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Sample records for atoll french polynesia

  1. Asymmetric radiation of seismic waves from an atoll: nuclear tests in French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael; Wicks, Charles W.; Krüger, Frank; Jahnke, Gunnar; Schlittenhardt, Jörg

    1998-01-01

    Seismic records of nuclear tests detonated in the Mururoa Atoll in French Polynesia show large unpredicted arrivals 2.2 and 4.5 seconds (X1 and X2) after the P-wave at the Australian Warramunga Array. These arrivals are not observed at the Canadian Yellowknife Array. X1 and X2 are also absent on Warramunga Array recordings of tests carried out at the Fangataufa Atoll situated 40 km SSE of Mururoa. Array analysis shows that X1 and X2 are produced within the source area. The layered crustal structure of the atoll, significant local inhomogeneities, and focusing effects due to the elongated shape and the steep flanks of the Mururoa Atoll are most likely responsible for X1 and X2. The form of Mururoa (28 × 10 km) and its East-West orientation is due to its location on the Austral Fracture Zone (AFZ). The Fangataufa Atoll on the other hand is almost circular (10 km diameter) and is unaffected by the dynamics along the AFZ. Our observations demonstrate that complicated structures in the source area can significantly alter the wave field at teleseismic distances and produce a large magnitude (mb) bias. A better understanding of the exact cause of these unusual seismic observations will only become possible, if the coordinates of the tests and information on the detailed 3-D structure of the atolls are released.

  2. Shoreline changes in reef islands of the Central Pacific: Takapoto Atoll, Northern Tuamotu, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvat, Virginie K. E.; Pillet, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    Atoll reef islands are considered highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. While accelerated sea-level rise is expected to destabilize reef islands, ocean warming and acidification are considered as major threats to coral reef growth, which is of primary importance for the persistence of islands and of food supply to islanders. Using multi-date aerial imagery, shoreline and island changes between 1969 and 2013 were assessed on Takapoto Atoll, Northern Tuamotu region, in French Polynesia. Results show that over the 44-year study period, 41% of islands were stable in area while 33% expanded and 26% contracted. Island expansion was the dominant mode of change on the leeward side of the atoll. Tropical Cyclone Orama (category 3, 1983) contributed to shoreline and island change on the windward side of the atoll through the reworking of previous storm deposits and the injection of fresh sediments in the island system (with up to 62% of an island's land area being covered with fresh sediments). Human activities contributed significantly to shoreline and island change throughout the atoll through infrastructure construction, the removal of the indigenous vegetation from a number of islets and sediment mining.

  3. Amount and type of derelict gear from the declining black pearl oyster aquaculture in Ahe atoll lagoon, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréfouët, Serge; Thomas, Yoann; Lo, Cedrik

    2014-06-15

    Pearl oyster aquaculture is a major activity in French Polynesia atoll lagoons. After the economic decline that characterized the last decade, concerns recently rose about discarded installations and materials that supported aquaculture practices and by facilities abandoned after they had to close their activities. In May 2013, a first inventory of the type and amount of pearl farms derelict gear (PFDG) was achieved on 47 sites in Ahe lagoon. Surveys were conducted within and outside the boundaries of aquaculture concessions. Twenty types of PFDG littered the lagoon floor and the water column. The most impacted areas were near abandoned grafting houses with up to nine types of PFDG. Forty-five percent of the sites were impacted, including outside concessions. While management authorities are fully aware of the problem, this first assessment is a wake-up call to stimulate the cleaning of lagoons, enhance awareness among farmers, and identify potential ecological consequences on lagoon ecosystems.

  4. Integrated control of peridomestic larval habitats of Aedes and Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in atoll villages of French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, Frederic; Sechan, Yves; Loncke, Stepiiane; Deparis, Xavier; Cheffort, Jules; Faaruia, Marc

    2002-05-01

    An integrated larval mosquito control program was carried out in Tiputa village on Rangiroa atoll of French Polynesia. Mosquito abundance before and after treatment was compared with the abundance in an untreated village. Mosquito larval habitats consisted of large concrete or polyurethane cisterns, wells, and 200-liter drums. Depending on the target species, larval habitat category, its configuration, and purpose (drinking consumption or not), abatement methods consisted of sealing the larval habitats with mosquito gauze, treating them with 1% Temephos, covering the water with a 10-cm thick layer of polystyrene beads or introducing fish (Poecillia reticulata Rosen & Bailey). All premises of the chosen village were treated and a health education program explained basic mosquito ecology and the methods of control. A community health agent was trained to continue the control program at the end of the experiment. Entomological indices from human bait collections and larval surveys indicated that mosquito populations were reduced significantly, compared with concurrent samples from the untreated control village, and that mosquito control remained effective for 6 mo after treatment. Effects of the treatment were noticed by the inhabitants in terms of a reduction in the number of mosquito bites. In the Polynesian context, such control programs may succeed in the long-term only if strong political decisions are taken at the village level, if a community member is designated as being responsible for maintaining the program, and if the inhabitants are motivated sufficiently by the mosquito nuisance to intervene.

  5. Ocean-lagoon water and plankton exchanges in a semi-closed pearl farming atoll lagoon (Ahe, Tuamotu archipelago, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, M.; Rodier, M.; Guillaumot, C.; Thomas, Y.; Henry, K.; Andréfouët, S.

    2017-05-01

    In atoll lagoons, plankton richness is highly dependent on water exchange with the ocean through the atoll rim. However, the dynamics of the physical and biological fluxes at the lagoon-ocean interface remain poorly characterized. Here, we studied the combined effects of lagoon-ocean water exchanges and local environmental conditions on the phyto- and zooplankton abundance and community structure across the atoll lagoon rim of Ahe (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia). Plankton and environmental variables were monitored in May 2013 (i) at several stations inside and outside the lagoon and (ii) during time-series corresponding to ebb-flood tidal cycles in the two types of channels connecting the lagoon to the ocean: at the passage (300 m long and about 11 m deep) and in hoa (i.e reef-flat less than 50 cm depth). Our results highlight tidally-driven selective plankton exchanges between the lagoon and external ocean. Phytoplankton (chlorophyll-a) and zooplankton biomass were respectively 4 times and 7 times higher in the lagoon than at stations outside the atoll lagoon. Copepoda was the dominant zooplankton group at the oceanic station (>75% abundance) whereas meroplankton (with bivalve larvae most common) was dominant at the lagoon stations (54%), in the passage (55-82%) and in hoa (>80%). These differences between sites suggest a loss of bivalve larvae through export to the ocean and retention and/or increased production of copepods in the lagoon. The daily export of bivalve larvae represents a low percentage of the lagoon stock, in agreement with previously published larval dispersal numerical models. The retention of copepods could constitute a significant input of nutrients and organic matter (through excretion, feces release, decomposition, and remineralization) into the lagoon.

  6. CPAFFC Delegation Visits French Polynesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YinShenglun

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of Gaston Flosse, president of the Government of French Polynesia, a CPAFFC delegation headed by CPAFFC President Chen Haosu and Vice President Su Guang paid a goodwill visit to French Polynesia in September 2003. The Government of French Polynesia attached great importance to the visit. During their stay there, the delegation exchanged views with President Flosse many times on promoting friendship and cooperation between the Chinese and French Polynesian peoples. Both sides unanimously held that to promote friendship and strengthen cooperation are the common aspiration of the Chinese and French Polynesian people, which is conducive to the prosperity and development of the two sides and world peace. The delegation had extensive contacts with highranking officials and personages of various circles, and achieved its purpose of strengthening understanding, enhancing friendship and promoting cooperation.

  7. Nutrient regeneration in the water column and at the sediment-water interface in pearl oyster culture (Pinctada margaritifera) in a deep atoll lagoon (Ahe, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Élise; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a first estimation of the overall contribution of pearl oyster culture to nutrient regeneration in a deep atoll lagoon. Nutrient release by pearl oyster culture in the water column and nutrient fluxes at the sediment-water interface were compared in two contrasted conditions (i.e. under the influence or not of pearl oyster farming) in the Ahe atoll (French Polynesia). Nitrogen flux intensity was higher in the water column than at the benthic interface. Nitrogen was released at a rate of 31.36 μmol h-1 m-2 in the water column and 12.05 μmol h-1 m-2 at the sediment-water interface. Average phosphorus flux was 2.85 μmol h-1 m-2 at the sediment-water interface and 2.16 μmol h-1 m-2 in the water column. In this deep lagoon, pearl oyster culture exerted more influence in the pelagic compartment than at the benthic interface where flux rate seemed not to be influenced by the presence of pearl oyster culture. These results demonstrate that it is essential to study these two interfaces in concert when assessing the impact of suspended shellfish farming on nutrient dynamics. Overall, the impact of pearl oyster culture may stimulate phytoplankton growth near cultivation areas through the rapid recycling of inorganic nutrients.

  8. The atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa (French Polynesia). The nuclear testings. Radiological aspects; Les atolls de Mururoa et de Fangataufa (Polynesie Francaise). Les experimentations nucleaires. Aspects radiologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G

    2007-07-01

    This report provides a review of the radiological measures implemented during the thirty year period of French nuclear tests in Polynesian atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. It presents full details of the practices deployed throughout these tests, including, in particular, aspects concerning radiological protection for the population and the environment. It contains all the scientific results and measurements of radioactivity performed during this period, providing concrete facts that can be used to assess the consequences these tests have had on the personnel involved, the population and the environment. (author)

  9. Hydroids from French Polynesia with notes on distribution and ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, W.; Vasseur, P.

    1977-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Distribution and ecology of hydroids from coral reefs of high islands and atolls of French Polynesia so far have received little attention. Redier (1967, 1971) published a preliminary list of 14 species from Salvat's collections, sampled during several trips to Tahiti, Tuamoto (Mururoa,

  10. Tidal flushing and wind driven circulation of Ahe atoll lagoon (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia) from in situ observations and numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, F; Le Gendre, R; Thomas, Y; Andréfouët, S

    2012-01-01

    Hydrodynamic functioning and water circulation of the semi-closed deep lagoon of Ahe atoll (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia) were investigated using 1 year of field data and a 3D hydrodynamical model. Tidal amplitude averaged less than 30 cm, but tide generated very strong currents (2 ms(-1)) in the pass, creating a jet-like circulation that partitioned the lagoon into three residual circulation cells. The pass entirely flushed excess water brought by waves-induced radiation stress. Circulation patterns were computed for climatological meteorological conditions and summarized with stream function and flushing time. Lagoon hydrodynamics and general overturning circulation was driven by wind. Renewal time was 250 days, whereas the e-flushing time yielded a lagoon-wide 80-days average. Tide-driven flush through the pass and wind-driven overturning circulation designate Ahe as a wind-driven, tidally and weakly wave-flushed deep lagoon. The 3D model allows studying pearl oyster larvae dispersal in both realistic and climatological conditions for aquaculture applications.

  11. Silent Circulation of Ross River Virus in French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Aubry

    2015-08-01

    Discussion: Our results support the existence of autochthonous RRV transmission and suggest that this pathogen has silently circulated in French Polynesia. These findings raise the question of possible undetected circulation of RRV in other Pacific Island Countries and Territories.

  12. The Campsicnemus popeye species group (Diptera: Dolichopodidae) from French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, Neal L

    2013-01-01

    A new species-group (the popeye group) of the mega-diverse dolichopodid genus Campsicnemus from French Polynesia is described to include six new species: C. craigi Evenhuis, sp. nov.; C. elinae Evenhuis, sp. nov.; C. meyeri Evenhuis, sp. nov.; C. moorea Evenhuis, sp. nov.; C. pectinatus Evenhuis, sp. nov.; and C. popeye Evenhuis, sp. nov. Keys to Campsicnemus species groups in French Polynesia and to species in the C. popeye group are given.

  13. Zika Virus Seroprevalence, French Polynesia, 2014–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teissier, Anita; Huart, Michael; Merceron, Sébastien; Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Roche, Claudine; Vial, Anne-Laure; Teururai, Sylvianne; Sicard, Sébastien; Paulous, Sylvie; Desprès, Philippe; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Musso, Didier; Deparis, Xavier; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai

    2017-01-01

    During 2013–2014, French Polynesia experienced an outbreak of Zika virus infection. Serosurveys conducted at the end of the outbreak and 18 months later showed lower than expected disease prevalence rates (49%) and asymptomatic:symptomatic case ratios (1:1) in the general population but significantly different prevalence rates (66%) and asymptomatic:symptomatic ratios (1:2) in schoolchildren. PMID:28084987

  14. Report of the preliminary mission of radiological controls on the island of Mangareva and the atolls of Tureia and Hao (French Polynesia). Investigation performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory on the request of the inquiry Commission on consequences of atmospheric nuclear tests; Compte rendu de la mission preliminaire de controles radiologiques sur l'Ile de Mangareva et les Atolls de Tureia et Hao (Polynesie Francaise). Etude realisee par le laboratoire de la CRIIRAD a la demande de la Commission d'Enquete sur les consequences des essais nucleaires aeriens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    After a presentation of the objectives of the mission, and a summary of the undertaken actions on each site, this document gives some general information on radionuclides and on the sampling and analysis method. Then, it discusses the results obtained by radiological analyses and gives recommendations about the current radiological situation of the studied island and atolls. It shows that official assessment of radiation doses undergone by the French Polynesia population during the period atmospheric nuclear tests must be revised. It outlines the need of new exhaustive investigations on health consequences of these past exposures to ionizing radiation. Recommendations are formulated

  15. Vector Competence of Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis Populations from French Polynesia for Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Vaea; Paoaafaite, Tuterarii; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai

    2016-05-01

    From October 2014 to March 2015, French Polynesia experienced for the first time a chikungunya outbreak. Two Aedes mosquitoes may have contributed to chikungunya virus (CHIKV) transmission in French Polynesia: the worldwide distributed Ae. aegypti and the Polynesian islands-endemic Ae. polynesiensis mosquito. To investigate the vector competence of French Polynesian populations of Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis for CHIKV, mosquitoes were exposed per os at viral titers of 7 logs tissue culture infectious dose 50%. At 2, 6, 9, 14 and 21 days post-infection (dpi), saliva was collected from each mosquito and inoculated onto C6/36 mosquito cells to check for the presence of CHIKV infectious particles. Legs and body (thorax and abdomen) of each mosquito were also collected at the different dpi and submitted separately to viral RNA extraction and CHIKV real-time RT-PCR. CHIKV infection rate, dissemination and transmission efficiencies ranged from 7-90%, 18-78% and 5-53% respectively for Ae. aegypti and from 39-41%, 3-17% and 0-14% respectively for Ae. polynesiensis, depending on the dpi. Infectious saliva was found as early as 2 dpi for Ae. aegypti and from 6 dpi for Ae. polynesiensis. Our laboratory results confirm that the French Polynesian population of Ae. aegypti is highly competent for CHIKV and they provide clear evidence for Ae. polynesiensis to act as an efficient CHIKV vector. As supported by our findings, the presence of two CHIKV competent vectors in French Polynesia certainly contributed to enabling this virus to quickly disseminate from the urban/peri-urban areas colonized by Ae. aegypti to the most remote atolls where Ae. polynesiensis is predominating. Ae. polynesiensis was probably involved in the recent chikungunya outbreaks in Samoa and the Cook Islands. Moreover, this vector may contribute to the risk for CHIKV to emerge in other Polynesian islands like Fiji, and more particularly Wallis where there is no Ae. aegypti.

  16. Vector Competence of Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis Populations from French Polynesia for Chikungunya Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaea Richard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available From October 2014 to March 2015, French Polynesia experienced for the first time a chikungunya outbreak. Two Aedes mosquitoes may have contributed to chikungunya virus (CHIKV transmission in French Polynesia: the worldwide distributed Ae. aegypti and the Polynesian islands-endemic Ae. polynesiensis mosquito.To investigate the vector competence of French Polynesian populations of Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis for CHIKV, mosquitoes were exposed per os at viral titers of 7 logs tissue culture infectious dose 50%. At 2, 6, 9, 14 and 21 days post-infection (dpi, saliva was collected from each mosquito and inoculated onto C6/36 mosquito cells to check for the presence of CHIKV infectious particles. Legs and body (thorax and abdomen of each mosquito were also collected at the different dpi and submitted separately to viral RNA extraction and CHIKV real-time RT-PCR.CHIKV infection rate, dissemination and transmission efficiencies ranged from 7-90%, 18-78% and 5-53% respectively for Ae. aegypti and from 39-41%, 3-17% and 0-14% respectively for Ae. polynesiensis, depending on the dpi. Infectious saliva was found as early as 2 dpi for Ae. aegypti and from 6 dpi for Ae. polynesiensis. Our laboratory results confirm that the French Polynesian population of Ae. aegypti is highly competent for CHIKV and they provide clear evidence for Ae. polynesiensis to act as an efficient CHIKV vector.As supported by our findings, the presence of two CHIKV competent vectors in French Polynesia certainly contributed to enabling this virus to quickly disseminate from the urban/peri-urban areas colonized by Ae. aegypti to the most remote atolls where Ae. polynesiensis is predominating. Ae. polynesiensis was probably involved in the recent chikungunya outbreaks in Samoa and the Cook Islands. Moreover, this vector may contribute to the risk for CHIKV to emerge in other Polynesian islands like Fiji, and more particularly Wallis where there is no Ae. aegypti.

  17. Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Djaltou Aboubaker; Phelippeau, Michael; Drancourt, Michel; Musso, Didier

    2017-04-01

    French Polynesia is an overseas territory located in the South Pacific. The incidence of tuberculosis in French Polynesia has been stable since 2000 with an average of 20 cases/y/100,000 inhabitants. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in French Polynesia is unknown because M. tuberculosis isolates have not been routinely genotyped. From 2009 to 2012, 34 isolates collected from 32 French Polynesian patients were identified as M. tuberculosis by probe hybridization. These isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs)-variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR). Spoligotype patterns obtained using commercial kits were compared with the online international database SITVIT. MIRU-VNTR genotyping was performed using an in-house protocol based on capillary electrophoresis sizing for 24-loci MIRU-VNTR genotyping. The results of the spoligotyping method revealed that 25 isolates grouped into six previously described spoligotypes [H1, H3, U likely (S), T1, Manu, and Beijing] and nine isolates grouped into six new spoligotypes. Comparison with the international database MIRU-VNTRplus distributed 30 isolates into five lineages (Haarlem, Latin American Mediterranean, S, X, and Beijing) and four as unassigned isolates. Genotyping identified four phylogenetic lineages belonging to the modern Euro-American subgroup, one Beijing genotype responsible for worldwide pandemics, including remote islands in the South Pacific, and one Manu genotype of the ancestral lineage of M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Development and return migration to rural French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, V S

    1990-01-01

    "In this article, a recent trend towards return migration to outer island French Polynesia is examined. Following a discussion of massive rural to urban migration throughout island Oceania, the regional and international factors responsible for reversing population movements in this French Territory are discussed. Finally, the impact of return migration on Tubuai, a rapidly developing outer island, is assessed specifically analyzing the manner in which returnees are reintegrated socially and economically into rural community life. The article concludes that returnees are development-oriented, but that increasing population growth in a context of fundamentally limited rural resources is not an economically viable process in the long term."

  19. Effectiveness of a Heritage Educational Program for the Acquisition of Oral and Written French and Tahitian in French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocus, Isabelle; Guimard, Philippe; Vernaudon, Jacques; Paia, Mirose; Cosnefroy, Olivier; Florin, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    The research examines the effects of a bilingual pedagogical program (French/Tahitian) on the acquisition of oral and written French as well as the Tahitian language itself in primary schools in French Polynesia. 125 children divided into an experimental group (partially schooled in Tahitian for 300 min per week) and a control group (schooled in…

  20. Periodicity of Wuchereria bancrofti var. pacifica filariasis in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulia-Pelat, J P; Glaziou, P; Chanteau, S; Nguyen-Ngoc, L; Marcet, Y; Gardines, R; Martin, P M; Cartel, J L

    1993-06-01

    In 1992, a study on microfilaremia periodicity was carried out on 12 Wuchereria bancrofti carriers in the Marquesas islands. Blood samples were collected simultaneously every 4 hours during a 48 hour period by finger-prick and venipuncture for determination of microfilaremia by both blood film and membrane filtration technique methods, and for determination of antigenemia. The membrane filtration results showed no significant nycthemeral variations between the microfilaria densities at hours 16:00, 20:00, 24:00, 04:00, 08:00 and 12:00. Conversely, the blood film method showed a significant difference between the microfilaria densities: the microfilaremia was higher during the day (12:00-20:00 hours) than during the night (24:00-08:00 hours). As for antigenemia, using Og 4 C3 monoclonal antibody, there was no significant fluctuation during 48 hours. These results confirm that W. bancrofti var. pacifica is subperiodic and diurnal in French Polynesia. In particular, they substantiate the validity of examining venous blood by the membrane filtration technique as the judgment criterion of choice in therapeutic trials and of examining capillary blood during peak hours by the blood film method for evaluating the endemic level in a population.

  1. Seroprevalence of arboviruses among blood donors in French Polynesia, 2011–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Aubry

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: These results corroborate the expected high transmission of DENV and conversely suggest that no active circulation of ZIKV, JEV, and WNV occurred in French Polynesia before 2011. Information provided by this study may be useful for public health authorities to improve surveillance and implement strategies to prevent the transmission of arboviruses.

  2. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  3. Reconstruction of individual doses for the subjects of a case-control study of thyroid cancer in French Polynesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdovitch, V.; Cardis, E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, 69 - Lyon (France); Doyon, F.; Vathaire, F. de [National Institute for Health and Medical Research, INSERM Unit 605, 94 - Villejuif (France); Bouville, A. [Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DHHS/NIH/NCI/Div.) (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A case-control study of thyroid cancer coordinated b y the Unit 605 I.N.S.E.R.M. as carried out in French Polynesia. Forty-six atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (including five safety tests) were conducted in French Polynesia between 966 and 1974. The study includes 600 subjects both cases and controls all aged up to 30 years old at start of nuclear weapons testing. Under the normal conditions following testing the radioactive debris was moved to the east from he test site (atolls Moruroa or Fangataufa) over the uninhabited regions of the Pacific. However, some of the radioactive debris in troposphere was caught in anticyclones eddies and were transferred back to the central South Pacific area in a few days. Radioactive clouds with changed direction result ed in the local deposition of radionuclides on the ground of inhabited islands of French Polynesia. Radiation doses to the thyroids of the subjects were assessed based on the available historical results of radiometric measurements and meteorological data. These included annual reports on the radiological situation in French Polynesia that had been sent to the Secretariat of UNSCEAR. Results of measurements of exposure rate and of total activity in filtered air were used to evaluate the ground depositions of specific radionuclides. Radiation monitoring also included measurements of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs in cows milk produced in Tahiti and measurements of radioactivity in foodstuffs produced on the selected islands. For each atmospheric nuclear weapons test that contributed substantially to the local deposition of radionuclides, the radiation dose to the thyroid from {sup 131}I intake via inhalation and ingestion was estimated. In additional, thyroid doses from the intake of short-lived radio iodines (132, 133, 135 I) and {sup 132}Te, external exposure from gamma-emitted radionuclides deposited on the ground, and ingestion of long-lived {sup 137}Cs were reconstructed. The assessment of individual thyroid

  4. Pectinoidea (Bivalvia: Propeamussiidae, Entoliidae and Pectinidae) from the Tarava Seamounts, Society Islands and the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.H.; Maestrati, P.

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen species of Pectinoidea (six Propeamussiidae Abbott, 1954, one Entoliidae Teppner, 1922, eleven Pectinidae Rafinesque, 1815) are listed from the Tarava Seamounts, Society Islands and Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia. Four Propeamussiidae species (Parvamussium lamellatum n. sp., Parvamus

  5. Zika virus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome--case report, French Polynesia, December 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, E; Watrin, L; Larre, P; Leparc-Goffart, I; Lastere, S; Valour, F; Baudouin, L; Mallet, Hp; Musso, D; Ghawche, F

    2014-03-06

    Zika fever, considered as an emerging disease of arboviral origin, because of its expanding geographic area, is known as a benign infection usually presenting as an influenza-like illness with cutaneous rash. So far, Zika virus infection has never led to hospitalisation. We describe the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occurring immediately after a Zika virus infection, during the current Zika and type 1 and 3 dengue fever co-epidemics in French Polynesia.

  6. Taxonomic revison of Sargassum (Fucales, Phaeophyceae) from French Polynesia based on morphological and molecular analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Mattio, Lydiane; Payri, Claude; Stiger-Pouvreau, V.

    2008-01-01

    An assessment of Sargassum in French Polynesia was done through the critical revision of the literature, type specimens, and specimens from type localities. Sargassum samples were newly collected, and four morphotypes were identified on the basis of morphological characters. Molecular analysis of the nuclear ITS2, chloroplastic partial rbcLS, and mitochondrial cox3 markers generated two clades and confirmed the recent divergence suspected between closely related species. Although 18 different...

  7. Evaluation of five serological tests for the diagnosis of porcine brucellosis in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praud, Anne; Gimenez, Olivier; Zanella, Gina; Pozzi, Nathalie; Antras, Valérie; Meyer, Laurence; Garin-Bastuji, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Porcine brucellosis due to Brucella suis biovar 1 raises important issues for pig breeders in French Polynesia. In this region, the disease is enzootic, spreads silently and engenders economic losses in infected farms as well as sporadic human cases. While serological tests are essential in surveillance and control programmes of animal diseases, to date none of the available tests have been shown to be reliable enough to be used as a gold standard in routine individual diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. Few studies about the estimation of the sensitivity and the specificity of porcine brucellosis screening tests have been published, none of them dealing with French Polynesia. The studied population included 1,595 pigs from French Polynesia. Five tests were evaluated: Rose Bengal test, fluorescence polarisation assay, indirect ELISA, and two competitive ELISAs (C-ELISA). The sensitivity and the specificity of each test were estimated. C-ELISA2 was the most sensitive test (Se C-ELISA2=0.954 [0.889; 0.992] 95% credibility interval (CrI)) while both C-ELISA and Rose Bengal test (RBT) were the most specific ones (Sp C-ELISA1=0.856 [0.806; 0.915] 95% CrI; Sp C-ELISA2=0.849 [0.817; 0.879] 95% CrI; Sp RBT=0.853 [0.812; 0.898] 95% CrI).

  8. Dietary patterns, goitrogenic food, and thyroid cancer: a case-control study in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléro, Énora; Doyon, Françoise; Chungue, Vaïana; Rachédi, Frédérique; Boissin, Jean-Louis; Sebbag, Joseph; Shan, Larrys; Rubino, Carole; de Vathaire, Florent

    2012-01-01

    French Polynesia has one of the world's highest thyroid cancer incidence rates. A case-control study among native residents of French Polynesia included 229 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed between 1979 and 2004, and 371 population controls. Dietary patterns and goitrogenic food consumption (cabbage, cassava) were analyzed. We used a factor analysis to identify dietary patterns and a conditional logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between dietary patterns or food items and thyroid cancer risk. Two distinct dietary patterns were identified: traditional Polynesian and Western. A nonsignificant inverse association was observed between the traditional Polynesian dietary pattern and thyroid cancer risk. The Western pattern was not associated with thyroid cancer risk. Cassava consumption was significantly associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. In conclusion, a traditional Polynesian dietary pattern led to a weak reduced risk of thyroid cancer in French Polynesia. The protective effect of cassava on this cancer does not seem to be substantially different from that of cabbage, which was the main goitrogenic food studied to date.

  9. Sponge distribution and the presence of photosymbionts in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photosymbionts play an important role in the ecology and evolution of diverse host species within the marine environment. Although sponge-photosymbiont interactions have been well described from geographically disparate sites worldwide, our understanding of these interactions from shallow water systems within French Polynesia is limited. We surveyed diverse habitats around the north coast of Moorea, French Polynesia and screened sponges for the presence of photosymbionts. Overall sponge abundance and diversity were low, with <1% cover and only eight putative species identified by 28S barcoding from surveys at 21 sites. Of these eight species, seven were found predominately in shaded or semi-cryptic habitats under overhangs or within caverns. Lendenfeldia chondrodes was the only species that supported a high abundance of photosymbionts and was also the only species found in exposed, illuminated habitats. Interestingly, L. chondrodes was found at three distinct sites, with a massive, fan-shaped growth form at two of the lagoon sites and a thin, encrusting growth form within a bay site. These two growth forms differed in their photosymbiont abundance, with massive individuals of L. chondrodes having higher photosymbiont abundance than encrusting individuals from the bay. We present evidence that some sponges from French Polynesia support abundant photosymbiont communities and provide initial support for the role of these communities in host ecology.

  10. Natural cleaning of the black-lip pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera by butterflyfishes (Chaetodon) in French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Frédéric; Legraverant, Yohann; Berthe, Cécile; Brooker, Rohan M.; Lo, Cédrik; Lecchini, David

    2016-12-01

    Biofouling increases the operational and economic costs associated with pearl production. As current procedures for reducing oyster biofouling can be detrimental to survival and growth and may pollute the surrounding environment developing alternative, biologically-mediated, methods could potentially increase both production and ecological sustainability. With this in mind, the present study investigated natural cleaning of black-lipped pearl oysters, Pinctada margaritifera, by butterflyfishes (Chaetodon). The feeding behaviour of six butterflyfish species was examined at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia: Chaetodon auriga, Chaetodon citrinellus, Chaetodon ephippium, Chaetodon lunulatus, Chaetodon trifascialis and Chaetodon ulietensis. All species cleaned the surface of pearl oysters by removing epibionts (from 16% to 40% of total biomass), although dietary variation may explain different cleaning efficiencies. Generalist omnivores (C. auriga, C. citrinellus, C. ephippium and C. ulietensis) were the most efficient cleaners (% cleaning range: 26-40% of total biomass). Within this group, C. ephippium removed the most biomass (average of 41%) targeting algae and anemones. However, C. auriga targeted the most diverse range of epibionts, removing significant amounts of algae, sponges, tunicates, and anemones. These results suggest that foraging by butterflyfishes can substantially reduce biofouling on economically-important tropical bivalves.

  11. Comparison of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-backpack and insectazooka aspirators for sampling Aedes polynesiensis in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapairai, Limb K; Sang, Michel A Cheong; Bossin, Hervé C

    2014-06-01

    The efficiency of the recently developed handheld InsectaZooka (IZ) aspirator was compared to that of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Backpack (CDC-BP) aspirator by conducting human bait collections on 2 islets (locally called motus) of the atoll of Tetiaroa, French Polynesia. Abundance of mosquitoes was compared between the wind-exposed and wind-protected sides of each motu to measure the effect of wind on mosquito distribution. The number of host-seeking Aedes polynesiensis mosquitoes collected on the 2 motus with either sampling device was not significantly different. Collection of male mosquitoes was low irrespective of the type of aspirator used. Wind had an effect on mosquito distribution, as females were more abundant on the protected sides of both motus. The IZ aspirator is a lighter and equally efficient alternative to the CDC-BP aspirator for collecting Ae. polynesiensis.

  12. Temporal patterns and geographic heterogeneity of Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks in French Polynesia and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission has been reported in 67 countries/territories in the Oceania region and the Americas since 2015, prompting the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare ZIKV as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016, due to its strong association with medical complications such as microcephaly and Guillain–Barré Syndrome (GBS). However, a substantial gap in knowledge still exists regarding differing temporal pattern and potential of transmission of ZIKV in different regions of the world. Methods We use a phenomenological model to ascertain the temporal patterns and transmission potential of ZIKV in various countries/territories, by fitting the model to Zika case data from Yap Island and French Polynesia in the Oceania region and 11 countries/territories with confirmed case data, namely, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Saint Martin, and Suriname, to pinpoint the waves of infections in each country/territory and to estimate the respective basic reproduction number R0. Results Six of these time series datasets resulted in statistically significant model fit of at least one wave of reported cases, namely that of French Polynesia, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Guatemala, Suriname and Saint Martin. However, only Colombia and Guatemala exhibited two waves of cases while the others had only one wave. Temporal patterns of the second wave in Colombia and the single wave in Suriname are very similar, with the respective turning points separated by merely a week. Moreover, the mean estimates of R0 for Colombia, Guatemala and Suriname, all land-based populations, range between 1.05 and 1.75, while the corresponding mean estimates for R0 of island populations in French Polynesia, Puerto Rico and Saint Martin are significantly lower with a range of 5.70–6.89. We also fit the Richards model to Zika case data from six main archipelagos in French Polynesia

  13. Temporal patterns and geographic heterogeneity of Zika virus (ZIKV outbreaks in French Polynesia and Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hen Hsieh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Zika virus (ZIKV transmission has been reported in 67 countries/territories in the Oceania region and the Americas since 2015, prompting the World Health Organization (WHO to declare ZIKV as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016, due to its strong association with medical complications such as microcephaly and Guillain–Barré Syndrome (GBS. However, a substantial gap in knowledge still exists regarding differing temporal pattern and potential of transmission of ZIKV in different regions of the world. Methods We use a phenomenological model to ascertain the temporal patterns and transmission potential of ZIKV in various countries/territories, by fitting the model to Zika case data from Yap Island and French Polynesia in the Oceania region and 11 countries/territories with confirmed case data, namely, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Saint Martin, and Suriname, to pinpoint the waves of infections in each country/territory and to estimate the respective basic reproduction number R0. Results Six of these time series datasets resulted in statistically significant model fit of at least one wave of reported cases, namely that of French Polynesia, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Guatemala, Suriname and Saint Martin. However, only Colombia and Guatemala exhibited two waves of cases while the others had only one wave. Temporal patterns of the second wave in Colombia and the single wave in Suriname are very similar, with the respective turning points separated by merely a week. Moreover, the mean estimates of R0 for Colombia, Guatemala and Suriname, all land-based populations, range between 1.05 and 1.75, while the corresponding mean estimates for R0 of island populations in French Polynesia, Puerto Rico and Saint Martin are significantly lower with a range of 5.70–6.89. We also fit the Richards model to Zika case data from six main archipelagos in French

  14. Environmental monitoring associated with nuclear testing in French Polynesia; La surveillance de l'environnement associee aux essais nucleaires en Polynesie francaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Arnould, C.; Bory, P.; Ducousso, R.; Sarbach, J. [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-07-15

    The realization of the programme of nuclear experiments in French Polynesia was accompanied by the installation by a radiological monitoring device of the environment, either the physical environment or biological, continental or marine, vegetable or animal, in order to make sure of the absence of risk for the populations. This device took all its importance with the tests carried out in the atmosphere between 1966 and 1974. Its implementation required important means in hardware and manpower with the intervention of civil and military or sometimes mixed organizations. The monitoring was naturally done in a very complete way in the zones close to the sites of tests, but also on the whole of the Polynesian territory, in particular the most populated atolls. It also carried, but in a less extended way, on remote zones, like the Andean countries, because of their geographical location. The results obtained by the various involved laboratories were gathered and interpreted in order to ensure information of the persons in charge and the authorities, in particular in Polynesia and through them the population. They were each year transmitted to the scientific committee of the United Nations for the study of the effects of ionizing radiations (UNSCEAR). The surveillance device is thus described, apart from the zones close to the zones of testing, with the presentation of the various implied organizations and the various monitoring programs. (authors)

  15. Queer kinship practices in non-western contexts: French Polynesia's gender-variant parents and the law of La République.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghellini, Aleardo

    2010-01-01

    French Polynesia is an overseas collectivity of France whose kinship practices accommodate transgender parenting through the involvement of gender-variant (mahu) people in childrearing, including as adoptive parents in customary (faamu) adoption. While the existence and visibility of gender-variant people in French Polynesia is well documented, there is no literature on their involvement in parenting, reflecting a more general dearth of research on LGBT parenting in non-Western contexts. Drawing on the author's fieldwork in French Polynesia, this article fills this gap. The article also discusses the negative implications of France's ambivalence towards LGBT parenting for French Polynesian gender-variant parents and the children they raise.

