WorldWideScience

Sample records for atom based quantum

  1. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, S N; Moiseev, S A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  2. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, S N [Institute of Advanced Research, Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan, Kazan (Russian Federation); Moiseev, S A [Kazan E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  3. Nanoscale phosphorus atom arrays created using STM for the fabrication of a silicon based quantum computer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J. L. (Jeremy L.); Schofield, S. R. (Steven R.); Simmons, M. Y. (Michelle Y.); Clark, R. G. (Robert G.); Dzurak, A. S. (Andrew S.); Curson, N. J. (Neil J.); Kane, B. E. (Bruce E.); McAlpine, N. S. (Neal S.); Hawley, M. E. (Marilyn E.); Brown, G. W. (Geoffrey W.)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computers offer the promise of formidable computational power for certain tasks. Of the various possible physical implementations of such a device, silicon based architectures are attractive for their scalability and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. These designs use either the electron or nuclear spin state of single donor atoms to store quantum information. Here we describe a strategy to fabricate an array of single phosphorus atoms in silicon for the construction of such a silicon based quantum computer. We demonstrate the controlled placement of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. This has been achieved by patterning a hydrogen mono-layer 'resist' with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and exposing the patterned surface to phosphine (PH3) molecules. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites. Keywords: Quantum computing, nanotechriology scanning turincling microscopy, hydrogen lithography

  4. Quantum chaos in atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arcy, Michael Brendan

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents an account of experimental and numerical investigations of two quantum systems whose respective classical analogues are chaotic. These are the δ-kicked rotor, a paradigm in classical chaos theory, and the novel δ-kicked accelerator, created by application of a constant external acceleration or torque to the rotor. The experimental realisation of these systems has been achieved by the exposure of laser-cooled caesium atoms to approximate δ-kicks from a pulsed, high-intensity, vertical standing wave of laser light. Gravity's effect on the atoms can be controlled by appropriate shifting of the profile of the standing wave. Numerical simulations of the systems are based on a diffractive model of the potential's effect. Each system's dynamics are characterised by the final form of the momentum distribution and the dependence of the atoms' mean kinetic energy on the number and time period of the δ-kicks. The phenomena of dynamical localisation and quantum resonances in the δ-kicked rotor, which have no counterparts in the system's classical analogue, are observed and investigated. Similar experiments on the δ-kicked accelerator reveal the striking phenomenon of the quantum accelerator mode, in which a large momentum is transferred to a substantial fraction of the atomic ensemble. This feature, absent in the system's classical analogue, is characterised and an analytic explanation is presented. The effect on each quantum system of decoherence, introduced through spontaneous emission in the atoms, is examined and comparison is made with the results of classical simulations. While having little effect on the classical systems, the level of decoherence used is found to degrade quantum signatures of behaviour. Classical-like behaviour is, to some extent, restored, although significant quantum features remain. Possible applications of the quantum accelerator mode are discussed. These include use as a tool in atom optics and interferometry, a

  5. Three-dimensional theory of quantum memories based on Λ-type atomic ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeuthen, Emil; Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a three-dimensional theory for quantum memories based on light storage in ensembles of Λ-type atoms, where two long-lived atomic ground states are employed. We consider light storage in an ensemble of finite spatial extent and we show that within the paraxial approximation the Fresnel number of the atomic ensemble and the optical depth are the only important physical parameters determining the quality of the quantum memory. We analyze the influence of these parameters on the storage of light followed by either forward or backward read-out from the quantum memory. We show that for small Fresnel numbers the forward memory provides higher efficiencies, whereas for large Fresnel numbers the backward memory is advantageous. The optimal light modes to store in the memory are presented together with the corresponding spin waves and outcoming light modes. We show that for high optical depths such Λ-type atomic ensembles allow for highly efficient backward and forward memories even for small Fresnel numbers F(greater-or-similar sign)0.1.

  6. Quantum Repeaters and Atomic Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Johannes

    a previous protocol, thereby enabling fast local processing, which greatly enhances the distribution rate. We then move on to describe our work on improving the stability of atomic clocks using entanglement. Entanglement can potentially push the stability of atomic clocks to the so-called Heisenberg limit...... and allows for near-Heisenberg limited stability of atomic clocks. Furthermore, we describe how the operation of a clock can be altered to gain an exponential improvement of the stability even without entanglement. In the next part of the thesis, we describe our work on a novel type of heralded quantum gates...... temperature quantum memories and single photon sources. We have introduced a novel concept of motional averaging, which can be used in room-temperature systems, where fluctuations due to thermal motion is an issue. In particular, we have considered a system based on microcells filled with Cs-atoms, which can...

  7. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  8. A linear atomic quantum coupler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Orany, Faisal A A [Department of Mathematics and computer Science, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University 41522, Ismailia (Egypt); Wahiddin, M R B, E-mail: el_orany@hotmail.co, E-mail: faisal.orany@mimos.m, E-mail: mridza@mimos.m [Cyberspace Security Laboratory, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-04-28

    In this paper we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of which includes a localized atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchange of energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) and with the atom-mode system in the second waveguide via the evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for this system and deduce its wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional coupler the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit a long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions the system can yield the results of the two-mode JCM.

  9. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  10. Quantum mechanical fragment methods based on partitioning atoms or partitioning coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Ke R; Xu, Xuefei; Isegawa, Miho; Leverentz, Hannah R; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-09-16

    atoms for capping dangling bonds, and we have shown that they can greatly improve the accuracy. Finally we present a new approach that goes beyond QM/MM by combining the convenience of molecular mechanics with the accuracy of fitting a potential function to electronic structure calculations on a specific system. To make the latter practical for systems with a large number of degrees of freedom, we developed a method to interpolate between local internal-coordinate fits to the potential energy. A key issue for the application to large systems is that rather than assigning the atoms or monomers to fragments, we assign the internal coordinates to reaction, secondary, and tertiary sets. Thus, we make a partition in coordinate space rather than atom space. Fits to the local dependence of the potential energy on tertiary coordinates are arrayed along a preselected reaction coordinate at a sequence of geometries called anchor points; the potential energy function is called an anchor points reactive potential. Electrostatically embedded fragment methods and the anchor points reactive potential, because they are based on treating an entire system by quantum mechanical electronic structure methods but are affordable for large and complex systems, have the potential to open new areas for accurate simulations where combined QM/MM methods are inadequate.

  11. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  12. Atom-chip-based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity with a quantum gravimeter based on an atom chip. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal [1]. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates [2], as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties that will allow to overcome the current limitations in the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technology offers the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We present a lab-based prototype that uses the atom chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serves as inertial reference inside the vacuum [3]. With this setup, it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal. All steps are pursued on a baseline of 1 cm right below the atom chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will target for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz [4]. The device will be characterized in cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor and finally employed in a campaign to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the

  13. Quantum Electronics for Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nagourney, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Quantum Electronics for Atomic Physics provides a course in quantum electronics for researchers in atomic physics. The book covers the usual topics, such as Gaussian beams, cavities, lasers, nonlinear optics and modulation techniques, but also includes a number of areas not usually found in a textbook on quantum electronics. It includes such practical matters as the enhancement of nonlinear processes in a build-up cavity, impedance matching into a cavity, laser frequencystabilization (including servomechanism theory), astigmatism in ring cavities, and atomic/molecular spectroscopic techniques

  14. Localised quantum states of atomic and molecular particles physisorbed on carbon-based nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Trachta, Michal; Bludský, Ota; Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 11 (2014), "114702-1"-"114702-10" ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/11/0436; GA ČR GAP208/10/0725 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic structure * carbon nanostructures * graphene * quantum mechanics * physisorbed Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  15. Single-passage read-out of atomic quantum memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiurasek, J; Sherson, J; Opatrny, T

    2005-01-01

    Retrieving quantum information, collective atomic spin systems, quantum memory Udgivelsesdato: 17 Feb.......Retrieving quantum information, collective atomic spin systems, quantum memory Udgivelsesdato: 17 Feb....

  16. Engineering quantum hyperentangled states in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Mehwish; -Islam, Rameez-ul; Abbas, Tasawar; Ikram, Manzoor

    2017-11-01

    Hyperentangled states have boosted many quantum informatics tasks tremendously due to their high information content per quantum entity. Until now, however, the engineering and manipulation of such states were limited to photonic systems only. In present article, we propose generating atomic hyperentanglement involving atomic internal states as well as atomic external momenta states. Hypersuperposition, hyperentangled cluster, Bell and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states are engineered deterministically through resonant and off-resonant Bragg diffraction of neutral two-level atoms. Based on the characteristic parameters of the atomic Bragg diffraction, such as comparatively large interaction times and spatially well-separated outputs, such decoherence resistant states are expected to exhibit good overall fidelities and offer the evident benefits of full controllability, along with extremely high detection efficiency, over the counterpart photonic states comprised entirely of flying qubits.

  17. Quantum Phonon Optics: Squeezing Quantum Noise in the Atomic Displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have investigated(X. Hu and F. Nori, Physical Review B, in press; preprints.) coherent and squeezed quantum states of phonons. Squeezed states are interesting because they allow the possibility of modulating the quantum fluctuations of atomic displacements below the zero-point quantum noise level of phonon vacuum states. We have studiedfootnotemark[1] the possibility of squeezing quantum noise in the atomic displacement using a polariton-based approach and also a method based on the three-phonon anharmonic interaction. Our focus here is on the first approach. We have diagonalized the polariton Hamiltonian and calculated the corresponding expectation values and fluctuations of both the atomic displacement and the lattice amplitude operators (the later is the phonon analog of the electric field operator for photons). Our results shows that squeezing of quantum fluctuations in the atomic displacements can be achieved with appropriate initial states of both photon and phonon fields. The degree of squeezing is directly related to the crystal susceptibility, which is indicative of the interaction strength between the incident light and the crystal.

  18. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  19. Quantum state detection and state preparation based on cavity-enhanced nonlinear interaction of atoms with single photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mahdi

    Our ability to engineer quantum states of light and matter has significantly advanced over the past two decades, resulting in the production of both Gaussian and non-Gaussian optical states. The resulting tailored quantum states enable quantum technologies such as quantum optical communication, quantum sensing as well as quantum photonic computation. The strong nonlinear light-atom interaction is the key to deterministic quantum state preparation and quantum photonic processing. One route to enhancing the usually weak nonlinear light-atom interactions is to approach the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) interaction by means of high finesse optical resonators. I present results from the MIT experiment of large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal photon, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. I also present a scheme to probabilistically change the amplitude and phase of a signal photon qubit to, in principle, arbitrary values by postselection on a control photon that has interacted with that state. Notably, small changes of the control photon polarization measurement basis by few degrees can substantially change the amplitude and phase of the signal state. Finally, I present our ongoing effort at Purdue to realize similar peculiar quantum phenomena at the single photon level on chip scale photonic systems.

  20. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Saif, Farhan

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits ...

  1. Remote Preparation of an Atomic Quantum Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Berner, Stefan; Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and future quantum communication networks. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped 87 Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%

  2. Dopant atoms as quantum components in silicon nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaosong; Han, Weihua; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liuhong; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wang; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fuhua

    2018-06-01

    Recent progress in nanoscale fabrication allows many fundamental studies of the few dopant atoms in various semiconductor nanostructures. Since the size of nanoscale devices has touched the limit of the nature, a single dopant atom may dominate the performance of the device. Besides, the quantum computing considered as a future choice beyond Moore's law also utilizes dopant atoms as functional units. Therefore, the dopant atoms will play a significant role in the future novel nanoscale devices. This review focuses on the study of few dopant atoms as quantum components in silicon nanoscale device. The control of the number of dopant atoms and unique quantum transport characteristics induced by dopant atoms are presented. It can be predicted that the development of nanoelectronics based on dopant atoms will pave the way for new possibilities in quantum electronics. Project supported by National Key R&D Program of China (No. 2016YFA0200503).

  3. Quantum network with individual atoms and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, G.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum physics allows a new approach to information processing. A grand challenge is the realization of a quantum network for long-distance quantum communication and large-scale quantum simulation. This paper highlights a first implementation of an elementary quantum network with two fibre-linked high-finesse optical resonators, each containing a single quasi-permanently trapped atom as a stationary quantum node. Reversible quantum state transfer between the two atoms and entanglement of the two atoms are achieved by the controlled exchange of a time-symmetric single photon. This approach to quantum networking is efficient and offers a clear perspective for scalability. It allows for arbitrary topologies and features controlled connectivity as well as, in principle, infinite-range interactions. Our system constitutes the largest man-made material quantum system to date and is an ideal test bed for fundamental investigations, e.g. quantum non-locality. (authors)

  4. Scalable quantum information processing with atomic ensembles and flying photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Feng; Yu Yafei; Feng Mang; Zhang Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme for scalable quantum information processing with atomic ensembles and flying photons. Using the Rydberg blockade, we encode the qubits in the collective atomic states, which could be manipulated fast and easily due to the enhanced interaction in comparison to the single-atom case. We demonstrate that our proposed gating could be applied to generation of two-dimensional cluster states for measurement-based quantum computation. Moreover, the atomic ensembles also function as quantum repeaters useful for long-distance quantum state transfer. We show the possibility of our scheme to work in bad cavity or in weak coupling regime, which could much relax the experimental requirement. The efficient coherent operations on the ensemble qubits enable our scheme to be switchable between quantum computation and quantum communication using atomic ensembles.

  5. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Nguyen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, … and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1/2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an XXZ spin-1/2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We

  6. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. L.; Raimond, J. M.; Sayrin, C.; Cortiñas, R.; Cantat-Moltrecht, T.; Assemat, F.; Dotsenko, I.; Gleyzes, S.; Haroche, S.; Roux, G.; Jolicoeur, Th.; Brune, M.

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, …) and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1 /2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an X X Z spin-1 /2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We discuss

  7. Classical and quantum chaos in atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, Farhan

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of an atom with an electro-magnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electro-magnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits dynamical localization and quantum recurrences

  8. Spatial EPR entanglement in atomic vapor quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parniak, Michal; Dabrowski, Michal; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    Spatially-structured quantum states of light are staring to play a key role in modern quantum science with the rapid development of single-photon sensitive cameras. In particular, spatial degree of freedom holds a promise to enhance continous-variable quantum memories. Here we present the first demonstration of spatial entanglement between an atomic spin-wave and a photon measured with an I-sCMOS camera. The system is realized in a warm atomic vapor quantum memory based on rubidium atoms immersed in inert buffer gas. In the experiment we create and characterize a 12-dimensional entangled state exhibiting quantum correlations between a photon and an atomic ensemble in position and momentum bases. This state allows us to demonstrate the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in its original version, with an unprecedented delay time of 6 μs between generation of entanglement and detection of the atomic state.

  9. Electronic Conduction through Atomic Chains, Quantum Well and Quantum Wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Charge transport is dynamically and strongly linked with atomic structure, in nanostructures. We report our ab-initio calculations on electronic transport through atomic chains and the model calculations on electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates in presence of random impurity potential in a quantum well and in a quantum wire. We computed synthesis and ballistic transport through; (a) C and Si based atomic chains attached to metallic electrodes, (b) armchair (AC), zigzag (ZZ), mixed, rotated-AC and rotated-ZZ geometries of small molecules made of 2S, 6C and 4H atoms attaching to metallic electrodes, and (c) carbon atomic chain attached to graphene electrodes. Computed results show that synthesis of various atomic chains are practically possible and their transmission coefficients are nonzero for a wide energy range. The ab-initio calculations on electronic transport have been performed with the use of Landauer-type scattering formalism formulated in terms of Grben's functions in combination with ground-state DFT. The electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates have been calculated as function of excitation energy both at zero and finite temperatures for disordered 2D and 1D systems. Our model calculations suggest that electron scattering rates in a disordered system are mainly governed by effective dimensionality of a system, carrier concentration and dynamical screening effects.

  10. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  11. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco, E-mail: fnori@riken.jp [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Remarkable progress towards realizing quantum computation has been achieved using natural and artificial atoms as qubits. This paper presents a brief overview of the current status of different types of qubits. On the one hand, natural atoms (such as neutral atoms and ions) have long coherence times, and could be stored in large arrays, providing ideal 'quantum memories'. On the other hand, artificial atoms (such as superconducting circuits or semiconductor quantum dots) have the advantage of custom-designed features and could be used as 'quantum processing units'. Natural and artificial atoms can be coupled with each other and can also be interfaced with photons for long-distance communications. Hybrid devices made of natural/artificial atoms and photons may provide the next-generation design for quantum computers.

  12. Quantum Spin Lenses in Atomic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Glaetzle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose and discuss quantum spin lenses, where quantum states of delocalized spin excitations in an atomic medium are focused in space in a coherent quantum process down to (essentially single atoms. These can be employed to create controlled interactions in a quantum light-matter interface, where photonic qubits stored in an atomic ensemble are mapped to a quantum register represented by single atoms. We propose Hamiltonians for quantum spin lenses as inhomogeneous spin models on lattices, which can be realized with Rydberg atoms in 1D, 2D, and 3D, and with strings of trapped ions. We discuss both linear and nonlinear quantum spin lenses: in a nonlinear lens, repulsive spin-spin interactions lead to focusing dynamics conditional to the number of spin excitations. This allows the mapping of quantum superpositions of delocalized spin excitations to superpositions of spatial spin patterns, which can be addressed by light fields and manipulated. Finally, we propose multifocal quantum spin lenses as a way to generate and distribute entanglement between distant atoms in an atomic lattice array.

  13. Quantum information processing with atoms and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroe, C.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum information processors exploit the quantum features of superposition and entanglement for applications not possible in classical devices, offering the potential for significant improvements in the communication and processing of information. Experimental realization of large-scale quantum information processors remains a long term vision, as the required nearly pure quantum behaviour is observed only in exotic hardware such as individual laser-cooled atoms and isolated photons. But recent theoretical and experimental advances suggest that cold atoms and individual photons may lead the way towards bigger and better quantum information processors, effectively building mesoscopic versions of Schroedinger's cat' from the bottom up. (author)

  14. The effect of various quantum mechanically derived partial atomic charges on the bulk properties of chloride-based ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolghadr, Amin Reza, E-mail: arzolghadr@shirazu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71946-84795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghatee, Mohammad Hadi [Department of Chemistry, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71946-84795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moosavi, Fatemeh [Department of Chemistry, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 91779 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-22

    Partial atomic charges using various quantum mechanical calculations for [C{sub n}mim]Cl (n = 1, 4) ionic liquids (ILs) are obtained and used for development of molecular dynamics simulation (MD) force fields. The isolated ion pairs are optimized using HF, B3LYP, and MP2 methods for electronic structure with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Partial atomic charges are assigned to the atomic center with CHELPG and NBO methods. The effect of these sets of partial charges on the static and dynamic properties of ILs is evaluated by performing a series of MD simulations and comparing the essential thermodynamic properties with the available experimental data and available molecular dynamics simulation results. In contrast to the general trends reported for ionic liquids with BF{sub 4}, PF{sub 6}, and iodide anions (in which restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) charges are preferred), partial charges derived by B3LYP-NBO method are relatively good in prediction of the structural, dynamical, and thermodynamic energetic properties of the chloride based ILs.

  15. Generation of Exotic Quantum States of a Cold Atomic Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Lund

    Over the last decades quantum effects have become more and more controllable, leading to the implementations of various quantum information protocols. These protocols are all based on utilizing quantum correlation. In this thesis we consider how states of an atomic ensemble with such correlations...... can be created and characterized. First we consider a spin-squeezed state. This state is generated by performing quantum non-demolition measurements of the atomic population difference. We show a spectroscopically relevant noise reduction of -1.7dB, the ensemble is in a many-body entangled state...... — a nanofiber based light-atom interface. Using a dual-frequency probing method we measure and prepare an ensemble with a sub-Poissonian atom number distribution. This is a first step towards the implementation of more exotic quantum states....

  16. Storage of Quantum Variables in Atomic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cviklinski, J.; Ortalo, J.; Josse, V.

    2007-01-01

    Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three-level syst......-level systems allows direct mapping the quantum state of light into long lived coherences in the atomic ground state. We show that excess noise linked to atomic transitions can be made negligible. Experimental developments are discussed for atomic vapours and cold atoms....

  17. Atoms and cavities: Explorations of quantum entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimond, J. M.; Hagley, E.; Maitre, X.; Nogues, G.; Wunderlich, C.; Brune, M.; Haroche, S.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of circular Rydberg atoms with a high-quality microwave cavity makes it possible to realize complex quantum state manipulations. The state of an atom can be 'copied' onto the cavity. Reversing this operation at a later time with a second atom, we realize an elementary 'quantum memory' holding an atomic quantum coherence for a while in a cavity mode. We have also generated two-atom entangled states of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type. At variance with previous experiments, this one implies massive particles in a completely controlled process. These entanglement manipulations can be generalized to more complex or to mesoscopic systems and open the way to new tests of fundamental aspects of the quantum world

  18. Quantum mechanical determination of atomic polarizabilities of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Esther; Szabadi, András; Schröder, Christian

    2018-04-25

    The distribution of a molecule's polarizability to individual atomic sites is inevitable to develop accurate polarizable force fields. We present the direct quantum mechanical calculation of atomic polarizabilities of 27 common ionic liquids. The method is superior to previously published distribution routines based on large databases of the molecular polarizability, and enables the correct description of any ionic liquid and its peculiarities within the quantum mechanical framework.

  19. Quantum optics experiments with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachor, H.A.; McClelland, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of light ultimately limit the sensitivity of spectroscopic measurements. The quantum properties of coherent laser light and of nonclassical types of light are reviewed. Two recent experiments are described which generate light with suppressed quantum noise, pointing the way to improved and more sensitive measurements. (orig.)

  20. Manipulating cold atoms for quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: I will describe how cold atoms can be manipulated to realize arrays of addressable qbits as prototype quantum registers, focussing on how atom chips can be used in combination with cavity qed techniques to form such an array. I will discuss how the array can be generated and steered using optical lattices and the Mott transition, and describe the sources of noise and how these place limits on the use of such chips in quantum information processing. (author)

  1. Quantum chaos of the 2-level atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R; Hoehnerbach, M [Essen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich Physik

    1984-01-01

    Recent work on the two-level atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field is reviewed from the point of view of 'quantum chaos', defined as the quantum behavior of a dynamical system which is non-integrable in the classical limit. Spectral properties and the dynamics of occupation probabilities including their revivals are obtained without making the rotating wave approximation.

  2. Quantum localization of the kicked rydberg atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida; Reinhold; Burgdorfer

    2000-03-20

    We investigate the quantum localization of the one-dimensional Rydberg atom subject to a unidirectional periodic train of impulses. For high frequencies of the train the classical system becomes chaotic and leads to fast ionization. By contrast, the quantum system is found to be remarkably stable. We find this quantum localization to be directly related to the existence of "scars" of the unstable periodic orbits of the system. The localization length is given by the energy excursion along the periodic orbits.

  3. Quantum measurements of atoms using cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dada, Adetunmise C.; Andersson, Erika; Jones, Martin L.; Kendon, Vivien M.; Everitt, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Generalized quantum measurements are an important extension of projective or von Neumann measurements in that they can be used to describe any measurement that can be implemented on a quantum system. We describe how to realize two nonstandard quantum measurements using cavity QED. The first measurement optimally and unambiguously distinguishes between two nonorthogonal quantum states. The second example is a measurement that demonstrates superadditive quantum coding gain. The experimental tools used are single-atom unitary operations effected by Ramsey pulses and two-atom Tavis-Cummings interactions. We show how the superadditive quantum coding gain is affected by errors in the field-ionization detection of atoms and that even with rather high levels of experimental imperfections, a reasonable amount of superadditivity can still be seen. To date, these types of measurements have been realized only on photons. It would be of great interest to have realizations using other physical systems. This is for fundamental reasons but also since quantum coding gain in general increases with code word length, and a realization using atoms could be more easily scaled than existing realizations using photons.

  4. A single-atom quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Holger P; Nölleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Figueroa, Eden; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2011-05-12

    The faithful storage of a quantum bit (qubit) of light is essential for long-distance quantum communication, quantum networking and distributed quantum computing. The required optical quantum memory must be able to receive and recreate the photonic qubit; additionally, it must store an unknown quantum state of light better than any classical device. So far, these two requirements have been met only by ensembles of material particles that store the information in collective excitations. Recent developments, however, have paved the way for an approach in which the information exchange occurs between single quanta of light and matter. This single-particle approach allows the material qubit to be addressed, which has fundamental advantages for realistic implementations. First, it enables a heralding mechanism that signals the successful storage of a photon by means of state detection; this can be used to combat inevitable losses and finite efficiencies. Second, it allows for individual qubit manipulations, opening up avenues for in situ processing of the stored quantum information. Here we demonstrate the most fundamental implementation of such a quantum memory, by mapping arbitrary polarization states of light into and out of a single atom trapped inside an optical cavity. The memory performance is tested with weak coherent pulses and analysed using full quantum process tomography. The average fidelity is measured to be 93%, and low decoherence rates result in qubit coherence times exceeding 180  microseconds. This makes our system a versatile quantum node with excellent prospects for applications in optical quantum gates and quantum repeaters.

  5. Hybrid quantum systems of ions and atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we review the progress in experiments with hybrid systems of trapped ions and ultracold neutral atoms. We give a theoretical overview over the atom-ion interactions in the cold regime and give a summary of the most important experimental results. We conclude with an overview of remaining open challenges and possible applications in hybrid quantum systems of ions and neutral atoms.

  6. Quantum simulation of transverse Ising models with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauss, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Quantum Ising models are canonical models for the study of quantum phase transitions (Sachdev 1999 Quantum Phase Transitions (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)) and are the underlying concept for many analogue quantum computing and quantum annealing ideas (Tanaka et al Quantum Spin Glasses, Annealing and Computation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). Here we focus on the implementation of finite-range interacting Ising spin models, which are barely tractable numerically. Recent experiments with cold atoms have reached the interaction-dominated regime in quantum Ising magnets via optical coupling of trapped neutral atoms to Rydberg states. This approach allows for the tunability of all relevant terms in an Ising spin Hamiltonian with 1/{r}6 interactions in transverse and longitudinal fields. This review summarizes the recent progress of these implementations in Rydberg lattices with site-resolved detection. Strong correlations in quantum Ising models have been observed in several experiments, starting from a single excitation in the superatom regime up to the point of crystallization. The rapid progress in this field makes spin systems based on Rydberg atoms a promising platform for quantum simulation because of the unmatched flexibility and strength of interactions combined with high control and good isolation from the environment.

  7. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  8. Quantum networks based on cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Stephan; Bochmann, Joerg; Figueroa, Eden; Hahn, Carolin; Kalb, Norbert; Muecke, Martin; Neuzner, Andreas; Noelleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum repeaters require an efficient interface between stationary quantum memories and flying photons. Single atoms in optical cavities are ideally suited as universal quantum network nodes that are capable of sending, storing, retrieving, and even processing quantum information. We demonstrate this by presenting an elementary version of a quantum network based on two identical nodes in remote, independent laboratories. The reversible exchange of quantum information and the creation of remote entanglement are achieved by exchange of a single photon. Quantum teleportation is implemented using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement. Quantum control over all degrees of freedom of the single atom also allows for the nondestructive detection of flying photons and the implementation of a quantum gate between the spin state of the atom and the polarization of a photon upon its reflection from the cavity. Our approach to quantum networking offers a clear perspective for scalability and provides the essential components for the realization of a quantum repeater.

  9. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  10. Hybrid Quantum Information Processing with Superconductors and Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robert

    Hybrid approaches to quantum information processing (QIP) aim to capitalize on the strengths of disparate quantum technologies to realize a system whose capabilities exceed those of any single experimental platform. At the University of Wisconsin, we are working toward integration of a fast superconducting quantum processor with a stable, long-lived quantum memory based on trapped neutral atoms. Here we describe the development of a quantum interface between superconducting thin-film cavity circuits and trapped Rydberg atoms, the key technological obstacle to realization of superconductor-atom hybrid QIP. Specific accomplishments to date include development of a theoretical protocol for high-fidelity state transfer between the atom and the cavity; fabrication and characterization of high- Q superconducting cavities with integrated trapping electrodes to enhance zero-point microwave fields at a location remote from the chip surface; and trapping and Rydberg excitation of single atoms within 1 mm of the cavity. We discuss the status of experiments to probe the strong coherent coupling of single Rydberg atoms and the superconducting cavity. Supported by ARO under contract W911NF-16-1-0133.

  11. Scalable quantum information processing with photons and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    Over the past three decades, the promises of super-fast quantum computing and secure quantum cryptography have spurred a world-wide interest in quantum information, generating fascinating quantum technologies for coherent manipulation of individual quantum systems. However, the distance of fiber-based quantum communications is limited due to intrinsic fiber loss and decreasing of entanglement quality. Moreover, probabilistic single-photon source and entanglement source demand exponentially increased overheads for scalable quantum information processing. To overcome these problems, we are taking two paths in parallel: quantum repeaters and through satellite. We used the decoy-state QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon source, and used the measurement-device-independent QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon detectors--two main loopholes in quantum cryptograph. Based on these techniques, we are now building world's biggest quantum secure communication backbone, from Beijing to Shanghai, with a distance exceeding 2000 km. Meanwhile, we are developing practically useful quantum repeaters that combine entanglement swapping, entanglement purification, and quantum memory for the ultra-long distance quantum communication. The second line is satellite-based global quantum communication, taking advantage of the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the atmosphere. We realized teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100 km, and later on a rapidly moving platform. We are also making efforts toward the generation of multiphoton entanglement and its use in teleportation of multiple properties of a single quantum particle, topological error correction, quantum algorithms for solving systems of linear equations and machine learning. Finally, I will talk about our recent experiments on quantum simulations on ultracold atoms. On the one hand, by applying an optical Raman lattice technique, we realized a two-dimensional spin-obit (SO

  12. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frank, S; Bonneau, M; Schmiedmayer, J; Hild, S; Gross, C; Cheneau, M; Bloch, I; Pichler, T; Negretti, A; Calarco, T; Montangero, S

    2016-10-11

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  13. Quantum phase transitions in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfir, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of quantum phase transitions in mesoscopic systems and applications to atomic nuclei are presented. Analysis in terms of the Interacting Boson Model shows that the main features persist even for moderate number of particles. Experimental evidence in rare-earth nuclei is discussed. New order and control parameters for systems with the same number of particles are proposed. (author)

  14. Many-body quantum simulation with Rydberg atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.

    2010-01-01

    quantum switch mechanism that involves electromagnetically induced transparency. In the following work, this many-particle entangling gate it then used as the principle building block for the development of a new Rydberg quantum simulation architecture. It is shown that laser-excited Rydberg atoms in optical or magnetic lattices provide an efficient implementation of a universal quantum simulator for spin models. Simulation protocols are developed that allow one to realize the coherent and dissipative time evolution of spin models involving higher-order interactions, such as Kitaev's toric code Hamiltonian and more complex lattice gauge theories. It is analyzed in detail how this can be achieved by stroboscopic sequences of multi-qubit Rydberg gates combined with dissipative steps via optical pumping. Based on multi-particle reservoir engineering the new scheme can also be used for the dissipative preparation of entangled states and many-body quantum phases. The work presented in the last part of this thesis has been performed in close collaboration with the group of Prof. Rainer Blatt at the Institute for Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck. In this project, novel possibilities for the quantum simulation of general open-system dynamics using trapped ions are explored both theoretically and in an experiment. A digital, i.e., gate-based quantum simulation scheme is developed that combines high-fidelity multi-ion entangling gates with optical pumping on auxiliary ions, for the realization of coherent and dissipative multi-qubit dynamics. The elementary building blocks of this simulation architecture have been demonstrated in an experiment that for the first time realizes a toolbox for simulating an open quantum system with up to five qubits. In the experiment, this engineering of general dynamics is illustrated by the dissipative preparation of entangled states, the simulation of coherent many-body spin interactions and the quantum non-demolition measurement

  15. Towards deterministic optical quantum computation with coherently driven atomic ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, David

    2005-01-01

    Scalable and efficient quantum computation with photonic qubits requires (i) deterministic sources of single photons, (ii) giant nonlinearities capable of entangling pairs of photons, and (iii) reliable single-photon detectors. In addition, an optical quantum computer would need a robust reversible photon storage device. Here we discuss several related techniques, based on the coherent manipulation of atomic ensembles in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency, that are capable of implementing all of the above prerequisites for deterministic optical quantum computation with single photons

  16. Quantum electronics for atomic physics and telecommunication

    CERN Document Server

    Nagourney, Warren G

    2014-01-01

    Nagourney provides a course in quantum electronics for researchers in atomic physics and other related areas (including telecommunications). The book covers the usual topics, such as Gaussian beams, optical cavities, lasers, non-linear optics, modulation techniques and fibre optics, but also includes a number of areas not usually found in a textbook on quantum electronics, such as the enhancement of non-linear processes in a build-up cavity or periodically poled waveguide, impedance matching into a cavity and astigmatism in ring cavities.

  17. Experimental entanglement of 25 individually accessible atomic quantum interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yunfei; Wu, Yukai; Jiang, Nan; Chang, Wei; Li, Chang; Zhang, Sheng; Duan, Luming

    2018-04-01

    A quantum interface links the stationary qubits in a quantum memory with flying photonic qubits in optical transmission channels and constitutes a critical element for the future quantum internet. Entanglement of quantum interfaces is an important step for the realization of quantum networks. Through heralded detection of photon interference, we generate multipartite entanglement between 25 (or 9) individually addressable quantum interfaces in a multiplexed atomic quantum memory array and confirm genuine 22-partite (or 9-partite) entanglement. This experimental entanglement of a record-high number of individually addressable quantum interfaces makes an important step toward the realization of quantum networks, long-distance quantum communication, and multipartite quantum information processing.

  18. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld, David M; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    At ICAP we presented the efforts and progress at MIT towards using ultracold atoms for the realization of various forms of quantum magnetism. These efforts include a study of fermions with strong repulsive interactions in which we obtained evidence for a phase transition to itinerant ferromagnetism, the characterization of cold atom systems by noise measurements, and a new adiabatic gradient demagnetization cooling scheme which has enabled us to realize temperatures of less than 350 picokelvin and spin temperatures of less than 50 picokelvin in optical lattices. These are the lowest temperatures ever measured in any physical system.

  19. A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    98, 111115. 5. Karmakar, S, Shih, Y. Two- color ghost imaging with enhanced angular resolving power. Physical Review A. 2010; 81, 033845. 6. Karmakar...information. We constructed the rubidium (⁸⁷Rb) atomic memory magneto optical trap (MOT) cell and laser controls, and developed protocols, hardware, and...software to control the secure teleportation of information between quantum memories at ARL and JQI. Notably, we performed successful in-laboratory

  20. Scheme of 2-dimensional atom localization for a three-level atom via quantum coherence

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar, Sajjad; Ahmed, Rizwan; Khan, M. Khalid

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system. The scheme is based on quantum coherence via classical standing wave fields between the two excited levels. Our results show that conditional position probability is significantly phase dependent of the applied field and frequency detuning of spontaneously emitted photons. We obtain a single localization peak having probability close to unity by manipulating the control parameters. The effect of ato...

  1. Quantum dot systems: artificial atoms with tunable properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Quantum dots - also called zero-dimensional electron systems or artificial atoms - are physical objects where the constituent electrons are confined in a small spatial region, leading to discrete eigenvalues for the energies of the confined electrons. Large quantum dots offer a dense energy spectrum comparable to that of metallic grains, whereas small quantum dots more closely resemble atoms in their electronic properties. Quantum dots can be linked to leads by tunnel barriers, hence permitting electrical transport measurements: Coulomb blockade and single-electron charging effects are observed due to the repulsive electron electron interaction on the quantum dot site. Usually fabricated by conventional semiconductor growth and processing technology, the advantage is that both simple and also more complex quantum dot systems can be designed to purpose, acting as model systems with in-situ tunable parameters such as the number of confined electrons in the quantum dot and the strength of the tunnel coupling to the leads, electrostatically controlled by the applied voltages to gate electrodes. With increasing the tunnel coupling to the leads, the virtual occupation of the quantum dot from the leads becomes more and more important -- the simple description of electrical transport by single-electron tunneling events breaks down. The basic physics is described by the Kondo physics based on the Anderson impurity model. A system consisting of strongly electrostatically coupled quantum dots with separate leads to each quantum dot represent another realization of the Anderson impurity model. Experiments to verify the analogy are presented. The experimental data embedded within this tutorial have been obtained with Alexander Huebel, Matthias Keller, Joerg Schmid, David Quirion, Armin Welker, Ulf Wilhelm, and Klaus von Klitzing. (author)

  2. Spatial dispersion in atom-surface quantum friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, D.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Busch, K.; Intravaia, F.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the influence of spatial dispersion on atom-surface quantum friction. We show that for atom-surface separations shorter than the carrier's mean free path within the material, the frictional force can be several orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by local optics. In addition, when taking into account spatial dispersion effects, we show that the commonly used local thermal equilibrium approximation underestimates by approximately 95% the drag force, obtained by employing the recently reported nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation for quantum friction. Unlike the treatment based on local optics, spatial dispersion in conjunction with corrections to local thermal equilibrium change not only the magnitude but also the distance scaling of quantum friction.

  3. Quantum physics of atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei and particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisberg, R.M.; Resnick, R.

    1983-01-01

    This textbook is intended to be used for students who have been through substantial treatments of elementary differential and integral calculus and elementary level of classical physics. Various phenomena of early quantum physics, basic core of quantum mechanics and its application to one and two-electron atoms, multielectron atoms, quantum statistics and nuclei are discussed

  4. The quantum beat principles and applications of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F

    2007-01-01

    This work attempts to convey a broad understanding of the physical principles underlying the workings of these quantum-based atomic clocks, with introductory chapters placing them in context with the early development of mechanical clocks and the introduction of electronic time-keeping as embodied in the quartz-controlled clocks. While the book makes no pretense at being a history of atomic clocks, it nevertheless takes a historical perspective in its treatment of the subject. Intended for nonspecialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering, The Quantum Beat covers a wide range of salient topics relevant to atomic clocks, treated in a broad intuitive manner with a minimum of mathematical formalism. Detailed descriptions are given of the design principles of the rubidium, cesium, hydrogen maser, and mercury ion standards; the revolutionary changes that the advent of the laser has made possible, such as laser cooling, optical pumping, the formation of "optical molasses," and the cesium "fountain" stand...

  5. Bohr's Creation of his Quantum Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, John

    2013-04-01

    Fresh letters throw new light on the content and state of Bohr's mind before and during his creation of the quantum atom. His mental furniture then included the atomic models of the English school, the quantum puzzles of Continental theorists, and the results of his own studies of the electron theory of metals. It also included the poetry of Goethe, plays of Ibsen and Shakespeare, novels of Dickens, and rhapsodies of Kierkegaard and Carlyle. The mind that held these diverse ingredients together oscillated between enthusiasm and dejection during the year in which Bohr took up the problem of atomic structure. He spent most of that year in England, which separated him for extended periods from his close-knit family and friends. Correspondence with his fianc'ee, Margrethe Nørlund, soon to be published, reports his ups and downs as he adjusted to J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, the English language, and the uneven course of his work. In helping to smooth out his moods, Margrethe played an important and perhaps an enabling role in his creative process.

  6. Quasideterministic generation of maximally entangled states of two mesoscopic atomic ensembles by adiabatic quantum feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Lisi, Antonio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Vitali, David

    2005-01-01

    We introduce an efficient, quasideterministic scheme to generate maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles. The scheme is based on quantum nondemolition measurements of total atomic populations and on adiabatic quantum feedback conditioned by the measurements outputs. The high efficiency of the scheme is tested and confirmed numerically for ideal photodetection as well as in the presence of losses

  7. Hanbury Brown and Twiss and other atom-atom correlations: advances in quantum atom optics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years ago, two astronomers, R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, invented a new method to measure the angular diameter of stars, in spite of the atmospheric fluctuations. Their proposal prompted a hot debate among physicists : how might two particles (photons), emitted independently (at opposite extremities of a star) , behave in a correlated way when detected ? It was only after the development of R Glauber's full quantum analysis that the effect was understood as a two particle quantum interference effect. From a modern perspective, it can be viewed as an early example of the amazing properties of pairs of entangled particles. The effect has now been observed with bosonic and fermionic atoms, stressing its fully quantum character. After putting these experiments in a historical perspective, I will present recent results, and comment on their significance. I will also show how our single atom detection scheme has allowed us to demonstrate the creation of atom pairs by non linear mixing of matter wa...

  8. Quantum Computation by Optically Coupled Steady Atoms/Quantum-Dots Inside a Quantum Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowdhury, V. P.; Anantram, M. P.; Mor, T.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for quantum computation using $n$ steady 3-level atoms kept inside a quantum cavity, or using $n$ quantum-dots (QDs) kept inside a quantum cavity. In this model one external laser is pointed towards all the atoms/QDs, and $n$ pairs of electrodes are addressing the atoms/QDs, so that each atom is addressed by one pair. The energy levels of each atom/QD are controlled by an external Stark field given to the atom/QD by its external pair of electrodes. Transition between two energy levels of an individual atom/ QD are controlled by the voltage on its electrodes, and by the external laser. Interactions between two atoms/ QDs are performed with the additional help of the cavity mode (using on-resonance condition). Laser frequency, cavity frequency, and energy levels are far off-resonance most of the time, and they are brought to the resonance (using the Stark effect) only at the time of operations. Steps for a controlled-NOT gate between any two atoms/QDs have been described for this model. Our model demands some challenging technological efforts, such as manufacturing single-electron QDs inside a cavity. However, it promises big advantages over other existing models which are currently implemented, and might enable a much easier scale-up, to compute with many more qubits.

  9. Experimental proof of quantum non-separability based on the transition of the atom in beta-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.

