WorldWideScience

Sample records for atolls

  1. HARP PRIA- Palmyra Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This HARP was first deployed off of Palmyra Atoll in 2006. Recording at this site ended in 2010. The HARP was recovered and redeployed multiple times (see time...

  2. Bikini Atoll groundwater development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work

  3. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  4. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  5. Rose Atoll Coral Monitoring Narrative

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Narrative report summarizes the results of coral monitoring at 11 georeferenced sites at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, undertaken by Dr. James Maragos, USFWS Coral...

  6. Growing plants on atoll soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L

    2000-02-16

    Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in growing plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to grow both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to grow more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the

  7. The Vascular Plants of Losap Atoll

    OpenAIRE

    MANNER, Harley I.; SANA, Dickson

    1995-01-01

    Prior to 1988, studies and observations on Losap Atoll (Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia) indicated a vascular flora of 43 species. A recent collection and observations of the flora of Losap Atoll indicated the presence of 101 species of vascular plants, of which 70 are indigenous and 31 are introduced species. Of these, 34 indigenous and 22 introduced species can be considered new records. An implication of these increases in numbers of species is that the floras of most atolls in the P...

  8. Johnston Atoll - Eradication of Yellow Crazy Ants

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — While on a research and monitoring cruise that visited Johnston Atoll in late January 2010, USFWS employees found an infestation of Anoplolepis gracilipes, or...

  9. Rose Atoll - Eradication of Invasive Ants

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — There are at least 9 species of ants introduced to Rose Atoll, including species that tend to scale insects that are devastating the Pisonia grandis trees on the 15...

  10. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Johnston Atoll 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 17 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  11. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  12. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Species Management 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We initiated management of 3 species of plants that are introduced and invasive at Palmyra Atoll NWR. The work consisted of describing the distributions of these...

  13. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Wake Atoll in April...

  14. Johnston Atoll -Eradication of Yellow Crazy Ants

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — While on a research and monitoring cruise that visited Johnston Atoll in late January 2010, USFWS employees found an infestation of Anoplolepis gracilipes, or...

  15. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Wake Atoll in October...

  16. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Palmyra Atoll 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 13 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the...

  17. Rose Atoll 1993 Shipwreck Restoration Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summarizes efforts undertaken to remove grounded shipwreck at Rose Atoll and monitor impacts to community composition between 1993 and 2012.

  18. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll U.S. Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US conducted a nuclear testing program at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands from 1946 through 1958. Several atolls, including Bikini, were contaminated as a result of the nuclear detonations. Since 1974 the authors have conducted an extensive research and monitoring program to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls, identify the critical radionuclides and pathways, estimate the radiological dose to current or resettling populations, and develop remedial measures to reduce the dose to atoll populations. This paper describes exposure pathways and radionuclides; composition of atoll soils; radionuclide transport and dose estimates; remedial measures; and reduction in dose from a combined option

  19. The two atolls (Mururoa and Fangataufa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After three decades of testing nuclear devices on the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa, France stopped the tests in 1996. The International Atomic Energy Agency was requested to carry out an independent study of the radiological situation on the atolls. The study covers a wide range of disciplines of science and aims to establish whether any residual radioactive material could represent a health hazard. The video shows the first stages of the study: sampling the environment and chemical analysis of plant and fish specimen in order to test the distribution and migration of radioisotopes in the lagoon

  20. Resuspension studies at Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following experiments were conducted on Bikini Atoll to provide key parameters for an assessment of inhalation exposure from plutonium-contaminated dust aerosols: (1) a characterization of background (plutonium activity, dust, plutonium, sea spray, and organic aerosol concentrations); (2) a study of plutonium resuspension from a bare field; (3) a study of plutonium resuspension by traffic; and (4) a study of personal inhalation exposure. Dust concentrations of 21 μg m-3 and sea spray of 34 μg m-3 were the background throughout the Bikini Island except within 50 m of the windward beach. Background concentrations of 239+240Pu were 60 aCi m-3 in the coconut grove and 264 aCi m-3 over rain-stabilized bare soil. The ratio of plutonium activity in aerosols relative to the activity in underlying soil, defined as the enhancement factor, EF, was typically less than one. Enhancement factors increased about 3.8 as a result of tilling. Plutonium resuspension flux was estimated at 0.49 pCi m-2 year-1 over most of Bikini Island. Aerosol size distributions associated with mass and with plutonium activity were typically log-normal with median aerodynamic diameter 2.44 μm, which decreased to 2.0 μm above freshly tilled soil. The Pu concentration in aerosols collected over disturbed soil increased by a factor of 19.1. Vehicular traffic produced dust pulses typically of 10 s duration, 28 μg m-3 average concentration, and plutonium enhancement factor 2.5. Personal dosimetry showed that enhancement of dust by a worker was a factor of 2.64 for heavy work outdoors and 1.86 for light work in and around houses. Pulmonary deposition of plutonium was calculated for various exposure conditions. The pulmonary deposition ranged from 1476 aCi h-1 to 12 aCi h-1

  1. Terrestrial forest management plan for Palmyra Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Stacie A.; McEachern, Kathryn; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    This 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Palmyra Program to refine and expand goals and objectives developed through the Conservation Action Plan process. It is one in a series of adaptive management plans designed to achieve TNC's mission toward the protection and enhancement of native wildlife and habitat. The 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' focuses on ecosystem integrity and specifically identifies and addresses issues related to assessing the status and distribution of resources, as well as the pressures acting upon them, most specifically nonnative and potentially invasive species. The plan, which presents strategies for increasing ecosystem integrity, provides a framework to implement and track the progress of conservation and restoration goals related to terrestrial resources on Palmyra Atoll. The report in its present form is intended to be an overview of what is known about historical and current forest resources; it is not an exhaustive review of all available literature relevant to forest management but an attempt to assemble as much information specific to Palmyra Atoll as possible. Palmyra Atoll is one of the Northern Line Islands in the Pacific Ocean southwest of the Hawai`ian Islands. It consists of many heavily vegetated islets arranged in a horseshoe pattern around four lagoons and surrounded by a coral reef. The terrestrial ecosystem consists of three primary native vegetation types: Pisonia grandis forest, coastal strand forest, and grassland. Among these vegetation types, the health and extent of Pisonia grandis forest is of particular concern. Overall, the three vegetation types support 25 native plant species (two of which may be extirpated), 14 species of sea birds, six shore birds, at least one native reptile, at least seven native insects, and six native land crabs. Green and hawksbill turtles forage at Palmyra Atoll

  2. Biology of the rodents of Enewetak Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roof rats and Polynesian rats, introduced to the atoll by 20th Century commerce and the Micronesians, respectively, were present allopatrically on the larger islets. Of necessity, they were largely vegetarians. Reproductive cycles were keyed to rainfall patterns. High density populations had high stress indices, including high parasite loads. The rats, at the top of the terrestrial food pyramid, constituted a bioenvironmental monitor that was rarely utilized during the several test programs. Bioconcentration of radioisotopes, especially 137Cs and 60Co, occurred; rats implanted with dosimeters were determined to function as environmental radiation monitors. They hypothesized that roof rats on Enjebi survived the nearby nuclear detonation. Analysis of plasma transferrins indicated greater heterozygosity in the northern atoll rat populations. The incidence of oral palatal ridge deformations also was positively correlated with environmental radiation levels, but other gross indications of radiation effect were not found

  3. Ascidians from Rocas Atoll, northeast Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Vieira Paiva; Ronaldo Ruy Oliveira-Filho; Tito Monteiro Da Cruz Lotufo

    2015-01-01

    Rocas Atoll is the only one of its kind in the South Atlantic—and the first Brazilian marine biological reserve. This is the first report about the ascidians from Rocas. A total of 12 species were found, 5 of them not hitherto described: Ascidia viridina sp. nov., Didemnum rochai sp. nov., Leptoclinides crocotulus sp. nov., Polysyncraton maurizeliae sp. nov., and Trididemnum rocasensis sp. nov.). One Caribbean species, Didemnum halimedae, was also discovered in the region for the first time. ...