  16. Best management strategies for sustainable giant clam fishery in French Polynesia islands: answers from a spatial modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Van Wynsberge

    Full Text Available The giant clam Tridacna maxima has been largely overexploited in many tropical regions over the past decades, and was therefore listed in appendix II of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES in 1985. In French Polynesia, several atolls and islands harbor the world's highest stocks of giant clams in very shallow and accessible areas, which are therefore highly vulnerable to fishing pressure. The local fishery authority (i.e., Direction des Resources Marines or "DRM" implemented several management schemes in 2002 to control and regulate fishing pressure. However, for further decisions DRM was missing a sensitivity analysis on the effectiveness of the possible management actions. Here, we report on the use of a deterministic Viable Population Analysis (VPA and spatially-explicit age-based population model that simulated the 30-year trajectory of a Tridacna maxima stock under different management approaches. Specifically, given various scenarios of intra-island larval dispersal, we tested which of No-take-Areas (NTAs, rotational closures, size limits, quotas, and restocking schemes would lead to the highest future stocks in Tubuai and Raivavae, two exploited islands of the Austral archipelago. For both islands, stock abundances were estimated in 2004/2010 and 2005/2010 respectively, and natural mortalities were assessed previously only in Tubuai. When compared to field data, the model successfully predicted the 2010 stocks for Tubuai, but proved to be less reliable for Raivavae, where natural mortality rates may well be different from those on Tubuai. For Tubuai, the spatial model suggested that reducing fishing effort (through fixed quotas and banning fishing below the 12 cm size limit (as currently implemented were the most effective management actions to sustain T. maxima populations into the future. Implementing NTAs was of poor effectiveness. NTAs increased giant clam stock inside the protected area, but also

  17. Field evaluation of selected traps and lures for monitoring the filarial and arbovirus vector, Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae), in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapairai, Limb K; Joseph, Hayley; Sang, Michel A Cheong; Melrose, Wayne; Ritchie, Scott A; Burkot, Thomas R; Sinkins, Steven P; Bossin, Hervé C

    2013-07-01

    The efficacy of the BG-Sentinel (BGS) and the BG-Mosquitito (BGM) mosquito traps for sampling populations of the important filariasis and dengue vector Aedes (Stegomyia) polynesiensis (Marks) was evaluated in French Polynesia against human bait collections (HBC) using a modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention backpack aspirator. Traps were baited with BG-Lure (a combination of lactic acid, ammonia, and caproic acid) or carbon dioxide plus octenol (1-octen-3-ol) known as attractants to aedine mosquitoes. Mosquito sampling was conducted on two typical islands of French Polynesia: the high, volcanic island of Moorea, and the low, coral island (atoll) of Tetiaroa Sampling efficacy was measured in a randomized Latin Square design. Production of carbon dioxide from yeast-sugar fermentation was used as an alternative source of CO2 because supply via dry ice, gas cylinders, or propane combustion in remote tropical islands is costly and challenging. Although the BGS trap captured the greatest number ofAe. polynesiensis in both island settings, catch rates of BGS or BGM baited with either lure were not significantly different from that of HBC. On Moorea, the number of collected aedes species in the BGS trap baited with either lure was significantly greater than the BGM with BG-lure. On Tetiaroa, BGM trapping was severely hampered by damage from rats, and the traps were removed from the study. Our study confirms the efficiency, comparability, and convenience of the BGS trap, a robust and safe alternative to HBC for sampling Aedes mosquitoes in research and surveillance efforts against filariasis and arboviruses in the South Pacific.

  18. [Ciguatera and acute polyradiculoneuritis. Description of two cases in French Polynesia: immunoallergic hypothesis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, E; Gatti, C; Legrand, A M; Ghawche, F

    2009-02-01

    Ciguatera is a foodborne poisoning caused by eating seafood from tropical and subtropical reef areas. According to official data from the local health department, cases of ciguatera in French Polynesia are estimated to involve 240 to 400 persons per 100 000 inhabitants. Associated with a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, nervous, and general signs, ciguatera is usually benign although some forms can lead to hospitalization. The purpose of this report is to describe two unusual cases involving patients who developed acute polyradiculoneuritis with Guillain-Barré-syndrome-like peripheral nervous system deficits on the seventh day of ciguatera after ingestion of moray eel. The hypothesis of an immune-allergic reaction is raised especially in the light of rapid improvement of the patient who received polyvalent immunoglobulin treatment.

  19. High spatial variability in coral bleaching around Moorea (French Polynesia): patterns across locations and water depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Lucie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Schrimm, Muriel; Lenihan, Hunter Stanton

    2007-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events are one of the main threats to coral reefs. A severe bleaching event impacted Moorea, French Polynesia, between March and July 2002, causing 55+/-14% of colonies to suffer bleaching around the island. However, bleaching varied significantly across coral genera, locations, and as a function of water depth, with a bleaching level as high as 72% at some stations. Corals in deeper water bleached at a higher rate than those in shallow water, and the north coast was more impacted than the west coast. The relatively small scale of variability in bleaching responses probably resulted from the interaction between extrinsic factors, including hydrodynamic condition, and intrinsic factors, such as differential adaptation of the coral/algal association.

  20. Recent disturbances augment community shifts in coral assemblages in Moorea, French Polynesia

    KAUST Repository

    Pratchett, Morgan S.

    2010-09-19

    Coral reefs are often subject to disturbances that can cause enduring changes in community structure and abundance of coral reef organisms. In Moorea, French Polynesia, frequent disturbances between 1979 and 2003 caused marked shifts in taxonomic composition of coral assemblages. This study explores recent changes in live cover and taxonomic structure of coral communities on the north coast of Moorea, French Polynesia, to assess whether coral assemblages are recovering (returning to a previous Acropora-dominated state) or continuing to move towards an alternative community structure. Coral cover declined by 29.7% between July 2003 and March 2009, mostly due to loss of Acropora and Montipora spp. Coral mortality varied among habitats, with highest levels of coral loss on the outer reef slope (7-20 m depth). In contrast, there was limited change in coral cover within the lagoon, and coral cover actually increased on the reef crest. Observed changes in coral cover and composition correspond closely with the known feeding preferences and observed spatial patterns of Acanthaster planci L., though observed coral loss also coincided with at least one episode of coral bleaching, as well as persistent populations of the corallivorous starfish Culcita novaeguineae Muller & Troschel. While climate change poses an important and significant threat to the future structure and dynamics coral reef communities, outbreaks of A. planci remain a significant cause of coral loss in Moorea. More importantly, these recent disturbances have followed long-term shifts in the structure of coral assemblages, and the relative abundance of both Pocillopora and Porites continue to increase due to disproportionate losses of Acropora and Montipora. Moreover, Pocillopora and Porites dominate assemblages of juvenile corals, suggesting that there is limited potential for a return to an Acropora-dominated state, last recorded in 1979. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Recent disturbances augment community shifts in coral assemblages in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchett, M. S.; Trapon, M.; Berumen, M. L.; Chong-Seng, K.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are often subject to disturbances that can cause enduring changes in community structure and abundance of coral reef organisms. In Moorea, French Polynesia, frequent disturbances between 1979 and 2003 caused marked shifts in taxonomic composition of coral assemblages. This study explores recent changes in live cover and taxonomic structure of coral communities on the north coast of Moorea, French Polynesia, to assess whether coral assemblages are recovering (returning to a previous Acropora-dominated state) or continuing to move towards an alternative community structure. Coral cover declined by 29.7% between July 2003 and March 2009, mostly due to loss of Acropora and Montipora spp. Coral mortality varied among habitats, with highest levels of coral loss on the outer reef slope (7-20 m depth). In contrast, there was limited change in coral cover within the lagoon, and coral cover actually increased on the reef crest. Observed changes in coral cover and composition correspond closely with the known feeding preferences and observed spatial patterns of Acanthaster planci L., though observed coral loss also coincided with at least one episode of coral bleaching, as well as persistent populations of the corallivorous starfish Culcita novaeguineae Muller & Troschel. While climate change poses an important and significant threat to the future structure and dynamics coral reef communities, outbreaks of A. planci remain a significant cause of coral loss in Moorea. More importantly, these recent disturbances have followed long-term shifts in the structure of coral assemblages, and the relative abundance of both Pocillopora and Porites continue to increase due to disproportionate losses of Acropora and Montipora. Moreover, Pocillopora and Porites dominate assemblages of juvenile corals, suggesting that there is limited potential for a return to an Acropora-dominated state, last recorded in 1979.

  2. Integrated management of pearl culture in French Polynesia in the context of global change: Synopsis of existing results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Yannick; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; Lo, Cedrik; Le Moullac, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents a state of the art on knowledge of the black pearl oyster aquaculture at the scale of French Polynesia. It also introduces the main results obtained throughout the multi-partners POLYPERL project. The goal of this project was to develop an integrated and participative action-research of the pearl oyster culture system, focusing on the environmental, technological, economical and societal dimensions impacting the industry. The research proposed ranges from the understanding of biological phenomena of the production system to socio-economic aspects and governance of the industry, taking into account the management of anthropogenic, climate and health risks. We introduce here the different papers from the POLYPERL project that are compiled in this volume of ECSS dealing with recent scientific work that can contribute to sustainability of the pearl industry in French Polynesia.

  3. Potential for Zika virus transmission through blood transfusion demonstrated during an outbreak in French Polynesia, November 2013 to February 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, D; Nhan, T; Robin, E; Roche, C; Bierlaire, D; Zisou, K; Shan Yan, A; Cao-Lormeau, V M; Broult, J

    2014-04-10

    Since October 2013, French Polynesia has experienced the largest documented outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKAV) infection. To prevent transmission of ZIKAV by blood transfusion, specific nucleic acid testing of blood donors was implemented. From November 2013 to February 2014: 42 (3%) of 1,505 blood donors, although asymptomatic at the time of blood donation, were found positive for ZIKAV by PCR. Our results serve to alert blood safety authorities about the risk of post-transfusion Zika fever.

  4. Report on the behalf of the Economy, Sustainable Development and Land Planning Commission on the bill project related to the follow-up of environmental consequences of French nuclear tests in French Polynesia - Nr 244; Rapport fait au nom de la commission de l'economie, du developpement durable et de l'amenagement du territoire sur la proposition de loi relative au suivi des consequences environnementales des essais nucleaires francais en Polynesie francaise - No. 244

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courteau, Roland

    2012-01-11

    In a first part of this report, the author recalls the history of the creation of the Pacific experiment centre and the test campaign which took place without a real consultation of local populations. He comments the end of nuclear tests while giving an overview of site dismantling and of radioactive materials which have been left there. Then, he addresses the environmental consequences of the nuclear tests in French Polynesia: follow-up system, follow-up of radiological consequences, risks related to subsoil steadiness, necessity of better information of local populations and acknowledgement of test effects. He presents the bill project concerning the return of both atolls within the authority of French Polynesia. The discussion of the bill project articles is reported

  5. A comparison study of Zika virus outbreaks in French Polynesia, Colombia and the State of Bahia in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daihai; Gao, Daozhou; Lou, Yijun; Zhao, Shi; Ruan, Shigui

    2017-03-21

    Zika virus (ZIKV) disease outbreaks occurred in French Polynesia in 2013-2014 and in Brazil and Colombia in 2015-2016, respectively. Using our recently developed ZIKV disease model, we simulated the reported ZIKV infection cases from French Polynesia, Colombia and the State of Bahia of Brazil. Moreover, we estimated that the infection attack rates were 78.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 63.5-86.3%) in French Polynesia which closely matches a previous serological study; 20.8% (95% CI: 1.1-50.0%) in Colombia which suggests that the attack rate was most likely less than 50%; and 32.4% (95% CI: 2.5-94.2%) in the State of Bahia in Brazil which suggests that the attack rate is unidentifiable with monthly data in Bahia. Furthermore, we found that the association of precipitation and ZIKV outbreak was more evident in Colombia than the other two places. These results are helpful for us to understand the possible evolution, to control the on-going outbreaks, to prevent the potential geographic spread, and to study the ecological and epidemiological characteristics of ZIKV.

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccination Coverage and Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Among Children in French Polynesia, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal K; Le Calvez, Evelyne; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Ségalin, Jean-Marc

    2016-06-01

    French Polynesia is considered to be moderately endemic for chronic hepatitis B virus infection, with an estimated 3% of the population having hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). From 1990 to 1992, a 3-dose hepatitis B vaccination series was introduced into the routine infant immunization schedule in French Polynesia, including a birth dose (BD). In 2014, a nationally representative 2-stage cluster survey was undertaken to evaluate the impact of the vaccination program on HBsAg prevalence among school children (∼6 years of age) in Cours Préparatoire (CP). Documented vaccination data were reviewed for all eligible children; children with consent were tested for HBsAg with a rapid point-of-care test. In total, 1,660 students were identified; 1,567 (94%) had vaccination data for review and 1,196 (72%) participated in the serosurvey. Three-dose vaccination coverage was 98%, while timely BD coverage, defined as a dose administered within 24 hours of life, was 89%. Receipt of the second and third doses was often delayed, with 75% and 55% receiving a second and third dose within 1 month of the recommended age, respectively. No children tested positive for HBsAg. French Polynesia's vaccination program has achieved high coverage and an HBsAg seroprevalence of 0% (0-0.5%) among CP school children, but timeliness of vaccination could be improved.

  7. Ciguatera fish toxicity in French Polynesia: size does not always matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriau, Matthias; Ponton, Dominique; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille

    2014-06-01

    Accumulation of ciguatoxins (CTXs) in tropical reef fish tissues during their life is responsible of the most prevalent human seafood intoxication in the South Pacific called Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP). It has been assumed for a long time that CTXs are transferred and accumulated along the trophic food chain, and consequently that smaller individuals within a given fish species are safer to eat than larger ones. However, the relationship between toxicity and fish size has been studied for a limited number of species only and the conclusions are often contradictory. The toxicity of 856 fishes from 59 different species sampled in six islands in French Polynesia between 2003 and 2011 was assessed by Receptor Binding Assay. Among them, 45 species × island and 32 families × island for which the number of individuals was ≥6 allowed testing the relationship between toxicity and size. Except for six specimens of Lutjanus bohar caught in Fakarava (P < 0.01; R(2) = 0.854), the 44 remaining species × island showed no significant increase of CTXs concentration with fish total length (TL). Moreover, the proportion of toxic individuals decreased significantly for Epinephelus polyphekadion from Fakarava (n = 24; P < 0.05) and Kyphosus cinerascens from Raivavae (n = 29; P < 0.05), while no significant variation was detected for the other 43 species × island. At the family level, only three positive and three negative relationships between size and CTXs concentration were observed among the 32 family × island analyzed. No relationship between the proportion of toxic fish within a family and the relative total length of individuals were observed. The lack of relationship between toxicity and size observed for most of the species and families from the six islands suggests that fish size cannot be used as an efficient predictor of fish toxicity in French Polynesia. These results highlight the need for improving our knowledge about metabolic processes

  8. Ciguatera risk management in French Polynesia: the case study of Raivavae Island (Australes Archipelago).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinain, Mireille; Darius, H Taiana; Ung, André; Fouc, Mote Tchou; Revel, Taina; Cruchet, Philippe; Pauillac, Serge; Laurent, Dominique

    2010-10-01

    Based on epidemiological data available through long-term monitoring surveys conducted by both the Public Health Directorate and the Louis Malardé Institute, ciguatera is highly endemic in French Polynesia, most notably in Raivavae (Australes) which appears as a hot spot of ciguatera with an average incidence rate of 140 cases/10,000 population for the period 2007-2008. In order to document the ciguatera risk associated with Raivavae lagoon, algal and toxin-based field monitoring programs were conducted in this island from April 2007 to May 2008. Practically, the distribution, abundance and toxicity of Gambierdiscus populations, along with the toxicity levels in 160 fish distributed within 25 distinct species, were assessed in various sampling locations. Herbivores such as Scarids (parrotfish) and Acanthurids (unicornfish) were rated as high-risk species based on receptor-binding assay toxicity data. A map of the risk stratification within the Raivavae lagoon was also produced, which indicates that locations where both natural and man-made disturbances have occurred remained the most susceptible to CFP incidents. Our findings also suggest that, locally, the traditional knowledge about ciguatera may not be scientifically complete but is functionally correct. Community education resulted in self-regulating behaviour towards avoidance of high-risk fish species and fishing locations.

  9. Leprosy in French Polynesia. The possible impact of multidrug therapy on epidemiological trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartel, J L; Spiegel, A; Nguyen Ngoc, L; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Martin, P M; Grosset, J H

    1992-09-01

    In 1982, following the recommendations of a WHO study group, multidrug therapy (MDT) was introduced into French Polynesia to treat all patients suffering from active leprosy, and--only on request--those still on dapsone monotherapy. After 5 years, a clear-cut decrease of prevalence and mean annual detection rates for leprosy (except for detection rates among children aged less than 15 years, many of such cases being detected early by increased household contact training) has been observed. There was also a decrease in the proportion of newly detected cases with disabilities. During the 21-year period preceding the introduction of MDT into the control programme, mean annual detection rates for leprosy had remained stable, and this led to the consideration that such a decrease was due neither to the natural decline of the disease nor to the economic improvement of the country. Our results, together with the fact that, to date, the relapse rate was nil in the Polynesian patients put on MDT, strongly suggest that the implementation of MDT has resulted in a decrease of detection rates for leprosy which may be a consequence of a decrease in the transmission of the disease.

  10. Comparative Effects of Different Disturbances in Coral Reef Habitats in Moorea, French Polynesia

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    Mélanie L. Trapon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation and loss of critical coastal habitats has significant ramifications for marine fisheries, such that knowledge of changes in habitat quality and quantity are fundamental to effective ecosystem management. This study explores changes in the structure of coral reef habitats, specifically changes in coral cover and composition, in Moorea, French Polynesia, to assess the independent and combined effects of different disturbances since 1979. During this period, reefs on the north coast have been subject to coral bleaching, severe tropical storms, as well as outbreaks of Acanthaster. Coral cover varied significantly among years, showing marked declines during some, but not all, disturbances. The greatest rates of coral loss coincided with outbreaks of A. planci. Moreover, successive disturbances have had differential effects among coral genera, leading to strong directional shifts in coral composition. Acropora is declining in abundance and coral assemblages are becoming increasingly dominated by Pocillopora and Porites. Observed changes in the cover and composition of corals are likely to have further significant impacts on the reef fish assemblages. Given that significant disturbances have been mostly associated with outbreaks of A. planci, rather than climate change, effective ecosystem management may reduce and/or delay impending effects of climate change.

  11. TAXONOMIC REVISION OF SARGASSUM (FUCALES, PHAEOPHYCEAE) FROM FRENCH POLYNESIA BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR ANALYSES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattio, Lydiane; Payri, Claude Elisabeth; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie

    2008-12-01

    An assessment of Sargassum in French Polynesia was done through the critical revision of the literature, type specimens, and specimens from type localities. Sargassum samples were newly collected, and four morphotypes were identified on the basis of morphological characters. Molecular analysis of the nuclear ITS2, chloroplastic partial rbcLS, and mitochondrial cox3 markers generated two clades and confirmed the recent divergence suspected between closely related species. Although 18 different epithets have been attributed to French Polynesian Sargassum since 1828, only three species are considered valid in this study. Most of these species were transferred to S. pacificum Bory, the only species present in the Society Archipelago, while S. obtusifolium J. Agardh was restricted to the Austral Archipelago, and S. echinocarpum J. Agardh was confirmed for the Austral and Gambier Archipelagos. A morphological identification key is provided, along with descriptions and illustrations for each polymorphic species. Moreover, the study of several regional collections underlined similar and low specific diversity among Sargassum populations in the southeastern Pacific. As a result of this study, we propose that S. bacciferum J. Agardh var. latiuscula Grunow, S. bisserula f. pacifica Grunow, S. boraborense (Grunow) Setch., S. mangarevense (Grunow) Setch., S. sociale (Grunow) Setch., and S. tahitense Grunow be considered as heterotypic synonyms of S. pacificum. Sargassum skottsbergii Sjöstedt, S. hawaiiensis Doty et Newhouse, S. divaricatum var. chilensis Grunow, S. obtusifolium J. Agardh f. chamberlainii Grunow, and S. obtusifolium J. Agardh f. lendigeroides Grunow are further regarded as heterotypic synonyms of S. obtusifolium.

  12. Assessment of artificial radionuclides issued from French nuclear bomb testing at Mururoa (French Polynesia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.-M.; Thomas, A.J. (Ecole Normale Superieure, Montrouge (France). Inst. de Biogeochimie Marine); Charrier, B.; Cousteau, J.-Y.; Sarano, F. (Fondation Cousteau, Paris (France))

    1990-03-01

    The Mururoa lagoon was sampled immediately after a nuclear test. {sup 131}I was found in sediments and plankton. Official French sources explain its occurrence by an accidental release during a control operation. Long-lived nuclides ({sup 137}Cs, Pu isotopes, etc) are ascribed to past local atmospheric tests. Their total flux to the Pacific Ocean is markedly low as compared to discharges by major reprocessing plants. Radionuclides short-term impact on Pacific ecosystems and man is insignificant. Long-term processes could not be assessed. (author).

  13. Ciguatera fish poisoning: Incidence, health costs and risk perception on Moorea Island (Society archipelago, French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Ewen; Gatti, Clémence; Bambridge, Tamatoa; Chinain, Mireille

    2016-12-01

    Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) is a non-bacterial seafood poisoning well characterized in the remote archipelagos of French Polynesia, yet poorly documented in the Society archipelago, most notably on Moorea, the second most populated island in French Polynesia, which counts a high proportion of fishermen fishing on a regular basis. To address this knowledge gap, a holistic study of the ciguatera issue was conducted on Moorea. First, ciguatera risk was analysed in terms of incidence rate, fish species most commonly involved and risk stratification in Moorea lagoon based on 2007-2013 epidemiological data. A mean incidence rate of 8 cases per 10,000 inhabitants for the study period and an average under-reporting rate of 54% were found. Taking into account hospitalization and medication fees, and loss of productive days, the health-related costs due to CFP were estimated to be USD $1613 and $749 for each reported and unreported case, respectively, with an overall cost of USD $241,847 for the study period. Comparison of the present status of CFP on Moorea with a risk map established in the late 1970's showed that the spatial distribution of the risk has stayed relatively stable in time, with the north shore of the island remaining the most prone to ciguatera. Evaluation of the current knowledge on CFP among different populations groups, i.e. fishermen, residents and visitors, was also conducted through direct and indirect interviews. About half of the fishermen interviewed were actually able to identify risky fishing areas. While, overall, the CFP risk perception in the fishing community of Moorea seemed accurate, although not scientifically complete, it was sufficient for the safe practice of their fishing activities. This may be due in part to adaptive responses adopted by 36% of the fishermen interviewed, such as the avoidance of either high-risk fishing sites or toxic species. At the residents and visitors' level, the study points out a striking lack of awareness

  14. Transmission Dynamics of Zika Virus in Island Populations: A Modelling Analysis of the 2013-14 French Polynesia Outbreak.

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    Adam J Kucharski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Between October 2013 and April 2014, more than 30,000 cases of Zika virus (ZIKV disease were estimated to have attended healthcare facilities in French Polynesia. ZIKV has also been reported in Africa and Asia, and in 2015 the virus spread to South America and the Caribbean. Infection with ZIKV has been associated with neurological complications including Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS and microcephaly, which led the World Health Organization to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2015. To better understand the transmission dynamics of ZIKV, we used a mathematical model to examine the 2013-14 outbreak on the six major archipelagos of French Polynesia. Our median estimates for the basic reproduction number ranged from 2.6-4.8, with an estimated 11.5% (95% CI: 7.32-17.9% of total infections reported. As a result, we estimated that 94% (95% CI: 91-97% of the total population of the six archipelagos were infected during the outbreak. Based on the demography of French Polynesia, our results imply that if ZIKV infection provides complete protection against future infection, it would take 12-20 years before there are a sufficient number of susceptible individuals for ZIKV to re-emerge, which is on the same timescale as the circulation of dengue virus serotypes in the region. Our analysis suggests that ZIKV may exhibit similar dynamics to dengue virus in island populations, with transmission characterized by large, sporadic outbreaks with a high proportion of asymptomatic or unreported cases.

  15. Correlation and causal relationship between GPS water vapor measurements and rainfall intensities in a tropical region (Tahiti-French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, J.; Sichoix, L.; Barriot, J.-P.; Fadil, A.

    2011-11-01

    We processed a eight-year time series (2001-2008) of zenith wet delay and associated precipitable water (PW) contents from the permanent GPS station THTI (OGT) and a corresponding precipitation time series from the pluviometer of the Matatia valley (7 km South East from the GPS receiver). Daily GPS data were obtained (including zenith total delay and North and East gradients) by applying the PPP strategy of the GIPSY-OASIS II package w.r.t. IGS final products. We used the Saastamoinen model to extract the hydrostatic part of the delay. Taking into account surface meteorological measurements, we transformed the resulting wet delay into an estimate of PW above the receiver. The precipitation dataset consisted of rainfall gauge measurements spanning the same period provided by the "Direction de l'Equipement" (GEGDP). This work poses a preliminary diagnostic on the evolution of PW and precipitations over French Polynesia with emphasis on a broad range of timescales, from seasonal to diurnal components. Before this study, no monitoring system had provided accurate and quasi continuous measures of PW in French Polynesia.

  16. Dengue 1 diversity and microevolution, French Polynesia 2001-2006: connection with epidemiology and clinics.

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    Elodie Descloux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever (DF is an emerging infectious disease in the tropics and subtropics. Determinants of DF epidemiology and factors involved in severe cases-dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS-remain imperfectly characterized. Since 2000, serotype 1 (DENV-1 has predominated in the South Pacific. The aim of this study was (i to determine the origin and (ii to study the evolutionary relationships of DENV-1 viruses that have circulated in French Polynesia (FP from the severe 2001 outbreak to the recent 2006 epidemic, and (iii to analyse the viral intra-host genetic diversity according to clinical presentation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequences of 181 envelope gene and 12 complete polyproteins of DENV-1 viruses obtained from human sera in FP during the 2001-2006 period were generated. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all DENV-1 FP strains belonged to genotype IV-"South Pacific" and derived from a single introduction event from South-East Asia followed by a 6-year in situ evolution. Although the ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous substitutions per site indicated strong negative selection, a mutation in the envelope glycoprotein (S222T appeared in 2002 and was subsequently fixed. It was noted that genetic diversification was very significant during the 2002-2005 period of endemic DENV-1 circulation. For nine DF sera and eight DHF/DSS sera, approximately 40 clones/serum of partial envelope gene were sequenced. Importantly, analysis revealed that the intra-host genetic diversity was significantly lower in severe cases than in classical DF. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: First, this study showed that DENV-1 epidemiology in FP was different from that described in other South-Pacific islands, characterized by a long sustained viral circulation and the absence of new viral introduction over a 6-year period. Second, a significant part of DENV-1 evolution was observed during the endemic period characterized by the rapid

  17. Mid- to Late Holocene Sea-Level Record in French Polynesia, South-Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, N.; Camoin, G.; Vella, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Samankassou, E.; Botella, A.; Milne, G. A.; Fietzke, J.; Dussouillez, P.; Plaine, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid- to Late Holocene provides the opportunity to study the coastal response to sea-level change that has a similar amplitude (i.e., a few decimetres up to 1 m) to the sea-level rise that is likely to occur before the end of the current century. Furthermore, this time period provides an important baseline of natural climate variability prior to the industrial revolution. This study aims to reconstruct Mid- to Late Holocene relative sea-level change in French Polynesia by examining coral reef records from ten islands, which represent ideal settings for accurate sea-level change studies because: 1) they can be regarded as tectonically stable during the relevant period (slow subsidence), 2) they are located far from former ice sheets ('far-field'), 3) they are characterized by a low tidal amplitude, and 4) they cover a wide range of latitudes which produces significantly improved constraints on GIA (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment) model parameters. The accurate reconstruction of sea-level change relies on absolute U/Th dating of in situ coral colonies and their accurate positioning via GPS RTK (Real Time Kinematic) measurements with a vertical and horizontal precision of ± 2.5 cm and ~1 cm, respectively. We focus mainly on the analysis of coral microatolls, which are sensitive low-tide recorders, as their vertical accretion is limited by the water level. Their growth patterns allow the reconstruction of low-amplitude and high-frequency sea-level changes on centennial to sub-decadal time scales. A sea-level rise of less than ~1 m is documented between 6 and 3-3.5 ka, and is followed by a gradual fall in sea level that started around 2 ka and persisted until the past few centuries. The reconstructed sea-level curve therefore extends the Tahiti sea-level curve [Deschamps et al., 2012, Nature, 483, 559-564], and is in good agreement with a geophysical model tuned to fit far-field deglacial records [Bassett et al., 2005, Science, 309, 925-928].

  18. Ethnobotanical survey of cosmetic plants used in Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Xénia; Ansel, Jean-Luc; Lecellier, Gaël; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Butaud, Jean-François

    2016-11-29

    Cosmetic plants and their uses have often been neglected in ethnobotanical surveys which focus mainly on plants with medicinal or food uses. Thus, this survey was carried out to specifically investigate cosmetics in a small community and to establish a cosmetopoeia, based on the model of pharmacopoeia for medicinal plants. The geographic spread of the survey covered the Marquesas Islands, one of the five archipelagos of French Polynesia (Pacific Ocean). This archipelago was also recently investigated for its pharmacopoeia. This survey is based on individual interviews of Marquesan informants on the islands of Tahiti (Society archipelago) and Nuku Hiva (Marquesas archipelago). The methodological approach was semi-directive with open-ended questions based on cosmetic criteria (application area, cosmetic use, plant). Before each interview, researchers and the informant signed a Prior Informed Consent (PIC). Quantitative analyses were performed using basic statistics and the indice of Fidelity Level (FL). Twenty-eight informants from five of the six inhabited Marquesan islands were interviewed and yielded more than 500 cosmetic recipes. Marquesan cosmetopoeia included 79 plant taxa, of which 5% are Marquesan endemics, 23% are indigenous, 28% are Polynesian introductions and 44% are modern introductions. Among the introduced species, half were cultivated whereas the other half were weedy species. Most of the plants were abundant and only eight species were considered rare, of which four were Marquesan endemics. Main cosmetic plants were identified through informant citations and fidelity levels, and included Calophyllum inophyllum, Cananga odorata, Citrus aurantiifolia, Cocos nucifera, Curcuma longa, Gardenia taitensis, Mentha spp., Ocimum basilicum, Rauvolfia nukuhivensis and Santalum insulare var. marchionense. The most referred application areas were skin, hair and private parts whereas the main cosmetic uses were perfume, hydration, medicinal care and healing

  19. From eradication to containment: invasion of French Polynesia by Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and releases of two natural enemies: a 17-year case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), was discovered on Tahiti Island, French Polynesia, in 1996. Two other economically important Bactrocera species were previously established: B. kirki (Froggatt) in 1928, and B. tryoni (Froggatt), Queensland fruit fly, in 1970. This situation provi...

  20. Establishment of the Brown Widow Spider (Araneae: Theridiidae) and Infestation of its Egg Sacs by a Parasitoid, Philolema latrodecti (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), in French Polynesia and the Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Jérôme; Vetter, Richard S

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents two newly established species for French Polynesia: the invasive brown widow spider, Latrodectus geometricus C. L. Koch, and its potential biocontrol agent, the parasitoid wasp, Philolema latrodecti (Fullaway). The brown widow spider was recorded from the island of Moorea in 2006 and, since that discovery, the occurrence of this species has expanded to two of the five archipelagos of French Polynesia including the main island of Tahiti and four of the Cook Islands. Although the tropical climate contributes to the establishment of L. geometricus, a biotic factor, P. latrodecti, may restrain population from demographic explosion. This eurytomid wasp is present in French Polynesia and is a parasitoid that has been used in biological control of the southern black widow Latrodectus mactans (F.) in Hawaii. This wasp could become a significant limiting factor for L. geometricus distribution on these islands, as it was found in 31% of the Tahitian brown widow spider egg sacs that were dissected. However, thus far, the wasp was only found on Tahiti in association with the brown widow spider. Although the brown widow is generally considered to be less toxic than its black widow relatives, it remains of medical concern in French Polynesia because reactions to its bites can, at times, be severe. The spider remains of public concern because it is a novel species; it has the word widow in its name and dark morphs are mistaken as black widows.