    1988-01-01

    The basic non-local character of the quantum processes is a continuously discussed and doubted problem of quantum theory. Recent experimental proofs of the Bell inequalities are questioned in the literature, using local theories of hidden variables. Present paper shows a simple and direct proof of non-locality of quantum processes, analyzing the case of the beta decay. The hypothetical energy transfer between shell electrons and beta electron-neutrino system is proved to be superluminal but necessary for the energy balance of the process. This argumentation proves the nonseparability and nonlocality of quantum processes. (D.G.) 8 refs

  10. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (2 um), or 6 nT / Hz1 / 2 per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly one-hundred points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT / Hz1 / 2 each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner would measure these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly two orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10- 6 Phi0 / Hz1 / 2) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are for the first time carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns and done so using samples that may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge transport images at temperatures from room to \\x9D4K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  11. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field (B) of strength up to 10 11 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >10 9 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >10 9 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs 'dynamically' from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints. (author)

  12. Non-adiabatic quantum state preparation and quantum state transport in chains of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostmann, Maike; Minář, Jiří; Marcuzzi, Matteo; Levi, Emanuele; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by recent progress in the experimental manipulation of cold atoms in optical lattices, we study three different protocols for non-adiabatic quantum state preparation and state transport in chains of Rydberg atoms. The protocols we discuss are based on the blockade mechanism between atoms which, when excited to a Rydberg state, interact through a van der Waals potential, and rely on single-site addressing. Specifically, we discuss protocols for efficient creation of an antiferromagnetic GHZ state, a class of matrix product states including a so-called Rydberg crystal and for the state transport of a single-qubit quantum state between two ends of a chain of atoms. We identify system parameters allowing for the operation of the protocols on timescales shorter than the lifetime of the Rydberg states while yielding high fidelity output states. We discuss the effect of positional disorder on the resulting states and comment on limitations due to other sources of noise such as radiative decay of the Rydberg states. The proposed protocols provide a testbed for benchmarking the performance of quantum information processing platforms based on Rydberg atoms.

  13. Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  14. Applications of Atomic Systems in Quantum Simulation, Quantum Computation and Topological Phases of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengtao

    and simulation. Trapped atomic ions are one of the leading platforms to build a scalable, universal quantum computer. The common one-dimensional setup, however, greatly limits the system's scalability. By solving the critical problem of micromotion, we propose a two-dimensional architecture for scalable trapped-ion quantum computation. Hamiltonian tomography for many-body quantum systems is essential for benchmarking quantum computation and simulation. By employing dynamical decoupling, we propose a scalable scheme for full Hamiltonian tomography. The required number of measurements increases only polynomially with the system size, in contrast to an exponential scaling in common methods. Finally, we work toward the goal of demonstrating quantum supremacy. A number of sampling tasks, such as the boson sampling problem, have been proposed to be classically intractable under mild assumptions. An intermediate quantum computer can efficiently solve the sampling problem, but the correct operation of the device is not known to be classically verifiable. Toward practical verification, we present an experimental friendly scheme to extract useful and robust information from the quantum boson samplers based on coarse-grained measurements. In a separate study, we introduce a new model built from translation-invariant Ising-interacting spins. This model possesses several advantageous properties, catalyzing the ultimate experimental demonstration of quantum supremacy.

  15. Quantum and semiclassical spin networks: from atomic and molecular physics to quantum computing and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Bitencourt, Ana Carla P.; Ferreira, Cristiane da S.; Marzuoli, Annalisa; Ragni, Mirco

    2008-11-01

    The mathematical apparatus of quantum-mechanical angular momentum (re)coupling, developed originally to describe spectroscopic phenomena in atomic, molecular, optical and nuclear physics, is embedded in modern algebraic settings which emphasize the underlying combinatorial aspects. SU(2) recoupling theory, involving Wigner's 3nj symbols, as well as the related problems of their calculations, general properties, asymptotic limits for large entries, nowadays plays a prominent role also in quantum gravity and quantum computing applications. We refer to the ingredients of this theory—and of its extension to other Lie and quantum groups—by using the collective term of 'spin networks'. Recent progress is recorded about the already established connections with the mathematical theory of discrete orthogonal polynomials (the so-called Askey scheme), providing powerful tools based on asymptotic expansions, which correspond on the physical side to various levels of semi-classical limits. These results are useful not only in theoretical molecular physics but also in motivating algorithms for the computationally demanding problems of molecular dynamics and chemical reaction theory, where large angular momenta are typically involved. As for quantum chemistry, applications of these techniques include selection and classification of complete orthogonal basis sets in atomic and molecular problems, either in configuration space (Sturmian orbitals) or in momentum space. In this paper, we list and discuss some aspects of these developments—such as for instance the hyperquantization algorithm—as well as a few applications to quantum gravity and topology, thus providing evidence of a unifying background structure.

  16. Quantum delayed-choice experiment with a single neutral atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Tiancai

    2017-10-01

    We present a proposal to implement a quantum delayed-choice (QDC) experiment with a single neutral atom, such as a rubidium or cesium atom. In our proposal, a Ramsey interferometer is adopted to observe the wave-like or particle-like behaviors of a single atom depending on the existence or absence of the second π/2-rotation. A quantum-controlled π/2-rotation on target atom is realized through a Rydberg-Rydberg interaction by another ancilla atom. It shows that a heavy neutral atom can also have a morphing behavior between the particle and the wave. The realization of the QDC experiment with such heavy neutral atoms not only is significant to understand the Bohr's complementarity principle in matter-wave and matter-particle domains but also has great potential on the quantum information process with neutral atoms.

  17. Magnetic atom lattices for quantum information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Simply put, a quantum computer aims at solving computational problems using genuine quantum mechanical effects. An important feature is that a quantum computer can simulate the behavior of any other quantum mechanical system. Furthermore, quantum devices are predicted to enable secure communication

  18. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  19. Steady state quantum discord for circularly accelerated atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jiawei, E-mail: hujiawei@nbu.edu.cn [Center for Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Yu, Hongwei, E-mail: hwyu@hunnu.edu.cn [Center for Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China)

    2015-12-15

    We study, in the framework of open quantum systems, the dynamics of quantum entanglement and quantum discord of two mutually independent circularly accelerated two-level atoms in interaction with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar fields in the Minkowski vacuum. We assume that the two atoms rotate synchronically with their separation perpendicular to the rotating plane. The time evolution of the quantum entanglement and quantum discord of the two-atom system is investigated. For a maximally entangled initial state, the entanglement measured by concurrence diminishes to zero within a finite time, while the quantum discord can either decrease monotonically to an asymptotic value or diminish to zero at first and then followed by a revival depending on whether the initial state is antisymmetric or symmetric. When both of the two atoms are initially excited, the generation of quantum entanglement shows a delayed feature, while quantum discord is created immediately. Remarkably, the quantum discord for such a circularly accelerated two-atom system takes a nonvanishing value in the steady state, and this is distinct from what happens in both the linear acceleration case and the case of static atoms immersed in a thermal bath.

  20. Distribution of quantum information between an atom and two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    The construction of networks consisting of optically interconnected processing units is a promising way to scale up quantum information processing systems. To store quantum information, single trapped atoms are among the most proven candidates. By placing them in high finesse optical resonators, a bidirectional information exchange between the atoms and photons becomes possible with, in principle, unit efficiency. Such an interface between stationary and ying qubits constitutes a possible node of a future quantum network. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate the prospects of a quantum interface consisting of a single atom trapped within the mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. In a two-step process, we distribute entanglement between the stored atom and two subsequently emitted single photons. The long atom trapping times achieved in the system together with the high photon collection efficiency of the cavity make the applied protocol in principle deterministic, allowing for the creation of an entangled state at the push of a button. Running the protocol on this quasi-stationary quantum interface, the internal state of the atom is entangled with the polarization state of a single emitted photon. The entanglement is generated by driving a vacuum-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage between states of the coupled atom-cavity system. In a second process, the atomic part of the entangled state is mapped onto a second emitted photon using a similar technique and resulting in a polarization-entangled two-photon state. To verify and characterize the photon-photon entanglement, we measured a violation of a Bell inequality and performed a full quantum state tomography. The results prove the prior atom-photon entanglement and demonstrate a quantum information transfer between the atom and the two emitted photons. This reflects the advantages of a high-finesse cavity as a quantum interface in future quantum networks. (orig.)

  1. Distribution of quantum information between an atom and two photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Bernhard

    2008-11-03

    The construction of networks consisting of optically interconnected processing units is a promising way to scale up quantum information processing systems. To store quantum information, single trapped atoms are among the most proven candidates. By placing them in high finesse optical resonators, a bidirectional information exchange between the atoms and photons becomes possible with, in principle, unit efficiency. Such an interface between stationary and ying qubits constitutes a possible node of a future quantum network. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate the prospects of a quantum interface consisting of a single atom trapped within the mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. In a two-step process, we distribute entanglement between the stored atom and two subsequently emitted single photons. The long atom trapping times achieved in the system together with the high photon collection efficiency of the cavity make the applied protocol in principle deterministic, allowing for the creation of an entangled state at the push of a button. Running the protocol on this quasi-stationary quantum interface, the internal state of the atom is entangled with the polarization state of a single emitted photon. The entanglement is generated by driving a vacuum-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage between states of the coupled atom-cavity system. In a second process, the atomic part of the entangled state is mapped onto a second emitted photon using a similar technique and resulting in a polarization-entangled two-photon state. To verify and characterize the photon-photon entanglement, we measured a violation of a Bell inequality and performed a full quantum state tomography. The results prove the prior atom-photon entanglement and demonstrate a quantum information transfer between the atom and the two emitted photons. This reflects the advantages of a high-finesse cavity as a quantum interface in future quantum networks. (orig.)

  2. Geometric manipulation of the quantum states of two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Mingzhen; Barber, Zeb W.; Fischer, Joe A.; Babbitt, Wm. Randall

    2004-01-01

    Manipulation of the quantum states of two-level atoms has been investigated using laser-controlled geometric phase change, which has the potential to build robust quantum logic gates for quantum computing. For a qubit based on two electronic transition levels of an atom, two basic quantum operations that can make any universal single qubit gate have been designed employing resonant laser pulses. An operation equivalent to a phase gate has been demonstrated using Tm 3+ doped in a yttrium aluminum garnet crystal

  3. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2001-01-01

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  4. Phase-sensitive atomic dynamics in quantum light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balybin, S. N.; Zakharov, R. V.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Interaction between a quantum electromagnetic field and a model Ry atom with possible transitions to the continuum and to the low-lying resonant state is investigated. Strong sensitivity of atomic dynamics to the phase of applied coherent and squeezed vacuum light is found. Methods to extract the quantum field phase performing the measurements on the atomic system are proposed. In the case of the few-photon coherent state high accuracy of the phase determination is demonstrated, which appears to be much higher in comparison to the usually used quantum-optical methods such as homodyne detection.

  5. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiu-Qin; Liu Ni; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. (paper)

  6. Quantum-mechanical transport equation for atomic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical transport equation (QMTE) is derived which should be applicable to a wide range of problems involving the interaction of radiation with atoms or molecules which are also subject to collisions with perturber atoms. The equation follows the time evolution of the macroscopic atomic density matrix elements of atoms located at classical position R and moving with classical velocity v. It is quantum mechanical in the sense that all collision kernels or rates which appear have been obtained from a quantum-mechanical theory and, as such, properly take into account the energy-level variations and velocity changes of the active (emitting or absorbing) atom produced in collisions with perturber atoms. The present formulation is better suited to problems involving high-intensity external fields, such as those encountered in laser physics.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo for atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.N.

    1989-11-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo with fixed nodes (QMC) approach has been employed in studying energy-eigenstates for 1--4 electron systems. Previous work employing the diffusion QMC technique yielded energies of high quality for H 2 , LiH, Li 2 , and H 2 O. Here, the range of calculations with this new approach has been extended to include additional first-row atoms and molecules. In addition, improvements in the previously computed fixed-node energies of LiH, Li 2 , and H 2 O have been obtained using more accurate trial functions. All computations were performed within, but are not limited to, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. In our computations, the effects of variation of Monte Carlo parameters on the QMC solution of the Schroedinger equation were studied extensively. These parameters include the time step, renormalization time and nodal structure. These studies have been very useful in determining which choices of such parameters will yield accurate QMC energies most efficiently. Generally, very accurate energies (90--100% of the correlation energy is obtained) have been computed with single-determinant trail functions multiplied by simple correlation functions. Improvements in accuracy should be readily obtained using more complex trial functions

  8. Quantum Kalman filtering and the Heisenberg limit in atomic magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geremia, J M; Stockton, John K; Doherty, Andrew C; Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 (United States)

    2003-12-19

    The shot-noise detection limit in current high-precision magnetometry [I. Kominis, T. Kornack, J. Allred, and M. Romalis, Nature (London) 422, 596 (2003)]10.1038/nature01484 is a manifestation of quantum fluctuations that scale as 1/{radical}(N) in an ensemble of N atoms. Here, we develop a procedure that combines continuous measurement and quantum Kalman filtering [V. Belavkin, Rep. Math. Phys. 43, 405 (1999)] to surpass this conventional limit by exploiting conditional spin squeezing to achieve 1/N field sensitivity. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of optimal estimation for high bandwidth precision magnetometry at the Heisenberg limit and also identifies an approximate estimator based on linear regression.

  9. Optical bistability using quantum interference in V-type atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M A; Calderon, Oscar G

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of a V-type three-level atomic system in a ring cavity driven by a coherent field is studied. We consider a V configuration under conditions such that interference between decay channels is important. We find that when quantum interference is taken into account, optical bistability can be realized with a considerable decrease in the threshold intensity and the cooperative parameter. On the other hand, we also include the finite bandwidth of the driving field and study its role in the optical bistable response. It is found that at certain linewidths of the driving field optical bistability is obtained even if the system satisfies the trapping condition and the threshold intensity can be controlled. Furthermore, a change from the optical bistability due to quantum interference to the usual bistable behaviour based on saturation occurs as the driving field linewidth increases

  10. Single-cell atomic quantum memory for light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opatrny, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrating atomic quantum memory for light [B. Julsgaard et al., Nature 432, 482 (2004)] involve two macroscopic samples of atoms, each with opposite spin polarization. It is shown here that a single atomic cell is enough for the memory function if the atoms are optically pumped with suitable linearly polarized light, and quadratic Zeeman shift and/or ac Stark shift are used to manipulate rotations of the quadratures. This should enhance the performance of our quantum memory devices since less resources are needed and losses of light in crossing different media boundaries are avoided

  11. Towards experimental quantum-field tomography with ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, A; Friesdorf, M; Langen, T; Rauer, B; Schweigler, T; Hübener, R; Schmiedmayer, J; Riofrío, C A; Eisert, J

    2015-07-03

    The experimental realization of large-scale many-body systems in atomic-optical architectures has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. To work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. Here we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum-field tomography. Our procedure is based on the continuous analogues of matrix-product states, ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. To experimentally demonstrate the power of our procedure, we quench a one-dimensional Bose gas by a transversal split and use our method for a partial quantum-field reconstruction of the far-from-equilibrium states of this system. We expect our technique to play an important role in future studies of continuous quantum many-body systems.

  12. Photonic and Quantum Interactions of Atomic-Scale Junctions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, the fundamental quantum and photonic interactions of bimetallic atomic-scale junctions (ASJs) will be explored, with three major space...

  13. Calculation of the factor of the time's relativity in quantum area for different atoms based on the `Substantial motion' theory of Mulla Sadra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Iranian Philosopher, Mulla Sadra (1571-1640) in his theory of ``Substantial motion'' emphasized that ``the universe moves in its entity'', and ``the time is the fourth dimension of the universe'' This definition of space-time is proposed by him at three hundred years before Einstein. He argued that the time is magnitude of the motion (momentum) of the matter in its entity. In the other words, the time for each atom (body) is sum of the momentums of its involved fundamental particles. The momentum for each atom is different from the other atoms. In this methodology, by proposing some formulas, we can calculate the time for involved particles' momentum (time) for each atom in a second of the Eastern Time Zone (ETZ). Due to differences between these momentums during a second in ETZ, the time for each atom, will be different from the other atoms. This is the relativity in quantum physics. On the other hand, the God communicates with elementary particles via sub-particles (see my next paper) and transfers the packages (bit) of information and laws to them for processing and selection of their next step. Differences between packages like complexity and velocity of processing during the time, is the second variable in relativity of time for each atom which may be effective on the factor.

  14. Cloud Quantum Computing of an Atomic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, E. F.; McCaskey, A. J.; Hagen, G.; Jansen, G. R.; Morris, T. D.; Papenbrock, T.; Pooser, R. C.; Dean, D. J.; Lougovski, P.

    2018-05-01

    We report a quantum simulation of the deuteron binding energy on quantum processors accessed via cloud servers. We use a Hamiltonian from pionless effective field theory at leading order. We design a low-depth version of the unitary coupled-cluster ansatz, use the variational quantum eigensolver algorithm, and compute the binding energy to within a few percent. Our work is the first step towards scalable nuclear structure computations on a quantum processor via the cloud, and it sheds light on how to map scientific computing applications onto nascent quantum devices.

  15. Quantum Interference between Autonomous Single-Photon Sources from Doppler-Broadened Atomic Ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Teak; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Park, Jiho; Kim, Heonoh; Moon, Han Seb

    2017-01-01

    To realize a quantum network based on quantum entanglement swapping, bright and completely autonomous sources are essentially required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) quantum interference between two independent bright photon pairs generated via the spontaneous four-wave mixing in Doppler-broadened ladder-type 87Rb atoms. Bright autonomous heralded single photons are operated in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with no synchronization or supplemental filters. The four-fol...

  16. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  17. Simple Atomic Quantum Memory Suitable for Semiconductor Quantum Dot Single Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Janik; Buser, Gianni; Horsley, Andrew; Béguin, Lucas; Jöckel, Andreas; Jahn, Jan-Philipp; Warburton, Richard J.; Treutlein, Philipp

    2017-08-01

    Quantum memories matched to single photon sources will form an important cornerstone of future quantum network technology. We demonstrate such a memory in warm Rb vapor with on-demand storage and retrieval, based on electromagnetically induced transparency. With an acceptance bandwidth of δ f =0.66 GHz , the memory is suitable for single photons emitted by semiconductor quantum dots. In this regime, vapor cell memories offer an excellent compromise between storage efficiency, storage time, noise level, and experimental complexity, and atomic collisions have negligible influence on the optical coherences. Operation of the memory is demonstrated using attenuated laser pulses on the single photon level. For a 50 ns storage time, we measure ηe2 e 50 ns=3.4 (3 )% end-to-end efficiency of the fiber-coupled memory, with a total intrinsic efficiency ηint=17 (3 )%. Straightforward technological improvements can boost the end-to-end-efficiency to ηe 2 e≈35 %; beyond that, increasing the optical depth and exploiting the Zeeman substructure of the atoms will allow such a memory to approach near unity efficiency. In the present memory, the unconditional read-out noise level of 9 ×10-3 photons is dominated by atomic fluorescence, and for input pulses containing on average μ1=0.27 (4 ) photons, the signal to noise level would be unity.

  18. Quantum electrodynamics with 1D arti cial atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, Alisa

    A 1D atom, a single quantum emitter coupled to a single optical mode, exhibits rich quantum electrodynamic (QED) e_ects and is thought to be the key ingredient for many applications in quantuminformation processing. Single quantum dots (QD) in photonic-crystal waveguides (PCW) constitute a robust...... as expected from the theory. The value of g(2)(0) is around 1.08. The results con_rm the observation of an on-chip giant optical nonlinearity and the 1D atom behavior. Another direction in this thesis has been to investigate the e_ect of Anderson localization on the electrodynamics of QDs in PCWs. A large...

  19. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The position and momentum space information entropies of weakly interacting trapped atomic Bose–Einstein condensates and spin-polarized trapped atomic Fermi gases at absolute zero temperature are evaluated. We find that sum of the position and momentum space information entropies of these quantum systems ...

  20. Stabilization of atoms with nonzero magnetic quantum numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, B.; Jensen, R.V.

    1993-01-01

    A classical analysis of the interaction of an atomic electron with an oscillating electric field with arbitrary initial quantum number, n, magnetic quantum number, m > 0, field strength, and frequency shows that the classical, dynamics for the perturbed electron can be stabilized for large fields and high frequencies. Using a four-dimensional map approximation to the classical dynamics, explicit expressions are obtained for the full parameter dependence of the boundaries of stability surrounding the open-quotes death valleyclose quotes of rapid classical ionization. A preliminary analysis of the quantum dynamics in terms of the quasienergy states associated with the corresponding quantum map is also included with particular emphasis on the role of unstable classical structures in stabilizing atoms. Together, these results provide motivation and direction for further theoretical and experimental studies of stabilization of atoms (and molecules) in super-intense microwave and laser fields

  1. Theory of a Quantum Scanning Microscope for Cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Laflamme, C; Vasilyev, D V; Baranov, M A; Zoller, P

    2018-03-30

    We propose and analyze a scanning microscope to monitor "live" the quantum dynamics of cold atoms in a cavity QED setup. The microscope measures the atomic density with subwavelength resolution via dispersive couplings to a cavity and homodyne detection within the framework of continuous measurement theory. We analyze two modes of operation. First, for a fixed focal point the microscope records the wave packet dynamics of atoms with time resolution set by the cavity lifetime. Second, a spatial scan of the microscope acts to map out the spatial density of stationary quantum states. Remarkably, in the latter case, for a good cavity limit, the microscope becomes an effective quantum nondemolition device, such that the spatial distribution of motional eigenstates can be measured backaction free in single scans, as an emergent quantum nondemolition measurement.

  2. Multimode quantum model of a cw atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, J.J.; Haine, S.A.; Savage, C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Laser cooling allows dilute atomic gases to be cooled to within K of absolute zero. Ultracold gases were first achieved twenty years ago and have since found applications in areas such as spectroscopy, time standards, frequency standards, quantum information processing and atom optics. The atomic analogue of the lasing mode in optical lasers is Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), in which a cooled sample of atoms condense into the lowest energy quantum state. This new state of matter was recently achieved in dilute Bose gases in 1995. Atoms coupled out of a BEC exhibit long-range spatial coherence, and provide the coldest atomic source currently available. These atomic sources are called 'atom lasers' because the BEC is analogous to the lasing mode of an optical laser. The high spectral flux from optical lasers is caused by a process called gain-narrowing, which requires continuous wave (cw) operation. Coupling a BEC quickly into an untrapped state forms a coherent atomic beam but it has a spread in momentum as large as the trapped BEC. Coupling the atoms out more slowly reduces the output linewidth at the expense of reducing the overall flux. These atom lasers are equivalent to Q-switched optical lasers. A cw atom laser with gain-narrowing would produce an increasingly monoenergetic output as the flux increased, dramatically improving the spectral flux. A cw atom laser is therefore a major goal of the atom optics community, but there are several theoretical and practical obstacles to understanding the complexities of such a system. The main obstacle to the production of a cw atom laser is the technical difficulties involved in continuously pumping the lasing mode. No complete theory exists which describes a cw atom laser. Complete cw atom laser models require a quantum field description due to their non-Markovian dynamics, significant spatial effects and the dependence of the output on the quantum statistics of the lasing mode. The extreme dimensionality

  3. Coopetition and manipulation of quantum correlations in Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chu-Hui; Yan, Dong; Liu, Yi-Mou; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    We study the steady-state quantum correlations arising from the atom–field and interatomic interplays in two-level Rydberg atoms coherently driven by an external laser field. Three kinds of quantum correlations, i.e., atom–atom correlation, atom–field entanglement and photon–photon correlation, are simultaneously examined by considering dipole–dipole interactions (DDI) for pairwise Rydberg atoms. They are shown to be closely linked with single and double Rydberg excitations, which can be modulated to work in the blockade or antiblockade regime depending on the driving field frequency, the DDI strength and the Rydberg decay rate. As a result, we obtain strongly correlated atoms and highly antibunching photons (indispensable resources in applications of quantum information processing) intermediated with robust atom–field entanglement. (paper)

  4. Relativistic quantum similarities in atoms in position and momentum spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, P.; Sarsa, A.; Buendia, E.; Galvez, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    A study of different quantum similarity measures and their corresponding quantum similarity indices is carried out for the atoms from H to Lr (Z=1-103). Relativistic effects in both position and momentum spaces have been studied by comparing the relativistic values to the non-relativistic ones. We have used the atomic electron density in both position and momentum spaces obtained within relativistic and non-relativistic numerical-parameterized optimized effective potential approximations. -- Highlights: → Quantum similarity measures and indices in electronic structure of atoms. → Position and momentum electronic densities. → Similarity of relativistic and non-relativistic densities. → Similarity of core and valence regions of different atoms. → Dependence with Z along the Periodic Table.

  5. Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; D'Incao, Jose; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space promise exciting technical capabilities for fundamental physics research, with proposals including unprecedented tests of the weak equivalence principle, precision measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark energy. Consequently, multiple AI-based missions have been proposed to NASA, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station. In this talk, I will discuss our plans and preparation at JPL for the proposed flight experiments to use the CAL facility to study the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision measurements of fundamental physics with AIs in microgravity. The project centers on the physics of pairwise interactions and molecular dynamics in these quantum systems as a means to overcome uncontrolled shifts associated with the gravity gradient and few-particle collisions. We will further utilize the CAL AI for proof-of-principle tests of systematic mitigation and phase-readout techniques for use in the next-generation of precision metrology experiments based on AIs in microgravity. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Graphene based quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H G; Hu, H; Pan, Y; Mao, J H; Gao, M; Guo, H M; Du, S X; Greber, T; Gao, H-J

    2010-08-04

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  7. Manipulating collective quantum states of ultracold atoms by probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, Andrew Christopher James

    2015-01-01

    The field of cold gases has grown dramatically over the past few decades. The exquisite experimental control of their environment and properties has lead to landmark achievements, and has motivated the pursuit of quantum technologies with ultracold atoms. At the same time, the theory of measureme......The field of cold gases has grown dramatically over the past few decades. The exquisite experimental control of their environment and properties has lead to landmark achievements, and has motivated the pursuit of quantum technologies with ultracold atoms. At the same time, the theory...... of measurements on quantum systems has grown into a well established field. Experimental demonstrations of nondestructive continuous measurements on individual quantum systems now occur in many laboratories. Such experiments with ultracold atoms have shown great progress, but the exploitation of the quantum...... nature of the measurement interaction and backaction is yet to be realised. This dissertation is concerned with ultracold atoms and their control via fully quantum mechanical probes. Nonclassical, squeezed and entangled states of matter and single photon sources are important for fundamental studies...

  8. Single-Atom Gating of Quantum State Superpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-04-28

    The ultimate miniaturization of electronic devices will likely require local and coherent control of single electronic wavefunctions. Wavefunctions exist within both physical real space and an abstract state space with a simple geometric interpretation: this state space - or Hilbert space - is spanned by mutually orthogonal state vectors corresponding to the quantized degrees of freedom of the real-space system. Measurement of superpositions is akin to accessing the direction of a vector in Hilbert space, determining an angle of rotation equivalent to quantum phase. Here we show that an individual atom inside a designed quantum corral1 can control this angle, producing arbitrary coherent superpositions of spatial quantum states. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and nanostructures assembled atom-by-atom we demonstrate how single spins and quantum mirages can be harnessed to image the superposition of two electronic states. We also present a straightforward method to determine the atom path enacting phase rotations between any desired state vectors. A single atom thus becomes a real-space handle for an abstract Hilbert space, providing a simple technique for coherent quantum state manipulation at the spatial limit of condensed matter.

  9. Atomic Quantum Simulations of Abelian and non-Abelian Gauge Theories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Using a Fermi-Bose mixture of ultra-cold atoms in an optical lattice, in a collaboration of atomic and particle physicists, we have constructed a quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge theory coupled to fermionic matter. The construction is based on quantum link models which realize continuous gauge symmetry with discrete quantum variables. At low energies, quantum link models with staggered fermions emerge from a Hubbard-type model which can be quantum simulated. This allows investigations of string breaking as well as the real-time evolution after a quench in gauge theories, which are inaccessible to classical simulation methods. Similarly, using ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices, we have constructed a quantum simulator for U(N) and SU(N) lattice gauge theories with fermionic matter based on quantum link models. These systems share qualitative features with QCD, including chiral symmetry breaking and restoration at non-zero temperature or baryon density. Unlike classical simulations, a quantum ...

  10. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2009-11-01

    Cold atom experiments have observed atom-molecule mixtures by tuning the interactions between particles.footnotetextM.L. Olsen, J. D. Perreault, T. D. Cumby, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 80, 030701(R) (2009) We study many particle interactions by examaning a simple model that describes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. A set of functional Renomalization Group equationsfootnotetextR. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys., Vol 66 No. 1, January 1994^,footnotetextS.W. Tsai, A.H. Castro Neto, R. Shankar, D.K. Campbell, Phys. Rev. B 72, 054531 (2005) describing these processes are set up and solved numerically. The Self Energy of the fermions are attained as a function of frequency and we search for frequency dependent instabilities that could denote a transition from a disordered liquid to a BCS phase. (Financial support from NSF DMR-084781 and UC-Lab Fees Research Program.)

  11. Few-particle quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murmann, Simon

    2015-11-25

    This thesis reports on the deterministic preparation of magnetically ordered states in systems of few fermionic atoms. We follow the concept of quantum simulation and use {sup 6}Li atoms in two different hyperfine states to mimic the behavior of electrons in a solidstate system. In a first experiment, we simulate the two-site Hubbard model by using two atoms in an isolated double-well potential. We prepare the two-particle ground state of this model with a fidelity exceeding 90%. By introducing strong repulsive interactions, we are able to realize a pure spin model and describe the energy spectrum with a two-site Heisenberg Hamiltonian. In a second experiment, we realize Heisenberg spin chains of up to four atoms in a single strongly-elongated trapping potential. Here, the atoms self-align along the potential axis due to strong repulsive interactions. We introduce two novel measurement techniques to identify the state of the spin chains and thereby confirm that we can deterministically prepare antiferromagnetic ground-state systems. This constitutes the first observation of quantum magnetism with fermionic atoms that exceeds nearest-neighbor correlations. Both the double-well system and the spin chains can be seen as building blocks of larger ground-state spin systems. Their deterministic preparation therefore opens up a new bottom-up approach to the experimental realization of quantum many-body systems with ultracold atoms.

  12. Planar quantum squeezing and atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Q. Y.; Drummond, P. D.; Reid, M. D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia); Peng Shiguo [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-08-15

    We obtain a lower bound on the sum of two orthogonal spin component variances in a plane. This gives a planar uncertainty relation which holds even when the Heisenberg relation is not useful. We investigate the asymptotic, large-J limit and derive the properties of the planar quantum squeezed states that saturate this uncertainty relation. These states extend the concept of spin squeezing to any two conjugate spin directions. We show that planar quantum squeezing can be achieved experimentally as the ground state of a Bose-Einstein condensate in two coupled potential wells with a critical attractive interaction. These states reduce interferometric phase noise at all phase angles simultaneously. This is useful for one-shot interferometric phase measurements where the measured phase is completely unknown. Our results can also be used to derive entanglement criteria for multiple spins J at separated sites, with applications in quantum information.

  13. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-01-01

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities (∼100 W/cm 2 ) and comparatively small detunings (∼1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of ∼1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  14. Fractional quantum Hall states of atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Anders S.; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method to create fractional quantum Hall states of atoms confined in optical lattices. We show that the dynamics of the atoms in the lattice is analogous to the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field if an oscillating quadrupole potential is applied together with a periodic modulation of the tunneling between lattice sites. In a suitable parameter regime the ground state in the lattice is of the fractional quantum Hall type, and we show how these states can be reached by melting a Mott-insulator state in a superlattice potential. Finally, we discuss techniques to observe these strongly correlated states

  15. Influence of the atomic structure on the quantum state of sputtered Ir atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastiaansen, J.; Philipsen, V.; Lievens, P.; Silverans, R.E.; Vandeweert, E.

    2004-01-01

    The probability of the ejection of a neutral atom in a specific quantum state after keV-ion beam sputtering is often interpreted in terms of the interaction between the atomic states of the escaping atom and the electronic states of the solid. In this work, we examined this interplay in the sputtering of iridium as this element has--unlike the elements employed in previous investigations--a complex atomic structure due to strong configuration interactions. Double-resonant two-photon laser ionization is used to probe the sputtered Ir atoms yielding information about the probability for an ejected atom to populate a specific atomic state and its escape velocity. The qualitative features of the corresponding population partition and state-selective velocity distributions show the influence of the excitation energy and the electronic structure of the different atomic states. A comparison is made between the experimental data and predictions from the resonant electron transfer description

  16. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B R; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single ^{87}Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics.

  17. Atomic physics tests of quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, P.J.

    1976-08-01

    The tests of quantum electrodynamics derived from bound systems and the free electron and muon magnetic moments are reviewed. The emphasis is on the areas in which recent developments in theory or experiment have taken place. Also determinations of the fine structure constant from the Josephson effect and the fine structure of helium are discussed

  18. Decoherence for a quantum memory in an ensemble of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedmatten, H. de; Chou, C.W.; Felinto, D.; Plyakov, S.; Kimble, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Atomic ensembles are a promising candidate for various applications in quantum information science. In particular, Duan, Lukin Cirac and Zoller (DLCZ) have proposed a protocol allowing scalable long distance quantum communication using atomic ensembles and linear optics. The DLCZ protocol is a probabilistic scheme based upon the entanglement of atomic ensembles via the detection of single photons. The detection of a single photon in the forward scattered direction is uniquely correlated with a collective atomic excitation in the sample, due to a collective enhancement effect. This collective excitation can be in principle stored for a time up to the coherence time of the system, and then released by conversion into a photon. This quantum memory is mandatory for the DLCZ scheme to be scalable. Hence, the coherence time is a critical parameter for this system. Our initial steps towards the realization of the DLCZ protocol have been by way of observations of non-classical correlations between the emitted single photons and the collective atomic excitations. However, in all the experiments reported so far using cold atomic ensembles, the coherence times were extremely short (of the order of 100 ns), thus preventing to take advantage of the quantum memory. In this contribution we explore the cause of this rather fast decoherence process and present an experimental scheme to overcome this problem. First results show an improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the coherence time. Future work includes the entanglement of two spatially separated cold atomic ensembles. (author)

  19. Nonequilibrium forces between neutral atoms mediated by a quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2010-01-01

    We study forces between two neutral atoms, modeled as three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, arising from mutual influences mediated by an electromagnetic field but not from their direct interactions. We allow as dynamical variables the center-of-mass motion of the atom, its internal degrees of freedom, and the quantum field treated relativistically. We adopt the method of nonequilibrium quantum field theory which can provide a first-principles, systematic, and unified description including the intrinsic and induced dipole fluctuations. The inclusion of self-consistent back-actions makes possible a fully dynamical description of these forces valid for general atom motion. In thermal equilibrium we recover the known forces--London, van der Waals, and Casimir-Polder--between neutral atoms in the long-time limit. We also reproduce a recently reported force between atoms when the system is out of thermal equilibrium at late times. More noteworthy is the discovery of the existence of a type of (or identification of the source of some known) interatomic force which we call the ''entanglement force,'' originating from the quantum correlations of the internal degrees of freedom of entangled atoms.

  20. Colloidal-quantum-dot photovoltaics using atomic-ligand passivation

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2011-09-18

    Colloidal-quantum-dot (CQD) optoelectronics offer a compelling combination of solution processing and spectral tunability through quantum size effects. So far, CQD solar cells have relied on the use of organic ligands to passivate the surface of the semiconductor nanoparticles. Although inorganic metal chalcogenide ligands have led to record electronic transport parameters in CQD films, no photovoltaic device has been reported based on such compounds. Here we establish an atomic ligand strategy that makes use of monovalent halide anions to enhance electronic transport and successfully passivate surface defects in PbS CQD films. Both time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and transient device characterization indicate that the scheme leads to a shallower trap state distribution than the best organic ligands. Solar cells fabricated following this strategy show up to 6% solar AM1.5G power-conversion efficiency. The CQD films are deposited at room temperature and under ambient atmosphere, rendering the process amenable to low-cost, roll-by-roll fabrication. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Section 5. The experimental design used a 1324-nm laser with beam splitters and wave-plates to measure the polarization drift as shown in Fig. 58. A...pump pulse on the beam splitter . ......................................................... 42 Fig. 32 Initial quantum density matrix tomography...photon pairs. BS is a 50-50 beam splitter and DM is a dichroic mirror that transmits idler photons and reflects signal photons. PM is polarization

  2. Quantum size effect and thermal stability of carbon-nanotube-based quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, N.Y.; Peng, J.; Liang, S.D.; Li, Z.B.; Xu, N.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Based on semi-experience quantum chemical calculation, we have investigated the quantum size effect and thermal stability of open-end carbon nanotube (5, 5) quantum dots of 20 to 400 atoms. It was found that there is a gap in the energy band of all carbon nanotube (5, 5) quantum dots although a (5, 5) carbon nanotube is metallic. The energy gap of quantum dots is much dependent of the number of atoms in a dot, as a result of the quantization rules imposed by the finite scales in both radial and axial directions of a carbon nanotube quantum dot. Also, the heat of formation of carbon nanotube quantum dots is dependent of the size of a quantum dot. (author)

  3. Signatures of a quantum diffusion limited hydrogen atom tunneling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanoff, Morgan E; Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2017-12-20

    We are studying the details of hydrogen atom (H atom) quantum diffusion in highly enriched parahydrogen (pH 2 ) quantum solids doped with chemical species in an effort to better understand H atom transport and reactivity under these conditions. In this work we present kinetic studies of the 193 nm photo-induced chemistry of methanol (CH 3 OH) isolated in solid pH 2 . Short-term irradiation of CH 3 OH at 1.8 K readily produces CH 2 O and CO which we detect using FTIR spectroscopy. The in situ photochemistry also produces CH 3 O and H atoms which we can infer from the post-photolysis reaction kinetics that display significant CH 2 OH growth. The CH 2 OH growth kinetics indicate at least three separate tunneling reactions contribute; (i) reactions of photoproduced CH 3 O with the pH 2 host, (ii) H atom reactions with the CH 2 O photofragment, and (iii) long-range migration of H atoms and reaction with CH 3 OH. We assign the rapid CH 2 OH growth to the following CH 3 O + H 2 → CH 3 OH + H → CH 2 OH + H 2 two-step sequential tunneling mechanism by conducting analogous kinetic measurements using deuterated methanol (CD 3 OD). By performing photolysis experiments at 1.8 and 4.3 K, we show the post-photolysis reaction kinetics change qualitatively over this small temperature range. We use this qualitative change in the reaction kinetics with temperature to identify reactions that are quantum diffusion limited. While these results are specific to the conditions that exist in pH 2 quantum solids, they have direct implications on the analogous low temperature H atom tunneling reactions that occur on metal surfaces and on interstellar grains.

  4. Photon-Mediated Quantum Gate between Two Neutral Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Stephan; Hacker, Bastian; Daiss, Severin; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2018-02-01

    Quantum logic gates are fundamental building blocks of quantum computers. Their integration into quantum networks requires strong qubit coupling to network channels, as can be realized with neutral atoms and optical photons in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we demonstrate that the long-range interaction mediated by a flying photon performs a gate between two stationary atoms inside an optical cavity from which the photon is reflected. This single step executes the gate in 2 μ s . We show an entangling operation between the two atoms by generating a Bell state with 76(2)% fidelity. The gate also operates as a cnot. We demonstrate 74.1(1.6)% overlap between the observed and the ideal gate output, limited by the state preparation fidelity of 80.2(0.8)%. As the atoms are efficiently connected to a photonic channel, our gate paves the way towards quantum networking with multiqubit nodes and the distribution of entanglement in repeater-based long-distance quantum networks.

  5. Photon-Mediated Quantum Gate between Two Neutral Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Welte

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantum logic gates are fundamental building blocks of quantum computers. Their integration into quantum networks requires strong qubit coupling to network channels, as can be realized with neutral atoms and optical photons in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we demonstrate that the long-range interaction mediated by a flying photon performs a gate between two stationary atoms inside an optical cavity from which the photon is reflected. This single step executes the gate in 2  μs. We show an entangling operation between the two atoms by generating a Bell state with 76(2% fidelity. The gate also operates as a cnot. We demonstrate 74.1(1.6% overlap between the observed and the ideal gate output, limited by the state preparation fidelity of 80.2(0.8%. As the atoms are efficiently connected to a photonic channel, our gate paves the way towards quantum networking with multiqubit nodes and the distribution of entanglement in repeater-based long-distance quantum networks.

  6. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bosonic systems and a ≃ 1.982 and b = 1 for ideal fermionic systems. These results obey the entropic uncertainty relation given by Beckner, Bialynicki-Birula and Myceilski. Keywords. Ultracold atomic gases; information entropy; foundations of quantum mechanics. PACS Nos 67.85.−d; 89.70.Cf; 03.65.Ta. 1. Introduction.

  7. Simulation and understanding of atomic and molecular quantum crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-07-01

    Quantum crystals abound in the whole range of solid-state species. Below a certain threshold temperature the physical behavior of rare gases (He 4 and Ne), molecular solids (H2 and CH4 ), and some ionic (LiH), covalent (graphite), and metallic (Li) crystals can be explained only in terms of quantum nuclear effects (QNE). A detailed comprehension of the nature of quantum solids is critical for achieving progress in a number of fundamental and applied scientific fields such as planetary sciences, hydrogen storage, nuclear energy, quantum computing, and nanoelectronics. This review describes the current physical understanding of quantum crystals formed by atoms and small molecules, as well as the wide palette of simulation techniques that are used to investigate them. Relevant aspects in these materials such as phase transformations, structural properties, elasticity, crystalline defects, and the effects of reduced dimensionality are discussed thoroughly. An introduction to quantum Monte Carlo techniques, which in the present context are the simulation methods of choice, and other quantum simulation approaches (e.g., path-integral molecular dynamics and quantum thermal baths) is provided. The overarching objective of this article is twofold: first, to clarify in which crystals and physical situations the disregard of QNE may incur in important bias and erroneous interpretations. And second, to promote the study and appreciation of QNE, a topic that traditionally has been treated in the context of condensed matter physics, within the broad and interdisciplinary areas of materials science.

  8. Fidelity for kicked atoms with gravity near a quantum resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    Kicked atoms under a constant Stark or gravity field are investigated for experimental setups with cold and ultracold atoms. The parametric stability of the quantum dynamics is studied using the fidelity. In the case of a quantum resonance, it is shown that the behavior of the fidelity depends on arithmetic properties of the gravity parameter. Close to a quantum resonance, the long-time asymptotics of the fidelity is studied by means of a pseudoclassical approximation introduced by Fishman et al. [J. Stat. Phys. 110, 911 (2003)]. The long-time decay of fidelity arises from the tunneling out of pseudoclassical stable islands, and a simple ansatz is proposed which satisfactorily reproduces the main features observed in numerical simulations.