  4. Ascidians from Rocas Atoll, northeast Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, Sandra V.; Oliveira Filho, Ronaldo R. de; Lotufo, Tito M. da Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Rocas Atoll is the only one of its kind in the South Atlantic—and the first Brazilian marine biological reserve. This is the first report about the ascidians from Rocas. A total of 12 species were found, 5 of them not hitherto described: Ascidia viridina sp. nov., Didemnum rochai sp. nov., Leptoclinides crocotulus sp. nov., Polysyncraton maurizeliae sp. nov., and Trididemnum rocasensis sp. nov. One Caribbean species, Didemnum halimedae, was also discovered in the region for the first time. Fu...

  5. Geochemistry of transuranic elements at Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of transuranic and other radionuclides in the marine environment at Bikini Atoll was studied to better understand the geochemical cycling of radionuclides produced by nuclear testing between 1946 and 1958. The reef areas, which are washed continually by clean ocean water, have low levels of radionuclide concentrations. Radionuclides are contained in fallout particles of pulverized coral. In the water these particles may dissolve, be transported by currents within the Atoll, or enter the North Equatorial Current by tidal exchange of water in the lagoon. The transuranic elements are distributed widely in sediments over the northwest quadrant of the Atoll, which suggests that this area serves as a settling basin for particles. The distribution of plutonium in the water column indicates that plutonium in the sediments is released to the bottom waters and then is transported and diluted by the prevailing currents. Upon interaction with the lagoon environment, plutonium occurs in several physicochemical states. Laboratory tests and field studies at Bikini show that approximately 15% of the plutonium is associated with the colloidal fraction

  6. Migration from atolls as climate change adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Thomas Ladegaard Kümmel; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    that migration currently improves access to financial and social capital, reduces pressure on natural resources and makes island communities less vulnerable to extreme weather events and other shocks — all factors that contribute positively to adaptive capacity. It also shows that there are major barriers...... in the two atoll communities, Reef Islands and Ontong Java, which are located in the periphery of Solomon Islands. The paper will outline current migration patterns in the two island groups and discuss how some of this migration may contribute to adaptation to climate change and other stresses. It shows...

  7. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Wake Atoll, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 1 or 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Wake Atoll in...

  8. Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Rose Atoll NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  9. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Managment: Eradicate/Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  10. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  11. Public Use Plan for Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Public Use Plan has been developed to guide management of public use activities after the Navy and its contractor personnel leave the atoll on June 30, 1997....

  12. Palmyra Atoll Quickbird II Seafloor Mosaic (1.8m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Pamyra Atoll were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The objective of this...

  13. Palmyra Atoll Quickbird II Terrestrial Mosaic (1.8m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Pamyra Atoll were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The objective of this...

  14. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Pearl & Hermes Atoll, NWHI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for , Pearl & Hermes, Atoll, NWHI. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical...

  15. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  16. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  17. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote...

  18. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Palmyra Atoll 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the...

  19. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Johnston Atoll 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  20. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge Station Plan [Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is currently an overlay refuge managed through cooperative agreement with the U.S. Navy. The refuge is located near the...

  1. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Johnston Atoll, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  2. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Prospects for resettlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international Advisory Group met at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna on 11-15 December 1995 for the purpose of reviewing the current radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and advising on the prospects for rehabilitation of the atoll and resettlement of its indigenous population. The Advisory Group was convened by the IAEA in response to a request for technical assistance from the Government of the Marshall Islands within the framework of IAEA technical co-operation project MHL/9/003, 'Radiological Monitoring in Bikini Atoll'. The primary aim of this review was to assist the Bikinian people to form their own judgement on the radiological conditions at their atoll and on the prospects for resettling there, should they so desire. At the meeting, the Advisory Group benefited greatly from the participation of a delegation from the Marshall Islands. At the request of the Government of the Marshall Islands, the international review was limited to Bikini Atoll and did not extend to other atolls, islands and isles affected by radioactive fallout from the testing. Moreover, within Bikini Atoll, it was concentrated on Bikini Island, where the Bikinian population formerly resided. The review relates to the prevailing radiological circumstances and their implications for the future habitability of the atoll. It is not intended to include the retrospective assessment of the past radiological impact of nuclear testing. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has routinely estimated, and reported to the United Nations General Assembly, radiation levels and effects attributable to nuclear weapon testing, including the tests carried out in the territory of the Marshall Islands. Some of the UNSCEAR estimates have been included in the report, but only for the sake of completeness

  3. Isotopic signature of plutonium at Bikini atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom ratios of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 244Pu were determined in sediments and soils from Bikini atoll using low energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. All samples had been contaminated by local fallout from nuclear weapon testing between 1946 and 1958 and show significant variations in the isotopic composition, which are ascribed to the different yields of single tests and to the mixture of material from various devices. Differences in the 244Pu/239Pu ratio (2.8-5.7x10-4) are more pronounced than in the 240Pu/239Pu ratio of the same samples and provide complementary information to distinguish the sources of contamination.

  4. Examination of Algal Diversity and Benthic Community Structure at Palmyra Atoll, U.S. Line Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is the second largest atoll under U.S. jurisdiction in the Pacific Ocean. Until recently, little was known about benthic...

  5. Estimating the Ground Water Resources of Atoll Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne E. Olsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground water resources of atolls, already minimal due to the small surface area and low elevation of the islands, are also subject to recurring, and sometimes devastating, droughts. As ground water resources become the sole fresh water source when rain catchment supplies are exhausted, it is critical to assess current groundwater resources and predict their depletion during drought conditions. Several published models, both analytical and empirical, are available to estimate the steady-state freshwater lens thickness of small oceanic islands. None fully incorporates unique shallow geologic characteristics of atoll islands, and none incorporates time-dependent processes. In this paper, we provide a review of these models, and then present a simple algebraic model, derived from results of a comprehensive numerical modeling study of steady-state atoll island aquifer dynamics, to predict the ground water response to changes in recharge on atoll islands. The model provides an estimate thickness of the freshwater lens as a function of annual rainfall rate, island width, Thurber Discontinuity depth, upper aquifer hydraulic conductivity, presence or absence of a confining reef flat plate, and in the case of drought, time. Results compare favorably with published atoll island lens thickness observations. The algebraic model is incorporated into a spreadsheet interface for use by island water resources managers.

  6. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands. Utrok Atoll (2010-2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kehl, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinelli, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tumey, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Langston, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tamblin, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tibon, S. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Chee, L. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Aisek, Jr., A. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); DeDrum, Z. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Mettao, M. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Henson, J. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands)

    2014-12-15

    As a hard copy supplement to the Marshall Islands Program website (https://marshallislands.llnl.gov), this document provides an overview of the individual radiological surveillance monitoring program established in support of residents of Utrōk Atoll and nonresident citizens of the Utrōk Atoll population group, along with full disclosure of verified measurement data (2010-2012). The Utrōk Atoll Whole Body Counting Facility has been temporarily stationed on Majuro Atoll and, in cooperation with the Utrōk Atoll Local Government, serves as a national radiological facility open to the general public.

  7. Review at Bikini Atoll. Assessing radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll and the prospects for resettlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some testing during the development of the atomic bomb was done in countries that do not have the infrastructure and expertise for evaluating any associated radiation risks. In such cases, outside expertise is needed to obtain independent advice about the radiological situation caused by residual radioactive material from nuclear testing. The IAEA has been requested by the governments of a number of its Member States to provide assistance in this context. Among the former nuclear test sites which the IAEA has reviewed is the Bikini Atoll of the Marshall Islands. Based on its review, the IAEA Advisory Group determined that no further corroboration of the measurements and assessments of the radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll is necessary. The data that have been collected are of sufficient quality to allow an appropriate evaluation to be performed. The limited IAEA monitoring of the area provided a good quality assurance verification of the previously collected data. It was recommended that Bikini Island should not be permanently resettled under the present radiological conditions. This recommendation was based on the assumption that persons resettling on the island would consume a diet of entirely locally produced food. The radiological data support that if a diet of this type were permitted, it could lead to an annual effective dose of about 15 mSv. This level was judged to require intervention of some type for radiation protection purposes

  8. Surge ammonium uptake in macroalgae from a coral atoll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, V.; Wafar, M.V.M.

    (Phaeophyta)) from Kavaratti atoll (Lakshadweep, India). Addition of ammonium (up to 20 mmol L-1) led to pronounced uptake within 4–6 min, with the amount of ammonium taken up during surge phase (<4 min) accounting for from about half to 10 times that taken up...