  1. Thyroid cancer in French Polynesia: a population based case control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindel, P.; Doyon, F.; Adjadj, E.; Vathaire, F. de [Institut Gustave Roussy, INSERM U605, 94 - Villejuif (France); Drozdovitch, V. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, 69 - Lyon (France); Bouville, A. [DHHS/NIH/NCI/Div. of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics EPS (United States); Paoaafaite, J.; Teuri, J. [IRD, Papeete Tahiti (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Because a previous study had shown that registered thyroid cancer incidence is higher among natives of French Polynesia (FP) than in other Maori populations from Hawaii and New-Zealand, a case-control study of thyroid cancer coordinated by Unit 605 of INSERM was conducted in FP. The main objective was to assess the potential role of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests performed by France between 1966 and 1974 on such a high incidence. The study included 600 subjects born and residing in FP: 229 cases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma diagnosed between 1979 and 2004, aged up to 30 years old at start of nuclear weapons testing and 371 control s matched on gender and birth date randomly selected from the FP registry of births. Face to face interviews were conducted from 2002 to 2004 by specialized investigators native from FP who received a specific formation for this study. Addresses were collected from the territorial medical insurance, which covers all the inhabitants, whatever their professional status. Detailed information about nutrition at time of interview and at the end of adolescence was collected by means of a semi-quantitative method using pictures. Data concerning residence, hormonal and reproductive life, familial and personal background of thyroid pathologies and cancers, and professional and environmental exposure to carcinogens were also collected. For each study subject, radiation thyroid dose was estimated taking into account residential history and dietary habits of the subject and deposition densities of radionuclides reconstructed for each island where the subject resided during the testing period. The iodine intake will be estimated from the dietary questionnaire, as well as from mass-spectrometry measurements of stable iodine in nail clippings, which were collected during the interviews. Among the 229 cases, 89% were females, 54% declared themselves as of pure Maori origin, another 36% of Maori-Asian or Maori

  2. Genetic network and breeding patterns of a sicklefin lemon shark (Negaprion acutidens population in the Society Islands, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Mourier

    Full Text Available Human pressures have put many top predator populations at risk of extinction. Recent years have seen alarming declines in sharks worldwide, while their resilience remains poorly understood. Studying the ecology of small populations of marine predators is a priority to better understand their ability to withstand anthropogenic and environmental stressors. In the present study, we monitored a naturally small island population of 40 adult sicklefin lemon sharks in Moorea, French Polynesia over 5 years. We reconstructed the genetic relationships among individuals and determined the population's mating system. The genetic network illustrates that all individuals, except one, are interconnected at least through one first order genetic relationship. While this species developed a clear inbreeding avoidance strategy involving dispersal and migration, the small population size, low number of breeders, and the fragmented environment characterizing these tropical islands, limits its complete effectiveness.

  3. Influence of boat noises on escape behaviour of white-spotted eagle ray Aetobatus ocellatus at Moorea Island (French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthe, Cecile; Lecchini, David

    2016-02-01

    The present study tested different sounds that could disturb eagle rays (Aetobatus ocellatus) during their foraging activities at Moorea, French Polynesia. Results showed that artificial white sound and single-frequency tones (40 Hz, 600 Hz or 1 kHz) did not have an effect on rays (at least 90% of rays continued to forage over sand), while playbacks of boat motor sound significantly disturbed rays during foraging activity (60% exhibited an escape behaviour). Overall, our study highlighted the negative effect of boat noises on the foraging activity of eagle rays. These noises produced by boat traffic could, however, have some positive effects for marine aquaculture if they could be used as a deterrent to repel the eagle rays, main predators of the pearl oysters.

  4. Biogeography of tropical Indo-West Pacific parasites: a cryptic species of Transversotrema and evidence for rarity of Transversotrematidae (Trematoda) in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Thomas H; Adlard, Robert D; Bray, Rodney A; Sasal, Pierre; Cutmore, Scott C

    2014-04-01

    We sought transversotrematid trematodes from French Polynesian fishes by examining 304 individual scaled fishes of 53 species from seven families known to harbour the family elsewhere. A single species was found at two locations in the Tuamotus Archipelago on two species of Chaetodontidae (Chaetodon auriga and Chaetodon ephippium) and one species of Lutjanidae (Lutjanus gibbus). The species closely resembles Transversotrema borboleta Hunter & Cribb, 2012 from chaetodontids and lutjanids of the northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) but differs from it consistently in 8 base positions of ITS2 rDNA. This level of variation exceeds that between some clearly morphologically distinct pairs of species of Transversotrema and the form from French Polynesia is thus interpreted as a distinct, though cryptic, species and named Transversotrema polynesiae n. sp. The new species forms part of a complex of species, here characterised as the T. borboleta complex, associated with chaetodontids and lutjanids in the tropical Indo-West Pacific. Most of the putative species within this complex are yet to be described. Comparison of identical numbers of matched samples of fishes from French Polynesia, Heron Island (southern GBR) and Lizard Island (northern GBR) revealed 1, 4 and 10 species of Transversotrema respectively suggesting that the French Polynesian fauna is depauperate for this family. In addition to those species apparently missing from suitable hosts in French Polynesia, several species from further west infect fishes (especially Nemipteridae) that are themselves absent from French Polynesia. This dramatic east-west decline in richness contrasts strongly with what is known for monogeneans, which appear to maintain their richness over the same scale, and is more precipitate than is known for other groups of trematodes. The decline might be explained in part by the absence of the as yet unknown first intermediate hosts in French Polynesia. However, we predict that it is explained

  5. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

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    Morgan S Pratchett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites, during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98% than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species is producing a coral assemblage that is

  6. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchett, Morgan S; McCowan, Dominique; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Heron, Scott F

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites), during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98%) than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species) is producing a coral assemblage that is more resistant to sustained and ongoing ocean warming.

  7. [Decree No. 91-272 of 12 March 1991 establishing the operation of the consultative committee for the control of immigration and foreigners in French Polynesia created by Article 4V of Act No. 90-612 of 12 July 1990].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-14

    This Decree sets forth rules on the operation, composition, and administration of the Consultative Committee for the Control of Immigration and Foreigners in French Polynesia. The Committee consists of eight members, half representatives of the French Government and half representatives of the Government of French Polynesia, and is presided over by the High Commissioner and the President of the Government of French Polynesia, or their representatives. The Committee is to be consulted on questions relating to the control of immigration and foreigners, including the issuance of visas for stays in French Polynesia exceeding 3 months. It is authorized to make recommendations on measures to control immigration and foreigners, including recommendations on applications for permission to stay in French Polynesia. The deliberations of the Committee are private, and information contained in applications or files that it examines is confidential. Further provisions of the Decree deal with meetings, witnesses, and decisions of the Government of French Polynesia with respect to the recommendations of the Committee.

  8. Tsunami field survey in French Polynesia of the 2015 Chilean earthquake Mw = 8.2 and what we learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamelot, Anthony; Reymond, Dominique; Savigny, Jonathan; Hyvernaud, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami generated by the earthquake of magnitude Mw=8.2 near the coast of central Chile on the 16th September 2015 was observed on 7 tide gauges distributed over the five archipelagoes composing French Polynesia, a territory as large as Europe. We'll sum up all the observations of the tsunami and the field survey done in Tahiti (Society islands) and Hiva-Oa (Marquesas islands) to evaluate the preliminary tsunami forecast tool (MERIT) and the detailed tsunami forecast tool (COASTER) of the French Polynesian Tsunami Warning Center. The preliminary tool forecasted a maximal tsunami height between 0.5m to 2.3 m all over the Marquesas Islands. But only the island of Hiva-Oa had a tsunami forecast greater than 1 meter especially in the Tahauku Bay well known for its local response due to its resonance properties. In Tahauku bay, the tide gauge located at the entrance of the bay recorded a maximal tsunami height above mean sea level ~ 1.7 m; and we measured at the bottom of the bay a run-up about 2.8 m at 388 m inland from the shoreline in the river bed, and a run-up of 2.5 m located 155 m inland. The multi-grid simulation over Tahiti was done one hour after the origin time of the earthquake and gave a very localized tsunami impact on the North shore. Our forecast indicated an inundation about 10 m inland that lead Civil Authorities to evacuate 6 houses. It was the first operational use of this new fine grid covering the north part of Tahiti that is not protected by a coral reef. So we were attentive to the feed back of the alert that confirm the forecast of the maximal height arrival 1 hour after the first arrival. The tsunami warning system forecast well strong impact as well as low impact as long as we have an early robust description of the seismic parameters and fine grids about 10 m spatial resolution to simulate tsunami impact. In January of 2016 we are able to forecast tsunami heights for 72 points located over 35 islands of French Polynesia.

  9. Radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia and others countries and territories year 1999; Surveillance de la radioactivite en Polynesie francaise et autres pays et territoires annee 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    This report presents the results of measures made in 1999 to provide the radioactivity monitoring in environment and food chains in french Polynesia. It does not concern the Fangataufa and Mururoa sites. The only radionuclides detected in the air, land and sea sampling of the French Polynesia are long life elements (Sr 90 included). The results of measurements are often under the detection limit, and when they are significant they stay very low. The efficient year dose coming from radioactivity for the Tahiti island is inferior or equal to 4 micro sievert for 1999. The annual radiation doses estimated in relation with exposure to artificial radionuclides are for the adults between 2 and 6 micro sievert and for children between 2 and five micro sievert. (N.C.)

  10. Radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia and other countries and territories year 1998; Surveillance de la radioactivite en Polynesie francaise et autres pays et territoires annee 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report presents the results of measures made in 1998 to provide the radioactivity monitoring in environment and food chains in french Polynesia. It does not concern the Fangataufa and Mururoa sites. The only radionuclides detected in the air, land and sea sampling of the French Polynesia are long life elements (Sr 90 included). The results of measurements are often under the detection limit, and when they are significant they stay very low. The efficient year dose coming from radioactivity for the Tahiti island is inferior or equal to 4 micro sievert for 1998. The annual radiation doses estimated in relation with exposure to artificial radionuclides are for the adults between 2 and 6 micro sievert and for children between 2 and five micro sievert. (N.C.)

  11. The 1979 Submarine Landslide-Generated Tsunami in Mururoa, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupardin, Adrien; Heinrich, Philippe; Frère, Antoine; Imbert, David; Hébert, Hélène; Flouzat, Mireille

    2017-08-01

    This paper aims at best describing the submarine landslide which induced partial submersion of the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa in 1979. More precisely, waves propagated along the south coast of Mururoa atoll and penetrated into its lagoon some minutes after the landslide triggering ( t = 0 s), whereas a train of eight water waves reached the runway located on the north-east coast of Fangataufa (40 km south of Mururoa) between t = 7 min 30 s and t = 20 min. A numerical model based on shallow water equations is used to simulate the landslide as well as the associated tsunami. Saint-Venant equations are used to propagate the tsunami in coastal areas, whereas the offshore propagation is simulated by solving weakly nonlinear Boussinesq equations. Low- and high-resolution nested grids are used to simulate the tsunami propagation in deep sea and in shallow waters, respectively. Several scenarios have been tested to reproduce the observed water and run-up heights in the near and far fields. The best scenarios correspond to a landslide with a volume in the range (75-90 Mm3) (for a basal friction angle of 35°) and with a basal friction angle in the range (30°-40°) (for a volume of 80 Mm3). These results have been completed by a parametric study on the slide parameters.

  12. The 1979 Submarine Landslide-Generated Tsunami in Mururoa, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupardin, Adrien; Heinrich, Philippe; Frère, Antoine; Imbert, David; Hébert, Hélène; Flouzat, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at best describing the submarine landslide which induced partial submersion of the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa in 1979. More precisely, waves propagated along the south coast of Mururoa atoll and penetrated into its lagoon some minutes after the landslide triggering (t = 0 s), whereas a train of eight water waves reached the runway located on the north-east coast of Fangataufa (40 km south of Mururoa) between t = 7 min 30 s and t = 20 min. A numerical model based on shallow water equations is used to simulate the landslide as well as the associated tsunami. Saint-Venant equations are used to propagate the tsunami in coastal areas, whereas the offshore propagation is simulated by solving weakly nonlinear Boussinesq equations. Low- and high-resolution nested grids are used to simulate the tsunami propagation in deep sea and in shallow waters, respectively. Several scenarios have been tested to reproduce the observed water and run-up heights in the near and far fields. The best scenarios correspond to a landslide with a volume in the range (75-90 Mm3) (for a basal friction angle of 35°) and with a basal friction angle in the range (30°-40°) (for a volume of 80 Mm3). These results have been completed by a parametric study on the slide parameters.

  13. Distribution and biological implications of plastic pollution on the fringing reef of Mo'orea, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific are extremely vulnerable to plastic pollution from oceanic gyres and land-based sources. To describe the extent and impact of plastic pollution, the distribution of both macro- (>5 mm) and microplastic (plastic reef of an isolated South Pacific island, Mo'orea, French Polynesia was quantified. Macroplastic was found on every beach on the island that was surveyed. The distribution of this plastic was categorized by site type and by the presence of Turbinaria ornata, a common macroalgae on Mo'orea. Microplastics were discovered in the water column of the fringing reef of the island, at a concentration of 0.74 pieces m(-2). Additionally, this study reports for the first time the ingestion of microplastic by the corallimorpha Discosoma nummiforme. Microplastics were made available to corallimorph polyps in a laboratory setting over the course of 108 h. Positively and negatively buoyant microplastics were ingested, and a microplastic particle that was not experimentally introduced was also discovered in the stomach cavity of one organism. This study indicates that plastic pollution has the potential to negatively impact coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific, and warrants further study to explore the broader potential impacts of plastic pollution on coral reef ecosystems.

  14. Distribution and biological implications of plastic pollution on the fringing reef of Mo’orea, French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J. Connors

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific are extremely vulnerable to plastic pollution from oceanic gyres and land-based sources. To describe the extent and impact of plastic pollution, the distribution of both macro- (>5 mm and microplastic (plastic < 5 mm of the fringing reef of an isolated South Pacific island, Mo’orea, French Polynesia was quantified. Macroplastic was found on every beach on the island that was surveyed. The distribution of this plastic was categorized by site type and by the presence of Turbinaria ornata, a common macroalgae on Mo’orea. Microplastics were discovered in the water column of the fringing reef of the island, at a concentration of 0.74 pieces m−2. Additionally, this study reports for the first time the ingestion of microplastic by the corallimorpha Discosoma nummiforme. Microplastics were made available to corallimorph polyps in a laboratory setting over the course of 108 h. Positively and negatively buoyant microplastics were ingested, and a microplastic particle that was not experimentally introduced was also discovered in the stomach cavity of one organism. This study indicates that plastic pollution has the potential to negatively impact coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific, and warrants further study to explore the broader potential impacts of plastic pollution on coral reef ecosystems.

  15. Congenital cerebral malformations and dysfunction in fetuses and newborns following the 2013 to 2014 Zika virus epidemic in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Marianne; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; Guillemette-Artur, Prisca; Lastère, Stéphane; Bost-Bezeaud, Frédérique; Marcelis, Ludivine; Abadie, Véronique; Garel, Catherine; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Rozenberg, Flore; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Mallet, Henri-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We detected an unusual increase in congenital cerebral malformations and dysfunction in fetuses and newborns in French Polynesia, following an epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV), from October 2013 to March 2014. A retrospective review identified 19 cases, including eight with major brain lesions and severe microcephaly, six with severe cerebral lesions without microcephaly and five with brainstem dysfunction without visible malformations. Imaging revealed profound neurological lesions (septal and callosal disruption, ventriculomegaly, abnormal neuronal migration, cerebellar hypoplasia, occipital pseudocysts, brain calcifications). Amniotic fluid was drawn from seven cases at gestation weeks 20 to 29. ZIKV RNA was detected by RT-PCR and infectious ZIKV isolates were obtained in four of five microcephalic, but not in two non-microcephalic cases with severe brain lesions. Medical termination of pregnancy was performed in eleven cases; two cases with brainstem dysfunction died in the first months of life; six cases are alive, with severe neurological impairment. The results show that four of seven tested fetuses with major neurological injuries were infected with ZIKV in utero. For other non-microcephalic, congenital abnormalities we were not able to prove or exclude ZIKV infection retrospectively. The unusual occurrence of brain malformations or dysfunction without microcephaly following a ZIKV outbreak needs further studies.

  16. New records of marine tardigrades from Moorea, French Polynesia, with the description of Styraconyx turbinarium sp. nov. (Arthrotardigrada, Halechiniscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Paul J; Fontoura, Paulo; Nelson, Diane R

    2015-05-05

    Five marine arthrotardigrade species are recorded from Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia. Four were collected from coral sand; two, Dipodarctus anaholiensis Pollock, 1995 and Florarctus kwoni Chang & Rho, 1997, are new records for the region, and two, Halechiniscus perfectus Schulz, 1955 and Styraconyx kristenseni kristenseni Renaud-Mornant, 1981, have been previously reported. The fifth, a new species Styraconyx turbinarium sp. nov., is described and was collected from the drifting brown alga Turbinaria ornata. The new species is characterized by the presence of peduncles on all digits, an elongate primary clava, and the lateral cirrus A arising from a common pedestal and enveloped by a common membrane extending almost to the claval tip. The new species differs from the most similar species, Styraconyx tyrrhenus D'Addabbo Gallo, Morone De Lucia & de Zio Grimaldi, 1989, by having longer and differently shaped primary clavae which are elongated in the new species and club-shaped in S. tyrrhenus. By having a dorsal cuticle that is coarsely punctated but without folds or other ornamentations, the new species can be easily distinguished from S. craticulus (Pollock, 1983), a species with similar primary clavae, but with cuticular dorsal folds ornamented with a grid-like pattern.

  17. Study of Groundwater Circulation Using Stable Isotopes : the Example of the Punaruu Watershed (Tropical Oceanic Island of Tahiti, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichoix, L.; Hildenbrand, A.; Marlin, C.; Gillot, P. Y.; Pheulpin, L.; Barriot, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing demand for drinking and industrial water, especially in the most populated areas of the tropical oceanic Island of Tahiti in French Polynesia (South central Pacific), makes it necessary to conduct hydrological and hydrogeological studies on water resources and management. Our investigation area represents the second largest watershed of Tahiti called Punaruu. The largest industrial zone of Tahiti occupies the minor low valley of this catchment and is particularly impacted by dredging of the stream and rock removals since several decades whereas the major high part is naturally well preserved. This study aims to identify the main infiltration areas of the aquifers of this industrial zone as well as the areas at low elevations to be protected from potential pollutions. During the period between May 2013 and July 2015, we have collected rainwater samples from five rain gauges located at elevations ranging from 0 to 1420 m. We have also performed water sampling from the main rivers and three springs up to altitudes of 800 m as well as six pumping boreholes in the industrial zone. Chemical (major elements) and stable isotopic (δ18O and δ2H) analyses have been done from all these water samples and help us to constrain a conceptual model of groundwater circulation within such a complex discontinuous volcanic structure.

  18. Surveillance and behavioral investigations of Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis in Moorea, French Polynesia, using a sticky ovitrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard C; Ritchie, Scott A

    2004-12-01

    The effectiveness of the sticky ovitrap was assessed for the container-breeding Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis in Moorea, French Polynesia. These mosquitoes are the primary vectors of dengue viruses and Bancroftian filariasis, respectively, in the area. Both Ae. aegypti and Ae. polynesiensis were collected in greatest numbers in sticky ovitraps baited with water or grass infusions rather than leaf infusions. Sticky ovitrap collections were significantly higher for both species in the 12 h post-midday than pre-midday and in traps set in shaded compared with open locations. More females of Ae. aegypti were collected in ovitraps at west-facing walls, although Ae. polynesiensis collected at east- or west-facing traps did not differ in number. Female Ae. aegypti (bloodfed, marked, and released for oviposition) were readily recaptured (19-26%) by sticky ovitraps, exhibiting movement of up to 30 m, and between outdoor and indoor situations. Overall, the sticky ovitrap proved an effective tool for investigating the oviposition behavior and dispersal of these container-breeding species.

  19. Evaluation of seafood toxicity in the Australes archipelago (French Polynesia) using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowiez, Ralph; Darius, Hélène Taiana; Cruchet, Philippe; Rossi, Fanny; Caillaud, Amandine; Laurent, Dominique; Chinain, Mireille

    2013-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), a disease caused by consuming fish that have accumulated ciguatoxins (CTXs) in their tissue, is regarded as the most prevalent form of intoxication in French Polynesia. Recently, the Australes, one of the least affected archipelago until the early 1980s, has shown a dramatic increase in its incidence rates in 2009 with unusual CFP cases. In the present work, potential health hazards associated with the proliferation of various marine phytoplankton species and the consumption of fish and marine invertebrates highly popular among local population were assessed in three Australes islands: Raivavae, Rurutu and Rapa. Extracts from the marine dinoflagellates Gambierdiscus, Ostreospis and mat-forming cyanobacteria as well as fish, giant clams and sea urchin samples were examined for the presence of CTXs and palytoxin (PLTX) by using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a). Cytotoxic responses observed with both standards (Pacific CTX-3C and PLTX) and targeted marine products indicate that CBA-N2a is a robust screening tool, with high sensitivity and good repeatability and reproducibility. In Rurutu and Raivavae islands, our main findings concern the presence of CTX-like compounds in giant clams and sea urchins, suggesting a second bio-accumulation route for CFP toxins in the ciguatera food chain. In Rapa, the potential CFP risk from Gambierdiscus bloom and fish was confirmed for the first time, with levels of CTXs found above the consumer advisory level of 0.01 ng Pacific CTX-1B g(-1) of flesh in three fish samples. However, despite the presence of trace level of PLTX in Ostreopsis natural assemblages of Rapa, no sign of PLTX accumulation is yet observed in tested fish samples. Because this multi-toxinic context is likely to emerge in most French Polynesian islands, CBA-N2a shows great potential for future applications in the algal- and toxin-based field monitoring programmes currently on hand locally.

  20. Bibliographic checklist of the marine benthic algae of Central Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean (Excluding Hawai‘i and French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda, R.T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Polynesian algal bibliographic checklist is based on records from past references for American Samoa and Samoa (380 spp., Cook Islands (111 spp., Johnston Atoll (190 spp., Line Islands (250 spp., Niue (3 spp., Phoenix Islands (193 spp., Pitcairn Islands (23 spp., Tokelau (1 sp., Tonga (109 spp., Wake Atoll (121 spp. and Wallis and Futuna (191 spp. and consists of three sections. The first section (I. Classification provides a listing of classes, orders, and families of the 238 genera of Polynesian algae. The second section (II. Species-Reference Index provides an alphabetized listing of the 667 named algal species under the four Phyla, i.e., Cyanobacteria (68 species, Rhodophyta (373 species, Ochrophyta (59 species and Chlorophyta (167 species with the applicable reference citations for each island or atoll. Brief taxonomic or nomenclatural notes are provided, when appropriate, for selected species. The third section (III. Island-Reference Index provides a chronological listing of all published references for the respective island or atoll in each island group. The complete references for all citations in the text are provided in the Reference section.

  1. Pelagic seabird surveys in the Tuamotu and Gambier Archipelagos, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwerf, Eric A.; Pierce, Ray J.; Gill, Verena A.; Wragg, Graham; Raust, Philippe; Tibbitts, T. Lee

    2006-01-01

    We conducted pelagic seabird surveys in the Gambier and Tuamotu Archipelagos in the southeastern Pacific Ocean totaling 40 hours during 7-27 March 2003 and 22.5 hours during 22-27 July 2001. We used a 300-m-wide strip transect to estimate seabird density, and we estimated relative abundance of birds at all distances. In 2001, we observed a total of 326 birds of 18 species. The mean relative abundance of all birds was 14.3 ?? 3.1/h. Red-footed Booby Sula sula was the most abundant species (5.6/h), followed by White Tern Gygis alba (3.4/h), and Great Crested or Swift Tern Sterna bergii (1.2/h). In 2003, we observed a total of 1463 birds of 25 species. The mean relative abundance of all birds was 36.6 ?? 11.4/h and the mean density of all birds was 4.14 ?? 0.72/km2. Brown Noddy Anous stolidus was the most abundant species (17.6/h, 1.5/km2), followed by White Tern (8.4/h, 1.3/km2), and Red-footed Booby (4.6/h, 0.8/km2). Several globally or locally rare species were observed infrequently, including Phoenix Petrel Pterodroma alba (0.1/h, 0.03/km2). Distribution of birds was uneven, with long periods of no birds punctuated by occasional feeding flocks. In 2003, species diversity was related to length of observation period, with more species observed on longer segments (r2 = 0.58, F1.5 = 6.03, P = 0.05). Although the duration and extent of our surveys were limited, these data are valuable because little published information is available on pelagic seabirds in southeastern Polynesia.

  2. Regional and local variability in recovery of shallow coral communities: Moorea, French Polynesia and central Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, T. J.; Dayton, P. K.; Dayton, A. E.; Steger, R.

    1991-01-01

    Coral communities at Moorea, French Polynesia, and on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, were severely depleted by disturbances early in the 1980s. Corals were killed by the predatory starfish Acanthaster planci, by cyclones, and/or by depressed sea level. This study compares benthic community structure and coral population structures on three disturbed reefs (Vaipahu-Moorea; Rib and John Brewer Reefs-GBR) and one undisturbed reef (Davies Reef-GBR) in 1987 89. Moorea barrier reefs had been invaded by tall macrophytes Turbinaria ornata and Sargassum sp., whereas the damaged GBR reefs were colonised by a diverse mixture of short macrophytes, turfs and coralline algae. The disturbed areas had broadly similar patterns of living and dead standing coral, and similar progress in recolonisation, which suggests their structure may converge towards that of undisturbed Davies Reef. Corals occupying denuded areas at Vaipahu, Rib and John Brewer were small (median diameter 5 cm in each case) and sparse (means 4 8 m-2) compared to longer established corals at Davies Reef (median diameter 9 cm; mean 18 m-2). At Moorea, damselfish and sea urchins interacted with corals in ways not observed in the GBR reefs. Territories of the damselfish Stegastes nigricans covered much of Moorea's shallow reef top. They had significantly higher diversity and density of post-disturbance corals than areas outside of territories, suggesting that the damselfish exerts some influences on coral community dynamics. Sea urchins on Moorea ( Diadema setosum Echinometra mathaei, Echinotrix calamaris) were causing widespread destruction of dead standing coral skeletons. Overall, it appears that the future direction and speed of change in the communities will be explicable more in terms of local than regional processes.

  3. Use of folk tests to detect ciguateric fish: a scientific evaluation of their effectiveness in Raivavae Island (Australes, French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darius, H T; Drescher, O; Ponton, D; Pawlowiez, R; Laurent, D; Dewailly, E; Chinain, M

    2013-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is a seafood intoxication commonly afflicting island communities in the Pacific. These populations, which are strongly dependent on fish resources, have developed over centuries various strategies to decrease the risk of intoxication, including the use of folk tests to detect ciguateric fish. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of two folk tests commonly used in Raivavae Island (Australes, French Polynesia): the rigor mortis test (RMT) and the bleeding test (BT). A total of 107 fish were collected in Raivavae Lagoon, among which 80 were tested by five testers using the RMT versus 107 tested by four testers using BT. First, the performance between testers was compared. Second, the efficiency of these tests was compared with toxicity data obtained via the receptor binding assay (RBA) by assessing various parameter's values such as sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV). Comparisons of outcomes between folk tests and RBA analyses were considered: tests used separately or in a parallel versus the series approach by each tester. The overall efficiency of the RMT and BT tests was also evaluated when the judgments of all testers were "pooled". The results demonstrate that efficiencies varied between testers with one showing the best scores in detecting toxic fish: 55% with RMT and 69.2% with BT. BT gave the best results in detecting toxic fish as compared with RMT, giving also better agreement between testers. If high NPV and Se values were to be privileged, the data also suggest that the best way to limit cases of intoxication would be to use RMT and BT tests in a parallel approach. The use of traditional knowledge and a good knowledge of risky versus healthy fishing areas may help reduce the risk of intoxication among communities where ciguatera fish poisoning is highly prevalent.

  4. Population structure of the hydrocoral Millepora platyphylla in habitats experiencing different flow regimes in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercière, Alexandre; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Planes, Serge

    2017-01-01

    While the fire coral Millepora platyphylla is an important component of Indo-Pacific reefs, where it thrives in a wide range of environments, the ecological and biological processes driving its distribution and population structure are not well understood. Here, we quantified this species’ population structure in five habitats with contrasting hydrodynamic regimes in Moorea, French Polynesia; two in the fore reef: mid and upper slopes, and three in the lagoon: back, fringing and patch reefs. A total of 3651 colonies of fire corals were mapped and measured over 45,000 m2 of surveyed reef. Due to the species’ sensitivity to fragmentation in response to strong water movement, hydrodynamic conditions (e.g. waves, pass and lagoonal circulation) corresponded to marked differences in colony size distributions, morphology and recruitment dynamics among habitats. The size structure varied among reef habitats with higher proportions of larger colonies in calm nearshore reefs (fringing and patch reefs), while populations were dominated by smaller colonies in the exposed fore reefs. The highest densities of fire corals were recorded in fore reef habitats (0.12–0.20 n.m-2) where the proportion of recruits and juveniles was higher at mid slope populations (49.3%) than on the upper slope near where waves break (29.0%). In the latter habitat, most colonies grew as vertical sheets on encrusting bases making them more vulnerable to colony fragmentation, whereas fire corals were encrusting or massive in all other habitats. The lowest densities of M. platyphylla occurred in lagoonal habitats (0.02–0.04 n.m-2) characterized by a combination of low water movement and other physical and biological stressors. This study reports the first evidence of population structure of fire corals in two common reef environments and illustrates the importance of water flow in driving population dynamic processes of these reef-building species. PMID:28273119

  5. Temporal and Spatial Comparisons of Underwater Sound Signatures of Different Reef Habitats in Moorea Island, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Bertucci

    Full Text Available As environmental sounds are used by larval fish and crustaceans to locate and orientate towards habitat during settlement, variations in the acoustic signature produced by habitats could provide valuable information about habitat quality, helping larvae to differentiate between potential settlement sites. However, very little is known about how acoustic signatures differ between proximate habitats. This study described within- and between-site differences in the sound spectra of five contiguous habitats at Moorea Island, French Polynesia: the inner reef crest, the barrier reef, the fringing reef, a pass and a coastal mangrove forest. Habitats with coral (inner, barrier and fringing reefs were characterized by a similar sound spectrum with average intensities ranging from 70 to 78 dB re 1 μPa.Hz(-1. The mangrove forest had a lower sound intensity of 70 dB re 1 μPa.Hz(-1 while the pass was characterized by a higher sound level with an average intensity of 91 dB re 1 μPa.Hz(-1. Habitats showed significantly different intensities for most frequencies, and a decreasing intensity gradient was observed from the reef to the shore. While habitats close to the shore showed no significant diel variation in sound intensities, sound levels increased at the pass during the night and barrier reef during the day. These two habitats also appeared to be louder in the North than in the West. These findings suggest that daily variations in sound intensity and across-reef sound gradients could be a valuable source of information for settling larvae. They also provide further evidence that closely related habitats, separated by less than 1 km, can differ significantly in their spectral composition and that these signatures might be typical and conserved along the coast of Moorea.

  6. 137 CS content in coconut water and copra in French Polynesia: contribution to the dose for population; Le cesium 137 dans la noix de coco en polynesie francaise : contribution a l'exposition de la population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletiko, C.; Arnould, C.; Sarbach, J. [Laboratoire d' etude et de surveillance de l' environnement, Papeete, Polynesie francaise, Tahiti (France); Bablet, J.P.; Ducousso, R. [Service mixte de controle biologique, Monthlery cedex (France)

    1992-07-01

    Coconut tree has the peculiarity to be a good integrator for alkaline metals. The isotope 137 of cesium, which was generated during previous atmospheric nuclear tests, has a high fission yield and a half-life of about 30 years; this nuclide is supposed to be still present in food chain in French Polynesia. In this food chain coconut water and coconut copra are ingested depending upon diet customs and areas of French Polynesia. For some islands, among local foodstuffs, cesium 137 content in coconut highly contributes to the dose. Spectrometry gamma results and annual doses calculation since 1966 are displayed. (author)

  7. [The usefulness of systematic follow-up of tuberculosis for the diagnosis of relapse in French Polynesia between 1971 and 1984].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaziou, P; Chansin, R; Spiegel, A; Cartel, J L

    1991-01-01

    Standard chemotherapy for one year was proposed for the treatment of tuberculous patients in French Polynesia between 1971 and 1978, and for nine months with the addition of pyrazinamide from 1979 to 1984. After treatment, the patients were followed up systematically for a period of 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the follow up measures to detect relapses. Of 1,065 patients treated between 1971 and 1984 at the centre for the control of tuberculosis 35 (3%) presented with a relapse, of whom 30 were confirmed either by bacteriological examination or histological examination. The level of relapse seen was not linked to age, sex, nor type of treatment received (one year or nine months). However, the level of relapse in non compliant patients to the initial treatment (7%) was significantly greater than those observed in patients who were totally compliant (2%) (p less than 0.0001). Of the 35 relapses 9 (26%) were discovered during routine follow up visits, of whom 8 were detected during the first year. The median delay separating apparent recovery from relapse was 8 months. 28 patients (80%) presented with symptoms suggestive of a relapse. Over 5 years 5773 consultations were carried out, which meant 642 consultations to detect one relapse. The authors suggest that in French Polynesia a systematic follow up limited to one year after apparent cure should be adequate.

  8. The Shark Assemblage at French Frigate Shoals Atoll, Hawai‘i: Species Composition, Abundance and Habitat Use

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, Jonathan J.; Austin M Stankus; Burns, Michael S.; Meyer, Carl G.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical data on the abundance and habitat preferences of coral reef top predators are needed to evaluate their ecological impacts and guide management decisions. We used longline surveys to quantify the shark assemblage at French Frigate Shoals (FFS) atoll from May to August 2009. Fishing effort consisted of 189 longline sets totaling 6,862 hook hours of soak time. A total of 221 sharks from 7 species were captured, among which Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis, 36.2%), gray reef (Carcha...

