up 8.6·10 13 neutron·cm -2 ·s -1 . It is shown, that transfer velocity of 54 Mn 'hot' atoms is defining by rate of radiation damage of targets in the irradiation process at that a key importance has a bombarding particles type applied for radioactive label getting

  16. Efficient and Adaptive Methods for Computing Accurate Potential Surfaces for Quantum Nuclear Effects: Applications to Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Nicole; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2018-01-09

    We present two sampling measures to gauge critical regions of potential energy surfaces. These sampling measures employ (a) the instantaneous quantum wavepacket density, an approximation to the (b) potential surface, its (c) gradients, and (d) a Shannon information theory based expression that estimates the local entropy associated with the quantum wavepacket. These four criteria together enable a directed sampling of potential surfaces that appears to correctly describe the local oscillation frequencies, or the local Nyquist frequency, of a potential surface. The sampling functions are then utilized to derive a tessellation scheme that discretizes the multidimensional space to enable efficient sampling of potential surfaces. The sampled potential surface is then combined with four different interpolation procedures, namely, (a) local Hermite curve interpolation, (b) low-pass filtered Lagrange interpolation, (c) the monomial symmetrization approximation (MSA) developed by Bowman and co-workers, and (d) a modified Shepard algorithm. The sampling procedure and the fitting schemes are used to compute (a) potential surfaces in highly anharmonic hydrogen-bonded systems and (b) study hydrogen-transfer reactions in biogenic volatile organic compounds (isoprene) where the transferring hydrogen atom is found to demonstrate critical quantum nuclear effects. In the case of isoprene, the algorithm discussed here is used to derive multidimensional potential surfaces along a hydrogen-transfer reaction path to gauge the effect of quantum-nuclear degrees of freedom on the hydrogen-transfer process. Based on the decreased computational effort, facilitated by the optimal sampling of the potential surfaces through the use of sampling functions discussed here, and the accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, we believe the method will find great utility in the study of quantum nuclear dynamics problems, of which application to hydrogen-transfer reactions and hydrogen

  17. Surface-Initiated Graft Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate from Chitin Nanofiber Macroinitiator under Dispersion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Endo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface-initiated graft atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA from self-assembled chitin nanofibers (CNFs was performed under dispersion conditions. Self-assembled CNFs were initially prepared by regeneration from a chitin ion gel with 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide using methanol; the product was then converted into the chitin nanofiber macroinitiator by reaction with α-bromoisobutyryl bromide in a dispersion containing N,N-dimethylformamide. Surface-initiated graft ATRP of MMA from the initiating sites on the CNFs was subsequently carried out under dispersion conditions, followed by filtration to obtain the CNF-graft-polyMMA film. Analysis of the product confirmed the occurrence of the graft ATRP on the surface of the CNFs.

  18. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Acuña, A Ulises; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  19. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions. Updated 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1997-04-01

    Following our previous compilations (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990), NIFS-DATA-20 (1993)), bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1954-1996 are listed in the order of the publication year. For easy finding of the references for a combination of collision partners, a simple list is provided. (author)

  20. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions, updated 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1990-08-01

    Following a previous compilation, new bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1989 are surveyed. For easy finding references for particular combination of collision partners, a simple list is also provided. Furthermore, for convenience, a copy of the previous compilation (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986)) is included. (author) 1363 refs

  1. Studies on atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylates and styrenes with controlled polymeric block structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Khalid

    2006-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was applied to homo and block copolymerization of vinyl monomers methacrylates, acrylates, and styrene with iron (FeCl2.4H2O) as the transition metal in most cases. As complexing ligand either a commercially available ligand (triphenyl phosphine) (PPh3) or synthetic aliphatic amines were used. As initiators, methyl 2-bromopropionate, ethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate, α,α-dichloroacetophenone, and poly(ethylene oxide) macroinitiator were employed. Block ...

  2. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions—II. parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, F.P.H. van; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and

  3. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-01-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron "breakup" reaction 2H(e,e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartnig, C.B.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of solvent reorganization in the first electron transfer step in the oxygen reduction reaction, i.e. O2+e-¿O2-, modeled as taking place in the outer Helmholtz plane. The first electron transfer step is usually considered the rate-determining step from many

  5. Quantifying atom addition reactions on amorphous solid water: a review of recent laboratory advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2018-06-01

    Complex organic molecules found in space are mostly formed on and in the ice mantle covering interstellar dust grains. In clouds where ionizing irradiation is insignificant, chemical reactions on the ice mantle are dominated by thermal processes. Modeling of grain surface chemistry requires detailed information from the laboratory, including sticking coefficients, binding energies, diffusion energy barriers, mechanism of reaction, and chemical desorption rates. In this talk, recent laboratory advances in obtaining these information would be reviewed. Specifically, this talk will focus on the efforts in our group in: 1) Determining the mechanism of atomic hydrogen addition reactions on amorphous solid water (ASW); 2) Measuring the chemical desorption coefficient of H+O3-->O2+OH using the time-resolved scattering technique; and 3) Measuring the diffusion energy barrier of volatile molecules on ASW. Further laboratory studies will be suggested.This research was supported by NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Research Grant #1615897.

  6. The solvation reaction field for a hydrogen atom in a dielectric continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A reaction field exists even for a nonpolar solute embedded in a spherical cavity within a surrounding homogeneous dielectric continuum. This arises from the tail of the electronic wave function that penetrates beyond the cavity boundary into the dielectric region. This effect, which is neglected or treated only in cursory fashion in most reaction field implementations, is examined in detail for the simple case of a ground state hydrogen atom, where very accurate solutions of the relevant equations can be obtained. Properties considered include the penetration of the electron outside the cavity, the electronic density at the nucleus, the electron binding energy, the electrostatic free energy of solvation, the polarizability, and the vertical 1s→2p excitation energy. Also, the effect of the common approximation of neglecting the volume polarization and treating only the surface polarization contribution to the reaction field is critically evaluated. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  7. Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atom by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ito, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atoms are obtained qualitatively by classical molecular dynamics simulation under the NVE condition with modified Brenner reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential. Chemical reaction depends on two parameters, i.e., polar angle θ and azimuthal angle φ of the incident hydrogen. From the simulation results, it is found that the reaction rates strongly depend on polar angle θ. Reflection rate becomes larger with increasing θ, and the θ dependence of adsorption rate is also found. The θ dependence is caused by three dimensional structure of the small potential barrier which covers adsorption sites. φ dependence of penetration rate is also found for large θ. (author)

  8. Imaging the electron transfer reaction of Ne2+ with Ar using position-sensitive coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, Sarah M; Hu Wanping; Price, Stephen D

    2002-01-01

    A new experiment, employing position-sensitive detection coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, has been used to investigate the single-electron transfer reaction between Ne 2+ and Ar by detecting the resulting pairs of singly charged ions in coincidence. The experimental technique allows the determination of the individual velocity vectors of the ionic products, in the centre-of-mass frame, for each reactive event detected. The experiments show that forward scattering dominates the reactivity, although a bimodal angular distribution is apparent. In addition, the spectra show that at laboratory frame collision energies from 4-14 eV the reactivity is dominated by Ne 2+ (2p 4 , 3 P) accepting an electron from an argon atom to form the ground state of Ne + together with an Ar + ion in an excited electronic level, predominantly arising from the Ar + (3s 2 3p 4 3d) configuration. The form of this reactivity, and the differences between the reactivity observed in these experiments and those performed at higher collision energies, are well reproduced by Landau-Zener theory

  9. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1976--January 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1977-01-01

    Multivalent hot atoms formed by the nuclear recoil method were studied: 31 Si, 32 P, and 11 C. For the recoil 31 Si reactions, we have completed the study on the reactivities of conjugated dienes towards monomeric 31 SiF 2 . The relative reactivities of 1,3-butadiene, trans-pentadiene, cis-pentadiene and 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene towards 31 SiF 2 have been measured as: 1.0:0.89:0.91:1.06 for singlet 31 SiF 2 ; and as 1.0:0.80:0.52:0.89 for the triplet. The large steric effect detected here between cis- and trans-pentadienes for their reactivities towards triplet 31 SiF 2 -donor indicates that a direct 1,4-addition process is possible for such 31 SiF 2 donating complexes. 2-methyl-1,1-diflorosilacyclopent-3-ene and its 3-methyl isomer were successfully synthesized by the co-pyrolysis technique. Experiments to evaluate the relative addition efficiencies of 31 SiH 2 towards various conjugated dienes; and to study to H- and F-abstraction mechanism by 31 Si atoms were begun. For recoil 32 P reactions, some progress has been made towards evaluating the mechanism of abstraction reactions by recoil 32 P atoms in PF 3 -PCl 3 system, and the moderator effect for recoil 32 P reactions with PF 3 -CH 4 mixtures. The possible formation of 32 PH, and the formation of 32 P atoms via the 32 S(n,p) 32 P process have also been explored. For recoil 11 C reactions, major progress has been obtained in the moderator studies of its reactions with 1,3-butadiene. With the successive addition of Ne as a moderator, the yield of acetylene- 11 C decreased, the yield of cyclopentene- 11 C increased while those of both 1,2,4-pentatriene- 11 C and cyclopentadiene- 11 C went through a minimum. Some progress for the identification of the last unknown 11 C-labeled product from this system has also been made

  10. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant, E-mail: vasant@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-08-26

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on. - Highlights: • Getter-source loaded magneto-optic trap (MOT). • Cold atomic beam generated by deflection from the MOT. • Use of two inclined beams for deflection.

  11. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions—II. parallel reversible chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, F.P.H. van; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles for a wide range of processes and conditions, for both film and penetration model. With the aid of this mass transfer model it is demonstrated that the absorption rates in syst...

  12. Proton exchange in acid–base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Proton exchange in acid–base complexes is studied. ► The structures, binding energies, and normal mode vibrations are calculated. ► Transition state structures of proton exchange mechanism are determined. ► In the complexes studied, the reaction coordinate involves heavy atom rocking. ► The reaction coordinate is not simply localized in the proton movements. - Abstract: We extend previous work on nitric acid–ammonia and nitric acid–alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid–strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are −1 . This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm −1 . Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  13. The effect of intramolecular quantum modes on free energy relationships for electron transfer reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens; Jortner, Joshua

    1975-01-01

    A general quantum mechanical description of exothermic electron transfer reactions is formulated by treating such reactions as the nonradiative decay of a ''supermolecule'' consisting of the electron donor, the electron acceptor, and the polar solvent. In particular, the role of the high-frequenc...

  14. Oxidation of nitrite by a trans-dioxoruthenium(VI) complex: direct evidence for reversible oxygen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2006-11-15

    Reaction of trans-[Ru(VI)(L)(O)(2)](2+) (1, L = 1,12-dimethyl-3,4:9,10-dibenzo-1,12-diaza-5,8-dioxacyclopentadecane, a tetradentate macrocyclic ligand with N(2)O(2) donor atoms) with nitrite in aqueous solution or in H(2)O/CH(3)CN produces the corresponding (nitrato)oxoruthenium(IV) species, trans-[Ru(IV)(L)(O)(ONO(2))](+) (2), which then undergoes relatively slow aquation to give trans-[Ru(IV)(L)(O)(OH(2))](2+). These processes have been monitored by both ESI/MS and UV/vis spectrophotometry. The structure of trans-[Ru(IV)(L)(O)(ONO(2))](+) (2) has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The ruthenium center adopts a distorted octahedral geometry with the oxo and the nitrato ligands trans to each other. The Ru=O distance is 1.735(3) A, the Ru-ONO(2) distance is 2.163(4) A, and the Ru-O-NO(2) angle is 138.46(35) degrees . Reaction of trans-[Ru(VI)(L)((18)O)(2)](2+) (1-(18)O(2)) with N(16)O(2)(-) in H(2)O/CH(3)CN produces the (18)O-enriched (nitrato)oxoruthenium(IV) species 2-(18)O(2). Analysis of the ESI/MS spectrum of 2-(18)O(2) suggests that scrambling of the (18)O atoms has occurred. A mechanism that involves linkage isomerization of the nitrato ligand and reversible oxygen atom transfer is proposed.

  15. Two-proton transfer reactions on even Ni and Zn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucenna, A.; Kraus, L.; Linck, I.; Tsan Ung Chan

    1988-01-01

    Two-proton transfer reactions induced by 112 MeV 12 C ions on even Ni and Zn isotopes are found to be less selective than the analogous two-neutron transfer reactions induced on the same targets in a similar incident energy range. The additional collective aspects observed in the proton transfer are examined in view of a semiphenomenological model of two quasi-particles coupled to a triaxial asymmetric rotor. Tentative spin and parity assignments emerge from this comparison, from crude shell model calculations and from systematic trends

  16. Polarization transfer in (p,n) reactions at 495 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddeucci, T.N.

    1991-01-01

    Polarization transfer observables have been measured with the NTOF facility at LAMPF for (p,n) reactions at 495 MeV. Measurements of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter D LL for transitions to discrete states at 0 degrees show convincing evidence for tensor interaction effects. Complete sets of polarization transfer observables have been measured for quasifree (p,n) reactions on 2 H, 12 C, 40 Ca at a scattering angle of 18 degrees. These measurements show no evidence for an enhancement in the isovector spin longitudinal response. 19 refs., 10 figs

  17. Excitation functions for quasi-elastic transfer reactions induced with heavy ions in bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, D.; Bimbot, R.; Maison, J.; Reilhac, L. de; Rivet, M.F.; Fleury, A.; Hubert, F.; Llabador, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The excitation functions for the production of 210 Bi, 210 Po, sup(207-211)At and 211 Rn through quasi-elastic transfer reactions induced with heavy ions in 209 Bi have been measured. The corresponding reactions involved the transfer of one neutron, one proton, two and three charges from projectile to target. The projectiles used were 12 C, 14 N, 16 O, 19 F, 20 Ne, 40 Ca, 56 Fe and 63 Cu. The experimental techniques involved target irradiations and off-line α and γ activity measurements. Chemical separations were used to solve specific problems. Careful measurements of incident energies and cross sections were performed close to the reaction thresholds

  18. Nucleon transfer reactions to rotational states induced by 206,208PB projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollersheim, H.J.; DeBoer, F.W.N.; Emling, H.; Grein, H.; Grosse, E.; Spreng, W.; Eckert, G.; Elze, Th.W.; Stelzer, K.; Lauterbach, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    In a systematic study of nucleon transfer reactions accompanied by Coulomb excitation the authors bombarded 152 Sm, 160 Gd and 232 Th with 206, 208 Pb beams at incident energies close to the Coulomb barrier. Particle-gamma coincidence techniques were used to identify excited states of reaction products populated through inelastic scattering and in nucleon transfer reactions. Large cross sections were observed for one- and two-neutron pick-up from 232 Th at an incident energy of 6.4 MeV/μ. The results are analyzed in the framework of semiclassical models

  19. Transfer reaction studies in the region of heavy and superheavy nuclei at SHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, S; Comas, V; Hofmann, S; Ackermann, D; Heredia, J; Hessberger, F P; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kindler, B; Lommel, B; Mann, R, E-mail: s.heinz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    We studied multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the region of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The goal was to investigate these reactions as possibility to create new superheavy neutron-rich isotopes, which cannot be produced in fusion reactions. The experiments have been performed at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI. At SHIP we can detect and identify the heavy, target-like, transfer products. Due to the low background at the focal plane detector and the isotope identification via radioactive decays, the setup allows to reach an upper cross-section limit of 10 pb/sr within one day of beamtime. We investigated the systems {sup 58,64}Ni + {sup 207}Pb and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 248}Cm at beam energies below and up to 20% above the Coulomb barrier. At all energies we observed a massive transfer of protons and neutrons, where transfer products with up to eight neutrons more than the target nucleus could be identified.

  20. Ion-atom charge-transfer system for a heavy-ion-beam pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, A.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Kroetz, W.; Wieser, J.; Murnick, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    An Ar target to which Cs vapor could be added, excited by a pulsed beam of 100-MeV 32 S ions, was studied as a prototype ion-atom charge-transfer system for pumping short-wavelength lasers. Low-velocity Ar 2+ ions were efficiently produced; a huge increase in the intensity of the Ar II 4d-4p spectral lines was observed when Cs vapor was added to the argon. This observation is explained by a selective charge transfer of the Cs 6s electron into the upper levels of the observed transitions. A rate constant of (1.4±0.2)x10 -9 cm 3 /s for the transfer process was determined

  1. The atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate - reactions with atomic chlorine and with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canosa-Mas, C.E.; Duffy, J.M.; Thompson, K.C.; Wayne, R.P. [Physical and Theoretical Chemical Lab., Oxford (United Kingdom); King, M.D. [King' s College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-05-01

    Methyl salicylate is one of a number of semiochemicals, signal molecules, emitted by herbivore-infested plants. These signal molecules attract predators of the herbivore, and the chemicals thus act indirectly as part of the defence mechanism of the plant. Previous studies have shown that ozone damage to plants can also elicit the emission of signal molecules. The fate of these signal molecules in the atmosphere is not known. Preliminary studies have been undertaken to examine the atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate for the first time. Rate coefficients for the reaction of methyl salicylate with atomic chlorine and with ozone have been determined; the values are (2.8()+-(0.3)x10{sup -12} and )approx4x10{sup -21} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These results suggest that neither reaction with atomic chlorine nor reaction with ozone will provide important loss routes for methyl salicylate in the atmosphere. The possible importance of photolysis of methyl salicylate in the atmosphere is considered. (Author)

  2. The atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate—reactions with atomic chlorine and with ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Duffy, Justin M.; King, Martin D.; Thompson, Katherine C.; Wayne, Richard P.