  9. External radiation survey and dose predictions for Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik, Ailuk, and Wotje Atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation measurements were made at several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands, which are known or suspected to have been the recipients of tropospheric fallout during the Pacific Testing Programs. Sufficient data were available to ascertain realistic dose predictions for the inhabitants of Rongelap and Utirik Atolls where the 30 year integral doses from external sources exclusive of background radiation were 0.65 and 0.06 rem respectively. These estimates are based on realistic life-style models based on observations of each atoll community. Ailuk and Wotje Atolls were found to be represenatives of regional background radiation levels

  10. Causes of mortality of albatross chicks at Midway Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, L.; Sievert, P.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the effect of plastic ingestion on seabirds in Hawaii, we necropsied the carcasses of 137 Laysan albatross (Diomedea immutabilis) chicks from Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean during the summer of 1987. Selected tissues were collected for microbiological, parasitological, toxicological or histopathological examinations. Dehydration was the most common cause of death. Lead poisoning, trauma, emaciation (starvation) and trombidiosis were other causes of death; nonfatal nocardiosis and avian pox also were present. There was no evidence that ingested plastic caused mechanical lesions or mortality in 1987, but most of the chicks had considerably less plastic in them than chicks from earlier years. Human activity (lead poisoning and vehicular trauma) caused mortality at Midway Atoll and represented additive mortality for pre-fledgling albatrosses.

  11. Primary productivity and its correlation with rainfall on Aldabra Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekeine, J.; Turnbull, L. A.; Cherubini, P.; de Jong, R.; Baxter, R.; Hansen, D.; Bunbury, N.; Fleischer-Dogley, F.; Schaepman-Strub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldabra Atoll, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1982, hosts the world's largest population of giant tortoises. In view of recent rainfall declines in the East African region, it is important to assess the implications of local rainfall trends on the atoll's ecosystem and evaluate potential threats to the food resources of the giant tortoises. However, building an accurate picture of the effects of climate change requires detailed context-specific case-studies, an approach often hindered by data deficiencies in remote areas. Here, we present and analyse a new historical rainfall record of Aldabra atoll together with two potential measures of primary productivity: (1) tree-ring measurements of the deciduous tree species Ochna ciliata and, (2) satellite-derived NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) data for the period 2001-2012. Rainfall declined by about 6 mm yr-1 in the last four decades, in agreement with general regional declines, and this decline could mostly be attributed to changes in wet-season rainfall. We were unable to cross-date samples of O. ciliata with sufficient precision to deduce long-term patterns of productivity. However, satellite data were used to derive Aldabra's land surface phenology (LSP) for the period 2001-2012 which was then linked to rainfall seasonality. This relationship was strongest in the eastern parts of the atoll (with a time-lag of about six weeks between rainfall changes and LSP responses), an area dominated by deciduous grasses that supports high densities of tortoises. While the seasonality in productivity, as reflected in the satellite record, is correlated with rainfall, we did not find any change in mean rainfall or productivity for the shorter period 2001-2012. The sensitivity of Aldabra's vegetation to rainfall highlights the potential impact of increasing water stress in East Africa on the region's endemic ecosystems.

  12. Estimating the Ground Water Resources of Atoll Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Arne E.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Jenson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Ground water resources of atolls, already minimal due to the small surface area and low elevation of the islands, are also subject to recurring, and sometimes devastating, droughts. As ground water resources become the sole fresh water source when rain catchment supplies are exhausted, it is critical to assess current groundwater resources and predict their depletion during drought conditions. Several published models, both analytical and empirical, are available to estimate the steady-state ...

  13. Marine radioactivity assessment of Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out an international project 'The Study of the Radiological Situation at the Atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa' with the aim of assessing the present and future radiological situation at the atolls and making recommendations for either monitoring or remedial actions if they are deemed necessary. The paper concentrates on marine radioactivity aspects and gives an estimation of present radionuclide concentrations in water, sediment and biota of the Mururoa and Fangataufa lagoons and the surrounding ocean. The dominant radionuclide in both lagoons is Pu in sediments (the total inventory is approximately 30 TBq). A decline in radionuclide concentrations has been observed in recent years in lagoon water, with the exception of 3H and 90Sr, for which a contribution from underground sources is to be expected. Radionuclide concentrations in biota from the lagoons and the surrounding ocean are low and consistent with previous measurements. The observed radionuclide concentrations in both lagoons imply that no radiological risk exists for hypothetical inhabitants of Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls

  14. Radionuclides in sediments and seawater at Rongelap Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Robison, W.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Brunk, J.L.

    1998-03-01

    The present concentrations and distributions of long-lived, man-made radionuclides in Rongelap Atoll lagoon surface sediments, based on samples collected and analyzed in this report. The radionuclides were associated with debris generated with the 1954 Bravo thermonuclear test at Bikini Atoll. Presently, only {sup 90}Sr and the transuranic radionuclides are found associated with the surface sediments in any quantity. Other radionuclides, including {sup 60}Co and {sup 137} Cs, are virtually absent and have either decayed or migrated from the deposits to the overlying seawater. Present inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 249+240}Pu in the surface layer at Rongelap are estimated to be 3% of the respective inventories in surface sediments from Bikini Atoll. There is a continuous slow release of the transuranics from the sediments back to the water column. The inventories will only slowly change with time unless the chemical-physical processes that now regulate this release to the water column are changed or altered.

  15. The atoll source states of 4U 1608-52

    CERN Document Server

    Van Straaten, S; Méndez, M; Straaten, Steve van; Klis, Michiel van der; Mendez, Mariano

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the atoll source 4U 1608-52 using a large data set obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the timing properties of 4U 1608-52 are almost exactly identical to those of the atoll sources 4U 0614+09 and 4U 1728-34 despite the fact that contrary to these sources 4U 1608-52 is a transient covering two orders of magnitude in luminosity. The frequencies of the variability components of these three sources follow a universal scheme when plotted versus the frequency of the upper kilohertz QPO, suggesting a very similar accretion flow configuration. If we plot the Z sources on this scheme only the lower kilohertz QPO and HBO follow identical relations. Using the mutual relations between the frequencies of the variability components we tested several models; the transition layer model, the sonic point beat frequency model, and the relativistic precession model. None of these models described the data satisfactory. Recently, it has been suggested that the atoll sources (among them 4U ...

  16. 2006 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI-06-09 - Kure Atoll, Pearl and Hermes Atoll and Kauai Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected from 23 June to 19 July 2006 aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) at Kure Atoll, Pearl and...

  17. Between-Habitat Variation of Benthic Cover, Reef Fish Assemblage and Feeding Pressure on the Benthos at the Only Atoll in South Atlantic: Rocas Atoll, NE Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, G. O.; Morais, R. A.; C D L Martins; Mendes, T. C.; Aued, A. W.; Cândido, D. V.; Oliveira, J. C.; L T Nunes; Fontoura, L.; M N Sissini; Teschima, M. M.; M. B. Silva; Ramlov, F.; Gouvea, L. P.; Ferreira, C. E. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Southwestern Atlantic harbors unique and relatively understudied reef systems, including the only atoll in South Atlantic: Rocas atoll. Located 230 km off the NE Brazilian coast, Rocas is formed by coralline red algae and vermetid mollusks, and is potentially one of the most "pristine" areas in Southwestern Atlantic. We provide the first comprehensive and integrative description of the fish and benthic communities inhabiting different shallow reef habitats of Rocas. We studied two contras...