  9. Manta rays in the Marquesas Islands: first records of Manta birostris in French Polynesia and most easterly location of Manta alfredi in the Pacific Ocean, with notes on their distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, J

    2012-11-01

    Based on direct observations of free-ranging specimens, the giant manta ray Manta birostris is reported from the Marquesas Islands, the first sighting in French Polynesia. Sightings of its sister species, the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, are also reported at the most easterly location in the Pacific Ocean. Preliminary individual identification as well as notes on their distribution are also reported.

  10. Ciguatera in French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    Legrand, A. M.; Pauillac, S.; Chinain, M. (Mireille)

    1992-01-01

    La ciguatera est une intoxication alimentaire par la consommation de poissons de récifs coralliens. Chaque année, en Polynésie française, environ 800 cas d'intoxication font l'objet de déclarations médicales. Le terme "ciguatera" est réservé aux empoisonnements par poisson exception faite des intoxications de type histaminique et des intoxications par tétrodotoxine ou par palytoxine. La ciguatera est considéré comme un problème de santé publique indéniable. Il est aussi et surtout préoccupant...

  11. Does use of tropical beaches by tourists and island residents result in damage to fringing coral reefs? A case study in Moorea French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Allison; Ho, Ellen; Bender, Erika; Fong, Peggy

    2010-12-01

    Although coral reefs worldwide are subject to increasing global threats, humans also impact coral reefs directly through localized activities such as snorkeling, kayaking and fishing. We investigated five sites on the northern shore of Moorea, French Polynesia, and quantified the number of visitors on the beach and in shallow water. In field surveys, we measured total coral cover and colony sizes of two common genera, Porites and Acropora, a massive and branching morphology, respectively. One site, which hosted over an order of magnitude more people than the other four, had significantly less total coral cover and supported very little branching Acropora. In addition, size frequency distributions of both the branching and massive genera were skewed toward smaller colony sizes at the high use site. Our results demonstrated that the use of tropical beaches may result in less coral cover, with branching colonies rare and small.

  12. Macroalgal bioindicators (growth, tissue N, delta(15)N) detect nutrient enrichment from shrimp farm effluent entering Opunohu Bay, Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, David T; Fong, Peggy

    2008-02-01

    Nutrient enrichment from shrimp aquaculture poses an increasing environmental threat due to the industry's projected rapid growth and unsustainable management practices. Traditional methods to monitor impacts emphasize water quality sampling; however, there are many advantages to bioindicators, especially in developing countries. We investigated the usefulness of three bioindicators -- growth, tissue nitrogen content and nitrogen stable isotope signature (delta(15)N) -- in the tropical red macroalga Acanthophora spicifera. Algae were collected, cultured, and deployed in a spatial array around the outflow from a shrimp farm in Moorea, French Polynesia, to detect nitrogenous wastes. All three parameters were highest adjacent to the shrimp farm indicating nutrient enrichment, and delta(15)N values confirmed the shrimp farm as the dominant nutrient source (5.63-5.96 per thousand). Isotope ratios proved the most sensitive indicator, as delta(15)N signatures were detected at the most distant sites tested, confirming their usefulness in tracing nutrients and mapping the spatial extent of enrichment.

  13. Transport of radionuclides from the Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls through the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelstaedt, E. [Bundesamt fuer Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, P.B. 301220, D-20305 Hamburg (Germany); Osvath, I.; Povinec, P.P.; Togawa, O. [International Atomic Energy Agency/Marine Environment Laboratory, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, B.P. 800, Monte Carlo (Monaco); Scott, E.M. [Department of Statistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-30

    The dispersion of radionuclides (3H, 90Sr, 137Cs, 239Pu) potentially released from the Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls through the South Pacific Ocean has been studied by means of computer models. The models used consisted of three differently structured compartmental models for the regional field and a hydrodynamic world ocean model for the far-field simulations. The outcome of regional modelling is predicted activity concentrations with time in different regions of French Polynesia (over up to 10000 years for plutonium). The far-field model simulates large-scale dispersion in the South Pacific Ocean over periods of up to 50 years. The overall result suggests that there will not be radioactive contamination of any radiological interest at inhabited sites in French Polynesia or anywhere else in the ocean at present or in the future.

  14. An updated assessment of Symbiodinium spp. that associate with common scleractinian corals from Moorea (French Polynesia) reveals high diversity among background symbionts and a novel finding of clade B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecellier, Gaël J.; Saulnier, Denis; Planes, Serge; Gueguen, Yannick; Wirshing, Herman H.; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    The adaptative bleaching hypothesis (ABH) states that, depending on the symbiotic flexibility of coral hosts (i.e., the ability of corals to “switch” or “shuffle” their algal symbionts), coral bleaching can lead to a change in the composition of their associated Symbiodinium community and, thus, contribute to the coral’s overall survival. In order to determine the flexibility of corals, molecular tools are required to provide accurate species delineations and to detect low levels of coral-associated Symbiodinium. Here, we used highly sensitive quantitative (real-time) PCR (qPCR) technology to analyse five common coral species from Moorea (French Polynesia), previously screened using only traditional molecular methods, to assess the presence of low-abundance (background) Symbiodinium spp. Similar to other studies, each coral species exhibited a strong specificity to a particular clade, irrespective of the environment. In addition, however, each of the five species harboured at least one additional Symbiodinium clade, among clades A–D, at background levels. Unexpectedly, and for the first time in French Polynesia, clade B was detected as a coral symbiont. These results increase the number of known coral-Symbiodinium associations from corals found in French Polynesia, and likely indicate an underestimation of the ability of the corals in this region to associate with and/or “shuffle” different Symbiodinium clades. Altogether our data suggest that corals from French Polynesia may favor a trade-off between optimizing symbioses with a specific Symbiodinium clade(s), maintaining associations with particular background clades that may play a role in the ability of corals to respond to environmental change. PMID:28168100

  15. An updated assessment of Symbiodinium spp. that associate with common scleractinian corals from Moorea (French Polynesia) reveals high diversity among background symbionts and a novel finding of clade B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzé, Héloïse; Lecellier, Gaël J; Saulnier, Denis; Planes, Serge; Gueguen, Yannick; Wirshing, Herman H; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    The adaptative bleaching hypothesis (ABH) states that, depending on the symbiotic flexibility of coral hosts (i.e., the ability of corals to "switch" or "shuffle" their algal symbionts), coral bleaching can lead to a change in the composition of their associated Symbiodinium community and, thus, contribute to the coral's overall survival. In order to determine the flexibility of corals, molecular tools are required to provide accurate species delineations and to detect low levels of coral-associated Symbiodinium. Here, we used highly sensitive quantitative (real-time) PCR (qPCR) technology to analyse five common coral species from Moorea (French Polynesia), previously screened using only traditional molecular methods, to assess the presence of low-abundance (background) Symbiodinium spp. Similar to other studies, each coral species exhibited a strong specificity to a particular clade, irrespective of the environment. In addition, however, each of the five species harboured at least one additional Symbiodinium clade, among clades A-D, at background levels. Unexpectedly, and for the first time in French Polynesia, clade B was detected as a coral symbiont. These results increase the number of known coral-Symbiodinium associations from corals found in French Polynesia, and likely indicate an underestimation of the ability of the corals in this region to associate with and/or "shuffle" different Symbiodinium clades. Altogether our data suggest that corals from French Polynesia may favor a trade-off between optimizing symbioses with a specific Symbiodinium clade(s), maintaining associations with particular background clades that may play a role in the ability of corals to respond to environmental change.

  16. Direct genetic evidence for reproductive philopatry and associated fine-scale migrations in female blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Johann; Planes, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of top predators has been emphasized as essential in an ecosystem due to their role in trophic chain regulation. Optimizing conservation strategies for these endangered marine top predators requires direct estimates of breeding patterns and connectivity as these are essential to understanding the population dynamics. There have been some attempts to investigate breeding patterns of reef sharks from litter reconstruction using molecular analyses. However, direct fine-scale migrations of female sharks for parturition as well as connectivity at a medium scale like between islands remain mostly unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers and a likelihood-based parentage analysis to determine breeding patterns of female blacktip reef sharks in Moorea (Society Islands, French Polynesia). Most females gave birth at their home island but some migrated to specific nursery areas outside the area they are attached to, sometimes going to another island 50 km away across deep ocean. Our analysis also revealed that females migrated to the same nursery for every birthing event. Many offspring showed a high level of inbreeding indicating an overall reduced population size, restricted movements and dispersal, or specific mating behaviour. Females represent the vectors that transport the genes at nursery grounds, and their fidelity should thus define reproductive units. As females seem to be philopatric, males could be the ones dispersing genes between populations. These results highlight the need to conserve coastal zones where female reef sharks seem to exhibit philopatry during the breeding season.

  17. Modeling of tropospheric integrated water vapor content using GPS, radiosonde, radiometer, rain gauge, and surface meteorological data in a tropical region (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Jonathan; Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Hopuare, Marania; Sichoix, Lydie; Fadil, Abdelali

    2012-11-01

    The integrated precipitable water vapor (IPW) is characterized by strong spatial and temporal variability, especially over tropical regions where the troposhere is not purely in hydrostatic equilibrium (convection). As an evidence, the survey of water vapor distibution as permanently as possible is an important issue and should serve as inputs for tropical climate modelling. In this paper, we present an estimation of the IPV from ground­ ba,.sed GPS receivers, which we compare to radiosondes and microwave radiometer. The data used here were collected in the vicinity of French Polynesia University site, during eight years from 2001 to 2008. In addition, we also include the IPW calculated using Era-Interim reanalyses (ECMWF). The main purpose of this paper is to highlight precision, qualities and limitations of each method available on the Island of Tahiti. During wet periods, the radiosondes vertical profiles of water vapor show an efficient mixing of water vapor between the the boundary layer (below trade winds inversion at Tahiti) and the free troposphere. Thus the rainy event detection allows to better constrain the validity range of a model of the vertical distribution of water vapor, which is based on a pseudo-adiabatic saturated evolution of the temperature.

  18. A DNA barcode-based survey of terrestrial arthropods in the Society Islands of French Polynesia: host diversity within the SymbioCode Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Ramage

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report here on the taxonomic and molecular diversity of 10 929 terrestrial arthropod specimens, collected on four islands of the Society Archipelago, French Polynesia. The survey was part of the ‘SymbioCode Project’ that aims to establish the Society Islands as a natural laboratory in which to investigate the flux of bacterial symbionts (e.g., Wolbachia and other genetic material among branches of the arthropod tree. The sample includes an estimated 1127 species, of which 1098 included at least one DNA-barcoded specimen and 29 were identified to species level using morphological traits only. Species counts based on molecular data emphasize that some groups have been understudied in this region and deserve more focused taxonomic effort, notably Diptera, Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera. Some taxa that were also subjected to morphological scrutiny reveal a consistent match between DNA and morphology-based species boundaries in 90% of the cases, with a larger than expected genetic diversity in the remaining 10%. Many species from this sample are new to this region or are undescribed. Some are under description, but many await inspection by motivated experts, who can use the online images or request access to ethanol-stored specimens.

  19. Macroalgal bioindicators (growth, tissue N, {delta}{sup 15}N) detect nutrient enrichment from shrimp farm effluent entering Opunohu Bay, Moorea, French Polynesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, David T. [Department of Zoology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2538 McCarthy Mall, Edmondson 152, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)], E-mail: david.t.lin@ucla.edu; Fong, Peggy [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, 621 Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Nutrient enrichment from shrimp aquaculture poses an increasing environmental threat due to the industry's projected rapid growth and unsustainable management practices. Traditional methods to monitor impacts emphasize water quality sampling; however, there are many advantages to bioindicators, especially in developing countries. We investigated the usefulness of three bioindicators-growth, tissue nitrogen content and nitrogen stable isotope signature ({delta}{sup 15}N)-in the tropical red macroalga Acanthophora spicifera. Algae were collected, cultured, and deployed in a spatial array around the outflow from a shrimp farm in Moorea, French Polynesia, to detect nitrogenous wastes. All three parameters were highest adjacent to the shrimp farm indicating nutrient enrichment, and {delta}{sup 15}N values confirmed the shrimp farm as the dominant nutrient source (5.63-5.96 per mille ). Isotope ratios proved the most sensitive indicator, as {delta}{sup 15}N signatures were detected at the most distant sites tested, confirming their usefulness in tracing nutrients and mapping the spatial extent of enrichment.

  20. A Vegetation Classification of the Opunohu Valley (Moorea Island, French Polynesia) based on a Relative Canopy-Height Class Set Using AirSAR and MASTER Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, B.; Thomas, J.; Capolsini, P.

    2003-12-01

    This paper addresses the vegetation mapping and land use of Opunohu Valley (Moorea Island - French Polynesia) using JPL-AirSAR and MASTER (MODIS/ASTER simulator) images acquired during the PACRIM2 mission (Aug. 2000). These sensors are different but can be considered as complementary since MASTER is a 20 meters ground resolution multispectral imaging scanner with 50 channels distributed in the visible-shortwave infrared, mid infrared and thermal infrared, and AirSAR is a C-band (TOPSAR) and L-band (POLSAR), 5meters ground resolution radar sensor. Our main application field deals with the complex and fragile vegetation cover of south pacific volcanic islands. We presently focus on Opunohu Valley because of its highly representative diversity of vegetation and land cover (found in other polynesian volcanic islands), including different types of forests, coconut fields, grass fields, fern lands, urban zones, agricultural areas, etc... We first defined an original set of classes based on the relative canopy-height of vegetation, we then composed a well-suited RGB SAR-composite image in order to visually discriminate our vegetation classes. An interesting "pineapple fields" class (an important economic resource in Moorea island) proved to particularly discriminate from height-related "grass fields" class because of its structural properties, which lead to a particular signature on SAR images. Using a supervised maximum likelihood algorithm, two classification maps have been defined on both the AirSAR and the MASTER images, using aerial photographs as a ground truth training set. The vegetal species included in each class as well as the classification results are further discussed and the MASTER and AirSAR based classification maps are compared.

  1. Organisms Composing an Experimental Coral Reef Community from Mo'orea, French Polynesia, Exhibit Taxon-Specific Net Production: Net Calcification Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coulson A. Lantz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current research on coral reefs seeks to link the responses to anthropogenic stressors (such as global warming and ocean acidification [OA] among differing functional levels of biological organization. While experimental studies have identified ex situ taxon-specific responses to OA and global warming, isolating and connecting these effects in situ at the community-level has proved difficult. The difficulties arise from the large number of naturally varying parameters affecting corals reefs, such as light intensity and seawater residence time that affect net community production and calcification. To control variation in seawater residence time and allow light intensity to vary naturally, experimental outer reef (17-m depth benthic communities composed of calcified algae, corals, and reef pavement were constructed in large outdoor flumes in Mo'orea, French Polynesia. Net community production (P, net community calcification (G, the ratio of P/G (P/Gratio, and slope of P regressed on G (P/Gslope were calculated for the communities, and concurrently for the constituent members under the same temperature, light, and flow conditions. P and G, for both the communities and constituent members, were correlated positively with light intensity, whereas P/Gratio and P/Gslope were unaffected by light intensity. P/Gratios and P/Gslopes exhibited values that were specific to each community member. These results suggest that the P/Gratio and P/Gslope may be unaffected by natural variability in light intensity and could serve as useful metrics to relate responses at the taxon and community level, which is an important step in assessing the effects of environmental changes on coral reefs.

  2. Evaluation of insecticide impregnated baits for control of mosquito larvae in land crab burrows on French Polynesian atolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, Frederic; Sechan, Yves; Faaruia, Marc

    2002-07-01

    Land crab burrows are larval mosquito habitats of major significance in the Pacific region. They are constituted by a sinuous tunnel leading to a chamber in contact with the water table, where mosquito larvae proliferate. Controlling larvae in these sites is difficult, because the configuration of burrows prevents the use of standard techniques. An experiment was carried out in French Polynesia to control Aedes polynesiensis Marks and Culex spp. breeding in burrows of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex (Herbst). The technique was based on the crab's behavior, which involves the crab carrying food into its burrow. It was shown that appetizing baits impregnated with an insecticide were carried by crabs into the flooded chamber of their burrows. A field treatment of burrows was carried out by sowing insecticide impregnated baits on the ground. The treatment coverage was almost perfect and the easy implementation of the technique enabled large areas to be treated in a short time. The bait was developed by compacting various flours, which easily incorporate a large variety of insecticide formulations. Although the baits can be easily stocked, a reliable insecticide is still to be found. The results indicate that our technique could be a method of choice for treating crab burrows.

  3. The shark assemblage at French Frigate Shoals atoll, Hawai'i: species composition, abundance and habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jonathan J; Stankus, Austin M; Burns, Michael S; Meyer, Carl G

    2011-02-10

    Empirical data on the abundance and habitat preferences of coral reef top predators are needed to evaluate their ecological impacts and guide management decisions. We used longline surveys to quantify the shark assemblage at French Frigate Shoals (FFS) atoll from May to August 2009. Fishing effort consisted of 189 longline sets totaling 6,862 hook hours of soak time. A total of 221 sharks from 7 species were captured, among which Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis, 36.2%), gray reef (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, 25.8%) and tiger (Galeocerdo cuvier, 20.4%) sharks were numerically dominant. A lack of blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) distinguished the FFS shark assemblage from those at many other atolls in the Indo-Pacific. Compared to prior underwater visual survey estimates, longline methods more accurately represented species abundance and composition for the majority of shark species. Sharks were significantly less abundant in the shallow lagoon than adjacent habitats. Recaptures of Galapagos sharks provided the first empirical estimate of population size for any Galapagos shark population. The overall recapture rate was 5.4%. Multiple closed population models were evaluated, with Chao M(h) ranking best in model performance and yielding a population estimate of 668 sharks with 95% confidence intervals ranging from 289-1720. Low shark abundance in the shallow lagoon habitats suggests removal of a small number of sharks from the immediate vicinity of lagoonal islets may reduce short-term predation on endangered monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi) pups, but considerable fishing effort would be required to catch even a small number of sharks. Additional data on long-term movements and habitat use of sharks at FFS are required to better assess the likely ecological impacts of shark culling.

  4. The shark assemblage at French Frigate Shoals atoll, Hawai'i: species composition, abundance and habitat use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Dale

    Full Text Available Empirical data on the abundance and habitat preferences of coral reef top predators are needed to evaluate their ecological impacts and guide management decisions. We used longline surveys to quantify the shark assemblage at French Frigate Shoals (FFS atoll from May to August 2009. Fishing effort consisted of 189 longline sets totaling 6,862 hook hours of soak time. A total of 221 sharks from 7 species were captured, among which Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis, 36.2%, gray reef (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, 25.8% and tiger (Galeocerdo cuvier, 20.4% sharks were numerically dominant. A lack of blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus distinguished the FFS shark assemblage from those at many other atolls in the Indo-Pacific. Compared to prior underwater visual survey estimates, longline methods more accurately represented species abundance and composition for the majority of shark species. Sharks were significantly less abundant in the shallow lagoon than adjacent habitats. Recaptures of Galapagos sharks provided the first empirical estimate of population size for any Galapagos shark population. The overall recapture rate was 5.4%. Multiple closed population models were evaluated, with Chao M(h ranking best in model performance and yielding a population estimate of 668 sharks with 95% confidence intervals ranging from 289-1720. Low shark abundance in the shallow lagoon habitats suggests removal of a small number of sharks from the immediate vicinity of lagoonal islets may reduce short-term predation on endangered monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi pups, but considerable fishing effort would be required to catch even a small number of sharks. Additional data on long-term movements and habitat use of sharks at FFS are required to better assess the likely ecological impacts of shark culling.

  5. Evolution of caesium 137 levels in coconut water and copra in french Polynesia, since 1967. Evolution de la teneur en cesium 137 depuis 1967 dans l'eau de coco et le coprah en Polynesie francaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabis de Saint-Chamas, L.; Bablet, J.P.; Ducousso, R. (Service mixte de controle biologique, 91 - Montlhery (FR)); Arnould, C. (Laboratoire d' etude et de surveillance de l' environnement, Papeete (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear experiments have been carried out by France in french Polynesia since 1966. The tests were first atmospheric, they have been underground since 1975. The experiment monitoring programme includes monitoring of {sup 137}Cs contents in coconuts from the whole french polynesian territory. The methodology is described and the results of the 2 589 samples collected for 1967 to 1988 are presented. The maximum content found since 1967 is 52 Bq.kg{sup -1} for coconut water and 289 Bq.kg{sup -1} for coconut copra. The decrease of {sup 137}Cs content is constant without discontinuity, whatever the distance from the explosion sites. The committed dose equivalent from {sup 137}Cs delivered by coconut water and copra consumption represents only a few microsieverts a year.

  6. 2D and 3D rockfall simulations of a real-size experiment on weathered volcanic hillslopes in Tahiti, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathon, Christian; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Sedan, Olivier; Nachbaur, Aude; Dewez, Thomas; Berger, Frédéric; Des Garets, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The Land Planning Authority of French Polynesia contracted BRGM to run a real-size rockfall experiment, called OFAI, in September 2009. The purposes of the experiments are two fold : first observe real-size rock trajectories in a context of variably weathered volcanic rock slopes; and second, use observed rockfall trajectories to calibrate block propagation models. 90 basalt blocks were dropped down a 150-m-long slope made of hard basalt veins, lenses of colluvium and erosion channels covered in blocks of various sizes. Parameters of the experiment concerned the shape (from nearly perfect sphere to elongated cubes) and mass of the blocks (from 300 kg to >5000 kg), and the launching point, in order to bounce the blocks both off stiff basalt veins and colluvium lenses. The data obtained from this real-size experiment were analyzed using two rockfall simulation models: a 2D model developed by the University of British Columbia, the Geological Survey of Canada and BRGM, and a 3D model which was developed from the 2D model, with the purpose of integrating the lateral dispersion of rockfalls. Both models are characterized by a 'hybrid approach' with a lumped mass assumption, taking indirectly the shape and rotational momentum of the block into account. Bouncing is simulated using soil restitution coefficients and plastic impact model (Falcetta, 1985). The input data are defined by probability density functions, thus allowing for both deterministic and probabilistic analysis. Usually calibrated with rare and punctual rockfall events, this recent experiment gave us a complete inventory of real 3D trajectories, associated with precise descriptions of the blocks (mass, shape) and accurate geomorphological characteristics of the impact points, so as to assess the performance of both models. The aims of the simulations were (i) comparing real trajectories to the simulated ones and evaluating their reliabilities (ii) calibrating material parameters for weathered volcanic

  7. French nuclear tests in Polynesia: requirement of truth and proposals for future; Essais nucleaires francais en Polynesie: exigence de verite et propositions pour l'avenir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrillot, B.; Taroanui Doom, J

    1999-02-15

    The nuclear experimentations realised by France in Polynesia from 1966 to 1996 have constituted a real economical, social, political, ecological and sanitary trauma for the populations of this far territory. The requirements and propositions elaborated during the colloquium of the 20. february 1999 are summarized in this work. (N.C.)

  8. The struggle of the veterans of the French nuclear tests; La lutte des veterans des essais nucleaires francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The question debated in this article concerns the demand of compensation and recognition of the impact on their health of nuclear tests. The military personnel that worked during nuclear tests in French Polynesia and the Sahara sites, but also the inhabitants of the atolls of Moruroa and Fangataufa equally in French Polynesia. An observatory of the veterans health has been created in order to improve the medical management of military personnel and former military personnel. An association 'Moruroa e tatou' contains the Polynesian former workers of the Nuclear tests of the Pacific and the association A.V.E.N. contains the veterans of nuclear tests. numerous examples are detailed. The question is tackled too for the consequences on health of the British nuclear tests, in Australia, Christmas Islands, and New Zealand. (N.C.)

  9. Bill proposition adopted by the Senate, related to the follow-up of environmental consequences of French nuclear tests in French Polynesia, transmitted by the Senate President to the National Assembly President - Nr 4192; Proposition de loi adoptee par le senat, relative au suivi des consequences environnementales des essais nucleaires francais en Polynesie francaise, transmise par M. le president du senat a M. le president de l'assemblee nationale - No. 4192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-18

    This bill project evokes the status of the Moruroa and Fangatufa atolls when French nuclear tests took place, their current environmental restoration, the radiation protection measures, the cooperation modalities between the French State and the local communities, the role of the French Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety, the existence of intervention plans, the creation of a commission for the follow-up of environmental consequences and the role and composition of this commission

  10. Revisiting wild stocks of black lip oyster Pinctada margaritifera in the Tuamotu Archipelago: The case of Ahe and Takaroa atolls and implications for the cultured pearl industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréfouët, Serge; Thomas, Yoann; Dumas, Franck; Lo, Cédrik

    2016-12-01

    Spat collecting of the black lip oyster (Pinctada margaritifera) is the foundation of cultured black pearl production, the second source of income for French Polynesia. To understand spat collecting temporal and spatial variations, larval supply and its origin need to be characterized. To achieve this, it is necessary to account for the stock of oysters, its distribution and population characteristics (size distribution, sex-ratio). While the farmed stock in concessions can be easily characterized, the wild stock is elusive. Here, we investigate the distribution and population structure of the wild stock of Ahe and Takaroa atolls using fine-scale bathymetry and in situ census data. Stocks were surprisingly low (∼666,000 and ∼1,030,000 oysters for Ahe and Takaroa respectively) considering these two atolls have both been very successful spat collecting atolls in the past. Furthermore, in Ahe atoll, wild populations are aging with a dominant but small female population. Comparison with the cultured stock population (∼14 millions oysters) and its dominant young male population suggests that to maximize larval supply and spat collecting on the long term, it would be useful to increase the number of females in selected sanctuaries. We discuss the implication of our findings for the long-term management of stocks and for spat collection in pearl farming atolls, and for on-going numerical modelling studies on larval dispersal.

  11. Transgender in Polynesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besnier, N.; Whelehan, P.; Bolin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Most societies of Polynesia include a small minority of nonnormatively gendered people. These are highly effeminate men and masculine women, whose gendering also implies an erotic attraction to persons of the same sex who are normatively gendered. The gender crossing that transgender Polynesians exh

  12. Archaeoastronomy in Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Polynesia represents a cultural context where astronomy is deeply embedded, both because of its importance in ocean voyaging and because of its role in the ritual-calendrical cycle that was carried from ancestral homelands in the central Pacific out to islands scattered over many thousands of kilometers. Cultural astronomy has a significant role to play in addressing some of the "big questions" of Polynesian cultural development, such as how and why Polynesian society developed in particular ways in each different island environment. Temple sites in the form of platforms and enclosures are ubiquitous throughout Polynesia, and have formed a natural focus for many archaeoastronomical investigations. The gradual contextualization of archaeoastronomy in Polynesia since the 1960s, but especially since the 1990s, has engendered a "paradigm shift" away from hunting for solstitial and equinoctial alignments toward investigations better attuned to the ethnohistory, which highlights the importance of the lunar calendar and regulation of the two main seasons using the Pleiades. On the other hand, recent work in Mangareva, integrating archaeological, archaeoastronomical, and ethnohistoric evidence, has served to highlight the importance of solstitial observations, at least in one corner of Polynesia. A key issue for the future is to distinguish between alignments upon the June solstice sun and the Pleiades, both of which represent important developmental strands.

  13. Transgender in Polynesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besnier, N.; Whelehan, P.; Bolin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Most societies of Polynesia include a small minority of nonnormatively gendered people. These are highly effeminate men and masculine women, whose gendering also implies an erotic attraction to persons of the same sex who are normatively gendered. The gender crossing that transgender Polynesians exh

  14. The importance of standardization for biodiversity comparisons: A case study using autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS) and metabarcoding to measure cryptic diversity on Mo'orea coral reefs, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransome, Emma; Geller, Jonathan B; Timmers, Molly; Leray, Matthieu; Mahardini, Angka; Sembiring, Andrianus; Collins, Allen G; Meyer, Christopher P

    2017-01-01

    The advancement of metabarcoding techniques, declining costs of high-throughput sequencing and development of systematic sampling devices, such as autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS), have provided the means to gather a vast amount of diversity data from cryptic marine communities. However, such increased capability could also lead to analytical challenges if the methods used to examine these communities across local and global scales are not standardized. Here we compare and assess the underlying biases of four ARMS field processing methods, preservation media, and current bioinformatic pipelines in evaluating diversity from cytochrome c oxidase I metabarcoding data. Illustrating the ability of ARMS-based metabarcoding to capture a wide spectrum of biodiversity, 3,372 OTUs and twenty-eight phyla, including 17 of 33 marine metazoan phyla, were detected from 3 ARMS (2.607 m2 area) collected on coral reefs in Mo'orea, French Polynesia. Significant differences were found between processing and preservation methods, demonstrating the need to standardize methods for biodiversity comparisons. We recommend the use of a standardized protocol (NOAA method) combined with DMSO preservation of tissues for sessile macroorganisms because it gave a more accurate representation of the underlying communities, is cost effective and removes chemical restrictions associated with sample transportation. We found that sequences identified at ≥ 97% similarity increased more than 7-fold (5.1% to 38.6%) using a geographically local barcode inventory, highlighting the importance of local species inventories. Phylogenetic approaches that assign higher taxonomic ranks accrued phylum identification errors (9.7%) due to sparse taxonomic coverage of the understudied cryptic coral reef community in public databases. However, a ≥ 85% sequence identity cut-off provided more accurate results (0.7% errors) and enabled phylum level identifications of 86.3% of the sequence reads. With over

  15. The importance of standardization for biodiversity comparisons: A case study using autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS) and metabarcoding to measure cryptic diversity on Mo’orea coral reefs, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Jonathan B.; Timmers, Molly; Leray, Matthieu; Mahardini, Angka; Sembiring, Andrianus; Collins, Allen G.; Meyer, Christopher P.

    2017-01-01

    The advancement of metabarcoding techniques, declining costs of high-throughput sequencing and development of systematic sampling devices, such as autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS), have provided the means to gather a vast amount of diversity data from cryptic marine communities. However, such increased capability could also lead to analytical challenges if the methods used to examine these communities across local and global scales are not standardized. Here we compare and assess the underlying biases of four ARMS field processing methods, preservation media, and current bioinformatic pipelines in evaluating diversity from cytochrome c oxidase I metabarcoding data. Illustrating the ability of ARMS-based metabarcoding to capture a wide spectrum of biodiversity, 3,372 OTUs and twenty-eight phyla, including 17 of 33 marine metazoan phyla, were detected from 3 ARMS (2.607 m2 area) collected on coral reefs in Mo’orea, French Polynesia. Significant differences were found between processing and preservation methods, demonstrating the need to standardize methods for biodiversity comparisons. We recommend the use of a standardized protocol (NOAA method) combined with DMSO preservation of tissues for sessile macroorganisms because it gave a more accurate representation of the underlying communities, is cost effective and removes chemical restrictions associated with sample transportation. We found that sequences identified at ≥ 97% similarity increased more than 7-fold (5.1% to 38.6%) using a geographically local barcode inventory, highlighting the importance of local species inventories. Phylogenetic approaches that assign higher taxonomic ranks accrued phylum identification errors (9.7%) due to sparse taxonomic coverage of the understudied cryptic coral reef community in public databases. However, a ≥ 85% sequence identity cut-off provided more accurate results (0.7% errors) and enabled phylum level identifications of 86.3% of the sequence reads. With

  16. Larval dispersal modeling of pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera following realistic environmental and biological forcing in Ahe atoll lagoon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoann Thomas

    Full Text Available Studying the larval dispersal of bottom-dwelling species is necessary to understand their population dynamics and optimize their management. The black-lip pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera is cultured extensively to produce black pearls, especially in French Polynesia's atoll lagoons. This aquaculture relies on spat collection, a process that can be optimized by understanding which factors influence larval dispersal. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of P. margaritifera larval dispersal kernel to both physical and biological factors in the lagoon of Ahe atoll. Specifically, using a validated 3D larval dispersal model, the variability of lagoon-scale connectivity is investigated against wind forcing, depth and location of larval release, destination location, vertical swimming behavior and pelagic larval duration (PLD factors. The potential connectivity was spatially weighted according to both the natural and cultivated broodstock densities to provide a realistic view of connectivity. We found that the mean pattern of potential connectivity was driven by the southwest and northeast main barotropic circulation structures, with high retention levels in both. Destination locations, spawning sites and PLD were the main drivers of potential connectivity, explaining respectively 26%, 59% and 5% of the variance. Differences between potential and realistic connectivity showed the significant contribution of the pearl oyster broodstock location to its own dynamics. Realistic connectivity showed larger larval supply in the western destination locations, which are preferentially used by farmers for spat collection. In addition, larval supply in the same sectors was enhanced during summer wind conditions. These results provide new cues to understanding the dynamics of bottom-dwelling populations in atoll lagoons, and show how to take advantage of numerical models for pearl oyster management.