    Methyl salicylate is one of a number of semiochemicals, signal molecules, emitted by herbivore-infested plants. These signal molecules attract predators of the herbivore, and the chemicals thus act indirectly as part of the defence mechanism of the plant. Previous studies have shown that ozone damage to plants can also elicit the emission of signal molecules. The fate of these signal molecules in the atmosphere is not known. Preliminary studies have been undertaken to examine the atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate for the first time. Rate coefficients for the reaction of methyl salicylate with atomic chlorine and with ozone have been determined; the values are (2.8±0.3)×10 -12 and ˜4×10 -21 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1. These results suggest that neither reaction with atomic chlorine nor reaction with ozone will provide important loss routes for methyl salicylate in the atmosphere. The possible importance of photolysis of methyl salicylate in the atmosphere is considered.

  3. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1979-January 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1980-01-01

    The major progress during this period was in the study of recoil 31 Si and recoil 11 C reactions and in the initiation of the studies on the interaction of molecular tritium on solid surfaces. For the recoil 31 Si systems, heterogeneous hydrogenation experiments have been designed to positively confirm that a major unknown product, derived from the interaction of 31 Si atoms with 1,3-butadiene, is 1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene. This compound has been shown to be very sensitive to γ-ray irradiation and to be thermally unstable at a temperature higher than 100 0 C. Another recoil 31 Si experiment was designed to review the mechanism of the 31 Si abstraction reactions. From the fact that high yields of [ 31 Si]-1-fluorosilacyclopent-3-ene were obtained as a product from a mixture of PH 3 and PF 3 together with 1,3-butadiene, the stepwise abstraction mechanism is definitely much more predominant than the possible simultaneous abstraction. Other recoil 31 Si works involved a detailed systematic composition study of 31 SiF 2 reactions with 1,3-butadiene, some neon moderator studies, and the continuation of the studies on the reactions of 31 SiF 2 and 31 SiH 2 with conjugated hexadienes. By using 2- 14 C-propanone and 1,3- 14 C-propanone, the mechanism of solvent-free oxidative cleavage of propanone by KMnO 4 was elucidated. Information thus derived was used to degradate the 11 C-labelled propadiene derived from the reactions of recoil 11 C atoms with ethylene. Results indicate that 73% of the 11 C-labelled propadiene was center-labelled. This value was observed to change with additives. Various mechanistic studies on the heterogeneous interactions of molecular T 2 on solid surfaces such as Pd supported on active carbon have been initiated

  4. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on a heterogeneous solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisao

    1980-01-01

    A method of the Monte Carlo simulation of the isotopic exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on an arbitrarily heterogeneous solid surface is described by employing hydrogen as an example. (author)

  5. Gamma spectroscopy of multiple nucleon transfer reactions in Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, Z.W.; Mayer, R.H.; Fornal, B.; Nisius, D.T.; Bearden, I.G.; Daly, P.J.; Broda, R.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1992-01-01

    The decay of (πh 11/2 ) n yrast isomers was studied in a series of proton-rich N = 82 isotones culminating in determination of B(E2) values in 153 Lu and 154 Hf. In the N = 82 isotones however, it seems unlikely that the measurements could be extended beyond 154 Hf (n = 8). The opportunity to investigate the (h 11/2 ) n ) isomers across the whole h 11/2 subshell exists, at least in principle, in Sn isotopes where the counterpart νh 11/2 subshell is being filled with neutrons starting at 116 Sn. Before our measurements were initiated, the (νh 11/2 ) n 10 + isomers were known to exist in 116, 118, 120 Sn, where the νh 11/2 subshell begins to fill, and in 128,130 Sn at the other end. Important information, however, was missing about the 10 + isomers in 122,124,126 Sn where the long lifetimes are expected. The υ = 3 (h 11/2 ) isomers in odd tin isomers for A ≥ 119 were also not identified. A serious experimental difficulty in populating high spin states in heavier Sn isotopes is that they are not accessible by fusion-evaporation reactions. We decided to search for these missing tin isotopes among the products of heavy ion reactions on 122,124 Sn targets. Using this approach we were able to identify the isomeric decays and measure the lifetimes of the (νh 11/2 n ) υ = 2 isomeric states in 122,124 Sn. In odd tin isotopes we identified new I = 19/2 + yrast isomers in 119,121,123 Sn and measured their lifetimes. In addition (νh 11/2 ) n υ = 3, I = 27/2 - isomers in 119,121 Sn were observed for the first time

  6. Photo- and radiation-chemical stability of molecules. Reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.G.; Ovchinnikov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the review of works published up to 1978 one of the main problems of radiation chemistry is discussed, namely the relationship between the structure of organic molecules and their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation. Theoretical aspects of this problem are considered for reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off. It is shown that the radical yield in low-temperature radiation-chemical experiments is connected with the position of lower triplet states of molecules, ionization potentials, polarity of medium and the energy of C-H bonds in cation radicals

  7. Ruthenium-catalyzed reactions--a treasure trove of atom-economic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Barry M; Frederiksen, Mathias U; Rudd, Michael T

    2005-10-21

    The demand for new chemicals spanning the fields of health care to materials science combined with the pressure to produce these substances in an environmentally benign fashion pose great challenges to the synthetic chemical community. The maximization of synthetic efficiency by the conversion of simple building blocks into complex targets remains a fundamental goal. In this context, ruthenium complexes catalyze a number of non-metathesis conversions and allow the rapid assembly of complex molecules with high selectivity and atom economy. These complexes often exhibit unusual reactivity. Careful consideration of the mechanistic underpinnings of the transformations can lead to the design of new reactions and the discovery of new reactivity.

  8. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-02-01

    Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy O+H collisions is studied; it is a problem of importance for modelling stellar spectra and obtaining accurate oxygen abundances in late-type stars including the Sun. The collisions have been studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model. The method has been extended to include configurations involving excited states of hydrogen using an estimate for the two-electron transition coupling, but this extension was found to not lead to any remarkably high rates. Rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K, and charge transfer and (de)excitation processes involving the first excited S-states, 4s.5So and 4s.3So, are found to have the highest rates. Data are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/vizbin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A57. The data are also available at http://https://github.com/barklem/public-data

  9. ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF N-BUTYL METHACRYLATE IN AQUEOUS DISPERSED SYSTEMS: A MINIEMULSION APPROACH. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasonication was applied in combination with a hydrophobe for the copper-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate in an aqueous dispersed system. A controlled polymerization was successfully achieved, as demonstrated by a linear correlation between...

  10. Comparison of dynamical aspects of nonadiabatic electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in solution are analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations. The rate for nonadiabatic PCET is expressed in terms of a time-dependent probability flux correlation function. The impact of the proton donor-acceptor and solvent dynamics on the probability flux is examined. The dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function is dominated by a solvent damping term that depends on the energy gap correlation function. The proton donor-acceptor motion does not impact the dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function but does influence the magnitude of the rate. The approximations previously invoked for the calculation of PCET rates are tested. The effects of solvent damping on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion are found to be negligible, and the short-time solvent approximation, in which only equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent are considered, is determined to be valid for these types of reactions. The analysis of PCET reactions is compared to previous analyses of single electron and proton transfer reactions. The dynamical behavior is qualitatively similar for all three types of reactions, but the time scale of the decay of the probability flux correlation function is significantly longer for single proton transfer than for PCET and single electron transfer due to a smaller solvent reorganization energy for proton transfer

  11. Atomic layer deposition assisted pattern transfer technology for ultra-thin block copolymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wenhui; Luo, Jun; Meng, Lingkuan; Li, Junjie; Xiang, Jinjuan; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Wenwu; Chen, Dapeng; Ye, Tianchun; Zhao, Chao

    2016-08-31

    As an emerging developing technique for next-generation lithography, directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymer (BCP) has attracted numerous attention and has been a potential alternative to supplement the intrinsic limitations of conventional photolithography. In this work, the self-assembling properties of a lamellar diblock copolymer poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA, 22k-b-22k, L{sub 0} = 25 nm) on Si substrate and an atomic layer deposition (ALD)-assisted pattern transfer technology for the application of DSA beyond 16/14 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology nodes, were investigated. Firstly, two key processing parameters of DSA, i.e. annealing temperatures and durations of BCP films, were optimized to achieve low defect density and high productivity. After phase separation of BCP films, self-assembling patterns of low defect density should be transferred to the substrate. However, due to the nano-scale thickness and the weak resistance of BCP films to dry etching, it is nearly impossible to transfer the BCP patterns directly to the substrate. Therefore, an ALD-based technology was explored in this work, in which deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} selectively reacts with PMMA blocks thus hardening the PMMA patterns. After removing PS blocks by plasma etching, hardened PMMA patterns were left and transferred to underneath SiO{sub 2} hard mask layer. Using this patterned hard mask, nanowire array of 25 nm pitch were realized on Si substrate. From this work, a high-throughput DSA baseline flow and related ALD-assisted pattern transfer technique were developed and proved to have good capability with the mainstream CMOS technology. - Highlights: • Optimization on self-assembly process for high productivity and low defectivity • Enhancement of etching ratio and resistance by atomic layer deposition (ALD) • A hard mask was used for pattern quality improvement and contamination control.

  12. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  13. Theoretical study of the reaction kinetics of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod

    2015-02-12

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the reaction of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran (THP, C5H10O) was performed using several ab initio methods and statistical rate theory calculations. Initial geometries of all species involved in the potential energy surface of the title reaction were obtained at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. These molecular geometries were reoptimized using three different meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) functionals. Single-point energies of the stationary points were obtained by employing the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD) and fourth-order Møller-Plesset (MP4 SDQ) levels of theory. The computed CCSD and MP4(SDQ) energies for optimized structures at various DFT functionals were found to be consistent within 2 kJ mol-1. For a more accurate energetic description, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory were performed for the minimum structures and transition states optimized at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Similar to other ether + Br reactions, it was found that the tetrahydropyran + Br reaction proceeds in an overall endothermic addition-elimination mechanism via a number of intermediates. However, the reactivity of various ethers with atomic bromine was found to vary substantially. In contrast with the 1,4-dioxane + Br reaction, the chair form of the addition complex (c-C5H10O-Br) for THP + Br does not need to undergo ring inversion to form a boat conformer (b-C4H8O2-Br) before the intramolecular H-shift can occur to eventually release HBr. Instead, a direct, yet more favorable route was mapped out on the potential energy surface of the THP + Br reaction. The rate coefficients for all relevant steps involved in the reaction mechanism were computed using the energetics of coupled cluster calculations. On the basis of the results of the CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory, the calculated overall rate coefficients can be expressed as kov.,calc.(T) = 4.60 × 10

  14. Electron-electron interaction and transfer ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A B

    2008-01-01

    Recently it was pointed out that electron capture occurring in fast ion-atom collisions can proceed via a mechanism which earlier was not considered. In the present paper we study this mechanism in more detail. Similarly as in radiative capture, where the electron transfer occurs due to the interaction with the radiation field and proceeds via emission of a photon, within this mechanism the electron capture is caused by the interaction with another atomic electron leading mainly to the emission of the latter. In contrast to the electron-electron Thomas capture, this electron-electron (E-E) mechanism is basically a first-order one having similarities to the kinematic and radiative capture channels. It also possesses important differences with the latter two. Leading to transfer ionization, this first-order capture mechanism results in the electron emission mainly in the direction opposite to the motion of the projectile ion. The same, although less pronounced, feature is also characteristic for the momenta of the target recoil ions produced via this mechanism. It is also shown that the action of the E-E mechanism is clearly seen in recent experimental data on the transfer ionization in fast proton-helium collisions.

  15. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Energetic halogen atoms or ions, activated by various nuclear transformations are studied in gas, high pressure and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and liquid and solid aqueous solutions of biomolecular and organic solutes in order to understand better the mechanisms and dynamics of high energy monovalent species. The experimental program and its goals remain the same, consisting of four interrelated areas: (1) The stereochemistry of energetic 18 F, /sup 34m/Cl, and 38 Cl substitution reactions with chiral molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. (2) The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving energetic chlorine, bromine, and iodine reactions in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and aqueous solutions of biomolecules and alkyl halides is being investigated in more detail. Current attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. Specifically, energetic halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions or organic and biomolecular solutes are studied. (3) Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular and organic solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are being studied in an attempt to learn more about the activation events in the condensed phase. (4) The applications of hot chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Current attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as site indicators in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are currently being developed. 14 references

  16. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  17. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Zhiyuan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength λ. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and λ. In the large hopping limit where g >λ, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  18. Inelastic scattering and clusters transfer in 3,4He + 9Be reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Denikin, A. S.; Lukyanov, S.; Skobelev, N. K.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Voskoboynik, E. I.; Penionzhkevich, Y. E.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tyurin, G. P.; Burjan, Václav; Kroha, Václav; Mrázek, Jaromír; Piskoř, Štěpán; Glagolev, Vadim; Xu, Yi; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kuterbekov, K. A.; Tuleushev, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 5 (2015), s. 703-712 ISSN 1547-4771 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cross-section * reactions * Be Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  19. On the transferability of atomic contributions to the optical rotatory power of hydrogen peroxide, methyl hydroperoxide and dimethyl peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, Marina; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    for the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon atoms as well as for the methyl group at the level of time-dependent density functional theory with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional employing a large Gaussian basis set. We find that the atomic or group contributions are not transferable among these three molecules....

  20. Cross sections for energy transfer in collisions between two excited sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huennekens, J.; Gallagher, A.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured cross sections, sigma/sub n/L, for the excitation transfer process Na(3P)+Na(3P)→Na(3S)+Na(nL), where nL is the 4D or 5S level. Our results are sigma/sub 4D/ = 23 A 2 +- 35% and sigma/sub 5S/ = 16 A 2 +- 35% at Tapprox.600 K. To obtain these cross sections we have used pulsed excitation and measured the intensities of 4D, 5S, and 3P fluorescence emissions, and the spatial distribution of excited atoms resulting from radiation diffusion, as well as the excited atom density as a function of time. Additionally, we have accounted for (time-dependent) radiation trapping of 3P and nL level radiation and for the resulting anisotropies of these fluorescence emissions. Comparisons of our results with theory have been made, and their relevance to other experiments is discussed

  1. Sub-Coulomb heavy ion neutron transfer reactions and neutron orbit sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Direct transfer reactions below the Coulomb barrier offer the best means of determining neutron densities near the nuclear surface. This paper describes how heavy ion sub-Coulomb transfer can be used to determine the rms radii of neutron orbits in certain nuclei. The theoretical background is outlined and problems associated with the comparison of experiment and theory are discussed. Experiments performed to calibrate sub-Coulomb heavy ion transfer reactions are presented, and some comments are made on the relative roles of light and heavy ion reactions. Preliminary values for the rms radii of neutron orbits and neutron excesses extracted from recent experiments are given, and some remarks are made concerning the implications of these results for the triton wave function and for the Coulomb energy difference anomaly. (author)

  2. One-neutron transfer reaction: a toy model in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Galilei, Padova, Italy INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Padova, Italy INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy))" >Moschini, L

    2014-01-01

    A simple 1D toy model to study one-neutron transfer reactions is developed. It is based on the solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation for a particle initially bound by a fixed potential well, perturbed by a second moving potential, which accounts for the second partner of the reaction. At the end of the time evolution it is possible to evaluate the probability of the transfer of the particle from a potential to the other, as well as the transfer to continuum states in the case of weakly-bound systems. Although rather simple, the model accounts for most of the physical characteristics of these kind of reactions: such as the existence of an optimum Q-value and the dependence on the parameters defining the relative motion of the two potentials

  3. Nobel Prize 1992: Rudolph A. Marcus: theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulate Segura, Diego Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A review of the theory developed by Rudolph A. Marcus is presented, who for his rating to the theory of electron transfer in chemical systems was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992. Marcus theory has constituted not only a good extension of the use of a spectroscopic principle, but also has provided an energy balance and the application of energy conservation for electron transfer reactions. A better understanding of the reaction coordinate is exposed in terms energetic and establishing the principles that govern the transfer of electrons, protons and some labile small molecular groups as studied at present. Also, the postulates and equations described have established predictive models of reaction time, very useful for industrial environments, biological, metabolic, and others that involve redox processes. Marcus theory itself has also constituted a large contribution to the theory of complex transition [es

  4. Search for an explanation for neutralization rates of atomic ion-ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Wiens, Justin P.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured well over a hundred rate coefficients k for cation-anion mutual neutralization reactions at thermal energies. For molecular ions, the k at 300 K tend not to vary more than a factor of two or three, presumably because a great many neutral states cross the incoming Coulombic potential energy curve. Atomic-atomic systems, for which there are few favorable curve crossings between the neutral and Coulombic curves, show variation of at least a factor of 60 in the measured k values at 300 K. For reactions involving the noble-gas cations, we assume that the final state is the lowest excited state of the neutral, plus the ground state of the neutralized anion, because otherwise the crossing distance R is so small that the curve-crossing probability is nil. We plotted measured k values (in cm3/s) vs the distance R (in bohr) at which the neutral and Coulombic curves cross, the found that the data are fairly well fit by a power law for k, 10-4R - 2 . 8 . The question is, is there a physical explanation for the observed dependence on R? We will discuss the data and the expectations of Landau-Zener theory. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR-2303EP).