  9. Nanostructure van der Waals interaction between a quantum well and a quantum dot atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horing, Norman J Morgenstern

    2006-01-01

    We examine the van der Waals interaction between mobile plasma electrons in a narrow quantum well nanostructure and a quantum dot atom. This formulation of the van der Waals interaction exhibits it to second order as the correlation energy (self-energy) of the dot-atom electrons mediated by the image potential arising from the dynamic, nonlocal and spatially inhomogeneous polarization of the quantum well plasma electrons. This image potential of the quantum-well plasma is, in turn, determined by the dynamic, nonlocal, inhomogeneous screening function of the quantum well, which involves the space-time matrix inversion of its spatially inhomogeneous, nonlocal and time-dependent dielectric function. The latter matrix inversion is carried out exactly, in closed form, and the van der Waals energy is evaluated in the electrostatic limit to dipole-dipole terms

  10. Hydrogen atom as a quantum-classical hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Fei; Wu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen atom is studied as a quantum-classical hybrid system, where the proton is treated as a classical object while the electron is regarded as a quantum object. We use a well known mean-field approach to describe this hybrid hydrogen atom; the resulting dynamics for the electron and the proton is compared to their full quantum dynamics. The electron dynamics in the hybrid description is found to be only marginally different from its full quantum counterpart. The situation is very different for the proton: in the hybrid description, the proton behaves like a free particle; in the fully quantum description, the wave packet center of the proton orbits around the center of mass. Furthermore, we find that the failure to describe the proton dynamics properly can be regarded as a manifestation of the fact that there is no conservation of momentum in the mean-field hybrid approach. We expect that such a failure is a common feature for all existing approaches for quantum-classical hybrid systems of Born-Oppenheimer type.

  11. Teleportation of two-atom entangled state in resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao

    2007-01-01

    An alternative scheme is presented for teleportation of a two-atom entangled state in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is based on the resonant atom-cavity field interaction. In the scheme, only one cavity is involved, and the number of the atoms needed to be detected is decreased compared with the previous scheme. Since the resonant atom-cavity field interaction greatly reduces the interaction time, the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed during the teleportation process. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed. The scheme can easily be generalized to the teleportation of N-atom Greeninger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states. The number of atoms needed to be detected does not increase as the number of the atoms in the GHZ state increases.

  12. Multipartite quantum correlations among atoms in QED cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batle, J.; Farouk, A.; Tarawneh, O.; Abdalla, S.

    2018-02-01

    We study the nonlocality dynamics for two models of atoms in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED); the first model contains atoms in a single cavity undergoing nearest-neighbor interactions with no initial correlation, and the second contains atoms confined in n different and noninteracting cavities, all of which were initially prepared in a maximally correlated state of n qubits corresponding to the atomic degrees of freedom. The nonlocality evolution of the states in the second model shows that the corresponding maximal violation of a multipartite Bell inequality exhibits revivals at precise times, defining, nonlocality sudden deaths and nonlocality sudden rebirths, in analogy with entanglement. These quantum correlations are provided analytically for the second model to make the study more thorough. Differences in the first model regarding whether the array of atoms inside the cavity is arranged in a periodic or open fashion are crucial to the generation or redistribution of quantum correlations. This contribution paves the way to using the nonlocality multipartite correlation measure for describing the collective complex behavior displayed by slightly interacting cavity QED arrays.

  13. Quantum Mechanical Study of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R. C.

    1961-01-01

    This paper, following a brief introduction, is divided into five parts. Part I outlines the theory of the molecular orbital method for the ground, ionized and excited states of molecules. Part II gives a brief summary of the interaction integrals and their tabulation. Part III outlines an automatic program designed for the computation of various states of molecules. Part IV gives examples of the study of ground, ionized and excited states of CO, BH and N2 where the program of automatic computation and molecular integrals have been utilized. Part V enlists some special problems of Molecular Quantum Mechanics are being tackled at New York University.

  14. Atomic physics. Introduction to quantum physics and structure of the atomic system. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnac, Bernard; Pebay-Peyroula, J.-C.

    1975-01-01

    This lecture is intended for providing experimental foundations to the basic principles of quantum mechanics, from descriptions of some characteristic experiments which emphasize the limitations of the classical theory. The basic laws that govern the internal structure of atomic systems are exposed (waves and photons, the planetary model and principal quantum number, and the spatial classification of kinetic momenta and magnetic moments). Experimental studies presently in progress are reviewed and their aims are outlined [fr

  15. Quantum interface between an atom and a photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilk, Tatjana

    2008-02-01

    A single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity is a versatile tool for quantum information processing. Utilized as a single-photon source, it allows one to generate single photons very efficiently in a well de ned spatio-temporal mode. In a first experiment, polarization-control over the photons is shown. A time-resolved two-photon interference experiment proves the indistinguishability of these photons - required in various quantum information processing schemes. Moreover, in a second experiment, entanglement between the polarization of the emitted photon and the population of the atomic Zeeman levels is created. Subsequent state mapping of the atomic state onto another photon results in a pair of polarization-entangled photons emitted one after the other from the cavity. Although these schemes are in principle possible in free space, the cavity boosts the efficiency by several orders of magnitude. (orig.)

  16. Quantum state preparation using multi-level-atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Th; Deasy, K; Chormaic, S Nic

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics for controlling processes on the quantum scale is the fidelity or robustness of the techniques being used. In the case of single atoms localized in micro-traps, it was recently shown that the use of time-dependent tunnelling interactions in a multi-trap setup can be viewed as analogous to the area of multi-level optics. The atom's centre-of-mass can then be controlled with a high fidelity, using a STIRAP-type process. Here, we review previous work that led to the development of multi-level atom optics and present two examples of our most recent work on quantum state preparation

  17. Method and apparatus for quantum information processing using entangled neutral-atom qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Yuan Yu; Biedermann, Grant; Deutsch, Ivan

    2018-04-03

    A method for preparing an entangled quantum state of an atomic ensemble is provided. The method includes loading each atom of the atomic ensemble into a respective optical trap; placing each atom of the atomic ensemble into a same first atomic quantum state by impingement of pump radiation; approaching the atoms of the atomic ensemble to within a dipole-dipole interaction length of each other; Rydberg-dressing the atomic ensemble; during the Rydberg-dressing operation, exciting the atomic ensemble with a Raman pulse tuned to stimulate a ground-state hyperfine transition from the first atomic quantum state to a second atomic quantum state; and separating the atoms of the atomic ensemble by more than a dipole-dipole interaction length.

  18. Scissors Mode of Dipolar Quantum Droplets of Dysprosium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Wenzel, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Langen, Tim; Isoard, Mathieu; Stringari, Sandro; Pfau, Tilman

    2018-04-01

    We report on the observation of the scissors mode of a single dipolar quantum droplet. The existence of this mode is due to the breaking of the rotational symmetry by the dipole-dipole interaction, which is fixed along an external homogeneous magnetic field. By modulating the orientation of this magnetic field, we introduce a new spectroscopic technique for studying dipolar quantum droplets. This provides a precise probe for interactions in the system, allowing us to extract a background scattering length for 164Dy of 69 (4 )a0 . Our results establish an analogy between quantum droplets and atomic nuclei, where the existence of the scissors mode is also only due to internal interactions. They further open the possibility to explore physics beyond the available theoretical models for strongly dipolar quantum gases.

  19. Quantum localization in the three-dimensional kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Emil; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdoerfer, Joachim; Tong, X.-M.; Reinhold, Carlos O.

    2003-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) unidirectionally kicked Rydberg atom. For parabolic initial states elongated in the direction of the kicks we show that the ionization of the quantum system is suppressed as compared to the classical counterpart and that the quantum wave function is localized along all degrees of freedom, whereas the classical system is globally diffusive. We discuss the connection to the previously studied one-dimensional (1D) model of the kicked Rydberg atom and verify that the 1D model is a good approximation to the 3D quantum case in the limiting case of the most elongated initial states. We further study the quantum phase-space distribution (Husimi distribution) of the eigenstates of the period-one time-evolution (Floquet) operator and show that the eigenstates are localized in phase space. For the most elongated parabolic initial state, we are able to identify the unstable periodic orbits around which Floquet states localize. We discuss the possibility of observing quantum localization in high Rydberg states in n>100

  20. Quantum dynamics of a two-atom-qubit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Hieu; Nguyen Bich Ha; Le Thi Ha Linh

    2009-01-01

    A physical model of the quantum information exchange between two qubits is studied theoretically. The qubits are two identical two-level atoms, the physical mechanism of the quantum information exchange is the mutual dependence of the reduced density matrices of two qubits generated by their couplings with a multimode radiation field. The Lehmberg-Agarwal master equation is exactly solved. The explicit form of the mutual dependence of two reduced density matrices is established. The application to study the entanglement of two qubits is discussed.

  1. Estimation of atomic interaction parameters by quantum measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Alexander Holm; Mølmer, Klaus

    Quantum systems, ranging from atomic systems to field modes and mechanical devices are useful precision probes for a variety of physical properties and phenomena. Measurements by which we extract information about the evolution of single quantum systems yield random results and cause a back actio...... strategies, we address the Fisher information and the Cramér-Rao sensitivity bound. We investigate monitoring by photon counting, homodyne detection and frequent projective measurements respectively, and exemplify by Rabi frequency estimation in a driven two-level system....

  2. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

    2014-03-21

    Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

  3. Single atom doping for quantum device development in diamond and silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weis, C.D.; Schuh, A.; Batra, A.; Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I.W.; Bokor, J.; Lo, C.C.; Cabrini, S.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Fuchs, G.D.; Hanson, R.; Awschalom, D.D.; Schenkel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to inject dopant atoms with high spatial resolution, flexibility in dopant species, and high single ion detection fidelity opens opportunities for the study of dopant fluctuation effects and the development of devices in which function is based on the manipulation of quantum states in

  4. Single-atom gating and magnetic interactions in quantum corrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Anh T.; Kim, Eugene H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2017-04-01

    Single-atom gating, achieved by manipulation of adatoms on a surface, has been shown in experiments to allow precise control over superposition of electronic states in quantum corrals. Using a Green's function approach, we demonstrate theoretically that such atom gating can also be used to control the coupling between magnetic degrees of freedom in these systems. Atomic gating enables control not only on the direct interaction between magnetic adatoms, but also over superpositions of many-body states which can then control long distance interactions. We illustrate this effect by considering the competition between direct exchange between magnetic impurities and the Kondo screening mediated by the host electrons, and how this is affected by gating. These results suggest that both magnetic and nonmagnetic single-atom gating may be used to investigate magnetic impurity systems with tailored interactions, and may allow the control of entanglement of different spin states.

  5. Quantum Optics 6 - Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons - Conference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The conference organized by Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics and Warsaw University, sponsored by European Science Foundation, was held in Krynica (120 km south-east of Cracow), Poland, June 13-18 2005. This was the sixth conference of the cycle, the previous one was held in Koscielisko, Poland in 2001. This time the main subject of the conference was: Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons. The meeting was focused on the physics of ultracold quantum gases, which without doubts determines the frontiers of the modern atomic, molecular and optical physics. Special attention was also be given to quantum information processing, both from theoretical and experimental point of view, including possible realizations in ultracold quantum gases. The conference consisted of invited lectures and a poster session. Competition for the best poster was held, sponsored by Journal of Optics B and Journal of Physics B - for more on this, including the results of the competition visit. (author)

  6. Resonance fluorescence and quantum jumps in single atoms: Testing the randomness of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erber, T.; Hammerling, P.; Hockney, G.; Porrati, M.; Putterman, S.; La Jolla Institute, La Jolla, California 92037; Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024)

    1989-01-01

    When a single trapped 198 Hg + ion is illuminated by two lasers, each tuned to an approximate transition, the resulting fluorescence switches on and off in a series of pulses resembling a bistable telegraph. This intermittent fluorescence can also be obtained by optical pumping with a single laser. Quantum jumps between successive atomic levels may be traced directly with multiple-resonance fluorescence. Atomic transition rates and photon antibunching distributions can be inferred from the pulse statistics and compared with quantum theory. Stochastic tests also indicate that the quantum telegraphs are good random number generators. During periods when the fluorescence is switched off, the radiationless atomic currents that generate the telegraph signals can be adjusted by varying the laser illumination: if this coherent evolution of the wave functions is sustained over sufficiently long time intervals, novel interactive precision measurements, near the limits of the time-energy uncertainty relations, are possible. Copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  7. Towards a fullerene-based quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, Simon C; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G Andrew D; Britz, David A; Gunlycke, Daniel; Jefferson, John; Jones, Mark A G; Leigh, David F; Lovett, Brendon W; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Lyon, S A; Morton, John J L; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Sambrook, Mark R; Tyryshkin, Alexei M

    2006-01-01

    Molecular structures appear to be natural candidates for a quantum technology: individual atoms can support quantum superpositions for long periods, and such atoms can in principle be embedded in a permanent molecular scaffolding to form an array. This would be true nanotechnology, with dimensions of order of a nanometre. However, the challenges of realizing such a vision are immense. One must identify a suitable elementary unit and demonstrate its merits for qubit storage and manipulation, including input/output. These units must then be formed into large arrays corresponding to an functional quantum architecture, including a mechanism for gate operations. Here we report our efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to create such a technology based on endohedral fullerenes or 'buckyballs'. We describe our successes with respect to these criteria, along with the obstacles we are currently facing and the questions that remain to be addressed

  8. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities.

  9. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  10. Quantum phases of electric dipole ensembles in atom chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2005-01-01

    We present how a phase factor is generated when an electric dipole moves along a closed trajectory inside a magnetic field gradient. The similarity of this situation with charged particles in a magnetic field can be employed to simulate condensed matter models, such as the quantum Hall effect and chiral spin Hamiltonians, with ultra cold atoms integrated on atom chips. To illustrate this we consider a triangular configuration of a two-dimensional optical lattice, where the chiral spin Hamiltonian σ-> i -bar σ-> j xσ-> k can be generated between any three neighbours on a lattice yielding an experimentally implementable chiral ground state

  11. Atom-loss-induced quantum optical bi-stability switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bao-Jun; Cui Fu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a system composed of a cigar-shaped Bose—Einstein condensate and an optical cavity with the two sides coupled dispersively. By adopting discrete-mode approximation for the condensate, taking atom loss as a necessary part of the model to analyze the evolution of the system, while using trial and error method to find out steady states of the system as a reference, numerical simulation demonstrates that with a constant pump, atom loss will trigger a quantum optical bi-stability switch, which predicts a new interesting phenomenon for experiments to verify

  12. From rotating atomic rings to quantum Hall states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaglia, M; Rizzi, M; Dalibard, J

    2011-01-01

    Considerable efforts are currently devoted to the preparation of ultracold neutral atoms in the strongly correlated quantum Hall regime. However, the necessary angular momentum is very large and in experiments with rotating traps this means spinning frequencies extremely near to the deconfinement limit; consequently, the required control on parameters turns out to be too stringent. Here we propose instead to follow a dynamic path starting from the gas initially confined in a rotating ring. The large moment of inertia of the ring-shaped fluid facilitates the access to large angular momenta, corresponding to giant vortex states. The trapping potential is then adiabatically transformed into a harmonic confinement, which brings the interacting atomic gas in the desired quantum-Hall regime. We provide numerical evidence that for a broad range of initial angular frequencies, the giant-vortex state is adiabatically connected to the bosonic ν = 1/2 Laughlin state.

  13. Subwavelength atom localization via quantum coherence in a three-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafoor, Fazal [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-12-15

    We propose a three-level atomic system where quantum coherence is generated by a classical standing-wave field coupled to the two upper excited decaying levels. Quantum coherence results in cancellation of the spontaneously emitted spectral lines depending on the choice of the phase of the standing wave. We exploit this phenomenon for precision measurement of the atomic position in the standing wave. Measurement of the conditional position probability distribution shows one to eight peaks per unit wavelength of the standing wave. Only one controllable parameter, that is, the phase of the driving standing wave, is enough to control these atomic positions. Along with the other results, the result of obtaining a single peak is remarkable as it enhances the efficiency of our system by a factor of 8.

  14. Subwavelength atom localization via quantum coherence in a three-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal

    2011-01-01

    We propose a three-level atomic system where quantum coherence is generated by a classical standing-wave field coupled to the two upper excited decaying levels. Quantum coherence results in cancellation of the spontaneously emitted spectral lines depending on the choice of the phase of the standing wave. We exploit this phenomenon for precision measurement of the atomic position in the standing wave. Measurement of the conditional position probability distribution shows one to eight peaks per unit wavelength of the standing wave. Only one controllable parameter, that is, the phase of the driving standing wave, is enough to control these atomic positions. Along with the other results, the result of obtaining a single peak is remarkable as it enhances the efficiency of our system by a factor of 8.

  15. Level rearrangement in exotic atoms and quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combescure, Monique; Khare, Avinash; Raina, Ashok; Richard Jean-Marc; Weydert, Carole

    2007-01-01

    A presentation and a generalisation are given of the phenomenon of level rearrangement, which occurs when an attractive long-range potential is supplemented by a short-range attractive potential of increasing strength. This problem has been discovered in condensate-matter physics and has also been studied in the physics of exotic atoms. A similar phenomenon occurs in a situation inspired by quantum dots, where a short-range interaction is added to an harmonic confinement. (authors)

  16. Atomic-cascade photons and quantum-mechanical nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years there have been several experiments on polarization correlation between photons emitted in atomic cascades. They are supposed to bear on the notion that the consequences of events do not propagate faster than light. This notion is difficult to reconcile with quantum-mechanical predictions for idealized versions of the experiments in question. The present Comment offers a brief introduction to the situation. (author)

  17. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches

    OpenAIRE

    Micklitz, T.; Müller, C. A.; Altland, A.

    2013-01-01

    Signatures of strong Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Anderson localization leads to a formation of a coherence peak in the \\emph{forward} scattering direction (as opposed to the common weak localization backscattering peak). We present a microscopic, and fully time...

  18. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (˜0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  19. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  20. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  1. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated

  2. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  3. Long-distance quantum communication with neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    The architecture proposed by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles is analyzed. Its fidelity and throughput in entanglement distribution, entanglement swapping, and quantum teleportation is derived within a framework that accounts for multiple excitations in the ensembles as well as loss and asymmetries in the channel. The DLCZ performance metrics that are obtained are compared to the corresponding results for the trapped-atom quantum communication architecture that has been proposed by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Northwestern University (MIT and NU). Both systems are found to be capable of high-fidelity entanglement distribution. However, the DLCZ scheme only provides conditional teleportation and repeater operation, whereas the MIT-NU architecture affords full Bell-state measurements on its trapped atoms. Moreover, it is shown that achieving unity conditional fidelity in DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation requires ideal photon-number resolving detectors. The maximum conditional fidelities for DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation that can be realized with nonresolving detectors are 1/2 and 2/3, respectively

  4. Quantum Ensemble Classification: A Sampling-Based Learning Control Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Dong, Daoyi; Qi, Bo; Petersen, Ian R; Rabitz, Herschel

    2017-06-01

    Quantum ensemble classification (QEC) has significant applications in discrimination of atoms (or molecules), separation of isotopes, and quantum information extraction. However, quantum mechanics forbids deterministic discrimination among nonorthogonal states. The classification of inhomogeneous quantum ensembles is very challenging, since there exist variations in the parameters characterizing the members within different classes. In this paper, we recast QEC as a supervised quantum learning problem. A systematic classification methodology is presented by using a sampling-based learning control (SLC) approach for quantum discrimination. The classification task is accomplished via simultaneously steering members belonging to different classes to their corresponding target states (e.g., mutually orthogonal states). First, a new discrimination method is proposed for two similar quantum systems. Then, an SLC method is presented for QEC. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for the binary classification of two-level quantum ensembles and the multiclass classification of multilevel quantum ensembles.

  5. Quantum chemistry literature data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Kimio; Morokuma, Keiji

    1982-01-01

    Ab initio computations of atomic and molecular electronic structure now appear in so many journals that it is very difficult for interested scientistics to locate proper and comprehensive references. This book is designed to help them and contains more than 2500 references to the literature published in the years 1978-1980. These have been gathered from nineteen well-known international core journals by quantum chemists themselves and the result is a thorough bibliography. Each entry is a full reference consisting of the following items: (1) authors, (2) journal name, volume, page and year, (3) compounds, (4) methods of calculation, (5) basis sets, (6) calculated properties, and (7) comments. For easy access to the references, the reader can consult the compound and author indexes. A short article on the reliability of ab initio calculations is included as an appendix; this gives a rough idea about the accuracy of the calculated results reported. As the book has been complied using the resources of a computer data base of quantum chemistry literature, it is particularly up to date and the authors will be able to provide supplements regularly. This bibliography will be an asset to large departments of chemistry and all university libraries. (orig.)

  6. Rainbow Emission from an Atomic Transition in Doped Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Abhijit; Pandey, Anshu; Sarma, D D

    2014-07-03

    Although semiconductor quantum dots are promising materials for displays and lighting due to their tunable emissions, these materials also suffer from the serious disadvantage of self-absorption of emitted light. The reabsorption of emitted light is a serious loss mechanism in practical situations because most phosphors exhibit subunity quantum yields. Manganese-based phosphors that also exhibit high stability and quantum efficiency do not suffer from this problem but in turn lack emission tunability, seriously affecting their practical utility. Here, we present a class of manganese-doped quantum dot materials, where strain is used to tune the wavelength of the dopant emission, extending the otherwise limited emission tunability over the yellow-orange range for manganese ions to almost the entire visible spectrum covering all colors from blue to red. These new materials thus combine the advantages of both quantum dots and conventional doped phosphors, thereby opening new possibilities for a wide range of applications in the future.

  7. Atomically precise cluster catalysis towards quantum controlled catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Catalysis of atomically precise clusters supported on a substrate is reviewed in relation to the type of reactions. The catalytic activity of supported clusters has generally been discussed in terms of electronic structure. Several lines of evidence have indicated that the electronic structure of clusters and the geometry of clusters on a support, including the accompanying cluster-support interaction, are strongly correlated with catalytic activity. The electronic states of small clusters would be easily affected by cluster–support interactions. Several studies have suggested that it is possible to tune the electronic structure through atomic control of the cluster size. It is promising to tune not only the number of cluster atoms, but also the hybridization between the electronic states of the adsorbed reactant molecules and clusters in order to realize a quantum-controlled catalyst. (review)

  8. A One-Dimensional Quantum Interface between a Few Atoms and Weak Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Béguin, Jean-Baptiste Sylvain

    Quantum interfaces between light and the collective degrees of freedom of an ensemble of identical atoms have been proposed as a valuable and promising alternative to cavity quantum electrodynamics enhanced interaction with single particles. Many features of the quantum world (e. g. multipartite...... entanglement, squeezed states), which are central to the future developments of Quantum Information Science and Metrology, can be explored with mesoscopic collective states of atoms. An efficient quantum interface needs a high optical depth for the atomic ensemble and a measurement sensitivity limited by both...... the intrinsic quantum noise of light and the quantum projection noise of atoms. This was achieved in the past in a free space optical dipole trap ensemble of Nat ∼ 10^6 atoms, which triggered the operation of a collective Ramsey atomic clock assisted by entanglement. We have characterized and prepared non...

  9. Long lived quantum memory with nuclear atomic spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatra, A.; Reinaudi, G.; Dantan, A.; Giacobino, E.; Pinard, M.

    2005-01-01

    We propose store non-classical states of light into the macroscopic collective nuclear spin (10 18 atoms) of a 3 He vapor, using metastability exchange collisions. We show that these collisions currently used to transfer orientation from the metastable state 2 3 S 1 to the ground state state of 3 He, may conserve quantum correlations and give a possible experimental scheme to perfectly map a squeezed vacuum field state onto a nuclear spin state, which should allow for extremely long storage times (hours). In addition to the apparent interest for quantum information, the scheme offers the intriguing possibility to create a long-lived non classical state for spins. During a metastability exchange collision an atom in the ground state state and an atom in the metastable triplet state 2 3 S exchange their electronic spin variables. The ground state atom is then brought into the metastable state and vice-versa. A laser transition is accessible from the metastable state so that the metastable atoms are coupled with light. This, together with metastability exchange collisions, provides an effective coupling between ground state atoms and light. In our scheme, a coherent field and a squeezed vacuum field excite a Raman transition between Zeeman sublevels of the metastable state, after the system is prepared in the fully polarized state by preliminary optical pumping. According to the intensity of the coherent field, which acts as a control parameter, the squeezing of the field can be selectively transferred either to metastable or to ground state atoms. Once it is encoded in the purely nuclear spin of the ground state of 3 He, which is 20 eV apart from the nearest excited state and interacts very little with the environment, the quantum state can survive for times as long as several hours. By lighting up only the coherent field in the same configuration as for the 'writing' phase, the nuclear spin memory can be 'read' after a long delay, the squeezing being transferred

  10. Isotope-based quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plekhanov, Vladimir G.

    2012-01-01

    The present book provides to the main ideas and techniques of the rapid progressing field of quantum information and quantum computation using isotope - mixed materials. It starts with an introduction to the isotope physics and then describes of the isotope - based quantum information and quantum computation. The ability to manipulate and control electron and/or nucleus spin in semiconductor devices provides a new route to expand the capabilities of inorganic semiconductor-based electronics and to design innovative devices with potential application in quantum computing. One of the major challenges towards these objectives is to develop semiconductor-based systems and architectures in which the spatial distribution of spins and their properties can be controlled. For instance, to eliminate electron spin decoherence resulting from hyperfine interaction due to nuclear spin background, isotopically controlled devices are needed (i.e., nuclear spin-depleted). In other emerging concepts, the control of the spatial distribution of isotopes with nuclear spins is a prerequisite to implement the quantum bits (or qbits). Therefore, stable semiconductor isotopes are important elements in the development of solid-state quantum information. There are not only different algorithms of quantum computation discussed but also the different models of quantum computers are presented. With numerous illustrations this small book is of great interest for undergraduate students taking courses in mesoscopic physics or nanoelectronics as well as quantum information, and academic and industrial researches working in this field.

  11. Quantum signature scheme based on a quantum search algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chun Seok; Kang, Min Sung; Lim, Jong In; Yang, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum signature scheme based on a two-qubit quantum search algorithm. For secure transmission of signatures, we use a quantum search algorithm that has not been used in previous quantum signature schemes. A two-step protocol secures the quantum channel, and a trusted center guarantees non-repudiation that is similar to other quantum signature schemes. We discuss the security of our protocol. (paper)

  12. Orthonormal Wavelet Bases for Quantum Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tymczak, C.; Wang, X.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the use of compactly supported, orthonormal wavelet bases for quantum molecular-dynamics (Car-Parrinello) algorithms. A wavelet selection scheme is developed and tested for prototypical problems, such as the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, and the local density approximation to atomic and molecular systems. Our method shows systematic convergence with increased grid size, along with improvement on compression rates, thereby yielding an optimal grid for self-consistent electronic structure calculations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Hybrid quantum logic and a test of Bell's inequality using two different atomic isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, C J; Schäfer, V M; Home, J P; Szwer, D J; Webster, S C; Allcock, D T C; Linke, N M; Harty, T P; Aude Craik, D P L; Stacey, D N; Steane, A M; Lucas, D M

    2015-12-17

    Entanglement is one of the most fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, and is the key resource for quantum information processing (QIP). Bipartite entangled states of identical particles have been generated and studied in several experiments, and post-selected or heralded entangled states involving pairs of photons, single photons and single atoms, or different nuclei in the solid state, have also been produced. Here we use a deterministic quantum logic gate to generate a 'hybrid' entangled state of two trapped-ion qubits held in different isotopes of calcium, perform full tomography of the state produced, and make a test of Bell's inequality with non-identical atoms. We use a laser-driven two-qubit gate, whose mechanism is insensitive to the qubits' energy splittings, to produce a maximally entangled state of one (40)Ca(+) qubit and one (43)Ca(+) qubit, held 3.5 micrometres apart in the same ion trap, with 99.8 ± 0.6 per cent fidelity. We test the CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) version of Bell's inequality for this novel entangled state and find that it is violated by 15 standard deviations; in this test, we close the detection loophole but not the locality loophole. Mixed-species quantum logic is a powerful technique for the construction of a quantum computer based on trapped ions, as it allows protection of memory qubits while other qubits undergo logic operations or are used as photonic interfaces to other processing units. The entangling gate mechanism used here can also be applied to qubits stored in different atomic elements; this would allow both memory and logic gate errors caused by photon scattering to be reduced below the levels required for fault-tolerant quantum error correction, which is an essential prerequisite for general-purpose quantum computing.

  14. Quantum simulation of conductivity plateaux and fractional quantum Hall effect using ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberán, Nuria; García-March, Miguel Angel; Taron, Josep; Dagnino, Daniel; Trombettoni, Andrea; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the role of impurities in the fractional quantum Hall effect using a highly controllable system of ultracold atoms. We investigate the mechanism responsible for the formation of plateaux in the resistivity/conductivity as a function of the applied magnetic field in the lowest Landau level regime. To this aim, we consider an impurity immersed in a small cloud of an ultracold quantum Bose gas subjected to an artificial magnetic field. We consider scenarios corresponding to experimentally realistic systems with gauge fields induced by rotation of the trapping parabolic potential. Systems of this kind are adequate to simulate quantum Hall effects in ultracold atom setups. We use exact diagonalization for few atoms and to emulate transport equations, we analyze the time evolution of the system under a periodic perturbation. We provide a theoretical proposal to detect the up-to-now elusive presence of strongly correlated states related to fractional filling factors in the context of ultracold atoms. We analyze the conditions under which these strongly correlated states are associated with the presence of the resistivity/conductivity plateaux. Our main result is the presence of a plateau in a region, where the transfer between localized and non-localized particles takes place, as a necessary condition to maintain a constant value of the resistivity/conductivity as the magnetic field increases. (paper)

  15. Quantum quench in an atomic one-dimensional Ising chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Kirilov, E; Lauber, K; Weinmann, P; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2013-08-02

    We study nonequilibrium dynamics for an ensemble of tilted one-dimensional atomic Bose-Hubbard chains after a sudden quench to the vicinity of the transition point of the Ising paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition. The quench results in coherent oscillations for the orientation of effective Ising spins, detected via oscillations in the number of doubly occupied lattice sites. We characterize the quench by varying the system parameters. We report significant modification of the tunneling rate induced by interactions and show clear evidence for collective effects in the oscillatory response.

  16. Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2018-0012 Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures PHILIP Kim HARVARD COLLEGE PRESIDENT...21-02-2018 2.  REPORT TYPE      Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)      15 Aug 2015 to 14 Feb 2017 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nano Electronics on...NOTES 14.  ABSTRACT We report molecular beam epitaxial growth and electronic transport properties of high quality topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films

  17. Quantum theory of scattering of atoms and diatomic molecules by solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.S.

    1973-01-01

    The unitary treatment, based on standard t-matrix theory, of the quantum theory of scattering of atoms by solid surfaces, is extended to the scattering of particles having internal degrees of freedom by perfect harmonic crystalline surfaces. The diagonal matrix element of the interaction potential which enters into the quantum scattering theory is obtained to represent the potential for the specular beam. From the two-potential formula, the scattering intensities for the diffracted beams and the inelastic beams with or without internal transitions of the particles are obtained by solving the equation for the t-matrix elements. (author)

  18. Scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state to any node in a quantum communication network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋克慧; 张为俊; 郭光灿

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for teleporting an unknown atomic state. In order to realize the teleportation to any node ina quantum communication network, an n-atom Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state is needed, which is utilizedas the quantum channel. From this n-atom GHZ state, two-node entanglement of processing and receiving teleportedstates can be obtained through the quantum logic gate manipulation. Finally, for the unequally weighted GHZ state,probabilistic teleportation is shown.

  19. From the atomic nucleus to the cosmos. How the strange laws of the quantum world form our reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The reality of nature, Hamlet in quantum world, the ene of the local realism, quantum jumps, a new quantum theory, string theory for solids, atomic nuclei between liquid and crystal, simulated quantum worlds, space-time entanglement, Einstein in the quantum test, quantum cryptography, quantum computers as code breaker. (HSI)

  20. Isotope-based quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The present book provides to the main ideas and techniques of the rapid progressing field of quantum information and quantum computation using isotope - mixed materials. It starts with an introduction to the isotope physics and then describes of the isotope - based quantum information and quantum computation. The ability to manipulate and control electron and/or nucleus spin in semiconductor devices provides a new route to expand the capabilities of inorganic semiconductor-based electronics and to design innovative devices with potential application in quantum computing. One of the major challenges towards these objectives is to develop semiconductor-based systems and architectures in which the spatial distribution of spins and their properties can be controlled. For instance, to eliminate electron spin decoherence resulting from hyperfine interaction due to nuclear spin background, isotopically controlled devices are needed (i.e., nuclear spin-depleted). In other emerging concepts, the control of the spatial...

  1. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  2. Quantum interference and coherent control in dissipative atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paspalakis, E.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis we study the effects of quantum interference arising from dissipative processes in atomic systems. First, we identify quantum interference phenomena arising from decay mechanisms. Second, we use dynamical methods (the properties of laser fields) to obtain a tailored response of systems in which such interferences are present. We are mainly concerned with two dissipative processes: spontaneous emission and ionization. First, we study the effects of quantum interference arising from spontaneous emission on the population dynamics and the spontaneous emission spectrum of several multi-level systems. Coherent 'phase' control methods for manipulating the response of systems involving spontaneous emission interference are also proposed. Several interesting phenomena are identified such as partial and total quenching of spontaneous emission, phase dependent population dynamics and coherent population trapping. Next, we consider the process of laser-induced continuum structure, where an atom is coupled by two laser fields to the same electronic continuum. An {it ab initio}, non-perturbative study of this process in helium using the R-Matrix Floquet theory is presented. The results of our numerical calculations are compared with those obtained by simple perturbative models and with recent experimental results. The possibility of coherent population transfer via a continuum of states is then analyzed. We study two distinct atomic systems. A laser-induced continuum structure scheme (unstructured continuum) and a bichromatically driven autoionizing scheme (structured continuum). We find that the same conditions which lead to 'dark' states in these systems lead to efficient population transfer. We also identify parameters detrimental to the transfer efficiency and propose methods to overcome them. Finally, we study short pulse propagation in systems involving interfering dissipation mechanisms. We show that the existence of dark states can lead to loss-free and

  3. Spin-based quantum computation in multielectron quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xuedong; Sarma, S. Das

    2001-01-01

    In a quantum computer the hardware and software are intrinsically connected because the quantum Hamiltonian (or more precisely its time development) is the code that runs the computer. We demonstrate this subtle and crucial relationship by considering the example of electron-spin-based solid state quantum computer in semiconductor quantum dots. We show that multielectron quantum dots with one valence electron in the outermost shell do not behave simply as an effective single spin system unles...

  4. Measurement-Based Entanglement of Noninteracting Bosonic Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Brian J; Lin, Yiheng; Brown, Mark O; Kaufman, Adam M; Ball, Randall J; Knill, Emanuel; Rey, Ana M; Regal, Cindy A

    2018-05-11

    We demonstrate the ability to extract a spin-entangled state of two neutral atoms via postselection based on a measurement of their spatial configuration. Typically, entangled states of neutral atoms are engineered via atom-atom interactions. In contrast, in our Letter, we use Hong-Ou-Mandel interference to postselect a spin-singlet state after overlapping two atoms in distinct spin states on an effective beam splitter. We verify the presence of entanglement and determine a bound on the postselected fidelity of a spin-singlet state of (0.62±0.03). The experiment has direct analogy to creating polarization entanglement with single photons and hence demonstrates the potential to use protocols developed for photons to create complex quantum states with noninteracting atoms.

  5. Combined atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence imaging to select single InAs/GaAs quantum dots for quantum photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Luca; Liu, Jin; Song, Jin Dong; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-07-24

    We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The motivation of this work is to determine an approach that allows to assess single quantum dots as candidates for quantum nanophotonic devices. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we find that single quantum dots often appear in the vicinity of comparatively large topographic features. Despite this, the quantum dots generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions, and this behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Such large surface features are nevertheless a detriment to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices: they are likely to cause large spectral shifts in the wavelength of cavity modes designed to resonantly enhance the quantum dot emission, thereby resulting in a nominally perfectly-fabricated single quantum dot device failing to behave in accordance with design. We anticipate that the approach of screening quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies, will be necessary to improve the yield of single quantum dot nanophotonic devices.

  6. Interplay between Switching Driven by the Tunneling Current and Atomic Force of a Bistable Four-Atom Si Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shiro; Maeda, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Zobač, Vladimír; Pou, Pablo; Rodrigo, Lucia; Mutombo, Pingo; Pérez, Ruben; Jelínek, Pavel; Morita, Seizo

    2015-07-08

    We assemble bistable silicon quantum dots consisting of four buckled atoms (Si4-QD) using atom manipulation. We demonstrate two competing atom switching mechanisms, downward switching induced by tunneling current of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and opposite upward switching induced by atomic force of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Simultaneous application of competing current and force allows us to tune switching direction continuously. Assembly of the few-atom Si-QDs and controlling their states using versatile combined AFM/STM will contribute to further miniaturization of nanodevices.

  7. A Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Kellogg, James R.; Aveline, David C.; Maleki, Lute; Kohel, James M.

    2010-01-01

    A transportable atom interferometer-based gravity gradiometer has been developed at JPL to carry out measurements of Earth's gravity field at ever finer spatial resolutions, and to facilitate high-resolution monitoring of temporal variations in the gravity field from ground- and flight-based platforms. Existing satellite-based gravity missions such as CHAMP and GRACE measure the gravity field via precise monitoring of the motion of the satellites; i.e. the satellites themselves function as test masses. JPL's quantum gravity gradiometer employs a quantum phase measurement technique, similar to that employed in atomic clocks, made possible by recent advances in laser cooling and manipulation of atoms. This measurement technique is based on atomwave interferometry, and individual laser-cooled atoms are used as drag-free test masses. The quantum gravity gradiometer employs two identical atom interferometers as precision accelerometers to measure the difference in gravitational acceleration between two points (Figure 1). By using the same lasers for the manipulation of atoms in both interferometers, the accelerometers have a common reference frame and non-inertial accelerations are effectively rejected as common mode noise in the differential measurement of the gravity gradient. As a result, the dual atom interferometer-based gravity gradiometer allows gravity measurements on a moving platform, while achieving the same long-term stability of the best atomic clocks. In the laboratory-based prototype (Figure 2), the cesium atoms used in each atom interferometer are initially collected and cooled in two separate magneto-optic traps (MOTs). Each MOT, consisting of three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating laser beams centered on a quadrupole magnetic field, collects up to 10(exp 9) atoms. These atoms are then launched vertically as in an atom fountain by switching off the magnetic field and introducing a slight frequency shift between pairs of lasers to create a moving

  8. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  9. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-01-01

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  10. Trapped atomic ions for quantum-limited metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineland, David

    2017-04-01

    Laser-beam-manipulated trapped ions are a candidate for large-scale quantum information processing and quantum simulation but the basic techniques used can also be applied to quantum-limited metrology and sensing. Some examples being explored at NIST are: 1) As charged harmonic oscillators, trapped ions can be used to sense electric fields; this can be used to characterize the electrode-surface-based noisy electric fields that compromise logic-gate fidelities and may eventually be used as a tool in surface science. 2) Since typical qubit logic gates depend on state-dependent forces, we can adapt the gate dynamics to sensitively detect additional forces. 3) We can use extensions of Bell inequality measurements to further restrict the degree of local realism possessed by Bell states. 4) We also briefly describe experiments for creation of Bell states using Hilbert space engineering. This work is a joint effort including the Ion-Storage group, the Quantum processing group, and the Computing and Communications Theory group at NIST, Boulder. Supported by IARPA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  11. Microwave potentials and optimal control for robust quantum gates on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutlein, Philipp; Haensch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob; Negretti, Antonio; Cirone, Markus A.; Calarco, Tommaso

    2006-01-01

    We propose a two-qubit collisional phase gate that can be implemented with available atom chip technology and present a detailed theoretical analysis of its performance. The gate is based on earlier phase gate schemes, but uses a qubit state pair with an experimentally demonstrated, very long coherence lifetime. Microwave near fields play a key role in our implementation as a means to realize the state-dependent potentials required for conditional dynamics. Quantum control algorithms are used to optimize gate performance. We employ circuit configurations that can be built with current fabrication processes and extensively discuss the impact of technical noise and imperfections that characterize an actual atom chip. We find an overall infidelity compatible with requirements for fault-tolerant quantum computation

  12. Molecular engineering with artificial atoms: designing a material platform for scalable quantum spintronics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Matthew F.; Ma, Xiangyu; Zide, Joshua M. O.; Bryant, Garnett W.

    2017-09-01

    Self-assembled InAs Quantum Dots (QDs) are often called "artificial atoms" and have long been of interest as components of quantum photonic and spintronic devices. Although there has been substantial progress in demonstrating optical control of both single spins confined to a single QD and entanglement between two separated QDs, the path toward scalable quantum photonic devices based on spins remains challenging. Quantum Dot Molecules, which consist of two closely-spaced InAs QDs, have unique properties that can be engineered with the solid state analog of molecular engineering in which the composition, size, and location of both the QDs and the intervening barrier are controlled during growth. Moreover, applied electric, magnetic, and optical fields can be used to modulate, in situ, both the spin and optical properties of the molecular states. We describe how the unique photonic properties of engineered Quantum Dot Molecules can be leveraged to overcome long-standing challenges to the creation of scalable quantum devices that manipulate single spins via photonics.

  13. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-27

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  14. Simple and efficient absorption filter for single photons from a cold atom quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Daniel T; Lee, Patricia J; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-03-09

    The ability to filter unwanted light signals is critical to the operation of quantum memories based on neutral atom ensembles. Here we demonstrate an efficient frequency filter which uses a vapor cell filled with (85)Rb and a buffer gas to attenuate both residual laser light and noise photons by nearly two orders of magnitude with little loss to the single photons associated with our cold (87)Rb quantum memory. This simple, passive filter provides an additional 18 dB attenuation of our pump laser and erroneous spontaneous emissions for every 1 dB loss of the single photon signal. We show that the addition of a frequency filter increases the non-classical correlations and the retrieval efficiency of our quantum memory by ≈ 35%.