  18. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll: US nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikini Atoll was one of two sites in the Marshall Islands that were used in the 1950's by the United States for testing nuclear weapons. The testing produced widespread radioactive contamination in Bikini and much of the Northern Marshall Islands. The Bikini people, relocated in 1946 before the test program began, have long desired to return to their homeland. Coral soil on Bikini Island makes cesium-137 (137Cs) much more available for plant uptake than do soils of North America and Europe. Hence, when locally grown crops mature and become available for consumption, the resulting body burden of 137Cs and the associated doses to humans exceeds federal guidelines. The dose from the terrestrial food ingestion pathway dominates all other pathways and contributes about 90% of the total dose to returning residents. We are, therefore, involved in cost-effective efforts to reduce the dose associated with resettlement. We have evaluated several measures, in addition to soil removal, to eliminate 137Cs from the soil and to reduce its uptake into food crops. The most effective, and the easiest to implement, is the application of potassium to the atoll soils. A dramatic reduction in 137Cs occurs in tropical fruits after applications of potassium-rich fertilizer to experimental soil plots. This treatment reduces the associated ingestion dose to about 5% of the pre-treatment levels, and this option avoids removal of the organic-rich surface soils. In addition, the added potassium increases plant productivity. We are now focusing on determining the duration of the effects of potassium treatment on 137Cs uptake into plants, and the rate of environmental loss of 137Cs in the atoll ecosystem. (author)

  19. Population pressure on coral atolls: trends and approaching limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, M

    1990-09-01

    Trends and approaching limits of population pressure on coral atolls is discussed by examining the atoll environment in terms of the physical geography, the production systems, and resource distribution. Atoll populations are grouped as dependent and independent, and demographic trends in population growth, migraiton, urbanization, and political dependency are reviewed. Examination of the carrying capacity includes a dynamic model, the influences of the West, and philopsophical considerations. The carrying capacity is the "maximal population supportable in a given area". Traditional models are criticized because of a lack in accounting for external linkages. The proposed model is dynamic and considers perceived needs and overseas linkages. It also explains regional disparities in population distribution, and provides a continuing model for population movement from outer islands to district centers and mainland areas. Because of increased expectations and perceived needs, there is a lower carrying capacity for outlying areas, and expanded capacity in district centers. This leads to urbanization, emigration, and carrying capacity overshot in regional and mainland areas. Policy intervention is necessary at the regional and island community level. Atolls, which are islands surrounding deep lagoons, exist in archipelagoes across the oceans, and are rich in aquatic life. The balance in this small land area with a vulnerable ecosystem may be easily disturbed by scarce water supplies, barren soils, rising sea levels in the future, hurricanes, and tsunamis. Traditionally, fisheries and horticulture (pit-taro, coconuts, and breadfruit) have sustained populations, but modern influences such as blasting, reef mining, new industrial technologies, population pressure, and urbanization threaten the balance. Population pressure, which has lead to pollution, epidemics, malnutrition, crime, social disintegration, and foreign dependence, is evidenced in the areas of Tuvalu, Kiribati

  20. Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inventories of 239+240Pu and 241Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of 239+240Pu and lesser amounts of 241Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of 239+240Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized 239+240Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of 239+240Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of 241Am to 239+240Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of 239+240Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables

  1. Biogeochemistry of transuranic elements in Bikini Atoll lagoon. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of transuranic and other radionuclides in the marine environment at Bikini Atoll was studied to better understand the biogeochemical cycling of radionuclides produced during testing of some 23 nuclear and thermonuclear devices between 1946 and 1958. The radionuclides are primarily associated with the coralline sediments. However, the highest radionuclide concentrations are not found at the detonation craters but with the fine particles which have been washed out of the craters in the reef by the currents and deposited downstream. The transuranic elements are distributed widely in sediments over the northwest quadrant of the atoll suggesting that this area serves as a settling basin for particles. The transuranic elements associated with these sediment particles do not remain fixed but are remobilized and distributed asymmetrically in the water column throughout the lagoon. The physico-chemical states of plutonium, measured using dialysis and sorption techniques include approx. 15% colloidal and varying amounts in the soluble and particulate fractions depending on sample location. Uptake of these physicochemical states is extensive on plankton with distribution coefficients measured at Bikini between water and plankton of 104 - 106. The uptake of plutonium in higher organisms decreases with trophic level and low concentrations (approx. .001 pCi/g for 239240Pu) are found in the edible muscle of fish. The half-time for cleansing the reef of contaminant radionuclides has been estimated near the Bravo Crater using measurements made on the viscera of mullet

  2. Bikini Atoll coral biodiversity resilience five decades after nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five decades after a series of nuclear tests began, we provide evidence that 70% of the Bikini Atoll zooxanthellate coral assemblage is resilient to large-scale anthropogenic disturbance. Species composition in 2002 was assessed and compared to that seen prior to nuclear testing. A total of 183 scleractinian coral species was recorded, compared to 126 species recorded in the previous study (excluding synonomies, 148 including synonomies). We found that 42 coral species may be locally extinct at Bikini. Fourteen of these losses may be pseudo-losses due to inconsistent taxonomy between the two studies or insufficient sampling in the second study, however 28 species appear to represent genuine losses. Of these losses, 16 species are obligate lagoonal specialists and 12 have wider habitat compatibility. Twelve species are recorded from Bikini for the first time. We suggest the highly diverse Rongelap Atoll to the east of Bikini may have contributed larval propagules to facilitate the partial resilience of coral biodiversity in the absence of additional anthropogenic threats

  3. Aerial radiological and photographic survey of eleven atolls and two islands within the Northern Marshall Islands. Dates of surveys, July-November 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over eleven atolls and two islands within the northern Marshall Islands between September and November 1978. This survey was part of a comprehensive radiological survey, which included extensive terrestrial and marine sampling, to determine possible residual contamination which might remain as a result of the United States nuclear testing program conducted at Bikini Enewetak Atolls between 1946 and 1958. A similar survey was conducted at Enewetak Atoll in 1972. The present survey covered those atolls known to have received direct fallout from the Bravo event, conducted in March 1954 at Bikini Atoll. These included Bikini, Rongelap, Rongerik, Ailinginae, Bikar, Taka, and Utirik Atolls. In addition, several atolls and islands which might have been at the fringes of the Bravo fallout were also surveyed, including Likiep and Ailuk Atolls, Jemo and Mejit Islands, and Wotho Atoll. Ujelang Atoll, which lies approximately 200 km southwest of Enewetak, was also surveyed. Island-averaged terrestrial exposure rates in the range of 30 to 50 μR/h were observed over parts of Bikini Atoll, including Bikini Island, and over the northern part of Rongelap Atoll. Levels over southern Rongelap and over Rongerik Atoll ranged from 4 to 7 μR/h. Levels were somewhat lower at Ailinginae Atoll (approximately 2 μR/h) and at Utirik Atoll (approximately 0.7 μR/h). The variations observed were consistent with what might be expected from the fallout pattern of the Bravo event. Levels at Ailuk, Likiep, Wotho and Ujelang Atolls and at Mejit and Jemo Islands were consistent with 137Cs activity, due to worldwide fallout, observed within the United States and at other locations in the central Pacific. These four atolls and the two islands, therefore, do not appear to have recieved any significant direct contamination from the Bravo event or the other tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls

  4. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2002 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  5. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiiian Islands, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  6. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2002 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  7. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Surveys at the Midway Atoll, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Midway Atoll in...

  8. CRED REA Algal Assessment at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in...

  9. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Rose Atoll, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites around Rose Atoll in...

  10. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands (NWHI), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  11. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2003 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  12. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 13 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the...

  13. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 18 sites at Johnston Atoll in the...

  14. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Rose Atoll, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  15. 2007 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI0701 - Wake Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected between 19 April - 9 May 2007 aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) at Wake Atoll, Western...

  16. Eradication of Polynesian Rats (rattus exulans) from Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 38-day poison and trap campaign was conducted on Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge to eradicate Polynesian rats in order to reduce their impact of seabird eggs...

  17. Marine species survey of Johnson Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000697)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for nonindigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  18. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  19. Marine Species Survey of Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean, June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for non-indigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  20. Developing tools to eradicate ecologically destructive ants on Rose Atoll: effectiveness and attractiveness of formicidal baits

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A key factor contributing to the decline in the population of Pisonia grandis on Rose Atoll is an infestation of the non-native scale, Pulvinaria urbicola...

  1. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  2. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Palmyra Atoll, Line Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the...

  3. Final Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, including Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll NWR consists of removing the metal debris remaining from the grounding of a Taiwanese fishing vessel in 1993, and monitoring the...

  4. Transuranium radionuclides in components of the benthic environment of Enewetak Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the concentrations and distributions of transuranium radionuclides in the marine environment of Enewetak Atoll are reviewed. The distributions of the transuranics in the lagoon are very heterogeneous. The quantities of transuranics generated during the nuclear-test years at the Atoll and now associated with various sediment components are discussed. Whenever possible, concentrations of 241Am and /sup 239+240/Pu are compared

  5. Nature et fonctionnement des atolls des Tuamotu (Polynésie Française)

    OpenAIRE

    Rougerie, Francis (collab.)

