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Sample records for atmyb41 regulates transcriptional

  1. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  2. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    in different cell types. This thesis presents several methods for analysis and description of promoters. We focus particularly the binding sites of TFs and computational methods for locating these. We contribute to the ¿eld by compiling a database of binding preferences for TFs which can be used for site...... published providing an unbiased overview of the transcription start site (TSS) usage in a tissue. We have paired this method with high-throughput sequencing technology to produce a library of unprecedented depth (DeepCAGE) for the mouse hippocampus. We investigated this in detail and focused particularly...

  3. The grammar of transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Segal, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotes employ combinatorial strategies to generate a variety of expression patterns from a relatively small set of regulatory DNA elements. As in any other language, deciphering the mapping between DNA and expression requires an understanding of the set of rules that govern basic principles in transcriptional regulation, the functional elements involved, and the ways in which they combine to orchestrate a transcriptional output. Here, we review the current understanding of various grammatical rules, including the effect on expression of the number of transcription factor binding sites, their location, orientation, affinity and activity; co-association with different factors; and intrinsic nucleosome organization. We review different methods that are used to study the grammar of transcription regulation, highlight gaps in current understanding, and discuss how recent technological advances may be utilized to bridge them. PMID:24390306

  4. The transcriptional regulation of pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Chi Yeo; Huck-Hui Ng

    2013-01-01

    The defining features of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are their self-renewing and pluripotent capacities.Indeed,the ability to give rise into all cell types within the organism not only allows ESCs to function as an ideal in vitro tool to study embryonic development,but also offers great therapeutic potential within the field of regenerative medicine.However,it is also this same remarkable developmental plasticity that makes the efficient control of ESC differentiation into the desired cell type very difficult.Therefore,in order to harness ESCs for clinical applications,a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling ESC pluripotency and lineage commitment is necessary.In this respect,through a variety of transcriptomic approaches,ESC pluripotency has been found to be regulated by a system of ESC-associated transcription factors; and the external signalling environment also acts as a key factor in modulating the ESC transcriptome.Here in this review,we summarize our current understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network in ESCs,discuss how the control of various signalling pathways could influence pluripotency,and provide a future outlook of ESC research.

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  8. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  9. The Lrp family of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2003-01-01

    Genome analysis has revealed that members of the Lrp family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea. The archetype Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein from Escherichia coli is a global regulator involved in modulating a variety of metabolic

  10. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  11. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  12. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2016-04-19

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  13. Computational Analysis of the Transcriptional Regulation of the Actin Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑家顺; 吴加金; 孙之荣

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a very important regulatory step in the regulation of gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role in controlling the temporal special specificity of gene expression. The regulation area of actin genes was analyzed statistically to predict the transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory area. A group of transcription factors located in most of the sequences is believed to play an important role in co-regulating the expression of actin genes.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of TMP21 by NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Kun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TMP21 is a member of the p24 cargo protein family, which is involved in protein transport between the Golgi apparatus and ER. Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative disorder leading to dementia and deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ is the pathological feature of AD pathogenesis. Knockdown of TMP21 expression by siRNA causes a sharp increase in Aβ production; however the underlying mechanism by which TMP21 regulates Aβ generation is unknown, and human TMP21 gene expression regulation has not yet been studied. Results In this report we have cloned a 3.3-kb fragment upstream of the human TMP21 gene. The transcription start site (TSS of the human TMP21 gene was identified. A series of nested deletions of the 5' flanking region of the human TMP21 gene were subcloned into the pGL3-basic luciferase reporter plasmid. We identified the -120 to +2 region as containing the minimal sequence necessary for TMP21 gene promoter activity. Gel shift assays revealed that the human TMP21 gene promoter contains NFAT response elements. Expression of NFAT increased TMP21 gene expression and inhibition of NFAT by siRNA reduced TMP21 gene expression. Conclusion NFAT plays a very important role in the regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. This study demonstrates that the human TMP21 gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by NFAT signaling.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb. PMID:27207833

  16. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb.