  17. Larval Dispersal Modeling of Pearl Oyster Pinctada margaritifera following Realistic Environmental and Biological Forcing in Ahe Atoll Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yoann; Dumas, Franck; Andréfouët, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Studying the larval dispersal of bottom-dwelling species is necessary to understand their population dynamics and optimize their management. The black-lip pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera) is cultured extensively to produce black pearls, especially in French Polynesia's atoll lagoons. This aquaculture relies on spat collection, a process that can be optimized by understanding which factors influence larval dispersal. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of P. margaritifera larval dispersal kernel to both physical and biological factors in the lagoon of Ahe atoll. Specifically, using a validated 3D larval dispersal model, the variability of lagoon-scale connectivity is investigated against wind forcing, depth and location of larval release, destination location, vertical swimming behavior and pelagic larval duration (PLD) factors. The potential connectivity was spatially weighted according to both the natural and cultivated broodstock densities to provide a realistic view of connectivity. We found that the mean pattern of potential connectivity was driven by the southwest and northeast main barotropic circulation structures, with high retention levels in both. Destination locations, spawning sites and PLD were the main drivers of potential connectivity, explaining respectively 26%, 59% and 5% of the variance. Differences between potential and realistic connectivity showed the significant contribution of the pearl oyster broodstock location to its own dynamics. Realistic connectivity showed larger larval supply in the western destination locations, which are preferentially used by farmers for spat collection. In addition, larval supply in the same sectors was enhanced during summer wind conditions. These results provide new cues to understanding the dynamics of bottom-dwelling populations in atoll lagoons, and show how to take advantage of numerical models for pearl oyster management. PMID:24740288

  18. More coral, more fish? Contrasting snapshots from a remote Pacific atoll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldade, Ricardo; Mills, Suzanne C; Claudet, Joachim; Côté, Isabelle M

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are in decline across the globe as a result of overexploitation, pollution, disease and, more recently, climate change. The impacts of changes in coral cover on associated fish communities can be difficult to predict because of the uneven dependence of reef fish species on corals for food, shelter or the three-dimensional structure they provide. We compared live coral cover, reef fish community metrics, and their associations in two surveys of the lagoon of the remote atoll of Mataiva (French Polynesia) carried out 31 years apart. In contrast to the general pattern of decreasing coral cover reported for many parts of the Indo-Pacific region, live coral cover increased 6-7 fold at Mataiva between 1981 and 2012, and fish density nearly doubled. The stable overall reef fish species richness belied a significant shift in community structure. There was little overlap in community composition across years, and fish assemblages in 2012 were more homogeneous in composition than they were in 1981. Changes in species abundance were not clearly related to species-specific reliance on corals. The strong positive relationships between live coral cover and fish diversity and abundance noted in 1981, when coral cover rarely exceeded 10%, were no longer present in 2012, when coral cover rarely fell below this value. The most parsimonious explanation for these contrasting relationships is that, over the combined range of coral cover observed in the 1981 and 2012 snapshots, there is a rapidly asymptotic relationship between coral and fish. Our results, and other data from the south and west Pacific, suggest that fish diversity and abundance might accumulate rapidly up to a threshold of approximately 10% live coral cover. Such a relationship would have implications for our expectations of resistance and recovery of reef fish communities facing an increasingly severe regime of coral reef disturbances.

  19. More coral, more fish? Contrasting snapshots from a remote Pacific atoll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Beldade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are in decline across the globe as a result of overexploitation, pollution, disease and, more recently, climate change. The impacts of changes in coral cover on associated fish communities can be difficult to predict because of the uneven dependence of reef fish species on corals for food, shelter or the three-dimensional structure they provide. We compared live coral cover, reef fish community metrics, and their associations in two surveys of the lagoon of the remote atoll of Mataiva (French Polynesia carried out 31 years apart. In contrast to the general pattern of decreasing coral cover reported for many parts of the Indo-Pacific region, live coral cover increased 6–7 fold at Mataiva between 1981 and 2012, and fish density nearly doubled. The stable overall reef fish species richness belied a significant shift in community structure. There was little overlap in community composition across years, and fish assemblages in 2012 were more homogeneous in composition than they were in 1981. Changes in species abundance were not clearly related to species-specific reliance on corals. The strong positive relationships between live coral cover and fish diversity and abundance noted in 1981, when coral cover rarely exceeded 10%, were no longer present in 2012, when coral cover rarely fell below this value. The most parsimonious explanation for these contrasting relationships is that, over the combined range of coral cover observed in the 1981 and 2012 snapshots, there is a rapidly asymptotic relationship between coral and fish. Our results, and other data from the south and west Pacific, suggest that fish diversity and abundance might accumulate rapidly up to a threshold of approximately 10% live coral cover. Such a relationship would have implications for our expectations of resistance and recovery of reef fish communities facing an increasingly severe regime of coral reef disturbances.

  20. Multilingualism and Web Advertising: Addressing French-Speaking Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Drawing inferences from both quantitative and qualitative data, this study examines the extent to which American companies tailor their Web advertising for global audiences with a particular focus on French-speaking consumers in North America, Europe, Africa, the Caribbean and French Polynesia. Explored from a sociolinguistic and social semiotic…

  1. HARP PRIA- Palmyra Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This HARP was first deployed off of Palmyra Atoll in 2006. Recording at this site ended in 2010. The HARP was recovered and redeployed multiple times (see time...

  2. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  3. Control of bancroftian filariasis in an endemic area of Polynesia by ivermectin 400 micrograms/kg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N L; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Cartel, J L

    1996-01-01

    Community treatment with ivermectin was implemented in Opoa, French Polynesia from April 1991 to October 1993. All consenting inhabitants aged 3 years or more were treated with twice-yearly single doses of ivermectin, pregnant women excepted. A dosage of 100 microgram/kg was used for the 3 first treatments and then abandoned because it did not reduce the prevalence of microfilariae (mf) carriers. With a dosage of 400 micrograms/kg dosage, this prevalence decreased dramatically from 21% to 7%, and the mf level in carriers dropped to only 0.5% of its initial value after 3 treatments. The 400 micrograms/kg dosage was well tolerated and compliance was excellent. The twice-yearly single dose strategy with ivermectin at 400 micrograms/kg is safe and highly effective for filariasis control in an endemic area.

  4. Rare-earth elements enrichment of Pacific seafloor sediments: the view from volcanic islands of Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleton, Jérémie; Tuduri, Johann; Pourret, Olivier; Bailly, Laurent; Gisbert, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth elements (REEs) are key metals for «green» technologies such as energy saving lamps or permanent magnets used in, e.g., wind turbines, hard disk drives, portable phone or electric or hybrid vehicles. Since several years, world demand for these metals is therefore drastically increasing. The quasi-monopolistic position of China, which produces around 95 % of global REEs production, generates risks for the industries that depend on a secure supply of REEs. In response, countries are developing and diversifying their supply sources, with new mining projects located outside China and efforts in the area of REEs recycling. Most of these projects focus on deposits related to carbonatites and alkaline-peralkaline magmatism, which are generally enriched in light REEs (LREEs) compared to the heavy REEs (HREEs)-enriched deposits of the ion-adsorption types, located in southern China. However, a recent study revealed new valuable resources corresponding to seafloor sediments located in the south-eastern and north-central Pacific. The deep-sea mud described by these authors show a higher HREE/LREE ratio than ion-adsorption deposits, a feature which significantly increases their economic interest. The authors suggest mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal activity as an explanation to this anomalous enrichment. However, several contributions have documented considerable REEs enrichment in basalts and peridotitic xenoliths from French Polynesia. Several arguments have been exposed in favour of a supergene origin, with a short migration, suggesting that REEs were collected from weathered basalts. The Tahaa volcanic island (Sous-le-Vent Island, Society Archipelago, French Polynesia) is the first location where such enrichment has been described. New petrographic and mineralogical investigations confirm a supergene mobilization of this abnormal occurrence. REE-bearing minerals (mainly phosphates of the rhabdophane group) are primarily located within basalt vesicles but also in

  5. Rose Atoll Coral Monitoring Narrative

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Narrative report summarizes the results of coral monitoring at 11 georeferenced sites at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, undertaken by Dr. James Maragos, USFWS Coral...

  6. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote atoll...

  7. Growing plants on atoll soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L

    2000-02-16

    Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in growing plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to grow both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to grow more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the

  8. Basalt Pb isotope analysis and the prehistoric settlement of Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisler, M I; Woodhead, J D

    1995-03-14

    The prehistoric settlement of the Pacific Ocean has intrigued scholars and stimulated anthropological debate for the past two centuries. Colonized over a few millennia during the mid to late Holocene, the islands of the Pacific--displaying a wide diversity of geological and biotic variability--provided the stage for endless "natural experiments" in human adaptation. Crucial to understanding the evolution and transformation of island societies is documenting the relative degree of interisland contacts after island colonization. In the western Pacific, ideal materials for archaeologically documenting interisland contact--obsidian, pottery, and shell ornaments--are absent or of limited geographic distribution in Polynesia. Consequently, archaeologists have relied increasingly on fine-grained basalt artifacts as a means for documenting colonization routes and subsequent interisland contacts. Routinely used x-ray fluorescence characterization of oceanic island basalt has some problems for discriminating source rocks and artifacts in provenance studies. The variation in trace and major element abundances is largely controlled by near-surface magma-chamber processes and is broadly similar between most oceanic islands. We demonstrate that Pb isotope analysis accurately discriminates rock source and is an excellent technique for charting the scale, frequency, and temporal span of imported fine-grained basalt artifacts found throughout Polynesia. The technique adds another tool for addressing evolutionary models of interaction, isolation, and cultural divergence in the eastern Pacific.

  9. Cleanup, Rehabilitation, Resettlement of Enewetak Atoll - Marshall Islands. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    required to resettle the Enewetak people in the Atoll after 25-30 years of absence. During the post World War II period, the Atoll was used as a...The intent of the project is to remove or reduce those existing conditions which would be a bar to safe habitation of the Atoll and to return the Enewetak people to the Atoll ....inhabitants from the Atoll , the creation of hazards, both physical and radiological, and the consequent loss of much of the productive capacity of the Atoll

  10. Johnston Atoll - Eradication of Yellow Crazy Ants

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — While on a research and monitoring cruise that visited Johnston Atoll in late January 2010, USFWS employees found an infestation of Anoplolepis gracilipes, or yellow...

  11. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Wake Atoll in October...

  12. Rose Atoll - Eradication of Invasive Ants

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — There are at least 9 species of ants introduced to Rose Atoll, including species that tend to scale insects that are devastating the Pisonia grandis trees on the 15...

  13. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Species Management 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We initiated management of 3 species of plants that are introduced and invasive at Palmyra Atoll NWR. The work consisted of describing the distributions of these...

  14. Rose Atoll 1993 Shipwreck Restoration Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summarizes efforts undertaken to remove grounded shipwreck at Rose Atoll and monitor impacts to community composition between 1993 and 2012.

  15. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Johnston Atoll 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 17 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  16. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Wake Atoll in April...

  17. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Palmyra Atoll 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 13 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the...

  18. Learning and training. Education in eighteenth-century traditional Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri J.M. Claessen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article some methods and types of education in traditional Polynesia will be presented. The emphasis will fall on the second half of the eighteenth century. This period has been selected for on the one hand it covers the final years of the Polynesian culture before it was deeply influenced by good intended efforts of missionaries and administrators who tried to erase heathen customs and introduce dresses, and introducing reading and writing and the negative forces of traders, whalers and colonizers, who came to the islands to relax after arduous travels, and to buy cheap goods and food. On the other hand many voyagers, missionaries, administrators and traders left us in their logs and journals detailed descriptions of the islanders and their cultures as they had seen them and tried to understand them. These publications will be considered here as ‘sources’.

  19. French Foodscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Liselotte

    With the concept foodscapes as a point of departure, this paper explores the fundamental notions and the history of the traditional French cuisine in order to gain understanding of the ostensible rootedness of tradition in the modern French landscape of food and eating habits Concerned voices about...... By exploring how local and regional products and uses of food interact with the changes in the French cuisine over time, this paper seeks to retrace the history of the French meal through meanings of place and time, terroir and savoir-faire. The study will be based on sources from early modern/modern history...

  20. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote atoll...

  1. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote atoll...

  2. Palmyra Atoll - Invasive Plant Management: Eradicate/Control 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Remote atoll ecosystems are havens of biological diversity, but vulnerable to ecological invasion. The prosperity of the plants and animals that inhabit remote atoll...

  3. Aliens in Paradise. Boat density and exotic coastal mollusks in Moorea Island (French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardura, Alba; Planes, Serge; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Pacific islands are particularly vulnerable to the effects of invasive species. After habitat destruction or modification, invasive species are responsible for more biological extinctions than any other cause. Further, the rate of extinction of native species has been higher on islands than anywhere else in the world. Invasive species have also degraded native ecosystems. In order to detect exotic intertidal mollusk species, an extensive sampling around Moorea Island, a more or less unspoiled island surrounded by a rich coral reef habitat, has been developed considering that sampled points have different characteristics in wave exposure, algae coverage, type of substrate, distance to ports, distance to freshwater, distance sewage and boat traffic. Samples were DNA barcoded for unequivocal species assignation. The presence of five NIS among 26 species seems an important signal of introduction of alien biota in Moorea Island coast. However they were represented by a total of 38 individuals among 1487 mollusks (2.55%). While the distance to relatively big ports influenced directly species richness, the intensity of maritime traffic measured as boat density near sampling points was significantly associated with the frequency of exotic species. Other environmental factors did not show significant correlation with the frequency of exotics, suggesting that in an environment without big discontinuities, with little habitat modification, local boat traffic is the most influential factor in the spread of exotic species. This could be mitigated relatively easily by reducing boat density in local zones of ecological interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electromagnetic evidence for volatile-rich upwelling beneath the society hotspot, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Noriko; Tarits, Pascal; Baba, Kiyoshi; Utada, Hisashi; Kasaya, Takafumi; Suetsugu, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted a seafloor magnetotelluric survey that images, for the first time, three-dimensional electrical conductivity structure in the upper mantle beneath the Society hotspot. A striking feature in our model is a high-conductivity anomaly a few hundred kilometers in diameter, which is continuous from the lowest part of the upper mantle to a depth of approximately 50 km below sea level. Using theoretical and experimental results from mineral physics, we interpret the high-conductivity anomaly as evidence of the melt fraction up to 2.2 vol.%, which is robust regardless of assumed temperature, and the existence of carbonated silicate melt beneath the hotspot. Our results suggest that the Society hotspot is a pathway for ascending volatiles from the deeper part of the upper mantle to the surface.

  5. Modeling the erosion of tropical volcanic ocean islands : The Tahiti island case (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, F.; Sichoix, L.; Barriot, J.; Dumas, P.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we are interested in modeling the erosion of the Tahiti island, with two main objectives: risk assessment (erodibility of terrains with rainfall, catastrophic runoffs) and estimation of subsidence rate. The Tahiti island created around 1.4 Myears ago by an intraplate hotspot (aerial radiometric dating), is divided into two geological units: the main island Tahiti-Nui to northwest (end of volcanism 200,000 years ago) and the subsidiary Tahiti-Iti to the southeast (end of volcanism 380,000 years ago). It is now volcanically inactive and is deeply dissected by erosion. Tahiti Nui is around 30 km in diameter, and Tahiti Iti around 15 km. Both are linked through the isthmus of Taravao. The highest elevation is 2241 m. The two sub-islands are basaltic edifices, with an overwhelming presence of oxisols (down to tens of meters in some places). Slopes can be divided into three classes: 15° for the global slope of the shield volcanoes, 47° for the incision valleys and 2° for the seashore rim. Rainfalls range from 8,000 mm/year on the East side of Tahiti (trade winds) to 2,000 mm/year on the West side, the humid season of a year is summer. This study is conducted to validate the Unit Stream Power Erosion and Deposition (USPED) model, an enrichment to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to calculate average annual soil loss per unit land area resulting from rill and sheet erosion. The USPED model differs from other USLE models on how it handles the influence of topography on the erosion process, because USLE consider erosion only along the flow line without the influence of flow convergence/divergence. As the result, the USPED model predicts both erosion and deposition, while most other USLE-based models are limited to predictions of erosion only. The USLE, USPED equation can be written as A=R*K*LS*C*P where A is the soil loss, R the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor, K a soil erodibility factor, L a slope-length factor, S a slope steepness factor, C a cover-management factor and P a supporting practice factor. However, USPED adds a dimensionless index of sediment transport capacity and a topographic index, representing the change in transport capacity in the flow direction, to estimate the spatial distribution of both erosion and deposition. As an application, we show how this approach permits a better modeling of the soil losses in Tahiti with respect to the basic USLE-only approach, with both societal and risk-assessment benefits. Keywords: erosion, volcano, modeling, USLE, USPED

  6. Oxalis simplicifolia (Oxalidaceae, an unusual new unifoliolate species from the Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lorence

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxalis simplicifolia Lorence & W. L. Wagner sp. nov., a new species from the Marquesas Islands (Ua Huka is described and illustrated. It differs from the other Marquesas species, O. gagneorum, insimple, unifoliolate glabrous leaves, minutely glandular-puberulent calyx lobes, shorter corolla lobes, erect capsules, and smaller seeds. As its habitat is under serious threat from human impact, feral animals, and weeds, we concluded this new species should be added to the IUCN Red List as critically endangered (CR.

  7. Oxalis simplicifolia (Oxalidaceae), an unusual new unifoliolate species from the Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia)

    OpenAIRE

    David Lorence; Warren Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Oxalis simplicifolia Lorence & W. L. Wagner sp. nov., a new species from the Marquesas Islands (Ua Huka) is described and illustrated. It differs from the other Marquesas species, Oxalis gagneorum , in having simple, unifoliolate glabrous leaves, minutely glandular-puberulent calyx lobes, shorter corolla lobes, erect capsules, and smaller seeds. As its habitat is under serious threat from human impact, feral animals, and weeds, we conclude this new species should be added to the IUCN...

  8. French Foodscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Liselotte

    With the concept foodscapes as a point of departure, this paper explores the fundamental notions and the history of the traditional French cuisine in order to gain understanding of the ostensible rootedness of tradition in the modern French landscape of food and eating habits Concerned voices about...

  9. French Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.

  10. Resettlement of Bikini Atoll U.S. Nuclear Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.; Stoker, A.C.; Hamilton, T.F.

    1999-09-09

    The US conducted a nuclear testing program at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands from 1946 through 1958. Several atolls, including Bikini, were contaminated as a result of the nuclear detonations. Since 1974 the authors have conducted an extensive research and monitoring program to determine the radiological conditions at the atolls, identify the critical radionuclides and pathways, estimate the radiological dose to current or resettling populations, and develop remedial measures to reduce the dose to atoll populations. This paper describes exposure pathways and radionuclides; composition of atoll soils; radionuclide transport and dose estimates; remedial measures; and reduction in dose from a combined option.

  11. French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place: from 13 October to 19 December 2003. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Language Training Françoise Benz Tel.73127 language.training@cern.ch

  12. Migration from atolls as climate change adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Thomas Ladegaard Kümmel; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive strategies are important for reducing the vulnerability of atoll communities to climate change and sea level rise in both the short and long term. This paper seeks to contribute to the emerging discourse on migration as a form of adaptation to climate change based on empirical studies...... in the two atoll communities, Reef Islands and Ontong Java, which are located in the periphery of Solomon Islands. The paper will outline current migration patterns in the two island groups and discuss how some of this migration may contribute to adaptation to climate change and other stresses. It shows...... in adaptation to climate change in exposed atoll communities, addressing some of the barriers to migration seems logical. This may be done by efforts to stimulate migrant income opportunities, by improving migrant living conditions and by improving the transport services to the islands....

  13. Current radiological status of Utirik Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W L

    1998-08-01

    A preliminary radiological survey was conducted at Utirik Atoll in 1978 as part of the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS). A dose assessment based on these limited data indicated a relatively low dose of about 0.12 mSv to people living on Utirik in 1978 (Robison et al., 1982). A much more detailed radiological survey was conducted in April of both 1993 and 1994. Aerial photos of the islands of Utirik Atoll were taken as part of the 1978 NMIRS. The sampling grids for the 1993 and 1994 surveys are shown overlaid on these aerial photos in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. External gamma measurements and a collection of either drinking coconuts or copra coconuts were made at each location. Pandanus, breadfruit, lime, and banana were collected where available. Ground water was collected in 1993/94 from four wells on Utirik Island and two wells on Aon Island. Surface soil and soil profiles were collected at some of the grid points on each of the islands at the atoll in 1993/94. A comparison of the number of samples collected in 1978 and 1993/94 are shown in Table 1. A detailed listing of the samples collected in the 1993/94 radiological survey at Utirik Atoll is given in Table 2. The number of vegetation samples collected in 1993/94 is nearly a factor of 7 greater than in 1978. Soil samples collected in 1993/94 exceeded the number collected in 1978 by more than a factor of 4. Consequently, extensive data are now available for the islands at Utirik Atoll and form the basis for the current dose assessment for the atoll.

  14. French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.   Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012.   Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to ...

  15. French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July...

  16. Terrestrial forest management plan for Palmyra Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Stacie A.; McEachern, Kathryn; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    This 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Palmyra Program to refine and expand goals and objectives developed through the Conservation Action Plan process. It is one in a series of adaptive management plans designed to achieve TNC's mission toward the protection and enhancement of native wildlife and habitat. The 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' focuses on ecosystem integrity and specifically identifies and addresses issues related to assessing the status and distribution of resources, as well as the pressures acting upon them, most specifically nonnative and potentially invasive species. The plan, which presents strategies for increasing ecosystem integrity, provides a framework to implement and track the progress of conservation and restoration goals related to terrestrial resources on Palmyra Atoll. The report in its present form is intended to be an overview of what is known about historical and current forest resources; it is not an exhaustive review of all available literature relevant to forest management but an attempt to assemble as much information specific to Palmyra Atoll as possible. Palmyra Atoll is one of the Northern Line Islands in the Pacific Ocean southwest of the Hawai`ian Islands. It consists of many heavily vegetated islets arranged in a horseshoe pattern around four lagoons and surrounded by a coral reef. The terrestrial ecosystem consists of three primary native vegetation types: Pisonia grandis forest, coastal strand forest, and grassland. Among these vegetation types, the health and extent of Pisonia grandis forest is of particular concern. Overall, the three vegetation types support 25 native plant species (two of which may be extirpated), 14 species of sea birds, six shore birds, at least one native reptile, at least seven native insects, and six native land crabs. Green and hawksbill turtles forage at Palmyra Atoll

  17. Access French

    CERN Document Server

    Grosz, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Access is the major new language series designed with the needs of today's generation of students firmly in mind. Whether learning for leisure or business purposes or working towards a curriculum qualification, Access French is specially designed for adults of all ages and gives students a thorough grounding in all the skills required to understand, speak, read and write contemporary French from scratch. The coursebook consists of 10 units covering different topic areas, each of which includes Language Focus panels explaining the structures covered and a comprehensive glossary. Learning tips

  18. Ascidians from Rocas Atoll, northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Vieira Paiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rocas Atoll is the only one of its kind in the South Atlantic—and the first Brazilian marine biological reserve. This is the first report about the ascidians from Rocas. A total of 12 species were found, 5 of them not hitherto described: Ascidia viridina sp. nov., Didemnum rochai sp. nov., Leptoclinides crocotulus sp. nov., Polysyncraton maurizeliae sp. nov., and Trididemnum rocasensis sp. nov.. One Caribbean species, Didemnum halimedae, was also discovered in the region for the first time. Further, this is the first record of Didemnum digestum in the Atlantic. The results indicate a high degree of endemism in the ascidian fauna from Rocas Atoll, where didemnids are presently the most important members.

  19. An Ecological Assessment of Johnston Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Amsterdam. Fleet, R.R. 1974. The red-tailed tropicbird of Kure Atoll. Ornithological Monogr. No. 16. American Ornithol. Union, Lawrence, KS...resources (M. L. Reaka-Kudla, D. E. Wilson , and E.O. Wilson , Eds.). Joseph Henry Press, Washington, DC. Tyler, W. B. 1991. A tropical seabird nesting at a...detection and the application of a closed-circuit rebreather for field study. Marine Technology Society Journal 35(2)19-28. 2002 Lobel, P. S

  20. French Customs

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Please note that the French Customs (initially located in Building 904, Prévessin) are now located in Ferney-Voltaire (FR): Mrs Catherine NEUVILLE Douane de Ferney-Voltaire Rue de Genève F – 01210 Ferney-Voltaire Phone : 33 4 50 40 51 42 Email : catherine.neuville@douane.finances.gouv.fr Tom Wegelius Tel: 79947 Logistics and Site Services

  1. French visas

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (hereinafter "MAE") has informed CERN of the following new regulations governing the visas required when submitting requests for French legitimation documents (cf. in particular paragraph b) below concerning the facilities recently granted to certain categories of persons who are not nationals of Switzerland or of a member state of the European Economic Area). This notification replaces that which appeared in Bulletin No.19/2006 (ref. CERN/DSU-DO/RH/13173/Rev.). 1. Special residence permit ("Titre de séjour special") To qualify for a special residence permit from the MAE, persons who are not nationals of Switzerland or of a member state of the European Economic Area (hereinafter "EEA") must present the following upon arrival at CERN: a)\teither a “D”-type (long-stay) French visa marked “carte PROMAE à solliciter à l’arrivée”, even if they are not subject to the requirement to obtain an entrance and short-stay visa in France...

  2. Potential impact of sea level rise on French islands worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Bellard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although sea level rise is one of the most certain consequences of global warming, yet it remains one of the least studied. Several studies strongly suggested that sea level rise will accelerate in the future with a potentially rise from 0.5 to 2 m at the end of the century. However, currently island conservation programs do not take into account the potential effects of sea level rise. Therefore, we investigated the potential consequences of sea level rise for 1,269 French islands worldwide, by assessing the total number of island that will be totally submerged for three different scenarios (1, 2 and 3 m. Under the worst scenario, up to 12% of all islands could be entirely submerged. Two regions displayed the most significant loss of island: New Caledonia and French Polynesia. Focusing on New Caledonia, we highlighted that endemic plant species that are already classified as critically endangered by the IUCN will be the most vulnerable to sea level rise. Losses of insular habitats will thus be important in the next decades for the French islands. Given that French islands covers all latitudes in the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic oceans and in the Mediterranean, our results suggested that the implications for the 180 000 islands around the world should be considerable. Therefore, decision makers are required to define island conservation priorities that will suffer of the future sea level rise.

  3. Vector Competence of French Polynesian Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis for Zika Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaea Richard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2013-2014, French Polynesia experienced for the first time a Zika outbreak. Two Aedes mosquitoes may have contributed to Zika virus (ZIKV transmission in French Polynesia: the worldwide distributed Ae. aegypti and the Polynesian islands-endemic Ae. polynesiensis mosquito.To evaluate their vector competence for ZIKV, mosquitoes were infected per os at viral titers of 7 logs tissue culture infectious dose 50%. At several days post-infection (dpi, saliva was collected from each mosquito and inoculated onto C6/36 mosquito cells to check for the presence of ZIKV infectious particles. Legs and body of each mosquito were also collected and submitted separately to RNA extraction and ZIKV RT-PCR. In Ae. aegypti the infection rate was high as early as 6 dpi and the dissemination efficiency get substantial from 9 dpi while the both rates remained quite low in Ae. polynesiensis. The transmission efficiency was poor in Ae. aegypti until 14 dpi and no infectious saliva was found in Ae. polynesiensis at the time points studied.In our experimental conditions, the late ability of the French Polynesian Ae. aegypti to transmit ZIKV added by the poor competence of Ae. polynesiensis for this virus suggest the possible contribution of another vector for the propagation of ZIKV during the outbreak, in particular in remote islands where Ae. polynesiensis is predominating.

  4. Vector Competence of French Polynesian Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis for Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Vaea; Paoaafaite, Tuterarii; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2013–2014, French Polynesia experienced for the first time a Zika outbreak. Two Aedes mosquitoes may have contributed to Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission in French Polynesia: the worldwide distributed Ae. aegypti and the Polynesian islands-endemic Ae. polynesiensis mosquito. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate their vector competence for ZIKV, mosquitoes were infected per os at viral titers of 7 logs tissue culture infectious dose 50%. At several days post-infection (dpi), saliva was collected from each mosquito and inoculated onto C6/36 mosquito cells to check for the presence of ZIKV infectious particles. Legs and body of each mosquito were also collected and submitted separately to RNA extraction and ZIKV RT-PCR. In Ae. aegypti the infection rate was high as early as 6 dpi and the dissemination efficiency get substantial from 9 dpi while the both rates remained quite low in Ae. polynesiensis. The transmission efficiency was poor in Ae. aegypti until 14 dpi and no infectious saliva was found in Ae. polynesiensis at the time points studied. Conclusions/Significance In our experimental conditions, the late ability of the French Polynesian Ae. aegypti to transmit ZIKV added by the poor competence of Ae. polynesiensis for this virus suggest the possible contribution of another vector for the propagation of ZIKV during the outbreak, in particular in remote islands where Ae. polynesiensis is predominating. PMID:27654962

  5. French slanguage

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With this fun visual guide, simply follow the illustrated prompts and read the English words out loud: soon you'll be speaking French! Ask how someone is doing: "Comet Haley View" or say thank you very much: "Mare See Bow Cool." The simple icons are easy to follow and this pocket-sized guide is easy to carry with you. It will give you the basic phrases you need to get around while traveling, whether asking directions, ordering food at a restaurant, or shopping. But most of all, it's just plain fun!

  6. French training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For further information and registration, please consu...

  7. Cenozoic sea level and the rise of modern rimmed atolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Michael; Ashton, Andrew; Raymo, Maureen E.; Perron, J. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Sea-level records from atolls, potentially spanning the Cenozoic, have been largely overlooked, in part because the processes that control atoll form (reef accretion, carbonate dissolution, sediment transport, vertical motion) are complex and, for many islands, unconstrained on million-year timescales. Here we combine existing observations of atoll morphology and corelog stratigraphy from Enewetak Atoll with a numerical model to (1) constrain the relative rates of subsidence, dissolution and sedimentation that have shaped modern Pacific atolls and (2) construct a record of sea level over the past 8.5 million years. Both the stratigraphy from Enewetak Atoll (constrained by a subsidence rate of ~ 20 m/Myr) and our numerical modeling results suggest that low sea levels (50–125 m below present), and presumably bi-polar glaciations, occurred throughout much of the late Miocene, preceding the warmer climate of the Pliocene, when sea level was higher than present. Carbonate dissolution through the subsequent sea-level fall that accompanied the onset of large glacial cycles in the late Pliocene, along with rapid highstand constructional reef growth, likely drove development of the rimmed atoll morphology we see today.

  8. French Teaching Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Dale

    Supplementary teaching materials for French language programs are presented in this text. Primarily intended for secondary school students, the study contains seven units of material. They include: (1) French gestures, (2) teaching the interrogative pronouns, (3) French cuisine, (4) recreational learning games, (5) French-English cognates, (6)…

  9. What are become Moruroa and Fangataufa? The dismantling of tests sites did not happen; Que sont devenus Moruroa et Fangataufa? le demantelement des sites d'essais n'a pas eu lieu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Officially, the nuclear test sites of French polynesia have been dismantled. It would be more correct to say that the installations build on the Moruroa atolls have been destroyed. From the end of nuclear tests, the Cea constructions and installations, the most susceptible to be contaminated have been ruined without exterior witness. Nobody knows if the usual procedures of decontamination have been observed. About 15% of materials from he Moruroa base have been distributed as gifts to the local communities in french Polynesia. other materials have been transferred or sold. The observatory of French nuclear weapons estimates the cost of the closing of the French Polynesia test sites to about 15 milliards of Francs, including the compensations paid to the Polynesian government during 10 yeas, so be it hundred times the cost announced by the militaries in 1998. The observatory of French nuclear weapons estimates that the real assessment of radioactive waste being on Moruroa and Fangataufa atolls has not been completely made by the experts of IAEA. This assessment is still to make. The observatory of French nuclear weapons notices that the Moruroa and Fangataufa atolls stay under military status. It recommends that these atolls be reintegrated to the Polynesian land patrimony in order to allow independent expertise. (N.C.)

  10. Dispersal, Isolation, and Interaction in the Islands of Polynesia: A Critical Review of Archaeological and Genetic Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ann Horsburgh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Integration of archaeology, modern genetics, and ancient DNA holds promise for the reconstruction of the human past. We examine the advances in research on the indigenous peoples of Polynesia to determine: (1 what do archaeological and genetic data (ancient and modern DNA tell us about the origins of Polynesians; and, (2 what evidence is there for long-distance travel and contacts between Polynesians and indigenous populations of the Americas? We note that the general dispersal pattern of founding human populations in the remote islands of the Pacific and long-distance interaction spheres continue to reflect well-established models. New research suggests that the formation of an Ancestral Polynesia Culture in Western Polynesia may have involved differential patterns of dispersal followed by significant later migrations. It has also been suggested that the pause between the settlement of Western and Eastern Polynesia was centuries longer than currently thought, followed by a remarkably rapid pulse of island colonization. Long-distance travel between islands of the Pacific is currently best documented through the sourcing of artifacts, while the discovery of admixture of Native American DNA within the genome of the people from Easter Island (Rapa Nui is strong new evidence for sustained contacts between Polynesia and the Americas.

  11. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge Station Plan [Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is currently an overlay refuge managed through cooperative agreement with the U.S. Navy. The refuge is located near the...

  12. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1995: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Midway Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  13. Public Use Plan for Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Public Use Plan has been developed to guide management of public use activities after the Navy and its contractor personnel leave the atoll on June 30, 1997. In...

  14. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Johnston Atoll, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  15. Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1993: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Johnston Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  16. Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1992: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Johnston Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  17. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1991: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Midway Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  18. Palmyra Atoll Quickbird II Seafloor Mosaic (1.8m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Pamyra Atoll were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The objective of this...

  19. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Johnston Atoll 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Johnston Atoll in...

  20. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1993: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Midway Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  1. Nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton and zooxanthellae in a coral atoll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Devassy, V.P.; Slawyk, G.; Goes, J.I.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Rajendran, A.

    of the Lakshadweep Archipelago (Indian Ocean). This paper also presents the ambient concentrations of these nitrogenous nutrients in the lagoon and surrounding waters. In addition, the excretion of these nitrogen compounds by major coral species of the atoll was also...

  2. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Palmyra Atoll 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the US...

  3. Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Rose Atoll NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  4. Palmyra Atoll Quickbird II Terrestrial Mosaic (1.8m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Pamyra Atoll were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The objective of this...

  5. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Pearl & Hermes Atoll, NWHI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for , Pearl & Hermes, Atoll, NWHI. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical...