    1995-01-01

    The 77 atolls of the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia) constitute bio-geomorphological singularities in the oligotrophic oceanic field of the South Pacific. These open-ocean atoll reefs are locally overlaid by sandy islets (motu) and encompass lagoons with hydrological properties that are different from oceanic water, according to their degree of enclosure. Lagoonal waters may be more or less saline and eutrophic than oceanic water. In eutrophic lagoons, corals are replaced by macro-alga...

  6. Meiobenthic and Macrobenthic Community Structure in Carbonate Sediments of Rocas Atoll (North-east, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, S. A.; Warwick, R. M.; Attrill, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rocas is the only atoll of the South Atlantic and it is built almost exclusively by coralline red algae, vermetid gastropods and encrusting foraminiferans. Patterns in the community structure of meiofauna and macrofauna, particularly nematodes and polychaetes, at Rocas Atoll, north-east Brazil, are determined and compared for different habitats: sublittoral, tidal flat, reef pools and lagoon. Nematodes and copepods were the most abundant meiofaunal taxa. In all studied habitats at Rocas Atoll, oligochaetes, nematodes and polychaetes numerically dominate the macrofauna. Univariate and multivariate analyses reveal clear differences in community structure between the habitats of the atoll, especially between the sublittoral and the inner habitats. The number of species, total density, diversity (H') and trophic structure vary significantly between the habitats, but the differences are dependent on which faunistic category (meiobenthic or macrobenthic) is analysed. Nematodes belonging to the Epsilonematidae and Draconematidae, together with a diverse community of meiobenthic polychaetes, characterize the sublittoral habitat of Rocas Atoll. Both meiofauna and macrofauna are depressed in the tidal flat, and the local sediment instability particularly affects the polychaete abundance. Reef pools and lagoons support a very dense aggregation of invertebrates, particularly the macrofauna, when compared with other carbonate reef sediments. However, differences in the structure of meiofauna and macrofauna communities between reef pools and lagoons are not significant. Changes in meiobenthic and macrobenthic community structure are related to the gradation in the physical environment of the atoll.

  7. Primary productivity and its correlation with rainfall on Aldabra Atoll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shekeine

    2015-01-01

    O. ciliata with sufficient precision to deduce long-term patterns of productivity. However, satellite data were used to derive Aldabra's land surface phenology (LSP for the period 2001–2012 which was then linked to rainfall seasonality. This relationship was strongest in the eastern parts of the atoll (with a time-lag of about six weeks between rainfall changes and LSP responses, an area dominated by deciduous grasses that supports high densities of tortoises. While the seasonality in productivity, as reflected in the satellite record, is correlated with rainfall, we did not find any change in mean rainfall or productivity for the shorter period 2001–2012. The sensitivity of Aldabra's vegetation to rainfall highlights the potential impact of increasing water stress in East Africa on the region's endemic ecosystems.

  8. Bikini Atoll ionizing radiation survey - May 1985 - May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted 23 nuclear tests at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The single largest detonation was the Bravo test, which resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of a number of islands and prevented the timely resettlement of the native population. Since 1958, many studies have been conducted to assess clean up options and the internal and external radiation doses the Bikinians would likely receive, should they resettle the islands. Although the external dose rates from β and γ radiation have been previously determined by aerial and ground measurement techniques, technical constraints limited the assessment of external β dose rates from the Cs-137 and Sr-90/Y-90 contamination on the islands. Now, because of the recent development of very thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), these external β dose rates can be measured

  9. Marine biological survey of ROI-NAMUR outfall at the United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, May 2000 (NODC Accession 0000653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) central command post on...

  10. Baseline marine biological survey at Roi-Namur sewage outfall, United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1997 (NODC Accession 0000630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) central command post on...

  11. Marine Biological Survey ROI-NAMUR Outfall, United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, May 2000 (NODC Accession 0000653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll,approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll(USAKA) central command post on...

  12. Baseline Marine Biological Survey ROI-NAMUR Outfall United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1997(NODC Accession 0000630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll(USAKA) central command post on...

  13. Wave energy gradients across a Maldivian atoll: Implications for island geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kench, Paul S.; Brander, Robert W.; Parnell, Kevin E.; McLean, Roger F.

    2006-11-01

    Exposure to wave energy has been used to account for a range of ecological, geological and geomorphic processes in coral reef systems, but few attempts have been made to quantify spatial variations in energy at the atoll scale. This study presents results of measurements of wave energy on reef platforms across South Maalhosmadulu Atoll, Maldives and their implications for island geomorphology. The atoll has a perforated rim (37% effective aperture) and experiences predictable shifts in monsoon winds from the west (8 months) and northeast (4 months). Results show that wave energy affecting the atoll is considerably greater during the westerly monsoon. Atoll structure promotes significant changes in wave energy and wave characteristics across the atoll. Short period (3-8 s) monsoon-driven wave energy, which is significant on windward reefs, is dissipated on the peripheral reef network and the density of lagoonal patch reefs limits development of locally generated wind-wave energy across the lagoon. However, longer period swell (8-20 s) propagates through the lagoon to leeward reefs. A windward to leeward decay in wave energy is evident in the westerly monsoon, but not in the northeast monsoon, when long period swell (from the southwest) remains significant on western reefs. Net energy calculations that account for seasonal changes in wave energy across the atoll identify a steep west-east gradient that has geomorphic significance for island building. Western reefs are dominated by westerly flowing energy that is 4.5-7 times the total energy input elsewhere in the atoll. Wave energy on central reefs is balanced, whereas net energy on eastern reef platforms is dominated by eastward propagating waves. This steep energy gradient provides a physical explanation for the presence and distribution of islands on reef platforms across the atoll and provides quantitative support for the theory of Gardiner [Gardiner, J.S., 1903. The Fauna and Geography of the Maldives and

  14. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls in the Northern Line Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Dinsdale

    Full Text Available Microbes are key players in both healthy and degraded coral reefs. A combination of metagenomics, microscopy, culturing, and water chemistry were used to characterize microbial communities on four coral atolls in the Northern Line Islands, central Pacific. Kingman, a small uninhabited atoll which lies most northerly in the chain, had microbial and water chemistry characteristic of an open ocean ecosystem. On this atoll the microbial community was equally divided between autotrophs (mostly Prochlorococcus spp. and heterotrophs. In contrast, Kiritimati, a large and populated ( approximately 5500 people atoll, which is most southerly in the chain, had microbial and water chemistry characteristic of a near-shore environment. On Kiritimati, there were 10 times more microbial cells and virus-like particles in the water column and these microbes were dominated by heterotrophs, including a large percentage of potential pathogens. Culturable Vibrios were common only on Kiritimati. The benthic community on Kiritimati had the highest prevalence of coral disease and lowest coral cover. The middle atolls, Palmyra and Tabuaeran, had intermediate densities of microbes and viruses and higher percentages of autotrophic microbes than either Kingman or Kiritimati. The differences in microbial communities across atolls could reflect variation in 1 oceaonographic and/or hydrographic conditions or 2 human impacts associated with land-use and fishing. The fact that historically Kingman and Kiritimati did not differ strongly in their fish or benthic communities (both had large numbers of sharks and high coral cover suggest an anthropogenic component in the differences in the microbial communities. Kingman is one of the world's most pristine coral reefs, and this dataset should serve as a baseline for future studies of coral reef microbes. Obtaining the microbial data set, from atolls is particularly important given the association of microbes in the ongoing degradation

  15. The radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. Technical report. V. 1. Radionuclide concentrations measured in the terrestrial environment of the atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides technical details of the terrestrial sampling and measurement campaign undertaken as part of the Study of the Radiological Situation at the Atolls of Mururoa, Fangataufa by the Terrestrial Working Group. The primary objective of this group was to evaluate existing French data on the presence of environmental radionuclides on the atolls of Mururoa, Fangataufa and Tureia in French Polynesia. All aspects of the terrestrial environments of Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls - the sites of atmospheric and underground nuclear tests - were included in the sampling programme. Tureia Atoll - the nearest inhabited island - was also included in the sampling programme, in order to determine whether deposits from atmospheric testing are detectable there. The task required the co-operation of many different parties in order to provide the supporting logistics for the sampling campaign and the expertise for analysing the different radionuclides of interest in the samples collected. Samples were analysed by members of the IAEA's co-ordinated international network of Analytical Laboratories for Measuring Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA) and the Agency's laboratories, Seibersdorf. Samples were also sent to the French Service Mixte de Surveillance Radiologique et Biologique (SMSRB)