  15. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spins: From angular momentum conservation to quantum phase theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Yuan, H.; Tang, Z.; Quan, W.; Fang, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Rotation measurement in an inertial frame is an important technology for modern advanced navigation systems and fundamental physics research. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spin has demonstrated potential in both high-precision applications and small-volume low-cost devices. After rapid development in the last few decades, atomic spin gyroscopes are considered a promising competitor to current conventional gyroscopes—from rate-grade to strategic-grade applications. Although it has been more than a century since the discovery of the relationship between atomic spin and mechanical rotation by Einstein [Naturwissenschaften, 3(19) (1915)], research on the coupling between spin and rotation is still a focus point. The semi-classical Larmor precession model is usually adopted to describe atomic spin gyroscope measurement principles. More recently, the geometric phase theory has provided a different view of the rotation measurement mechanism via atomic spin. The theory has been used to describe a gyroscope based on the nuclear spin ensembles in diamond. A comprehensive understanding of inertial rotation measurement principles based on atomic spin would be helpful for future applications. This work reviews different atomic spin gyroscopes and their rotation measurement principles with a historical overlook. In addition, the spin-rotation coupling mechanism in the context of the quantum phase theory is presented. The geometric phase is assumed to be the origin of the measurable rotation signal from atomic spins. In conclusion, with a complete understanding of inertial rotation measurements using atomic spin and advances in techniques, wide application of high-performance atomic spin gyroscopes is expected in the near future.

  16. Atomic spin-chain realization of a model for quantum criticality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toskovic, R.; van den Berg, R.; Spinelli, A.; Eliens, I.S.; van den Toorn, B.; Bryant, B.; Caux, J.-S.; Otte, A.F.

    The ability to manipulate single atoms has opened up the door to constructing interesting and useful quantum structures from the ground up. On the one hand, nanoscale arrangements of magnetic atoms are at the heart of future quantum computing and spintronic devices; on the other hand, they can be

  17. Scholar-activating teaching materials on quantum physics. Pt. 3. Foundations of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebel, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally in the center of the interest on quantum physics referring to schools the question lies, whether electrons or photons are now particles or waves, a question, which is often characterized by the phrase ''wave-particle dualism'', which notoriously not exists in its original meaning. Against that by the author - on the base of important preparatory works of Kueblbeck and Mueller - a new concept of quantum physics for the school was proposed, which puts ''basic facts'' in the foreground, comparable with the Kueblbeck-Mueller ''characteristic features''. The ''basic facts'' are similar to axioms of quantum physics, by means of them a large number of experiments and phenomena can be ''explained'' at least qualitatively - in a heuristic way -. Instead of the so-called ''wave-particle dualism'' uncertainty and complementarity are put in the foreground. The new concept is in the Internet under http://www.forphys.de extensively presented with many further materials. In the partial volumes of this publication manifold and carefully elaborated teaching materials are presented, by which scholars can get themselves the partial set of quantum physics referring to schools by different methods like learning at stations, short referates, Internet-research, group puzzle, the query-sheet or the card-index method etc. In the present 3. part materials are prepared, by which scholars can get foundations of atomic physics and interpret in the sense of the ''basic facts or quantum physics''. Here deals it thus with discrete energy levels, the linear potential box, with atomic models, the atomic structure, the tunnel effect, and - because curricula it often require - also with the Schroedinger equation. The materials can also be usefully applied in other concepts.

  18. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  19. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (∼0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement

  20. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  1. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  2. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  3. Artificial atom and quantum terahertz response in carbon nanotube quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, K; Moriyama, S; Fuse, T; Kawano, Y; Toyokawa, S; Yamaguchi, T

    2008-01-01

    Artificial atom behaviours have been observed in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) quantum dots (QDs). Two-electron shell structures and the Zeeman splitting of single-particle states were revealed in single-electron transport measurements in low temperatures. To demonstrate that the charging energy of the dot lies in a terahertz (THz) range, the THz photon-assisted tunnelling was tested, and was really observed as a satellite Coulomb peak. Some satellite peaks moved as a frequency was changed, but other peaks did not move. We give possible models to explain the existence of two different satellite peaks.

  4. Quantum atom-heteronuclear molecule dark state: Role of population imbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Hui; Cui Shuai

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the finite-number effect of initial atoms in coherent atom-molecule conversion was investigated by Zhao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 010401 (2008)]. Here, by extending to the atom-heteronuclear molecule dark state, we find that the initial populations imbalance of the atoms plays a significant role in quantum conversion rate and adiabatic fidelity. In particular, even for the finite total number of imbalanced two-species atoms, the mean-field conversion rate, contrary to the general belief, still can be remarkably close to the exact quantum results.

  5. Atoms, cavities and ''Schroedinger's cats''. The monsters and wonders of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimond, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The decoherence effect appears at the border between quantum world and macroscopic reality when the superposition of quantum states collapses into one particular state. This article deals with an experiment made to study for the first time the decoherence phenomenon. Circular Rydberg atoms of rubidium and superconducting cavity are the tools used to seize the very moment when the quantum superposition vanishes. This experimental proof of decoherence allows to perceive the limitations of the applications of quantum physics to fields such as quantum computing. This kind of experiment could be used to test other properties of quantum systems. (A.C.)

  6. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  7. Coherence and fluctuations in the interaction between moving atoms and a quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, B.L.; Raval, A.

    1998-01-01

    Mesoscopic physics deals with three fundamental issues: quantum coherence, fluctuations and correlations. Here we analyze these issues for atom optics, using a simplified model of an assembly of atoms (or detectors, which are particles with some internal degree of freedom) moving in arbitrary trajectories in a quantum field. Employing the influence functional formalism, we study the self-consistent effect of the field on the atoms, and their mutual interactions via coupling to the field. We derive the coupled Langevin equations for the atom assemblage and analyze the relation of dissipative dynamics of the atoms (detectors) with the correlation and fluctuations of the quantum field. This provides a useful theoretical framework for analysing the coherent properties of atom-field systems. (author)

  8. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa. PMID:27922087

  9. Establishing and storing of deterministic quantum entanglement among three distant atomic ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhihui; Wu, Liang; Jia, Xiaojun; Liu, Yanhong; Deng, Ruijie; Li, Shujing; Wang, Hai; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2017-09-28

    It is crucial for the physical realization of quantum information networks to first establish entanglement among multiple space-separated quantum memories and then, at a user-controlled moment, to transfer the stored entanglement to quantum channels for distribution and conveyance of information. Here we present an experimental demonstration on generation, storage, and transfer of deterministic quantum entanglement among three spatially separated atomic ensembles. The off-line prepared multipartite entanglement of optical modes is mapped into three distant atomic ensembles to establish entanglement of atomic spin waves via electromagnetically induced transparency light-matter interaction. Then the stored atomic entanglement is transferred into a tripartite quadrature entangled state of light, which is space-separated and can be dynamically allocated to three quantum channels for conveying quantum information. The existence of entanglement among three released optical modes verifies that the system has the capacity to preserve multipartite entanglement. The presented protocol can be directly extended to larger quantum networks with more nodes.Continuous-variable encoding is a promising approach for quantum information and communication networks. Here, the authors show how to map entanglement from three spatial optical modes to three separated atomic samples via electromagnetically induced transparency, releasing it later on demand.

  10. Protecting quantum coherence of two-level atoms from vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaobao; Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the dynamics of a static polarizable two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field and explore under which conditions the coherence of the open quantum system is unaffected by the environment. For both a single-qubit and two-qubit systems, we find that the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise when the atom interacts with a non-boundary electromagnetic field. However, with the presence of a boundary, the dynamical conditions for the insusceptible of quantum coherence are fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction. -- Highlights: •We study the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field. •For both a single and two-qubit systems, the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise without a boundary. •The insusceptible of the quantum coherence can be fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. •Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction.

  11. Quantum theory of an atom in proximity to a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dall, Matthias; Diniz, Igor; Dias da Silva, Luis G. G. V.; de Sousa, Rogério

    2018-02-01

    The impact of superconducting correlations on localized electronic states is important for a wide range of experiments in fundamental and applied superconductivity. This includes scanning tunneling microscopy of atomic impurities at the surface of superconductors, as well as superconducting-ion-chip spectroscopy of neutral ions and Rydberg states. Moreover, atomlike centers close to the surface are currently believed to be the main source of noise and decoherence in qubits based on superconducting devices. The proximity effect is known to dress atomic orbitals in Cooper-pair-like states known as Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states, but the impact of superconductivity on the measured orbital splittings and optical-noise transitions is not known. Here we study the interplay between orbital degeneracy and particle-number admixture in atomic states, beyond the usual classical spin approximation. We model the atom as a generalized Anderson model interacting with a conventional s -wave superconductor. In the limit of zero on-site Coulomb repulsion (U =0 ), we obtain YSR subgap energy levels that are identical to the ones obtained from the classical spin model. When Δ is large and U >0 , the YSR spectra are no longer quasiparticle-like, and the highly degenerate orbital subspaces are split according to their spin, orbital, and number-parity symmetry. We show that U >0 activates additional poles in the atomic Green's function, suggesting an alternative explanation for the peak splittings recently observed in scanning tunneling microscopy of orbitally-degenerate impurities in superconductors. We describe optical excitation and absorption of photons by YSR states, showing that many additional optical channels open up in comparison to the nonsuperconducting case. Conversely, the additional dissipation channels imply increased electromagnetic noise due to impurities in superconducting devices.

  12. Ammonia-based quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Andrew J.; Cain, Paul A.; Williams, David A.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum computation using two eigenstates of ammonia or similar molecules. Individual ammonia molecules are confined inside fullerenes and used as two-level qubit systems. Interaction between these ammonia qubits takes place via the electric dipole moments, and in particular we show how a controlled-NOT gate could be implemented. After computation the qubit is measured with a single-electron electrometer sensitive enough to differentiate between the dipole moments of different states. We also discuss a possible implementation based on a quantum cellular automaton

  13. Computational study of An-X bonding (An = Th, U; X = p-block-based ligands) in pyrrolic macrocycle-supported complexes from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and bond energy decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kieran T P; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2017-01-17

    A systematic computational study of organoactinide complexes of the form [LAnX] n+ has been carried out using density functional theory, the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and Ziegler-Rauk energy decomposition analysis (EDA) methods. The systems studied feature L = trans-calix[2]benzene[2]pyrrolide, An = Th(iv), Th(iii), U(iii) and X = BH 4 , BO 2 C 2 H 4 , Me, N(SiH 3 ) 2 , OPh, CH 3 , NH 2 , OH, F, SiH 3 , PH 2 , SH, Cl, CH 2 Ph, NHPh, OPh, SiH 2 Ph, PHPh 2 , SPh, CPh 3 , NPh 2 , OPh, SiPh 3 PPh 2 , SPh. The PBE0 hybrid functional proved most suitable for geometry optimisations based on comparisons with available experimental data. An-X bond critical point electron densities, energy densities and An-X delocalisation indices, calculated with the PBE functional at the PBE0 geometries, are correlated with An-X bond energies, enthalpies and with the terms in the EDA. Good correlations are found between energies and QTAIM metrics, particularly for the orbital interaction term, provided the X ligand is part of an isoelectronic series and the number of open shell electrons is low (i.e. for the present Th(iv) and Th(iii) systems).

  14. Quantum averaging and resonances: two-level atom in a one-mode classical laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available   We use a nonperturbative method based on quantum averaging and an adapted from of resonant transformations to treat the resonances of the Hamiltonian of a two-level atom interacting with a one-mode classical field in Floquet formalism. We illustrate this method by extraction of effective Hamiltonians of the system in two regimes of weak and strong coupling. The results obtained in the strong-coupling regime, are valid in the whole range of the coupling constant for the one-photon zero-field resonance.

  15. Fast and robust approach to long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Taylor, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum repeaters create long-distance entanglement between quantum systems while overcoming difficulties such as the attenuation of single photons in a fiber. Recently, an implementation of a repeater protocol based on single qubits in atomic ensembles and linear optics has been proposed [Duan et al., Nature (London) 414, 413 (2001)]. Motivated by rapid experimental progress towards implementing that protocol, here we develop a more efficient scheme compatible with active purification of arbitrary errors. Using similar resources as the earlier protocol, our approach intrinsically purifies leakage out of the logical subspace and all errors within the logical subspace, leading to greatly improved performance in the presence of experimental inefficiencies. Our analysis indicates that our scheme could generate approximately one pair per 3 min over 1280 km distance with fidelity (F≥78%) sufficient to violate Bell's inequality

  16. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ajoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  17. Multi-quantum excitation in optically pumped alkali atom: rare gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Rawlins, W. T.; Davis, S. J.

    2014-03-01

    Diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) technology offers a means of achieving high-energy gas laser output through optical pumping of the D-lines of Cs, Rb, and K. The exciplex effect, based on weak attractive forces between alkali atoms and polarizable rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), provides an alternative approach via broadband excitation of exciplex precursors (XPAL). In XPAL configurations, we have observed multi-quantum excitation within the alkali manifolds which result in infrared emission lines between 1 and 4 μm. The observed excited states include the 42FJ states of both Cs and Rb, which are well above the two-photon energy of the excitation laser in each case. We have observed fluorescence from multi-quantum states for excitation wavelengths throughout the exciplex absorption bands of Cs-Ar, Cs-Kr, and Cs-Xe. The intensity scaling is roughly first-order or less in both pump power and alkali concentration, suggesting a collisional energy pooling excitation mechanism. Collisional up-pumping appears to present a parasitic loss term for optically pumped atomic systems at high intensities, however there may also be excitation of other lasing transitions at infrared wavelengths.

  18. Quantum teleportation of an arbitrary superposition of atomic states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qiong; Fang Xi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme to teleport an arbitrary multi-particle two-level atomic state between two parties or an arbitrary zero- and one-photon entangled state of multi-mode between two high-Q cavities in cavity QED.This scheme is based on the resonant interaction between atom and cavity and does not involve Bell-state measurement.It investigates the fidelity of this scheme and find out the case of this unity fidelity of this teleportation.Considering the practical case of the cavity decay,this paper finds that the condition of the unity fidelity is also valid and obtains the effect of the decay of the cavity on the successful probability of the teleportation.

  19. Quantum physics an introduction based on photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lvovsky, A I

    2018-01-01

    This textbook is intended to accompany a two-semester course on quantum mechanics for physics students. Along with the traditional material covered in such a course (states, operators, Schrödinger equation, hydrogen atom), it offers in-depth discussion of the Hilbert space, the nature of measurement, entanglement, and decoherence – concepts that are crucial for the understanding of quantum physics and its relation to the macroscopic world, but rarely covered in entry-level textbooks. The book uses a mathematically simple physical system – photon polarization – as the visualization tool, permitting the student to see the entangled beauty of the quantum world from the very first pages. The formal concepts of quantum physics are illustrated by examples from the forefront of modern quantum research, such as quantum communication, teleportation and nonlocality. The author adopts a Socratic pedagogy: The student is guided to develop the machinery of quantum physics independently by solving sets of carefully ...

  20. Non-perturbative treatment of relativistic quantum corrections in large Z atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, K.; Weymans, G.

    1983-09-01

    Renormalised g-Hartree-Dirac equations incorporating Dirac sea contributions are derived. Their implications for the non-perturbative, selfconsistent calculation of quantum corrections in large Z atoms are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Differences between application of some basic principles of quantum mechanics on atomic and mesoscopic levels

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulov, Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Formalism of the quantum mechanics developed for microscopic (atomic) level comes into collision with some logical difficulties on mesoscopic level. Some fundamental differences between application of its basic principles on microscopic and mesoscopic levels are accentuated.

  2. Probing the quantum analog of chaos with atoms in external fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, J C; Delande, D

    1987-01-01

    For a few years, considerable interest arose in the problem of the quantum analog of classical chaos for hamiltonian system. Among several other simple atomic physics systems, the atom in a magnetic field turns out to be the most promising prototype for tackling such questions. The classical and quantum motions are now well understood. The experimental study is possible in high Rydberg states of atoms. Throughout the study of some aspects of this problem, the authors demonstrate that the quantum analog of chaos presents a two-fold aspect. While the spectral properties at short range are conveniently described by Random matrix theories, a long-range order still exist in the quantum dynamics which indicates the existence of scars of symmetries. This in turn is quite clearly exhibited in the experimental data on Rydberg atoms. Finally the authors indicate how to generalize the notions to any situation involving the Coulomb field and perturbing potentials. 21 refs.; 8 figs.

  3. Hidden Markov Model of atomic quantum jump dynamics in an optically probed cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, S.; Molmer, K.; Alt, W.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the quantum jumps of an atom interacting with a cavity field. The strong atom- field interaction makes the cavity transmission depend on the time dependent atomic state, and we present a Hidden Markov Model description of the atomic state dynamics which is conditioned in a Bayesian...... manner on the detected signal. We suggest that small variations in the observed signal may be due to spatial motion of the atom within the cavity, and we represent the atomic system by a number of hidden states to account for both the small variations and the internal state jump dynamics. In our theory...

  4. Quantum decoherence in electronic current flowing through carbon nanotubes induced by thermal atomic vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum decoherence in electronic currents flowing through metallic carbon nanotubes caused by thermal atomic vibrations using the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for an open system. We reveal that the quantum coherence of conduction electrons decays exponentially with tube length at a fixed temperature, and that the decay rate increases with temperature. We also find that the phase relaxation length due to the thermal atomic vibrations is inversely proportional to temperature.

  5. Quantum coherence dynamics of a three-level atom in a two-mode field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovarov, N. K.

    2008-01-01

    The correlated dynamics of a three-level atom resonantly coupled to an electromagnetic cavity field is calculated (Λ, V, and L models). A diagrammatic representation of quantum dynamics is proposed for these models. As an example, Λ-atom dynamics is examined to demonstrate how the use of conventional von Neumann's reduction leads to internal decoherence (disentanglement-induced decoherence) and to the absence of atomic coherence under multiphoton excitation. The predicted absence of atomic coherence is inconsistent with characteristics of an experimentally observed atom-photon entangled state. It is shown that the correlated reduction of a composite quantum system proposed in [18] qualitatively predicts the occurrence and evolution of atomic coherence under multiphoton excitation if a seed coherence is introduced into any subsystem (the atom or a cavity mode)

  6. When hydroquinone meets methoxy radical: Hydrogen abstraction reaction from the viewpoint of interacting quantum atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Milena; Nakarada, Đura; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2018-05-25

    Interacting Quantum Atoms methodology is used for a detailed analysis of hydrogen abstraction reaction from hydroquinone by methoxy radical. Two pathways are analyzed, which differ in the orientation of the reactants at the corresponding transition states. Although the discrepancy between the two barriers amounts to only 2 kJ/mol, which implies that the two pathways are of comparable probability, the extent of intra-atomic and inter-atomic energy changes differs considerably. We thus demonstrated that Interacting Quantum Atoms procedure can be applied to unravel distinct energy transfer routes in seemingly similar mechanisms. Identification of energy components with the greatest contribution to the variation of the overall energy (intra-atomic and inter-atomic terms that involve hydroquinone's oxygen and the carbon atom covalently bound to it, the transferring hydrogen and methoxy radical's oxygen), is performed using the Relative energy gradient method. Additionally, the Interacting Quantum Fragments approach shed light on the nature of dominant interactions among selected fragments: both Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are of comparable importance when considering interactions of the transferring hydrogen atom with all other atoms, whereas the exchange-correlation term dominates interaction between methoxy radical's methyl group and hydroquinone's aromatic ring. This study represents one of the first applications of Interacting Quantum Fragments approach on first order saddle points. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Non-local correlation and quantum discord in two atoms in the non-degenerate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.-B.A.

    2012-01-01

    By using geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN), quantum correlation is investigated for two atoms in the non-degenerate two-photon Tavis–Cummings model. It is shown that there is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole–dipole interaction. The evolvement period of quantum correlation gets shorter with the increase in the dipole–dipole parameter. It is found that there exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also quantum nonlocality without quantum discord. Also, the MIN and GQD are raised rather than entanglement, and also with weak initial entanglement, there are MIN and entanglement in a interval of death quantum discord. - Highlights: ► Geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement induced nonlocality (MIN) are used to investigate the correlations of two two-level atoms. ► There is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. ► Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole–dipole interaction. ► There exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also without discord. ► Weak initial entanglement leads to MIN and entanglement in intervals of death discord.

  8. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    OpenAIRE

    Shengjun Wu; Zhihao Ma; Zhihua Chen; Sixia Yu

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches ...

  9. Intrinsic retrieval efficiency for quantum memories: A three-dimensional theory of light interaction with an atomic ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarati, Tanvi P.; Wu, Yukai; Duan, Luming

    2018-03-01

    Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller quantum repeater protocol, which was proposed to realize long distance quantum communication, requires usage of quantum memories. Atomic ensembles interacting with optical beams based on off-resonant Raman scattering serve as convenient on-demand quantum memories. Here, a complete free space, three-dimensional theory of the associated read and write process for this quantum memory is worked out with the aim of understanding intrinsic retrieval efficiency. We develop a formalism to calculate the transverse mode structure for the signal and the idler photons and use the formalism to study the intrinsic retrieval efficiency under various configurations. The effects of atomic density fluctuations and atomic motion are incorporated by numerically simulating this system for a range of realistic experimental parameters. We obtain results that describe the variation in the intrinsic retrieval efficiency as a function of the memory storage time for skewed beam configuration at a finite temperature, which provides valuable information for optimization of the retrieval efficiency in experiments.

  10. Atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random lattices: From Fermi glass to quantum spin glass and quantum percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Kantian, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate strongly interacting atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the system and discuss its low temperature physics. We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the interactions at local level in inhomogeneous but regular lattices. Such a control leads to the achievement of Fermi glass, quantum Fermi spin-glass, and quantum percolation regimes involving bare and/or composite fermions in random lattices

  11. Decoherence-Free Interaction between Giant Atoms in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockum, Anton Frisk; Johansson, Göran; Nori, Franco

    2018-04-06

    In quantum-optics experiments with both natural and artificial atoms, the atoms are usually small enough that they can be approximated as pointlike compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation with which they interact. However, superconducting qubits coupled to a meandering transmission line, or to surface acoustic waves, can realize "giant artificial atoms" that couple to a bosonic field at several points which are wavelengths apart. Here, we study setups with multiple giant atoms coupled at multiple points to a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide. We show that the giant atoms can be protected from decohering through the waveguide, but still have exchange interactions mediated by the waveguide. Unlike in decoherence-free subspaces, here the entire multiatom Hilbert space (2^{N} states for N atoms) is protected from decoherence. This is not possible with "small" atoms. We further show how this decoherence-free interaction can be designed in setups with multiple atoms to implement, e.g., a 1D chain of atoms with nearest-neighbor couplings or a collection of atoms with all-to-all connectivity. This may have important applications in quantum simulation and quantum computing.

  12. Decoherence-Free Interaction between Giant Atoms in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockum, Anton Frisk; Johansson, Göran; Nori, Franco

    2018-04-01

    In quantum-optics experiments with both natural and artificial atoms, the atoms are usually small enough that they can be approximated as pointlike compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation with which they interact. However, superconducting qubits coupled to a meandering transmission line, or to surface acoustic waves, can realize "giant artificial atoms" that couple to a bosonic field at several points which are wavelengths apart. Here, we study setups with multiple giant atoms coupled at multiple points to a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide. We show that the giant atoms can be protected from decohering through the waveguide, but still have exchange interactions mediated by the waveguide. Unlike in decoherence-free subspaces, here the entire multiatom Hilbert space (2N states for N atoms) is protected from decoherence. This is not possible with "small" atoms. We further show how this decoherence-free interaction can be designed in setups with multiple atoms to implement, e.g., a 1D chain of atoms with nearest-neighbor couplings or a collection of atoms with all-to-all connectivity. This may have important applications in quantum simulation and quantum computing.

  13. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    magnetometer at room temperature is reported. Furthermore, using spin-squeezing of atomic ensemble, the sensitivity of magnetometer is improved. Deterministic continuous variable teleportation between two distant atomic ensembles is demonstrated. The fidelity of teleportating dynamically changing sequence...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  14. Analyzing quantum jumps of one and two atoms strongly coupled to an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reick, Sebastian; Mølmer, Klaus; Alt, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We induce quantum jumps between the hyperfine ground states of one and two cesium atoms, strongly coupled to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator, and analyze the resulting random telegraph signals. We identify experimental parameters to deduce the atomic spin state nondestructively from ...

  15. Benchmarking gate-based quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Kristel; Nocon, Madita; Willsch, Dennis; Jin, Fengping; Lippert, Thomas; De Raedt, Hans

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of public access to small gate-based quantum processors, it becomes necessary to develop a benchmarking methodology such that independent researchers can validate the operation of these processors. We explore the usefulness of a number of simple quantum circuits as benchmarks for gate-based quantum computing devices and show that circuits performing identity operations are very simple, scalable and sensitive to gate errors and are therefore very well suited for this task. We illustrate the procedure by presenting benchmark results for the IBM Quantum Experience, a cloud-based platform for gate-based quantum computing.

  16. Nonequilibrium Quantum Phase Transition in a Hybrid Atom-Optomechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Niklas; Bakhtiari, M. Reza; Pelster, Axel; Thorwart, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We consider a hybrid quantum many-body system formed by a vibrational mode of a nanomembrane, which interacts optomechanically with light in a cavity, and an ultracold atom gas in the optical lattice of the out-coupled light. The adiabatic elimination of the light field yields an effective Hamiltonian which reveals a competition between the force localizing the atoms and the membrane displacement. At a critical atom-membrane interaction, we find a nonequilibrium quantum phase transition from a localized symmetric state of the atom cloud to a shifted symmetry-broken state, the energy of the lowest collective excitation vanishes, and a strong atom-membrane entanglement arises. The effect occurs when the atoms and the membrane are nonresonantly coupled.

  17. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  18. Controlling the thermoelectric effect by mechanical manipulation of the electron's quantum phase in atomic junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Akira; Demir, Firuz; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Saffarzadeh, Alireza; Kirczenow, George; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-08-11

    The thermoelectric voltage developed across an atomic metal junction (i.e., a nanostructure in which one or a few atoms connect two metal electrodes) in response to a temperature difference between the electrodes, results from the quantum interference of electrons that pass through the junction multiple times after being scattered by the surrounding defects. Here we report successfully tuning this quantum interference and thus controlling the magnitude and sign of the thermoelectric voltage by applying a mechanical force that deforms the junction. The observed switching of the thermoelectric voltage is reversible and can be cycled many times. Our ab initio and semi-empirical calculations elucidate the detailed mechanism by which the quantum interference is tuned. We show that the applied strain alters the quantum phases of electrons passing through the narrowest part of the junction and hence modifies the electronic quantum interference in the device. Tuning the quantum interference causes the energies of electronic transport resonances to shift, which affects the thermoelectric voltage. These experimental and theoretical studies reveal that Au atomic junctions can be made to exhibit both positive and negative thermoelectric voltages on demand, and demonstrate the importance and tunability of the quantum interference effect in the atomic-scale metal nanostructures.

  19. Rough set classification based on quantum logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Yasser F.

    2017-11-01

    By combining the advantages of quantum computing and soft computing, the paper shows that rough sets can be used with quantum logic for classification and recognition systems. We suggest the new definition of rough set theory as quantum logic theory. Rough approximations are essential elements in rough set theory, the quantum rough set model for set-valued data directly construct set approximation based on a kind of quantum similarity relation which is presented here. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the new model for quantum rough sets has new type of decision rule with less redundancy which can be used to give accurate classification using principles of quantum superposition and non-linear quantum relations. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt aiming to define rough sets in representation of a quantum rather than logic or sets. The experiments on data-sets have demonstrated that the proposed model is more accuracy than the traditional rough sets in terms of finding optimal classifications.

  20. Classical and quantum analysis of one-dimensional velocity selection for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J K; Kim, H A; Mishra, S R; Myrskog, S H; Jofre, A M; Segal, L R; Kim, J B; Steinberg, A M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a velocity selection technique for obtaining cold atoms, in which all atoms below a certain energy are spatially selected from the surrounding atom cloud. Velocity selection can in some cases be more efficient than other cooling techniques for the preparation of ultracold atom clouds in one dimension. With quantum mechanical and classical simulations and theory we present a scheme using a dipole force barrier to select the coldest atoms from a magnetically trapped atom cloud. The dipole and magnetic potentials create a local minimum which traps the coldest atoms. A unique advantage of this technique is the sharp cut-off in the velocity distribution of the sample of selected atoms. Such a non-thermal distribution should prove useful for a variety of experiments, including proposed studies of atomic tunnelling and scattering from quantum potentials. We show that when the rms size of the atom cloud is smaller than the local minimum in which the selected atoms are trapped, the velocity selection technique can be more efficient in one dimension than some common techniques such as evaporative cooling. For example, one simulation shows nearly 6% of the atoms retained at a temperature 100 times lower than the starting condition

  1. Quantum trajectories in elastic atom-surface scattering: threshold and selective adsorption resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, A S; Miret-Artés, S

    2005-01-01

    The elastic resonant scattering of He atoms off the Cu(117) surface is fully described with the formalism of quantum trajectories provided by Bohmian mechanics. Within this theory of quantum motion, the concept of trapping is widely studied and discussed. Classically, atoms undergo impulsive collisions with the surface, and then the trapped motion takes place covering at least two consecutive unit cells. However, from a Bohmian viewpoint, atom trajectories can smoothly adjust to the equipotential energy surface profile in a sort of sliding motion; thus the trapping process could eventually occur within one single unit cell. In particular, both threshold and selective adsorption resonances are explained by means of this quantum trapping considering different space and time scales. Furthermore, a mapping between each region of the (initial) incoming plane wave and the different parts of the diffraction and resonance patterns can be easily established, an important issue only provided by a quantum trajectory formalism. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Zero-contingent entropy of quantum states of a Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charvot, R.; Majernik, V.

    1996-01-01

    We calculated the zero-contingent entropy for the position of electron in H-atom as a function of its quantum numbers and compared it with the corresponding value of the Shannon entropy. The values of zero-contingent entropy of quantum states of H-atom correlate well with the corresponding values of Shannon's entropy. This points out that, besides the Shannon entropy, the zero-contingent entropy represents an appropriate, and mathematically rather simple, measure of the spreading out of the wave functions in H-atom. (authors)

  3. The electromagnetic virtual cloud of the ground-state hydrogen atom - a quantum field theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radozycki, T.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the virtual cloud around the hydrogen atom in the ground state are studied with the use of quantum field theory methods. The relativistic expression for the electromagnetic energy density around the atom, with the electron spin taken into account, is obtained. The distribution of the angular momentum contained in the cloud and the self-interaction kernel for the electrons bound in atom are also investigated. (author)

  4. Quantum ratchets for periodically kicked cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casati, Giulio [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unita di Como, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Poletti, Dario [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unita di Como, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    We study cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates exposed to time-dependent standing waves of light. We first discuss a quantum chaotic dissipative ratchet using the method of quantum trajectories. This system is characterized by directed transport emerging from a quantum strange attractor. We then present a very simple model of directed transport with cold atoms in a pair of periodically flashed optical lattices. Finally we study the dynamics of a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a toroidal trap and exposed to a pair of periodically flashed optical lattices. We show that the many-body atom-atom interactions, treated within the mean-field approximation, can generate directed transport.

  5. A new time-frequency method to reveal quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen in intense laser pulses: Synchrosqueezing transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Hau-tieng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a new adaptive time-frequency (TF) analysis technique, the synchrosqueezing transform (SST), to explore the dynamics of a laser-driven hydrogen atom at an ab initio level, upon which we have demonstrated its versatility as a new viable venue for further exploring quantum dynamics. For a signal composed of oscillatory components which can be characterized by instantaneous frequency, the SST enables rendering the decomposed signal based on the phase information inherited in the linear TF representation with mathematical support. Compared with the classical type of TF methods, the SST clearly depicts several intrinsic quantum dynamical processes such as selection rules, AC Stark effects, and high harmonic generation

  6. Quantum engineering of transistors based on 2D materials heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Colombo, Luigi; Fiori, Gianluca

    2018-03-01

    Quantum engineering entails atom-by-atom design and fabrication of electronic devices. This innovative technology that unifies materials science and device engineering has been fostered by the recent progress in the fabrication of vertical and lateral heterostructures of two-dimensional materials and by the assessment of the technology potential via computational nanotechnology. But how close are we to the possibility of the practical realization of next-generation atomically thin transistors? In this Perspective, we analyse the outlook and the challenges of quantum-engineered transistors using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials against the benchmark of silicon technology and its foreseeable evolution in terms of potential performance and manufacturability. Transistors based on lateral heterostructures emerge as the most promising option from a performance point of view, even if heterostructure formation and control are in the initial technology development stage.

  7. Quantum engineering of transistors based on 2D materials heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Colombo, Luigi; Fiori, Gianluca

    2018-03-01

    Quantum engineering entails atom-by-atom design and fabrication of electronic devices. This innovative technology that unifies materials science and device engineering has been fostered by the recent progress in the fabrication of vertical and lateral heterostructures of two-dimensional materials and by the assessment of the technology potential via computational nanotechnology. But how close are we to the possibility of the practical realization of next-generation atomically thin transistors? In this Perspective, we analyse the outlook and the challenges of quantum-engineered transistors using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials against the benchmark of silicon technology and its foreseeable evolution in terms of potential performance and manufacturability. Transistors based on lateral heterostructures emerge as the most promising option from a performance point of view, even if heterostructure formation and control are in the initial technology development stage.

  8. Atomically manufactured nickel-silicon quantum dots displaying robust resonant tunneling and negative differential resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Yih; Fisher, Brandon L.; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Lilley, Carmen M.

    2017-12-01

    Providing a spin-free host material in the development of quantum information technology has made silicon a very interesting and desirable material for qubit design. Much of the work and experimental progress has focused on isolated phosphorous atoms. In this article, we report on the exploration of Ni-Si clusters that are atomically manufactured via self-assembly from the bottom-up and behave as isolated quantum dots. These small quantum dot structures are probed at the atomic-scale with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, revealing robust resonance through discrete quantized energy levels within the Ni-Si clusters. The resonance energy is reproducible and the peak spacing of the quantum dot structures increases as the number of atoms in the cluster decrease. Probing these quantum dot structures on degenerately doped silicon results in the observation of negative differential resistance in both I-V and dI/dV spectra. At higher surface coverage of nickel, a well-known √19 surface modification is observed and is essentially a tightly packed array of the clusters. Spatial conductance maps reveal variations in the local density of states that suggest the clusters are influencing the electronic properties of their neighbors. All of these results are extremely encouraging towards the utilization of metal modified silicon surfaces to advance or complement existing quantum information technology.

  9. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology. PMID:27067992

  10. A Coherence Preservation Control Strategy in Cavity QED Based on Classical Quantum Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For eliminating the unexpected decoherence effect in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED, the transfer function of Rabi oscillation is derived theoretically using optical Bloch equations. In particular, the decoherence in cavity QED from the atomic spontaneous emission is especially considered. A feedback control strategy is proposed to preserve the coherence through Rabi oscillation stabilization. In the scheme, a classical quantum feedback channel for the quantum information acquisition is constructed via the quantum tomography technology, and a compensation system based on the root locus theory is put forward to suppress the atomic spontaneous emission and the associated decoherence. The simulation results have proved its effectiveness and superiority for the coherence preservation.

  11. Atomic effect algebras with compression bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caragheorgheopol, Dan; Tkadlec, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Compression base effect algebras were recently introduced by Gudder [Demonstr. Math. 39, 43 (2006)]. They generalize sequential effect algebras [Rep. Math. Phys. 49, 87 (2002)] and compressible effect algebras [Rep. Math. Phys. 54, 93 (2004)]. The present paper focuses on atomic compression base effect algebras and the consequences of atoms being foci (so-called projections) of the compressions in the compression base. Part of our work generalizes results obtained in atomic sequential effect algebras by Tkadlec [Int. J. Theor. Phys. 47, 185 (2008)]. The notion of projection-atomicity is introduced and studied, and several conditions that force a compression base effect algebra or the set of its projections to be Boolean are found. Finally, we apply some of these results to sequential effect algebras and strengthen a previously established result concerning a sufficient condition for them to be Boolean.

  12. Quantum election scheme based on anonymous quantum key distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rui-Rui; Yang Li

    2012-01-01

    An unconditionally secure authority-certified anonymous quantum key distribution scheme using conjugate coding is presented, based on which we construct a quantum election scheme without the help of an entanglement state. We show that this election scheme ensures the completeness, soundness, privacy, eligibility, unreusability, fairness, and verifiability of a large-scale election in which the administrator and counter are semi-honest. This election scheme can work even if there exist loss and errors in quantum channels. In addition, any irregularity in this scheme is sensible. (general)

  13. Generation and storage of quantum states using cold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Josse, Vincent; Cviklinski, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Cold cesium or rubidium atomic samples have a good potential both for generation and storage of nonclassical states of light. Generation of nonclassical states of light is possible through the high non-linearity of cold atomic samples excited close to a resonance line. Quadrature squeezing, polar...

  14. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with a Rydberg-blocked atomic ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerlin, Christine; Brion, Etienne; Esslinger, Tilman

    2010-01-01

    The realization of a Jaynes-Cummings model in the optical domain is proposed for an atomic ensemble. The scheme exploits the collective coupling of the atoms to a quantized cavity mode and the nonlinearity introduced by coupling to high-lying Rydberg states. A two-photon transition resonantly cou...

  15. Quantum yield and translational energy of hydrogen atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    erage kinetic energy of H atoms calculated from Doppler profiles was found to be ET(lab) = (50 ± 3) kJ/mol. The ... in this wavelength range H atoms are produced by ... tral hydrogen. 1,9 ... a spectral window of molecular oxygen, solar radia-.

  16. Quantum coherence and entanglement control for atom-cavity systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenchong

    Coherence and entanglement play a significant role in the quantum theory. Ideal quantum systems, "closed" to the outside world, remain quantum forever and thus manage to retain coherence and entanglement. Real quantum systems, however, are open to the environment and are therefore susceptible to the phenomenon of decoherence and disentanglement which are major hindrances to the effectiveness of quantum information processing tasks. In this thesis we have theoretically studied the evolution of coherence and entanglement in quantum systems coupled to various environments. We have also studied ways and means of controlling the decay of coherence and entanglement. We have studied the exact qubit entanglement dynamics of some interesting initial states coupled to a high-Q cavity containing zero photon, one photon, two photons and many photons respectively. We have found that an initially correlated environmental state can serve as an enhancer for entanglement decay or generation processes. More precisely, we have demonstrated that the degree of entanglement, including its collapse as well as its revival times, can be significantly modified by the correlated structure of the environmental modes. We have also studied dynamical decoupling (DD) technique --- a prominent strategy of controlling decoherence and preserving entanglement in open quantum systems. We have analyzed several DD control methods applied to qubit systems that can eliminate the system-environment coupling and prolong the quantum coherence time. Particularly, we have proposed a new DD sequence consisting a set of designed control operators that can universally protected an unknown qutrit state against colored phase and amplitude environment noises. In addition, in a non-Markovian regime, we have reformulated the quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to incorporate the effect of the external control fields. Without any assumptions on the system-environment coupling and the size of environment, we have

  17. Interatomic Coulombic electron capture in atomic, molecular, and quantum dot systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bande Annika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interatomic Coulombic electron capture (ICEC process has recently been predicted theoretically for clusters of atoms and molecules. For an atom A capturing an electron e(ε it competes with the well known photorecombination, because in an environment of neutral or anionic neighboring atoms B, A can transfer its excess energy in the ultrafast ICEC process to B which is then ionized. The cross section for e(ε + A + B → A− + B+ + e(ε′ has been obtained in an asymptotic approximation based on scattering theory for several clusters [1,2]. It was found that ICEC starts dominating the PR for distances among participating species of nanometers and lower. Therefore, we believe that the ICEC process might be of importance in the atmosphere, in biological systems, plasmas, or in nanostructured materials. As an example for the latter, ICEC has been investigated by means of electron dynamics in a model potential for semiconductor double quantum dots (QDs [3]. In the simplest case one QD captures an electron while the outgoing electron is emitted from the other. The reaction probability for this process was found to be relatively large.

  18. Quantum optics. All-optical routing of single photons by a one-atom switch controlled by a single photon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomroni, Itay; Rosenblum, Serge; Lovsky, Yulia; Bechler, Orel; Guendelman, Gabriel; Dayan, Barak

    2014-08-22

    The prospect of quantum networks, in which quantum information is carried by single photons in photonic circuits, has long been the driving force behind the effort to achieve all-optical routing of single photons. We realized a single-photon-activated switch capable of routing a photon from any of its two inputs to any of its two outputs. Our device is based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator. A single reflected control photon toggles the switch from high reflection (R ~ 65%) to high transmission (T ~ 90%), with an average of ~1.5 control photons per switching event (~3, including linear losses). No additional control fields are required. The control and target photons are both in-fiber and practically identical, making this scheme compatible with scalable architectures for quantum information processing. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  20. Quantum-statistical mechanics of an atom-dimer mixture: Lee-Yang cluster expansion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2006-01-01

    We use the Lee-Yang cluster expansion method to study quantum-statistical properties of a mixture of interconvertible atoms and dimers, where the dimers form in a two-body bound state of the atoms. We point out an infinite series of cluster diagrams whose summation leads to the Bose-Einstein condensation of the dimers below a critical temperature. Our theory captures some important features of a cold atom-dimer mixture such as interconversion of atoms and dimers and properties of the mixture at the unitarity limit

  1. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  2. Cracking quantum physics you, this book and 200 years of sub-atomic science

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Enter the invisible world of sub-atomic physics and discover the very core of existence. Cracking Quantum Physics takes you through every area of particle physics to clearly explain how our world was, and is, created, and breaks down the most complex theories into easily understandable elements. Subjects covered include:-Time travel-The Higgs field-Dark Matter-The anatomy of the elements-Enter the atom-Quantum reality-Quantum tunnelling-Electrodynamics-Accelerators and colliders-The Zeno effectAn easy-to-understand guide to some of the most complex and intriguing topics: Cracking Quantum Physics is a must-read for anyone who has ever wondered about the underlying forces and materials that make up the world as we know it.