  5. Correlations and polarization in electronic and atomic collisions and (e,2e) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubner, P.J.O.; Weigold, E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the invited papers presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Correlations and Polarization in Electronic and Atomic collisions and (e,2e) Reactions held at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia from 18-21 July, 1991. This symposium was a satellite meeting to the XVII International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) held in Brisbane, Australia. It follows a tradition of satellite meetings on (e,2e) collisions and on correlation and polarization in electronic and atomic collisions held in association with previous ICPEACs. The subject matter of this symposium covered that of the previous meeting at Hoboken, USA (1989) on correlation and polarization phenomena as well as that of the previous meeting at the University of Maryland (1989) on (e,2e) collisions. In addition it extended the scope to include some discussion of (e,3e), (γ,eγ) and (γ,2γ) coincidence measurements. The discussion of the current rapid advances in coincidence experiments, correlations and polarization measurements and related theoretical developments brought together 100 scientist from many countries with broad interdisciplinary backgrounds. The symposium stressed the common threads weaving through all these areas of research. (Author)

  6. Surface modification of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by reaction with atomic nitrogen at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Luning; Pejakovic, Dusan A.; Geng Baisong; Marschall, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Dry etching of {0 0 0 1} basal planes of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using active nitridation by nitrogen atoms was investigated at low pressures and high temperatures. The etching process produces channels at grain boundaries and pits whose shapes depend on the reaction temperature. For temperatures below 600 deg. C, the majority of pits are nearly circular, with a small fraction of hexagonal pits with rounded edges. For temperatures above 600 deg. C, the pits are almost exclusively hexagonal with straight edges. The Raman spectra of samples etched at 1000 deg. C show the D mode near 1360 cm -1 , which is absent in pristine HOPG. For deep hexagonal pits that penetrate many graphene layers, neither the surface number density of pits nor the width of pit size distribution changes substantially with the nitridation time, suggesting that these pits are initiated at a fixed number of extended defects intersecting {0 0 0 1} planes. Shallow pits that penetrate 1-2 graphene layers have a wide size distribution, which suggests that these pits are initiated on pristine graphene surfaces from lattice vacancies continually formed by N atoms. A similar wide size distribution of shallow hexagonal pits is observed in an n-layer graphene sample after N-atom etching.

  7. Oxidoreduction reactions involving the electrostatic and the covalent complex of cytochrome c and plastocyanin: Importance of the protein rearrangement for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerey, L.M.; Kostic, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Horse heart cytochrome c and French bean plastocyanin are cross-linked one-to-one by a carbodiimide in the same general orientation in which they associate electrostatically. The reduction potentials of the Fe and Cu atoms in the covalent diprotein complex are respectively 245 and 385 mV vs NHE; the EPR spectra of the two metals are not perturbed by cross-linking. For isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, which probably differ slightly from one another in the manner of cross-linking, are separated efficiently by cation-exchange chromatography. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric experiments with the covalent diprotein complex show that the presence of plastocyanin somewhat inhibits oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- and somewhat promotes oxidation of this protein by [Fe(C 5 H 5 ) 2 ] + . These changes in reactivity are explained in terms of electrostatic and steric effects. Pulse-radiolysis experiments with the electrostatic diprotein complex yield association constants of ≥5 x 10 6 and 1 x 10 5 M -1 at ionic strengths of 1 and 40 mM, respectively, and the rate constant of 1.05 x 10 3 s -1 , regardless of the ionic strength, for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. Analogous pulse-radiolysis experiments with each of the four isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, at ionic strengths of both 2 and 200 mM, show an absence of the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. A rearrangement of the proteins for this reaction seems to be possible (or unnecessary) in the electrostatic complex but impossible in the covalent complex

  8. Hydrophilization of poly(ether ether ketone) films by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP) has been exploited to hydrophilize PEEK. The ketone groups on the PEEK surface were reduced to hydroxyl groups which were converted to bromoisobutyrate initiating sites for SI-ATRP. The modification steps were followed by contact...... angle measurements and XPS. Moreover, ATR FTIR has been used to confirm the formation of initiating groups. Grafting of PEGMA from PEEK was performed in aqueous solution. The presence of the PPEGMA grafts on PEEK was revealed by the thermograms from TGA whereas investigations with AFM rejected changes...

  9. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated Ionomers by Chemical Modification and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller

    The cornerstone in this dissertation is made up by three individual assessments of the diversity in the macromolecular landscape that can be obtained by applying relatively few efficient chemical tools. The intention is to gain deeper knowledge on the chemical tuning of proton exchange membranes...... of hydrocarbon macromolecular architectures, PSU with postsulfonated polystyrene (PS) grafts are investigated. Here, IEC is controlled through the degree of substitution, the graft length and DS. The grafting is performed with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The third assessment is dedicated...... of control by ATRP and click chemistry enables a wide selection of polymer structures with the handles: degree of substitution (DS), polymerization and sulfonation, and blending....

  10. Efficiency of ablative plasma energy transfer into a massive aluminum target using different atomic number ablators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Stepniewski, W.; Jach, K.; Swierczynski, R.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Ullschmied, Jiří; Cikhart, J.; Klír, D.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 379-386 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : ablator atomic number * crater volume * laser energy transfer * plasma ablative pressure Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  11. Modification of Jute Fibers with Polystyrene via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Jankova, Katja Atanassova; Egsgaard, Helge

    2005-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated as a method of covalently bonding polystyrene to jute (Corchorus capsularis) and as a possible approach to fiber composites with enhanced properties. Jute fibers were modified with a brominated initiator and subsequently ATRP modified...... to attach polystyrene and then examined using SEM, DSC, TGA, FTIR, XPS, elemental analysis, and Py-GC-MS. These techniques confirmed that polystyrene had been covalently bound to the fibers and consequently ATRP-modified jute fiber mats were used to prepare hot-pressed polystyrene composites. Composite...

  12. In situ AFM investigation of electrochemically induced surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Yu, Bo; Zhou, Feng

    2013-02-12

    Electrochemically induced surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization is traced by in situ AFM technology for the first time, which allows visualization of the polymer growth process. It affords a fundamental insight into the surface morphology and growth mechanism simultaneously. Using this technique, the polymerization kinetics of two model monomers were studied, namely the anionic 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMA) and the cationic 2-(metharyloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (METAC). The growth of METAC is significantly improved by screening the ammonium cations by the addition of ionic liquid electrolyte in aqueous solution. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fabrication of Robust and Antifouling Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Jia, Shun-Tian

    2015-04-22

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of fluorinated methacrylates on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics. The hydrophobicity of the PET fabric was systematically tunable by controlling the polymerization time. The obtained superhydrophobic fabrics showed excellent chemical robustness even after exposure to different chemicals, such as acid, base, salt, acetone, and toluene. Importantly, the fabrics maintained superhydrophobicity after 2500 abrasion cycles, 100 laundering cycles, and long time exposure to UV irradiation. Also, the surface of the superhydrophobic fabrics showed excellent antifouling properties.

  14. Reactions of Ground State Nitrogen Atoms N(4S) with Astrochemically-Relevant Molecules on Interstellar Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Nourry, Sendres

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, ambitious programs were launched to probe the interstellar medium always more accurately. One of the major challenges of these missions remains the detection of prebiotic compounds and the understanding of reaction pathways leading to their formation. These complex heterogeneous reactions mainly occur on icy dust grains, and their studies require the coupling of laboratory experiments mimicking the extreme conditions of extreme cold and dilute media. For that purpose, we have developed an original experimental approach that combine the study of heterogeneous reactions (by exposing neutral molecules adsorbed on ice to non-energetic radicals H, OH, N...) and a neon matrix isolation study at very low temperatures, which is of paramount importance to isolate and characterize highly reactive reaction intermediates. Such experimental approach has already provided answers to many questions raised about some astrochemically-relevant reactions occurring in the ground state on the surface of dust grain ices in dense molecular clouds. The aim of this new present work is to show the implication of ground state atomic nitrogen on hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from some astrochemically-relevant species, at very low temperatures (3K-20K), without providing any external energy. Under cryogenic temperatures and with high barrier heights, such reactions involving N(4S) nitrogen atoms should not occur spontaneously and require an initiating energy. However, the detection of some radicals species as byproducts, in our solid samples left in the dark for hours at 10K, proves that hydrogen abstraction reactions involving ground state N(4S) nitrogen atoms may occur in solid phase at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show the efficiency of radical species formation stemming from non-energetic N-atoms and astrochemically-relevant molecules. We will then discuss how such reactions, involving nitrogen atoms in their ground states, might be the first key step

  15. Dramatic Influence of an Anionic Donor on the Oxygen-Atom Transfer Reactivity of a MnV–Oxo Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Heather M; Quesne, Matthew G; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A; Lancaster, Kyle M; Donohoe, James; DeBeer, Serena; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2014-01-01

    Addition of an anionic donor to an MnV(O) porphyrinoid complex causes a dramatic increase in 2-electron oxygen-atom-transfer (OAT) chemistry. The 6-coordinate [MnV(O)(TBP8Cz)(CN)]− was generated from addition of Bu4N+CN− to the 5-coordinate MnV(O) precursor. The cyanide-ligated complex was characterized for the first time by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and gives Mn–O=1.53 Å, Mn–CN=2.21 Å. In combination with computational studies these distances were shown to correlate with a singlet ground state. Reaction of the CN− complex with thioethers results in OAT to give the corresponding sulfoxide and a 2e−-reduced MnIII(CN)− complex. Kinetic measurements reveal a dramatic rate enhancement for OAT of approximately 24 000-fold versus the same reaction for the parent 5-coordinate complex. An Eyring analysis gives ΔH≠=14 kcal mol−1, ΔS≠=−10 cal mol−1 K−1. Computational studies fully support the structures, spin states, and relative reactivity of the 5- and 6-coordinate MnV(O) complexes. PMID:25256417

  16. A peroxidase mimic with atom transfer radical polymerization activity constructed through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yue; Yang, Jiebing; Liu, Yong; Yang, Yan; Tang, Jun; Li, Quanshun

    2018-07-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been considered to be an efficient strategy for constructing functional macromolecules owing to its simple operation and versatile monomers, and thus it is of great significance to develop ideal catalysts with higher activity and perfect reusability. We constructed a peroxidase mimic through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks UiO-66-NH 2 (ZrMOF), namely Heme-ZrMOF. After the systematic characterization of structure, the composite Heme-ZrMOF was demonstrated to possess high peroxidase activity using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as substrates. The enzyme mimic was then used as catalysts in the ATRP reactions of different monomers, in which favorable monomer conversion (44.6-98.0%) and product molecular weight (8600-25,600 g/mol) could be obtained. Compared to free heme, Heme-ZrMOF could efficiently achieve the easy separation of heme from the catalytic system and facilitate the ATRP reaction in an aqueous environment to avoid the utilization of organic solvents. In conclusion, the enzyme mimic Heme-ZrMOF could be potentially used as an effective catalyst for preparing well-defined polymers with biomedical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Polarization transfer from polarized nuclear spin to μ- spin in muonic atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Yoshitaka; Nagamine, Kanetada; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1987-02-01

    A theoretical study of polarization transfer from an initially-polarized nuclear spin to a μ - spin in a muonic atom is given. The switching of the hyperfine interaction at excited muonic states as well as at the ground 1s state is taken into account. The upper state of hyperfine doublet at the muonic 1s state is considered to proceed down to the lower state. It is found that as the hyperfine interaction becomes effective at higher excited muonic orbitals, a less extent of polarization is transferred from the nuclear spin to the μ - spin. The theoretical values obtained are compared with the recent experiment of μ - repolarization in a polarized 209 Bi target. (author)

  18. Coherent population transfer and superposition of atomic states via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage using an excited-doublet four-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shiqi; Gong Shangqing; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2004-01-01

    Coherent population transfer and superposition of atomic states via a technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in an excited-doublet four-level atomic system have been analyzed. It is shown that the behavior of adiabatic passage in this system depends crucially on the detunings between the laser frequencies and the corresponding atomic transition frequencies. Particularly, if both the fields are tuned to the center of the two upper levels, the four-level system has two degenerate dark states, although one of them contains the contribution from the excited atomic states. The nonadiabatic coupling of the two degenerate dark states is intrinsic, it originates from the energy difference of the two upper levels. An arbitrary superposition of atomic states can be prepared due to such nonadiabatic coupling effect

  19. Isotope effects for base-promoted, gas-phase proton transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, J.J.; Cheng, Xueheng

    1991-01-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most basic, the most common and the most important of chemical transformations; despite their apparent simplicity, much is unknown about this most fundamental of all chemical processes. Active interest in understanding the underlying principles of organic proton transfer reactions continues because of efforts being made to develop the theory of elementary chemical processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the dynamic role played by proton transfers in biochemical transformations. As organic chemists, the authors have used the flowing afterglow technique to gain an appreciation of the fundamental issues involved in reaction mechanisms by examining such processes in a solvent-free environment under thermally-equilibrated (300 K) conditions. Recent characterization of the facile production of both acetate and the monoenolate anion from the interaction of hydroxide or fluoride with acetic acid reinforces the idea that much yet must be learned about proton transfers/proton abstractions in general. Earlier work by Riveros and co-workers on competitive H vs D abstraction from α-d 1 -toluenes and by Noest and Nibbering on competitive H vs D abstraction from α,α,α-d 3 -acetone, in combination with the acetic acid results, challenged the author's to assemble a comprehensive picture of the competitive nature of proton transfer reactions for anionic base-promoted processes

  20. Nuclear rotational population patterns in heavy-ion scattering and transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, J O; Stoyer, M A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Canto, L F; Donangelo, R [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ring, P [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1991-05-01

    A model of {sup 239}Pu with decoupled neutron is used for theoretical calculations of rotational population patterns in heavy ion inelastic scattering and one-neutron transfer reactions. The system treated in {sup 90}Zr on {sup 239}Pu at the near-barrier energy of 500 MeV and backscattering angles of 180deg and 140deg. The influence of the complex nuclear optical potential is seen to be very strong, and the Nilsson wave function of the odd neutron produces a distinctive pattern in the transfer reaction. (orig.).

  1. Analysis of trace gases at ppb levels by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.

    1996-01-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace gas components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H 3 O + ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of medical information obtained by means of breath analysis, of environmental trace analysis, and examples in the field of food chemistry demonstrate the wide applicability of the method. (Authors)

  2. Investigation of transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Juliet M; Corbin, Joshua R; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2018-04-11

    Transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer is a powerful method for incorporating new CN bonds into relatively unfunctionalized scaffolds. In this communication, we report the first examples of site- and chemoselective CH bond amination reactions in aqueous media. The unexpected ability to employ water as the solvent in these reactions is advantageous in that it eliminates toxic solvent use and enables reactions to be run at increased concentrations with lower oxidant loadings. Using water as the reaction medium has potential to expand the scope of nitrene transfer to encompass a variety of biomolecules and highly polar substrates, as well as enable pH control over the site-selectivity of CH bond amination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interplay of break-up and transfer processes in reactions involving weakly-bound systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitturi, Andrea; Moschini, Laura

    2018-02-01

    In this note we illustrate some applications of a simple model which has been devised to clarify the reaction mechanism and the interplay of different reaction channels (elastic, inelastic, transfer, break-up) in heavy-ion collisions. The model involves two potential wells moving in one dimension and few active particles; in spite of its simplicity, it is supposed to maintain the main features, the properties and the physics of the full three-dimensional case. Special attention is given to the role of continuum states in reactions involving weakly-bound systems, and different approximation schemes (as first-order or coupled-channels) as well as different continuum discretization procedures are tested. In the case of two active particles the reaction mechanism associated with two-particle transfer and the effect of pairing intearction are investigated. Work done in collaboration with Antonio Moro and Kouichi Hagino

  4. Reactions of tritium atoms with amino acids, deuterated amino acids and mixtures of amino acids. Additivity property and isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badun, G.A.; Filatov, Eh.S.