  16. The radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. Technical report. V. 2. Radionuclide concentrations measured in the aquatic environment of the atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A marine monitoring programme was carried out within the framework of the IAEA's project entitled ''Study of the Radiological Situation at Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls'' with the aim of assessing present radionuclide concentrations in the marine environment of Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls. The terms of reference of the marine working group (WG2) included a review of the data provided by the French authorities on radionuclide distributions in the littoral and sub-littoral environments at the atolls. Further, using accredited international laboratories, it was decided to carry out sufficient and new independent monitoring work at and around the atolls in order to validate existing French data and, the same time, to provide a representative and high quality data set on current radionuclide concentrations in the marine environment, with particular reference to the requirement of Task Group A for radiological assessment purposes. This work included measurements of the current radionuclide concentrations in the marine environment, and estimation of concentration factors and Kd values appropriate for the region. The variations in activity concentrations in the lagoons over the past few years are discussed, and the likely sources of activity implied by these data are identified where possible

  17. 3 CFR 8337 - Proclamation 8337 of January 6, 2009. Establishment of the Rose Atoll Marine National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... abundant marine life, deep sea coral forests, and several new fish and invertebrate species. Rose Atoll supports most of the seabird population of American Samoa, including 12 federally protected migratory... the seabird and turtle species of the Central Pacific. Threatened Pisonia atoll forest trees are...

  18. Modern microbialites and their environmental significance, Meiji reef atoll, Nansha (Spratly) Islands, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN JianWei; WANG Yue

    2008-01-01

    Meiji (Mischief) coral atoll, in Nansha (Spratly) Islands, South China Sea, consists of an annular reef rim surrounding a central lagoon. On the atoll rim there are either protuberant 'motu' (small coral patch reefs on the rim of atoll) islets or lower sandy cays that contain modern microbialite deposits on the corals in pinnacles and surrounding bottoms of the atoll. Microbialites, including villiform, hairy, and thin spine growth forms, as well as gelatinous masses, mats and encruststion, developed on coral colonies and atoll rim sediments between 0 and 15 m deep-water settings. The microbialites were produced by natural populations of filamentous cyanobacteria and grew on (1) bulbous corals together with Acropora sp., (2) on massive colonies of Galaxea fascicularis, (3) on dead Montipora digitata, and (4) on dead Acropora teres, some hairy microbialite growing around broken coral branches. This study demonstrates that microbial carbonates are developed in coral reefs of South China Sea and indicates that microbial processes may be important in the construction of modern reef systems. The results have significance in the determination of nature and composition in microorganisms implied in the formation ancient microbialites, and permit evaluation of the importance of microbial deposits in modern coral reefs and of 'microbialites' in biogeochemical cycles of modern coral reef systems. The results also provide evidence of modern analogues for ancient microbialites in shallow-water settings, and combine with sedimentological studies of ancient microbialites to understand their controls.

  19. Environmental assessment for the resettlement of Eneu Island on Bikini Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This environmental assessment evaluates various alternatives to return the Bikini people to their homeland on Bikini Atoll. Eneu Island was spared the heavy nuclear contamination that rendered Bikini Island, the largest and main inhabitable island on the atoll, presently unsuitable for resettlement. The economic, social, technical and environmental consequences of all alternatives were compared, and alternative sites, purposes and scales for resettlement were included in the analysis. This environmental assessment explores these alternatives in detail and concludes that the resettlement of Eneu Island by some of the Bikini people at this time will not result in significant adverse effects to the environment nor will it foreclose any other full scale resettlement option involving the cleanup of Bikini Atoll. In addition, it concludes that the resettlement of Eneu can be accomplished independently from the planned cleanup and resettlement of Bikini Island. Plans and combination of plans involving the early resettlement of Eneu are fully feasible and implementable at this time. (author)

  20. Some statistical aspects of the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaning up the radionuclide contamination at Enewetak Atoll has involved a number of statistical design problems. Theoretical considerations led to choosing a grid sampling pattern; practical problems sometimes lead to resampling on a finer grid. Other problems associated with using grids have been both physical and statistical. The standard sampling system is an in situ intrinsic gamma detector which measures americium concentration. The cleanup guidelines include plutonium concentration, so additional sampling of soil is required to establish Pu/Am ratios. The soil sampling design included both guidelines for location of the samples and also a special pattern of subsamples making up composite samples. The large variance of the soil, sample results makes comparison between the two types difficult anyway, but this is compounded by vegetation attenuation of the in situ readings, soil disturbance influences, and differences in devegetation methods. The constraints inherent in doing what amounts to a research and development project, on a limited budget of time and money, in a field engineering environment are also considered

  1. Wave transformation and shoreline water level on Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Edward; Kench, Paul S.; O'Callaghan, Joanne; Popinet, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The influence of sea swell (SS) waves, infragravity (IG) waves, and wave setup on maximum runup (Rmax) is investigated across different tidal stages on Fatato Island, Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu. Field results illustrate that SS waves are tidally modulated at the shoreline, with comparatively greater wave attenuation and setup occurring at low tide versus high tide. A shoreward increase in IG wave height is observed across the 100 m wide reef flat at all tidal elevations, with no tidal modulation of IG wave height at the reef flat or island shoreline. A 1-D shock-capturing Green-Naghdi solver is used to replicate the field deployment and analyze Rmax. Model outputs for SS wave height, IG wave height and setup at the shoreline match field results with model skill >0.96. Model outputs for Rmax are used to identify the temporal window when geomorphic activity can occur on the beach face. During periods of moderate swell energy, waves can impact the beach face at spring low tide, due to a combination of wave setup and strong IG wave activity. Under mean wave conditions, the combined influence of setup, IG waves and SS waves results in interaction with island sediment at midtide. At high tide, SS and IG waves directly impact the beach face. Overall, wave activity is present on the beach face for 71% of the study period, a significantly longer duration than is calculated using mean water level and topographic data.

  2. Developing tools to eradicate ecologically destructive ants on Rose Atoll: effectiveness and attractiveness of formicidal baits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Robert; Banko, Paul; Pendleton, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A key factor contributing to the decline in the population of Pisonia grandis on Rose Atoll is an infestation of the non-native scale, Pulvinaria urbicola (Homoptera: Coccidae). Ants, in facultative relationships with scale insects, may facilitate scale population growth and increase their effect on plant hosts. Three ant species found on Rose Atoll, Tetramorium bicarinatum, T. simillimum, and Pheidole oceanica, are capable of tending Pulvinaria on Pisonia and may have contributed to the demise of the trees on the atoll. Replicated trials conducted on Rose Atoll during 17–21 March 2013 tested the effectiveness and relative attractiveness of five formicidal baits potentially to be used to eradicate these ants on the atoll. Three baits contained toxins (hydramethylnon in Amdro® and Maxforce®, indoxacarb in Provaunt®) and two baits contained an insect growth regulator (IGR; pyriproxyfen in Distance® and s-methoprene in Tango®). Amdro, Distance, and Maxforce are granular baits while Provaunt and Tango were mixed with adjuvants to form a gel-like matrix. Results varied among ant species and baits, but Provaunt was highly effective against workers of both Tetramorium species while Amdro and Maxforce were highly effective against T. simillimum and P. oceanica. Limited time on the island prevented the evaluation of the effectiveness of the IGR baits. The relative attractiveness of the baits generally mirrored their ability to kill worker ants. Tetramorium simillimum was attracted to all five baits; T. bicarinatum was attracted to Provaunt, Distance, and Tango; and P. oceanica was attracted to the three granular baits. These results and the small area of Rose Atoll suggest that island-wide application of formicidal baits may result in eradication of these ants, but an application strategy targeting all three species would more likely succeed with the use of multiple baits.