  6. Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1994: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Midway Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  7. Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1991: Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Johnston Atoll NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  8. Atoll-scale patterns in coral reef community structure: Human signatures on Ulithi Atoll, Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole L; Nelson, Peter; Abelson, Avigdor; Precoda, Kristin; Rulmal, John; Bernardi, Giacomo; Paddack, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic relationship between reefs and the people who utilize them at a subsistence level is poorly understood. This paper characterizes atoll-scale patterns in shallow coral reef habitat and fish community structure, and correlates these with environmental characteristics and anthropogenic factors, critical to conservation efforts for the reefs and the people who depend on them. Hierarchical clustering analyses by site for benthic composition and fish community resulted in the same 3 major clusters: cluster 1-oceanic (close proximity to deep water) and uninhabited (low human impact); cluster 2-oceanic and inhabited (high human impact); and cluster 3-lagoonal (facing the inside of the lagoon) and inhabited (highest human impact). Distance from village, reef exposure to deep water and human population size had the greatest effect in predicting the fish and benthic community structure. Our study demonstrates a strong association between benthic and fish community structure and human use across the Ulithi Atoll (Yap State, Federated States of Micronesia) and confirms a pattern observed by local people that an 'opportunistic' scleractinian coral (Montipora sp.) is associated with more highly impacted reefs. Our findings suggest that small human populations (subsistence fishing) can nevertheless have considerable ecological impacts on reefs due, in part, to changes in fishing practices rather than overfishing per se, as well as larger global trends. Findings from this work can assist in building local capacity to manage reef resources across an atoll-wide scale, and illustrates the importance of anthropogenic impact even in small communities.

  9. Delegation of Maldivian Ministry of Atolls Development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the CPAFFC,the delegation of the Maldivian Ministry of Atolls Development led by its Deputy Minister Fathimath Sheereen paid a visit to Beijing and Jiangsu from April 24 to 30. This was the first substantial exchange aiming at strengthening friendly contacts since the CPAFFC and the Ministry of Atolls Development established links last December. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu and Vice

  10. Multibeam collection for RR1213: Multibeam data collected aboard Roger Revelle from 2012-10-04 to 2012-11-05, departing from Papeete, French Polynesia and returning to Nuku Hiva, French Polynesia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Radiological Conditions on Rongelap Atoll: Diving and Fishing on and Around Rongelap Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T F

    2003-02-01

    Rongelap Atoll experienced close-in ''local fallout'' from nuclear weapons tests conducted by the United States (1946-58) in the northern Marshall Islands. Most of the radiation dose delivered to Rongelap Island residents during the 1950s was from radioactive elements that quickly decayed into non-radioactive elements. Since 1985, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has continued to provide monitoring of radioactive elements from bomb testing in the terrestrial and marine environment of Rongelap Atoll. The only remaining radioactive elements of environmental importance at the atoll are radioactive cesium (cesium-137), radioactive strontium (strontium-90), different types (isotopes) of plutonium, and americium (americium-241). Cesium- 137 and strontium-90 dissolve in seawater and are continually flushed out of the lagoon into the open ocean. The small amount of residual radioactivity from nuclear weapons tests remaining in the lagoon does not concentrate through the marine food chain. Elevated levels of cesium-137 and strontium-90 are still present in island soils and pose a potential health risk if certain types of local plants and coconut crabs are eaten in large quantities. Cesium-137 is taken up from the soil into plants and edible food products, and may end up in the body of people living on the islands and consuming local food. The presence of cesium-137 in the human body can be detected using a device called a whole body counter. A person relaxes in a chair for a few minutes while counts or measurements are taken using a detector a few inches away from the body. The whole body counting program on Rongelap Island was established in 1999 under a cooperative agreement between the Rongelap Atoll Local Government (RALG), the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Local technicians from Rongelap continue to operate the facility under supervision of scientists from LLNL. The facility permits

  12. Atoll mangroves and associated flora from Republic of Maldives, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jagtap, T.G.; Untawale, A.G.

    of the north atolls. Male' atoll was totally devoid of mangroves due to their large scale reclamation mainly for urbanisation and tourism. Mangrove flora comprised of 12 species and was dominated by Bruguiera cylindrica followed by Lumnitzera racemosa, Ceriops...

  13. French grammar for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Mazet, Veronique

    2013-01-01

    The easy way to master French grammar French Grammar For Dummies is a logical extension and complement to the successful language learning book, French For Dummies. In plain English, it teaches you the grammatical rules of the French language, including parts of speech, sentence construction, pronouns, adjectives, punctuation, stress and verb tenses, and moods. Throughout the book, you get plenty of practice opportunities to help you on your goal of mastering basic French grammar and usage. Grasp the grammatical rules of French including parts of speech, sentenc

  14. Habitat selection, facilitation, and biotic settlement cues affect distribution and performance of coral recruits in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Nichole

    2010-07-01

    Habitat selection can determine the distribution and performance of individuals if the precision with which sites are chosen corresponds with exposure to risks or resources. Contrastingly, facilitation can allow persistence of individuals arriving by chance and potentially maladapted to local abiotic conditions. For marine organisms, selection of a permanent attachment site at the end of their larval stage or the presence of a facilitator can be a critical determinant of recruitment success. In coral reef ecosystems, it is well known that settling planula larvae of reef-building corals use coarse environmental cues (i.e., light) for habitat selection. Although laboratory studies suggest that larvae can also use precise biotic cues produced by crustose coralline algae (CCA) to select attachment sites, the ecological consequences of biotic cues for corals are poorly understood in situ. In a field experiment exploring the relative importance of biotic cues and variability in habitat quality to recruitment of hard corals, pocilloporid and acroporid corals recruited more frequently to one species of CCA, Titanoderma prototypum, and significantly less so to other species of CCA; these results are consistent with laboratory assays from other studies. The provision of the biotic cue accurately predicted coral recruitment rates across habitats of varying quality. At the scale of CCA, corals attached to the "preferred" CCA experienced increased survivorship while recruits attached elsewhere had lower colony growth and survivorship. For reef-building corals, the behavioral selection of habitat using chemical cues both reduces the risk of incidental mortality and indicates the presence of a facilitator.

  15. Unusual seismic activity in 2011 and 2013 at the submarine volcano Rocard, Society hot spot (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talandier, Jacques; Hyvernaud, Olivier; Maury, René C.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two seismic events that occurred on 27 May 2011 and 29 April 2013 at the Rocard submarine volcano which overlies the Society hot spot. The Polynesian Seismic Network recorded for the first time unusual associated short- and long-period signals, with perfectly monochromatic (0.0589 Hz) Rayleigh wave trains of long period and duration. None of the numerous observations of long-period (10-30 s) signals previously associated with volcanic activity in Japan, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Antarctica, and the Hawaiian Islands have the characteristics we observed at Rocard. We propose a tentative model for these unusual and rather enigmatic signals, in which the movement of lava excited the resonance of a shallow open conduit under a high hydrostatic pressure of ~400 bars.

  16. Distribution and biological implications of plastic pollution on the fringing reef of Mo’orea, French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    Connors, Elizabeth Janice

    2017-01-01

    Plastic pollution has been recognized as a major pollutant of the open ocean, but the extent and impact of plastic pollution on the coral reef environment has yet to be fully understood. In this study, the distribution of both macro- (>5mm) and micro- plastic (

  17. Distribution and biological implications of plastic pollution on the fringing reef of Mo’orea, French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    Connors, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific are extremely vulnerable to plastic pollution from oceanic gyres and land-based sources. To describe the extent and impact of plastic pollution, the distribution of both macro- (>5 mm) and microplastic (plastic

  18. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga T Fajemila

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago. We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA. The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay fringing reefs is consistent with the disturbance-mosaic (microhabitat heterogeneity hypothesis. Calculations of the FORAM Index (FI, a single metric index to assess reef vitality, indicate that all fore- and most back-reef environments support active carbonate accretion and provide habitat suitability for carbonate producers dependent on algal symbiosis. Lowest suitability values were recorded within the innermost bays, an area where natural and increasing anthropogenic influences continue to impact the reefs. The presence of habitat specific assemblages and numerical abundance values of individual taxa show that benthic foraminifera are excellent recorders of environmental perturbations and good indicators useful in modern and ancient ecological and environmental studies.

  19. Habitat selection, facilitation, and biotic settlement cues affect distribution and performance of coral recruits in French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Habitat selection can determine the distribution and performance of individuals if the precision with which sites are chosen corresponds with exposure to risks or resources. Contrastingly, facilitation can allow persistence of individuals arriving by chance and potentially maladapted to local abiotic conditions. For marine organisms, selection of a permanent attachment site at the end of their larval stage or the presence of a facilitator can be a critical determinant of recruitment success. In coral reef ecosystems, it is well known that settling planula larvae of reef-building corals use coarse environmental cues (i.e., light) for habitat selection. Although laboratory studies suggest that larvae can also use precise biotic cues produced by crustose coralline algae (CCA) to select attachment sites, the ecological consequences of biotic cues for corals are poorly understood in situ. In a field experiment exploring the relative importance of biotic cues and variability in habitat quality to recruitment of hard corals, pocilloporid and acroporid corals recruited more frequently to one species of CCA, Titanoderma prototypum, and significantly less so to other species of CCA; these results are consistent with laboratory assays from other studies. The provision of the biotic cue accurately predicted coral recruitment rates across habitats of varying quality. At the scale of CCA, corals attached to the “preferred” CCA experienced increased survivorship while recruits attached elsewhere had lower colony growth and survivorship. For reef-building corals, the behavioral selection of habitat using chemical cues both reduces the risk of incidental mortality and indicates the presence of a facilitator. PMID:20169452

  20. Thermal ecology and habitat selection of two cryptic skinks (Scincidae: Emoia cyanura, E. impar) on Mo'orea, French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    McElroy, Matt T

    2007-01-01

    I studied the habitat selection and thermal biology of two cryptic South Pacific skinks (Emoia cyanura and Emoia impar) in order to determine whether or not differences in thermal preference affect habitat partitioning. I measured sun exposure and thermal characteristics of microhabitats selected by each skink, and then quantified preferred substrate temperatures and preferred body temperatures in a laboratory thermal gradient. Compared to E. impar, E. cyanura inhabited areas with open canopy...

  1. Distribution and biological implications of plastic pollution on the fringing reef of Mo’orea, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific are extremely vulnerable to plastic pollution from oceanic gyres and land-based sources. To describe the extent and impact of plastic pollution, the distribution of both macro- (>5 mm) and microplastic (plastic Microplastics were discovered in the water column of the fringing reef of the island, at a concentration of 0.74 pieces m−2. Additionally, this study reports for the first time the ingestion of microplastic by the corallimorpha Discosoma nummiforme. Microplastics were made available to corallimorph polyps in a laboratory setting over the course of 108 h. Positively and negatively buoyant microplastics were ingested, and a microplastic particle that was not experimentally introduced was also discovered in the stomach cavity of one organism. This study indicates that plastic pollution has the potential to negatively impact coral reef ecosystems of the South Pacific, and warrants further study to explore the broader potential impacts of plastic pollution on coral reef ecosystems.

  2. Towards a French Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breach, H. T.

    1972-01-01

    Contends that secondary school students lose their appeal for French as they advance in school. Suggests that French teachers endeavor to motivate students by focusing more attention on their students and less on their own credentials. (DS)

  3. The French experience

    CERN Document Server

    Bougard, Marie-Thérèse

    2003-01-01

    Developed for beginners, The French Experience 1 course book is designed to accompany the French Experience 1 CDs (9780563472582) but can also be used on its own to develop your reading and writing skills. You’ll gain valuable insights into French culture too.

  4. Forbidden sea turtles: Traditional laws pertaining to sea turtle consumption in Polynesia (Including the Polynesian Outliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudrud Regina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the Pacific regions of Micronesia, Melanesia and Polynesia, sea turtles are recognised as culturally significant species. The specifics of human-sea turtle interactions in these regions, however, are not well known, in part because ethnographic and historic reports documenting these interactions are scattered, requiring extensive archival research. Ethnographic and environmental data collected over a ten-year period are analysed to assess patterns of human-sea turtle interactions prior to (and sometimes beyond Western contact. From the ethnographic data for Polynesia, a region-wide pattern emerges where sea turtle consumption was restricted to special ceremonies when the elites such as chiefs and priests but no one else ate turtle. Only in two countries did this pattern differ. Environmental data does little to elucidate explanations for this region-wide treatment of sea turtles as restricted food sources, as there is no correlation between environmental variability and the presence or absence of these restrictions. Instead the results of this research suggest such practices may have been part of an ancestral Polynesian society, developing well before human settlement into this region of the Pacific.

  5. A reconnaissance approach for hydrology of atoll lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, J.; Andréfouët, S.

    2001-12-01

    As a reconnaissance tool of the hydrology of atoll lagoons in the micro-tidal environment of the Tuamotu Archipelago, we define and compute "potential" flow rates at lagoon scale under three swell regimes (high, average, and low swell) after assessment of orientation and width of reef-flat spillways using satellite images. As a direct test, the "potential" flows were compared with field measurements of (1) measured inflows across the reef flat (for eight atolls), (2) net outgoing flow through the pass (for three atolls), and (3) lagoon-level variation rates (for four atolls). Absolute values of "potential" and field flows agreed ( r 2=0.94, n=42, slope ~1). Computed average water renewal times (TRAV) were also tested against concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM and TRAV were positively correlated ( r 2=0.54, n=26; Spearman's rs=0.54), and this relationship should enable the detection of unusual atolls. This approach would then appear to be useful for the reconnaissance of hydrodynamics processes in comparable micro-tidal environments.

  6. Estimating the Ground Water Resources of Atoll Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne E. Olsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground water resources of atolls, already minimal due to the small surface area and low elevation of the islands, are also subject to recurring, and sometimes devastating, droughts. As ground water resources become the sole fresh water source when rain catchment supplies are exhausted, it is critical to assess current groundwater resources and predict their depletion during drought conditions. Several published models, both analytical and empirical, are available to estimate the steady-state freshwater lens thickness of small oceanic islands. None fully incorporates unique shallow geologic characteristics of atoll islands, and none incorporates time-dependent processes. In this paper, we provide a review of these models, and then present a simple algebraic model, derived from results of a comprehensive numerical modeling study of steady-state atoll island aquifer dynamics, to predict the ground water response to changes in recharge on atoll islands. The model provides an estimate thickness of the freshwater lens as a function of annual rainfall rate, island width, Thurber Discontinuity depth, upper aquifer hydraulic conductivity, presence or absence of a confining reef flat plate, and in the case of drought, time. Results compare favorably with published atoll island lens thickness observations. The algebraic model is incorporated into a spreadsheet interface for use by island water resources managers.

  7. Better or worse? The role of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in sustainable development. Case studies of remote atoll communities in Kiribati

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mala, Kirti; Schlaepfer, August; Pryor, Trevor [School of Electrical, Energy and Process Engineering, Murdoch University, Murdoch 6150 (Australia)

    2009-02-15

    The Republic of Kiribati, formerly known as the Gilbert Islands, is a Micronesian (One of the three groups of islands in the Pacific. The eight territories that make up Micronesia are Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Kiribati, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Republic of Nauru, Republic of Palau, Territory of Guam and Territory of Wake Island. The other two groups of islands in the Pacific are Melanesia and Polynesia) country in the Pacific. The energy sources utilised in Kiribati include petroleum products, biomass, solar energy and wind power. Solar energy was introduced in Kiribati in the early 1980s (Wade H. Survey of RESCO projects - prepared for OPRET, Fiji Department of Energy, 2003; p. 36). Currently, it makes a very insignificant (less than 1%) contribution to the total annual primary energy supply (South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP). Pacific Islands Renewable Energy Project (PIREP) - Pacific Regional Energy Assessment (PREA) 2004. Kiribati national report, Vol. 5, 2005). Solar energy in Kiribati is used mostly in the form of solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies for the provision of lighting and electricity. This study examines the role of PV technologies in the sustainable development process in Kiribati, with particular reference to remote atoll communities. Initial results from on-site surveys carried out are reported in this paper. These surveys have sought to identify the reasons why people use or do not use PV systems. (author)

  8. French grammar and usage

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Long trusted as the most comprehensive, up-to-date and user-friendly grammar available, French Grammar and Usage is a complete guide to French as it is written and spoken today. It includes clear descriptions of all the main grammatical phenomena of French, and their use, illustrated by numerous examples taken from contemporary French, and distinguishes the most common forms of usage, both formal and informal.Key features include:Comprehensive content, covering all the major structures of contemporary French User-friendly organisation offering easy-to-find sections with cross-referencing and i

  9. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands. Utrok Atoll (2010-2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kehl, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinelli, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tumey, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Langston, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tamblin, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tibon, S. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Chee, L. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Aisek, Jr., A. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); DeDrum, Z. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Mettao, M. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands); Henson, J. [Utrok Whole Body Counting Facility, Majuro Atoll (Republic of the Marshall Islands)

    2014-12-15

    As a hard copy supplement to the Marshall Islands Program website (https://marshallislands.llnl.gov), this document provides an overview of the individual radiological surveillance monitoring program established in support of residents of Utrōk Atoll and nonresident citizens of the Utrōk Atoll population group, along with full disclosure of verified measurement data (2010-2012). The Utrōk Atoll Whole Body Counting Facility has been temporarily stationed on Majuro Atoll and, in cooperation with the Utrōk Atoll Local Government, serves as a national radiological facility open to the general public.

  10. Report from the national defense and armed forces commission on the law project related to the acknowledgment and compensation for the victims of the French nuclear tests; Rapport fait au nom de la commission de la defense nationale et des forces armees sur le projet de loi (n. 1696) relatif a la reconnaissance et a l'indemnisation des victimes des essais nucleaires francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The report is a presentation and analysis of a French law project, that would give acknowledgment and compensation for those - military and civilian personnel as well as nearby populations - who suffered by being exposed to radiations during the French nuclear tests in Sahara and French Polynesia between 1960 and 1998. The law project gives details on the relevant periods of time, and about the inquiry and compensation procedures for each case. The future law is intended to ease the procedure for victims to prove the existence of a link between their pathology and their activity during the experimentations; it should also allow compensations for civilian populations that may have suffered from radioactive fallout.

  11. French For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Erotopoulos; Williams, Michelle M; Wenzel, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The fast, informal way to learn to speak French French is known as perhaps the most beautiful of all languages. Listen to someone speak French-sure, you don't have a clue what they're saying, but aren't you enraptured by the sound of it? French is a beautiful language but quite difficult to learn. Whether you need to learn the language for a French class, or you travel overseas for business or leisure, this revised edition of French for Dummies can help. Written in an easy-to-follow format, it gives you just what you need for basic communication in FrenchExpanded coverage of necessary grammar,

  12. Distant storms as drivers of environmental change at Pacific atolls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P A Gardner

    Full Text Available The central Pacific Ocean with its many low lying islands and atolls is under threat from sea level rise and increased storm activity. Here, we illustrate how increasing frequency and severity of large scale storm events associated with global climate change may be particularly profound at the local scale for human populations that rely on lagoon systems for provision of a variety of goods and services. In August 2011 a storm originating in the Southern Ocean caused a large amplitude ocean swell to move northward through the Pacific Ocean. Its arrival at Palmyra Atoll coincided with transient elevated sea surface height and triggered turnover of the lagoon water column. This storm-induced change to the lagoon reflects long distance connectivity with propagated wave energy from the Southern Ocean and illustrates the increasing threats generated by climate change that are faced by human populations on most low-lying Pacific islands and atolls.

  13. The ecosystem study on Rongelap Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.B.; Gessel, S.P.; Held, E.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Laboratory of Radiation Biology at the University of Washington carried out an intensive study of this Atoll, which was contaminated with radioactive fallout from the {open_quotes}Bravo shot{close_quotes} in 1954. This study involved many aspects of the environment and the plant and animal life: soils, land plants, marine life, birds, geology and hydrology, and human diets as well. In much of the research, the fortuitiously present radioactive isotopes, especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, were tracers. Although the term {open_quotes}ecosystem study{close_quotes} was not in vogue at that time, it is clear that this was an early use of the ecosystem approach. Soil types and their development, the distribution of mineral elements in plants and soils, including predominant radionuclides, distribution and growth of native terrestrial plants in relation to topography and salinity, some aspects of the human diets, micronutrient nutrition of the coconut palm, island and islet development and stability, were given attention in the studies. Some of the findings in the various areas of study will be presented and discussed. 32 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Numerical modelling of geothermal and reflux circulation in Enewetak Atoll: Implications for dolomitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G.; Whitaker, F.; Smart, P.; Sanford, W.

    2000-01-01

    Two types of regional-scale seawater circulation have been proposed to explain the formation of Enewetak Atoll dolomites: geothermal and reflux circulation. We have used a finite element groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and dynamic interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms in Enewetak Atoll. Geothermal circulation is concentrated around the atoll-margin whereas refluxing mesosaline brines flow from the atoll interior towards the margin to restrict and eventually shut off geothermal circulation. Refluxing brines of 36-80??? can account for the salinity signature recorded in dolomite fluid inclusions. Distributions of fluid flux and Mg mass-balance calculations suggest that both geothermal and reflux circulation mechanisms could account for the observed distribution of dolomite in Enewetak Atoll. Furthermore, the atoll interior may be extensively dolomitized as observed in other atolls. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.Two types of regional-scale seawater circulation have been proposed to explain the formation of Enewetak Atoll dolomites: geothermal and reflux circulation. We have used a finite element groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and dynamic interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms in Enewetak Atoll. Geothermal circulation is concentrated around the atoll-margin whereas refluxing mesosaline brines flow from the atoll interior towards the margin to restrict and eventually shut off geothermal circulation. Refluxing brines of 36-80 per mil can account for the salinity signature recorded in dolomite fluid inclusions. Distributions of fluid flux and Mg mass-balance calculations suggest that both geothermal and reflux circulation mechanisms could account for the observed distribution of dolomite in Enewetak Atoll. Furthermore, the atoll interior may be extensively dolomitized as observed in other atolls.

  15. Meet French Architecture in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susan

    2005-01-01

    On April 5, a French architectural exhibition entitled ""French Visions: City, Architecture and Sustainable Development"" was unveiled in Beijing Urban Planning Center. As a key exhibition within the framework of French Year in China, the exhibition will also be displayed in Shanghai and Chongqing. The largest exhibition of its kind ever held in China, French Visions extensively showed accomplishments of contemporary French architectural design.

  16. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Halley, Robert B.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Peterman, Zell E.

    1988-01-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios determined for samples from a 350 m core of Neogene lagoonal, shallow-water limestones from Enewetak Atoll display a remarkably informative trend. Like the recently published data for Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) carbonates, 87Sr/86Sr at Enewetak increases monotonically but not smoothly from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene. The data show intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr, punctuated by sharp transitions to lower values toward greater core depths. The sharp transitions correlate with observed solution disconformities caused by periods of subaerial erosion, whereas the intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr correspond to intervals of rapid accumulation of shallow-water carbonate sediments. When converted to numerical ages using the published DSDP 590B trend, the best-resolved time breaks are at 282 m (12.3 to 18.2 Ma missing) and 121.6 m (3.0 to 5.3 Ma missing) below the lagoon floor. At Enewetak, Sr isotopes offer a stratigraphic resolution for these shallow-marine Neogene carbonates comparable to that of nannofossil zonation in deep-sea carbonates (0.3-3 m.y.). In addition, the correlation of times of Sr-isotope breaks at Enewetak with times of rapid Sr-isotope change in the DSDP 590B samples confirms the importance off sea-level changes in the evolution of global-marine Sr isotopes and shows that the Sr-isotope response to sea-level falls is rapid.

  17. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy of Enewetak Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Halley, R. B.; Simmons, K. R.; Peterman, Z. E.

    1988-02-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios determined for samples from a 350 m core of Neogene lagoonal, shallow-water limestones from Enewetak Atoll display a remarkably informative trend. Like the recently published data for Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) carbonates, 87Sr/86Sr at Enewetak increases monotonically but not smoothly from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene. The data show intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr, punctuated by sharp transitions to lower values toward greater core depths. The sharp transitions correlate with observed solution disconformities caused by periods of subaerial erosion, whereas the intervals of little or no change in 87Sr/86Sr correspond to intervals of rapid accumulation of shallow-water carbonate sediments. When converted to numerical ages using the published DSDP 590B trend, the best-resolved time breaks are at 282 m (12.3 to 18.2 Ma missing) and 121.6 m (3.0 to 5.3 Ma missing) below the lagoon floor. At Enewetak, Sr isotopes offer a stratigraphic resolution for these shallow-marine Neogene carbonates comparable to that of nannofossil zonation in deep-sea carbonates (0.3-3 m.y.). In addition, the correlation of times of Sr-isotope breaks at Enewetak with times of rapid Sr-isotope change in the DSDP 590B samples confirms the importance off sea-level changes in the evolution of global-marine Sr isotopes and shows that the Sr-isotope response to sea-level falls is rapid.

  18. A comprehensive French grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Glanville

    2013-01-01

    Characterized by clear and accessible explanations, numerous examples and sample sentences, a new section on register and tone, and useful appendices covering topics including age and time, A Comprehensive French Grammar, Sixth Edition is an indispensable tool for advanced students of French language and literature.A revised edition of this established, bestselling French grammarIncludes a new section on register and medium and offers expanded treatment of French punctuationFeatures numerous examples and sample sentences, and useful appendices covering topics including age, time, and dimension

  19. French Lessons A Memoir

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Brilliantly uniting the personal and the critical, French Lessons is a powerful autobiographical experiment. It tells the story of an American woman escaping into the French language and of a scholar and teacher coming to grips with her history of learning. Kaplan begins with a distinctly American quest for an imaginary France of the intelligence. But soon her infatuation with all things French comes up against the dark, unimagined recesses of French political and cultural life.The daughter of a Jewish lawyer who prosecuted Nazi war criminals at Nuremburg, Kaplan grew up in the 1960s in the Mi

  20. Reevaluating the French Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Roland N.

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes previous interpretations concerning the French Revolution. Discusses several weaknesses of the Marxist views in light of recent philosophical and sociological thinking about social change. (RKM)

  1. French essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Laura K

    2011-01-01

    Just the core concepts you need to write and speak French correctly If you have some knowledge of French and want to polish your skills, French Essentials For Dummies focuses on just the core concepts you need to communicate effectively. From conjugating verbs to understanding tenses, this easy-to-follow guide lets you skip the suffering and score high at exam time. French 101 - get the lowdown on the basics, from expressing dates and times to identifying parts of speech Gender matters - see how a noun's gender determines the articles, adjectives, and pronouns y

  2. Neogene biostratigraphy and paleoenvironments of Enewetak Atoll, equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Bybell, L.M.; Brouwers, E.M.; Gibson, T.G.; Margerum, R.; Poore, R.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Micropaleontologic analyses of Neogene sediments from Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, provide data on the age of lagoonal deposits, stratigraphic disconformities and the paleoenvironmental and subsidence history of the atoll. Benthic foraminifers, planktic foraminifers, calcareous nannofossils and ostracodes were studied from six boreholes, the deepest penetrating 1605 feet below the lagoon floor into upper Oligocene strata. The Oligocene-Miocene boundary occurs at about 1200 ft below the lagoon floor. The early and middle Miocene is characterized by brief periods of deposition and numerous hiatuses. Ostracodes and benthic foraminifers indicate a shallow-marine reefal environment with occasional brackish water conditions. Upper Miocene and lower Pliocene deposits placed in calcareous nannofossil Zones NN9-15 and in planktic foraminifer Zones N16-19 contain species-rich benthic microfaunas which indicate alternating reefal and brackish water mangrove environments. The upper Pliocene contains at least two major depositional hiatuses that coincide with a major faunal turnover in benthic foraminiferal and ostracode assemblages. The Quaternary is characterized by benthic microfaunas similar to those of modern atoll lagoons and is punctuated by at least 11 disconformities which signify periods of low sea level. Atoll subsidence rates during the last 10 Ma averaged 30 to 40 m/m.y. ?? 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Report on a few Octocorals from Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verseveldt, J.

    1972-01-01

    In 1969 Dr. Arthur G. Humes, Boston University, Massachusetts, U.S.A., collected a number of octocorals at Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands. He found that most of these corals were the hosts of copepods, just like the corals collected by him in the waters north-west of Madagascar (vide Verseveldt, 1

  4. Simulation of radionuclide dispersion in the Pacific Ocean from Mururoa Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, A. [Laboratoire d' Oceanographie Dynamique et de Climatologie, Unite Mixte de Recherche CNRS-ORSTOM-UPMC, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Rancher, J. [CEA/DAM/DSR/DTDS/SARI, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    1999-04-01

    A series of numerical simulations was carried out to evaluate, on a Tropical South Pacific scale, the consequences over 10 yr of radionuclide releases to the ocean from French Polynesian nuclear test sites. Tracer advection and diffusion terms were computed based on a dispersion model using ocean dynamics and turbulent mixing coefficients derived from an Ocean General Circulation Model on the basis of a yearly climatological average. Preliminary experiments demonstrated sensitivity of the results to injection depth and type. Two instant unit releases were then carried out at the model characteristic depths of 5 and 364 m: maximum concentrations decrease by factors of more than 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 3}, respectively, over 10 yr. Temporal evolution tables for concentrations are given and can be applied to any given quantity of tracer introduced from Mururoa atoll into the Pacific Ocean. Taken as a whole, our results present, from qualitative and quantitative viewpoints, different dispersion scenarios as a function of release characteristics. Finally, a comparison with the surface release study by Ribbe and Tomczak (1990) shows that, while the order of magnitude of tracer concentrations is comparable, the direction of propagation is significantly different. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. French courses for BEGINNERS

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We are now offering a French course for beginners. If you are interested in following this course, please enrol through the following link, or contac: Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896 or Martine Zuffi, tel. 73483. Language Training French Training Kerstin Fuhrmeister Tel. 70896 kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch  

  6. Routledge French technical dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The French-English volume of this highly acclaimed set consists of some 100,000 keywords in both French and English, drawn from the whole range of modern applied science and technical terminology. Covers over 70 subject areas, from engineering and chemistry to packaging, transportation, data processing and much more.

  7. French in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Anglejan, Alison

    1979-01-01

    Discusses language legislation in Canada where French and English are both official languages, and in Quebec province where French has been declared the sole official language. Outlines the conflicts and the impact of these differing laws on Quebec, its population, and its relations with the rest of Canada. (JMF)

  8. French in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, John

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the usage of French in Gabon. As in other nations of francophone Africa, French is the language of upward social mobility in Gabon, and it offers access to the international community. However, one factor peculiar to Gabon is the virtual absence of a Gabonese national language, which promotes a greater dependency upon a mastery of the…

  9. The French Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltimore City Public Schools, MD.

    This outline on the French Revolution is designed to illustrate how this period of French history influenced various aspects of contemporary culture. Four main sections are treated: (1) ideas that led to the Revolution, (2) the reigns of the Bourbon kings, (3) the Revolution, and (4) the rise of Napoleon as a reaction to chaos. A list of 16mm…

  10. Pardon my French pocket French slang dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, Kate

    2009-01-01

    A runaway bestseller since its launch, Pardon My French! is a pocket-sized dictionary of French and English slang as it is spoken today. This edition includes even more non-standard language from the colloquial to the vulgar, with over 2,500 terms added. Ideal for both Francophobes and Francophiles alike. Over 14,000 referencesDozens of helpful usage notes to explain interesting meanings and originsThematic panels on the slang of sex, alcohol, violence etcFully updated and revised panels on varieties of slang (eg verlan, javanais, Black American slang)

  11. Cook Island artifact geochemistry demonstrates spatial and temporal extent of pre-European interarchipelago voyaging in East Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisler, Marshall I; Bolhar, Robert; Ma, Jinlong; St Pierre, Emma; Sheppard, Peter; Walter, Richard K; Feng, Yuexing; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Kirch, Patrick V

    2016-07-19

    The Cook Islands are considered the "gateway" for human colonization of East Polynesia, the final chapter of Oceanic settlement and the last major region occupied on Earth. Indeed, East Polynesia witnessed the culmination of the greatest maritime migration in human history. Perennial debates have critiqued whether Oceanic settlement was purposeful or accidental, the timing and pathways of colonization, and the nature and extent of postcolonization voyaging-essential for small founding groups securing a lifeline between parent and daughter communities. Centering on the well-dated Tangatatau rockshelter, Mangaia, Southern Cook Islands, we charted the temporal duration and geographic spread of exotic stone adze materials-essential woodworking tools found throughout Polynesia- imported for more than 300 y beginning in the early AD 1300s. Using a technique requiring only 200 mg of sample for the geochemical analysis of trace elements and isotopes of fine-grained basalt adzes, we assigned all artifacts to an island or archipelago of origin. Adze material was identified from the chiefly complex on the Austral Islands, from the major adze quarry complex on Tutuila (Samoa), and from the Marquesas Islands more than 2,400 km distant. This interaction is the only dated example of down-the-line exchange in central East Polynesia where intermediate groups transferred commodities attesting to the interconnectedness and complexity of social relations fostered during postsettlement voyaging. For the Cook Islands, this exchange may have lasted into the 1600s, at least a century later than other East Polynesian archipelagos, suggesting that interarchipelago interaction contributed to the later development of social hierarchies.

  12. French in Culinary World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rila Hilma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available More than million foods have been made by people from all over the world in the latest years. People now try to create new cooks and make some creativity on it. Then, cooking which the field is culinary has become an art because it needs an artistic value to decorate the food, a good taste and proper technique in processing delicious food in order to make it a masterpiece. French culinary is as famous as the Eiffel tower in the heart of the country, Paris. Most of fine dining international restaurants apply the French menu and cooking. This article presents an overview about the French element in culinary world; starts from its history, kitchen organization, French menu spelling, and French cooking vocabulary. The discussion proceeds library research to compile the data. Later, the art of culinary is interesting to be learned because it contains the classical history of world civilization, in this case French civilization. The issue of cooking trend nouvelle cuisine was a masterpiece of one of the greatest chef in his time, Escoffier. French culinary is widely well-known in all over the world because of innovation, creativity, and proud. Those are spirits that we must learn.