    1988-01-01

    Interaction of tritium atoms with glycine (1) and leucine (2) amino acids, deuterated amino acids, their mixtures and glycylleucine (3) peptide in the 77-300 K temperature range is studied in isothermal and gradient regimes. Tagged amino acids were separated from targets after conducting the reaction. At T 150 K are associated with intermolecular transmission of free valence in the mixture of amino acids. Regularities of the reaction found for the mixture of amino acids are conserved for (3) as well, i.e. the peptide bond does not essentially affect the reaction of isotopic exchange conditioned by atomic tritium

  5. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  6. Electron transfer and energy transfer reactions in photoexcited a-nonathiophene/C60 films and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.A.J.; Moses, D.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Heeger, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Photoexcitation of a nonathiophene in film or solution across the p-p* energy gap produces a metastable triplet state. In the presence of C60, on the other hand, an ultra fast electron transfer from the photoexcited nonathiophene onto C60 is observed in films, whereas in solution C60 is involved in

  7. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1980-01-01

    The major progress during this period was in the study of recoil /sup 31/Si and recoil /sup 11/C reactions and in the initiation of the studies on the interaction of molecular tritium on solid surfaces. For the recoil /sup 31/Si systems, heterogeneous hydrogenation experiments have been designed to positively confirm that a major unknown product, derived from the interaction of /sup 31/Si atoms with 1,3-butadiene, is 1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene. This compound has been shown to be very sensitive to ..gamma..-ray irradiation and to be thermally unstable at a temperature higher than 100/sup 0/C. Another recoil /sup 31/Si experiment was designed to review the mechanism of the /sup 31/Si abstraction reactions. From the fact that high yields of (/sup 31/Si)-1-fluorosilacyclopent-3-ene were obtained as a product from a mixture of PH/sub 3/ and PF/sub 3/ together with 1,3-butadiene, the stepwise abstraction mechanism is definitely much more predominant than the possible simultaneous abstraction. Other recoil /sup 31/Si works involved a detailed systematic composition study of /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ reactions with 1,3-butadiene, some neon moderator studies, and the continuation of the studies on the reactions of /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ and /sup 31/SiH/sub 2/ with conjugated hexadienes. By using 2-/sup 14/C-propanone and 1,3-/sup 14/C-propanone, the mechanism of solvent-free oxidative cleavage of propanone by KMnO/sub 4/ was elucidated. Information thus derived was used to degradate the /sup 11/C-labelled propadiene derived from the reactions of recoil /sup 11/C atoms with ethylene. Results indicate that 73% of the /sup 11/C-labelled propadiene was center-labelled. This value was observed to change with additives. Various mechanistic studies on the heterogeneous interactions of molecular T/sub 2/ on solid surfaces such as Pd supported on active carbon have been initiated.

  8. Kinetics of the reactions of bromine atoms with a series of aliphatic aldehydes at 298 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, I.; Imrik, K.; Dobe, S.; Berces, T. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Budapest (Hungary). Koezponti Kemiai Kutato Intezete

    1998-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) with selected aldehydes, i.e. ethanal (1), propanal (2), 2-methyl-propanal (3), 2.2-dimethyl-propanal (4) and trichloroacetaldehyde (5) were studied at 298{+-}2 K. Rate constants for overall reactions were measured using the fast flow technique with resonance fluorescence detection of Br. Complementary determinations were carried out by the laser flash photolysis method. The following rate constants were obtained in the kinetic measurements ({+-}2{sigma}): k{sub 1}=(2.1{+-}0.2) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 2}=(4.3{+-}0.4) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 3}=(6.3{+-}1.4) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 4}=(8.5{+-}0.8) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 5}{<=}1 x 10{sup 9}, all in cm{sup 3}mol{sup -1}s{sup -1} units. The probable mechanism for the reactions of bromine atoms with aliphatic aldehydes has been discussed. (orig.)

  9. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  10. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Phillip Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me5C5)2Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me5C5)2YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me5C5)2YbCH(SiMe3)2, displays similar chemistry to (Me5C5)2YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me5C5)3YbCH(SiMe5)2. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me5C5)2V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me5C5)2VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me5C5)2VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me5C5)2V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me5Ce5)2VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me5C5)2TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH4), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me5C5)2Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  11. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of chemical reactions coupled with heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Thomas C; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-28

    In this paper, we describe two types of effective events for describing heat transfer in a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation that may involve stochastic chemical reactions. Simulations employing these events are referred to as KMC-TBT and KMC-PHE. In KMC-TBT, heat transfer is modeled as the stochastic transfer of "thermal bits" between adjacent grid points. In KMC-PHE, heat transfer is modeled by integrating the Poisson heat equation for a short time. Either approach is capable of capturing the time dependent system behavior exactly. Both KMC-PHE and KMC-TBT are validated by simulating pure heat transfer in a rod and a square and modeling a heated desorption problem where exact numerical results are available. KMC-PHE is much faster than KMC-TBT and is used to study the endothermic desorption of a lattice gas. Interesting findings from this study are reported.

  12. Functionalized polymer film surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y.; Li, J.S.; Yang, W.T.; Xu, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to manipulate and control the surface properties of polymer films, without altering the substrate properties, is crucial to their wide-spread applications. In this work, a simple one-step method for the direct immobilization of benzyl chloride groups (as the effective atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators) on the polymer films was developed via benzophenone-induced coupling of 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC). Polyethylene (PE) and nylon films were selected as examples of polymer films to illustrate the functionalization of film surfaces via surface-initiated ATRP. Functional polymer brushes of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, sodium 4-styrenesulfonate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate, as well as their block copolymer brushes, have been prepared via surface-initiated ATRP from the VBC-coupled PE or nylon film surfaces. With the development of a simple approach to the covalent immobilization of ATRP initiators on polymer film surfaces and the inherent versatility of surface-initiated ATRP, the surface functionality of polymer films can be precisely tailored. - Highlights: ► Atom transfer radical polymerization initiators were simply immobilized. ► Different functional polymer brushes were readily prepared. ► Their block copolymer brushes were also readily prepared

  13. On the mechanism of activation of copper-catalyzed atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isse, Abdirisak Ahmed; Bortolamei, Nicola; De Paoli, Patrizia; Gennaro, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of activation of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been analyzed by investigating the kinetics of dissociative electron transfer (ET) to alkyl halides (RX) in acetonitrile. Using a series of alkyl halides, including both bromides and chlorides, the rate constants of ET (k ET ) to RX by electrogenerated aromatic radical anions (A· − ) acting as outer-sphere donors have been measured and analyzed according to the current theories of dissociative ET. This has shown that the kinetic data fit very well the “sticky” dissociative ET model with the formation of a weak adduct held together by electrostatic interactions. The rate constants of activation, k act , of some alkyl halides, namely chloroacetonitrile, methyl 2-bromopropionate and ethyl chloroacetate, by [Cu I L] + (L = tris(2-dimethylaminoethyl)amine, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, 1,1,4,7,7-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine) have also been measured in the same experimental conditions. Comparisons of the measured k act values with those predicted assuming an outer-sphere ET for the complexes have shown that activation by Cu(I) is 7–10 orders of magnitude faster than required by outer-sphere ET. Therefore, the mechanism of RX activation by Cu(I) complexes used as catalysts in ATRP occurs by an inner-sphere ET or more appropriately by a halogen atom abstraction

  14. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the Canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. Bubbles containing reaction products enhance the rate of transfer of water from the aqueous layer to the organic layer. These bubbles are generated by the oxidation of TBP and its reaction products in the organic layer and by the oxidation of butanol in the aqueous layer. Butanol is formed by the hydrolysis of TBP in the organic layer. For aqueous-layer bubbling to occur, butanol must transfer into the aqueous layer. Consequently, the rate of oxidation and bubble generation in the aqueous layer strongly depends on the rate of transfer of butanol from the organic to the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments

  16. Evaporation rates and surface profiles on heterogeneous surfaces with mass transfer and surface reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M; Schmidt, L D

    1979-01-01

    Simple models incorporating surface reaction and diffusion of volatile products through a boundary layer are developed to calculate effective rates of evaporation and local surface profiles on surfaces having active and inactive regions. The coupling between surface heterogeneities with respect to a particular reaction and external mass transfer may provide a mechanism for the surface rearrangement and metal loss encountered in several catalytic systems of practical interest. Calculated transport rates for the volatilization of platinum in oxidizing environments and the rearrangement of this metal during the ammonia oxidation reaction agree well with published experimental data.

  17. Disentangling the transfer and breakup contributions for the inclusive 8 Li + 208 Pb reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, A.M.; Crespo, R.; Garcia M, H.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, J.; Nunes, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the 8 Li + 208 Pb reaction at energies around the Coulomb barrier is presented. The study is focused on the elastic and one-neutron removal channels. For the elastic scattering, an optical model analysis of the experimental data is performed. The observed 7 Li is interpreted as the superposition of the one-neutron transfer reaction, 208 Pb ( 8 Li, 7 Li) 209 Pb, and the breakup reaction. The separate contribution of each one of these processes has been calculated within the DWBA formalism. The sum of both contributions explains adequately the experimental angular distribution of 7 Li. (Author)

  18. Synthesis of Well-Defined Three-Arm Star-Branched Polystyrene through Arm-First Coupling Approach by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahabuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a simple route to synthesize three-arm star-branched polystyrene. Atom transfer radical polymerization technique has been utilized to yield branched polystyrene involving Williamson coupling strategy. Initially a linear polymeric chain of predetermined molecular weight has been synthesized which is further end-functionalized into a primary alkyl bromide moiety, a prime requisition for Williamson reaction. The end-functionalized polymer is then coupled using 1,1,1-tris(4-hydroxyphenylethane, a trifunctional core molecule, to give well-defined triple-arm star-branched polystyrene.

  19. [Intermediate energy studies of polarization transfer, polarized deuteron scattering, and (p,π+-) reactions: Rapporteur's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of intermediate energy (80 to 1000 MeV) study contributions to the International Polarization Symposium in Osaka, Japan, August 1985 is presented in this report. Contributions fall into three categories: polarization transfer, polarized deuteron scattering and polarized (p,π +- ) reactions

  20. Possibilities of production of neutron-rich Md isotopes in multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Myeong-Hwan; Lee, Young-Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institue, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The possibilities of production of yet unknown neutron-rich isotopes of Md are explored in several multi-nucleon transfer reactions with actinide targets and stable and radioactive beams. The projectile-target combinations and bombarding energies are suggested to produce new neutron-rich isotopes of Md in future experiments. (orig.)

  1. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer...

  2. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions—I. Single reversible chemical reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, F.P.H. van; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1989-01-01

    An improved numerical technique was used in order to develop an absorption model with which it is possible to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon of mass transfer accompanied by a complex reversible chemical reaction. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass

  3. Analysis of coupled mass transfer and sol-gel reaction in a two-phase system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijns, H.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Pel, L.; Zitha, P.L.J.

    2006-01-01

    The coupled mass transfer and chemical reactions of a gel-forming compound in a two-phase system were studied in detail. Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate (TMOS) is often used as a precursor in sol-gel chemistry to produce silica gels in aqueous systems. TMOS can also be mixed with many hydrocarbons

  4. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  5. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: a spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086156; Raabe, Riccardo; Bracco, Angela

    In this thesis work, an exploratory experiment to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier, as a possible mean to perform $\\gamma$ spectroscopy studies of exotic neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high energies and spins. The experiment was performed at ISOLDE (CERN), employing the heavy-ion reaction $^{98}$Rb + $^{7}$Li at 2.85 MeV/A. Cluster-transfer reaction channels were studied through particle-$\\gamma$ coincidence measurements, using the MINIBALL Ge array coupled to the charged particle Si detectors T-REX. Sr, Y and Zr neutron-rich nuclei with A $\\approx$ 100 were populated by either triton- or $\\alpha$ transfer from $^{7}$Li to the beam nuclei and the emitted complementary charged fragment was detected in coincidence with the $\\gamma$ cascade of the residues, after few neutrons evaporation. The measured $\\gamma$ spectra were studied in detail and t...

  6. Mechanism of the Primary Charge Transfer Reaction in the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M; Schulten, Klaus; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    , the quinol-protein interaction, which initiates the Q-cycle, has not yet been completely described. Furthermore, the initial charge transfer reactions of the Q-cycle lack a physical description. The present investigation utilizes classical molecular dynamics simulations in tandem with quantum density...

  7. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  8. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  9. Exciplex mediated photoinduced electron transfer reactions of phthalocyanine-fullerene dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemi, Marja; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Efimov, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Evidences of an intramolecular exciplex intermediate in a photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reaction of double-linked free-base and zinc phthalocyanine-C-60 dyads were found. This was the first time for a dyad with phthalocyanine donor. Excitation of the phthalocyanine moiety of the dyads results

  10. Severe immediate allergic reactions to grapes: part of a lipid transfer protein-associated clinical syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilopoulou, Emilia; Zuidmeer, Laurian; Akkerdaas, Jaap; Tassios, Ioannis; Rigby, Neil R.; Mills, E. N. Clare; van Ree, Ronald; Saxoni-Papageorgiou, Photini; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Grape allergy is considered rare; grape lipid transfer protein (LTP; Vit v 1), an endochitinase and a thaumatin-like protein (TLP) have been reported as grape allergens. A considerable number of patients have referred to our department for severe reactions to grapes, and several IgE

  11. Transfer reactions in sup(32,36)S + sup(144,154)Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, A.J.; Tada, M. di; Fernandez Niello, J.; Testoni, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The deformation of spherical nuclei in transfer reactions near to the coulomb barrier is studied. The sup(32,36)S + sup(144,154)Sm reactions were carried out using sup(32)S beams produced by TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires with energies of 148 MeV and 160 MeV and sup(36)S beams produced by tandem accelerator of Laboratorio Nazionale di Legnaro with energies of 142 MeV and 155 MeV. The angular distributions were measured for sup(32)S reaction using gas ionization chamber and position sensitive detector. The mass spectra of reaction products were obtained measuring time of flight between time detectors, in the sup(36)S reaction. (M.C.K.)

  12. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Changhua [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); College of Chemistry and Biology, Beihua University, Jilin 132013 (China); Zhang, Xintong, E-mail: xtzhang@nenu.edu.cn [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Liu, Yichun [Centre for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, and Key Laboratory for UV-Emitting Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in photocatalysis process is focused. • Multi-electron transfer ORR is reviewed. • This review provides a guide to access to enhanced photocatalysis via multi-electron transfer. - Abstract: Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  13. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Liyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Li, Qianqian; Dong, Cezhou; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Wang, Hongtao; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Klie, Robert F.; Yassar, Reza Shahbazian

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Factorized distorted wave approximation for the (e,2e) reaction on atoms : noncoplanar symmetric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, A.J.; McCarthy, I.E.; Noble, C.J.; Weigold, E.

    1977-02-01

    Angular and energy correlations for electrons produced in the ionization of neon and xenon by electrons with energies between 400eV and 2.5 keV have been measured using symmetric noncoplanar kinematics. The reaction yields information about the atomic orbitals and their correlations when analysed with the distorted-wave off-shell impulse approximation. In the past either plane waves or various eikonal approximations have been used for the distorted waves, and in the cases where the eikonal parameters are approximately related to the elastic scattering the spectroscopic sum rule has been approximately verified. In the present work calculations have also been carried out using partial-wave-expanded optical model wave functions which describe the elastic scattering in detail. (Author)

  15. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati; Jiang, Qiu; Kurra, Narendra; Buttner, Ulrich; Wang, Xianbin; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  16. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Crossed molecular beam study of H and D atom reactions with NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberland, H.; Lucadou, W. von; Rohwer, P.