  3. Radiological conditions at the Southern Islands of Rongelap Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data presented in the following tables is the total available for each southern island; they include both the data from the 1978 Northern Marshall Island Radiological Survey (NMIRS) and trips to Rongelap Atoll from 1986 through 1991. There are additional samples that were taken at Rongelap Island in 1990 and 1991, and the data are unavailable for this report. In one table we present the number of vegetation samples collected in the 1978 NMIRS and from 1986 through 1991. Again, the majority of the 137Cs is from the 1986-1991 trips. We have not made additional analyses of 239+240Pu, 241Am and 90Sr because the concentrations are very low and these radionuclides contribute less than 5% of an already very small dose. In another table we show the number of soil samples collected at each island in 1978 and the number collected since 1986. Most of the data are from 1986 through 1991. The major exception is 90Sr where all of the data are from the 1978 NMIRS. We have done some additional Pu analyses of soils from Rongelap Eniaetok, and Borukka Island but none of the other southern islands. A significant amount of new data for 137Cs and 241Am have been generated from the samples collected from 1986 through 1991. The data are presented in the form of summary tables, graphics, detailed appendices and aerial photographs of the islands with the sample locations marked. The identified sample locations from the 1978 NMIRS will be added later

  4. Characterization studies of actinide contamination on Johnston Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents results that indicates that plutonium and americium contamination of Johnson Atoll soil and sludge from the cleanup plant settling pond is dispersed. The 241Am/239Pu ratio was essentially identical for all analyzed material. Except for one ''hot particle,'' no discrete Pu particles were located in untreated coral soil by SEM even though our sample contained both 241Am and 239Pu activity measurable by gammaray spectrometry. Alpha particle spectrometry analysis of sequentially filtered sludge showed small that activity is associated with particles as 0.4 μm in diameter. Thin section analysis revealed that the ''hot particle'' was a fragment of stainless steel with a layer of oxidized Pu, U, and other metals deposited on the outside. This Pu-containing layer was covered with a layer of coral soil that formed on the oxidized Pu/U phase during the process of weathering on JA. Analyses of all samples except the ''hot particle'' with SEM or TEM coupled with EDS did not reveal the presence of any distinct Pu phases, despite measurable activity in these samples. Together, these findings are consistent with the Pu and Am being highly dispersed throughout the contaminated soil and sludge. Direct evidence for association of Pu with coral was observed in the thin section of the ''hot particle.'' A possible mechanism for the dispersal of contamination is that weathering of fragments from the aborted missile leads to complexation of Pu with calcium carbonate followed by adsorption onto the coral soil surface. This process has not led to measurable fractionation of Am from its Pu parent

  5. Radiological survey of plants, animals, and soil at Christmas Island and seven atolls in the Marshall Islands. Progress report for 1974--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Operational Safety or DOS (now Safety Standards and Compliance) portion of the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology (LRE) Pacific Radiocology Program (formerly Johnston Atoll Program) began on 1 July 1974 and is continuing. The purpose of this program is to determine the kinds and amounts of radionuclides distributed in the foods, plants, animals, and soil of the Central Pacific, especially the Marshall Islands. Five field trips were conducted for this program between April 1974 and August 1975, and about 600 samples were collected. Results of the analyses indicate that 90Sr and 137Cs are dominant in the terrestrial environment and, in addition, 241Am and /sup 239,240/Pu are also important in the soil from Bikini and Rongelap atolls. Cobalt-60 and 55Fe are predominant in the marine environment together with naturally occurring 40K. Amounts of radioactivity vary between atolls and between islands within an atoll in relation to the distance from the nuclear weapons test sites. Bikini atoll has the highest amounts of radioactivity, but the northern islands of Rongelap Atoll have only slightly lower amounts. Rongerik and Ailinginae atolls and the southern islands of Rongelap Atoll have similar amounts of radioactivity which are lower than Bikini by factors of 5 to 10 or more. Values at Utirik Atoll are lower still, but are higher than amounts at Wotho and Kwajalein atolls. Christmas Island in the Line Islands has the least amount of radioactivity of the areas surveyed for this report

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3AP 16 45.260N, 169 31.039W, between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Midway Atoll Site P2C 9/21/2002 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P2C 28.260 N, 177.345 W, between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 26P 6/22/2005 (2)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472W), at meter 2 along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P9 9/28/2002 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P9 (27.794 N, 175.859 W), between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent...

  10. Rose Atoll Site 5P 2/10/2004 30-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 5P (14 33.280 S, 168 09.878 W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/30/1999 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P12 9/29/2002 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P12 (27.763 N, 175.973 W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent...

  13. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P9 9/28/2002 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P9 (27.794 N, 175.859 W), between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent...

  14. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/30/1999 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P12 9/29/2002 56-57M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P12 (27.763 N, 175.973 W), between 56 and 57 meters along a permanent...

  16. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P12 9/29/2002 59-60M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P12 (27.763 N, 175.973 W), between 59 and 60 meters along a permanent...

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P12 9/29/2002 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P12 (27.763 N, 175.973 W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent...

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P12 9/29/2002 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P12 (27.763 N, 175.973 W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent...

  19. Rose Atoll Site 5P 2/20/2002 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 5P (14 33.280S, 168 09.878W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 5P 2/10/2004 10-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 5P (14 33.280 S, 168 09.878 W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/29/1999 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/29/1999 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 5P 2/10/2004 47-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 5P (14 33.280 S, 168 09.878 W), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P 14 32.227S, 168 09.122W, between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P 14 32.282S, 168 09.218W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 27P 2/21/2012 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P 14 33.038S, 168 09.251W, between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/31/1999 9-10.5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 48-49M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 48 and 49 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 50-51M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 50 and 51 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30P-B (05 52.907N, 162 07.218W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9P-B (05 52.056N, 162 05.272W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Palmyra Atoll Site 27P 9/21/2004 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 27P 05 52.868N, 162 02.529W, between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Midway Atoll Site P18 12/4/2002 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P18 28.263 N, 177.337 W, between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 66-67M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Pearl Hermes Atoll, site P1 27.831N, 175.751 W, between 66 and 67 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 (28.277 N, 177.368 W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P 14 32.282S, 168 09.218W, between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 26P 3/6/2006 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P 14 32.465S, 168 09.472W, between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 26P 2/23/2012 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P 14 32.465S, 168 09.472S, between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Midway Atoll Site P17 12/4/2002 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P17 (28.231 N, 177.318 W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Palmyra Atoll Site 27P 9/21/2004 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 27P 05 52.868N, 162 02.529W, between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Palmyra Atoll Site 27P 9/21/2004 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 27P 05 52.868N, 162 02.529W, between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Collection and processing of plant, animal and soil samples from Bikini, Enewetak and Rongelap Atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States used the Marshall Islands for its nuclear weapons program testing site from 1946 to 1958. The BRAVO test was detonated at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954. Due to shifting wind conditions at the time of the nuclear detonation, many of the surrounding Atolls became contaminated with fallout (radionuclides carried by the wind currents). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Marshall Islands Project has been responsible for the collecting, processing, and analyzing of food crops, vegetation, soil, water, animals, and marine species to characterize the radionuclides in the environment, and to estimate dose at atolls that may have been contaminated. Tropical agriculture experiments reducing the uptake of 137Cs have been conducted on Bikini Atoll. The Marshall Islands field team and laboratory processing team play an important role in the overall scheme of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. This report gives a general description of the Marshall Islands field sampling and laboratory processing procedures currently used by our staff