  17. Transcriptional regulation by Polycomb group proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of transcription that have key roles in stem-cell identity, differentiation and disease. Mechanistically, they function within multiprotein complexes, called Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs), which modify histones (and other proteins......) and silence target genes. The dynamics of PRC1 and PRC2 components has been the focus of recent research. Here we discuss our current knowledge of the PRC complexes, how they are targeted to chromatin and how the high diversity of the PcG proteins allows these complexes to influence cell identity....

  18. IKAROS: a multifunctional regulator of the polymerase II transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Milot, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Transcription factors are important determinants of lineage specification during hematopoiesis. They favor recruitment of cofactors involved in epigenetic regulation, thereby defining patterns of gene expression in a development- and lineage-specific manner. Additionally, transcription factors can facilitate transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and assembly on chromatin. Interestingly, a few lineage-specific transcription factors, including IKAROS, also regulate transcription elongation. IKAROS is a tumor suppressor frequently inactivated in leukemia and associated with a poor prognosis. It forms a complex with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is required for productive transcription elongation. It has also been reported that IKAROS interacts with factors involved in transcription termination. Here we review these and other recent findings that establish IKAROS as the first transcription factor found to act as a multifunctional regulator of the transcription cycle in hematopoietic cells.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yun Jeong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC activity is crucial to maintains blood glucose and ATP levels, which largely depends on the phosphorylation status by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK isoenzymes. Although it has been reported that PDC is phosphorylated and inactivated by PDK2 and PDK4 in metabolically active tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and kidney during starvation and diabetes, the precise mechanisms by which expression of PDK2 and PDK4 are transcriptionally regulated still remains unclear. Insulin represses the expression of PDK2 and PDK4 via phosphorylation of FOXO through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Several nuclear hormone receptors activated due to fasting or increased fat supply, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, estrogen-related receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors, also participate in the up-regulation of PDK2 and PDK4; however, the endogenous ligands that bind those nuclear receptors have not been identified. It has been recently suggested that growth hormone, adiponectin, epinephrine, and rosiglitazone also control the expression of PDK4 in tissue-specific manners. In this review, we discuss several factors involved in the expressional regulation of PDK2 and PDK4, and introduce current studies aimed at providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji Yun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2012-10-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity is crucial to maintains blood glucose and ATP levels, which largely depends on the phosphorylation status by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Although it has been reported that PDC is phosphorylated and inactivated by PDK2 and PDK4 in metabolically active tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and kidney during starvation and diabetes, the precise mechanisms by which expression of PDK2 and PDK4 are transcriptionally regulated still remains unclear. Insulin represses the expression of PDK2 and PDK4 via phosphorylation of FOXO through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Several nuclear hormone receptors activated due to fasting or increased fat supply, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, estrogen-related receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors, also participate in the up-regulation of PDK2 and PDK4; however, the endogenous ligands that bind those nuclear receptors have not been identified. It has been recently suggested that growth hormone, adiponectin, epinephrine, and rosiglitazone also control the expression of PDK4 in tissue-specific manners. In this review, we discuss several factors involved in the expressional regulation of PDK2 and PDK4, and introduce current studies aimed at providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. PMID:23130316

  1. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  2. Regulation of Transcription Elongation and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Washburn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will review our current understanding of transcription elongation and termination in E. coli. We discuss why transcription elongation complexes pause at certain template sites and how auxiliary host and phage transcription factors affect elongation and termination. The connection between translation and transcription elongation is described. Finally we present an overview indicating where progress has been made and where it has not.

  3. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate th

  4. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  5. Regulation by transcription factors in bacteria: beyond description

    OpenAIRE

    Balleza, Enrique; López-Bojorquez, Lucia N; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Encarnación, Sergio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2008-01-01

    Transcription is an essential step in gene expression and its understanding has been one of the major interests in molecular and cellular biology. By precisely tuning gene expression, transcriptional regulation determines the molecular machinery for developmental plasticity, homeostasis and adaptation. In this review, we transmit the main ideas or concepts behind regulation by transcription factors and give just enough examples to sustain these main ideas, thus avoiding a classical ennumerati...