    1976-01-01

    Angular distributions and time of flight spectra of OH and OD from the reactions H + NO 2 and D + NO 2 have been measured at a relative kinetic energy of 440 meV (approximately 10 kcal/mol). Both angular distributions peak in the forward (atom beam) direction, the fall off to larger angles being more rapid for OD than for OH. Within statistical error the centre of mass velocity spectra do not show an isotope effect. Only 24 +- 5% of the total energy available is channeled into product translation independent of the isotope. This value is in very good agreement with our earlier results and with data from Polanyi and Sloans chemiluminescence experiments. (orig.) [de

  18. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  19. Proceedings of the 2nd joint seminar on atomic collisions and heavy ion induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kichinosuke; Ozawa, Kunio; Kamitsubo, H.; Nomura, T.; Awaya, Y.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-11-01

    The meeting of the 2nd joint seminar on atomic collisions and heavy ion induced nuclear reactions was held at the University of Tokyo, May 13 and 14, 1982. The aim of this seminar has been not only to recognize the common problems lying between above two research fields, but also to obtain an overview of the theoretical and experimental approaches to clear the current problems. In the seminar, more than 50 participants gathered and presented 16 papers. These are two general reviews and fourteen comprehensive surveys on topical subjects which have been developed very intensively in recent years. The editors would like to thank all participants for their assistance and cooperation in making possible a publication of these proceedings. (author)

  20. Hydride Transfer versus Deprotonation Kinetics in the Isobutane–Propene Alkylation Reaction: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with light alkenes plays an essential role in modern petrochemical processes for the production of high-octane gasoline. In this study we have employed periodic DFT calculations combined with microkinetic simulations to investigate the complex reaction mechanism of isobutane–propene alkylation catalyzed by zeolitic solid acids. Particular emphasis was given to addressing the selectivity of the alkylate formation versus alkene formation, which requires a high rate of hydride transfer in comparison to the competitive oligomerization and deprotonation reactions resulting in catalyst deactivation. Our calculations reveal that hydride transfer from isobutane to a carbenium ion occurs via a concerted C–C bond formation between a tert-butyl fragment and an additional olefin, or via deprotonation of the tert-butyl fragment to generate isobutene. A combination of high isobutane concentration and low propene concentration at the reaction center favor the selective alkylation. The key reaction step that has to be suppressed to increase the catalyst lifetime is the deprotonation of carbenium intermediates that are part of the hydride transfer reaction cycle. PMID:29226012

  1. Hydride Transfer versus Deprotonation Kinetics in the Isobutane-Propene Alkylation Reaction: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; van Santen, Rutger A; Poursaeidesfahani, Ali; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Pidko, Evgeny A; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2017-12-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with light alkenes plays an essential role in modern petrochemical processes for the production of high-octane gasoline. In this study we have employed periodic DFT calculations combined with microkinetic simulations to investigate the complex reaction mechanism of isobutane-propene alkylation catalyzed by zeolitic solid acids. Particular emphasis was given to addressing the selectivity of the alkylate formation versus alkene formation, which requires a high rate of hydride transfer in comparison to the competitive oligomerization and deprotonation reactions resulting in catalyst deactivation. Our calculations reveal that hydride transfer from isobutane to a carbenium ion occurs via a concerted C-C bond formation between a tert -butyl fragment and an additional olefin, or via deprotonation of the tert -butyl fragment to generate isobutene. A combination of high isobutane concentration and low propene concentration at the reaction center favor the selective alkylation. The key reaction step that has to be suppressed to increase the catalyst lifetime is the deprotonation of carbenium intermediates that are part of the hydride transfer reaction cycle.

  2. MoS2 monolayer catalyst doped with isolated Co atoms for the hydrodeoxygenation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoliang; Robertson, Alex W.; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Darby, Matthew T.; Muhieddine, Mohamad H.; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Stamatakis, Michail; Warner, Jamie H.; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2017-08-01

    The conversion of oxygen-rich biomass into hydrocarbon fuels requires efficient hydrodeoxygenation catalysts during the upgrading process. However, traditionally prepared CoMoS2 catalysts, although efficient for hydrodesulfurization, are not appropriate due to their poor activity, sulfur loss and rapid deactivation at elevated temperature. Here, we report the synthesis of MoS2 monolayer sheets decorated with isolated Co atoms that bond covalently to sulfur vacancies on the basal planes that, when compared with conventionally prepared samples, exhibit superior activity, selectivity and stability for the hydrodeoxygenation of 4-methylphenol to toluene. This higher activity allows the reaction temperature to be reduced from the typically used 300 °C to 180 °C and thus allows the catalysis to proceed without sulfur loss and deactivation. Experimental analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal a large number of sites at the interface between the Co and Mo atoms on the MoS2 basal surface and we ascribe the higher activity to the presence of sulfur vacancies that are created local to the observed Co-S-Mo interfacial sites.

  3. The improvement of the heat transfer model for sodium-water reaction jet code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Yoshirou; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kamoshida, Norio; Murata, Shuuichi

    2001-02-01

    For confirming the reasonable DBL (Design Base Leak) on steam generator (SG), it is necessary to evaluate phenomena of sodium-water reaction (SWR) in an actual steam generator realistically. The improvement of a heat transfer model on sodium-water reaction (SWR) jet code (LEAP-JET ver.1.40) and application analysis to the water injection tests for confirmation of propriety for the code were performed. On the improvement of the code, the heat transfer model between a inside fluid and a tube wall was introduced instead of the prior model which was heat capacity model including both heat capacity of the tube wall and inside fluid. And it was considered that the fluid of inside the heat exchange tube was able to treat as water or sodium and typical heat transfer equations used in SG design were also introduced in the new heat transfer model. Further additional work was carried out in order to improve the stability of the calculation for long calculation time. The test calculation using the improved code (LEAP-JET ver.1.50) were carried out with conditions of the SWAT-IR·Run-HT-2 test. It was confirmed that the SWR jet behavior on the result and the influence to the result of the heat transfer model were reasonable. And also on the improved code (LEAP-JET ver.1.50), user's manual was revised with additional I/O manual and explanation of the heat transfer model and new variable name. (author)

  4. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  5. Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bove, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Training one hand on a motor task results in performance improvements in the other hand, also when stimuli are randomly presented (nonspecific transfer). Corpus callosum (CC) is the main structure involved in interhemispheric information transfer; CC pathology occurs in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and is related to altered performance of tasks requiring interhemispheric transfer of sensorimotor information. To investigate the role of CC in nonspecific transfer during a pure motor reaction-time task, we combined motor behavior with diffusion tensor imaging analysis in PwMS. Twenty-two PwMS and 10 controls, all right-handed, were asked to respond to random stimuli with appropriate finger opposition movements with the right (learning) and then the left (transfer) hand. PwMS were able to improve motor performance reducing response times with practice with a trend similar to controls and preserved the ability to transfer the acquired motor information from the learning to the transfer hand. A higher variability in the transfer process, indicated by a significantly larger standard deviation of mean nonspecific transfer, was found in the PwMS group with respect to the control group, suggesting the presence of subtle impairments in interhemispheric communication in some patients. Then, we correlated the amount of nonspecific transfer with mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values, indicative of microstructural damage, obtained in five CC subregions identified on PwMS's FA maps. A significant correlation was found only in the subregion including posterior midbody (Pearson's r = 0.74, P = 0.003), which thus seems to be essential for the interhemispheric transfer of information related to pure sensorimotor tasks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Investigations of reactions between pure refractory metals and light gases with the field ion microscope and atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krautz, E.; Haiml, G.

    1989-01-01

    The initial stages of selected reactions of the refractory metals tungsten, niobium and tantalum with hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and methane have been studied with the field ion microscope in atomic resolution whereby the composition of single net planes converages and surface zones could absolutely be analyzed with the atom probe by using field desorption under defined conditions at low temperatures. 14 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  7. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-07

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  8. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shlyk, O.; Samish, I.; Matěnová, M.; Dulebo, A.; Poláková, H.; Kaftan, David; Scherz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAR 16 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 44580. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00703S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BACTERIAL REACTION CENTERS * INDUCED STRUCTURAL-CHANGES * ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Domino reactions initiated by intramolecular hydride transfers from tri(di)arylmethane fragments to ketenimine and carbodiimide functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajarin, Mateo; Bonillo, Baltasar; Ortin, Maria-Mar; Sanchez-Andrada, Pilar; Vidal, Angel; Orenes, Raul-Angel

    2010-10-21

    The ability of triarylmethane and diarylmethane fragments to behave as hydride donors participating in thermal [1,5]-H shift/6π-ERC tandem processes involving ketenimine and carbodiimide functions is disclosed. C-Alkyl-C-phenyl ketenimines N-substituted by a triarylmethane substructure convert into a variety of 3,3,4,4-tetrasubstituted-3,4-dihydroquinolines, as structurally related carbodiimides transform into 3,4,4-trisubstituted-3,4-dihydroquinazolines via transient ortho-azaxylylenes. The first step of these one-pot conversions, the [1,5]-H shift, is considered to be a hydride migration on the basis of the known hydricity of the tri(di)arylmethane fragment and the electrophilicity of the central heterocumulenic carbon atom, whereas the final electrocyclization involves the formation of a sterically congested C-C or C-N bond. In the cases of C,C-diphenyl substituted triarylmethane-ketenimines the usual 6π-ERC becomes prohibited by the presence of two phenyl rings at each end of the azatrienic system. This situation opens new reaction channels: (a) following the initial hydride shift, the tandem sequence continues with an alternative electrocyclization mode to give 9,10-dihydroacridines, (b) the full sequence is initiated by a rare 1,5 migration of an electron-rich aryl group, followed by a 6π-ERC which leads to 2-aryl-3,4-dihydroquinolines, or (c) a different [1,5]-H shift/6π-ERC sequence involving the initial migration of a hydrogen atom from a methyl group at the ortho position to the nitrogen atom of the ketenimine function. Diarylmethane-ketenimines bearing a methyl group at the benzylic carbon atom experience a tandem double [1,5]-H shift, the first one being the usual benzylic hydride transfer whereas the second one involves the methyl group at the initial benzylic carbon atom, the reaction products being 2-aminostyrenes. Diarylmethane-ketenimines lacking such a methyl group convert into 3,4-dihydroquinolines by the habitual tandem [1,5]-H shift/6

  10. Products and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with unsaturated alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana; Rodríguez, Diana; Soto, Amparo; Bravo, Iván; Diaz-de-Mera, Yolanda; Notario, Alberto; Aranda, Alfonso

    2012-04-01

    The products of the chlorine atom initiated oxidation of different unsaturated alcohols were determined at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature, in a 400 L teflon reaction chamber using GC-FID and GC-MS for the analysis. The major products detected (with molar yields in brackets) are: chloroacetaldehyde (50 ± 8%) and acrolein (27 ± 2%) from allyl alcohol; acetaldehyde (77 ± 11%), chloroacetaldehyde (75 ± 18%), and methyl vinyl ketone (17 ± 2%) from 3-buten-2-ol; acetone (55 ± 4%) and chloroacetaldehyde (59 ± 8%) from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol; chloroacetone (18 ± 1%) and methacrolein (8 ± 1%) from 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol; acetaldehyde (20 ± 1%), crotonaldehyde (6 ± 3%), 3-choloro-4-hydroxy-2-butanone (2 ± 2%) and 2-chloro-propanal (4 ± 5%) from crotyl alcohol; and acetone (24 ± 3%) from 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol. The experimental data suggests that addition of Cl to the double bond of the unsaturated alcohol is the dominant reaction pathway compared to the H-abstraction channel.

  11. Stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions: toward a unified understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R

    2013-07-16

    Many mechanistic and stereochemical studies have focused on the breaking of the C-H bond through base-catalyzed elimination reactions. When we began our research, however, chemists knew almost nothing about the stereospecificity of addition-elimination reactions involving conjugated acyclic carbonyl compounds, even though the carbonyl group is a pivotal functional group in organic chemistry. Over the last 25 years, we have studied the addition-elimination reactions of β-substituted acyclic esters, thioesters, and ketones in order to reach a comprehensive understanding of how electronic effects influence their stereochemistry. This Account brings together our understanding of the stereochemistry of 1,2-elimination and proton-transfer reactions, describing how each study has built upon previous work and contributed to our understanding of this field. When we began, chemists thought that anti stereospecificity in base-catalyzed 1,2-elimination reactions occurred via concerted E2 mechanisms, which provide a smooth path for anti elimination. Unexpectedly, we discovered that some E1cBirrev reactions produce the same anti stereospecificity as E2 reactions even though they proceed through diffusionally equilibrated, "free" enolate-anion intermediates. This result calls into question the conventional wisdom that anti stereochemistry must result from a concerted mechanism. While carrying out our research, we developed insights ranging from the role of historical contingency in the evolution of hydratase-dehydratase enzymes to the influence of buffers on the stereochemistry of H/D exchange in D2O. Negative hyperconjugation is the most important concept for understanding our results. This idea provides a unifying view for the largely anti stereochemistry in E1cBirrev elimination reactions and a basis for understanding the stereoelectronic influence of electron-withdrawing β-substituents on proton-transfer reactions.

  12. Coupled sensitizer-catalyst dyads: electron-transfer reactions in a perylene-polyoxometalate conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odobel, Fabrice; Séverac, Marjorie; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Fosse, Céline; Cannizzo, Caroline; Mayer, Cédric R; Elliott, Kristopher J; Harriman, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast discharge of a single-electron capacitor: A variety of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions are apparent for polyoxometalates functionalized with covalently attached perylene monoimide chromophores, but these are restricted to single-electron events. (et=electron transfer, cr=charge recombination, csr=charge-shift reaction, PER=perylene, POM=polyoxometalate).A new strategy is introduced that permits covalent attachment of an organic chromophore to a polyoxometalate (POM) cluster. Two examples are reported that differ according to the nature of the anchoring group and the flexibility of the linker. Both POMs are functionalized with perylene monoimide units, which function as photon collectors and form a relatively long-lived charge-transfer state under illumination. They are reduced to a stable pi-radical anion by electrolysis or to a protonated dianion under photolysis in the presence of aqueous triethanolamine. The presence of the POM opens up an intramolecular electron-transfer route by which the charge-transfer state reduces the POM. The rate of this process depends on the molecular conformation and appears to involve through-space interactions. Prior reduction of the POM leads to efficient fluorescence quenching, again due to intramolecular electron transfer. In most cases, it is difficult to resolve the electron-transfer products because of relatively fast reverse charge shift that occurs within a closed conformer. Although the POM can store multiple electrons, it has not proved possible to use these systems as molecular-scale capacitors because of efficient electron transfer from the one-electron-reduced POM to the excited singlet state of the perylene monoimide.

  13. Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry advancement in detection of hazardous substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, B.

    2012-01-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a mass spectrometric technique based on chemical ionization, which provides very rapid measurements (within seconds) of volatile organic compounds in air, usually without special sample preparation, and with a very low detection limit. The detection and study of product ion patterns of threat agents such as explosives and drugs and some major environmental pollutants (isocyanates and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)) is explored in detail here using PTR-MS, specifically Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). The proton transfer reaction (PTR) principle works on the detection of the compound in the vapor phase. For some compounds, which have extremely low vapor pressures, both sample and inlet line heating were needed. Generally, the protonated parent molecule (MH+) is found to be the dominant product ion, which therefore provides us with a higher level of confidence in the assignment of a trace compound. However, for several compounds, dissociative proton transfer can occur at various degrees resulting in other product ions. Analysis of other compounds, such as the presence of taggants and impurities were carried out, and in certain compounds unusual E/N anomalies were discovered (E/N is an instrumental set of parameters, where E is the electric field strength and N is the number density). Head space measurements above four different drinks (plain water, tea, red wine and white wine) spiked with four different 'date rape' drugs were also conducted. (author)

  14. Low-energy charge transfer for collisions of Si3+ with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhns, H.; Kreckel, H.; Savin, D. W.; Seely, D. G.; Havener, C. C.

    2008-06-01

    Cross sections of charge transfer for Si3+ ions with atomic hydrogen at collision energies of ≈40-2500eV/u were carried out using a merged-beam technique at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data span an energy range in which both molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations are available. The influence of quantum mechanical effects of the ionic core as predicted by MOCC is clearly seen in our results. However, discrepancies between our experiment and MOCC results toward higher collision energies are observed. At energies above 1000 eV/u good agreement is found with CTMC results.

  15. Ab initio study of charge transfer in B2+ low-energy collisions with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.; Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.

    2003-07-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state B2+(2s 2S) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with the existing experiments shows our results to be in good agreement. When EMOCC cross sections with and without rotational coupling are small (400 eV/u, inclusion of rotational coupling increases the total cross section by 50% 80%, improving the agreement between the current calculations and experiments. For state-selective cross sections, rotational coupling induces mixing between different symmetries; however, its effect, especially at low collision energies, is not as important as had been suggested in previous work.

  16. Low Energy Charge Transfer for Collisions of Si3+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhns, H. [Columbia University; Kreckel, H. [Columbia University; Savin, D. W. [Columbia University; Seely, D. G. [Albion College; Havener, Charles C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Cross sections of charge transfer for Si{sup 3+} ions with atomic hydrogen at collision energies of {approx} 40-2500 eV/u were carried out using a merged-beam technique at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data span an energy range in which both molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations are available. The influence of quantum mechanical effects of the ionic core as predicted by MOCC is clearly seen in our results. However, discrepancies between our experiment and MOCC results toward higher collision energies are observed. At energies above 1000 eV/u good agreement is found with CTMC results.