  3. Quantum phase crossovers with finite atom number in the Dicke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J G; Castaños, O; Nahmad-Achar, E; López-Peña, R

    2013-01-01

    Two-level atoms interacting with a one-mode cavity field at zero temperature have order parameters which reflect the presence of a quantum phase transition at a critical value of the atom–cavity coupling strength. Two popular examples are the number of photons inside the cavity and the number of excited atoms. Coherent states provide a mean field description, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. Employing symmetry-adapted (SA) SU(2) coherent states the quantum crossover, precursor of the critical behavior, can be described for a finite number of atoms. A variation after projection treatment, involving a numerical minimization of the SA energy surface, associates the quantum crossover with a discontinuity in the order parameters, which originates from competition between two local minima in the SA energy surface. Although this discontinuity is not present in finite systems, it provides a good description of 1/N effects in the observables. (paper)

  4. From a quantum to a classical description of intense laser-atom physics with Bohmian trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, X Y; Cai Qingyu; Zhan, M S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Bohmian mechanics is applied to intense laser-atom physics. The motion of an atomic electron in an intense laser field is obtained from the Bohm-Newton equation. We find that the quantum potential that dominates the quantum effect of a physical system becomes negligible as the electron is driven far from the parent ion by the intense laser field, i.e. the behavior of the electron smoothly tends towards classical soon after the electron is ionized. Our numerical calculations present direct positive evidence for semiclassical trajectory methods in intense laser-atom physics where the motion of the ionized electron is treated by classical mechanics, while quantum mechanics is needed before the ionization.

  5. Development by Niels Bohr of the quantum theory of the atom and of the correspondence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El'yashevich, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Bohr's investigations in 1912-1923 on the quantum theory of atoms are considered. The sources of N. Bohr's works on this subject are analyzed, and the beginning of his quantum research in 1912 is described. A detailed analysis is given of N. Bohr's famous paper on the hydrogen atom theory and on the origin of spectra. The further development of Bohr's ideas on atomic structure is considered, special attention is being payed to his postulates of stationary states and of radiation transitions and to the development of the correspondence principle. It is shown how well N. Bohr understood the difficulties of the model theory and how be tried to obtain a deep understanding of quantum phenomena

  6. Structural atomic-scale analysis of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wires and quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy on a (311)A substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, J.G.; Jo, M.; Mano, T.; Noda, T.; Sakoda, K.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural analysis at the atomic scale of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wires and quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy on a (311)A-oriented substrate. The shape, interfaces, and composition of these nanostructures and their surrounding matrix are investigated. We show that quantum wires can be

  7. Quantum properties of a parametric four-wave mixing in a Raman type atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharypov A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the quantum properties of two light fields used to parametric four-wave mixing in a Raman type atomic system. The system realizes an effective Hamiltonian of beamsplitter type coupling between the light fields, which allows to control squeezing and amplitude distribution of the light fields, as well as realizing their entanglement. The scheme can be feasibly applied to engineer the quantum properties of two single-mode light fields in properly chosen input states.

  8. Single-Atom Demonstration of the Quantum Landauer Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L. L.; Xiong, T. P.; Rehan, K.; Zhou, F.; Liang, D. F.; Chen, L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Yang, W. L.; Ma, Z. H.; Feng, M.

    2018-05-01

    One of the outstanding challenges to information processing is the eloquent suppression of energy consumption in the execution of logic operations. The Landauer principle sets an energy constraint in deletion of a classical bit of information. Although some attempts have been made to experimentally approach the fundamental limit restricted by this principle, exploring the Landauer principle in a purely quantum mechanical fashion is still an open question. Employing a trapped ultracold ion, we experimentally demonstrate a quantum version of the Landauer principle, i.e., an equality associated with the energy cost of information erasure in conjunction with the entropy change of the associated quantized environment. Our experimental investigation substantiates an intimate link between information thermodynamics and quantum candidate systems for information processing.

  9. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  10. Quantum dynamics of atoms in a resonator-generated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschler, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate the quantum motion of coherently driven ultracold atoms in the field of a damped high-Q optical cavity mode. The laser field is chosen far detuned from the atomic transition but close to a cavity resonance, so that spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed but a coherent field builds up in the resonator by stimulated scattering. On one hand the shape of the atomic wave function determines the field dynamics via the magnitude of the scattering and the effective refractive index the atoms create for the mode. The mode intensity on the other hand determines the optical dipole force on the atoms.The system shows rich atom-field dynamics including self organization, self-trapping, cooling or heating. In the limit of deep trapping we are able to derive a system of closed, coupled equations for a finite set of atomic expectation values and the field. This allows us to determine the self-consistent ground state of the system as well as the eigenfrequencies and damping rates for excitations. To treat several atoms in more detail we introduce the Bose-Hubbard model. This allows us to investigate several aspects of the quantum motion of the atoms inside the cavity. (author)

  11. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  12. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  13. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Zhiyuan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength λ. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and λ. In the large hopping limit where g >λ, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  14. Physics of quantum fluids. New trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramati, Alberto [Paris Univ. (France). Laboratoire Kastler Brossel; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Modugno, Michele (eds.) [IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Historia de la Ciencia

    2013-10-01

    Provides an overview of the field of quantum fluids. Presents analogies and differences between polariton and atomic quantum fluids. With contributions from the major actors in the field. Explains a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics. The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  15. Dipolar oscillations in a quantum degenerate Fermi-Bose atomic mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlaino, F; Brecha, R J; Hannaford, P; Riboli, F; Roati, G; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2003-01-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled dipolar oscillations in a Fermi-Bose mixture of 40 K and 87 Rb atoms. This low-energy collective mode is strongly affected by the interspecies interactions. Measurements are performed in the classical and quantum degenerate regimes and reveal the crucial role of the statistical properties of the mixture. At the onset of quantum degeneracy, we investigate the role of Pauli blocking and superfluidity for K and Rb atoms, respectively, resulting in a change in the collisional interactions

  16. Ultrafast quantum random number generation based on quantum phase fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feihu; Qi, Bing; Ma, Xiongfeng; Xu, He; Zheng, Haoxuan; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2012-05-21

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) can generate true randomness by exploiting the fundamental indeterminism of quantum mechanics. Most approaches to QRNG employ single-photon detection technologies and are limited in speed. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast QRNG at a rate over 6 Gbits/s based on the quantum phase fluctuations of a laser operating near threshold. Moreover, we consider a potential adversary who has partial knowledge on the raw data and discuss how one can rigorously remove such partial knowledge with postprocessing. We quantify the quantum randomness through min-entropy by modeling our system and employ two randomness extractors--Trevisan's extractor and Toeplitz-hashing--to distill the randomness, which is information-theoretically provable. The simplicity and high-speed of our experimental setup show the feasibility of a robust, low-cost, high-speed QRNG.

  17. A New Quantum Watermarking Based on Quantum Wavelet Transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidari, Shahrokh; Pourarian, Mohammad Rasoul; Naseri, Mosayeb; Gheibi, Reza; Baghfalaki, Masoud; Farouk, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Quantum watermarking is a technique to embed specific information, usually the owner’s identification, into quantum cover data such for copyright protection purposes. In this paper, a new scheme for quantum watermarking based on quantum wavelet transforms is proposed which includes scrambling, embedding and extracting procedures. The invisibility and robustness performances of the proposed watermarking method is confirmed by simulation technique. The invisibility of the scheme is examined by the peak-signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the histogram calculation. Furthermore the robustness of the scheme is analyzed by the Bit Error Rate (BER) and the Correlation Two-Dimensional (Corr 2-D) calculation. The simulation results indicate that the proposed watermarking scheme indicate not only acceptable visual quality but also a good resistance against different types of attack. (paper)

  18. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-12

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from 'electrochemical' to 'mechanical', which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  19. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from ‘electrochemical’ to ‘mechanical’, which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  20. Energetic Analysis of Conjugated Hydrocarbons Using the Interacting Quantum Atoms Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Cortés, Jesús; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2018-07-05

    A number of aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic organic molecules was analyzed in terms of the contributions to the electronic energy defined in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and the interacting quantum atoms method. Regularities were found in the exchange and electrostatic interatomic energies showing trends that are closely related to those of the delocalization indices defined in the theory. In particular, the CC interaction energies between bonded atoms allow to rationalize the energetic stabilization associated with the bond length alternation in conjugated polyenes. This approach also provides support to Clar's sextet rules devised for aromatic systems. In addition, the H⋯H bonding found in some of the aromatic molecules studied was of an attractive nature, according to the stabilizing exchange interaction between the bonded H atoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spectroscopy of systems of two identical atoms: effects of quantum interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, A.A.; Yudson, V.I.

    2017-01-01

    Several effects of quantum interference in spectroscopy of a system of two atoms are discussed. (i) In the system of spatially separated atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) geometry (a single-mode waveguide or photon crystal), a (meta)stable excited entangled state can be formed, its decay being very sensitive to the distance between the atoms and to perturbations which cause a difference between their resonance frequencies. (ii) In a system of closely located atoms in 3D space, the extreme sensitivity of absorption and fluorescence spectra to the direction of the applied magnetic field is demonstrated. These theoretical predictions can be useful for the quantum information processing and ultrasensitive measurements.

  2. Cooperative ring exchange and quantum melting of vortex lattices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Tarun Kanti; Baskaran, G.

    2004-01-01

    Cooperative ring exchange is suggested as a mechanism of quantum melting of vortex lattices in a rapidly rotating quasi-two-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Using an approach pioneered by Kivelson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 873 (1986)] for the fractional quantized Hall effect, we calculate the condition for quantum melting instability by considering large-correlated ring exchanges in a two-dimensional Wigner crystal of vortices in a strong 'pseudomagnetic field' generated by the background superfluid Bose particles. BEC may be profitably used to address issues of quantum melting of a pristine Wigner solid devoid of complications of real solids

  3. From atomic to mesoscale the role of quantum coherence in systems of various complexities

    CERN Document Server

    Novikova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the latest advancements and future developments of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics and its vital role in modern sciences and technologies. The chapters are devoted to studies of a wide range of quantum systems, with an emphasis on understanding of quantum coherence and other quantum phenomena originated from light-matter interactions. The book intends to survey the current research landscape and to highlight major scientific trends in AMO physics as well as those interfacing with interdisciplinary sciences. The volume may be particularly useful for young researchers working on establishing their scientific interests and goals.

  4. Quantum Coherent Multielectron Processes in an Atomic Scale Contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Peter-Jan; Xu, Fei; Kaasbjerg, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    The light emission from a scanning tunneling microscope operated on a Ag(111) surface at 6 K is analyzed from low conductances to values approaching the conductance quantum. Optical spectra recorded at sample voltages V reveal emission with photon energies hv > 2eV. A model of electrons interacting...

  5. Hydrogen atom in the phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia-Bondia, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using a coordinate transformation which regularizes the classical Kepler problem, we show that the hydrogen-atom case may be analytically solved via the phase-space formulation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The problem is essentially reduced to that of a four-dimensional oscillator whose treatment in the phase-space formulation is developed. Furthermore, the method allows us to calculate the Green's function for the H atom in a surprisingly simple way

  6. Nonequilibrium forces between atoms and dielectrics mediated by a quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a first principles microphysics derivation of the nonequilibrium forces between an atom, treated as a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and a bulk dielectric medium modeled as a continuous lattice of oscillators coupled to a reservoir. We assume no direct interaction between the atom and the medium but there exist mutual influences transmitted via a common electromagnetic field. By employing concepts and techniques of open quantum systems we introduce coarse-graining to the physical variables--the medium, the quantum field, and the atom's internal degrees of freedom, in that order--to extract their averaged effects from the lowest tier progressively to the top tier. The first tier of coarse-graining provides the averaged effect of the medium upon the field, quantified by a complex permittivity (in the frequency domain) describing the response of the dielectric to the field in addition to its back action on the field through a stochastic forcing term. The last tier of coarse-graining over the atom's internal degrees of freedom results in an equation of motion for the atom's center of mass from which we can derive the force on the atom. Our nonequilibrium formulation provides a fully dynamical description of the atom's motion including back-action effects from all other relevant variables concerned. In the long-time limit we recover the known results for the atom-dielectric force when the combined system is in equilibrium or in a nonequilibrium stationary state.

  7. Quantum-orbit theory of high-order atomic processes in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, D.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Atoms submitted to strong laser fields can emit electrons and photons of very high energies. These processes find a highly intuitive and also quantitative explanation in terms of Feynman's path integral and the concept of quantum orbits. The quantum-orbit formalism is particularly useful for high-order atomic processes in strong laser fields. For such multi-step processes there is an intermediate step during which the electron is approximately under the influence of the laser field only and can absorb energy from the field. This leads to the appearance of the plateau structures in the emitted electron or photon spectra. Usual examples of such processes are high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and high-order above threshold ionization (HATI). These structures were also observed in high-order above-threshold detachment, laser-assisted x-ray-atom scattering, laser-assisted electron-ion recombination, and electron-atom scattering. We will present high-order strong-field approximation (SFA) and show how the quantum-orbit formalism follows from it. This will be done for various above-mentioned processes. For HHG a classification of quantum orbits will be given [10) and generalized to the presence of a static field. The low-energy part of the HHG spectra and the enhancement of HHG near the channel closings can be explained taking into account a large number of quantum orbits. For HATI we will concentrate on the case of few-cycle laser pulse. The influence of the carrier-envelope relative phase on the HATI spectrum can easily be explained in terms of quantum orbits. The SFA and the quantum-orbit results will be compared with the results obtained by Dieter Bauer using ab initio solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. It will be shown that the Coulomb effects are important for low-energy electron spectra. Refs. 11 (author)

  8. LSB Based Quantum Image Steganography Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Na; Wang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    Quantum steganography is the technique which hides a secret message into quantum covers such as quantum images. In this paper, two blind LSB steganography algorithms in the form of quantum circuits are proposed based on the novel enhanced quantum representation (NEQR) for quantum images. One algorithm is plain LSB which uses the message bits to substitute for the pixels' LSB directly. The other is block LSB which embeds a message bit into a number of pixels that belong to one image block. The extracting circuits can regain the secret message only according to the stego cover. Analysis and simulation-based experimental results demonstrate that the invisibility is good, and the balance between the capacity and the robustness can be adjusted according to the needs of applications.

  9. Quantum reflection of fast atoms from insulator surfaces: Eikonal description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravielle, M S; Miraglia, J E, E-mail: msilvia@iafe.uba.a, E-mail: miraglia@iafe.uba.a [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, CONICET, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Dpto. de Fisica, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    Interference effects recently observed in grazing scattering of swift atoms from insulator surfaces are studied within a distorted-wave method - the surface eikonal approximation. This approach makes use of the eikonal wave function, involving axial channeled trajectories. The theory is applied to helium atoms colliding with a LiF(001) surface along low-index crystallographic directions. The roles played by the projectile polarization and the surface rumpling are investigated, finding that both effects are important for the description of the experimental projectile distributions.

  10. A quantum trampoline for ultra-cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-de-Saint-Vincent, M.; Brantut, J.-P.; Bordé, Ch. J.; Aspect, A.; Bourdel, T.; Bouyer, P.

    2010-01-01

    We have observed the interferometric suspension of a free-falling Bose-Einstein condensate periodically submitted to multiple-order diffraction by a vertical 1D standing wave. This scheme permits simultaneously the compensation of gravity and coherent splitting/recombination of the matter waves. It results in high-contrast interference in the number of atoms detected at constant height. For long suspension times, multiple-wave interference is revealed through a sharpening of the fringes. We characterize our atom interferometer and use it to measure the acceleration of gravity.

  11. Ultrafast atomic-scale visualization of acoustic phonons generated by optically excited quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni M. Vanacore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of atomic vibrations confined in quasi-zero dimensional systems is crucial from both a fundamental point-of-view and a technological perspective. Using ultrafast electron diffraction, we monitored the lattice dynamics of GaAs quantum dots—grown by Droplet Epitaxy on AlGaAs—with sub-picosecond and sub-picometer resolutions. An ultrafast laser pulse nearly resonantly excites a confined exciton, which efficiently couples to high-energy acoustic phonons through the deformation potential mechanism. The transient behavior of the measured diffraction pattern reveals the nonequilibrium phonon dynamics both within the dots and in the region surrounding them. The experimental results are interpreted within the theoretical framework of a non-Markovian decoherence, according to which the optical excitation creates a localized polaron within the dot and a travelling phonon wavepacket that leaves the dot at the speed of sound. These findings indicate that integration of a phononic emitter in opto-electronic devices based on quantum dots for controlled communication processes can be fundamentally feasible.

  12. Two-dimensional atom localization based on coherent field controlling in a five-level M-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangqian; Li, Jinjiang; Sun, Xiudong

    2017-12-11

    We study two-dimensional sub-wavelength atom localization based on the microwave coupling field controlling and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) effect. For a five-level M-type atom, introducing a microwave coupling field between two upper levels and considering the quantum interference between two transitions from two upper levels to lower levels, the analytical expression of conditional position probability (CPP) distribution is obtained using the iterative method. The influence of the detuning of a spontaneously emitted photon, Rabi frequency of the microwave field, and the SGC effect on the CPP are discussed. The two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization with high-precision and high spatial resolution is achieved by adjusting the detuning and the Rabi frequency, where the atom can be localized in a region smaller thanλ/10×λ/10. The spatial resolution is improved significantly compared with the case without the microwave field.

  13. Vector dark matter detection using the quantum jump of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiaoli; Di, Haoran

    2018-05-01

    The hidden sector U(1) vector bosons created from inflationary fluctuations can be a substantial fraction of dark matter if their mass is around 10-5 eV. The creation mechanism makes the vector bosons' energy spectral density ρcdm / ΔE very high. Therefore, the dark electric dipole transition rate in atoms is boosted if the energy gap between atomic states equals the mass of the vector bosons. By using the Zeeman effect, the energy gap between the 2S state and the 2P state in hydrogen atoms or hydrogen like ions can be tuned. The 2S state can be populated with electrons due to its relatively long life, which is about 1/7 s. When the energy gap between the semi-ground 2S state and the 2P state matches the mass of the cosmic vector bosons, induced transitions occur and the 2P state subsequently decays into the 1S state. The 2 P → 1 S decay emitted Lyman-α photons can then be registered. The choices of target atoms depend on the experimental facilities and the mass ranges of the vector bosons. Because the mass of the vector boson is connected to the inflation scale, the proposed experiment may provide a probe to inflation.

  14. Quantum Computation and Simulation Using Neutral Fermionic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-06

    Atomic and Solid State Physics Seminar on August 30, 2011.? Measuring the Collisional Frequency Shift in a Fermi Gas; XIII Cross? Border Laser...provide a mechanism to eliminate colli - sional interaction shifts in a Fermi gas. This has important ramifica- tions for optical lattice clocks which

  15. Evolution of the field quantum entropy and entanglement in a system of multimode light field interacting resonantly with a two-level atom through N_j-degenerate N~Σ-photon process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of the field quantum entropy and entanglement in a system of multi-mode coherent light field resonantly interacting with a two-level atom by de-generating the multi-photon process is studied by utilizing the Von Neumann re-duced entropy theory,and the analytical expressions of the quantum entropy of the multimode field and the numerical calculation results for three-mode field inter-acting with the atom are obtained. Our attention focuses on the discussion of the influences of the initial average photon number,the atomic distribution angle and the phase angle of the atom dipole on the evolution of the quantum field entropy and entanglement. The results obtained from the numerical calculation indicate that: the stronger the quantum field is,the weaker the entanglement between the quan-tum field and the atom will be,and when the field is strong enough,the two sub-systems may be in a disentangled state all the time; the quantum field entropy is strongly dependent on the atomic distribution angle,namely,the quantum field and the two-level atom are always in the entangled state,and are nearly stable at maximum entanglement after a short time of vibration; the larger the atomic dis-tribution angle is,the shorter the time for the field quantum entropy to evolve its maximum value is; the phase angles of the atom dipole almost have no influences on the entanglement between the quantum field and the two-level atom. Entangled states or pure states based on these properties of the field quantum entropy can be prepared.

  16. Physics of quantum fluids new trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Modugno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  17. Detailed Balance of Thermalization Dynamics in Rydberg-Atom Quantum Simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Park, YeJe; Kim, Kyungtae; Sim, H-S; Ahn, Jaewook

    2018-05-04

    Dynamics of large complex systems, such as relaxation towards equilibrium in classical statistical mechanics, often obeys a master equation that captures essential information from the complexities. Here, we find that thermalization of an isolated many-body quantum state can be described by a master equation. We observe sudden quench dynamics of quantum Ising-like models implemented in our quantum simulator, defect-free single-atom tweezers in conjunction with Rydberg-atom interaction. Saturation of their local observables, a thermalization signature, obeys a master equation experimentally constructed by monitoring the occupation probabilities of prequench states and imposing the principle of the detailed balance. Our experiment agrees with theories and demonstrates the detailed balance in a thermalization dynamics that does not require coupling to baths or postulated randomness.

  18. Detailed Balance of Thermalization Dynamics in Rydberg-Atom Quantum Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Park, YeJe; Kim, Kyungtae; Sim, H.-S.; Ahn, Jaewook

    2018-05-01

    Dynamics of large complex systems, such as relaxation towards equilibrium in classical statistical mechanics, often obeys a master equation that captures essential information from the complexities. Here, we find that thermalization of an isolated many-body quantum state can be described by a master equation. We observe sudden quench dynamics of quantum Ising-like models implemented in our quantum simulator, defect-free single-atom tweezers in conjunction with Rydberg-atom interaction. Saturation of their local observables, a thermalization signature, obeys a master equation experimentally constructed by monitoring the occupation probabilities of prequench states and imposing the principle of the detailed balance. Our experiment agrees with theories and demonstrates the detailed balance in a thermalization dynamics that does not require coupling to baths or postulated randomness.

  19. Rydberg Atoms in Strong Fields: a Testing Ground for Quantum Chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rydberg atoms in strong static electric and magnetic fields provide experimentally accessible systems for studying the connections between classical chaos and quantum mechanics in the semiclassical limit. This experimental accessibility has motivated the development of reliable quantum mechanical solutions. This thesis uses both experimental and computed quantum spectra to test the central approaches to quantum chaos. These central approaches consist mainly of developing methods to compute the spectra of quantum systems in non -perturbative regimes, correlating statistical descriptions of eigenvalues with the classical behavior of the same Hamiltonian, and the development of semiclassical methods such as periodic-orbit theory. Particular emphasis is given to identifying the spectral signature of recurrences --quantum wave packets which follow classical orbits. The new findings include: the breakdown of the connection between energy-level statistics and classical chaos in odd-parity diamagnetic lithium, the discovery of the signature of very long period orbits in atomic spectra, quantitative evidence for the scattering of recurrences by the alkali -metal core, quantitative description of the behavior of recurrences near bifurcations, and a semiclassical interpretation of the evolution of continuum Stark spectra. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  20. Quantum information generation, storage and transmission based on nuclear spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharov, V. V.; Makarov, V. I.

    2018-05-01

    A new approach to quantum information generation, storage and transmission is proposed. It is shown that quantum information generation and storage using an ensemble of N electron spins encounter unresolvable implementation problems (at least at the present time). As an alternative implementation we discuss two promising radical systems, one with N equivalent nuclear spins and another with N nonequivalent nuclear spins. Detailed analysis shows that only the radical system containing N nonequivalent nuclei is perfectly matched for quantum information generation, storage and transmission. We develop a procedure based on pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and we apply it to the radical system with the set of nonequivalent nuclei. The resulting EPR spectrum contains 2N transition lines, where N is the number of the atoms with the nuclear spin 1/2, and each of these lines may be encoded with a determined qudit sequence. For encoding the EPR lines we propose to submit the radical system to two magnetic pulses in the direction perpendicular to the z axis of the reference frame. As a result, the radical system impulse response may be measured, stored and transmitted through the communications channel. Confirming our development, the ab initio analysis of the system with three anion radicals was done showing matching between the simulations and the theoretical predictions. The developed method may be easily adapted for quantum information generation, storage, processing and transmission in quantum computing and quantum communications applications.

  1. QUANTUM NETWORKS WITH SINGLE ATOMS, PHOTONS AND PHONONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    there is interference between two different transport channels. For instance, in a cavity far from resonance, there is interference arising from all...recovers the well-known form of a Beer -Lambert law, reading T (∆A)/T0(∆A) = exp [ −N ln ∆ 2 A + (Γ′ + Γ1D)2/4 ∆2A + Γ′2/4 ] ’ exp [ − OD1 + (2∆A/Γ′)2...Elements of Quantum Optics. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2007. [39] J.-T. Shen and S. Fan. Coherent photon transport from spontaneous emission in one

  2. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  3. Entanglement of mixed quantum states for qubits and qudit in double photoionization of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, M., E-mail: bminakshi@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Asansol Girls’ College, Asansol 713304 (India); Sen, S. [Department of Physics, Triveni Devi Bhalotia College, Raniganj 713347 (India)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We study tripartite entanglement between two electronic qubits and an ionic qudit. • We study bipartite entanglement between any two subsystems of a tripartite system. • We have presented a quantitative application of entangled properties in Neon atom. - Abstract: Quantum entanglement and its paradoxical properties are genuine physical resources for various quantum information tasks like quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography, and quantum computer technology. The physical characteristic of the entanglement of quantum-mechanical states, both for pure and mixed, has been recognized as a central resource in various aspects of quantum information processing. In this article, we study the bipartite entanglement of one electronic qubit along with the ionic qudit and also entanglement between two electronic qubits. The tripartite entanglement properties also have been investigated between two electronic qubits and an ionic qudit. All these studies have been done for the single-step double photoionization from an atom following the absorption of a single photon without observing spin orbit interaction. The dimension of the Hilbert space of the qudit depends upon the electronic state of the residual photoion A{sup 2+}. In absence of SOI, when Russell–Saunders coupling (L–S coupling) is applicable, dimension of the qudit is equal to the spin multiplicity of A{sup 2+}. For estimations of entanglement and mixedness, we consider the Peres–Horodecki condition, concurrence, entanglement of formation, negativity, linear and von Neumann entropies. In case of L–S coupling, all the properties of a qubit–qudit system can be predicted merely with the knowledge of the spins of the target atom and the residual photoion.

  4. Three dimensional atom probe imaging of GaAsSb quantum rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, A.M.; Marquis, E.A.; Taboada, A.G.; Ripalda, J.M.; Garcia, J.M.; Molina, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    Unambiguous evidence of ring-shaped self-assembled GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented on the basis of atom-probe tomography reconstructions and dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The GaAs capping process causes a strong segregation of Sb out of the center of GaSb quantum dots, leading to the self-assembled GaAs x Sb 1-x quantum rings of 20-30 nm in diameter with x∼0.33. -- Highlights: → Atom-probe tomography resolves QR morphology of GaSb self-assembled GaSb buried nanostructures. → From atom-probe tomography compositional distribution has been obtained. → Strong segregation and morphological changes are observed with respect to uncapped QR.

  5. Unified quantum theory of elastic and inelastic atomic scattering from a physisorbed monolayer solid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, L. W.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Dammann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    A unified quantum theory of the elastic and inelastic scattering of low energy He atoms by a physisorbed monolayer solid in the one-phonon approximation is given. It uses a time-dependent wave packet with phonon creation and annihilation components and has a self-consistent feedback between...... the wave functions for elastic and inelastic scattered atoms. An attenuation of diffraction scattering by inelastic processes thus is inherent in the theory. The atomic motion and monolayer vibrations in the harmonic approximation are treated quantum mechanically and unitarity is preserved. The evaluation...... of specific one-phonon events includes contributions from diffuse inelastic scattering in other phonon modes. Effects of thermally excited phonons are included using a mean field approximation. The theory is applied to an incommensurate Xe/Pt(111) monolayer (incident energy Ei = 4-16 meV), a commensurate Xe...

  6. Opinion dynamics model based on quantum formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artawan, I. Nengah, E-mail: nengahartawan@gmail.com [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Physics, Udayana University (Indonesia); Trisnawati, N. L. P., E-mail: nlptrisnawati@gmail.com [Biophysics, Department of Physics, Udayana University (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Opinion dynamics model based on quantum formalism is proposed. The core of the quantum formalism is on the half spin dynamics system. In this research the implicit time evolution operators are derived. The analogy between the model with Deffuant dan Sznajd models is discussed.

  7. Towards quantum-based privacy and voting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillery, Mark; Ziman, Mario; Buzek, Vladimir; Bielikova, Martina

    2006-01-01

    The privacy of communicating participants is often of paramount importance, but in some situations it is an essential condition. A typical example is a fair (secret) voting. We analyze in detail communication privacy based on quantum resources, and we propose new quantum protocols. Possible generalizations that would lead to voting schemes are discussed

  8. Quantum control of ultra-cold atoms: uncovering a novel connection between two paradigms of quantum nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiao; Mouritzen, Anders Sørrig; Gong, Jiangbin

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the translational motion of cold atoms using optical lattice potentials is of both theoretical and experimental interest. By designing two on-resonance time sequences of kicking optical lattice potentials, a novel connection between two paradigms of nonlinear mapping systems, i.e. the...... sequences of control fields. Extensions of this study are also discussed. The results are intended to open up a new generation of cold-atom experiments of quantum nonlinear dynamics.......Controlling the translational motion of cold atoms using optical lattice potentials is of both theoretical and experimental interest. By designing two on-resonance time sequences of kicking optical lattice potentials, a novel connection between two paradigms of nonlinear mapping systems, i...

  9. Quantum Hall states of atomic Bose gases: Density profiles in single-layer and multilayer geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N. R.; Lankvelt, F. J. M. van; Reijnders, J. W.; Schoutens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the density profiles of confined atomic Bose gases in the high-rotation limit, in single-layer and multilayer geometries. We show that, in a local-density approximation, the density in a single layer shows a landscape of quantized steps due to the formation of incompressible liquids, which are analogous to fractional quantum Hall liquids for a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field. In a multilayered setup we find different phases, depending on the strength of the interlayer tunneling t. We discuss the situation where a vortex lattice in the three-dimensional condensate (at large tunneling) undergoes quantum melting at a critical tunneling t c 1 . For tunneling well below t c 1 one expects weakly coupled or isolated layers, each exhibiting a landscape of quantum Hall liquids. After expansion, this gives a radial density distribution with characteristic features (cusps) that provide experimental signatures of the quantum Hall liquids

  10. Ultrabright, narrow-band photon-pair source for atomic quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pin-Ju; Chen, Ying-Cheng

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate an ultrabright, narrow-band and frequency-tunable photon-pair source based on cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) which is compatible with atomic transition of rubidium D 2-line (780 nm) or cesium D 2-line (852 nm). With the pump beam alternating between a high and a low power phase, the output is switching between the optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and photon-pair generation mode. We utilize the OPO output light to lock the cavity length to maintain the double resonances of signal and idler, as well as to lock the signal frequency to cesium atomic transition. With a type-II phase matching and a double-passed pump scheme such that the cluster frequency spacing is larger than the SPDC bandwidth, the photon-pair output is in a nearly single-mode operation as confirmed by a scanning Fabry–Perot interferometer with its output detected by a photomultiplier. The achieved generation and detection rates are 7.24× {10}5 and 6142 s‑1 mW‑1, respectively. The correlation time of the photon pair is 21.6(2.2) ns, corresponding to a bandwidth of 2π × 6.6(6) MHz. The spectral brightness is 1.06× {10}5 s‑1 mW‑1 MHz‑1. This is a relatively high value under a single-mode operation with the cavity-SPDC scheme. The generated single photons can be readily used in experiments related to atomic quantum memories.

  11. Unfavorable regions in the ramachandran plot: Is it really steric hindrance? The interacting quantum atoms perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Peter I; Popelier, Paul L A

    2017-11-05

    Accurate description of the intrinsic preferences of amino acids is important to consider when developing a biomolecular force field. In this study, we use a modern energy partitioning approach called Interacting Quantum Atoms to inspect the cause of the φ and ψ torsional preferences of three dipeptides (Gly, Val, and Ile). Repeating energy trends at each of the molecular, functional group, and atomic levels are observed across both (1) the three amino acids and (2) the φ/ψ scans in Ramachandran plots. At the molecular level, it is surprisingly electrostatic destabilization that causes the high-energy regions in the Ramachandran plot, not molecular steric hindrance (related to the intra-atomic energy). At the functional group and atomic levels, the importance of key peptide atoms (O i -1 , C i , N i , N i +1 ) and some sidechain hydrogen atoms (H γ ) are identified as responsible for the destabilization seen in the energetically disfavored Ramachandran regions. Consistently, the O i -1 atoms are particularly important for the explanation of dipeptide intrinsic behavior, where electrostatic and steric destabilization unusually complement one another. The findings suggest that, at least for these dipeptides, it is the peptide group atoms that dominate the intrinsic behavior, more so than the sidechain atoms. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Parametrization of Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanical Methods: Bond-Tuned Link Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Ping; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2018-05-30

    Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are the most powerful available methods for high-level treatments of subsystems of very large systems. The treatment of the QM-MM boundary strongly affects the accuracy of QM/MM calculations. For QM/MM calculations having covalent bonds cut by the QM-MM boundary, it has been proposed previously to use a scheme with system-specific tuned fluorine link atoms. Here, we propose a broadly parametrized scheme where the parameters of the tuned F link atoms depend only on the type of bond being cut. In the proposed new scheme, the F link atom is tuned for systems with a certain type of cut bond at the QM-MM boundary instead of for a specific target system, and the resulting link atoms are call bond-tuned link atoms. In principle, the bond-tuned link atoms can be as convenient as the popular H link atoms, and they are especially well adapted for high-throughput and accurate QM/MM calculations. Here, we present the parameters for several kinds of cut bonds along with a set of validation calculations that confirm that the proposed bond-tuned link-atom scheme can be as accurate as the system-specific tuned F link-atom scheme.

  13. Parametrization of Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanical Methods: Bond-Tuned Link Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Ping Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM methods are the most powerful available methods for high-level treatments of subsystems of very large systems. The treatment of the QM−MM boundary strongly affects the accuracy of QM/MM calculations. For QM/MM calculations having covalent bonds cut by the QM−MM boundary, it has been proposed previously to use a scheme with system-specific tuned fluorine link atoms. Here, we propose a broadly parametrized scheme where the parameters of the tuned F link atoms depend only on the type of bond being cut. In the proposed new scheme, the F link atom is tuned for systems with a certain type of cut bond at the QM−MM boundary instead of for a specific target system, and the resulting link atoms are call bond-tuned link atoms. In principle, the bond-tuned link atoms can be as convenient as the popular H link atoms, and they are especially well adapted for high-throughput and accurate QM/MM calculations. Here, we present the parameters for several kinds of cut bonds along with a set of validation calculations that confirm that the proposed bond-tuned link-atom scheme can be as accurate as the system-specific tuned F link-atom scheme.

  14. Ground state energy of an hydrogen atom confined in carbon nano-structures: a diffusion quantum Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molayem, M.; Tayebi-Rad, Gh.; Esmaeli, L.; Namiranian, A.; Fouladvand, M. E.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Using the diffusion quantum monte Carlo method, the ground state energy of an Hydrogen atom confined in a carbon nano tube and a C60 molecule is calculated. For Hydrogen atom confined in small diameter tubes, the ground state energy shows significant deviation from a free Hydrogen atom, while with increasing the diameter this deviation tends to zero.

  15. Quantum correlations between each two-level system in a pair of atoms and general coherent fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdel-Khalek

    Full Text Available The quantitative description of the quantum correlations between each two-level system in a two-atom system and the coherent fields initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs is considered. Specifically, we consider two atoms locally interacting with PLPCSs and take into account the different terms of interactions, the entanglement and quantum discord are studied including the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects. Using the monogamic relation between the entanglement of formation and quantum discord in tripartite systems, we show that the control and preservation of the different kinds of quantum correlations greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical quantities. Finally, we explore the link between the dynamical behavior of quantum correlations and nonclassicality of the fields with and without atomic motion effect. Keywords: Quantum correlations, Monogamic relation, Coherent states, Power-law potentials, Wehrl entropy

  16. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, V Y F; Pijn, D R M; Schlatter, H; Torralbo-Campo, L; La Rooij, A L; Mulder, G B; Naber, J; Soudijn, M L; Tauschinsky, A; Abarbanel, C; Hadad, B; Golan, E; Folman, R; Spreeuw, R J C

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold (87)Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  17. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, V. Y. F. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, PO Box 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Complex Photonic Systems (COPS), MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Pijn, D. R. M.; Schlatter, H.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; La Rooij, A. L.; Mulder, G. B.; Naber, J.; Soudijn, M. L.; Tauschinsky, A.; Spreeuw, R. J. C., E-mail: r.j.c.spreeuw@uva.nl [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, PO Box 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abarbanel, C.; Hadad, B.; Golan, E. [Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Folman, R. [Department of Physics and Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  18. Virial theorem in the Kohn-Sham density-functional theory formalism: Accurate calculation of the atomic quantum theory of atoms in molecules energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A.; Ayers, P.W.; Gotz, A.W.; Castillo-Alvarado, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for computing the atom-in-molecule [quantum theory of atoms in molecule (QTAIM)] energies in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory is presented and tested by computing QTAIM energies for a set of representative molecules. In the new approach, the contribution for the correlation-kinetic

  19. Optically Controlled Distributed Quantum Computing Using Atomic Ensembles As Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    of lambda - type atoms. In Section 3, we summarize the model we had de- veloped previously for light shift blockade (LSB) of collective ex- citation...plane of | 〉a c1 2 and | 〉c a1 2 , so that the rotation matrix can be written as ⎡ ⎣ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎤ ⎦ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ = − R 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 2...the Hamiltonian in the basis of states a a1 2 , a c1 2 , c a1 2 and c c1 2 is = ⊗ + ⊗H H I I H1 2 1 2 where Ii is the identity matrix and Hi is the

  20. Three dimensional atom probe imaging of GaAsSb quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, A M; Marquis, E A; Taboada, A G; Ripalda, J M; García, J M; Molina, S I

    2011-07-01

    Unambiguous evidence of ring-shaped self-assembled GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented on the basis of atom-probe tomography reconstructions and dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The GaAs capping process causes a strong segregation of Sb out of the center of GaSb quantum dots, leading to the self-assembled GaAs(x)Sb(1-x) quantum rings of 20-30 nm in diameter with x ∼ 0.33. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurements of diffusion resonances for the atom optics quantum kicked rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M E K; Sadgrove, M P; Daley, A J; Gray, R N C; Tan, S M; Parkins, A S; Christensen, N; Leonhardt, R

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental observations of diffusion resonances for the quantum kicked rotor with weak decoherence. Cold caesium atoms are subject to a pulsed standing wave of near-resonant light, with spontaneous emission providing environmental coupling. The mean energy as a function of the pulse period is determined during the late-time diffusion period for a constant probability of spontaneous emission. Structure in the late-time energy is seen to increase with physical kicking strength. The observed structure is related to Shepelyansky's predictions for the initial quantum diffusion rates

  2. Atoms as nonlinear mixers for detection of quantum correlations at ultrahigh frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiades, N.P.; Polzik, E.S.; Kimble, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of quantum correlations are reported for a frequency difference of 25 THz between the signal and idler output fields generated by a subthreshold nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator. By simultaneously exciting a two-photon transition in atomic Cs by a combination of signal, idler, and open-quotes references oscillatorclose quotes fields, we record modulation of the excited-state population due to quantum interference between two alternative excitation pathways. The observed phase-sensitive modulation is proportional to the correlation function left-angle E s E i right-angle for the quantized signal and idler fields. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  4. Bound state quantum field theory application to atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Sapirstein, Jonathan

    2019-01-01

    Two aspects of the book should appeal to a wide audience. One aspect would be the comprehensive coverage on the latest updates and developments this book provides, besides Bethe and Salpeter's handbook on hydrogen and helium, which is still widely regarded as useful. The other aspect would be that a major part of the book uses “effective field theory”, a way of including quantum electrodynamics (QED) that starts with the familiar Schrödinger equation, and then adds perturbing operators derived in a rather simple manner that incorporates QED. Effective field theory is used in a number of fields including particle physics and nuclear physics, and readership is targeted at these communities too.Additionally, students using this book in conjunction with Peskin's textbook could learn to carry out fairly sophisticated calculations in QED in order to learn the technique, as this book comes with practical calculations.Also included is a very clear exposition of the Bethe–Salpeter equation, which is simply either ...

  5. Continuous-measurement-enhanced self-trapping of degenerate ultracold atoms in a double well: Nonlinear quantum Zeno effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weidong; Liu Jie

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate the influence of measurements on the quantum dynamics of degenerate Bose atoms gases in a symmetric double well. We show that continuous measurements enhance asymmetry on the density distribution of the atoms and broaden the parameter regime for self-trapping. We term this phenomenon as nonlinear quantum Zeno effect in analog to the celebrated Zeno effect in a linear quantum system. Under discontinuous measurements, the self-trapping due to the atomic interaction in the degenerate bosons is shown to be destroyed completely. Underlying physics is revealed and possible experimental realization is discussed

  6. Entanglement of a two-atom system driven by the quantum vacuum in arbitrary cavity size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Hidalgo, G., E-mail: gfloreshidalgo@unifei.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Química, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, 37500-903, Itajubá, MG (Brazil); Rojas, M., E-mail: moises.leyva@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CP 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Rojas, Onofre, E-mail: ors@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CP 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil)

    2017-05-10

    We study the entanglement dynamics of two distinguishable atoms confined into a cavity and interacting with a quantum vacuum field. As a simplified model for this system, we consider two harmonic oscillators linearly coupled to a massless scalar field which are inside a spherical cavity of radius R. Through the concurrence, the entanglement dynamics for the two-atom system is discussed for a range of initial states composed of a superposition of atomic states. Our results reveal how the entanglement of the two atoms behaves through the time evolution, in a precise way, for arbitrary cavity size and for arbitrary coupling constant. All our computations are analytical and only the final step is numerical. - Highlights: • Entanglement time evolution in arbitrary cavity size is considered. • In free space concurrence approaches a fixed value at large time. • For finite cavity, concurrence behaves almost as a periodic function of time.

  7. Computational code in atomic and nuclear quantum optics: Advanced computing multiphoton resonance parameters for atoms in a strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Gurskaya, M. Yu; Ignatenko, A. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Serga, I. N.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Ternovsky, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The consistent relativistic energy approach to the finite Fermi-systems (atoms and nuclei) in a strong realistic laser field is presented and applied to computing the multiphoton resonances parameters in some atoms and nuclei. The approach is based on the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism, multiphoton resonance lines moments technique and advanced Ivanov-Ivanova algorithm of calculating the Green’s function of the Dirac equation. The data for multiphoton resonance width and shift for the Cs atom and the 57Fe nucleus in dependence upon the laser intensity are listed.