  6. Methylation of an intragenic alternative promoter regulates transcription of GARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Sonja; Söntgerath, Viktoria Sophie Apollonia; Leipe, Jan; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Skapenko, Alla

    2016-02-01

    Alternative promoter usage has been proposed as a mechanism regulating transcriptional and translational diversity in highly elaborated systems like the immune system in humans. Here, we report that transcription of human glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) in regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs) is tightly regulated by two alternative promoters. An intragenic promoter contains several CpGs and acts as a weak promoter that is demethylated and initiates transcription Treg-specifically. The strong up-stream promoter containing a CpG-island is, in contrast, fully demethylated throughout tissues. Transcriptional activity of the strong promoter was surprisingly down-regulated upon demethylation of the weak promoter. This demethylation-induced transcriptional attenuation regulated the magnitude of GARP expression and correlated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Treg-specific GARP transcription was initiated by synergistic interaction of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and was underpinned by permissive chromatin remodeling caused by release of the H3K4 demethylase, PLU-1. Our findings describe a novel function of alternative promoters in regulating the extent of transcription. Moreover, since GARP functions as a transporter of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), a cytokine with broad pleiotropic traits, GARP transcriptional attenuation by alternative promoters might provide a mechanism regulating peripheral TGFβ to avoid unwanted harmful effects.

  7. The tumor suppressor p53 regulates its own transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Deffie, A; H. Wu; Reinke, V.; Lozano, G.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of p53 to suppress transformation correlates with its ability to activate transcription. To identify targets of p53 transactivation, we examined the p53 promoter itself. Northern (RNA) analysis and transient transfection experiments showed that p53 transcriptionally regulated itself. A functionally inactive mutant p53 could not regulate the p53 promoter. Deletion analysis of the p53 promoter delineated sequences between +22 and +67 as being critical for regulation. Electrophoretic...

  8. Transcriptional regulation of IL-2 in health and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of IL-2 production is central to our understanding of the immune system. Key during T cell activation, it also plays an essential role in the regulation of the immune response. This review discusses the function of recently described factors that modulate transcription and chromatin remodeling at the IL2 promoter. Also, it addresses the role of FoxP3 as a transcriptional regulator in conventional T cells and regulatory T cells, and the mechanisms whereby CD28 stabilizes IL2 transcription and translation. Finally, the alterations that prevent T cells from SLE patients from producing normal amounts of IL-2 upon stimulation are described. PMID:18723131

  9. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  10. Transcriptional Timers Regulating Mitosis in Early Drosophila Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Roknabadi, Amir; Di Talia, Stefano; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-09-13

    The development of an embryo requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular processes. During Drosophila gastrulation, a precise temporal pattern of cell division is encoded through transcriptional regulation of cdc25(string) in 25 distinct mitotic domains. Using a genetic screen, we demonstrate that the same transcription factors that regulate the spatial pattern of cdc25(string) transcription encode its temporal activation. We identify buttonhead and empty spiracles as the major activators of cdc25(string) expression in mitotic domain 2. The effect of these activators is balanced through repression by hairy, sloppy paired 1, and huckebein. Within the mitotic domain, temporal precision of mitosis is robust and unaffected by changing dosage of rate-limiting transcriptional factors. However, precision can be disrupted by altering the levels of the two activators or two repressors. We propose that the additive and balanced action of activators and repressors is a general strategy for precise temporal regulation of cellular transitions during development. PMID:27626650

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Yun Jeong; Nam Ho Jeoung; Keun-Gyu Park; In-Kyu Lee

    2012-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity is crucial to maintains blood glucose and ATP levels, which largely depends on the phosphorylation status by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Although it has been reported that PDC is phosphorylated and inactivated by PDK2 and PDK4 in metabolically active tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and kidney during starvation and diabetes, the precise mechanisms by which expression of PDK2 and PDK4 are transcriptionally re...