  17. Ab initio study of charge transfer in B2+ low-energy collisions with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.R.; Cooper, D.L.; Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state B 2+ (2s 2 S) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with the existing experiments shows our results to be in good agreement. When E 400 eV/u, inclusion of rotational coupling increases the total cross section by 50%-80%, improving the agreement between the current calculations and experiments. For state-selective cross sections, rotational coupling induces mixing between different symmetries; however, its effect, especially at low collision energies, is not as important as had been suggested in previous work

  18. Preparation of poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted titanate nanotubes by in situ atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yuan; Zhou Yongfeng; Yan Deyue; Gao Xueping

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the successful preparation of core-shell hybrid nanocomposites by a 'grafting from' approach based on in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from titanate nanotubes (TNTs). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of the products provide direct evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure, possessing a hard core of TNTs and a soft shell of poly-MMA (PMMA). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to determine the chemical structure, morphology, and the grafted PMMA quantities of the resulting products. The grafted PMMA content was well controlled and increased with increasing monomer/initiator ratio. Further copolymerization of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with PMMA-coated TNTs as initiators was realized, illustrating the 'living' characteristics of the ATRP method used in this paper.

  19. N-Chlorosuccinimide (NCS): A Novel Initiator for Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Xia-Yan; CHANG,Li-Qun; ZHOU,Hong; ZHANG,Ke-Da

    2006-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) was achieved, using N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS) as an initiator together with catalytic system CuCl/PMDETA (N,N,N',N',N"-pentamethyldiethyl-enetriamine), CuCl/MA5-DETA (N,N,N',N',N"-penta(methylacrylate)diethylenetriamine), and CuCl/bipy (bipy=2,2'-bipyridyl) respectively. The results indicated that the polymerization possessed typical controlled/living radical polymerization characteristics. The analysis for terminal group of obtained polymer by 1H NMR proved that NCS is an initiator for ATRP. In comparison with NBS, the polymerization rate was slower and the resulted polymer had narrower molecular weight distribution (MWD) when NCS was employed as the initiator.

  20. A New Initiator Cholesteryl Chloroformate for Cupper-Based Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹健; 楚娟; 张可达

    2004-01-01

    The polymerization of metyl methacrylate (MMA) was studied in detail by use of CuCl/L as a catalyst and cholesteryl chloroformate (CC) as an initiator. It was found that the atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA could proceed when L equals to a multidentate aliphatic amine ligand, N,N,N',N",N"-penta(methyl acrylate)diethylenetriamine (MA5-DETA), and no polymerization was occurred while L=2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. The linear proportionality of the molecular weights to the conversions and straight lines observed in ln[M]0/[M] versus time plots indicated that the present polymerization system had the typical controlled polymerization characteristics.

  1. SYNTHESIS OF BLOCK COPOLYMER BY INTEGRATED LIVING ANIONIC POLYMERIZATION-ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION (ATRP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Liu; Feng Liu; Ning Luo; Sheng-kang Ying; Qing Liu

    2000-01-01

    Alpha-trichloroacetoxy terminated polystyrene oligomer (PS-CH2CH2OCOCCl3) and poly-(styrene-b-butadiene)oligomer [P(S-b-B)-CH2CH2OCOCCl3)] were synthesized by living anionic polymeri-zation using n-butyllithium as initiator.Then the PS-CH2CH2OCOCCl3 (PS-Cl3) or P(S-b-B)-CH2CH2O-COCCl3 (PSB-Cl3) was used as the macroinitiator in the polymerization of (meth)acrylates in the presence of CuX/bpy. AB diblock and ABC triblock copolymers were prepared by the integrated living anionic polymerization (LAP)-atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The structures of the PSB-Cl3 and the P(S-b-MMA) were identified by FTIR and 1H-NMR spectrum, respectively. A new way to design block copolymers (the combination of LAP and ATRP) was developed.

  2. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF MMA/1-PROPYLMETHACRYLATE-POSS COPOLYMER WITH ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-xin Zhang; Ho-young Lee; Young-jun Shin; Dong-ho Lee; Seok Kyun Noh

    2008-01-01

    The methyl methacrylate(MMA)/1-propylmethacrylate-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane(PM-POSS) copolymers were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization with CuBr as catalyst.The unreacted PM-POSS monomer could be removed completely by washing the copolymerization product with n-hexane.The copolymers were characterized with 1H-NMR,X-ray diffraction,difierential scanning calorimetry,thermogravimetric analysis and gel permeatlon chromatography.With increasing PM-POSS feed ratio.the total conversion increased while the glass transition temperatures of copolymer decreased.The thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that the thermal stability of copolymer improved slightly with PM-POSS addition.The molecular weight of copolymers increased with incorporation of PM-POSS.

  3. Three Arm Star Homo- And Co-Polymers Via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.; Sobh, R.A.; Ayoub, M.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Star homo and co-polymers of some vinyl monomers such as methylmethacrylate, butylmethacrylate and styrene (MMA, BMA, St.) were prepared using N, N, N', N' tetramethylethylenediamine ligand/ CuBr catalytic system via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Three armed benzene based core was successfully used as initiator. Low polydispersities and regular molecular weight values were obtained in most cases especially at low conversions. MMA and BuMA showed comparable behavior where controlled and true ATRP was observed even at the high conversions. However, styrene monomer recorded irregular high polydispersities at high conversions in spite of the relatively low molecular weight values. 1HNMR confirmed the structures of the resulting polymers. Transmission Electron microscope (TEM) proved the nano-structure of the star polymers. The thermal behavior of the MMA star homo and copolymers was studied. The effect of the star shape on the thermal behavior was very clear with respect to the linear ones

  4. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  5. Reaction of atomic bromine with acetylene and loss rate of atmospheric acetylene due to reaction with OH, Cl, O, and Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.; Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The first-order, diffusion, and bimolecular rate constants for the reaction Br + C2H2 yields C2H3Br are evaluated. The rate constants are measured at 210, 248, 298, and 393 K and at pressures between 15-100 torr Ar using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of atomic bromine via Br resonance radiation. It is observed that the reaction is not affected by pressure or temperature and the bimolecular constant = (4.0 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the -15th cu cm/sec with an error of two standard deviations. The C2H2 + Br reaction rates are compared with reactions of C2H2 with Cl, OH, NH2, and H. The loss rates for atmospheric C2H2 for reactions with OH, Cl, O, and Br are calculated as a function of altitude.

  6. Classical/quantum correspondence in state selective charge transfer and excitation reactions involving highly charged ions and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purkait, M

    2009-01-01

    State selective charge transfer and excitation cross sections for collisions of Ne q+ (q = 1-10) with atomic hydrogen are calculated within the framework of Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation.

  7. Study of actinides fission induced by multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derkx, X.

    2010-10-01

    The study of actinide fission encounters two major issues. On one hand, measurements of the fission fragment distributions and the fission probabilities allow a better understanding of the fission process itself and the discrimination among the models of nuclear structure and dynamics. On the other hand, new measurements are required to improve nuclear data bases, which are a key component for the design of new generation reactors and radio-toxic waste incinerators. This thesis is in line with different French and American experimental projects using the surrogate method, i.e. transfer reactions leading to the same compound nuclei as in neutron irradiation, allowing the study of fission of actinides which are inaccessible by conventional techniques, whereas they are important for applications. The experiment is based on multi-nucleon transfer reactions between a 238 U beam and a 12 C target, using the inverse kinematics technique to measure, for each transfer channel, the complete isotopic distributions of the fission fragments with the VAMOS spectrometer. The work presented in this dissertation is focused on the identification of the transfer channels and their properties, as their angular distributions and the distributions of the associated excitation energy, using the SPIDER telescope to identify the target recoil nuclei. This work of an exploratory nature aims to generalize the surrogate method to heavy transfers and to measure, for the first time, the fission probabilities in inverse kinematics. The obtained results are compared with available direct kinematics and neutron irradiation measurements. (author)

  8. Squids, supercurrents, and slope anomalies: Nuclear structure from heavy-ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Within the past five years we have developed experimental techniques to study heavy-ion transfer reactions to high spin states in deformed nuclei. These methods have been turned into a quantitative tool to assess the influence of collective excitation on single-particle and pairing structure. I discuss some of the nuclear structure questions which are being answered in these experiments: How strong is ground state pairing? How does pairing change with angular momentum? Why is two-neutron transfer much stronger than expected at large radial separation? What is the evidence for a nuclear Josephson Effect? What is the evidence for a nuclear Berry phase effect (nuclear SQUID)? Why does one-neutron transfer populate much higher spins than would be naively expected? Conversely, why does two-neutron transfer populate much lower spins than anyone expected? The answer to each of these questions involves the influence of detailed nuclear structure on transfer reactions, and represents quantitative new information about the effect of angular momentum and excitation energy on many-body systems with a finite number of particles. 8 refs., 6 figs

  9. Heavy-ion induced multinucleon transfer reactions in the 2s--1d shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmer, C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to investigate whether new nuclear structure information can be obtained from studying the direct transfer of more than two nucleons using heavy-ion projectiles, we have investigated the 28 Si( 16 O, 12 C) 32 S and 12 C( 14 N,d) 24 Mg reactions as candidates for the direct transfer of four- and twelve-nucleons, respectively. The counter telescope-position sensitive detector kinematic coincidence method--both angular distributions (22 0 less than theta/sub L/ less than 95 0 , E/sub L/ = 55.54 MeV) and excitation functions (theta/sub L/ = 26 0 , 50 less than E/sub L/ less than 63 MeV) were obtained for strongly excited states below 10 MeV in excitation in the first reaction. For the 12 C + 14 N interaction, a measurement of the angular distributions (25 0 less than theta/sub L/ less than 140 0 , E/sub L/ = 20,25 MeV) for proton, deuteron and alpha-particle emission to many low-lying states sufficed for the present purposes. Comparison of Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations with these data indicated that the light-particle production from the 12 C + 14 N interaction as investigated here is predominantly compound nuclear in nature. The selectively strong population of a few states in 32 S by the 28 Si-( 16 O, 12 C) 32 S reaction is primarily direct. The structure of these states was deduced from available light-ion-induced transfer reaction studies and shell model calculations; the importance of shell model configurations is indicated, and an alpha-particle transfer model can not account for the observed selectivity. Calculations of the 28 Si( 16 O, 12 C) 32 S reaction with a microscopic multinucleon transfer code indicate selectivities consistent with the present results. Moreover, the calculations suggest the presence of other, unexpected selectivities, all of which may be understood on a physical basis, and some of which appear as an extension of a similar effect seen in two-nucleon transfer reactions

  10. Effect of current and atomized grain size distribution on the solidification of Plasma Transferred Arc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Bond

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA is the only thermal spray process that results in a metallurgical bond, being frequently described as a hardfacing process. The superior properties of coatings have been related to the fine microstructures obtained, which are finer than those processed under similar heat input with welding techniques using wire feedstock. This observation suggests that the atomized feedstock plays a role on the solidification of coatings. In this study a model for the role of the powders grains in the solidification of PTA coatings is put forward and discussed. An experiment was setup to discuss the model which involved the deposition of an atomized Co-based alloy with different grain size distributions and deposition currents. X ray diffraction showed that there were no phase changes due to the processing parameters. Microstructure analysis by Laser Confocal Microscopy, dilution with the substrate steel and Vickers microhardness were used the characterized coatings and enriched the discussion confirming the role of the powdered feedstock on the solidification of coatings.

  11. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O 2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O 2 and co-adsorption of CO and O 2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O 2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O 2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O 2 . For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO 2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a

  12. Study of breakup and transfer of weakly bound nucleus 6Li to explore the low energy reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. L.; Zhang, G. X.; Hu, S. P.; Zhang, H. Q.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Guo, C. L.; Wu, X. G.; Yang, J. C.; Zheng, Y.; Li, C. B.; He, C. Y.; Zhong, J.; Li, G. S.; Yao, Y. J.; Guo, M. F.; Sun, H. B.; Valiente-Dobòn, J. J.; Goasduff, A.; Siciliano, M.; Galtarosa, F.; Francesco, R.; Testov, D.; Mengoni, D.; Bazzacco, D.; John, P. R.; Qu, W. W.; Wang, F.; Zheng, L.; Yu, L.; Chen, Q. M.; Luo, P. W.; Li, H. W.; Wu, Y. H.; Zhou, W. K.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, E. T.; Hao, X.

    2017-11-01

    Investigation of the breakup and transfer effect of weakly bound nuclei on the fusion process has been an interesting research topic in the past several years. However, owing to the low intensities of the presently available radioactive ion beam (RIB), it is difficult to clearly explore the reaction mechanisms of nuclear systems with unstable nuclei. In comparison with RIB, the beam intensities of stable weakly bound nuclei such as 6,7Li and 9Be, which have significant breakup probability, are orders of magnitude higher. Precise fusion measurements have already been performed with those stable weakly bound nuclei, and the effect of breakup of those nuclei on the fusion process has been extensively studied. Those nuclei indicated large production cross sections for particles other than the α + x breakup. The particles are originated from non-capture breakup (NCBU), incomplete fusion (ICF) and transfer processes. However, the conclusion of reaction dynamics was not clear and has the contradiction. In our previous experiments we have performed 6Li+96Zr and 154Sm at HI-13 Tandem accelerator of China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) by using HPGe array. It is shown that there is a small complete fusion (CF) suppression on medium-mass target nucleus 96Zr different from about 35% suppression on heavier target nucleus 154Sm at near-barrier energies. It seems that the CF suppression factor depends on the charge of target nuclei. We also observed one neutron transfer process. However, the experimental data are scarce for medium-mass target nuclei. In order to have a proper understanding of the influence of breakup and transfer of weakly bound projectiles on the fusion process, we performed the 6Li+89Y experiment with incident energies of 22 MeV and 34 MeV on Galileo array in cooperation with Si-ball EUCLIDES at Legnaro National Laboratory (LNL) in Italy. Using particle-particle and particle-γ coincidences, the different reaction mechanisms can be clearly explored.

  13. Heterogeneous Single-Atom Catalyst for Visible-Light-Driven High-Turnover CO2 Reduction: The Role of Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Chen, Shuangming; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jiawen; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Zhang, Wenkai; Xiong, Yujie

    2018-03-01

    Visible-light-driven conversion of CO 2 into chemical fuels is an intriguing approach to address the energy and environmental challenges. In principle, light harvesting and catalytic reactions can be both optimized by combining the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalysts; however, the efficiency of charge transfer between light absorbers and catalytic sites is often too low to limit the overall photocatalytic performance. In this communication, it is reported that the single-atom Co sites coordinated on the partially oxidized graphene nanosheets can serve as a highly active and durable heterogeneous catalyst for CO 2 conversion, wherein the graphene bridges homogeneous light absorbers with single-atom catalytic sites for the efficient transfer of photoexcited electrons. As a result, the turnover number for CO production reaches a high value of 678 with an unprecedented turnover frequency of 3.77 min -1 , superior to those obtained with the state-of-the-art heterogeneous photocatalysts. This work provides fresh insights into the design of catalytic sites toward photocatalytic CO 2 conversion from the angle of single-atom catalysis and highlights the role of charge kinetics in bridging the gap between heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Microporous hollow fibre membrane modules as gas-liquid contactors. Part 2. Mass transfer with chemical reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, H.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1993-01-01

    Absorption determined by mass transfer in the liquid is described well with the Graetz-Lévèque equation adapted from heat transfer. The influence of a chemical reaction on the mass transfer was simulated with a numerical model and tested on the absorption of CO2 in a hydroxide solution. Absorption

  15. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  16. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nafion®-catalyzed microwave-assisted Ritter reaction: An atom-economic solvent-free synthesis of amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    An atom-economic solvent-free synthesis of amides by the Ritter reaction of alcohols and nitriles under microwave irradiation is reported. This green protocol is catalyzed by solid supported Nafion®NR50 with improved efficiency and reduced waste production.