  8. Optimization of digital image processing to determine quantum dots' height and density from atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J E; Paciornik, S; Pinto, L D; Ptak, F; Pires, M P; Souza, P L

    2018-01-01

    An optimized method of digital image processing to interpret quantum dots' height measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy is presented. The method was developed by combining well-known digital image processing techniques and particle recognition algorithms. The properties of quantum dot structures strongly depend on dots' height, among other features. Determination of their height is sensitive to small variations in their digital image processing parameters, which can generate misleading results. Comparing the results obtained with two image processing techniques - a conventional method and the new method proposed herein - with the data obtained by determining the height of quantum dots one by one within a fixed area, showed that the optimized method leads to more accurate results. Moreover, the log-normal distribution, which is often used to represent natural processes, shows a better fit to the quantum dots' height histogram obtained with the proposed method. Finally, the quantum dots' height obtained were used to calculate the predicted photoluminescence peak energies which were compared with the experimental data. Again, a better match was observed when using the proposed method to evaluate the quantum dots' height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The quantum exodus jewish fugitives, the atomic bomb, and the holocaust

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Gordon Murray

    2012-01-01

    It was no accident that the Holocaust and the Atomic Bomb happened at the same time. When the Nazis came into power in 1933, their initial objective was not to get rid of Jews. Rather, their aim was to refine German culture: Jewish professors and teachers at fine universities were sacked. Atomic science had attracted a lot of Jewish talent, and as Albert Einstein and other quantum exiles scattered, they realized that they held the key to a weapon of unimaginable power. Convincedthat their gentile counterparts in Germany had come to the same conclusion, and having witnessed what the Nazis were

  10. Simulations of quantum transport in nanoscale systems: application to atomic gold and silver wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2002-01-01

    . The potential drop profile and induced electronic current (and therefore the conductance) are obtained from first principles. The method takes into account the atomic structure of both the nanoscale structure and the semi-infinite electrodes through which the potential is applied. Non-equilibrium Green......'s function techniques are used to calculate the quantum conductance. Here we apply the method to the study of the electronic transport in wires of gold and silver with atomic thickness. We show the results of our calculations, and compare with some of the abundant experimental data on these systems....

  11. Atomic collision experiments at the border line between classical and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilanti, V.

    1984-01-01

    In order to understand atomic and molecular interactions, one has to learn how to live with the wave-particle duality, considering classical nuclei and quantum electrons. A better way, illustrated by reference to experiments, is by quasiclassical (or semi-classical) mechanics, governing a world with a quasi-zero Planck's constant. One thus explains optical analogs (shadows, rainbows, glories) as interference effects in atomic collisions. Reference is also made to Wheeler's 'black bird' on the inversion problem from spectroscopy and scattering to molecular structure. The paper concludes outlining a journey in the hyperspace to escape from Einstein's torus and to find interferences and resonances in three body scattering and reactions. (Auth.)

  12. Accelerator based atomic physics experiments: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, C.D.

    1976-01-01

    Atomic Physics research with beams from accelerators has continued to expand and the number of papers and articles at meetings and in journals reflects a steadily increasing interest and an increasing support from various funding agencies. An attempt will be made to point out where interdisciplinary benefits have occurred, and where applications of the new results to engineering problems are expected. Drawing from material which will be discussed in the conference, a list of the most active areas of research is presented. Accelerator based atomic physics brings together techniques from many areas, including chemistry, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and engineering. An example is the use of crystal channeling to sort some of the phenomena of ordinary heavy ion stopping powers. This tool has helped us to reach a better understanding of stopping mechanisms with the result that now we have established a better base for predicting energy losses of heavy ions in various materials

  13. Effects of quantum statistics in cold-atom gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis recalls the main properties of Bose-Einstein condensates as they have been experimentally produced since 1995 in diluted alkaline gases and as they have been magnetically trapped. The author discusses the standard theoretical approach of Bogoliubov which relies on an hypothesis of symmetry breakage. Then, the author addresses the dynamic consequences of this hypothesis, in particularly on the existence of a condensate phase jamming which results in a loss of coherence properties for the system. The third part addresses the dynamic study of a condensate within a pattern-type potential. A numerical integration of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is performed. Through variations of the non-linear parameter (which expresses interactions between atoms), the influence of non-linearities on the system behaviour is analysed. Notably, the author shows how, by increasing this parameter, the macroscopic wave function passes from a regular dynamics to a stochastic dynamics. In the fourth part, the author reports the modelling of an experiment of mixing with five waves within the context of matter waves. He shows how to adapt this experiment for fermions/bosons mixing where an incident fermion wave is sent towards a network of condensed bosons [fr

  14. Quantum transport in defective phosphorene nanoribbons: Effects of atomic vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-02-01

    Defects are almost inevitably present in realistic materials and defective materials are expected to exhibit very different properties than their nondefective (perfect) counterparts. Here, using a combination of the tight-binding approach and the scattering matrix formalism, we investigate the electronic transport properties of defective phosphorene nanoribbons (PNRs) containing atomic vacancies. We find that for both armchair PNRs (APNRs) and zigzag PNRs (ZPNRs), single vacancies can create quasilocalized states, which can affect their conductance. With increasing vacancy concentration, three different transport regimes are identified: ballistic, diffusive, and Anderson localized ones. In particular, ZPNRs that are known to be metallic due to the presence of edge states become semiconducting: edge conductance vanishes and transport gap appears due to Anderson localization. Moreover, we find that for a fixed vacancy concentration, both APNRs and ZPNRs of narrower width and/or longer length are more sensitive to vacancy disorder than their wider and/or shorter counterparts, and that for the same ribbon length and width, ZPNRs are more sensitive to vacancy disorder than APNRs.

  15. Love, literature and the quantum atom Niels Bohr's 1913 trilogy revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Aaserud, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Niels Bohr ranks with Einstein among the physicists of the 20th century. He rose to this status through his invention of the quantum theory of the atom and his leadership in its defense and development. He also ranks with Einstein in his humanism and his sense of responsibility to his science and the society that enabled him to create it. Our book presents unpublished excerpts from extensive correspondence between Bohr and his immediate family, and uses it to describe and analyze the psychological and cultural background to his invention. The book also contains a reprinting of the three papers of 1913 - the "Trilogy" - in which Bohr worked out the provisional basis of a quantum theory of the atom.

  16. Quantum state population transfer of lithium atoms induced by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Huanqiang; Zhang Xianzhou; Jia Guangrui; Zhang Yonghui; Jiang Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA) and B-splines function, we have calculated the five quantum state population transfer of rydberg lithium atoms. We also analyse the influence of the four major parameters of the frequency-chirped laser pulses field on transition. The result shows that the population can be completely transferred to the target state by changing the parameters of the laser pulse and achieve manual controls to a certain degree. (authors)

  17. Optical bistability induced by quantum coherence in a negative index atomic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong-Jun; Sun Hui; Li Jin-Ping; Yin Bao-Yin; Guo Hong-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Bistability behaviors in an optical ring cavity filled with a dense V-type four-level atomic medium are theoretically investigated. It is found that the optical bistability can appear in the negative refraction frequency band, while both the bistability and multi-stability can occur in the positive refraction frequency bands. Therefore, optical bistability can be realized from conventional material to negative index material due to quantum coherence in our scheme. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Quantitative criterion for quantum interference within spontaneous emission modification of a driven ladder atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiaren; Zhang Zhiyi; Xiao George; Grover, C P

    2003-01-01

    The spontaneous emission spectrum of a ladder three-level atom with an upper transition driven by a coherent field is calculated under a universal model where various decays, any incoherent pumping and coherent driving are taken into account. The analytical expression for the spectrum profile is given on the basis of the quantum regression theorem. To our knowledge, it is the first time that the quantitative criterion condition Ω ab - γ ac vertical bar, under which quantum destructive interference induced by the coherent driving field occurs, is deduced for the modification of spontaneous emission from the middle level to the ground level. The roles and limits of incoherent pumping, coherent driving and experimental configuration are discussed for realizing the quantum interference and reducing the Doppler effects

  19. Site-controlled quantum dots fabricated using an atomic-force microscope assisted technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuma Y

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn atomic-force microscope assisted technique is developed to control the position and size of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Presently, the site precision is as good as ± 1.5 nm and the size fluctuation is within ± 5% with the minimum controllable lateral diameter of 20 nm. With the ability of producing tightly packed and differently sized QDs, sophisticated QD arrays can be controllably fabricated for the application in quantum computing. The optical quality of such site-controlled QDs is found comparable to some conventionally self-assembled semiconductor QDs. The single dot photoluminescence of site-controlled InAs/InP QDs is studied in detail, presenting the prospect to utilize them in quantum communication as precisely controlled single photon emitters working at telecommunication bands.

  20. Requirements for fault-tolerant factoring on an atom-optics quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J; Stephens, Ashley M; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-01-01

    Quantum information processing and its associated technologies have reached a pivotal stage in their development, with many experiments having established the basic building blocks. Moving forward, the challenge is to scale up to larger machines capable of performing computational tasks not possible today. This raises questions that need to be urgently addressed, such as what resources these machines will consume and how large will they be. Here we estimate the resources required to execute Shor's factoring algorithm on an atom-optics quantum computer architecture. We determine the runtime and size of the computer as a function of the problem size and physical error rate. Our results suggest that once the physical error rate is low enough to allow quantum error correction, optimization to reduce resources and increase performance will come mostly from integrating algorithms and circuits within the error correction environment, rather than from improving the physical hardware.

  1. Semiclassical analysis of quantum localization of the periodically kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Persson, E.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Grossmann, F.

    2004-01-01

    The periodically kicked Rydberg atom displays quantum localization, features of which depend on the orientation and strength of the unidirectional kicks. They include scarring of the wave function, localization by cantori, and exponential localization in the regime of strong perturbation resembling dynamical localization. Using the semiclassical Herman-Kluk propagator we investigate the degree to which semiclassical dynamics can mimic quantum localization. While the semiclassical approximation has difficulties to reproduce the scarred wave functions, the exponential tail which is a typical signature of the dynamical localization is well represented in the case of strong classical diffusion. Also the localization by broken tori is observed in the semiclassical recurrence probability for short times but the deviation from the corresponding quantum dynamics becomes more pronounced for the long-time evolution

  2. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  3. An endohedral fullerene-based nuclear spin quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Chenyong; Suter, Dieter; Du Jiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new scalable quantum computer architecture based on endohedral fullerene molecules. Qubits are encoded in the nuclear spins of the endohedral atoms, which posses even longer coherence times than the electron spins which are used as the qubits in previous proposals. To address the individual qubits, we use the hyperfine interaction, which distinguishes two modes (active and passive) of the nuclear spin. Two-qubit quantum gates are effectively implemented by employing the electronic dipolar interaction between adjacent molecules. The electron spins also assist in the qubit initialization and readout. Our architecture should be significantly easier to implement than earlier proposals for spin-based quantum computers, such as the concept of Kane [B.E. Kane, Nature 393 (1998) 133]. - Research highlights: → We propose an endohedral fullerene-based scalable quantum computer architecture. → Qubits are encoded on nuclear spins, while electron spins serve as auxiliaries. → Nuclear spins are individually addressed using the hyperfine interaction. → Two-qubit gates are implemented through the medium of electron spins.

  4. Quantum Monte-Carlo programming for atoms, molecules, clusters, and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schattke, Wolfgang; Diez Muino, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This is a book that initiates the reader into the basic concepts and practical applications of Quantum Monte Carlo. Because of the simplicity of its theoretical concept, the authors focus on the variational Quantum Monte Carlo scheme. The reader is enabled to proceed from simple examples as the hydrogen atom to advanced ones as the Lithium solid. In between, several intermediate steps are introduced, including the Hydrogen molecule (2 electrons), the Lithium atom (3 electrons) and expanding to an arbitrary number of electrons to finally treat the three-dimensional periodic array of Lithium atoms in a crystal. The book is unique, because it provides both theory and numerical programs. It pedagogically explains how to transfer into computational tools what is usually described in a theoretical textbook. It also includes the detailed physical understanding of methodology that cannot be found in a code manual. The combination of both aspects allows the reader to assimilate the fundamentals of Quantum Monte Carlo not only by reading but also by practice.

  5. Physical reason for quantum behaviour of the electron and stability of the main state of the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    An electron model is proposed explaining the physical reasons for its nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical behaviour, the origin of its own mechanical and magnetic momentum and field energy. As an example the main electron state in hydrogen atom is obtained

  6. Creating Very True Quantum Algorithms for Quantum Energy Based Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Geurdes, Han; Batle, Josep; Abdalla, Soliman; Farouk, Ahmed; Diep, Do Ngoc

    2018-04-01

    An interpretation of quantum mechanics is discussed. It is assumed that quantum is energy. An algorithm by means of the energy interpretation is discussed. An algorithm, based on the energy interpretation, for fast determining a homogeneous linear function f( x) := s. x = s 1 x 1 + s 2 x 2 + ⋯ + s N x N is proposed. Here x = ( x 1, … , x N ), x j ∈ R and the coefficients s = ( s 1, … , s N ), s j ∈ N. Given the interpolation values (f(1), f(2),...,f(N))=ěc {y}, the unknown coefficients s = (s1(ěc {y}),\\dots , sN(ěc {y})) of the linear function shall be determined, simultaneously. The speed of determining the values is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of N. Our method is based on the generalized Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm to qudit systems. Next, by using M parallel quantum systems, M homogeneous linear functions are determined, simultaneously. The speed of obtaining the set of M homogeneous linear functions is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of N × M.

  7. Machine Learning Based Localization and Classification with Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Cameron; Griffin, Lewis D.; Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate identification of position, material, orientation, and shape of objects imaged by a Rb 85 atomic magnetometer performing electromagnetic induction imaging supported by machine learning. Machine learning maximizes the information extracted from the images created by the magnetometer, demonstrating the use of hidden data. Localization 2.6 times better than the spatial resolution of the imaging system and successful classification up to 97% are obtained. This circumvents the need of solving the inverse problem and demonstrates the extension of machine learning to diffusive systems, such as low-frequency electrodynamics in media. Automated collection of task-relevant information from quantum-based electromagnetic imaging will have a relevant impact from biomedicine to security.

  8. Manipulating molecular quantum states with classical metal atom inputs: demonstration of a single molecule NOR logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, We-Hyo; Manzano, Carlos; Renaud, Nicolas; de Mendoza, Paula; De Sarkar, Abir; Ample, Francisco; Hliwa, Mohamed; Echavarren, Antonio M; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan; Joachim, Christian

    2011-02-22

    Quantum states of a trinaphthylene molecule were manipulated by putting its naphthyl branches in contact with single Au atoms. One Au atom carries 1-bit of classical information input that is converted into quantum information throughout the molecule. The Au-trinaphthylene electronic interactions give rise to measurable energy shifts of the molecular electronic states demonstrating a NOR logic gate functionality. The NOR truth table of the single molecule logic gate was characterized by means of scanning tunnelling spectroscopy.

  9. Conductive atomic force microscopy studies on the transformation of GeSi quantum dots to quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S L; Xue, F; Wu, R; Cui, J; Jiang, Z M; Yang, X J

    2009-04-01

    Conductive atomic force microscopy has been employed to study the topography and conductance distribution of individual GeSi quantum dots (QDs) and quantum rings (QRs) during the transformation from QDs to QRs by depositing an Si capping layer on QDs. The current distribution changes significantly with the topographic transformation during the Si capping process. Without the capping layer, the QDs are dome-shaped and the conductance is higher at the ring region between the center and boundary than that at the center. After capping with 0.32 nm Si, the shape of the QDs changes to pyramidal and the current is higher at both the center and the arris. When the Si capping layer increases to 2 nm, QRs are formed and the current of individual QRs is higher at the rim than that at the central hole. By comparing the composition distributions obtained by scanning Auger microscopy and atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching, the origin of the current distribution change is discussed.

  10. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Graphene based quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Pan, Y.; Mao, J. H.; Gao, M.; Guo, H. M.; Du, S. X.; Greber, T.; Gao, H.-J.

    2010-08-01

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  11. Quantum phases of low-dimensional ultra-cold atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Ludwig G.

    2007-06-01

    In this thesis we derive and explore the quantum phases of various types of ultracold atom systems, as well as their experimental signature. The technology of cooling, trapping and manipulating ultracold atoms has advanced in an amazing fashion during the last decade, which has led to the study of many-body effects of atomic ensembles. We first consider atomic mixtures in one dimension, which show a rich structure of phases, using a Luttinger liquid description. We then go on to consider how noise correlations in time-of-flight images of one-dimensional systems can be used to draw conclusions about the many-body state that they're in. Thirdly, we consider the quantum phases of Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices, either square lattices or triangular lattices, using the powerful method of functional renormalization group analysis. Lastly, we study the phases of two-coupled quasi-superfluids in two dimensions, which shows unusual phases, and which could be used to realize the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, i.e. the generation of topological defects by ramping across a phase transition, first proposed in the context of an early universe scenario.

  12. Atomic-scale structure of self-assembled In(Ga)As quantum rings in GaAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, P.; Koenraad, P.M.; Wolter, J.H.; Granados, D.; Garcia, J.M.; Fomin, V.; Gladilin, V.N.; Devreese, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    We present an atomic-scale analysis of the indium distribution of self-assembled In(Ga)As quantum rings (QRs) which are formed from InAs quantum dots by capping with a thin layer of GaAs and subsequent annealing. We find that the size and shape of QRs as observed by cross-sectional scanning

  13. Quantum physics of entangled systems: wave-particle duality and atom-photon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of quantum physics is the wave nature of matter. It explains experimentally observed effects like interference and diffraction, occurring when an object moves from one place to another along several indistinguishable ways simultaneously. The wave nature disappears when the individual ways are distinguishable. In this case, the particle nature of the object becomes visible. To determine the particle nature quantitatively, the way of the object has to be measured. Here, large progress has been made recently with new techniques, enabling one to investigate single moving atoms in a controlled manner. Two examples are discussed in the following two sections. The first experiment describes an atom interferometer, where the way of the atom is entangled with its internal state. This allows one to explore the origin of wave-particle duality and perform a quantitative test of this fundamental principle. The second experiment reports on the observation of an atom-photon molecule, a bound state between an atom and a single photon. A fascinating aspect of this system is that it makes possible to monitor the motion of a single neutral atom in real time. (orig.)

  14. Silicon based quantum dot hybrid qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun

    2015-03-01

    The charge and spin degrees of freedom of an electron constitute natural bases for constructing quantum two level systems, or qubits, in semiconductor quantum dots. The quantum dot charge qubit offers a simple architecture and high-speed operation, but generally suffers from fast dephasing due to strong coupling of the environment to the electron's charge. On the other hand, quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, but their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications. This talk will present experimental progress of a `hybrid' qubit, formed by three electrons in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot, which combines desirable characteristics (speed and coherence) in the past found separately in qubits based on either charge or spin degrees of freedom. Using resonant microwaves, we first discuss qubit operations near the `sweet spot' for charge qubit operation. Along with fast (>GHz) manipulation rates for any rotation axis on the Bloch sphere, we implement two independent tomographic characterization schemes in the charge qubit regime: traditional quantum process tomography (QPT) and gate set tomography (GST). We also present resonant qubit operations of the hybrid qubit performed on the same device, DC pulsed gate operations of which were recently demonstrated. We demonstrate three-axis control and the implementation of dynamic decoupling pulse sequences. Performing QPT on the hybrid qubit, we show that AC gating yields π rotation process fidelities higher than 93% for X-axis and 96% for Z-axis rotations, which demonstrates efficient quantum control of semiconductor qubits using resonant microwaves. We discuss a path forward for achieving fidelities better than the threshold for quantum error correction using surface codes. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028), and by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  15. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, Bernd; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Kleinpoppen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Derives parameters for electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules calculated from theory. Delivers the quantum mechanical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Presents state-of-the-art experiments in atomic and molecular physics and related theoretical approaches. The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter. The feasibility of such perfect' and-or 'complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory. It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment 'complete'. The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases. This book captures the spirit of research in the direction of the complete experiment in atomic and molecular physics, considering some of the basic quantum processes: scattering, Auger decay and photo-ionization. It includes a description of the experimental methods used to realize, step by step, the complete experiment up to the level of the amplitudes and phases. The corresponding arsenal includes, beyond determining the total cross section, the observation of angle and spin resolved quantities, photon polarization and correlation parameters, measurements applying coincidence techniques, preparing initially polarized targets, and even more sophisticated methods. The 'complete' experiment is, until today, hardly to perform

  16. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Bernd [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Kleinpoppen, Hans

    2013-07-01

    Derives parameters for electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules calculated from theory. Delivers the quantum mechanical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Presents state-of-the-art experiments in atomic and molecular physics and related theoretical approaches. The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter. The feasibility of such perfect' and-or 'complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory. It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment 'complete'. The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases. This book captures the spirit of research in the direction of the complete experiment in atomic and molecular physics, considering some of the basic quantum processes: scattering, Auger decay and photo-ionization. It includes a description of the experimental methods used to realize, step by step, the complete experiment up to the level of the amplitudes and phases. The corresponding arsenal includes, beyond determining the total cross section, the observation of angle and spin resolved quantities, photon polarization and correlation parameters, measurements applying coincidence techniques, preparing initially polarized targets, and even more sophisticated methods. The 'complete' experiment is

  17. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  18. Numerical methods for atomic quantum gases with applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and to ultracold fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minguzzi, A.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Vignolo, P.

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of Bose–Einstein condensation in ultra-cold vapours of alkali atoms has given enormous impulse to the study of dilute atomic gases in condensed quantum states inside magnetic traps and optical lattices. High-purity and easy optical access make them ideal candidates to investigate

  19. Interplay between switching driven by the tunneling current andatomic force of a bistable four-atom Si quantum dot

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamazaki, S.; Maeda, K.; Sugimoto, Y.; Abe, M.; Zobač, Vladimír; Pou, P.; Rodrigo, L.; Mutombo, Pingo; Perez, R.; Jelínek, Pavel; Morita, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2015), 4356-4363 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : atomic manipulation * atomic switch * Si quantum dot * scanning tunneling microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.779, year: 2015

  20. SiNx-induced intermixing in AlInGaAs/InP quantum well through interdiffusion of group III atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ko-Hsin; Thomas, Kevin; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Manganaro, Marina; Corbett, Brian; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Peters, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the composition profiles within intermixed and non-intermixed AlInGaAs-based multiple quantum wells structures by secondary ion mass spectrometry and observe that the band gap blue shift is mainly attributed to the interdiffusion of In and Ga atoms between the quantum wells and the barriers. Based on these results, several AlInGaAs-based single quantum well (SQW) structures with various compressive strain (CS) levels were grown and their photoluminescence spectra were investigated after the intermixing process involving the encapsulation of thin SiN x dielectric films on the surface followed by rapid thermal annealing. In addition to the annealing temperature, we report that the band gap shift can be also enhanced by increasing the CS level in the SQW. For instance, at an annealing temperature of 850 °C, the photoluminescence blue shift is found to reach more than 110 nm for the sample with 1.2%-CS SQW, but only 35 nm with 0.4%-CS SQW. We expect that this relatively larger atomic compositional gradient of In (and Ga) between the compressively strained quantum well and the barrier can facilitate the atomic interdiffusion and it thus leads to the larger band gap shift.

  1. Quantum secret sharing based on quantum error-correcting codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zu-Rong; Liu Wei-Tao; Li Cheng-Zu

    2011-01-01

    Quantum secret sharing(QSS) is a procedure of sharing classical information or quantum information by using quantum states. This paper presents how to use a [2k − 1, 1, k] quantum error-correcting code (QECC) to implement a quantum (k, 2k − 1) threshold scheme. It also takes advantage of classical enhancement of the [2k − 1, 1, k] QECC to establish a QSS scheme which can share classical information and quantum information simultaneously. Because information is encoded into QECC, these schemes can prevent intercept-resend attacks and be implemented on some noisy channels. (general)

  2. Distance Ranging Based on Quantum Entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jun-Jun; Han Xiao-Chun; Zeng Gui-Hua; Fang Chen; Zhao Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    In the quantum metrology, applications of quantum techniques based on entanglement bring in some better performances than conventional approaches. We experimentally investigate an application of entanglement in accurate ranging based on the second-order coherence in the time domain. By a fitting algorithm in the data processing, the optimization results show a precision of ±200 μm at a distance of 1043.3m. In addition, the influence of jamming noise on the ranging scheme is studied. With some different fitting parameters, the result shows that the proposed scheme has a powerful anti-jamming capability for white noise

  3. Opportunistic quantum network coding based on quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tao; Du, Gang; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-04-01

    It seems impossible to endow opportunistic characteristic to quantum network on the basis that quantum channel cannot be overheard without disturbance. In this paper, we propose an opportunistic quantum network coding scheme by taking full advantage of channel characteristic of quantum teleportation. Concretely, it utilizes quantum channel for secure transmission of quantum states and can detect eavesdroppers by means of quantum channel verification. What is more, it utilizes classical channel for both opportunistic listening to neighbor states and opportunistic coding by broadcasting measurement outcome. Analysis results show that our scheme can reduce the times of transmissions over classical channels for relay nodes and can effectively defend against classical passive attack and quantum active attack.

  4. Optical anisotropy of non-common-atom quantum wells and dots: effects of interface symmetry reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropov, A.A.; Sorokin, S.V.; Shubina, T.V.; Nekrutkina, O.V.; Solnyshkov, D.D.; Ivanov, S.V.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the investigations of in-plane optical anisotropy in non-common-atom heterostructures: ZnSe/BeTe perfect quantum wells (QWs) and CdSe/BeTe rough QWs and quantum dots. A noticeable linear polarization of photoluminescence (PL) with respect to the in-plane [1-10] and [110] crystal axes was observed in the ZnSe/BeTe QWs with equivalent ZnTe-type interfaces due to the reduction of QW symmetry, induced by unintentional formation of BeSe chemical bonds at a ''BeTe-ZnSe'' interface. The BeSe bond concentration and, hence, the polarization degree depend on the Te/Be flux ratio during molecular beam epitaxy growth of the samples. Strongly linearly polarized (up to 80%) PL was detected in the CdSe/BeTe structures, evidencing QW-like flat symmetry of the emitting sites of carrier localization. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Adsorption Energies of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Atoms on the Low-temperature Amorphous Water Ice: A Systematic Estimation from Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Nakatani, Naoki; Furuya, Kenji; Hama, Tetsuya

    2018-03-01

    We propose a new simple computational model to estimate the adsorption energies of atoms and molecules to low-temperature amorphous water ice, and we present the adsorption energies of carbon (3 P), nitrogen (4 S), and oxygen (3 P) atoms based on quantum chemistry calculations. The adsorption energies were estimated to be 14,100 ± 420 K for carbon, 400 ± 30 K for nitrogen, and 1440 ± 160 K for oxygen. The adsorption energy of oxygen is consistent with experimentally reported values. We found that the binding of a nitrogen atom is purely physisorption, while that of a carbon atom is chemisorption, in which a chemical bond to an O atom of a water molecule is formed. That of an oxygen atom has a dual character, with both physisorption and chemisorption. The chemisorption of atomic carbon also implies the possibility of further chemical reactions to produce molecules bearing a C–O bond, though this may hinder the formation of methane on water ice via sequential hydrogenation of carbon atoms. These properties would have a large impact on the chemical evolution of carbon species in interstellar environments. We also investigated the effects of newly calculated adsorption energies on the chemical compositions of cold dense molecular clouds with the aid of gas-ice astrochemical simulations. We found that abundances of major nitrogen-bearing molecules, such as N2 and NH3, are significantly altered by applying the calculated adsorption energy, because nitrogen atoms can thermally diffuse on surfaces, even at 10 K.

  6. High-Capacity Quantum Secure Direct Communication Based on Quantum Hyperdense Coding with Hyperentanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tie-Jun; Li Tao; Du Fang-Fang; Deng Fu-Guo

    2011-01-01

    We present a quantum hyperdense coding protocol with hyperentanglement in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom of photons first and then give the details for a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol based on this quantum hyperdense coding protocol. This QSDC protocol has the advantage of having a higher capacity than the quantum communication protocols with a qubit system. Compared with the QSDC protocol based on superdense coding with d-dimensional systems, this QSDC protocol is more feasible as the preparation of a high-dimension quantum system is more difficult than that of a two-level quantum system at present. (general)

  7. Atomic Layer Deposition of CdS Quantum Dots for Solid-State Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.; Ardalan, Pendar; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Bakke, Jonathan R.; Ding, I-Kang; McGehee, Michael D.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2011-01-01

    Functioning quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells have been fabricated using the vacuum deposition technique atomic layer deposition (ALD). Utilizing the incubation period of CdS growth by ALD on TiO 2, we are able to grow QDs of adjustable size which act as sensitizers for solid-state QDsensitized solar cells (ssQDSSC). The size of QDs, studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), varied with the number of ALD cycles from 1-10 nm. Photovoltaic devices with the QDs were fabricated and characterized using a ssQDSSC device architecture with 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p methoxyphenylamine) 9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) as the solid-state hole conductor. The ALD approach described here can be applied to fabrication of quantum-confined structures for a variety of applications, including solar electricity and solar fuels. Because ALD provides the ability to deposit many materials in very high aspect ratio substrates, this work introduces a strategy by which material and optical properties of QD sensitizers may be adjusted not only by the size of the particles but also in the future by the composition. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of CdS Quantum Dots for Solid-State Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2011-10-04

    Functioning quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells have been fabricated using the vacuum deposition technique atomic layer deposition (ALD). Utilizing the incubation period of CdS growth by ALD on TiO 2, we are able to grow QDs of adjustable size which act as sensitizers for solid-state QDsensitized solar cells (ssQDSSC). The size of QDs, studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), varied with the number of ALD cycles from 1-10 nm. Photovoltaic devices with the QDs were fabricated and characterized using a ssQDSSC device architecture with 2,2\\',7,7\\'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p methoxyphenylamine) 9,9\\'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) as the solid-state hole conductor. The ALD approach described here can be applied to fabrication of quantum-confined structures for a variety of applications, including solar electricity and solar fuels. Because ALD provides the ability to deposit many materials in very high aspect ratio substrates, this work introduces a strategy by which material and optical properties of QD sensitizers may be adjusted not only by the size of the particles but also in the future by the composition. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Relativistic atomic matrix elements of rq for arbitrary states in the quantum-defect approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owono Owono, L.C.; Owona Angue, M.L.C.; Kwato Njock, M.G.; Oumarou, B.

    2004-01-01

    Recurrence relations used in the calculation of matrix elements of r q for arbitrary q and states of the relativistic one-electron atom with a point-like ionic core are obtained with Dirac and quasirelativistic effective radial Hamiltonians. The phenomenological and supersymmetry-inspired quantum-defect approaches introduced in previous works to model the electron-core interactions are employed. The formulas worked out on the basis of a hypervirial inspired method may be viewed as a generalization to off-diagonal cases of our recently reported results on the evaluation of expectation values of r q

  10. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Moody, Michael P; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum Effects in Molecule-Based Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    Research into molecule-based-magnets has made immense strides in recent years, with the discoveries of all organic molecular magnets, room temperature 3D ordered permanent magnets, and single-molecule magnets (SMMs), the latter exhibiting a host of spectacular quantum phenomena; for a review, see ref. [1]. SMMs represent a molecular approach to nanoscale and sub-nanoscale magnetic particles. They offer all of the advantages of molecular chemistry as well as displaying the superparamagnetic properties of mesoscale magnetic particles of much larger dimensions. They also straddle the interface between classical and quantum behavior; for example, they exhibit quantum tunneling of their magnetization. I will give a general introduction to this area of research, followed by an overview of recent results obtained using high-frequency (40-800 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance techniques developed at the University of Florida. These results include: an elucidation of the role of molecular symmetry in the magnetic quantum tunneling phenomenon [2]; and the observation of quantum entanglement between pairs of nanomagnets within a supramolecular dimer [3]. 1. D. Gatteschi and R. Sessoli, Angew. Chem. 42, 268 (2003). 2. E. del Barco et al., J. Low Temp. Phys. 140, 119-174 (2005). 3. S. Hill et al., Science 302, 1015 (2003).

  12. Group representations, error bases and quantum codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E

    1996-01-01

    This report continues the discussion of unitary error bases and quantum codes. Nice error bases are characterized in terms of the existence of certain characters in a group. A general construction for error bases which are non-abelian over the center is given. The method for obtaining codes due to Calderbank et al. is generalized and expressed purely in representation theoretic terms. The significance of the inertia subgroup both for constructing codes and obtaining the set of transversally implementable operations is demonstrated.

  13. Quantum Watermarking Scheme Based on INEQR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Changming; Wei, Lai; Zhang, Xiafen; Ian, Hou

    2018-04-01

    Quantum watermarking technology protects copyright by embedding invisible quantum signal in quantum multimedia data. In this paper, a watermarking scheme based on INEQR was presented. Firstly, the watermark image is extended to achieve the requirement of embedding carrier image. Secondly, the swap and XOR operation is used on the processed pixels. Since there is only one bit per pixel, XOR operation can achieve the effect of simple encryption. Thirdly, both the watermark image extraction and embedding operations are described, where the key image, swap operation and LSB algorithm are used. When the embedding is made, the binary image key is changed. It means that the watermark has been embedded. Of course, if the watermark image is extracted, the key's state need detected. When key's state is |1>, this extraction operation is carried out. Finally, for validation of the proposed scheme, both the Signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the security of the scheme are analyzed.

  14. Quantum walks based on an interferometric analogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillery, Mark; Bergou, Janos; Feldman, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    There are presently two models for quantum walks on graphs. The ''coined'' walk uses discrete-time steps, and contains, besides the particle making the walk, a second quantum system, the coin, that determines the direction in which the particle will move. The continuous walk operates with continuous time. Here a third model for quantum walks is proposed, which is based on an analogy to optical interferometers. It is a discrete-time model, and the unitary operator that advances the walk one step depends only on the local structure of the graph on which the walk is taking place. This type of walk also allows us to introduce elements, such as phase shifters, that have no counterpart in classical random walks. Several examples are discussed

  15. Quantum Phase Transition in a Cold Atomic Spin-Boson Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Stanic, Ivan; Le Hur, Karyn

    2008-03-01

    We theoretically implement a spin array in a tunable bosonic environment using cold bosonic atoms with two (hyperfine) ground states, trapped by different potentials [1]. The first specie lies in a deep optical lattice with tightly confining wells and forms a spin array; spin-up/down corresponds to occupation by one/no atom at each site. The second specie forms a superfluid reservoir. Different species are coupled coherently via laser transitions and collisions. Whereas the laser coupling mimics a transverse field for the spins, the coupling to the reservoir phonons (sound modes) induces a ferromagnetic (Ising) coupling as well as dissipation. This results in a peculiar ferro-paramagnetic quantum phase transition where the effect of dissipation can be studied in a controllable manner. [1] Peter P. Orth, Ivan Stanic, and Karyn Le Hur, arXiv:0711.2309 [cond-mat.other].

  16. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  17. Quantum diffusion of muonium atoms in solids: Localization vs. band-like propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.G.; Eshchenko, D.G.; Brewer, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of muonium dynamics in insulators and semiconductors at low temperature have led to two fundamentally different pictures: Mu is found to localize strongly in Van der Waals crystals, while in alkali halides and compound semiconductors it has long been believed to undergo bandlike propagation with a characteristic bandwidth Δ∼0.1K. Our recent measurements in transverse field indicate that Mu atom may be localized at low temperatures in both KCl and GaAs. This apparent discrepancy with previous results may dramatically change our understanding of muonium quantum dynamics in solids, raising the question of whether Mu atoms can ever be truly delocalized at low temperature or if its localization is a general phenomenon in solids

  18. Electron correlation in the interacting quantum atoms partition via coupled-cluster lagrangian densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín-Gallego, Fernando José; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; García-Revilla, Marco; Francisco, Evelio; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2016-07-15

    The electronic energy partition established by the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) approach is an important method of wavefunction analyses which has yielded valuable insights about different phenomena in physical chemistry. Most of the IQA applications have relied upon approximations, which do not include either dynamical correlation (DC) such as Hartree-Fock (HF) or external DC like CASSCF theory. Recently, DC was included in the IQA method by means of HF/Coupled-Cluster (CC) transition densities (Chávez-Calvillo et al., Comput. Theory Chem. 2015, 1053, 90). Despite the potential utility of this approach, it has a few drawbacks, for example, it is not consistent with the calculation of CC properties different from the total electronic energy. To improve this situation, we have implemented the IQA energy partition based on CC Lagrangian one- and two-electron orbital density matrices. The development presented in this article is tested and illustrated with the H2 , LiH, H2 O, H2 S, N2 , and CO molecules for which the IQA results obtained under the consideration of (i) the CC Lagrangian, (ii) HF/CC transition densities, and (iii) HF are critically analyzed and compared. Additionally, the effect of the DC in the different components of the electronic energy in the formation of the T-shaped (H2 )2 van der Waals cluster and the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution between F(-) and CH3 F is examined. We anticipate that the approach put forward in this article will provide new understandings on subjects in physical chemistry wherein DC plays a crucial role like molecular interactions along with chemical bonding and reactivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms coupled with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhiming, E-mail: 465609785@qq.com [School of Economics and Management, Wuyi University, Jiangmen 529020 (China); Situ, Haozhen, E-mail: situhaozhen@gmail.com [College of Mathematics and Informatics, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2017-02-15

    In this article, the dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms interacting with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field in the Minkowski vacuum is investigated. We firstly derive the master equation that describes the system evolution with initial Bell-diagonal state. Then we discuss the system evolution for three cases of different initial states: non-zero correlation separable state, maximally entangled state and zero correlation state. For non-zero correlation initial separable state, quantum correlation and coherence can be protected from vacuum fluctuations during long time evolution when the separation between the two atoms is relatively small. For maximally entangled initial state, quantum correlation and coherence overall decrease with evolution time. However, for the zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence are firstly generated and then drop with evolution time; when separation is sufficiently small, they can survive from vacuum fluctuations. For three cases, quantum correlation and coherence first undergo decline and then fluctuate to relatively stable values with the increasing distance between the two atoms. Specially, for the case of zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence occur periodically revival at fixed zero points and revival amplitude declines gradually with increasing separation of two atoms.

  20. Dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms coupled with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Situ, Haozhen

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms interacting with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field in the Minkowski vacuum is investigated. We firstly derive the master equation that describes the system evolution with initial Bell-diagonal state. Then we discuss the system evolution for three cases of different initial states: non-zero correlation separable state, maximally entangled state and zero correlation state. For non-zero correlation initial separable state, quantum correlation and coherence can be protected from vacuum fluctuations during long time evolution when the separation between the two atoms is relatively small. For maximally entangled initial state, quantum correlation and coherence overall decrease with evolution time. However, for the zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence are firstly generated and then drop with evolution time; when separation is sufficiently small, they can survive from vacuum fluctuations. For three cases, quantum correlation and coherence first undergo decline and then fluctuate to relatively stable values with the increasing distance between the two atoms. Specially, for the case of zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence occur periodically revival at fixed zero points and revival amplitude declines gradually with increasing separation of two atoms.

  1. Dissipative preparation of steady Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states for Rydberg atoms with quantum Zeno dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X. Q.; Wu, J. H.; Yi, X. X.; Long, Gui-Lu

    2017-12-01

    Inspired by a recent work [F. Reiter, D. Reeb, and A. S. Sørensen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 040501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.040501], we present a simplified proposal for dissipatively preparing a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state of three Rydberg atoms in a cavity. The Z pumping is implemented under the action of the spontaneous emission of Λ -type atoms and the quantum Zeno dynamics induced by strong continuous coupling. In the meantime, a dissipative Rydberg pumping breaks up the stability of the state | GHZ+〉 in the process of Z pumping, making | GHZ-〉 the unique steady state of the system. Compared with the former scheme, the number of driving fields acting on atoms is greatly reduced and only a single-mode cavity is required. The numerical simulation of the full master equation reveals that a high fidelity ˜98 % can be obtained with the currently achievable parameters in the Rydberg-atom-cavity system.

  2. Semihierarchical quantum repeaters based on moderate lifetime quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Hua, Yi-Lin; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    The construction of large-scale quantum networks relies on the development of practical quantum repeaters. Many approaches have been proposed with the goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons, but most of them are inefficient or difficult to implement with current technology. Here, we present a protocol that uses a semihierarchical structure to improve the entanglement distribution rate while reducing the requirement of memory time to a range of tens of milliseconds. This protocol can be implemented with a fixed distance of elementary links and fixed requirements on quantum memories, which are independent of the total distance. This configuration is especially suitable for scalable applications in large-scale quantum networks.

  3. Quantum metrology of phase for accelerated two-level atom coupled with electromagnetic field with and without boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Liu, Xiaobao; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang

    2018-03-01

    We study how to improve the precision of the quantum estimation of phase for an uniformly accelerated atom in fluctuating electromagnetic field by reflecting boundaries. We find that the precision decreases with increases of the acceleration without the boundary. With the presence of a reflecting boundary, the precision depends on the atomic polarization, position and acceleration, which can be effectively enhanced compared to the case without boundary if we choose the appropriate conditions. In particular, with the presence of two parallel reflecting boundaries, we obtain the optimal precision for atomic parallel polarization and the special distance between two boundaries, as if the atom were shielded from the fluctuation.

  4. Direct Identification of Atomic-Like Electronic Levels in InAs Nano crystal Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millo, O.; Katz, D.