  15. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 14P 2/21/2012 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 14P (14 33.071S, 168 09.421W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Palmyra Atoll Site 15P 3/15/2002 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 15P 05 52.221N, 162 02.697W, between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 (28.277 N, 177.368 W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Midway Atoll Site P17 12/4/2002 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P17 (28.231 N, 177.318 W), between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Midway Atoll Site P17 12/4/2002 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P17 (28.231 N, 177.318 W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 28.277 N, 177.368 W, between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 51-52M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P 14 32.227S, 168 09.122W, between 51 and 52 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Midway Atoll Site P20 12/6/2002 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P20 28.271 N, 177.385 W, between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Midway Atoll Site P17 12/4/2002 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P17 28.231 N, 177.318 W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P 14 32.282S, 168 09.218W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P 14 32.465S, 168 09.472S, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 47.170N, 169 27.908W, between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Midway Atoll Site P14 9/24/2002 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P14 28.241 N, 177.371 W, between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Midway Atoll Site P19 12/5/2002 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P19 28.193 N, 177.401 W, between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 1B-P 6/29/2000 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1BP 16 47.147N, 169 27.695W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 14P 2/21/2012 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 14P 14 33.071S, 168 09.421W, between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Midway Atoll Site P2 9/21/2002 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P2 28.260 N, 177.345 W, between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 59-60M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 59 and 60 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 84-85M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 84 and 85 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 64-65M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 64 and 65 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 77-78M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 77 and 78 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 52-53M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 52 and 53 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 58-59M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 58 and 59 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 83-84M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 83 and 84 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 58-59M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 58 and 59 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 50-51M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 50 and 51 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 75-76M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 75 and 76 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 90-91M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 90 and 91 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 85-86M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 85 and 86 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 54-55M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 54 and 55 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 57-58M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 57 and 58 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 61-62M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 61 and 62 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 57-58M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 57 and 58 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 63-64M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 63 and 64 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 81-82M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 81 and 82 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 79-80M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 79 and 80 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 75-76M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 75 and 76 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 86-87M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 86 and 87 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 80-81M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 80 and 81 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 83-84M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 83 and 84 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 67-68M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 67 and 68 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 89-90M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 89 and 90 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 76-77M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 76 and 77 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 81-82M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 81 and 82 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 82-83M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 82 and 83 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 76-77M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 76 and 77 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 55-56M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 55 and 56 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 79-80M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 79 and 80 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 66-67M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 66 and 67 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 53-54M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 53 and 54 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 61-62M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 61 and 62 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 80-81M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 80 and 81 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 74-75M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 74 and 75 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 60-61M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 60 and 61 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 77-78M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 77 and 78 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 74-75M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 74 and 75 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 78-79M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 78 and 79 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 87-88M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 87 and 88 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 62-63M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 62 and 63 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 91-92M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 91 and 92 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 84-85M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 84 and 85 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 82-83M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 82 and 83 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 56-57M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 56 and 57 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 51-52M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 51 and 52 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 60-61M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 60 and 61 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 88-89M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 88 and 89 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 59-60M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 59 and 60 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 78-79M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 78 and 79 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/20/2012 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P 14 32.967S, 168 10.086W, between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 47.170N, 169 27.908W, between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Palmyra Atoll Site 27P 9/21/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 27P (05 52.868N, 162 02.529W), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Midway Atoll Site P17 12/4/2002 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P17 (28.231 N, 177.318 W), between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 (28.277 N, 177.368 W), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 51-52M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P 14 32.282S, 168 09.218W, between 51 and 52 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Collection and processing of plant, animal and soil samples from Bikini, Enewetak and Rongelap Atolls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The United States used the Marshall Islands for its nuclear weapons program testing site from 1946 to 1958. The BRAVO test was detonated at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954. Due to shifting wind conditions at the time of the nuclear detonation, many of the surrounding Atolls became contaminated with fallout (radionuclides carried by the wind currents). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Marshall Islands Project has been responsible for the collecting, processing, and analyzing of food crops, vegetation, soil, water, animals, and marine species to characterize the radionuclides in the environment, and to estimate dose at atolls that may have been contaminated. Tropical agriculture experiments reducing the uptake of {sup 137}Cs have been conducted on Bikini Atoll. The Marshall Islands field team and laboratory processing team play an important role in the overall scheme of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. This report gives a general description of the Marshall Islands field sampling and laboratory processing procedures currently used by our staff.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 13P 2/19/2012 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P 14 32.300S, 168 09.401W, between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 15P 3/31/2004 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 15P 05 52.219N, 162 02.697W, between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 25P 2/21/2012 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P 14 32.297S, 168 09.327W, between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 28.277 N, 177.368 W, between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of limestones and dolomites, bikini and eniwetok atolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gross M.; Tracey, J.I., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Aragonitic, unconxolidated sediments from the borings on the Eniwetok and Bikini atolls are isotopically identical with unaltered skeletal fragments, whereas the recrystallized limestones exhibit isotopic variations resulting from alteration in meteoric waters during periods of emergence. Dolomites and associated calcites are enriched in O18, perhaps because of interaction with hypersaline brines.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 32P 8/2/2004 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 32P 14 32.361S, 168 09.430W, between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3A-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3A-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3A-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 47.170N, 169 27.908W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3A-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3A-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/24/2002 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P 14 32.967S, 168 10.086W, between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 15P 3/31/2004 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 15P 05 52.219N, 162 02.697W, between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 13P 2/19/2012 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P 14 32.946S, 168 09.584W, between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 13P 2/19/2012 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P 14 32.946S, 168 09.584W, between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 23P 2/10/2004 3-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 23P 14 32.538S, 168 10.341W, between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 47.170N, 169 27.908W, between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 25P 2/21/2012 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P 14 32.297S, 168 09.327W, between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 28.277 N, 177.368 W, between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Midway Atoll Site P20 12/6/2002 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P20 28.271 N, 177.385 W, between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Capilloquinol: A Novel Farnesyl Quinol from the Dongsha Atoll Soft Coral Sinularia capillosa

    OpenAIRE

    Shang-Kwei Wang; Chang-Yih Duh; Shi-Yie Cheng; Ki-Jhih Huang

    2011-01-01

    Capilloquinol (1), possessing an unprecedented farnesyl quinoid skeleton, was isolated from the Dongsha Atoll soft coral Sinularia capillosa. The structure of capilloquinol was elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data. The cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against human cytomegalovirus of 1 was evaluated in vitro.

  2. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 28.277 N, 177.368 W, between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 31P 2/22/2012 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P 14 32.568S, 168 09.417W, between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 13P 6/22/2005 (30)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P 14 32.946S, 168 09.584W, at meter 30 along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Midway Atoll Site P17 12/4/2002 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P17 (28.231 N, 177.318 W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 15P 3/31/2004 89-90M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 15P (05 52.219N, 162 02.697W), between 89 and 90 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/29/1999 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P (05 52.291N, 162 06.738W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (6)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 6 along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (2)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 2 along a permanent transect.

  14. Palmyra Atoll Site 27P 9/21/2004 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 27P (05 52.868N, 162 02.529W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Pearl Hermes Atoll, site P3 27.833 N, 175.753W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 13P 6/22/2005 (15)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), at meter 15 along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 14P 2/21/2012 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 14P (14 33.071S, 168 09.421W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P 14 32.297S, 168 09.327W, between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 13P 6/22/2005 (33)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), at meter 33 along a permanent transect.

  1. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 9/24/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P (05 52.291N, 162 06.738W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Johnston Atoll Site 1B-P 6/29/2000 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1B-P (16 47.147N, 169 27.695W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 27P 6/21/2005 (45)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), at meter 45 along a permanent transect.

  4. Palmyra Atoll Site 27P 9/21/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 27P (05 52.868N, 162 02.529W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 48-49M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 48 and 49 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 50-51M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 50 and 51 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Palmyra Atoll Site 9P-B 3/29/2004 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 9PB 05 52.056N, 162 05.272W, between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-B 9/6/2006 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30PB 05 52.907N, 162 07.218W, between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 5/28/2001 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P 05 52.291N, 162 06.738W, between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 91-92M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Pearl Hermes Atoll, site P1 27.831N, 175.751 W, between 91 and 92 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/31/1999 39.5-40.5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 29P 2/21/2012 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P 14 32.227S, 168 09.122W, between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Midway Atoll Site P16 12/3/2002 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P16 28.277 N, 177.368 W, between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P 14 32.300S, 168 09.401W, between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 2B-P 6/30/2000 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2B-P (16 45.606N, 169 30.705W), between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (3)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 3 along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/10/2004 48-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P (14 32.967S, 168 10.086W), between 48 and 49 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (5)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 5 along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (1)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 1 along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 32P 2/22/2012 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 32P 14 32.361S, 168 09.430W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 75-76M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Pearl Hermes Atoll, site P1 27.831N, 175.751 W, between 75 and 76 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Johnston Atoll Site 1B-P 6/29/2000 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1BP 16 47.147N, 169 27.695W, between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near Kure Atoll (100-101), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-101b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Kure Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been produced as part...

  3. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near Midway Atoll (100-102), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-102b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been produced as...

  4. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near Pearl and Hermes Atoll (100-103), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-103b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been...

  5. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/20/2012 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P 14 32.967S, 168 10.086W, between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/31/1999 20.5-21.5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P 14 33.075S, 168 09.622W, between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Midway Atoll Site P20 12/6/2002 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Midway Atoll, site P20 28.271 N, 177.385 W, between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P 14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W, between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 14P 2/21/2012 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 14P 14 33.071S, 168 09.421W, between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P7 9/27/2002 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Pearl Hermes Atoll, site P7 27.864 N, 175.792 W, between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2AP 16 45.815N, 169 30.706W, between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Onemetersquare 1 meter x 1 meter benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1AP 16 46.909N, 169 27.757W, between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.