  13. French in Culinary World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rila Hilma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available More than million foods have been made by people from all over the world in the latest years. People now try to create new cooks and make some creativity on it. Then, cooking which the field is culinary has become an art because it needs an artistic value to decorate the food, a good taste and proper technique in processing delicious food in order to make it a masterpiece. French culinary is as famous as the Eiffel tower in the heart of the country, Paris. Most of fine dining international restaurants apply the French menu and cooking. This article presents an overview about the French element in culinary world; starts from its history, kitchen organization, French menu spelling, and French cooking vocabulary. The discussion proceeds library research to compile the data. Later, the art of culinary is interesting to be learned because it contains the classical history of world civilization, in this case French civilization. The issue of cooking trend “nouvelle cuisine” was a masterpiece of one of the greatest chef in his time, Escoffier. French culinary is widely well-known in all over the world because of innovation, creativity, and proud. Those are spirits that we must learn.   

  14. Modern French Grammar Workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    An innovative new workbook of exercises and language tasks for intermediate and advanced learners of French. This Workbook can be used independently or alongside Modern French Grammar.This Workbook provides exercises in:* Essential grammatical structures* Everyday functions such as agreeing and disagreeing* Role-plays set in a wide range of different contextsIt is suitable for group or pair work and for private study.A comprehensive answer key at the back of the Workbook enables you to check on your progress.This Workbook is ideal for all learners who have a basic knowledge of French, includin

  15. Flirting with French

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, William

    2015-01-01

    William Alexander is not just a Francophile, he wants to be French. It's not enough to explore the country, to enjoy the food and revel in the ambience, he wants to feel French from the inside. Among the things that stand in his way is the fact that he can't actually speak the language. Setting out to conquer the language he loves (but which, amusingly, does not seem to love him back), Alexander devotes himself to learning French, going beyond grammar lessons and memory techniques to delve into the history of the language, the science of linguistics, and the art of translation. Along

  16. French Dictionaries. Series: Specialised Bibliographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaar, R. M.

    This is a list of French monolingual, French-English and English-French dictionaries available in December 1975. Dictionaries of etymology, phonetics, place names, proper names, and slang are included, as well as dictionaries for children and dictionaries of Belgian, Canadian, and Swiss French. Most other specialized dictionaries, encyclopedias,…

  17. Causes of mortality of albatross chicks at Midway Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, L.; Sievert, P.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the effect of plastic ingestion on seabirds in Hawaii, we necropsied the carcasses of 137 Laysan albatross (Diomedea immutabilis) chicks from Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean during the summer of 1987. Selected tissues were collected for microbiological, parasitological, toxicological or histopathological examinations. Dehydration was the most common cause of death. Lead poisoning, trauma, emaciation (starvation) and trombidiosis were other causes of death; nonfatal nocardiosis and avian pox also were present. There was no evidence that ingested plastic caused mechanical lesions or mortality in 1987, but most of the chicks had considerably less plastic in them than chicks from earlier years. Human activity (lead poisoning and vehicular trauma) caused mortality at Midway Atoll and represented additive mortality for pre-fledgling albatrosses.

  18. 500 French verbs for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Erotopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Vexed by French verbs? Fear no more! In 500 French Verbs For Dummies, beginning French language learners can find a quick reference for verbs in the basic present tenses. More advanced French speakers can utilize this book to learn more complex verb tenses and conjugations as well as advanced verbs with irregular endings. One page for each of the 500 most commonly used verbs in the French language -alphabetically arranged and numbered for easy referenceSpecial designation of the 50 most essential French verbsA summary of basic French grammar that incl

  19. Wave and tidal flushing in a near-equatorial mesotidal atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mirella B.; Macedo, Eduardo C.; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Siegle, Eduardo

    2017-03-01

    Most of the atolls found worldwide are under microtidal regimes, and their circulation mechanisms are widely documented and well known. Here, we describe the flushing mechanisms of a small-sized mesotidal atoll, based on water-level, wave and current data obtained during two different periods (total of 60 d). Rocas is the only atoll in the South Atlantic Ocean and is built primarily of coralline algae. Two reef passages connect the atoll lagoon to the ocean. Synchronous current profilers were deployed at the two reef passages, one inside and one outside the atoll, to characterize the influence of tides and waves on the circulation. Results showed that wind waves drove a setup on the exposed side of the atoll and that currents were predominately downwind, causing outflow at both reef passages. Waves breaking on the windward side supplied water to the atoll causing the lagoon water level to rise above ocean water level, driving the outflow. However, unlike microtidal atolls, at Rocas Atoll the water level drops significantly below the reef rim during low tides. This causes the reef rim to act as a barrier to water pumping into the lagoon by waves, resulting in periodic activation of the wave pumping mechanism throughout a tidal cycle. As result, inflow occurs in the wider passage during 27% of each tidal cycle, starting at low tides and reversing direction during mid-flood tide when the water level exceeded approximately 1.6 m (while overtopping the atoll's rim). Our findings show that tides play a direct role in driving circulation on a mesotidal atoll, not only by modulating wave setup but also by determining the duration of wave pumping into the lagoon.

  20. Adding a French Touch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Deep in Sichuan Province,a mountain town strives to re-brand itself as a romantic tourist destination With French-style cobblestone streets,an eclectic mix of buildings and architecture,and the overall relaxing atmosphere,

  1. Marine radioactivity assessment of Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, P P; Woodhead, D; Blowers, P; Bonfield, R; Cooper, M; Chen, Q; Dahlgaard, H; Dovlete, C; Fox, V; Froehlich, K; Gastaud, J; Gröning, M; Hamilton, T; Ikeuchi, Y; Kanisch, G; Krüger, A; Kwong, L L; Matthews, M; Morgenstern, U; Mulsow, S; Pettersson, H; Smedley, P; Taylor, B; Taylor, C; Tinker, R

    1999-09-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out an international project. 'The Study of the Radiological Situation at the Atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa' with the aim of assessing the present and future radiological situation at the atolls and making recommendations for either monitoring or remedial actions if they are deemed necessary. The paper concentrates on marine radioactivity aspects and gives an estimation of present radionuclide concentrations in water, sediment and biota of the Mururoa and Fangataufa lagoons and the surrounding ocean. The dominant radionuclide in both lagoons is Pu in sediments (the total inventory is approximately 30 TBq). A decline in radionuclide concentrations has been observed in recent years in lagoon water, with the exception of 3H and 90Sr, for which a contribution from underground sources is to be expected. Radionuclide concentrations in biota from the lagoons and the surrounding ocean are low and consistent with previous measurements. The observed radionuclide concentrations in both lagoons imply that no radiological risk exists for hypothetical inhabitants of Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls.

  2. beta- and gamma-Comparative dose estimates on Enewetak Atoll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crase, K W; Gudiksen, P H; Robison, W L

    1982-05-01

    Enewetak Atoll is one of the Pacific atolls used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and gamma-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Enewetak Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the beta and low energy gamma-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a beta-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to beta- or low energy gamma-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is somewhat dependent on ground cover, since a minimal amount of vegetation will reduce it significantly from that over bare soil, but thick stands of vegetation have little effect on any further reductions. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey (En73). Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the beta's or low energy gamma's, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  3. English and French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to learn a language, there is no excuse anymore!   You can attend one of our English or French courses and you can practise the language with a tandem partner! General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. Oral Expression This course is aimed at students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. Cours d’anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 3 mars a...

  4. Clean Up, Rehabilitation, Resettlement of Enewetak Atoll -Marshall Islands. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The documentation is a summary of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for a proposed project to clean up the Atoll of Enewetak and...resettle the Enewetak people on the Atoll . The summary has been prepared specifically for translation into the language of the Enewetak people.

  5. Nutrient concentrations and primary productivity at the Peros Banhos and Salomon atolls in the Chagos Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, R. F.; Drew, E. A.

    1984-02-01

    Coral atolls are areas of high biological productivity even though they are usually located in regions of the tropical ocean characterized by low primary production and extremely low levels of vital dissolved nutrient materials. Recent studies have indicated the possible importance of in situ dinitrogen fixation on shallow reef flats in supplementing low oceanic nitrate levels and thus contributing to the maintenance of high reef productivity. Variations in the structure of atolls may have a direct bearing on the accumulation of fixed nitrogen and other nutrient materials, and consequently on lagoonal and reefal primary productivity. This paper investigates the effect of differing atoll configurations by comparing neighbouring, but structurally dissimilar, mid-ocean atolls. The findings are discussed in terms of ecosystem function and possible influences on the structural evolution of atolls.

  6. 2006 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI-06-09 - Kure Atoll, Pearl and Hermes Atoll and Kauai Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected from 23 June to 19 July 2006 aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) at Kure Atoll, Pearl and Hermes...

  7. Miocene to Present Sea Level and the Origin of Modern Rimmed Atoll Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, M.; Perron, J. T.; Raymo, M. E.; Ashton, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rising sea-level over the next century will reshape our coastlines and make low-lying islands more vulnerable to extreme events. Atolls could potentially provide unique geologic records from periods of high sea level analogous to those we might experience over the coming centuries. However, sea-level records from atolls have been largely overlooked, in part because the processes that shape coral reef and atoll form are often complex and, in many cases, remain unexplored. Darwin's canonical model, which proposes an evolution from fringing reef to barrier reef to atoll as an ocean island ages and subsides, cannot explain the stratigraphy or morphology of many island reefs. We will present a study that combines a numerical model of reef development with existing stratigraphic records from Pacific atolls. The model, driven by sea level, simulates the evolution of atoll morphology using parameterizations of coral growth, rim derived sediment and in situ production, dissolution, and subsidence. We use it to solve for late-Miocene to present sea level by iteratively changing the ice volume and deep-ocean temperature corrections for converting deep-ocean, benthic, δ18O to sea level and finding the best-fit between the model output and corelog stratigraphy from Enewetak Atoll. We then compare lagoon depths produced by the model for different island sizes and dissolution rates (but the same subsidence and sediment production rates) to an independent dataset of real-world observations from the Marshall, Gilbert and Caroline Island chains. Our model results suggest that a period of sustained low sea level occurred during the late Miocene before rising above present moving into the Pliocene. We propose that it was atoll exposure and enhanced lagoon dissolution during the subsequent sea-level fall since the late Pliocene, ~2.7 Ma - not crustal subsidence, as Darwin's canonical model of atoll evolution presumes - that likely drove the development of modern rimmed atoll

  8. Which psychoactive substances are used by patients seen in the healthcare system in French overseas territories? Results of the OPPIDUM survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveluy, Amélie; Frauger, Elisabeth; Peyrière, Hélène; Moracchini, Christophe; Haramburu, Françoise; Micallef, Joëlle

    2017-02-01

    Addiction to illicit substances or medicines is influenced by cultural, religious, ethnic factors as well as local availability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the profile of drug users and characteristics of the psychoactive substances used in French overseas territories, using data from the OPPIDUM survey. OPPIDUM is an annual, nationwide, multicentric, cross-sectional study based on specialized care centres that included subjects presenting a drug addiction or under opiate maintenance treatment. The current study includes data from the 2012 and 2013 surveys and focuses on patients included by drug addiction centres located in French overseas departments and territories: French Pacific Ocean (French Polynesia, New Caledonia), French Americas (Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, French Guiana) and Reunion Island. Data from metropolitan France (2013 survey) were included as reference. Two hundred and forty-five patients were included. The sex ratio was 3.7 for the Pacific Ocean, 3.5 for the French Americas and 3.3 for Reunion Island. Cannabis was consumed in all the territories, from 50.8% in Reunion Island to 81.7% in Pacific Ocean. Cocaine was most frequently consumed in the French Americas (61%), mainly in the 'freebase' form (91%), whereas 6.5% of cocaine users in metropolitan France did so. Problematic use of medicines was most frequent in Reunion Island. Heroin seems rarely used in all overseas territories. This study highlights the complexity of substances used in French overseas territories, which often differ from that in mainland France. The relative difference between different areas provides valuable information for future investigations and possible interventions.

  9. French Antilles and Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    This discussion of French Antilles and Guiana cover the following: the people, geography, history, government, political conditions, economy, and relations with the US. In 1983 the population totaled 303,000 with an annual growth rate of 0.09%. The infant mortality rate (1981) was 12.6/1000 and life expectancy 68 years. About 98% of the people of Martinique are of Afro European or Afro European Indian descent. The remainder are the old planter families and a sizable number of metropolitan French. Most of the work force are employed in agriculture or food processing and associated industries. Most permanent residents of Guadeloupe are of mixed Afro European descent. A few thousand Metropolitan French reside there. Most French Guianese live along the coast, about 1/2 of them in the capital. Martinique is the northernmost of the Windward Islands, which are part of the Lesser Antilles chain in the Caribbean Sea southeast of Puerto Rico. Guadeloupe comprises 2 of the Leeward Islands, which are also part of the Lesser Antilles chain. French Guiana is located on the northern coast of South America, a few degrees north of the Equator. Indians were the 1st known indigenous inhabitants of French Guiana and the French Antilles. Columbus sighted Guadeloupe in 1493, Martinique in 1493 or 1502, and the Guiana coast probably during his 3rd voyage in 1498. French Guiana, Guadeloupe, and Martinique, as overseas departments of France since 1946, are integral parts of the French Republic. Their relationship to Metropolitan France is somewhat similar to that of Alaska and Hawaii to the counterminous US. Each department has a general council composed of 1 representative elected by each canton. Guadeloupe and Martinique each elect 2 senators to the French Senate and 3 deputies to the National Assembly. French Guiana elects 1 senator and 1 deputy. In each of the 3 departments exist individuals and small political parties that advocate immediate independence, but their adherents form only

  10. Language Training: French

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 24 January to 18 March 2005. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 24 January to 18 March 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 24 hours Price: 528 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  11. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 11 October to 17 December 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: tel. 72844. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  12. Language Training: French

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  13. Language Training: French

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 24 January to 18 March 2005. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 24 January to 18 March 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 24 hours Price: 528 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  14. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  15. Comparing Written Competency in Core French and French Immersion Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin-Fortin, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have compared the written competency of French immersion students and their core French peers, and research on these learners at a postsecondary level is even scarcer. My corpus consists of writing samples from 255 students from both backgrounds beginning a university course in French language. The writing proficiency of core French…

  16. The French Revolution and the French Language: A Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djite, Paulin

    1992-01-01

    Explores the relationship between revolutionary ideals and the subsequent expansion and promotion of the French language. It is shown, through a linguistic and sociopolitical history of the French Revolution and the French language, that there is no incompatibility between the two and that the movement of Francophonie is a continuation of France's…

  17. French grammar in context

    CERN Document Server

    Jubb, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Instructors' edition without answer keysDiscount of 20% offered when 10 ebooks are sold- e.g. they will be sold for 263.60/ £151.90 instead of 329.50/£189.90French Grammar in Context presents a unique and exciting approach to learning grammar. Authentic texts from a rich variety of sources, literary and journalistic, are used as the starting point for the illustration and explanation of key areas of French grammar. Each point is consolidated with a wide range of written and spoken exercises. Grammar is presented not as an end in itself, but as a

  18. French nuclear physics accelerator opens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumé, Belle

    2016-12-01

    A new €140m particle accelerator for nuclear physics located at the French Large Heavy Ion National Accelerator (GANIL) in Caen was inaugurated last month in a ceremony attended by French president François Hollande.

  19. Population pressure on coral atolls: trends and approaching limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, M

    1990-09-01

    Trends and approaching limits of population pressure on coral atolls is discussed by examining the atoll environment in terms of the physical geography, the production systems, and resource distribution. Atoll populations are grouped as dependent and independent, and demographic trends in population growth, migraiton, urbanization, and political dependency are reviewed. Examination of the carrying capacity includes a dynamic model, the influences of the West, and philopsophical considerations. The carrying capacity is the "maximal population supportable in a given area". Traditional models are criticized because of a lack in accounting for external linkages. The proposed model is dynamic and considers perceived needs and overseas linkages. It also explains regional disparities in population distribution, and provides a continuing model for population movement from outer islands to district centers and mainland areas. Because of increased expectations and perceived needs, there is a lower carrying capacity for outlying areas, and expanded capacity in district centers. This leads to urbanization, emigration, and carrying capacity overshot in regional and mainland areas. Policy intervention is necessary at the regional and island community level. Atolls, which are islands surrounding deep lagoons, exist in archipelagoes across the oceans, and are rich in aquatic life. The balance in this small land area with a vulnerable ecosystem may be easily disturbed by scarce water supplies, barren soils, rising sea levels in the future, hurricanes, and tsunamis. Traditionally, fisheries and horticulture (pit-taro, coconuts, and breadfruit) have sustained populations, but modern influences such as blasting, reef mining, new industrial technologies, population pressure, and urbanization threaten the balance. Population pressure, which has lead to pollution, epidemics, malnutrition, crime, social disintegration, and foreign dependence, is evidenced in the areas of Tuvalu, Kiribati

  20. Geothermal convection: a mechanism for dolomitization at Enewetak Atoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.M.; Sanford, W.; Whitaker, F.; Smart, P.

    2000-01-01

    Geothermal convection in carbonate platforms could drive massive dolomitization by supplying mass transport of magnesium over long periods and at temperatures high enough to overcome kinetic limitations. Reactive-transport simulations based on Enewetak Atoll show dolomitization in a thin band at a permeability contrast near the base of the platform, which is consistent with field observations of dolomitized Eocene deposits. Dolomitization is predicted at approximately 6% per My at temperatures of 45–60°C, and complete dolomitization could be accomplished in ∼16 My. Calcium enrichment of pore fluids and upward transport of these fluids is established early, prior to 30 ky.

  1. Assessment of a radioactive waste disposal site at Enewetak Atoll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshkin, V E; Robison, W L

    1997-07-01

    The 43 nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll by the United States between 1948 and 1958 produced close-in fallout that contaminated the islands and lagoon of the atoll with radioactive fission and activation products, and unfissioned nuclear fuel. In 1972, the U.S. government announced that it would conduct a cleanup and restoration operation to return the atoll to the Enewetak people. The radiological cleanup began in 1977 and lasted to 1980 and focused on reducing the concentration of the transuranium elements (238,239,240Pu and 241Am = TRU) in soils on some of the islands that might eventually be used for residence or for subsistence agricultural. The cleanup plan called for relocating soil and some other contaminated debris to Runit Island on the eastern perimeter of the Atoll. Some of the contaminated soil was mixed with cement and the mixture placed below the water level in the Cactus Crater that was formed by a nuclear explosion in 1958. The remainder of the contaminated material was mixed with concrete and placed above ground over the crater in the shape of a dome. A concrete cap was constructed over the dome of soil. Concern has been expressed by the people of Enewetak and by others over the possible aquatic impacts from the radionuclides entombed in the crater. A National Academy of Sciences committee examined the dome and concluded that the containment structure and its contents present no credible health hazard to the people of Enewetak, either now or in the future. The committee suggested that "at least part of the radioactivity contained in the structure is available for transport to the groundwater and subsequently to the lagoon and it is important to determine whether this pathway may be a significant one." Therefore, a surveillance program was started in 1980, in conjunction with other research efforts, to study the radionuclides in samples of fish, groundwater, and lagoon seawater. Our data and conclusions support the findings suggested by the

  2. Mapping nuclear craters on Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, John C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In 1984, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed geologic analysis of two nuclear test craters at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, on behalf of the Defense Nuclear Agency. A multidisciplinary task force mapped the morphology, surface character, and subsurface structure of two craters, OAK and KOA. The field mapping techniques include echo sounding, sidescan sonar imaging, single-channel and multichannel seismic reflection profiling, a seismic refraction survey, and scuba and submersible operations. All operations had to be navigated precisely and correlatable with subsequent drilling and sampling operations.

  3. 1001 most useful French words

    CERN Document Server

    Buxbaum, Marcella Ottolenghi

    2001-01-01

    This practical, inexpensive volume features over 1,000 common French words, each accompanied by a French sentence demonstrating proper usage. Also included are definitions arranged by such categories as family, food, numbers, and more. (These words are not repeated in the alphabetical section.) A page of Vocabulary Tips explains how to easily recognize hundreds of French/English cognates.

  4. French Wines on the Decline?:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo

    2004-01-01

    French wines, differentiated by geographic origin, served for many decades as a basis for the French success in the British wine market. However in the early 1990s, market share began to decline. This article explores the values that market participants placed on labelling information on French...

  5. Syllabification and French Phonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    Much research has focused on the question of whether phonological rules can and should be stated more appropriately in terms of the syllable than other units, notable segments and various boundaries. Formulation of rules without reference to the syllable obscures the motivation and unity of alternations. French has rules for consonant deletion…

  6. Complete French Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Gaelle

    2010-01-01

    The best-selling complete course for a fun and effective way to learn French. This ISBN is for the paperback book. The corresponding audio support (ISBN: 9781444100068) is also available. The book and audio support can also be purchased as a pack (ISBN: 9781444100051).

  7. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR/SOC

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), in order to fill in a 'fiche individuelle' form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format. The French card in their possession. An A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done...

  8. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  9. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel are asked to go to the cards office (33/1-015), taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, The French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested to take these items to the c...

  10. Arthur Rimbaud: French symbolist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Raats

    1981-05-01

    Full Text Available Rimbaud as a poet occupies a unique position in the history of French literature and with his theory of poetry he greatly influenced not only the Symbolist movement of which he was one of the chief initiators, but all of contemporary poetry.

  11. French course for beginners

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A French course for beginners (level 0) will take place from 15 July to 28 August. Timetable: not yet fixed Duration: 54 hours / 2 hours a day Price: 702 SF Please enrol as soon as possible through the Web: http://cern.ch/Training

  12. Reformer Takes French Reins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The painful reforms chosen by French voters to rejuvenate their sluggish economy have smoothed the way for Nicolas Sarkozy to take up France’s top political job.The 52-year-old leader of the ruling right-wing Union

  13. Teaching the French Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    Reports on presentations made at a symposium sponsored by the Connecticut Humanities Council. Papers dealt with teaching the French Revolution by presenting European history in new relationships with the rest of the world and by examining the Declaration of the Rights of Man as it related to the role of women. (KO)

  14. Hydrogeology and management of freshwater lenses on atoll islands: Review of current knowledge and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Adrian D.; Sharp, Hannah K.; Galvis, Sandra C.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Sinclair, Peter

    2017-08-01

    On atoll islands, fresh groundwater occurs as a buoyant lens-shaped body surrounded by saltwater derived from the sea, forming the main freshwater source for many island communities. A review of the state of knowledge of atoll island groundwater is overdue given their susceptibility to adverse impacts, and the task to address water access and sanitation issues within the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals framework before the year 2030. In this article, we review available literature to summarise the key processes, investigation techniques and management approaches of atoll island groundwater systems. Over fifty years of investigation has led to important advancements in the understanding of atoll hydrogeology, but a paucity of hydrogeological data persists on all but a small number of atoll islands. We find that the combined effects of buoyancy forces, complex geology, tides, episodic ocean events, strong climatic variability and human impacts create highly dynamic fresh groundwater lenses. Methods used to quantify freshwater availability range from simple empirical relationships to three-dimensional density-dependent models. Generic atoll island numerical models have proven popular in trying to unravel the individual factors controlling fresh groundwater lens behaviour. Major challenges face the inhabitants and custodians of atoll island aquifers, with rising anthropogenic stresses compounded by the threats of climate variability and change, sea-level rise, and some atolls already extracting freshwater at or above sustainability limits. We find that the study of atoll groundwater systems remains a critical area for further research effort to address persistent knowledge gaps, which lead to high uncertainties in water security issues for both island residents and surrounding environs.

  15. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Reibel

    Full Text Available Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients.Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71. Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31 or from French overseas territories (n = 36 where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4 was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33, followed by type 3 (n = 17, type 4 (n = 11 and type 2 (n = 6. SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients' countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements.The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories, metropolitan France or (b more likely random in regions where

  16. Bikini Atoll coral biodiversity resilience five decades after nuclear testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Zoe T. [Museum of Tropical Queensland, Flinders St, Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia) and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia) and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811 (Australia); NRAS - Marshall Islands: Natural Resource Assessment Surveys (Australia)], E-mail: zoe.richards@jcu.edu.au; Beger, Maria [Ecology Centre and Commonwealth Research Facility for Applied Environmental Decision Analysis, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); NRAS - Marshall Islands: Natural Resource Assessment Surveys (Australia); Pinca, Silvia [College of the Marshall Islands, Majuro, Marshall Islands, NRAS - Marshall Islands: Natural Resource Assessment Surveys (Australia); Wallace, Carden C. [Museum of Tropical Queensland, Flinders St, Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia)

    2008-03-15

    Five decades after a series of nuclear tests began, we provide evidence that 70% of the Bikini Atoll zooxanthellate coral assemblage is resilient to large-scale anthropogenic disturbance. Species composition in 2002 was assessed and compared to that seen prior to nuclear testing. A total of 183 scleractinian coral species was recorded, compared to 126 species recorded in the previous study (excluding synonomies, 148 including synonomies). We found that 42 coral species may be locally extinct at Bikini. Fourteen of these losses may be pseudo-losses due to inconsistent taxonomy between the two studies or insufficient sampling in the second study, however 28 species appear to represent genuine losses. Of these losses, 16 species are obligate lagoonal specialists and 12 have wider habitat compatibility. Twelve species are recorded from Bikini for the first time. We suggest the highly diverse Rongelap Atoll to the east of Bikini may have contributed larval propagules to facilitate the partial resilience of coral biodiversity in the absence of additional anthropogenic threats.

  17. Symbolism in French literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pack

    1990-05-01

    Full Text Available To talk of Symbolism in French literature may be ambiguous, as two different categories of writers have been grouped under this generic term: the symbolists stricto sensu, such as Moréas or Viélé-Griffin, who were mostly minor poets, and some great figures of French literature. The aim of this article is to show that, although Symbolism as an organized movement did not produce any important contribution, the nineteenth century witnessed indeed the emergence of a new trend, common to several poets who were inclined to do away with the heritage of the classical school. These poets - of whom Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud and Mallarmé are the most renowned, although they did not really associate with the symbolist school, created individualistic poetry of the foremost rank.

  18. Final Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, including Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll NWR consists of removing the metal debris remaining from the grounding of a Taiwanese fishing vessel in 1993, and monitoring the...

  19. Developing tools to eradicate ecologically destructive ants on Rose Atoll: effectiveness and attractiveness of formicidal baits

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A key factor contributing to the decline in the population of Pisonia grandis on Rose Atoll is an infestation of the non-native scale, Pulvinaria urbicola...

  20. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  1. Marine species survey of Johnson Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000697)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for nonindigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  2. C-CAP Territory of American Samoa (Rose Atoll) 2006-2009 Land Cover Change Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the 2006 and 2009 classifications of Territory of American Samoa (Rose Atoll) and can be used to analyze change. This data set utilized 1 full...

  3. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2003 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 15 sites at Pearl and Hermes Atoll...

  4. Eradication of Polynesian Rats (rattus exulans) from Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 38-day poison and trap campaign was conducted on Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge to eradicate Polynesian rats in order to reduce their impact of seabird eggs...

  5. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Surveys at the Palmyra Atoll, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 10 sites at Palmyra Atoll in March...

  6. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  7. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands (NWHI), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 13 sites at Pearl and Hermes Atoll...

  8. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  9. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  10. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiiian Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  11. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kingman Atoll, Line Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Palmyra Atoll in the...

  12. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiiian Islands, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  13. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites around Palmyra Atoll in...

  14. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiiian Islands, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  15. Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 2002: January-September

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains monthly reports for Palmyra Atoll NWR from January to September of 2002. The reports address highlights, weather conditions, research...

  16. 77 FR 61426 - Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of..., consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and...

  17. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  18. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 2002 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Pearl and Hermes Atoll...

  19. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2002 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  20. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — One, 25-m line transect was surveyed at 50-cm intervals as part of the Rapid Ecological Assessment conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian...

  1. 2007 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI0701 - Wake Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected between 19 April - 9 May 2007 aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) at Wake Atoll, Western Pacific...

  2. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — One, 25-m line transect was surveyed at 50-cm intervals as part of the Rapid Ecological Assessment conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian...

  3. CRED REA Algal Assessment at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  4. Historical Summary of Sea Turtle Observations at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 1839-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Compilation of 40 recorded observations of sea turtles at Rose Atoll between 1839 and 1991, with each observation consisting of the source, date, and brief notes.

  5. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Kure Atoll, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites Kure Atoll in August, 2003 from...

  6. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas (PRIAs), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 18 sites at Johnston Atoll in the...

  7. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Kure Atoll in the...

  8. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2003 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the...

  9. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 6 sites at Johnston Atoll in the...

  10. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Pearl and Hermes Atoll...

  11. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2003 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  12. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  13. Marine macrophytes of Minicoy (Lakshadweep) coral atoll of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Thirty-seven species of marine algae, belonging to 31 genera 5 seagrass species and one mangrove species, were recorded from Minicoy Atoll. The predominant seaweeds observed were Enteromorpha clathrata, Caulerpa species, Ulva lactuca, Halimeda...

  14. Marine Species Survey of Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean, June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for non-indigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  15. Marine Species Survey of Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific Ocean, June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The marine biota of Johnston atoll was surveyed for non-indigenous species in June, 2000 with observations and collections made by investigators using Scuba. Eleven...

  16. CRED REA Coral Population Paramaters at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 1 or 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 11 sites at Rose Atoll in...

  17. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands (NWHI), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  18. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Surveys at the Midway Atoll, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Midway Atoll in...

  19. CRED REA Algal Assessments, Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2002 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway Atoll in the...

  20. On the occurrence of Bullia tranquebarica (Roding) Nassaridae (Gastropoda) in Kavaratti atoll (Lakshadweep)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Namboodiri, P.N.; Sivadas, P.

    A live buccinid gastropod Bullia tranquebarica belonging to family Nassaridae was collected from Kavaratti atoll in Lakshadweep island of Indian Ocean. Interesting pattern of its distribution is described. This is the second record of occurrence...

  1. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages:   http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registratio...

  2. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. A 'personnel office' stamped photocopy of the old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), between 8:30 and 12:30, in order to fill a 'fiche individuelle' form (in black ink only), which has to be personally signed by themselves and another separately signed by members of their family, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format (signed on the back) The French card in their possession an A4 photocopy of the same Fre...

  3. Language Training: French

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registra...

  4. Analysis of Radiation Exposure for Personnel on the Residence Islands of Enewetak Atoll after Operation GREENHOUSE, 1951-1952.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-20

    ON THE RESIDENCE ISLANDS OF ENEWETAK ATOLL AFTER OPERATION GREENHOUSE, 1951-1952. 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; and Klemm, J. 13a TYPE...radiological environments are reconstructed for the residence islands of Enewetak Atoll following the roll-up phase of Operation GREENHOUSE in May 1951...to June 1952. For an individual assigned to Enewetak Atoll during this period, a mean dose of 1.5-2.0 rem would have been accrued, depending on the

  5. Estimating the freshwater-lens thickness of atoll islands in the Federated States of Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. T.; Jenson, J. W.; Taboroši, D.

    2013-03-01

    The water resources of the 32 atolls of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) are under continual threat from El Niño-induced droughts and other natural hazards. With government policies emphasizing sustainable development of atoll-island communities, local managers are in need of tools for predicting changes in the availability of fresh groundwater, which communities depend upon during droughts that incapacitate rain-catchment systems. An application of a recently developed, readily portable algebraic model is demonstrated here, to estimate the freshwater-lens thickness of atoll islands in the FSM, a key component of FSM groundwater resource assessment. Specifically, the model provides estimates of the lens thickness of atoll islands in the FSM during normal and drought conditions. The model was tested for use in the FSM through comparison with available lens data under both average rainfall conditions and intense drought conditions, and then applied to major islands of each atoll within the FSM. Results indicate that out of 105 major islands on FSM atolls, only six would likely retain sufficient groundwater to sustain the local community during an intense drought.

  6. Meiobenthic and Macrobenthic Community Structure in Carbonate Sediments of Rocas Atoll (North-east, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, S. A.; Warwick, R. M.; Attrill, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rocas is the only atoll of the South Atlantic and it is built almost exclusively by coralline red algae, vermetid gastropods and encrusting foraminiferans. Patterns in the community structure of meiofauna and macrofauna, particularly nematodes and polychaetes, at Rocas Atoll, north-east Brazil, are determined and compared for different habitats: sublittoral, tidal flat, reef pools and lagoon. Nematodes and copepods were the most abundant meiofaunal taxa. In all studied habitats at Rocas Atoll, oligochaetes, nematodes and polychaetes numerically dominate the macrofauna. Univariate and multivariate analyses reveal clear differences in community structure between the habitats of the atoll, especially between the sublittoral and the inner habitats. The number of species, total density, diversity (H') and trophic structure vary significantly between the habitats, but the differences are dependent on which faunistic category (meiobenthic or macrobenthic) is analysed. Nematodes belonging to the Epsilonematidae and Draconematidae, together with a diverse community of meiobenthic polychaetes, characterize the sublittoral habitat of Rocas Atoll. Both meiofauna and macrofauna are depressed in the tidal flat, and the local sediment instability particularly affects the polychaete abundance. Reef pools and lagoons support a very dense aggregation of invertebrates, particularly the macrofauna, when compared with other carbonate reef sediments. However, differences in the structure of meiofauna and macrofauna communities between reef pools and lagoons are not significant. Changes in meiobenthic and macrobenthic community structure are related to the gradation in the physical environment of the atoll.

  7. French public finances at risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creel Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using descriptive evidence, this paper contributes to the debate on French public finances’ consolidation by examining the long-term sustainability of France’s fiscal position. We trace the historical trends of government’s tax receipts and expenditures. We illustrate that while the level of public expenditure in France is larger than in the Euro Area, its trend is comparable to its neighbours. French net debt is comparable to Eurozone’s while French net wealth remains positive. However, the French tax system is not progressive with only 6% of compulsory levies raised that way, and too complex. The paper then acknowledges the efficient debt management of French authorities. As a conclusion, we see no risk of future unsustainability linked to the nature or the level of current French public finances.

  8. Baseline Marine Biological Survey ROI-NAMUR Outfall United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1997(NODC Accession 0000630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll(USAKA) central command post on...

  9. Baseline marine biological survey at Roi-Namur sewage outfall, United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1997 (NODC Accession 0000630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) central command post on...

  10. Marine biological survey of ROI-NAMUR outfall at the United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, May 2000 (NODC Accession 0000653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll, approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) central command post on...