    1999-01-01

    The size dependent level structure of InAs nano crystals in the range 2-7 nm in diameter is investigated using both tunneling and optical spectroscopies. The tunneling measurements are performed using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope on individual nano crystals that, are attached to a gold substrate via dithiol molecules. The tunneling I-V characteristics manifest an interplay between single electron charging and quantum size effects. We are able to directly identify quantum confined states of isolated InAs nano crystals having s and p symmetries. These states are observed in the I-V curves as two and six-fold single electron charging multiplets. Excellent agreement is found between the strongly allowed optical transitions [1] and the spacing of levels detected in the tunneling experiment. This correlation provides new information on the quantum-dot level structure, from which we conclude that the top-most valence band state has both s and p characteristics. The interplay between level structure singles electron charging of the nano crystals obeys an atomic-like Aufbau sequential electron level occupation

  5. Generalized quantum mean-field systems and their application to ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimborn-Witthaut, Friederike Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Strongly interacting many-body systems consisting of a large number of indistinguishable particles play an important role in many areas of physics. Though such systems are hard to deal with theoretically since the dimension of the respective Hilbert space increases exponentially both in the particle number and in the number of system modes. Therefore, approximations are of considerable interest. The mean-field approximation describes the behaviour in the macroscopic limit N→∞, which leads to an effective nonlinear single-particle problem. Although this approximation is widely used, rigorous results on the applicability and especially on finite size corrections are extremely rare. One prominent example of strongly interacting many-body systems are ultracold atoms in optical lattices, which are a major subject of this thesis. Typically these systems consist of a large but well-defined number of particles, such that corrections to the mean-field limit can be systematically studied. This thesis is divided into two parts: In the first part we study generalized quantum mean-field systems in a C * -algebraic framework. These systems are characterized by their intrinsic permutation symmetry. In the limit of infinite system size, N→∞, the intensive observables converge to the commutative algebra of weak * -continuous functions on the single particle state space. To quantify the deviations from the meanfield prediction for large but finite N, we establish a differential calculus for state space functions and provide a generalized Taylor expansion around the mean-field limit. Furthermore, we introduce the algebra of macroscopic fluctuations around the mean-field limit and prove a quantum version of the central limit theorem. On the basis of these results, we give a detailed study of the finite size corrections to the ground state energy and establish bounds, for both the quantum and the classical case. Finally, we restrict ourselves to the subspace of Bose

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  7. Carbon based thirty six atom spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskoti, Charles R.; Zettl, Alex K.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Cote, Michel; Grossman, Jeffrey C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2005-09-06

    A solid phase or form of carbon is based on fullerenes with thirty six carbon atoms (C.sub.36). The C.sub.36 structure with D.sub.6h symmetry is one of the two most energetically favorable, and is conducive to forming a periodic system. The lowest energy crystal is a highly bonded network of hexagonal planes of C.sub.36 subunits with AB stacking. The C.sub.36 solid is not a purely van der Waals solid, but has covalent-like bonding, leading to a solid with enhanced structural rigidity. The solid C.sub.36 material is made by synthesizing and selecting out C.sub.36 fullerenes in relatively large quantities. A C.sub.36 rich fullerene soot is produced in a helium environment arc discharge chamber by operating at an optimum helium pressure (400 torr). The C.sub.36 is separated from the soot by a two step process. The soot is first treated with a first solvent, e.g. toluene, to remove the higher order fullerenes but leave the C.sub.36. The soot is then treated with a second solvent, e.g. pyridine, which is more polarizable than the first solvent used for the larger fullerenes. The second solvent extracts the C.sub.36 from the soot. Thin films and powders can then be produced from the extracted C.sub.36. Other materials are based on C.sub.36 fullerenes, providing for different properties.

  8. Dynamics in the quantum/classical limit based on selective use of the quantum potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garashchuk, Sophya; Dell’Angelo, David; Rassolov, Vitaly A.

    2014-01-01

    A classical limit of quantum dynamics can be defined by compensation of the quantum potential in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The quantum potential is a non-local quantity, defined in the trajectory-based form of the Schrödinger equation, due to Madelung, de Broglie, and Bohm, which formally generates the quantum-mechanical features in dynamics. Selective inclusion of the quantum potential for the degrees of freedom deemed “quantum,” defines a hybrid quantum/classical dynamics, appropriate for molecular systems comprised of light and heavy nuclei. The wavefunction is associated with all of the nuclei, and the Ehrenfest, or mean-field, averaging of the force acting on the classical degrees of freedom, typical of the mixed quantum/classical methods, is avoided. The hybrid approach is used to examine evolution of light/heavy systems in the harmonic and double-well potentials, using conventional grid-based and approximate quantum-trajectory time propagation. The approximate quantum force is defined on spatial domains, which removes unphysical coupling of the wavefunction fragments corresponding to distinct classical channels or configurations. The quantum potential, associated with the quantum particle, generates forces acting on both quantum and classical particles to describe the backreaction

  9. Dynamics in the quantum/classical limit based on selective use of the quantum potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garashchuk, Sophya, E-mail: garashchuk@sc.edu; Dell’Angelo, David; Rassolov, Vitaly A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2014-12-21

    A classical limit of quantum dynamics can be defined by compensation of the quantum potential in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The quantum potential is a non-local quantity, defined in the trajectory-based form of the Schrödinger equation, due to Madelung, de Broglie, and Bohm, which formally generates the quantum-mechanical features in dynamics. Selective inclusion of the quantum potential for the degrees of freedom deemed “quantum,” defines a hybrid quantum/classical dynamics, appropriate for molecular systems comprised of light and heavy nuclei. The wavefunction is associated with all of the nuclei, and the Ehrenfest, or mean-field, averaging of the force acting on the classical degrees of freedom, typical of the mixed quantum/classical methods, is avoided. The hybrid approach is used to examine evolution of light/heavy systems in the harmonic and double-well potentials, using conventional grid-based and approximate quantum-trajectory time propagation. The approximate quantum force is defined on spatial domains, which removes unphysical coupling of the wavefunction fragments corresponding to distinct classical channels or configurations. The quantum potential, associated with the quantum particle, generates forces acting on both quantum and classical particles to describe the backreaction.

  10. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  11. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  12. A Quantum Proxy Weak Blind Signature Scheme Based on Controlled Quantum Teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Yu, Yao-Feng; Song, Qin; Gao, Lan-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Proxy blind signature is applied to the electronic paying system, electronic voting system, mobile agent system, security of internet, etc. A quantum proxy weak blind signature scheme is proposed in this paper. It is based on controlled quantum teleportation. Five-qubit entangled state functions as quantum channel. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to implement message blinding, so it could guarantee not only the unconditional security of the scheme but also the anonymity of the messages owner.

  13. The atomic world spooky? It ain't necessarily so! emergent quantum mechanics, how the classical laws of nature can conspire to cause quantum-like behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    van Holten, Theo

    2017-01-01

    The present book takes the discovery that quantum-like behaviour is not solely reserved to atomic particles one step further. If electrons are modelled as vibrating droplets instead of the usually assumed point objects, and if the classical laws of nature are applied, then exactly the same behaviour as in quantum theory is found, quantitatively correct! The world of atoms is strange and quantum mechanics, the theory of this world, is almost magic. Or is it? Tiny droplets of oil bouncing round on a fluid surface can also mimic the world of quantum mechanics. For the layman - for whom the main part of this book is written - this is good news. If the everyday laws of nature can conspire to show up quantum-like phenomena, there is hope to form mental pictures how the atomic world works. The book is almost formula-free, and explains everything by using many sketches and diagrams. The mathematical derivations underlying the main text are kept separate in a -peer reviewed - appendix. The author, a retired professor ...

  14. Atoms and light. Matter radiation interaction. DEA in quantum physics, year 2003. 2nd year Master: Fundamental concepts in Physics, Cursus: Quantum Physics. Year 2006-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, Claude

    2003-01-01

    This document contains two nearly identical courses on the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation. The second one addresses a few more issues in sub-paragraphs, but follows the same organisation and plan. A first part addresses tools in quantum optics. It presents phenomenological approaches (the Lorentz and Einstein models), the semi-conventional approach (isolated atom, effect of the environment with the Bloch equations, interaction with a non-monochromatic field, oscillator force), the quantum description of the free electromagnetic field (corpuscular aspect of the thermal radiation field, decomposition of the conventional electromagnetic field into modes, quantification of free radiation, radiation kinetic moment and pulse, radiation stationary states, value of the electric field in a quantum state), the interaction between atom and quantum field (interaction Hamiltonian, interaction process, photo-detection). The second part addresses some phenomena of quantum optics such as spontaneous emission, quasi-resonant interactions in two-level systems, three-level systems, fluctuations and correlations in the matter-radiation interaction. Appendices contain elements on atom structure, and on the density matrix

  15. Fault-tolerant quantum repeater with atomic ensembles and linear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zengbing; Zhao Bo; Chen Yuao; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Pan Jianwei

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a robust quantum repeater architecture building on the original Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller (DLCZ) protocol [L.M. Duan et al. Nature (London) 414, 413 (2001)]. The architecture is based on two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel-type interference which relaxes the long-distance interferometric stability requirements by about seven orders of magnitude, from subwavelength for the single photon interference required by DLCZ to the coherence length of the photons, thereby removing the weakest point in the DLCZ scheme. Our proposal provides an exciting possibility for robust and realistic long-distance quantum communication

  16. Beyond quantum mechanics? Hunting the 'impossible' atoms (Pauli Exclusion Principle violation and spontaneous collapse of the wave function at test)

    CERN Document Server

    Piscicchia, K; Bartalucci, S; Bassi, A; Bertolucci, S; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; De Paolis, L; Di Matteo, S; Donadi, S; d'Uffizi, A; Egger, J-P; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Laubenstein, M; Marton, J; Milotti, E; Pietreanu, D; Ponta, T; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Sperandio, L; Doce, O Vazquez; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01

    The development of mathematically complete and consistent models solving the so-called "measurement problem", strongly renewed the interest of the scientific community for the foundations of quantum mechanics, among these the Dynamical Reduction Models posses the unique characteristic to be experimentally testable. In the first part of the paper an upper limit on the reduction rate parameter of such models will be obtained, based on the analysis of the X-ray spectrum emitted by an isolated slab of germanium and measured by the IGEX experiment. The second part of the paper is devoted to present the results of the VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment and to describe its recent upgrade. The VIP experiment established a limit on the probability that the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) is violated by electrons, using the very clean method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper.

  17. Maximum likelihood versus likelihood-free quantum system identification in the atom maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, Catalin; Kypraios, Theodore; Guţă, Mădălin

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating a dynamical parameter of a Markovian quantum open system (the atom maser), by performing continuous time measurements in the system's output (outgoing atoms). Two estimation methods are investigated and compared. Firstly, the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) takes into account the full measurement data and is asymptotically optimal in terms of its mean square error. Secondly, the ‘likelihood-free’ method of approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) produces an approximation of the posterior distribution for a given set of summary statistics, by sampling trajectories at different parameter values and comparing them with the measurement data via chosen statistics. Building on previous results which showed that atom counts are poor statistics for certain values of the Rabi angle, we apply MLE to the full measurement data and estimate its Fisher information. We then select several correlation statistics such as waiting times, distribution of successive identical detections, and use them as input of the ABC algorithm. The resulting posterior distribution follows closely the data likelihood, showing that the selected statistics capture ‘most’ statistical information about the Rabi angle. (paper)

  18. Quantum logic gates based on coherent electron transport in quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, A; Bordone, P; Brunetti, R; Jacoboni, C; Reggiani, S

    2000-06-19

    It is shown that the universal set of quantum logic gates can be realized using solid-state quantum bits based on coherent electron transport in quantum wires. The elementary quantum bits are realized with a proper design of two quantum wires coupled through a potential barrier. Numerical simulations show that (a) a proper design of the coupling barrier allows one to realize any one-qbit rotation and (b) Coulomb interaction between two qbits of this kind allows the implementation of the CNOT gate. These systems are based on a mature technology and seem to be integrable with conventional electronics.

  19. Transitionless quantum driving based wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Koushik; Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2017-01-01

    Shortcut to adiabaticity (STA) techniques have the potential to drive a system beyond the adiabatic limits. Here, we present a robust and efficient method for wireless power transfer (WPT) between two coils based on the so-called transitionless quantum driving (TQD) algorithm. We show that it is possible to transfer power between the coils significantly fast compared to its adiabatic counterpart. The scheme is fairly robust against the variations in the coupling strength and the coupling dist...

  20. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  1. Model of a programmable quantum processing unit based on a quantum transistor effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablayev, Farid; Andrianov, Sergey; Fetisov, Danila; Moiseev, Sergey; Terentyev, Alexandr; Urmanchev, Andrey; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we propose a model of a programmable quantum processing device realizable with existing nano-photonic technologies. It can be viewed as a basis for new high performance hardware architectures. Protocols for physical implementation of device on the controlled photon transfer and atomic transitions are presented. These protocols are designed for executing basic single-qubit and multi-qubit gates forming a universal set. We analyze the possible operation of this quantum computer scheme. Then we formalize the physical architecture by a mathematical model of a Quantum Processing Unit (QPU), which we use as a basis for the Quantum Programming Framework. This framework makes it possible to perform universal quantum computations in a multitasking environment.

  2. Probing quantum entanglement, quantum discord, classical correlation, and the quantum state without disturbing them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhenni; Jin Jiasen; Yu Changshui

    2011-01-01

    We present schemes for a type of one-parameter bipartite quantum state to probe quantum entanglement, quantum discord, the classical correlation, and the quantum state based on cavity QED. It is shown that our detection does not influence all these measured quantities. We also discuss how the spontaneous emission introduced by our probe atom influences our detection.

  3. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Perez, A.; Saavedra, C.; Klimov, A. B.

    2011-01-01

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  4. Fundamental Interactions for Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Willians, Jason R.

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space are a key element for several applications of interest to NASA. Our proposal for participating in the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station is dedicated to mitigating the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision AI-based measurements of fundamental physics in microgravity. One important focus of our proposal is to enhance initial state preparation for dual-species AIs. Our proposed filtering scheme uses Feshbach molecular states to create highly correlated mixtures of heteronuclear atomic gases in both their position and momentum distributions. We will detail our filtering scheme along with the main factors that determine its efficiency. We also show that the atomic and molecular heating and loss rates can be mitigated at the unique temperature and density regimes accessible on CAL. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Phonon-based scalable platform for chip-scale quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Reinke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a scalable phonon-based quantum computer on a phononic crystal platform. Practical schemes involve selective placement of a single acceptor atom in the peak of the strain field in a high-Q phononic crystal cavity that enables coupling of the phonon modes to the energy levels of the atom. We show theoretical optimization of the cavity design and coupling waveguide, along with estimated performance figures of the coupled system. A qubit can be created by entangling a phonon at the resonance frequency of the cavity with the atom states. Qubits based on this half-sound, half-matter quasi-particle, called a phoniton, may outcompete other quantum architectures in terms of combined emission rate, coherence lifetime, and fabrication demands.

  6. Demonstration of spatial-light-modulation-based four-wave mixing in cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juo, Jz-Yuan; Lin, Jia-Kang; Cheng, Chin-Yao; Liu, Zi-Yu; Yu, Ite A.; Chen, Yong-Fan

    2018-05-01

    Long-distance quantum optical communications usually require efficient wave-mixing processes to convert the wavelengths of single photons. Many quantum applications based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) have been proposed and demonstrated at the single-photon level, such as quantum memories, all-optical transistors, and cross-phase modulations. However, EIT-based four-wave mixing (FWM) in a resonant double-Λ configuration has a maximum conversion efficiency (CE) of 25% because of absorptive loss due to spontaneous emission. An improved scheme using spatially modulated intensities of two control fields has been theoretically proposed to overcome this conversion limit. In this study, we first demonstrate wavelength conversion from 780 to 795 nm with a 43% CE by using this scheme at an optical density (OD) of 19 in cold 87Rb atoms. According to the theoretical model, the CE in the proposed scheme can further increase to 96% at an OD of 240 under ideal conditions, thereby attaining an identical CE to that of the previous nonresonant double-Λ scheme at half the OD. This spatial-light-modulation-based FWM scheme can achieve a near-unity CE, thus providing an easy method of implementing an efficient quantum wavelength converter for all-optical quantum information processing.

  7. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Mei; Ai, Qing; Yang, Guo-Jian [Department of Physics, Applied Optics Beijing Area Major Laboratory, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hobiny, Aatef [NAAM-Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Deng, Fu-Guo, E-mail: fgdeng@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Applied Optics Beijing Area Major Laboratory, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); NAAM-Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-03-15

    We propose a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We show the details by implementing nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification modules with atoms in waveguides, and discuss the feasibility of the repeater with currently achievable technology. In our scheme, the faulty events can be discarded by detecting the polarization of the photons. That is, our protocols are accomplished with a fidelity of 100% in principle, which is advantageous for implementing realistic long-distance quantum communication. Moreover, additional atomic qubits are not required, but only a single-photon medium. Our scheme is scalable and attractive since it can be realized in solid-state quantum systems. With the great progress on controlling atom-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in quantum information processing in the future.

  8. Force sensing based on coherent quantum noise cancellation in a hybrid optomechanical cavity with squeezed-vacuum injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motazedifard, Ali; Bemani, F; Naderi, M H; Roknizadeh, R; Vitali, D

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyse a feasible experimental scheme for a quantum force sensor based on the elimination of backaction noise through coherent quantum noise cancellation (CQNC) in a hybrid atom-cavity optomechanical setup assisted with squeezed vacuum injection. The force detector, which allows for a continuous, broadband detection of weak forces well below the standard quantum limit (SQL), is formed by a single optical cavity simultaneously coupled to a mechanical oscillator and to an ensemble of ultracold atoms. The latter acts as a negative-mass oscillator so that atomic noise exactly cancels the backaction noise from the mechanical oscillator due to destructive quantum interference. Squeezed vacuum injection enforces this cancellation and allows sub-SQL sensitivity to be reached in a very wide frequency band, and at much lower input laser powers. (paper)

  9. Force sensing based on coherent quantum noise cancellation in a hybrid optomechanical cavity with squeezed-vacuum injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motazedifard, Ali; Bemani, F.; Naderi, M. H.; Roknizadeh, R.; Vitali, D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyse a feasible experimental scheme for a quantum force sensor based on the elimination of backaction noise through coherent quantum noise cancellation (CQNC) in a hybrid atom-cavity optomechanical setup assisted with squeezed vacuum injection. The force detector, which allows for a continuous, broadband detection of weak forces well below the standard quantum limit (SQL), is formed by a single optical cavity simultaneously coupled to a mechanical oscillator and to an ensemble of ultracold atoms. The latter acts as a negative-mass oscillator so that atomic noise exactly cancels the backaction noise from the mechanical oscillator due to destructive quantum interference. Squeezed vacuum injection enforces this cancellation and allows sub-SQL sensitivity to be reached in a very wide frequency band, and at much lower input laser powers.

  10. Decoherence and Entanglement Simulation in a Model of Quantum Neural Network Based on Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaisky Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the simulation of a quantum neural network based on quantum dots using numerical method of path integral calculation. In the proposed implementation of the quantum neural network using an array of single-electron quantum dots with dipole-dipole interaction, the coherence is shown to survive up to 0.1 nanosecond in time and up to the liquid nitrogen temperature of 77K.We study the quantum correlations between the quantum dots by means of calculation of the entanglement of formation in a pair of quantum dots on the GaAs based substrate with dot size of 100 ÷ 101 nanometer and interdot distance of 101 ÷ 102 nanometers order.

  11. Solving the scalability issue in quantum-based refinement: Q|R#1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Moriarty, Nigel W; Xu, Yanting; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Afonine, Pavel V; Waller, Mark P

    2017-12-01

    Accurately refining biomacromolecules using a quantum-chemical method is challenging because the cost of a quantum-chemical calculation scales approximately as n m , where n is the number of atoms and m (≥3) is based on the quantum method of choice. This fundamental problem means that quantum-chemical calculations become intractable when the size of the system requires more computational resources than are available. In the development of the software package called Q|R, this issue is referred to as Q|R#1. A divide-and-conquer approach has been developed that fragments the atomic model into small manageable pieces in order to solve Q|R#1. Firstly, the atomic model of a crystal structure is analyzed to detect noncovalent interactions between residues, and the results of the analysis are represented as an interaction graph. Secondly, a graph-clustering algorithm is used to partition the interaction graph into a set of clusters in such a way as to minimize disruption to the noncovalent interaction network. Thirdly, the environment surrounding each individual cluster is analyzed and any residue that is interacting with a particular cluster is assigned to the buffer region of that particular cluster. A fragment is defined as a cluster plus its buffer region. The gradients for all atoms from each of the fragments are computed, and only the gradients from each cluster are combined to create the total gradients. A quantum-based refinement is carried out using the total gradients as chemical restraints. In order to validate this interaction graph-based fragmentation approach in Q|R, the entire atomic model of an amyloid cross-β spine crystal structure (PDB entry 2oNA) was refined.

  12. Quantum size effects in TiO2 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tallarida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the atomic layer deposition of TiO2 by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Ti precursor, titanium isopropoxide, was used in combination with H2O on Si/SiO2 substrates that were heated at 200 °C. The low growth rate (0.15 Å/cycle and the in situ characterization permitted to follow changes in the electronic structure of TiO2 in the sub-nanometer range, which are influenced by quantum size effects. The modified electronic properties may play an important role in charge carrier transport and separation, and increase the efficiency of energy conversion systems.

  13. Quantum mechanics on phase space: The hydrogen atom and its Wigner functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, P.; Martins, M. G. R.; Fernandes, M. C. B.; Vianna, J. D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Symplectic quantum mechanics (SQM) considers a non-commutative algebra of functions on a phase space Γ and an associated Hilbert space HΓ, to construct a unitary representation for the Galilei group. From this unitary representation the Schrödinger equation is rewritten in phase space variables and the Wigner function can be derived without the use of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. In this article the Coulomb potential in three dimensions (3D) is resolved completely by using the phase space Schrödinger equation. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel(KS) transformation is applied and the Coulomb and harmonic oscillator potentials are connected. In this context we determine the energy levels, the amplitude of probability in phase space and correspondent Wigner quasi-distribution functions of the 3D-hydrogen atom described by Schrödinger equation in phase space.

  14. Phase locking of a semiconductor double-quantum-dot single-atom maser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.-Y.; Hartke, T. R.; Stehlik, J.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-11-01

    We experimentally study the phase stabilization of a semiconductor double-quantum-dot (DQD) single-atom maser by injection locking. A voltage-biased DQD serves as an electrically tunable microwave frequency gain medium. The statistics of the maser output field demonstrate that the maser can be phase locked to an external cavity drive, with a resulting phase noise L =-99 dBc/Hz at a frequency offset of 1.3 MHz. The injection locking range, and the phase of the maser output relative to the injection locking input tone are in good agreement with Adler's theory. Furthermore, the electrically tunable DQD energy level structure allows us to rapidly switch the gain medium on and off, resulting in an emission spectrum that resembles a frequency comb. The free running frequency comb linewidth is ≈8 kHz and can be improved to less than 1 Hz by operating the comb in the injection locked regime.

  15. Scholar-activating teaching materials on quantum physics. Pt. 3. Foundations of atomic physics; Schueleraktivierende Unterrichtsmaterialien zur Quantenphysik. T. 3. Grundlagen der Atomphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebel, Horst

    2010-07-01

    Traditionally in the center of the interest on quantum physics referring to schools the question lies, whether electrons or photons are now particles or waves, a question, which is often characterized by the phrase ''wave-particle dualism'', which notoriously not exists in its original meaning. Against that by the author - on the base of important preparatory works of Kueblbeck and Mueller - a new concept of quantum physics for the school was proposed, which puts ''basic facts'' in the foreground, comparable with the Kueblbeck-Mueller ''characteristic features''. The ''basic facts'' are similar to axioms of quantum physics, by means of them a large number of experiments and phenomena can be ''explained'' at least qualitatively - in a heuristic way -. Instead of the so-called ''wave-particle dualism'' uncertainty and complementarity are put in the foreground. The new concept is in the Internet under http://www.forphys.de extensively presented with many further materials. In the partial volumes of this publication manifold and carefully elaborated teaching materials are presented, by which scholars can get themselves the partial set of quantum physics referring to schools by different methods like learning at stations, short referates, Internet-research, group puzzle, the query-sheet or the card-index method etc. In the present 3. part materials are prepared, by which scholars can get foundations of atomic physics and interpret in the sense of the ''basic facts or quantum physics''. Here deals it thus with discrete energy levels, the linear potential box, with atomic models, the atomic structure, the tunnel effect, and - because curricula it often require - also with the Schroedinger equation. The materials can also be usefully applied in other concepts.

  16. Quantum networks based on spins in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronald Hanson

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement of spatially separated objects is one of the most intriguing phenomena that can occur in physics. Besides being of fundamental interest, entanglement is also a valuable resource in quantum information technology enabling secure quantum communication networks and distributed quantum computing. Here we present our most recent results towards the realization of scalable quantum networks with solid-state qubits. (author)

  17. Quantum treatment of the capture of an atom by a fast nucleus incident on a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakeshaft, R.; Spruch, L.

    1980-01-01

    The classical double-scattering model of Thomas for the capture of electrons from atoms by fast ions yields a cross section sigma which dominates over the single scattering contribution for sufficiently fast ions. The magnitude of the classical double-scattering sigma differs, however, from its quantum-mechanical (second-Born) analog by an order of magnitude. Further, a ''fast ion'' means an ion of some MeV, and at those energies the cross sections are very low. On the other hand, as noted by Bates, Cook, and Smith, the double-scattering cross section for the capture of atoms from molecules by fast ions dominates over the single-scattering contribution for incident ions of very much lower energy; roughly, one must have the velocity of the incident projectile much larger than a characteristic internal velocity of the particles in the target. It follows that we are in the asymptotic domain not at about 10 MeV but at about 100 eV. For the reaction H + +CH 4 → H 2 + +CH 3 with incident proton energies of 70 to 150 eV, the peak in the angular distribution as determined experimentally is at almost precisely the value predicted by the classical model, but the theoretical total cross section is about 30 times too large. Using a quantum version of the classical model, which involves the same kinematics and therefore preserves the agreement with the angular distribution, we obtain somewhat better agreement with the experimental total cross section, by a factor of about 5. In the center-of-mass frame, for sufficiently high incident energy, the first of the two scatterings involves the scattering of H + by H through an angle of very close to 90 0 , and it follows that the nuclei of the emergent H 2 + ion will almost all be in the singlet state. We have also calculated the cross section for the reaction D + +CH 4 → (HD) + +CH 3

  18. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng; Choi, Joshua J.; Stachnik, David; Bartnik, Adam C.; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Malliaras, George G.; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  19. Multiparty secret sharing of quantum information based on entanglement swapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongmin; Zhang Kuanshou; Peng Kunchi

    2004-01-01

    A protocol of multiparty secret sharing of quantum information based on entanglement swapping is analyzed. In this protocol, Bell states are needed in order to realize the quantum information secret sharing and it is convenient to realize the quantum secret sharing among the members of any subset of users

  20. Efficient multiuser quantum cryptography network based on entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Kunkun; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-04-04

    We present an efficient quantum key distribution protocol with a certain entangled state to solve a special cryptographic task. Also, we provide a proof of security of this protocol by generalizing the proof of modified of Lo-Chau scheme. Based on this two-user scheme, a quantum cryptography network protocol is proposed without any quantum memory.

  1. Position-based quantum cryptography and catalytic computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we present several results along two different lines of research. The first part concerns the study of position-based quantum cryptography, a topic in quantum cryptography. By combining quantum mechanics with special relativity theory, new cryptographic tasks can be developed that

  2. Destructive quantum interference in electron transport: A reconciliation of the molecular orbital and the atomic orbital perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Geskin, Victor; Stadler, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Destructive quantum interference (DQI) in single molecule electronics is a purely quantum mechanical effect and is entirely defined by the inherent properties of the molecule in the junction such as its structure and symmetry. This definition of DQI by molecular properties alone suggests its relation to other more general concepts in chemistry as well as the possibility of deriving simple models for its understanding and molecular device design. Recently, two such models have gained a wide spread attention, where one was a graphical scheme based on visually inspecting the connectivity of the carbon sites in conjugated π systems in an atomic orbital (AO) basis and the other one puts the emphasis on the amplitudes and signs of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs). There have been discussions on the range of applicability for these schemes, but ultimately conclusions from topological molecular Hamiltonians should not depend on whether they are drawn from an AO or a MO representation, as long as all the orbitals are taken into account. In this article, we clarify the relation between both models in terms of the zeroth order Green's function and compare their predictions for a variety of systems. From this comparison, we conclude that for a correct description of DQI from a MO perspective, it is necessary to include the contributions from all MOs rather than just those from the frontier orbitals. The cases where DQI effects can be successfully predicted within a frontier orbital approximation we show them to be limited to alternant even-membered hydrocarbons, as a direct consequence of the Coulson-Rushbrooke pairing theorem in quantum chemistry.

  3. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  4. Optical anisotropy of non-common-atom quantum wells and dots: effects of interface symmetry reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropov, A.A.; Sorokin, S.V.; Shubina, T.V.; Nekrutkina, O.V.; Solnyshkov, D.D.; Ivanov, S.V. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute of RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Waag, A. [Abteilung Halbleiterphysik, Universitaet Ulm, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Landwehr, G. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    We report on the investigations of in-plane optical anisotropy in non-common-atom heterostructures: ZnSe/BeTe perfect quantum wells (QWs) and CdSe/BeTe rough QWs and quantum dots. A noticeable linear polarization of photoluminescence (PL) with respect to the in-plane [1-10] and [110] crystal axes was observed in the ZnSe/BeTe QWs with equivalent ZnTe-type interfaces due to the reduction of QW symmetry, induced by unintentional formation of BeSe chemical bonds at a ''BeTe-ZnSe'' interface. The BeSe bond concentration and, hence, the polarization degree depend on the Te/Be flux ratio during molecular beam epitaxy growth of the samples. Strongly linearly polarized (up to 80%) PL was detected in the CdSe/BeTe structures, evidencing QW-like flat symmetry of the emitting sites of carrier localization. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Polarized electron beams elastically scattered by atoms as a tool for testing fundamental predictions of quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2018-03-29

    Quantum information theory deals with quantum noise in order to protect physical quantum bits (qubits) from its effects. A single electron is an emblematic example of a qubit, and today it is possible to experimentally produce polarized ensembles of electrons. In this paper, the theory of the polarization of electron beams elastically scattered by atoms is briefly summarized. Then the POLARe program suite, a set of computer programs aimed at the calculation of the spin-polarization parameters of electron beams elastically interacting with atomic targets, is described. Selected results of the program concerning Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms are presented together with the comparison with experimental data about the Sherman function for low kinetic energy of the incident electrons (1.5eV-350eV). It is demonstrated that the quantum-relativistic theory of the polarization of electron beams elastically scattered by atoms is in good agreement with experimental data down to energies smaller than a few eV.

  6. Open quantum systems and the two-level atom interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, A.; Stefanescu, E.

    1987-07-01

    On the basis of Lindblad theory of open quantum systems we obtain new optical equations for the system of two-level atom interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. The conventional Block equations in a generalized form with field phases are obtained in the hypothesis that all the terms are slowly varying in the rotating frame.(authors)

  7. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  8. The effect of nonadiabaticity on the efficiency of quantum memory based on an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselkova, N. G.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum efficiency is an important characteristic of quantum memory devices that are aimed at recording the quantum state of light signals and its storing and reading. In the case of memory based on an ensemble of cold atoms placed in an optical cavity, the efficiency is restricted, in particular, by relaxation processes in the system of active atomic levels. We show how the effect of the relaxation on the quantum efficiency can be determined in a regime of the memory usage in which the evolution of signals in time is not arbitrarily slow on the scale of the field lifetime in the cavity and when the frequently used approximation of the adiabatic elimination of the quantized cavity mode field cannot be applied. Taking into account the effect of the nonadiabaticity on the memory quality is of interest in view of the fact that, in order to increase the field-medium coupling parameter, a higher cavity quality factor is required, whereas storing and processing of sequences of many signals in the memory implies that their duration is reduced. We consider the applicability of the well-known efficiency estimates via the system cooperativity parameter and estimate a more general form. In connection with the theoretical description of the memory of the given type, we also discuss qualitative differences in the behavior of a random source introduced into the Heisenberg-Langevin equations for atomic variables in the cases of a large and a small number of atoms.

  9. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  10. Quantum physics of light and matter a modern introduction to photons, atoms and many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The book gives an introduction to the field quantization (second quantization) of light and matter with applications to atomic physics. The first chapter briefly reviews the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics and the basic notions of quantum information theory and quantum statistical mechanics. The second chapter is devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, while the third chapter shows the consequences of the light field quantization in the description of electromagnetic transitions.In the fourth chapter it is analyzed the spin of the electron, and in particular its derivation from the Dirac equation, while the fifth chapter investigates the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra (Stark and Zeeman effects). The sixth chapter describes the properties of systems composed by many interacting identical particles by introducing the Hartree-Fock variational method, the density functional theory, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Finally,...

  11. Quantum electrodynamics tests and X-rays standards using pionic atoms and highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, Trassinelli

    2005-12-01

    The object of this thesis is to present a new measurement of the pion mass using pionic nitrogen X-ray spectroscopy and results on helium-like argon and sulphur spectroscopy. The new pion mass has been measured with an accuracy of 1.7 ppm, 30% better that the present world average value, and it is obtained from Bragg spectroscopy of 5 ->4 pionic nitrogen transitions using the theoretical predictions provided by quantum electrodynamics. We have got: m(π - ) = (139.571042 ± 0.000210 ± 0.000110) where the first error is due to the statistics and the second is the systematic error. I present the calculation of the hyperfine structure and recoil corrections for pionic atoms using a new perturbation method for the Klein-Gordon equation. The spectrometer used for this measurement has been characterized with the relativistic M1 transitions from helium-like ions produced with a new device, the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion Trap. High statistics spectra from these ions have enabled us to measure transition energies with an accuracy of some ppm which has allowed us to compare theoretical predictions with experiment data. X-ray emission from pionic atoms and multicharged ions can be used to define new types of X-ray standards for energies of a few keV

  12. Physics. Experimental and theoretical foundations. Pt. 3. Atomic, molecular, and quantum physics. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Reinhart

    2012-01-01

    This textbook mediates in three volumes the matter of the first four semester of the bachelor respectively master course. The otherwise generally usual separate presentation of experimental and theoretical physics is canceled in favor of an integrated treatment. The advances are obvious: The studying is enabled to learn to understand knowledge gotten by means of experiments also immediately in a quantitative formulation. The can equally be used as textbook to an integrated course and to separated courses. Because the relevant theoretical concepts are developed without gap a special book of theoretical physics is unnecessary. Numerous exercise problems deepen the understanding and help directly in the preparation for examinations. The illustrations are mostly presented in two colours. Volume III treats atomic and molecular physics. After a semiclassical presentation the quantum-mechanical foundations are developed and in the following chapters applied to atomic systems and processes. An introduction in the foundations and application of the laser. The closure is formed by a chapter about entangled systems.

  13. Quantum random number generator based on quantum tunneling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haihan; Li, Junlin; Pan, Dong; Zhang, Weixing; Long, Guilu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an experimental implementation of quantum random number generator(QRNG) with inherent randomness of quantum tunneling effect of electrons. We exploited InGaAs/InP diodes, whose valance band and conduction band shared a quasi-constant energy barrier. We applied a bias voltage on the InGaAs/InP avalanche diode, which made the diode works under Geiger mode, and triggered the tunneling events with a periodic pulse. Finally, after data collection and post-processing, our...

  14. Feedback control of persistent-current oscillation based on the atomic-clock technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Dumke, Rainer

    2018-05-01

    We propose a scheme of stabilizing the persistent-current Rabi oscillation based on the flux qubit-resonator-atom hybrid structure. The low-Q L C resonator weakly interacts with the flux qubit and maps the persistent-current Rabi oscillation of the flux qubit onto the intraresonator electric field. This oscillating electric field is further coupled to a Rydberg-Rydberg transition of the 87Rb atoms. The Rabi-frequency fluctuation of the flux qubit is deduced from measuring the atomic population via the fluorescence detection and stabilized by feedback controlling the external flux bias. Our numerical simulation indicates that the feedback-control method can efficiently suppress the background fluctuations in the flux qubit, especially in the low-frequency limit. This technique may be extensively applicable to different types of superconducting circuits, paving a way to long-term-coherence superconducting quantum information processing.

  15. The hydrogen atom-deuterium molecule reaction: Experimental determination of product quantum state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinnen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The H + H 2 atom exchange reaction (and its isotopic analogs) is the simplest neutral bimolecular chemical reaction because of the small number of electrons in the system and the lightness of the nuclei. The H 3 potential energy surface (PES) is the most accurately known reactive surface (LSTH surface); there have been both quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and quantal calculations performed on it. This is one of the few systems for which theory is ahead of experiment, and many theoretical predictions await experimental comparison. The H + D 2 → HD + D reaction is studied using thermal D 2 (∼298 K) and translationally hot hydrogen atoms. Photolysis of HI at 266 nm generates H atoms with center-of-mass collision energies of 1.3 and 0.55 eV, both of which are above the classical reaction barrier of 0.42 eV. The rovibrational population distribution of the molecular product is measured by (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). A major effort has been directed toward calibrating the (2+1) REMPI detection procedure, to determine quantitatively the relationship between ion signals and relative quantum state populations for HD. An effusive, high-temperature nozzle has been constructed to populate thermally the high rovibrational levels observed in the reaction. The results are compared to theoretical calculations of the E,F 1 Σ g + - X 1 Σ g + two-photon transition moments. For the H + D 2 reaction, the populations of all energetically accessible HD product levels are measured. Specifically, the following levels are observed: HD(v = 0, J = 0-15), HD(v = 1, J = 0-12), and HD(v = 2, J = 0-8). Of the available energy, 73% is partitioned into product translation, 18% into HD rotation, and 9% into HD vibration

  16. Quantum computer based on activated dielectric nanoparticles selectively interacting with short optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomskii, Oleg N; Kharitonov, Yu Ya

    2004-01-01

    The operation principle of a quantum computer is proposed based on a system of dielectric nanoparticles activated with two-level atoms - cubits, in which electric dipole transitions are excited by short intense optical pulses. It is proved that the logical operation (logical operator) CNOT (controlled NOT) is performed by means of time-dependent transfer of quantum information over 'long' (of the order of 10 4 nm) distances between spherical nanoparticles owing to the delayed interaction between them in the optical radiation field. It is shown that one-cubit and two-cubit logical operators required for quantum calculations can be realised by selectively exciting dielectric particles with short optical pulses. (quantum calculations)

  17. Assessment of a quantum phase-gate operation based on nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebic, S.; Ottaviani, C.; Di Giuseppe, G.; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze in detail the proposal for a two-qubit gate for travelling single-photon qubits recently presented by Ottaviani et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 010301(R) (2006)]. The scheme is based on an ensemble of five-level atoms coupled to two quantum and two classical light fields. The two quantum fields undergo cross-phase modulation induced by electromagnetically induced transparency. The performance of this two-qubit quantum phase gate for travelling single-photon qubits is thoroughly examined in the steady-state and transient regimes, by means of a full quantum treatment of the system dynamics. In the steady-state regime, we find a general trade-off between the size of the conditional phase shift and the fidelity of the gate operation. However, this trade-off can be bypassed in the transient regime, where a satisfactory gate operation is found to be possible, significantly reducing the gate operation time

  18. Threshold quantum cryptograph based on Grover's algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jianzhong; Qin Sujuan; Wen Qiaoyan; Zhu Fuchen

    2007-01-01

    We propose a threshold quantum protocol based on Grover's operator and permutation operator on one two-qubit signal. The protocol is secure because the dishonest parties can only extract 2 bits from 3 bits information of operation on one two-qubit signal while they have to introduce error probability 3/8. The protocol includes a detection scheme to resist Trojan horse attack. With probability 1/2, the detection scheme can detect a multi-qubit signal that is used to replace a single-qubit signal, while it makes every legitimate qubit invariant

  19. Wavelet-Based Quantum Field Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Altaisky

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Euclidean quantum field theory for the fields $phi_{Delta x}(x$, which depend on both the position $x$ and the resolution $Delta x$, constructed in SIGMA 2 (2006, 046, on the base of the continuous wavelet transform, is considered. The Feynman diagrams in such a theory become finite under the assumption there should be no scales in internal lines smaller than the minimal of scales of external lines. This regularisation agrees with the existing calculations of radiative corrections to the electron magnetic moment. The transition from the newly constructed theory to a standard Euclidean field theory is achieved by integration over the scale arguments.

  20. Quantum BCH Codes Based on Spectral Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ying; Zeng Guihua

    2006-01-01

    When the time variable in quantum signal processing is discrete, the Fourier transform exists on the vector space of n-tuples over the Galois field F 2 , which plays an important role in the investigation of quantum signals. By using Fourier transforms, the idea of quantum coding theory can be described in a setting that is much different from that seen that far. Quantum BCH codes can be defined as codes whose quantum states have certain specified consecutive spectral components equal to zero and the error-correcting ability is also described by the number of the consecutive zeros. Moreover, the decoding of quantum codes can be described spectrally with more efficiency.

  1. Numerical simulation of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine due to direct irradiation of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma to biological membrane with quantum mechanical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Yoshida, Taketo; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Plasma medicine is one of the most attractive applications using atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma. With respect to direct contact of the discharge plasma with a biological membrane, reactive oxygen species play an important role in induction of medical effects. However, complicated interactions between the plasma radicals and membrane have not been understood well. In the present work, we simulated elemental processes at the first stage of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine using the quantum mechanical molecular dynamics code in a general software AMBER. The change in the above processes was classified according to the incident energy of oxygen atom. At an energy of 1 eV, the abstraction of a hydrogen atom and recombination to phosphatidylcholine were simultaneously occurred in chemical attachment of incident oxygen atom. The exothermal energy of the reaction was about 80% of estimated one based on the bond energies of ethane. An oxygen atom over 10 eV separated phosphatidylcholine partially. The behaviour became increasingly similar to physical sputtering. The reaction probability of oxygen atom was remarkably high in comparison with that of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that we can uniformly estimate various physicochemical dynamics of reactive oxygen species against membrane lipids.

  2. Quantum computing based on space states without charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyurkov, V.; Filippov, S.; Gorelik, L.

    2010-01-01

    An implementation of a quantum computer based on space states in double quantum dots is discussed. There is no charge transfer in qubits during a calculation, therefore, uncontrolled entanglement between qubits due to long-range Coulomb interaction is suppressed. Encoding and processing of quantum information is merely performed on symmetric and antisymmetric states of the electron in double quantum dots. Other plausible sources of decoherence caused by interaction with phonons and gates could be substantially suppressed in the structure as well. We also demonstrate how all necessary quantum logic operations, initialization, writing, and read-out could be carried out in the computer.