  18. Presolvated Electron Reaction with Methylacetoacetate: Electron Localization, Proton-Deuteron Exchange, and H-atom Abstraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Alex; Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methylacetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-CO-OCH3) at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•−-CH2-CO-OCH3) in the temperature range (77 to ca. 170 K) have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylen protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K), CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-CO-OCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) support the radical assignments. PMID:25255751

  19. Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Amino Acids; Reactions entre Atomes Chauds de Tritium et Acides Amines; Reaktsii goryachikh atomov tritiya s aminokislotami; Reacciones de Atomos de Tritio Calientes con Aminoacidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonov, E. F.; Nesmejanov, An. N. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Universitet, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    In the existing literature there is a lack of systematic data on the interaction of tritium recoil atoms with amino acids, yet such data, in conjunction with results already obtained for organic acids and amines, could help in determining the mechanism of hot reactions in relation to the structure of compounds (chain length, functional substitutes). A study was made of the yields from the reaction of hot tritium atoms: (1) with amino acids having lengthened chains, and (2) with amino acids having a carbon chain of constant length, but with various functional substitutes. For this purpose mixtures of lithium carbonate and the acids under study were irradiated for 15 min with a slow neutron flux of 0.87 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. Analysis was carried out on a gas chromatography unit with interchangeable columns (molecular sieves, and liquid petrolatum on kieselguhr) and with paper chromatography. Although the data obtained for the radiation survival capacity of amino acids as a function of carbon chain length were at variance with a basic tenet of radiation chemistry according to which the conservation of molecules increases in proportion to the length of their chains, the data can be explained in terms of an intramolecular transfer of energy along the carbon chain from the collision site of the hot atom to the hydroxyl group, and subsequent ''de-excitation''; on the other hand, although the energy, of tritium recoil atoms is greater than that of the chemical bond, the latter nevertheless exerts an influence on the radiation conservation of molecules with a carbon chain of constant length but with various substitutes. (author) [French] Les etudes publiees jusqu'a present ne contiennent guere de renseignements systematiques sur les interactions entre atomes de tritium de recul et acides amines. Pourtant, ces donnees, completees par celles dont on dispose sur les acides organiques et les amines, pourraient aider a definir le mecanisme des reactions chaudes en fonction

  20. Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions at modified lead dioxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Yun-Lin.

    1990-09-21

    The electrocatalytic activities were compared for pure and chloride-doped beta-PbO{sub 2} (Cl-PbO{sub 2}) films on gold and platinum substrates. Rate constants were increased significantly for oxidations of Mn{sup 2+}, toluene, benzyl alcohol, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and benzaldehyde in acidic media by the incorporation of Cl{sup {minus}} into the oxide films. These reactions are concluded to occur by the electrocatalytic transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the reaction products. Results of x-ray diffraction studies indicate the Cl-PbO{sub 2} film continues to have the slightly distorted rutile structure of pure beta-PbO{sub 2}. The observed electrocatalytic phenomena are concluded to be the beneficial consequence of surface defects generated when Cl{sup {minus}} serves for charge compensation within the surface matrix and, thereby, increases the number of surface sites capable of adsorbing hydroxyl radicals which are transferred in the electrocatalytic O-transfer reactions. 91 refs., 44 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Spectroscopy of $^{46}$Ar by the $(t,p)$ two-neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, K.; Hellgartner, S.; Mücher, D.; Bildstein, V.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Gaffney, L.P.; Gernhäuser, R.; Iwanicki, J.; Johansen, J.G.; Huyse, M.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, T.; Lutter, R.; Orlandi, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Roger, T.; Schrieder, G.; Seidlitz, M.; Sorlin, O.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.; De Witte, H.; Zielinska, M.

    2016-04-27

    States in the $N=28$ nucleus $^{46}$Ar have been studied by a two-neutron transfer reaction at REX-ISOLDE (CERN). A beam of radioactive $^{44}$ at an energy of 2.16~AMeV and a tritium loaded titanium target were used to populate $^{46}$ by the t($^{44}$,p) two-neutron transfer reaction. Protons emitted from the target were identified in the T-REX silicon detector array. The excitation energies of states in $^{46}$ have been reconstructed from the measured angles and energies of recoil protons. Angular distributions for three final states were measured and based on the shape of the differential cross section an excited state at 3695~keV has been identified as $J^\\pi = 0^+$. The angular differential cross section for the population of different states are compared to calculations using a reaction model employing both sequential and direct transfer of two neutrons. Results are compared to shell model calculations using state-of-the-art effective interactions.

  2. Deep-inelastic multinucleon transfer processes in the 16O+27Al reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, B. J.; Sawant, Y.; Patwari, P.; Santra, S.; Pal, A.; Kundu, A.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Jha, V.; Pandit, S. K.; Parkar, V. V.; Ramachandran, K.; Mahata, K.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Kailas, S.; Nag, T. N.; Sahoo, R. N.; Singh, P. P.; Sekizawa, K.

    2018-03-01

    The reaction mechanism of deep-inelastic multinucleon transfer processes in the 16O+27Al reaction at an incident 16O energy (Elab=134 MeV) substantially above the Coulomb barrier has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Elastic-scattering angular distribution, total kinetic energy loss spectra, and angular distributions for various transfer channels have been measured. The Q -value- and angle-integrated isotope production cross sections have been deduced. To obtain deeper insight into the underlying reaction mechanism, we have carried out a detailed analysis based on the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. A recently developed method, TDHF+GEMINI, has been applied to evaluate production cross sections for secondary products. From a comparison between the experimental and theoretical cross sections, we find that the theory qualitatively reproduces the experimental data. Significant effects of secondary light-particle emissions are demonstrated. Possible interplay among fusion-fission, deep-inelastic, multinucleon transfer, and particle evaporation processes is discussed.

  3. Study of neutron-proton pairing in N=Z unstable nuclei through transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Crom, B.

    2016-01-01

    A nucleus is described as a set of independent neutrons and protons linked by a mean-field potential. However, in order to have a better description one needs to take into account some residual interactions such as pairing. Neutron-neutron and proton-proton pairings are well-studied but neutron-proton pairing is not well-known. np pairing can be isovector pairing such as nn and pp pairing or isoscalar which is yet unknown. Over-binding of N=Z nuclei could be a manifestation of np pairing. We have studied np pairing through transfer reactions. In this case, the cross-section of np pair transfer is expected to be enhanced in the presence of important np pairing. np pairing is expected to be important in N=Z nuclei with high J orbitals. Since the development of radioactive beam facilities, such beams are only available. The experiment was performed at GANIL with an efficient set-up so as to detect products from the (p, 3 He) transfer reaction. This reaction is affected by isovector and isoscalar np pairing. We used 56 Ni and 52 Fe beams so as to see the effect of the occupancy of 0f 7/2 shell on the np pairing. First, we analysed the data from the 56 Ni(p,d) 55 Ni reaction and we compared the results with the literature to validate analysis procedure. After analysing data from the 56 Ni(p, 3 He) 54 Co reaction and extracting the population of the various states of 54 Co, we obtained information about the relative intensity between isoscalar and isovector np pairing in 56 Ni showing the predominance of isovector np pairing in this nucleus. Moreover, in the framework of developing a new charged particle detector, research on the discrimination of light nuclei using pulse shape analysis was performed and is also presented. (author)

  4. Super-multi-nucleon transfer observed in 60Ni+124Sn reaction slightly above the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasi, E.; Pravikoff, M.S.; Nolte, E.; Morinaga, H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the behaviour of nucleon transfer near the Coulomb barrier through the produced radioactivities, we have studied the 60 Ni+ 124 Sn system, the residual activity measurements were done at three lab energies of 237, 247 and 258 MeV (Bsub(c)(lab) = 234 MeV). For the highest energy we measured also the angular distribution. In addition to activities corresponding to a few nucleon transfers and evaporation residues, a large number of radioactive nuclei was found, which could be attributed to another class of reaction mechanism. Here, we report on this new phenomenon, which might be due to a super-multi-nucleon transfer, on the basis of the measured angular and mass distributions

  5. On the length dependence of bridge-mediated electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Shevchenko, Ye.V.; May, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bridge-mediated nonadiabatic donor-acceptor (D-A) electron transfer (ET) is studied for the case of a regular molecular bridge of N identical units. It is shown that the multi-exponential ET kinetics reduces to a single-exponential transfer if, and only if, the integral population of the bridge remains small (less than 10 -2 ). An analytical expression for the overall D-A ET rate is derived and the necessary and sufficient conditions are formulated at which the rate is given as a sum of a superexchange and a sequential contribution. To describe experimental data on the N-dependence of ET reactions an approximate form of the overall transfer rate is derived. This expression is used to reproduce experimental data on distant ET through polyproline chains. Finally it is noted that the obtained analytical results can also be used for the description of more complex two-electron transfer reactions if the latter comprises separate single-electron pathways

  6. Mass transfer with complex chemical reactions in gas–liquid systems : two-step reversible reactions with unit stoichiometric and kinetic orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vas Bhat, R.D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    An absorption model to study gas–liquid mass transfer accompanied by reversible two-step reactions in the liquid phase has been presented. This model has been used to determine mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles over a wide range of process conditions. Although

  7. Mass transfer with complex chemical reactions in gas-liquid systems: two-step reversible reactions with unit stoichiometric and kinetic orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vas bhat, R.D.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2000-01-01

    An absorption model to study gas¿liquid mass transfer accompanied by reversible two-step reactions in the liquid phase has been presented. This model has been used to determine mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and concentration profiles over a wide range of process conditions. Although

  8. Unveiling the high-activity origin of single-atom iron catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Cheng, Daojian; Xu, Haoxiang; Zeng, Xiaofei; Wan, Xin; Shui, Jianglan; Xiang, Zhonghua; Cao, Dapeng

    2018-06-26

    It is still a grand challenge to develop a highly efficient nonprecious-metal electrocatalyst to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we propose a surfactant-assisted method to synthesize single-atom iron catalysts (SA-Fe/NG). The half-wave potential of SA-Fe/NG is only 30 mV less than 20% Pt/C in acidic medium, while it is 30 mV superior to 20% Pt/C in alkaline medium. Moreover, SA-Fe/NG shows extremely high stability with only 12 mV and 15 mV negative shifts after 5,000 cycles in acidic and alkaline media, respectively. Impressively, the SA-Fe/NG-based acidic proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) exhibits a high power density of 823 mW cm -2 Combining experimental results and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we further reveal that the origin of high-ORR activity of SA-Fe/NG is from the Fe-pyrrolic-N species, because such molecular incorporation is the key, leading to the active site increase in an order of magnitude which successfully clarifies the bottleneck puzzle of why a small amount of iron in the SA-Fe catalysts can exhibit extremely superior ORR activity.

  9. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Shchepunov, V. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Gulbekyan, G. G.; Khabarov, M. V.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Efremov, A. A.; Pashenko, S. V.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Yeremin, A. V.; Yavor, M. I.; Kalimov, A. G.

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A≈20 to A≈500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90° electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  10. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Oganessian, Yu T; Dmitriev, S N; Itkis, M G; Gulbekyan, G G; Khabarov, M V; Bekhterev, V V; Bogomolov, S L; Efremov, A A; Pashenko, S V; Stepantsov, S V; Yeremin, A V; Yavor, M I; Kalimov, A G

    2003-01-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 sup - sup 3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A approx 20 to A approx 500, its mass acceptance is as large as +-2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considere...

  11. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Shchepunov, V.A.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Gulbekyan, G.G.; Khabarov, M.V.; Bekhterev, V.V.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Pashenko, S.V.; Stepantsov, S.V.; Yeremin, A.V.; Yavor, M.I.; Kalimov, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3 . The set up can work in the wide mass range from A∼20 to A∼500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given

  12. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Shchepunov, V.A. E-mail: shchepun@sunhe.jinr.rushchepun@cv.jinr.ru; Dmitriev, S.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Gulbekyan, G.G.; Khabarov, M.V.; Bekhterev, V.V.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Pashenko, S.V.; Stepantsov, S.V.; Yeremin, A.V.; Yavor, M.I.; Kalimov, A.G

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10{sup -3}. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A{approx}20 to A{approx}500, its mass acceptance is as large as {+-}2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  13. Dinuclear Tetrapyrazolyl Palladium Complexes Exhibiting Facile Tandem Transfer Hydrogenation/Suzuki Coupling Reaction of Fluoroarylketone

    KAUST Repository

    Dehury, Niranjan

    2016-07-18

    Herein, we report an unprecedented example of dinuclear pyrazolyl-based Pd complexes exhibiting facile tandem catalysis for fluoroarylketone: Tetrapyrazolyl di-palladium complexes with varying Pd-Pd distances efficiently catalyze the tandem reaction involving transfer hydrogenation of fluoroarylketone to the corresponding alcohol and Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction of the resulting fluoroarylalcohol under moderate reaction conditions, to biaryl alcohol. The complex with the shortest Pd-Pd distance exhibits the highest tandem activity among its di-metallic analogues, and exceeds in terms of activity and selectivity the analogous mononuclear compound. The kinetics of the reaction indicates clearly that reductive transformation of haloarylketone into haloaryalcohol is the rate determining step in the tandem reaction. Interestingly while fluoroarylketone undergoes the multistep tandem catalysis, the chloro- and bromo-arylketones undergo only a single step C-C coupling reaction resulting in biarylketone as the final product. Unlike the pyrazole based Pd compounds, the precursor PdCl2 and the phosphine based relevant complexes (PPh3)2PdCl2 and (PPh3)4Pd are found to be unable to exhibit the tandem catalysis.

  14. Kinetics and mechanisms of photoinduced electron-transfer reaction of zinc myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Keiichi; Asami, Satoko; Okada, Mihoko; Sakurai, Takeshi.

    1994-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) between zinc myoglobin (ZnPPMb) and a variety of quenchers, such as hexacyanoferrate(III)([Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- ) and hexaammineruthenium(III)(Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ ions, cationic viologens, copper(II) protein (stellacyanin), and metmyoglobins, has been studied in aqueous degassed solutions. The excited triplet state of ZnPPMb( * ZnPPMb) was quenched by [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- in a self-associated complex. Both quenching rate constant and formation constant of the self-associated complex decrease with increasing ionic strengths. The thermal backward ET reaction for this system was not observed; it is most likely that the backward ET step is much faster than the quenching reaction. All of the cationic quenchers examined in this work did not form a self-associated complex with * ZnPPMb, and the intermolecular quenching occurred. The thermal backward ET reaction was observed for these cationic quenchers. Not only photoinduced ET but also thermal backward ET reactions were insensitive to the driving force of the reactions, suggesting that the reactions are controlled by conformational changes in ZnPPMb. The quenching rate constants increase with increasing ionic strength for the cationic quenchers. The effects of poly-L-lysine hydrochloride, sodium poly-L-glutamate, and sodium cyclo-hexaphosphate were also examined. The active site of the * ZnPPMb toward both anionic and cationic quenchers is assumed to be the positively charged site near the heme pocket. (author)

  15. Production of isomers in compound and transfer reactions with 4He ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Aksenov, N.V.; Albin, Yu.A.; Bozhikov, G.A.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Starodub, G.Ya.; Vostokin, G.K.; Carroll, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    A well-known island of nuclear isomerism appears near A = 175-180 due to the deformation alignment of single-particle orbits at high angular momentum. This sometimes results in the formation of multi-quasiparticle states with record spin that are long-lived because of 'K-hindrance', i.e., symmetry rearrangement. Production methods and spectroscopic studies of these isomers remain a challenge for modern nuclear reaction and nuclear structure physics. Activities were produced by irradiation of 176 Yb(97.6%) enriched and nat Lu targets with 35-MeV 4 He ions from the internal beam of the U200 cyclotron. Induced activities were analyzed applying methods of radiochemistry and gamma spectroscopy. Yields of compound and nucleon-transfer reactions were measured and the isomer-to-ground state ratios were deduced. Calculated results were obtained using standard procedures to reproduce the (α, xn) cross sections, and the systematic behavior of the nucleon-transfer yields was established. The isomer-to-ground state ratios for direct reactions with 4 He ions were examined, resulting in a new characterization of the reaction mechanism

  16. Mass transfer rate through liquid membranes: interfacial chemical reactions and diffusion as simultaneous permeability controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Chiarizia, R.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the permeability of a liquid membrane to metal cations have been derived taking into account aqueous diffusion, membrane diffusion, and interfacial chemical reactions as simultaneous permeability controlling factors. Diffusion and chemical reactions have been coupled by a simple model analogous to the one previously described by us to represent liquid-liquid extraction kinetics. The derived equations, which make use of experimentally determined interfacial reaction mechanisms, qualitatively fit unexplained literature data regarding Cu 2+ transfer through liquid membranes. Their use to predict and optimize membrane permeability in practical separation processes by setting the appropriate concentration of the membrane carrier [LIX 64 (General Mills), a commercial β-hydroxy-oxime] and the pH of the aqueous copper feed solution is briefly discussed. 4 figures

  17. An annular ionization detector for quasi-elastic and transfer reaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dinesh, B V; Nayak, B K; Biswas, D C; Saxena, A; Pant, L M; Sahu, P K; Choudhury, R K

    2000-01-01

    An annular ionization chamber detector has been developed to study quasi-elastic and transfer reactions in heavy-ion collisions at near-barrier and sub-barrier energies. The important feature of the detector is that it has a near 2 pi coverage in the azimuthal angle phi for the particles entering in the detector at a given theta direction. This feature makes the detector very useful for measurement of the differential cross-sections at backward angles with respect to the beam direction, involving low cross-section reaction channels. The split anode configuration of the detector makes it capable of both particle identification and energy measurement for heavy ions and fission fragments. The detector has been tested using heavy-ion beams from the 14 MV-pelletron accelerator at Mumbai. Results on quasi-elastic excitation function measurements and barrier distribution studies in many heavy-ion reactions using this detector setup are discussed.