  11. Marine Biological Survey ROI-NAMUR Outfall, United States Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, May 2000 (NODC Accession 0000653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Roi-Namur is located at the northernmost tip of Kwajalein Atoll,approximately 64 kilometers north of the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll(USAKA) central command post on...

  12. [French immigration policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, P

    1994-01-01

    From the late nineteenth century through 1974, France permitted immigration to furnish workers and to compensate for the low level of fertility. Intense immigration from North Africa, the economic crisis of the 1970s, and other factors led to policy changes in 1974. French immigration policy since 1974 has fluctuated between guaranteeing foreigners equal rights regardless of their religion, race, culture, or national origin, and attempting to differentiate among immigrants depending on their degree of assimilability to French culture. From 1974 to 1988, France had five different policies regarding whether to permit new immigration and what to do about illegal immigrants. In July 1984, the four major political parties unanimously supported a measure in Parliament that definitively guaranteed the stay in France of legal immigrants, whose assimilation thus assumed priority. Aid for return to the homeland was no longer to be widely offered, and immigration of unskilled workers was to be terminated except for those originating in European Community countries. Major changes of government in 1988 and 1993 affected only the modalities of applying these principles. The number of immigrants has fluctuated since 1974. Unskilled workers, the only category whose entrance was specifically controlled by the 1984 measures, have declined from 174,000 in 1970 to 25,000 in the early 1990s. The number of requests for political asylum declined from 60,000 in 1989 to 27,000 in 1993, and in 1991, 15,467 persons were granted refugee status. The number of immigrants of all types permitted to remain in France declined from 250,000 or 3000 per year in the early 1970s to around 110,000 at present. Although the decline is significant, it appears insufficient to the government in power since 1993. Although migratory flows are often explained as the product of imbalance in the labor market or in demographic growth, the French experience suggests that government policies, both in the sending and

  13. French grammar made easy

    CERN Document Server

    McNab, Rosi

    2014-01-01

    The Grammar Made Easy series is ideal for complete beginners as well as for those non-linguists who have some knowledge of the language but need to know the basics of grammar to progress beyond phrasebook level. The books consist of seven units that present basic grammar topics in an accessible and non-patronising manner. The interactive CD-ROM provides extensive interactive grammar practice, it contains around 220 activities (those included in the book plus extra ones) covering all the language in French Grammar Made Easy. Learners work at their own pace and move through the different sect

  14. FRENCH PROTOCOL CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des Ressources Humaines; Human Resources Division; Tel. 74683-79494

    2000-01-01

    Senior officials, holders of FRENCH PROTOCOL cards (blue cards) due to expire on 31.12.2000, are requested to return these cards and those of family members, for extension to: Bureau des cartes, Bât 33.1-009/1-015 Should the three spaces for authentication on the back of the card be full, please enclose two passport photographs for a new card. In the case of children aged 14 and over, an attestation of dependency and a school certificate should be returned with the card.

  15. FRENCH PROTOCOL CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2000-01-01

    Senior officials, holders of FRENCH PROTOCOL cards (blue cards) due to expire on 31.12.2000, are requested to return these cards and those of family members, for extension to: Bureau des cartes, Bât 33.1-009/1-015 Should the three spaces for authentication on the back of the card be full, please enclose two passport photographs for a new card. In the case of children aged 14 and over, an attestation of dependency and a school certificate should be returned with the card.

  16. FRENCH PROTOCOL CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Division du Personnel

    1999-01-01

    Senior officials, holders of FRENCH PROTOCOL cards (blue cards) due to expire on 31.12.1999, are requested to return these cards and those of family members, for extension to:Bureau des cartes, bâtiment 33.1-025Should the 3 spaces for authentication on the back of the card be full, please enclose 2 passport photographs for a new card.In the case of children aged 14 and over, an attestation of dependency and a school certificate should be returned with the card.Personnel DivisionTel. 79494/74683

  17. 1001 easy French phrases

    CERN Document Server

    McCoy, Heather

    2010-01-01

    The perfect companion for tourists and business travelers in France and other places where the French language is spoken, this book offers fast, effective communication. More than 1,000 basic words, phrases, and sentences cover everything from asking directions and renting a car to ordering dinner and finding a bank.Designed as a quick reference tool and an easy study guide, this inexpensive and easy-to-use book offers completely up-to-date terms for modern telecommunications, idioms, and slang. The contents are arranged for quick access to phrases related to greetings, transportation, shoppin

  18. Invitation Refusals in Cameroon French and Hexagonal French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenkia, Bernard Mulo

    2015-01-01

    Descriptions of regional pragmatic variation in French are lacking to date the focus has been on a limited range of speech acts, including apologies, requests, compliments and responses to compliments. The present paper, a systematic analysis of invitation refusals across regional varieties of French, is designed to add to the research on…

  19. The French Revolution on Film: American and French Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harison, Casey

    2005-01-01

    It is not hard to locate negative or condescending images of the French Revolution in aspects of popular American culture, including film. Despite a handful of instances where nuanced or ambiguous "messages" may be identified, the number of American film interpretations of the French Revolution that might be judged historically…

  20. Comparison of tropospheric integrated water vapor content by using GPS, radiosonde, radiometer data and models for the tropical Island of Tahiti (French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, J.; Barriot, J.; Fadil, A.; Sichoix, L.

    2011-12-01

    The integrated precipitable water (IPW) in the troposphere can be subject to strong spatial and temporal variations, in particular over tropical zones. The IPW is estimated at the Geodetic Tahiti Observatory site from GPS, radiosonde, radiometer measurements. 8 years (2001-2008) of GPS observations at the IGS THTI station are processed with the GIPSY-OASIS II software package following the precise point positioning (PPP) mode. We compare the IPW of the permanent GPS data with those derived from the collocated radiometer and radiosonde data. The Global Forecast System (GFS) model which covers the entire globe with one degree latitude and longitude grid spacing, is then used to obtain the IPW at the same site. The meteorological surface data (pressure, temperature and relative humidity) also help to compute the IPW by using the Saastamoinen model. Finally, the analysis of the correlation between all these IPW estimates leads us to re-adjust the Saastamoinen parameters such that correction coefficients now better constrain the tropospheric model.

  1. Compared efficacy of repeated annual and semi-annual doses of ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine for prevention of Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis in French Polynesia. Final evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartel, J L; Spiegel, A; Nguyen Ngnoc, L; Cardines, R; Plichart, R; Martin, P M; Roux, J F; Moulia-Pelat, J P

    1992-06-01

    In October 1989, 58 apparently healthy Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers, in whom microfilarial (mf) density was greater than or equal to 100 mf/ml, were randomly allocated to treatment groups receiving single doses of either ivermectin at 100 mcg/kg or diethylcarbamazine (DEC) at 3 and 6 mg/kg. Six months later, half of the carriers initially treated with ivermectin 100 mcg/kg or DEC 3 mg/kg were given a second similar dose while the rest were given a placebo. Six months later again, all of the carriers received a last treatment dose similar to the initial one. The results observed during the 12-month period which followed this last treatment have confirmed that (i) in terms of immediate clearance or complete negativation of microfilaremia, the efficacy of ivermectin is higher than that of DEC (at dosage of 3 or 6 mg/kg), (ii) DEC is more effective than ivermectin in sustaining the reduction of microfilaremia over a longer period of time and (iii) the efficacy of repeated single doses of either DEC 3 mg/kg or ivermectin 100 mcg/kg is much higher when given semi-annually than annually.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A new model evaluating Holocene sediment dynamics: Insights from a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic lagoon (Bora Bora, Society Islands, French Polynesia, South Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaack, Anja; Gischler, Eberhard; Hudson, J. Harold; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Lohner, Andreas; Vogel, Hendrik; Garbode, Eva; Camoin, Gilbert F.

    2016-08-01

    Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic lagoons of barrier reefs provide great potential as sedimentary archives focusing on paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic changes as well as on event deposition. Sediment sources include lagoonal carbonate production, the marginal reef and the volcanic hinterland. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic continent-attached coastal lagoons have been intensively studied, however, their isolated oceanic counterparts have been widely disregarded. Here, we present a new model of Holocene sediment dynamics in the barrier-reef lagoon of Bora Bora based on sedimentological, paleontological, geochronological and geochemical data. The lagoonal succession started with a Pleistocene soil representing the Lowstand Systems Tract. As the rising Holocene sea inundated the carbonate platform, peat accumulated locally 10,650-9400 years BP. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation started ca. 8700-5500 years BP and represents the Transgressive Systems Tract. During that time, sediments were characterized by relatively coarse grain size and contained high amounts of terrestrial material from the volcanic hinterland as well as carbonate sediments mainly produced within the lagoon. Siliciclastic content decreases throughout the Holocene. After the rising sea had reached its modern level, sand aprons formed between reef crest and lagoon creating transport pathways for reef-derived material leading to carbonate-dominated sedimentation ca. 6000-3000 years BP during the Highstand Systems Tract. However, mainly fine material was transported and accumulated in the lagoon while coarser grains were retained on the prograding sand apron. From ca. 4500-500 years BP, significant variations in grain-size, total organic carbon as indicator for primary productivity, Ca and Cl element intensities as qualitative indicators for carbonate availability and lagoonal salinity are seen. Such patterns could indicate event (re-)deposition and correlate with contemporaneous event deposits found in the lagoon of nearby Tahaa, which are supposed to be induced by elevated cyclone activity. Correspondingly, enhanced erosion and run-off from the volcanic hinterland as well as lower lagoonal salinity would be associated with intense rainfall during repeated cyclone landfall. Increased amounts of coarse-grained sediment from marginal reef areas would be transported into the lagoon. However, Ti/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios as proxies for terrigenous sediment delivery have incessantly declined since the mid-Holocene. Also, benthic foraminiferal faunas do not validate reef-to-lagoon transport of sediment. Alternatively, the apparent onset of higher hydrodynamic energy conditions can be explained by more permanent southeast trade winds and higher-than-present sea level, which are supposed for the mid-late Holocene in the south Pacific. Sustained winds would have flushed higher amounts of open ocean water into the lagoon enhancing primary productivity and the amount of pelagic organisms within the lagoon while lowering lagoonal salinity. We propose the shift towards coarser-grained sedimentation patterns during the mid-late Holocene to reflect sediment-load shedding of sand aprons due to oversteepening of slopes at sand apron/lagoon edges during times of stronger trades and higher-than-present sea level of the Highstand Systems Tract, which led to redeposition of sediment even within the lagoon center. Modern conditions including a sea-level fall to modern level were reached ca. 1000 years BP, and lagoonal infill has been determined to a large part by fine-grained carbonate-dominated sediments produced within the lagoon and derived from the marignal reef. Infill of lagoonal accommodation space via sand aprons is estimated to be up to six times higher than infill by lagoonal background sedimentation and emphasizes the importance of the progradation of sand aprons. Contrary to the commonly supposed assumption that coarse-grained sediment layers within fine-grained lagoonal successions represent overwash events induced by storms or periods of higher storm activity, we postulate a new model of long-term lagoonal sediment dynamics including sea level, climatic change and geomorphological variation of the barrier reef lagoon.

  3. Coral species identification and occurrences from sites at Mandano and Wakatobi, Sulawesi, Indonesia and Raiatea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, March-May, 2002 (NODC Accession 0039738)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are coral species and occurrences data from Pacific reef areas (crest, flat, and slope) collected at sites in Manado, northern Sulawesi, Indonesia (app....

  4. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls in the Northern Line Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Dinsdale

    Full Text Available Microbes are key players in both healthy and degraded coral reefs. A combination of metagenomics, microscopy, culturing, and water chemistry were used to characterize microbial communities on four coral atolls in the Northern Line Islands, central Pacific. Kingman, a small uninhabited atoll which lies most northerly in the chain, had microbial and water chemistry characteristic of an open ocean ecosystem. On this atoll the microbial community was equally divided between autotrophs (mostly Prochlorococcus spp. and heterotrophs. In contrast, Kiritimati, a large and populated ( approximately 5500 people atoll, which is most southerly in the chain, had microbial and water chemistry characteristic of a near-shore environment. On Kiritimati, there were 10 times more microbial cells and virus-like particles in the water column and these microbes were dominated by heterotrophs, including a large percentage of potential pathogens. Culturable Vibrios were common only on Kiritimati. The benthic community on Kiritimati had the highest prevalence of coral disease and lowest coral cover. The middle atolls, Palmyra and Tabuaeran, had intermediate densities of microbes and viruses and higher percentages of autotrophic microbes than either Kingman or Kiritimati. The differences in microbial communities across atolls could reflect variation in 1 oceaonographic and/or hydrographic conditions or 2 human impacts associated with land-use and fishing. The fact that historically Kingman and Kiritimati did not differ strongly in their fish or benthic communities (both had large numbers of sharks and high coral cover suggest an anthropogenic component in the differences in the microbial communities. Kingman is one of the world's most pristine coral reefs, and this dataset should serve as a baseline for future studies of coral reef microbes. Obtaining the microbial data set, from atolls is particularly important given the association of microbes in the ongoing degradation

  5. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level...

  6. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of s...

  7. Essential French Vocabulary Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Thomas, Noel

    2010-01-01

    Essential French Vocabulary is the course for you if you need help with your study of French. This fully revised edition of our best-selling course now comes with free downloadable audio support containing hints on how to learn vocabulary effectively.

  8. French in the Ivory Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djite, Paulin G.

    1989-01-01

    Overviews the Ivory Coast's sociolinguistic situation. Standard French, restricted to the elite, is threatened by the local lingua franca. The spread and functional allocations of Dyula and Popular French support the point that the pervasive use of a language does not always lead to its adoption as a national language. (CB)

  9. Essential French Verbs Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Weston, Marie-Therese

    2010-01-01

    Essential French Verbs is the course for you if you need help with your study of French. This fully revised edition of our best-selling course now comes with free downloadable audio support containing hints on how to learn verbs effectively.

  10. French in the Ivory Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djite, Paulin G.

    1989-01-01

    Overviews the Ivory Coast's sociolinguistic situation. Standard French, restricted to the elite, is threatened by the local lingua franca. The spread and functional allocations of Dyula and Popular French support the point that the pervasive use of a language does not always lead to its adoption as a national language. (CB)

  11. Publications in psychology: French issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANK ARNOULD

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the situation of psychology publications in France, in particular, the visibility of French research through journals and bibliographic databases; the role of publications for the evalua-tion of researchers and laboratories, and the contribution of French psychologists to a national publica-tions archiving platform.

  12. The French Revolution and "Revisionism."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Claude

    1990-01-01

    Outlines revisionist interpretations of the French Revolution that challenged the dominant historiographical tradition during the 1950s and 1960s. Distinguishes four central characteristics of revisionist works. Identifies a key split in current French Revolution historiography between reflection on nineteenth-century…

  13. General and Professional French Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    The next session will take place from 11 October to 17 December 2010. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. NEW COURSES Specific French courses -Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. DELF 1 and 2). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an intermediate level of French, please enrol through the following link: French courses or contact: Lucette Fournier, tel.  73483 (French courses).

  14. 78 FR 7385 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ...; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll Marine National Monuments AGENCY... Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll Marine National Monuments. DATES: NMFS must receive... record and will generally be posted for public viewing on www.regulations.gov without change....

  15. Modern microbialites and their environmental significance, Meiji reef atoll, Nansha (Spratly) Islands, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN JianWei; WANG Yue

    2008-01-01

    Meiji (Mischief) coral atoll, in Nansha (Spratly) Islands, South China Sea, consists of an annular reef rim surrounding a central lagoon. On the atoll rim there are either protuberant 'motu' (small coral patch reefs on the rim of atoll) islets or lower sandy cays that contain modern microbialite deposits on the corals in pinnacles and surrounding bottoms of the atoll. Microbialites, including villiform, hairy, and thin spine growth forms, as well as gelatinous masses, mats and encruststion, developed on coral colonies and atoll rim sediments between 0 and 15 m deep-water settings. The microbialites were produced by natural populations of filamentous cyanobacteria and grew on (1) bulbous corals together with Acropora sp., (2) on massive colonies of Galaxea fascicularis, (3) on dead Montipora digitata, and (4) on dead Acropora teres, some hairy microbialite growing around broken coral branches. This study demonstrates that microbial carbonates are developed in coral reefs of South China Sea and indicates that microbial processes may be important in the construction of modern reef systems. The results have significance in the determination of nature and composition in microorganisms implied in the formation ancient microbialites, and permit evaluation of the importance of microbial deposits in modern coral reefs and of 'microbialites' in biogeochemical cycles of modern coral reef systems. The results also provide evidence of modern analogues for ancient microbialites in shallow-water settings, and combine with sedimentological studies of ancient microbialites to understand their controls.

  16. Coastal groundwater exchange on a small Pacific atoll island: Roi Namur, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Ferdinand K. J.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Storlazzi, Curt

    2017-04-01

    Atoll islands, most of which only average 1-2 meters above today's sea level, provide a tremendous natural laboratory in which to study and better understand the intensifying impacts of high rates of sea-level rise on tropical reef-lined islands globally due to their unique geologic structure and limited water supply. Groundwater resources of atolls are typically minimal due to the low elevation and small surface area of the islands and are also subject to recurring droughts, and more frequent, storm-driven seawater overwash events. Although groundwater is the principal means of freshwater storage on atoll islands and is a major factor in determining the overall sustainability of island communities, hydrological data on how an aquifer will response to changes in sea-level rise or storm-driven overwash remain limited. We here present high-resolution time series hydrogeological and geochemical data to determine the role of the atoll's carbonate geology, land use, and atmospheric and oceanographic forcing in driving coastal groundwater exchange on the island of Roi Namur on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This information can provide new estimates on the recovery and resilience of coastal groundwater resources on such islands to expected climate change-driven perturbations.

  17. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  18. Practising French grammar a workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dr Roger Hawkins; Towell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This new edition of Practising French Grammar offers a set of varied and accessible exercises for developing a practical awareness of French as it is spoken and written today. The lively examples and authentic texts and cartoons have been updated to reflect current usage. A new companion website provides a wealth of additional interactive exercises to help consolidate challenging grammar points. Practising French Grammar provides concise summaries of key grammatical points at the beginning of each exercise, as well as model answers to the exercises and translations of difficult words, making i

  19. The french educational satellite arsene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danvel, M.; Escudier, B.

    ARSENE (Ariane, Radio-amateur, Satellite pour l'ENseignement de l'Espace) is a telecommunications satellite for Amateur Space Service. Its main feature is that more than 100 students from French engineering schools and universities have been working since 1979 for definition phase and satellite development. The highest IAF awards has been obtained by "ARSENE students" in Tokyo (1980) and Rome (1981). The French space agency, CNES and French aerospace industries are supporting the program. The European Space Agency offered to place ARSENE in orbit on the first Ariane mark IV launch late 1985.

  20. Gabonese French Dictionaries: Survey and Perspectives*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gabonese languages), but also to standard French, official French (acrolectal .... Page 3 ... dynamic than others. ... Common French and popular French are not standardized or normalized ..... Coming back to the organization of the National Lexicographic Units (NLUs) ... As a result of these studies, a major project involving.

  1. Teaching for Content: Greek Mythology in French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giauque, Gerald S.

    An intermediate-level university French course in Greek mythology was developed to (1) improve student skills in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending French, (2) familiarize students with Greek mythology, and (3) prepare students to deal better with allusions to Greek mythology in French literature. The texts used are a French translation…

  2. 21 CFR 169.115 - French dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false French dressing. 169.115 Section 169.115 Food and... § 169.115 French dressing. (a) Description. French dressing is the separable liquid food or the... fabricated shall be safe and suitable. French dressing contains not less than 35 percent by weight...

  3. 7 CFR 993.7 - French prunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false French prunes. 993.7 Section 993.7 Agriculture... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.7 French prunes. French prunes means: (a) Prunes produced from plums of the following varieties of plums: French (Prune d'Agen, Petite Prune d'Agen), Coates...

  4. Wave transformation and shoreline water level on Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Edward; Kench, Paul S.; O'Callaghan, Joanne; Popinet, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The influence of sea swell (SS) waves, infragravity (IG) waves, and wave setup on maximum runup (Rmax) is investigated across different tidal stages on Fatato Island, Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu. Field results illustrate that SS waves are tidally modulated at the shoreline, with comparatively greater wave attenuation and setup occurring at low tide versus high tide. A shoreward increase in IG wave height is observed across the 100 m wide reef flat at all tidal elevations, with no tidal modulation of IG wave height at the reef flat or island shoreline. A 1-D shock-capturing Green-Naghdi solver is used to replicate the field deployment and analyze Rmax. Model outputs for SS wave height, IG wave height and setup at the shoreline match field results with model skill >0.96. Model outputs for Rmax are used to identify the temporal window when geomorphic activity can occur on the beach face. During periods of moderate swell energy, waves can impact the beach face at spring low tide, due to a combination of wave setup and strong IG wave activity. Under mean wave conditions, the combined influence of setup, IG waves and SS waves results in interaction with island sediment at midtide. At high tide, SS and IG waves directly impact the beach face. Overall, wave activity is present on the beach face for 71% of the study period, a significantly longer duration than is calculated using mean water level and topographic data.

  5. French Literature Abroad: Towards an Alternative History of French Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gaunt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available What would a history of medieval literature in French that is not focused on France and Paris look like? Taking as its starting point the key role played in the development of textual culture in French by geographical regions that are either at the periphery of French-speaking areas, or alternatively completely outside them, this article offers three case studies: first of a text composed in mid-twelfth century England; then of one from early thirteenth-century Flanders; and finally from late thirteenth-century Italy. What difference does it make if we do not read these texts, and the language in which they are written, in relation to French norms, but rather look at their cultural significance both at their point of production, and then in transmission? A picture emerges of a literary culture in French that is mobile and cosmopolitan, one that cannot be tied to the teleology of an emerging national identity, and one that is a bricolage of a range of influences that are moving towards France as well as being exported from it. French itself functions as a supralocal written language (even when it has specific local features and therefore may function more like Latin than a local vernacular.

  6. Dialect Effects in Speech Perception: The Role of Vowel Duration in Parisian French and Swiss French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joanne L.; Mondini, Michele; Grosjean, Francois; Dommergues, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    The current experiments examined how native Parisian French and native Swiss French listeners use vowel duration in perceiving the /[openo]/-/o/ contrast. In both Parisian and Swiss French /o/ is longer than /[openo]/, but the difference is relatively large in Swiss French and quite small in Parisian French. In Experiment 1 we found a parallel…

  7. French switch off in protest

    CERN Multimedia

    McCabe, H

    1999-01-01

    French scientists have refused to restart two synchrotron machines after the summer vacation. They are protesting at the government decision to give money to the British synchrotron project Diamond, so ending hopes of the construction of the proposed

  8. Reshuffle lifts French synchrotron hopes

    CERN Multimedia

    McCabe, H

    2000-01-01

    The sacking of Claude Allegre as research minister has raised doubts over the level of France's promised participation in the construction of Diamond but reawakened French hopes that the synchrotron Soleil may now be built (1 page).

  9. Q fever in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Carole; Mahamat, Aba; Demar, Magalie; Abboud, Philippe; Djossou, Félix; Raoult, Didier

    2014-10-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is present worldwide. Recent studies have shown that this bacterium is an emerging pathogen in French Guiana and has a high prevalence (24% of community-acquired pneumonia). In this review, we focus on the peculiar epidemiology of Q fever in French Guiana. We place it in the context of the epidemiology of the disease in the surrounding countries of South America. We also review the clinical features of Q fever in this region, which has severe initial presentation but low mortality rates. These characteristics seem to be linked to a unique genotype (genotype 17). Finally, we discuss the issue of the animal reservoir of C. burnetii in French Guiana, which is still unknown. Further studies are necessary to identify this reservoir. Identification of this reservoir will improve the understanding of the Q fever epidemic in French Guiana and will provide new tools to control this public health problem.

  10. Feudalism and the French Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Thomas E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews and questions the traditional established interpretation that the French Revolution was about feudalism. Concludes that revisionist historians have cast doubt upon the orthodox theory but that they have not supplied an alternative explanation. (Author/DB)

  11. General and professionnal French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. These courses are open to everyone working on the CERN site and to their spouses.   Oral Expression This course is aimed at students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their oral communication skills. Activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc. The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our web site or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896 - language.training@cern.ch).

  12. General and professionnal French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. These courses are open to everyone working on the CERN site and to their spouses.   Oral Expression This course is aimed at students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 27 January to 4 April 2014. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our web site or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896 - language.training@cern.ch).

  13. The record of Pliocene sea-level change at Enewetak Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Bruce R.; Quinn, Terrence M.

    Detailed seismic stratigraphy, lithostratigraphy, and chemostratigraphy indicate that atoll-wide subaerial exposure surfaces (major disconformities) developed during major sea-level lowstands form prominent seismic reflectors and are coincident with biostratigraphic breaks in the Plio-Pleistocene on Enewetak Atoll. Sea-level models based on the stratigraphic position and age of major disconformities suggest a maximum sea-level highstand elevation of 36 m above present sea level and a maximum sea-level lowstand elevation of 63 m below present sea level for the Pliocene.

  14. English and French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to learn a language, there is no excuse anymore!   You can attend one of our English or French courses and you can practise the language with a tandem partner! Cours d’anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 3 mars au 27 juin 2014. Ces cours s’adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu’à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web : http://cern.ch/Training. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 3 March to 27 June 2014. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Writing Profe...

  15. Wuchereria bancrofti (Filariidea: Dipetalonematidae) and its vector Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) in a French Polynesian village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, F; Nguyen, N L; Cartel, J L

    1995-05-01

    In March 1991, a study on Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold, 1887) infection rates in its vector, Aedes polynesiensis Marks, was carried out in a village of French Polynesia. Our data were collected 10 yr after the suspension of human mass chemoprophylaxis and served as a baseline for pending ivermectin treatment scheduled in 1991-1993. In total, 1,789 biting females were collected, of which 1,740 were dissected and 1,183 (68%) were parous. Among these, 106 (8.96%) were infected with W. bancrofti and 34 (2.87%) harbored infective L3 larvae. The mean number of larvae per infected mosquito was 2.69, and the mean number of L3 larvae per L3 positive mosquito was 1.44. The Ae. polynesiensis biting index was 4.7 bites per 15 min, but varied significantly among habitats. The highest parous biting rates occurred in fields and peridomestic gardens and the lowest was close to houses. The proportion of parous infected and infective mosquitoes was higher in peridomestic habitats (0.25 infective bites per 15 min) than in domestic habitats (0.09) or in fields (0.11).

  16. A study of the Brazilian Fernando de Noronha island and Rocas atoll wakes in the tropical Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamabi, Christine C.; Araujo, Moacyr; Silva, Marcus; Bourlès, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Observational data and numerical modeling were used to investigate oceanic current wakes surrounding Fernando de Noronha Island (3°51‧S-32°25‧W) and Rocas Atoll (3°52‧S-33°49‧W). These two Brazilian systems are located in the western tropical Atlantic region and are under the influence of the westward flow of the central South Equatorial Current (cSEC). In order to highlight the effects of wakes on ocean dynamics, two different numerical simulations were performed, using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS): the first one including Fernando de Noronha Island and Rocas Atoll (Scenario I) and the second one with artificial removal of the island and atoll (Scenario NI). Simulations are validated through the Scenario I that well reproduces the wakes that give rise to the development of eddies downstream of FN and AR. These mesoscale structures have a strong influence on the thermodynamic properties surrounding the Island and the Atoll. Scenario NI allows evidence of the presence of an Island and Atoll shoaling mixed layer throughout the year, primarily on the western side of the Island and the Atoll. Mixing at the base of the mixed layer, inducing a subsurface cooling, is also enhanced in the downstream portion of the Island and Atoll, particularly when the cSEC is strengthened. These simulations support the ;island mass effect; on the high productivity of subsurface waters generally observed on the western side of these islands.

  17. Larger foraminifer biostratigraphy of PEACE boreholes, Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, T.G.; Margerum, R.

    1991-01-01

    Larger foraminiferal assemblages, including Lepidocyclina orientalis, Miogypsina thecideaeformis, Miogypsinoides dehaartii, etc., and a smaller foraminifer, Austrotrillina striata, are used to correlate upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata in the Pacific Atoll Exploration Program (PEACE) boreholes at Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, western Pacific Ocean, with the Te and Tf zones of the previously established Tertiary Far East Letter Zonation. Correlation using these two benthic groups is critical because calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers are absent in the lower Miocene strata. Biostratigraphic data from these boreholes delineate a thick (greater than 700 feet) sequence of upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata corresponding to lower and upper Te zone. These strata document a major period of carbonate accumulation at Enewetak during the Late Oligocene and early Miocene (26 to 18 million years ago).

  18. Population dynamics of Siderastrea stellata Verrill, 1868 from Rocas Atoll, RN: implications for predicted climate change impacts at the only South Atlantic atoll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Andrea L; Cordeiro, Soraia M; Reis, Joice N; Cardoso, Lucas G; Guimarães, Alaíse G

    2017-01-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean warming and acidification, and it is important to determine the role of reef building species in this environment in order to obtain insight into their susceptibility to expected impacts of global changes. Aspects of the life history of a coral population, such as reproduction, growth and size-frequency can contribute to the production of models that are used to estimate impacts and potential recovery of the population, acting as a powerful tool for the conservation and management of those ecosystems. Here, we present the first evidence of Siderastrea stellata planulation, its early growth, population size-frequency distribution and growth rate of adult colonies in Rocas Atoll. Our results, together with the environmental protection policies and the absence of anthropogenic pressures, suggest that S. stellata population may have a good potential in the maintenance and recovery in the atoll. However, our results also indicate an impact on corals' recruitment, probably as a consequence of the positive temperature anomaly that occurred in 2010. Thus, despite the pristine status of Rocas Atoll, the preservation of its coral community seems to be threatened by current global changes, such as more frequent thermal stress events.

  19. Population dynamics of Siderastrea stellata Verrill, 1868 from Rocas Atoll, RN: implications for predicted climate change impacts at the only South Atlantic atoll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBARA R. PINHEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Coral reefs are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean warming and acidification, and it is important to determine the role of reef building species in this environment in order to obtain insight into their susceptibility to expected impacts of global changes. Aspects of the life history of a coral population, such as reproduction, growth and size-frequency can contribute to the production of models that are used to estimate impacts and potential recovery of the population, acting as a powerful tool for the conservation and management of those ecosystems. Here, we present the first evidence of Siderastrea stellata planulation, its early growth, population size-frequency distribution and growth rate of adult colonies in Rocas Atoll. Our results, together with the environmental protection policies and the absence of anthropogenic pressures, suggest that S. stellata population may have a good potential in the maintenance and recovery in the atoll. However, our results also indicate an impact on corals' recruitment, probably as a consequence of the positive temperature anomaly that occurred in 2010. Thus, despite the pristine status of Rocas Atoll, the preservation of its coral community seems to be threatened by current global changes, such as more frequent thermal stress events.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Palmyra Atoll Site 30P-A 8/10/2006 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 30P-A (05 52.663N, 162 07.113W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Palmyra Atoll Site 16P 8/12/2006 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Palmyra Atoll, site 16P (5 52.291N, 162 06.738W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P7 9/27/2002 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P7 (27.864 N, 175.792 W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Johnston Atoll Site 3B-P 7/1/2000 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3B-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 47.170N, 169 27.908W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 47.170N, 169 27.908W), between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Johnston Atoll Site 3A-P 7/1/2000 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3A-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Johnston Atoll Site 1B-P 6/29/2000 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1B-P (16 47.147N, 169 27.695W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Johnston Atoll Site 2B-P 6/30/2000 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2B-P (16 45.606N, 169 30.705W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 47.170N, 169 27.908W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 3B-P 7/1/2000 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 3B-P (16 45.260N, 169 31.039W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 2B-P 6/30/2000 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2B-P (16 45.606N, 169 30.705W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Johnston Atoll Site 2B-P 6/30/2000 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2B-P (16 45.606N, 169 30.705W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Johnston Atoll Site 10P 1/15/2004 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 10P (16 45.807N, 169 30.705W), between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 47.170N, 169 27.908W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Johnston Atoll Site 2B-P 6/30/2000 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2B-P (16 45.606N, 169 30.705W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Johnston Atoll Site 2A-P 6/30/2000 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 2A-P (16 45.815N, 169 30.706W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Johnston Atoll Site 4P 7/1/2000 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 4P (16 46.246N, 169 30.337W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 1/23/2006 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 46.909N, 169 27.757W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 7/3/2000 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Johnston Atoll Site 6P 1/23/2006 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 6P (16 43.113N, 169 33.076W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Johnston Atoll Site 1A-P 6/29/2000 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Johnston Atoll, site 1A-P (16 47.170N, 169 27.908W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 13P 2/19/2012 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/29/1999 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 8-9M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 8 and 9 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 62-63M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 62 and 63 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P2 6/13/2000 51-52M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P2 (27.833N, 175.751 W), between 51 and 52 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 84-85M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 84 and 85 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P2 6/13/2000 83-84M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P2 (27.833N, 175.751 W), between 83 and 84 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P2 6/13/2000 63-64M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P2 (27.833N, 175.751 W), between 63 and 64 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 59-60M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 59 and 60 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 78-79M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 78 and 79 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P1 (27.831N, 175.751 W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 64-65M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 64 and 65 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 48-49M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 48 and 49 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P4 6/14/2000 77-78M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P4 (27.834N, 175.753 W), between 77 and 78 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P1 (27.831N, 175.751 W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P6 9/19/2002 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P6 (27.817 N, 175.833W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P3 6/14/2000 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P3 (27.833 N, 175.753W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P1 (27.831N, 175.751 W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P2 6/13/2000 54-55M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P2 (27.833N, 175.751 W), between 54 and 55 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P2 6/13/2000 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P2 (27.833N, 175.751 W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P2 6/13/2000 78-79M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P2 (27.833N, 175.751 W), between 78 and 79 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Pearl & Hermes Atoll Site P1 6/13/2000 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Pearl & Hermes Atoll, site P1 (27.831N, 175.751 W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.