  3. On promotion of base technologies of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization decided in June, 1987 by the Atomic Energy Commission, it was recognized that hereafter, the opening-up of the new potential that atomic energy possesses should be aimed at, and the policy was shown so that the research and development hereafter place emphasis on the creative and innovative region which causes large technical innovation, by which the spreading effect to general science and technology can be expected, and the development of the base technologies that connect the basic research and project development is promoted. The trend of atomic energy development so far, the change of the situation surrounding atomic energy, the direction of technical development of atomic energy hereafter and the base technologies are discussed. The concept of the technical development of materilas, artificial intelligence, lasers, and the evaluation and reduction of radiation risks used for atomic energy is described. As the development plan of atomic energy base technologies, the subjects of technical development, the future image of technical development, the efficient promotion of the development and so on are shown. (Kato, I.)

  4. Influence of qubit displacements on quantum logic operations in a silicon-based quantum computer with constant interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenev, D. I.; Berman, G. P.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2006-01-01

    The errors caused by qubit displacements from their prescribed locations in an ensemble of spin chains are estimated analytically and calculated numerically for a quantum computer based on phosphorus donors in silicon. We show that it is possible to polarize (initialize) the nuclear spins even with displaced qubits by using controlled-NOT gates between the electron and nuclear spins of the same phosphorus atom. However, a controlled-NOT gate between the displaced electron spins is implemented with large error because of the exponential dependence of exchange interaction constant on the distance between the qubits. If quantum computation is implemented on an ensemble of many spin chains, the errors can be small if the number of chains with displaced qubits is small

  5. The atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells and the green gap problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, C.J., E-mail: colin.humphreys@msm.cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J.T., E-mail: jg641@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Tang, F., E-mail: ft274@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Oehler, F., E-mail: fabrice.oehler@lpn.cnrs.fr [CNRS/C2N, Paris Sud University, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C., E-mail: changlin.zheng@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@mcem.monash.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Martin, T.L., E-mail: tomas.martin@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Bagot, P.A.J., E-mail: paul.bagot@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Moody, M.P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Sutherland, D., E-mail: danny.sutherland@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dawson, P., E-mail: philip.dawson@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Schulz, S., E-mail: stefan.schulz@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings Complex, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); and others

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We have studied the atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells. • The non-polar (11-20) InGaN quantum wells contain indium-rich clusters, unlike the polar (0001) quantum wells. • The electrons and holes in the quantum wells are localised by different mechanisms. - Abstract: We have used high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), aberration-corrected quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (Q-STEM), atom probe tomography (APT) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the atomic structure of (0001) polar and (11-20) non-polar InGaN quantum wells (QWs). This paper provides an overview of the results. Polar (0001) InGaN in QWs is a random alloy, with In replacing Ga randomly. The InGaN QWs have atomic height interface steps, resulting in QW width fluctuations. The electrons are localised at the top QW interface by the built-in electric field and the well-width fluctuations, with a localisation energy of typically 20 meV. The holes are localised near the bottom QW interface, by indium fluctuations in the random alloy, with a localisation energy of typically 60 meV. On the other hand, the non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs contain nanometre-scale indium-rich clusters which we suggest localise the carriers and produce longer wavelength (lower energy) emission than from random alloy non-polar InGaN QWs of the same average composition. The reason for the indium-rich clusters in non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs is not yet clear, but may be connected to the lower QW growth temperature for the (11-20) InGaN QWs compared to the (0001) polar InGaN QWs.

  6. Upconversion-based receivers for quantum hacking-resistant quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin; Kanter, Gregory S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel upconversion (sum frequency generation)-based quantum-optical system design that can be employed as a receiver (Bob) in practical quantum key distribution systems. The pump governing the upconversion process is produced and utilized inside the physical receiver, making its access or control unrealistic for an external adversary (Eve). This pump facilitates several properties which permit Bob to define and control the modes that can participate in the quantum measurement. Furthermore, by manipulating and monitoring the characteristics of the pump pulses, Bob can detect a wide range of quantum hacking attacks launched by Eve.

  7. Experimental quantum ratchets based on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, H.; Loefgren, A.; Sheng, W.; Xu, H.; Svensson, A.; Omling, P.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A number of biological processes, for instance muscular contraction and intracellular transport, are based on a fascinating physical principle: In periodic, asymmetric potentials, so-called ratchets, the random motion of Brownian particles can be put to use by extracting energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations. These findings have recently revived interest in physics to explore the general principles of ratchet effects. So far, most ratchet systems studied assumed or used classical systems. In extension of this previous work, highly interesting and new physics can also be expected from ratchet mechanisms that rely on quantum processes. In this contribution, the requirements for experimental studies of quantum ratchet effects will be discussed, and it will be pointed out that these prerequisites are ideally fulfilled in semiconductor- and metal-nanostructures. As an example, experimental and theoretical results will be presented showing that phase-coherent, asymmetric (triangular) electron cavities can partially rectify an applied AC voltage. Using this effect, which is related to electron wave interference, an electron current can be generated without applied net field

  8. Quantum cosmology based on discrete Feynman paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, Geoffrey F.

    2002-01-01

    Although the rules for interpreting local quantum theory imply discretization of process, Lorentz covariance is usually regarded as precluding time quantization. Nevertheless a time-discretized quantum representation of redshifting spatially-homogeneous universe may be based on discrete-step Feynman paths carrying causal Lorentz-invariant action--paths that not only propagate the wave function but provide a phenomenologically-promising elementary-particle Hilbert-space basis. In a model under development, local path steps are at Planck scale while, at a much larger ''wave-function scale'', global steps separate successive wave-functions. Wave-function spacetime is but a tiny fraction of path spacetime. Electromagnetic and gravitational actions are ''at a distance'' in Wheeler-Feynman sense while strong (color) and weak (isospin) actions, as well as action of particle motion, are ''local'' in a sense paralleling the action of local field theory. ''Nonmaterial'' path segments and ''trivial events'' collaborate to define energy and gravity. Photons coupled to conserved electric charge enjoy privileged model status among elementary fermions and vector bosons. Although real path parameters provide no immediate meaning for ''measurement'', the phase of the complex wave function allows significance for ''information'' accumulated through ''gentle'' electromagnetic events involving charged matter and ''soft'' photons. Through its soft-photon content the wave function is an ''information reservoir''

  9. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  10. A quantum-mechanical study of atom-diatom collisions in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sintarng.

    1989-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical formalism, in both space-fixed (SF) and body-fixed (BF) coordinate systems, is developed for describing an S-state structureless atom (A) colliding with a Estate vibrating rotor diatomic molecule (BC) in the presence of a laser field. The additional Hamiltonians H rad and H int , which describe the laser field and its interaction with the atom-diatom collision system, have been added to the field-free Hamiltonian Ho. And the collision problem can be solved by this extended Hamiltonian. The laser field Hamiltonian is represented by the number state representation. The interaction Hamiltonian is expressed by rvec μ BC . rvec ε, where rvec μ BC is the dipole moment of the diatomic molecule BC, and rvec ε is the electric field strength of the laser field. Since the field-free total angular momentum J is coupling with the laser field, J and its z-axis projection M are no longer conserved. To facilitate the collision problem, the laser field is restricted to a single mode, and its interaction with the collision only involves dipole allowed transitions in which a single photon is absorbed or emitted. For convenience, the coupled-channel equations are solved by the real boundary conditions instead of the complex boundary conditions. On applying the real boundary conditions, the author obtains the K-matrix, which is related to the S-matrix by S = (I + iK)(I - iK) -1 . A model calculation is discussed for the Ar + CO collision system in a laser intensity of 10 9 W/cm 2

  11. Quantum volume hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme for parallel spatially multimode quantum memory for light. The scheme is based on a counterpropagating quantum signal wave and a strong classical reference wave as in a classical volume hologram and therefore can be called a quantum volume hologram. The medium for the hologram consists of a spatially extended ensemble of atoms placed in a magnetic field. The write-in and readout of this quantum hologram is as simple as that of its classical counterpart and consists of a single-pass illumination. In addition, we show that the present scheme for a quantum hologram is less sensitive to diffraction and therefore is capable of achieving a higher density of storage of spatial modes as compared to previous proposals. We present a feasibility study and show that experimental implementation is possible with available cold atomic samples. A quantum hologram capable of storing entangled images can become an important ingredient in quantum information processing and quantum imaging.

  12. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT NUMBER 77 Massachusetts...for the graphene macro-atom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 4.3 Performance of the graphene based single photon switch. . . . . . . . 68 5.1 All-optical...community of scientists, as well as the occasional pick up basketball, softball , volleyball, hockey and tennis team. Both past and present members have

  13. Effective convergence to complete orbital bases and to the atomic Hartree--Fock limit through systematic sequences of Gaussian primitives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.W.; Ruedenberg, K.

    1979-01-01

    Optimal starting points for expanding molecular orbitals in terms of atomic orbitals are the self-consistent-field orbitals of the free atoms and accurate information about the latter is essential for the construction of effective AO bases for molecular calculations. For expansions of atomic SCF orbitals in terms of Gaussian primitives, which are of particular interest for applications in polyatomic quantum chemistry, previous information has been limited in accuracy. In the present investigation a simple procedure is given for finding expansions of atomic self-consistent-field orbitals in terms of Gaussian primitives to arbitrarily high accuracy. The method furthermore opens the first avenue so far for approaching complete basis sets through systematic sequences of atomic orbitals

  14. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3 × 10(-3), which is comparable to that (7.5 × 10(-3)) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10(-3) was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  15. Study of Atoms and Molecules with Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Suewattana, Malliga; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei; Walter, Eric J.

    2006-03-01

    We study the ground-state properties of second-row atoms and molecules using the phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AF QMC) method. This method projects the many-body ground state from a trial wave function by means of random walks in the Slater-determinant space. We use a single Slater-determinant trial wave function obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations. The calculations were done with a plane-wave basis and supercells with periodic boundary condition. We investigate the finite-size effects and the accuracy of pseudopotentials within DFT, HF, and AF QMC frameworks. Pseudopotentials generated from both LDA (OPIUM) and HF are employed. We find that the many-body QMC calculations show a greater sensitivity to the accuracy of the pseudopotentials. With reliable pseudopotentials, the ionization potentials and dissociation energies obtained using AF QMC are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. S. Zhang and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 136401 (2003) http://opium.sourceforge.net I. Ovcharenko, A. Aspuru-Guzik, and W. A. Lester, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7790 (2001)

  16. Quantum Entangled Dark Solitons Formed by Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishmash, R. V.; Carr, L. D.

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by experiments on Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices, we study the quantum evolution of dark soliton initial conditions in the context of the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. An extensive set of quantum measures is utilized in our analysis, including von Neumann and generalized quantum entropies, quantum depletion, and the pair correlation function. We find that quantum effects cause the soliton to fill in. Moreover, soliton-soliton collisions become inelastic, in strong contrast to the predictions of mean-field theory. These features show that the lifetime and collision properties of dark solitons in optical lattices provide clear signals of quantum effects.

  17. Quantum multi-signature protocol based on teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiao-jun; Liu Yun; Sun Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a protocol which can be used in multi-user quantum signature is proposed. The scheme of signature and verification is based on the correlation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and the controlled quantum teleportation. Different from the digital signatures, which are based on computational complexity, the proposed protocol has perfect security in the noiseless quantum channels. Compared to previous quantum signature schemes, this protocol can verify the signature independent of an arbitrator as well as realize multi-user signature together. (orig.)

  18. A Novel Quantum Video Steganography Protocol with Large Payload Based on MCQI Quantum Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhiguo; Chen, Siyi; Ji, Sai

    2017-11-01

    As one of important multimedia forms in quantum network, quantum video attracts more and more attention of experts and scholars in the world. A secure quantum video steganography protocol with large payload based on the video strip encoding method called as MCQI (Multi-Channel Quantum Images) is proposed in this paper. The new protocol randomly embeds the secret information with the form of quantum video into quantum carrier video on the basis of unique features of video frames. It exploits to embed quantum video as secret information for covert communication. As a result, its capacity are greatly expanded compared with the previous quantum steganography achievements. Meanwhile, the new protocol also achieves good security and imperceptibility by virtue of the randomization of embedding positions and efficient use of redundant frames. Furthermore, the receiver enables to extract secret information from stego video without retaining the original carrier video, and restore the original quantum video as a follow. The simulation and experiment results prove that the algorithm not only has good imperceptibility, high security, but also has large payload.

  19. Quantum memory for nonstationary light fields based on controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, B.; Tittel, W.; Gisin, N.; Nilsson, M.; Kroell, S.; Cirac, J. I.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a method for efficient storage and recall of arbitrary nonstationary light fields, such as, for instance, single photon time-bin qubits or intense fields, in optically dense atomic ensembles. Our approach to quantum memory is based on controlled, reversible, inhomogeneous broadening and relies on a hidden time-reversal symmetry of the optical Bloch equations describing the propagation of the light field. We briefly discuss experimental realizations of our proposal

  20. Analysis of a quantum memory for photons based on controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangouard, Nicolas; Simon, Christoph; Afzelius, Mikael; Gisin, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a quantum memory for photons based on controlled and reversible inhomogeneous broadening. The explicit solution of the equations of motion is obtained in the weak excitation regime, making it possible to gain insight into the dependence of the memory efficiency on the optical depth, and on the width and shape of the atomic spectral distributions. We also study a simplified memory protocol which does not require any optical control fields

  1. Atom Tunneling in the Hydroxylation Process of Taurine/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase Identified by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase is one of the most studied α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (αKGDs), involved in several biotechnological applications. We investigated the key step in the catalytic cycle of the αKGDs, the hydrogen transfer process, by a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (B3LYP/CHARMM22). Analysis of the charge and spin densities during the reaction demonstrates that a concerted mechanism takes place, where the H atom transfer happens simultaneously with the electron transfer from taurine to the Fe═O cofactor. We found the quantum tunneling of the hydrogen atom to increase the rate constant by a factor of 40 at 5 °C. As a consequence, a quite high kinetic isotope effect close to 60 is obtained, which is consistent with the experimental value.

  2. Bit-commitment-based quantum coin flipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Ashwin; Shor, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on a special framework for quantum coin-flipping protocols, bit-commitment-based protocols, within which almost all known protocols fit. We show a lower bound of 1/16 for the bias in any such protocol. We also analyze a sequence of multiround protocols that tries to overcome the drawbacks of the previously proposed protocols in order to lower the bias. We show an intricate cheating strategy for this sequence, which leads to a bias of 1/4. This indicates that a bias of 1/4 might be optimal in such protocols, and also demonstrates that a more clever proof technique may be required to show this optimality

  3. Quantum random number generator based on quantum nature of vacuum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A. E.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Gleim, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum random number generator (QRNG) allows obtaining true random bit sequences. In QRNG based on quantum nature of vacuum, optical beam splitter with two inputs and two outputs is normally used. We compare mathematical descriptions of spatial beam splitter and fiber Y-splitter in the quantum model for QRNG, based on homodyne detection. These descriptions were identical, that allows to use fiber Y-splitters in practical QRNG schemes, simplifying the setup. Also we receive relations between the input radiation and the resulting differential current in homodyne detector. We experimentally demonstrate possibility of true random bits generation by using QRNG based on homodyne detection with Y-splitter.

  4. Numerical methods for atomic quantum gases with applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and to ultracold fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguzzi, A.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Vignolo, P.

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in ultra-cold vapours of alkali atoms has given enormous impulse to the study of dilute atomic gases in condensed quantum states inside magnetic traps and optical lattices. High-purity and easy optical access make them ideal candidates to investigate fundamental issues on interacting quantum systems. This review presents some theoretical issues which have been addressed in this area and the numerical techniques which have been developed and used to describe them, from mean-field models to classical and quantum simulations for equilibrium and dynamical properties. After an introductory overview on dilute quantum gases, both in the homogeneus state and under harmonic or periodic confinement, the article is organized in three main sections. The first concerns Bose-condensed gases at zero temperature, with main regard to the properties of the ground state in different confinements and to collective excitations and transport in the condensate. Bose-Einstein-condensed gases at finite temperature are addressed in the next section, the main emphasis being on equilibrium properties and phase transitions and on dynamical and transport properties associated with the presence of the thermal cloud. Finally, the last section is focused on theoretical and computational issues that have emerged from the efforts to drive gases of fermionic atoms and boson-fermion mixtures deep into the quantum degeneracy regime, with the aim of realizing novel superfluids from fermion pairing. The attention given in this article to methods beyond standard mean-field approaches should make it a useful reference point for future advances in these areas

  5. Scheme for the implementation of a universal quantum cloning machine via cavity-assisted atomic collisions in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Xubo; Pahlke, K.; Mathis, W.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the 1→2 universal quantum cloning machine of Buzek and Hillery [Phys. Rev. A 54, 1844 (1996)] in the context of cavity QED. The scheme requires cavity-assisted collision processes between atoms, which cross through nonresonant cavity fields in the vacuum states. The cavity fields are only virtually excited to face the decoherence problem. That's why the requirements on the cavity quality factor can be loosened

  6. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  7. QMCPACK: an open source ab initio quantum Monte Carlo package for the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongnim; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Beaudet, Todd D.; Benali, Anouar; Chandler Bennett, M.; Berrill, Mark A.; Blunt, Nick S.; Josué Landinez Borda, Edgar; Casula, Michele; Ceperley, David M.; Chiesa, Simone; Clark, Bryan K.; Clay, Raymond C., III; Delaney, Kris T.; Dewing, Mark; Esler, Kenneth P.; Hao, Hongxia; Heinonen, Olle; Kent, Paul R. C.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Li, Ying Wai; Lopez, M. Graham; Luo, Ye; Malone, Fionn D.; Martin, Richard M.; Mathuriya, Amrita; McMinis, Jeremy; Melton, Cody A.; Mitas, Lubos; Morales, Miguel A.; Neuscamman, Eric; Parker, William D.; Pineda Flores, Sergio D.; Romero, Nichols A.; Rubenstein, Brenda M.; Shea, Jacqueline A. R.; Shin, Hyeondeok; Shulenburger, Luke; Tillack, Andreas F.; Townsend, Joshua P.; Tubman, Norm M.; Van Der Goetz, Brett; Vincent, Jordan E.; ChangMo Yang, D.; Yang, Yubo; Zhang, Shuai; Zhao, Luning

    2018-05-01

    QMCPACK is an open source quantum Monte Carlo package for ab initio electronic structure calculations. It supports calculations of metallic and insulating solids, molecules, atoms, and some model Hamiltonians. Implemented real space quantum Monte Carlo algorithms include variational, diffusion, and reptation Monte Carlo. QMCPACK uses Slater–Jastrow type trial wavefunctions in conjunction with a sophisticated optimizer capable of optimizing tens of thousands of parameters. The orbital space auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method is also implemented, enabling cross validation between different highly accurate methods. The code is specifically optimized for calculations with large numbers of electrons on the latest high performance computing architectures, including multicore central processing unit and graphical processing unit systems. We detail the program’s capabilities, outline its structure, and give examples of its use in current research calculations. The package is available at http://qmcpack.org.

  8. Color encryption scheme based on adapted quantum logistic map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Alaa; Zhang, Tiejun; Amin, Mohamed; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new color image encryption scheme based on quantum chaotic system. In this scheme, a new encryption scheme is accomplished by generating an intermediate chaotic key stream with the help of quantum chaotic logistic map. Then, each pixel is encrypted by the cipher value of the previous pixel and the adapted quantum logistic map. The results show that the proposed scheme has adequate security for the confidentiality of color images.

  9. Ground test of satellite constellation based quantum communication

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Sheng-Kai; Yong, Hai-Lin; Liu, Chang; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Li, Dong-Dong; Lin, Jin; Dai, Hui; Zhao, Shuang-Qiang; Li, Bo; Guan, Jian-Yu; Chen, Wei; Gong, Yun-Hong; Li, Yang; Lin, Ze-Hong; Pan, Ge-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Satellite based quantum communication has been proven as a feasible way to achieve global scale quantum communication network. Very recently, a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite has been launched for this purpose. However, with a single satellite, it takes an inefficient 3-day period to provide the worldwide connectivity. On the other hand, similar to how the Iridium system functions in classic communication, satellite constellation (SC) composed of many quantum satellites, could provide global...

  10. Bibliographic data base on atomic and molecular data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu.

    1983-03-01

    A comparative study is made on three bibliographic data bases: INSPEC, ORNL - AMPIC, GAPHYOR. An on - line retrieval is carried out for searching a number of specific atomic and molecular data. Characteristics of each data base are clarified and suggestions are given for use of those data bases. (author)

  11. Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Architectures that would exploit the distinct characteristics of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) have been proposed for digital communication networks that connect advanced digital computing circuits. In comparison with networks of wires in conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry, the networks according to the proposed architectures would be more compact. The proposed architectures would make it possible to implement complex interconnection schemes that are required for some advanced parallel-computing algorithms and that are difficult (and in many cases impractical) to implement in VLSI circuitry. The difficulty of implementation in VLSI and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA were described previously in Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42. To recapitulate: Wherever two wires in a conventional VLSI circuit cross each other and are required not to be in electrical contact with each other, there must be a layer of electrical insulation between them. This, in turn, makes it necessary to resort to a noncoplanar and possibly a multilayer design, which can be complex, expensive, and even impractical. As a result, much of the cost of designing VLSI circuits is associated with minimization of data routing and assignment of layers to minimize crossing of wires. Heretofore, these considerations have impeded the development of VLSI circuitry to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. On the other hand, with suitable design and under suitable operating conditions, QCA-based signal paths can be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. The proposed architectures require two advances in QCA-based circuitry beyond basic QCA-based binary

  12. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos : accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...of quantum chaos Igor Bray CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 01/20/2017 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos : accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos

  13. Experimental eavesdropping based on optimal quantum cloning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartkiewicz, K.; Lemr, K.; Černoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Miranowicz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 17 (2013), "173601-1"-"173601-5" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum cryptography * qubits * eavesdropping * quantum cloning Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.728, year: 2013

  14. Chapter 6 Quantum Mechanical Methods for Loss-Excitation and Loss-Ionization in Fast Ion-Atom Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkic, Dzevad

    quantum mechanical perturbation theories applied to electron loss collisions involving two hydrogen-like atoms. Both the one- and two-electron transitions (target unaffected by collision, as well as loss-ionization) are thoroughly examined in various intervals of impact energies varying from the threshold via the Massey peak to the Bethe asymptotic region. Systematics are established for the fast, simple, and accurate computations of cross sections for loss-excitation and loss-ionization accounting for the entire spectra of all four particles, including two free electrons and two free protons. The expounded algorithmic strategy of quantum mechanical methodologies is of great importance for wide applications to particle transport physics, especially in fusion research and hadron radiotherapy. This should advantageously replace the current overwhelming tendency in these fields for using phenomenological modeling with artificial functions extracted from fitting the existing experimental/theoretical data bases for cross sections.

  15. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  16. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  17. Sub-doppler spectroscopy based on the transit relaxation of atomic particles in a thin gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmailov, Azad

    2010-01-01

    This paper is the review of methods, achievements and possibilities of the recently elaborated high-resolution laser spectroscopy based on sub-doppler absorption, fluorescence and polarization resonances, which arise because of the specific optical selection of comparatively slow-speed atoms in a thin cell with rarefied gas. It was considered two following mechanisms of such a velocity selection of atomic particles connected with their flight durations between walls of the thin cell : 1) optical pumping of sublevels of the ground atomic term and 2) optical excitation of long-lived quantum levels. Theoretical bases of elaborated spectroscopy methods are presented. In case of the optical pumping mechanism, experimental technique and results on the record of sub-doppler spectral structure of Cs and Rb atoms and on the frequency stabilization of diode lasers by given methods are described. Perspectives of further development and applications of this new direction of the high-resolution spectroscopy are discussed

  18. A Narrow-Linewidth Atomic Line Filter for Free Space Quantum Key Distribution under Daytime Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Woolf, David; Hensley, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Quantum key distribution can provide secure optical data links using the established BB84 protocol, though solar backgrounds severely limit the performance through free space. Several approaches to reduce the solar background include time-gating the photon signal, limiting the field of view through geometrical design of the optical system, and spectral rejection using interference filters. Despite optimization of these parameters, the solar background continues to dominate under daytime atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate an improved spectral filter by replacing the interference filter (Δν ~ 50 GHz) with an atomic line filter (Δν ~ 1 GHz) based on optical rotation of linearly polarized light through a warm Rb vapor. By controlling the magnetic field and the optical depth of the vapor, a spectrally narrow region can be transmitted between crossed polarizers. We find that the transmission is more complex than a single peak and evaluate peak transmission as well as a ratio of peak transmission to average transmission of the local spectrum. We compare filters containing a natural abundance of Rb with those containing isotopically pure 87 Rb and 85 Rb. A filter providing > 95 % transmission and Δν ~ 1.1 GHz is achieved.

  19. Quantum-mechanical theory for electronic-vibrational-rotational energy transfer in atom--diatom collisions: Analysis of the Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellum, J.C.; McGuire, P.

    1983-01-01

    We investigate forms of the molecular system Hamiltonian valid for rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments of inelastic atom--diatom collisions characterized by exchange of energy between electronic, vibrational, and rotational degrees of freedom. We analyze this Hamiltonian in terms of various choices of independent coordinates which unambiguously specify the electronic and nuclear positions in the context of space-fixed and body-fixed reference frames. In particular we derive forms of the Hamiltonian in the context of the following four sets of independent coordinates: (1) a so-called space-fixed set, in which both electronic and nuclear positions are relative to the space-fixed frame; (2) a so-called mixed set, in which nuclear positions are relative to the body-fixed frame while electronic positions are relative to the space-fixed frame; (3) a so-called body-fixed set, in which both electronic and nuclear positions are relative to the body-fixed frame; and (4) another mixed set, in which nuclear positions are relative to the space-fixed frame while electronic positions are relative to the body-fixed frame. Based on practical considerations in accounting for electronic structure and nonadiabatic coupling of electronic states of the collision complex we find the forms of the Hamiltonian in the context of coordinate sets (3) and (4) above to be most appropriate, respectively, for body-fixed and space-fixed treatments of nuclear dynamics in collisional transfer of electronic, vibrational, and rotational energies

  20. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Image Correlation Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tianxiang; Chen, Jiamin; Pei, Dongju; Zhang, Wenquan; Zhou, Nanrun

    2015-02-01

    A novel quantum gray-level image encryption and decryption algorithm based on image correlation decomposition is proposed. The correlation among image pixels is established by utilizing the superposition and measurement principle of quantum states. And a whole quantum image is divided into a series of sub-images. These sub-images are stored into a complete binary tree array constructed previously and then randomly performed by one of the operations of quantum random-phase gate, quantum revolving gate and Hadamard transform. The encrypted image can be obtained by superimposing the resulting sub-images with the superposition principle of quantum states. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are the parameters of random phase gate, rotation angle, binary sequence and orthonormal basis states. The security and the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. The proposed encryption algorithm can resist brute force attack due to its very large key space and has lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  1. A novel clustering algorithm based on quantum games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; He Yan; Jiang Jingping

    2009-01-01

    Enormous successes have been made by quantum algorithms during the last decade. In this paper, we combine the quantum game with the problem of data clustering, and then develop a quantum-game-based clustering algorithm, in which data points in a dataset are considered as players who can make decisions and implement quantum strategies in quantum games. After each round of a quantum game, each player's expected payoff is calculated. Later, he uses a link-removing-and-rewiring (LRR) function to change his neighbors and adjust the strength of links connecting to them in order to maximize his payoff. Further, algorithms are discussed and analyzed in two cases of strategies, two payoff matrixes and two LRR functions. Consequently, the simulation results have demonstrated that data points in datasets are clustered reasonably and efficiently, and the clustering algorithms have fast rates of convergence. Moreover, the comparison with other algorithms also provides an indication of the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. Quantum key distribution over multicore fiber based on silicon photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Bacco, Davide; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    on quantum physics. In order to exchange secure information between users, quantum key distribution (QKD), a branch of Quantum Communications (QCs), provides good prospects for ultimate security based on the laws of quantum mechanics [2–7]. Most of QKD systems are implemented in a point-to-point link using...... generations, to HD-entanglement distribution. Furthermore, MCFs are expected as a good candidate for overcoming the capacity limit of a current optical communication system, as example the record capacity of 661 Tbits/s was obtained last year with a 30-cores fiber [8]. Proof of concept experiment has already...... requirements in terms of key generation are needed. A solution may be represented by new technologies applied to quantum world. In particular multicore fiber (MCF) open a new scenario for quantum communications, from high-dimensional (HD) spatial entanglement generation, to HD QKD and multi-user key...

  3. Silicon CMOS architecture for a spin-based quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhorst, M; Eenink, H G J; Yang, C H; Dzurak, A S

    2017-12-15

    Recent advances in quantum error correction codes for fault-tolerant quantum computing and physical realizations of high-fidelity qubits in multiple platforms give promise for the construction of a quantum computer based on millions of interacting qubits. However, the classical-quantum interface remains a nascent field of exploration. Here, we propose an architecture for a silicon-based quantum computer processor based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We show how a transistor-based control circuit together with charge-storage electrodes can be used to operate a dense and scalable two-dimensional qubit system. The qubits are defined by the spin state of a single electron confined in quantum dots, coupled via exchange interactions, controlled using a microwave cavity, and measured via gate-based dispersive readout. We implement a spin qubit surface code, showing the prospects for universal quantum computation. We discuss the challenges and focus areas that need to be addressed, providing a path for large-scale quantum computing.

  4. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2016-05-18

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips.

  5. Accurate Mapping of Multilevel Rydberg Atoms on Interacting Spin-1 /2 Particles for the Quantum Simulation of Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Léséleuc, Sylvain; Weber, Sebastian; Lienhard, Vincent; Barredo, Daniel; Büchler, Hans Peter; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2018-03-01

    We study a system of atoms that are laser driven to n D3 /2 Rydberg states and assess how accurately they can be mapped onto spin-1 /2 particles for the quantum simulation of anisotropic Ising magnets. Using nonperturbative calculations of the pair potentials between two atoms in the presence of electric and magnetic fields, we emphasize the importance of a careful selection of experimental parameters in order to maintain the Rydberg blockade and avoid excitation of unwanted Rydberg states. We benchmark these theoretical observations against experiments using two atoms. Finally, we show that in these conditions, the experimental dynamics observed after a quench is in good agreement with numerical simulations of spin-1 /2 Ising models in systems with up to 49 spins, for which numerical simulations become intractable.

  6. Control of the inversionless gain and refractive index in a V-type atom via squeezed vacuum and quantum interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.A.; Calderon, Oscar G.; Carreno, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the steady-state populations and gain lineshape of a V-type three-level atom with a closely spaced excited doublet. The atom is driven by a strong coherent field, a weak probe, and a single broadband squeezed vacuum. We focus our attention in the interplay between the quantum interference and the squeezed field on the probe gain. It is shown that the relative phases between the two coherent fields and the squeezed field play an important role in the optical properties of the atom. Specifically, we find that the probe can experience gain without population inversion for proper values of the parameters characterizing the squeezed field and in the absence of incoherent pumping. The system can be tailored to exhibit multiple dispersion regimes accompanied by negligible gain or absorption over a large bandwidth, a desirable feature for obtaining propagation of pulses with negligible distortion

  7. Simulation of quantum computation : A deterministic event-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, K; De Raedt, H

    We demonstrate that locally connected networks of machines that have primitive learning capabilities can be used to perform a deterministic, event-based simulation of quantum computation. We present simulation results for basic quantum operations such as the Hadamard and the controlled-NOT gate, and

  8. Simulation of Quantum Computation : A Deterministic Event-Based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Raedt, K. De; Raedt, H. De

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that locally connected networks of machines that have primitive learning capabilities can be used to perform a deterministic, event-based simulation of quantum computation. We present simulation results for basic quantum operations such as the Hadamard and the controlled-NOT gate, and

  9. Chemical sensors based on quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Rochat, Michel; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2002-09-01

    There is an increasing need in many chemical sensing applications ranging from industrial process control to environmental science and medical diagnostics for fast, sensitive, and selective gas detection based on laser spectroscopy. The recent availability of novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers as mid-infrared spectroscopic sources address this need. A number of spectroscopic techniques have been demonstrated. For example, the authors have employed QC-DFB lasers for the monitoring and quantification of several trace gases and isotopic species in ambient air at ppmv and ppbv levels by means of direct absorption, wavelength modulation, cavity enhanced and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. In this work, pulsed thermoelectrically cooled QC-DFB lasers operating at ~15.6 μm were characterized for spectroscopic gas sensing applications. A new method for wavelength scanning based on the repetition rate modulation was developed. A non-wavelength-selective pyroelectric detector was incorporated in the gas sensor giving an advantage of room-temperature operation and low cost. Absorption lines of CO2 and H2O were observed in ambient air providing information about the concentration of these species.

  10. Next Generation Extended Lagrangian Quantum-based Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre, Christian

    2017-06-01

    A new framework for extended Lagrangian first-principles molecular dynamics simulations is presented, which overcomes shortcomings of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, while maintaining important advantages of the unified extended Lagrangian formulation of density functional theory pioneered by Car and Parrinello three decades ago. The new framework allows, for the first time, energy conserving, linear-scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, which is necessary to study larger and more realistic systems over longer simulation times than previously possible. Expensive, self-consinstent-field optimizations are avoided and normal integration time steps of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics can be used. Linear scaling electronic structure theory is presented using a graph-based approach that is ideal for parallel calculations on hybrid computer platforms. For the first time, quantum based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation is becoming a practically feasible approach in simulations of +100,000 atoms-representing a competitive alternative to classical polarizable force field methods. In collaboration with: Anders Niklasson, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Transfer of an unknown quantum state, quantum networks, and memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Asoka; Agarwal, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    We present a protocol for transfer of an unknown quantum state. The protocol is based on a two-mode cavity interacting dispersively in a sequential manner with three-level atoms in the Λ configuration. We propose a scheme for quantum networking using an atomic channel. We investigate the effect of cavity decoherence in the entire process. Further, we demonstrate the possibility of an efficient quantum memory for arbitrary superposition of two modes of a cavity containing one photon

  12. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, A.I.M.

    1981-01-01

    This book, based on a thirty lecture course given to students at the beginning of their second year, covers the quantum mechanics required by physics undergraduates. Early chapters deal with wave mechanics, including a discussion of the energy states of the hydrogen atom. These are followed by a more formal development of the theory, leading to a discussion of some advanced applications and an introduction to the conceptual problems associated with quantum measurement theory. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Problems are included at the end of each chapter. (U.K.)

  13. Applied research of quantum information based on linear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiao-Ye

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on outstanding work in two main subfields of quantum information science: one involves the quantum measurement problem, and the other concerns quantum simulation. The thesis proposes using a polarization-based displaced Sagnac-type interferometer to achieve partial collapse measurement and its reversal, and presents the first experimental verification of the nonlocality of the partial collapse measurement and its reversal. All of the experiments are carried out in the linear optical system, one of the earliest experimental systems to employ quantum communication and quantum information processing. The thesis argues that quantum measurement can yield quantum entanglement recovery, which is demonstrated by using the frequency freedom to simulate the environment. Based on the weak measurement theory, the author proposes that white light can be used to precisely estimate phase, and effectively demonstrates that the imaginary part of the weak value can be introduced by means of weak measurement evolution. Lastly, a nine-order polarization-based displaced Sagnac-type interferometer employing bulk optics is constructed to perform quantum simulation of the Landau-Zener evolution, and by tuning the system Hamiltonian, the first experiment to research the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in non-equilibrium kinetics processes is carried out in the linear optical system.

  14. A Quantum Cryptography Communication Network Based on Software Defined Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongliang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the Internet, information security has attracted great attention in today’s society, and quantum cryptography communication network based on quantum key distribution (QKD is a very important part of this field, since the quantum key distribution combined with one-time-pad encryption scheme can guarantee the unconditional security of the information. The secret key generated by quantum key distribution protocols is a very valuable resource, so making full use of key resources is particularly important. Software definition network (SDN is a new type of network architecture, and it separates the control plane and the data plane of network devices through OpenFlow technology, thus it realizes the flexible control of the network resources. In this paper, a quantum cryptography communication network model based on SDN is proposed to realize the flexible control of quantum key resources in the whole cryptography communication network. Moreover, we propose a routing algorithm which takes into account both the hops and the end-to-end availible keys, so that the secret key generated by QKD can be used effectively. We also simulate this quantum cryptography communication network, and the result shows that based on SDN and the proposed routing algorithm the performance of this network is improved since the effective use of the quantum key resources.

  15. Applied research of quantum information based on linear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao-Ye

    2016-08-01

    This thesis reports on outstanding work in two main subfields of quantum information science: one involves the quantum measurement problem, and the other concerns quantum simulation. The thesis proposes using a polarization-based displaced Sagnac-type interferometer to achieve partial collapse measurement and its reversal, and presents the first experimental verification of the nonlocality of the partial collapse measurement and its reversal. All of the experiments are carried out in the linear optical system, one of the earliest experimental systems to employ quantum communication and quantum information processing. The thesis argues that quantum measurement can yield quantum entanglement recovery, which is demonstrated by using the frequency freedom to simulate the environment. Based on the weak measurement theory, the author proposes that white light can be used to precisely estimate phase, and effectively demonstrates that the imaginary part of the weak value can be introduced by means of weak measurement evolution. Lastly, a nine-order polarization-based displaced Sagnac-type interferometer employing bulk optics is constructed to perform quantum simulation of the Landau-Zener evolution, and by tuning the system Hamiltonian, the first experiment to research the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in non-equilibrium kinetics processes is carried out in the linear optical system.

  16. Quantum optics with ultracold quantum gases: towards the full quantum regime of the light-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhov, Igor B; Ritsch, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of ultracold quantum gases trapped by light is a prominent direction of modern research, the quantum properties of light were widely neglected in this field. Quantum optics with quantum gases closes this gap and addresses phenomena where the quantum statistical natures of both light and ultracold matter play equally important roles. First, light can serve as a quantum nondemolition probe of the quantum dynamics of various ultracold particles from ultracold atomic and molecular gases to nanoparticles and nanomechanical systems. Second, due to the dynamic light-matter entanglement, projective measurement-based preparation of the many-body states is possible, where the class of emerging atomic states can be designed via optical geometry. Light scattering constitutes such a quantum measurement with controllable measurement back-action. As in cavity-based spin squeezing, the atom number squeezed and Schrödinger cat states can be prepared. Third, trapping atoms inside an optical cavity, one creates optical potentials and forces, which are not prescribed but quantized and dynamical variables themselves. Ultimately, cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum gases requires a self-consistent solution for light and particles, which enriches the picture of quantum many-body states of atoms trapped in quantum potentials. This will allow quantum simulations of phenomena related to the physics of phonons, polarons, polaritons and other quantum quasiparticles. (topical review)

  17. Quantum Dots Based Rad-Hard Computing and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, A.; Klimeck, G.; Leon, R.; Qiu, Y.; Toomarian, N.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are solid-state structures made of semiconductors or metals that confine a small number of electrons into a small space. The confinement of electrons is achieved by the placement of some insulating material(s) around a central, well-conducting region. Thus, they can be viewed as artificial atoms. They therefore represent the ultimate limit of the semiconductor device scaling. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Arbitrated Quantum Signature with Hamiltonian Algorithm Based on Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ronghua; Ding, Wanting; Shi, Jinjing

    2018-03-01

    A novel arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) scheme is proposed motivated by the Hamiltonian algorithm (HA) and blind quantum computation (BQC). The generation and verification of signature algorithm is designed based on HA, which enables the scheme to rely less on computational complexity. It is unnecessary to recover original messages when verifying signatures since the blind quantum computation is applied, which can improve the simplicity and operability of our scheme. It is proved that the scheme can be deployed securely, and the extended AQS has some extensive applications in E-payment system, E-government, E-business, etc.

  19. Formation, atomic structure, and electronic properties of GaSb quantum dots in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timm, R.

    2007-12-14

    In this work, cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used for the first time to study the shape, size, strain, chemical composition, and electronic properties of capped GaSb/GaAs QDs at the atomic scale. By evaluating such structural results on a variety of nanostructures built using different epitaxy methods and growth conditions, details on the underlying QD formation processes can be revealed. A cross-over from flat quantum wells (QWs) to optically active QDs can be observed in samples grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with increasing amount of GaSb, including self-assembled Sb accumulations within a still two-dimensional layer and tiny three-dimensional GaSb islands probably acting as precursor structures. The QWs consist of significantly intermixed material with stoichiometries of maximally 50% GaSb, additionally exhibiting small gaps filled with GaAs. A higher GaSb content up to nearly pure material is found in the QDs, being characterized by small sizes of up to 8 nm baselength and about 2 nm height. In spite of the intermixing, all nanostructures have rather abrupt interfaces, and no significant Sb segregation in growth direction is observed. This changes completely when molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used as growth method, in which case individual Sb atoms are found to be distributed over several nm above the nanostructures. Massive group-V atomic exchange processes are causing this strong inter-mixing and Sb segregation during GaAs overgrowth. In combination with the large strain inherent to GaSb/GaAs QDs, this segregation upon overgrowth is assumed to be the reason for a unique structural phenomenon: All MBE-grown QDs, independent of the amount of deposited GaSb, exhibit a ring structure, consisting of a ring body of high GaSb content and a more or less extended central gap filled with GaAs. These rings have formed in a self-assembled way even when the initial GaSb layer was overgrown considerably fast

  20. Sub-Poissonian statistics of quantum jumps in single molecule or atomic ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osad'ko, I.S.; Gus'kov, D.N.

    2007-01-01

    A theory for statistics of quantum jumps in single molecule or ion driven by continues wave laser field is developed. These quantum jumps can relate to nonradiative singlet-triplet transitions in a molecule or to on → off jumps in a single ion with shelving processes. Distribution function w N (T) of quantum jumps in time interval T is found. Computer simulation of quantum jumps is realized. Statistical treatment of simulated jumps reveals sub-Poissonian statistics of quantum jumps. The theoretical distribution function w N (T) fits well the distribution of jumps found from simulated data. Experimental data on quantum jumps found in experiments with single Hg + ion are described by the function w N (T) well