  18. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  19. An investigation of one- versus two-dimensional semiclassical transition state theory for H atom abstraction and exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-02-28

    We investigate which terms in Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory (RD SCTST) contribute most significantly in rate constant calculations of hydrogen extraction and exchange reactions of hydrocarbons. We also investigate the importance of deep tunneling corrections to the theory. In addition, we introduce a novel formulation of the theory in Jacobi coordinates. For the reactions of H atoms with methane, ethane, and cyclopropane, we find that a one-dimensional (1-D) version of the theory without deep tunneling corrections compares well with 2-D SCTST results and accurate quantum scattering results. For the "heavy-light-heavy" H atom exchange reaction between CH3 and CH4, deep tunneling corrections are needed to yield 1-D results that compare well with 2-D results. The finding that accurate rate constants can be obtained from derivatives of the potential along only one dimension further validates RD SCTST as a computationally efficient yet accurate rate constant theory.

  20. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  1. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  2. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  3. Iron halide mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate with N-Alkyl-2-pyridylmethanimine as the ligand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Schubert, U.S.

    2004-01-01

    The controlled atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) catalyzed by iron halide/N-(n-hexyl)-2-pyridylmethanimine (NHPMI) is described. The ethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate (EBIB)-initiated ATRP with [MMA]0/[EBIB]0/[iron halide]0/[NHPMI]0 = 150/1/1/2 was better controlled in

  4. Charge transfer incollisions of Li3+ and Be4+ ions with atomic hydrogen at low impact energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, T.; Itikawa, Y.

    1981-08-01

    Total charge transfer cross sections are calculated for the collisions of Li 3+ and Be 4+ ions with H(1s) atoms in the low energy region (E 3+ -H system, a reasonable agreement is found between the present calculation and the recent experiment. (author)

  5. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  6. Ion conducting solid polymer electrolytes based on polypentafluorostyrene-b-polyether-b-polypentafluorostyrene prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova, Katja; Jannasch, P.; Hvilsted, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Novel triblock copolymers based on central poly( ethylene glycol) ( PEG) or poly( ethylene glycol-co-propylene glycol) (PEGPG) blocks with poly( pentafluorostyrene) (PFS) outer blocks were prepared by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) with polydispersities on the order of 1.2 - 1...

  7. Strong isotope effects on the charge transfer in slow collisions of He2+ with atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Oehrn, Y.; Deumens, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Sabin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Probabilities and cross sections for charge transfer by He2+ impact on atomic hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), and tritium (T) at low collision energies are calculated. The results are obtained using an ab initio theory, which solves the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. For the H target, excellent

  8. Synthesis of triblock and random copolymers of 4- acetoxystyrene and styrene by living atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Bo; Chen, Xianyi; Ivan, Bela

    1997-01-01

    Triblock copolymers containing polystyrene (PSt) and poly(4-acetoxystyrene) (PAcOSt) segments have been prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the first step one of the two monomers was polymerized in bulk using the initiating system alpha,alpha'-dibromo-p-xylene/CuBr/2,2'-bi...

  9. Kinetic isotope effects and tunnelling in the proton-transfer reaction between 4-nitrophenylnitromethane and tetramethylguanidine in various aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldin, E.F.; Mateo, S.

    1975-01-01

    Rates and equilibrium constants have been determined for the proton-transfer reaction of 4-nitrophenylnitromethane, NO 2 C 6 H 4 CH 2 NO 2 , and its αα-deuterated analogue NO 2 C 6 H 4 CD 2 NO 2 , with the strong base tetramethylguanidine [HN=C(NMe 2 ) 2 ), at temperatures between -60 0 C and +65 0 in a range of aprotic solvents. Spectrophotometry and the stopped-flow technique were used. The reaction is a simple proton-transfer process leading to an ion-pair. The kinetic isotope effects are correlated with the polarity of the solvents, as measured by the dielectric constant or by the empirical parameter Esub(T). In the less polar solvents they are exceptionally large. In toluene, for example, at 25 0 C the rate ratio ksup(H)/ksup(D) = 45 +- 2, the activation energy difference Esub(a)sup(D) - Esub(a)sup(H) =4.3 +- 0.3 kcal molsup(-1) (16 kJ molsup(-1), and the ratio of the pre-exponential factors logsub(10) (Asup(D)/Asup(H)) = 1.5 +- 0.2+ and even larger values of logsub(10)(Asup(D)/Asup(H)) are found for mesitylene (1.94 +- 0.06) and cyclohexane (2.4 +- 0.2). Positive deviations from linear Arrhenius plots are found for these solvents. Tunnelling is the only interpretation that cannot account for these results. For the more polar solvents (dielectric constant 7 to 37), the isotope effects are closer to the range predicted by semi-classical theory. The isotope effects in all solvents have been fitted to Bell's equation for a parabolic barrier, and the barrier dimensions calculated for each solvent. The suggested interpretation of the results is that the solvent-solute interactions affect the height of the barrier and that motions of solvent molecules are coupled with the motion of the proton in the more polar solvents but not in the less polar ones; reorganization of solvent molecules accompanies the proton-transfer in the more polar solvents, but only electron-polarization in the less polar. Tunnelling has large effects in the less polar solvents, where the

  10. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.; Munro, Andrew W.; Gorton, Lo; Wachenfeldt, Claes von; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer reactions of trHb-Bs were electrochemically studied in solution and at graphite electrodes. Spectrophotometrical potentiometric titration and direct electrochemical measurements gave a heme iron redox potential of −103 ± 4 mV and −108 ± 2 mV vs. NHE, at pH 7, respectively. The redox potential of the heme in trHb-Bs shifted −59 mV per pH unit at pH higher than 7, consistently with a 1e − /1 H + – transfer reaction. The heterogeneous rate constant k s for a quasi-reversible 1e − – 1H + – transfer reaction between graphite and trHb-Bs was 10.1 ± 2.3 s −1 . Upon reversible cyanide binding the k s doubled, while the redox potential of heme shifted 21 mV negatively, presumably reflecting changes in redox activity and in vivo signaling functions of trHb-Bs associated with ligand binding. Bioelectrocatalytic reduction of O 2 catalyzed by trHb-Bs was one of the most efficient hitherto reported for Hbs, with an apparent catalytic rate constant, k cat , of 56 ± 6 s −1 . The results obtained are of particular interest for applications of trHb in environmental biosensing and toxicity screening

  11. Three-nucleon transfer reactions and cluster structure in the A = 15 to A = 19 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    The ( 6 Li,t) and ( 6 Li, 3 He) reactions were studied on targets of 12 C, 13 C, 14 N, 15 N, and 16 O at E/sub Li/ approx. = 44 MeV and theta/sub lab/ approx. = 15 0 . A preferential population of final states was exhibited in spectra for the A = 15 to A = 19 nuclei. The strong forward peaking of angular distributions in the 13 C( 6 Li,t) 16 O and 13 C( 6 Li, 3 He) 16 N reactions can be reproduced by DWBA calculations but not by the Hauser-Feshbach model. Such indications of a primarily direct mechanism at forward angles suggest use of these three-nucleon-transfer reactions to identify candidates for 3p-nh states. A comparison with other multinucleon transfer data, e.g., those from ( 7 Li,α) and ( 7 Li,t) reactions on 13 C and 15 N targets, further tests dominant particle-hole configurations. The relationship between ( 6 Li,t) and ( 6 Li, 3 He) spectra reveals analog states, notably T = 1, T/sub z/ = 0 levels at high excitation in 16 O. Nuclear theory is used to investigate the role of triton clustering in such structure. The 2N + L = 6 band predicted by a folded-potential model of 18 O = 15 N + t shows an underlying correspondence to the experimental levels in triton-transfer data. Triton spectroscopic factors calculated from the SU(3) shell model further suggest the broad influence of clustering phenomena in this mass region. Experimental evidence of systematic behavior in the triton binding energies of proposed p/sup -n/(sd) 3 configurations was found

  12. Eosin Y as a Direct Hydrogen Atom Transfer Photocatalyst for the Functionalization of C-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuan-Zi; Rong, Jia-Wei; Wu, Hao-Lin; Zhou, Quan; Deng, Hong-Ping; Tan, Jin Da; Xue, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tao, Hai-Rong; Wu, Jie

    2018-05-02

    Eosin Y, a well-known economical alternative to metal catalysts in visible-light-driven single-electron transfer-based organic transformations, can behave as an effective direct hydrogen atom transfer catalyst for C-H activation. Using the alkylation of C-H bonds with electron-deficient alkenes as a model study revealed an extremely broad substrate scope, enabling easy access to a variety of important synthons. This eosin Y-based photocatalytic hydrogen atom transfer strategy is promising for diverse functionalization of a wide range of native C-H bonds in a green and sustainable manner. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Communication: Transfer Ionization in a Thermal Reaction of a Cation and Anion: Ar+ with Br and I (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2015-0016 TP-2015-0016 COMMUNICATION: TRANSFER IONIZATION IN A THERMAL REACTION OF A CATION AND ANION: AR+ WITH BR...DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 2013 – 23 Sep 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Communication: Transfer Ionization in a Thermal Reaction of a Cation and Anion...Rights. Communication: Transfer ionization in a thermal reaction of a cation and anion: Ar+ with Br− and I− Nicholas S. Shuman, Thomas M. Miller

  14. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kouta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ohno, Hiroyuki [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhumi, E-mail: nobu1@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of L-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. - Highlights: • pH dependencies of activity were different for the reduction of cyt c and DCPIP. • DET-based bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH was observed. • The similar pH-dependent profile was found with cyt c and electrode. • The present results suggested that IET reaction of CcPDH shows pH dependence.

  15. O-, N-Atoms-Coordinated Mn Cofactors within a Graphene Framework as Bioinspired Oxygen Reduction Reaction Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Mao, Kaitian; Gao, Shiqi; Huang, Hao; Xia, Guoliang; Lin, Zhiyu; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Changlai; Wang, Hui; Chen, Qianwang

    2018-05-28

    Manganese (Mn) is generally regarded as not being sufficiently active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared to other transition metals such as Fe and Co. However, in biology, manganese-containing enzymes can catalyze oxygen-evolving reactions efficiently with a relative low onset potential. Here, atomically dispersed O and N atoms coordinated Mn active sites are incorporated within graphene frameworks to emulate both the structure and function of Mn cofactors in heme-copper oxidases superfamily. Unlike previous single-metal catalysts with general M-N-C structures, here, it is proved that a coordinated O atom can also play a significant role in tuning the intrinsic catalytic activities of transition metals. The biomimetic electrocatalyst exhibits superior performance for the ORR and zinc-air batteries under alkaline conditions, which is even better than that of commercial Pt/C. The excellent performance can be ascribed to the abundant atomically dispersed Mn cofactors in the graphene frameworks, confirmed by various characterization methods. Theoretical calculations reveal that the intrinsic catalytic activity of metal Mn can be significantly improved via changing local geometry of nearest coordinated O and N atoms. Especially, graphene frameworks containing the Mn-N 3 O 1 cofactor demonstrate the fastest ORR kinetics due to the tuning of the d electronic states to a reasonable state. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Photo induced multiple fragmentation of atoms and molecules: Dynamics of Coulombic many-particle systems studied with the COLTRIMS reaction microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czasch, A.; Schmidt, L.Ph.H.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Jagutzki, O.; Schoessler, S.; Schoeffler, M.S.; Doerner, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    2005-01-01

    Many-particle dynamics in atomic and molecular physics has been investigated by using the COLTRIMS reaction microscope. The COLTRIMS technique visualizes photon and ion induced many-particle fragmentation processes in the eV and milli-eV regime. It reveals the complete momentum pattern in atomic and molecular many-particle reactions comparable to the bubble chamber in nuclear physics

  17. Reaction layer growth and reaction heat of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels using centrifugally atomized powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Han, Young Soo; Park, Jong Man; Park, Soon Dal; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2003-01-01

    The growth behavior of reaction layers and heat generation during the reaction between U-Mo powders and the Al matrix in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels were investigated. Annealing of 10 vol.% U-10Mo/Al dispersion fuels at temperatures from 500 to 550 deg. C was carried out for 10 min to 36 h to measure the growth rate and the activation energy for the growth of reaction layers. The concentration profiles of reaction layers between the U-10Mo vs. Al diffusion couples were measured and the integrated interdiffusion coefficients were calculated for the U and Al in the reaction layers. Heat generation of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels with 10-50 vol.% of U-Mo fuel during the thermal cycle from room temperature to 700 deg. C was measured employing the differential scanning calorimetry. Exothermic heat from the reaction between U-Mo and the Al matrix is the largest when the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel is about 30 vol.%. The unreacted fraction in the U-Mo powders increases as the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel increases from 30 to 50 vol.%

  18. Studies of transfer reactions of photosensitized electrons involving complexes of transition metals in view of solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakubo, Masaaki

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis addresses electron transfer reactions occurring during photosynthesis, for example, photosensitized reaction in which chlorophyll is the sensitizer. More specifically, the author studied experimentally electron photo-transfers with type D sensitizers (riboflavin, phenoxazine and porphyrin), and various complexes of transition metals. After a presentation of these experiments, the author describes the photosensitisation process (photo-physics of riboflavin, oxygen deactivation, sensitized photo-oxidation and photo-reduction). The theoretical aspect of electron transfer is then addressed: generalities, deactivation of the riboflavin triplet, initial efficiency of electron transfer. Experimental results on three basic processes (non-radiative deactivation, energy transfer, electron transfer) are interpreted in a unified way by using the non-radiative transfer theory. Some applications are described: photo-electrochemical batteries, photo-oxidation and photo-reduction of the cobalt ion

  19. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with Diethyl Ethylphosphonate and Triethyl Phosphate

    KAUST Repository

    Laversin, H.

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, the relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rate coefficients for the reaction of two organophosphorus compounds: Triethyl phosphate (TEP) and Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) with OH radicals and Cl atoms at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298 – 352 K. The following expressions (in cm3molecule-1s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP and TEP: kOH+DEEP= (7.84±0.65)x10-14exp((1866±824)/T), kOH+TEP = (6.54±0.42)x10-14exp((1897±626)/T), kCl+DEEP = (5.27± 0.80)x10−11exp(765±140/T) and kCl+TEP = (5.23± 0.80)x10−11exp(736± 110/T). These results show that the reaction of the studied compounds with Cl atoms proceeds more rapidly than that with OH radicals. The related tropospheric lifetimes suggest that once emitted into the atmosphere, TEP and DEEP can be removed within a few hours in areas close to their emission sources. TEP and DEEP are principally removed by OH radicals. However, in coastal areas where the Cl atoms’ concentration is higher, TEP and DEEP removal by reaction with Cl atoms could be a competitive process.

  20. Quantification of ion or atom transfer phenomena in materials implanted by nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudadesse, Hassane

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of transfer of the constituents of a system from regions of higher to lower concentration is of interest for implanted bio-materials. It allows determining the rate at which this material is integrated in a living material. To evaluate the ossification kinetics and to study the bio-functionality in corals of Ca and Sr, irradiations with a 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 was performed, followed by the examination of changes in the localization of these elements. By using PIXE analysis method the distribution of Ca, P, Sr, Zn and Fe in the implant, bone and bone-implant interfaces were determined. Thus, it was shown that resorption of coral in sheep is achieved in 5 months after implantation and is identical to the cortical tissues 4 months after implantation in animals as for instance in hares. We have analyzed the tissues from around the prostheses extracted from patients. The samples were calcined and reduced to powder weighting some milligrams. We have adopted for this study the PIXE analysis method. The samples were irradiated by a proton beam of 3 MeV and about 400 μm diameter. The results show the presence of the elements Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni or Zn according to the type of the implanted prosthesis. This dispersal of the metallic ions and atoms contaminate the tissues. The transfer factors translate the exchanges between bone and the implanted material. The solvatation phenomenon and the electric charge equilibrium explain the transfer order of cations Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ and of the anion PO 4 3- . We have also determined these factors for the elements Ti, Cr and Ni. An original technique to study the bone bio-functionality was used. Use of phosphate derivatives labelled by 99m Tc allows obtaining information about the fixation of radioactive tracer. It was found that only after the eighth month at the implantation the neo-formed bone fixes the MDP (methyl diphosphate) labelled by 99m Tc in a similar way as in the control sample. Starting from this moment the