  12. Transcriptional responses and regulations to deficient phosphorus in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxiang BAO; Shuhua ZHANG; Wenjing LU; Chengjin GUO; Juntao GU; Kai XIAO

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past several years in the understanding of phosphorus (Pi)-starvation responses in plants and their regulation. The transcriptional changes that occur in response to Pi starvation are beginning to be revealed, although much is left to understand about their significance. In this paper, the recent progresses on the gene expression changes under deficient-Pi, cis-regulatory elements involved in response to deficient-Pi, the transcriptional control of Pi-starvation responses in eukaryotes, transcription factors involved in response to Pi-starvation, the role of MicroRNA on regulation of phosphate homeostasis, and phosphate sensing and signal transduction in plants have been summarized. The purpose of this review is to provide some basis for further elucidation of the transcriptional responses and regulations, and the networks of Pi sensing and signal transduction under deficient-Pi in plants in the future.

  13. Regulation of transcription by synthetic DNA-bending agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, David; Firestine, Steven M

    2006-11-01

    Gene expression is regulated by a complex interplay between binding and the three-dimensional arrangement of transcription factors with RNA polymerase and DNA. Previous studies have supported a direct role for DNA bending and conformation in gene expression, which suggests that agents that induce bends in DNA might be able to control gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) bending agents on the transcription of luciferase in an in vitro transcriptional/translational system. We find that transcription is regulated only by a TFO that induces a bend in the DNA. Related TFOs that do not induce bends in DNA have no effect on transcription. Reporter expression can be increased by as much as 80 % or decreased by as much as 50 % depending on the phasing of the upstream bend relative to the promoter. We interpret the results as follows: when the bend is positioned such that the upstream DNA is curved toward the RNA polymerase on the same DNA face, transcription is enhanced. When the upstream DNA is curved away, transcription is attenuated. These results support the hypothesis that DNA-bending agents might have the capability to regulate gene expression, thereby opening up a previously undervalued avenue in research on the artificial control of gene expression. PMID:17004274

  14. Regulation of human protein S gene (PROS1) transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Cornelia de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the transcriptional regulation of the gene for anticoagulant plasma Protein S, PROS1. Protein S is a cofactor for Protein C in the Protein C anticoagulant pathway. The coagulation cascade is negatively regulated by this pathway through inactivation of activ

  15. Regulation by transcription factors in bacteria: beyond description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleza, Enrique; López-Bojorquez, Lucia N; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Encarnación, Sergio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Transcription is an essential step in gene expression and its understanding has been one of the major interests in molecular and cellular biology. By precisely tuning gene expression, transcriptional regulation determines the molecular machinery for developmental plasticity, homeostasis and adaptation. In this review, we transmit the main ideas or concepts behind regulation by transcription factors and give just enough examples to sustain these main ideas, thus avoiding a classical ennumeration of facts. We review recent concepts and developments: cis elements and trans regulatory factors, chromosome organization and structure, transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) and transcriptomics. We also summarize new important discoveries that will probably affect the direction of research in gene regulation: epigenetics and stochasticity in transcriptional regulation, synthetic circuits and plasticity and evolution of TRNs. Many of the new discoveries in gene regulation are not extensively tested with wetlab approaches. Consequently, we review this broad area in Inference of TRNs and Dynamical Models of TRNs. Finally, we have stepped backwards to trace the origins of these modern concepts, synthesizing their history in a timeline schema. PMID:19076632

  16. The prevalence and regulation of antisense transcripts in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ni

    Full Text Available A strand-specific transcriptome sequencing strategy, directional ligation sequencing or DeLi-seq, was employed to profile antisense transcriptome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Under both normal and heat shock conditions, we found that polyadenylated antisense transcripts are broadly expressed while distinct expression patterns were observed for protein-coding and non-coding loci. Dominant antisense expression is enriched in protein-coding genes involved in meiosis or stress response pathways. Detailed analyses further suggest that antisense transcripts are independently regulated with respect to their sense transcripts, and diverse mechanisms might be potentially involved in the biogenesis and degradation of antisense RNAs. Taken together, antisense transcription may have profound impacts on global gene regulation in S. pombe.

  17. Initiation and regulation of paramyxovirus transcription and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noton, Sarah L; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-05-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle.

  18. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: A zinc finger transcription factor

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; D'Souza, Ursula M.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Yajima, Shunsuke; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich; Yang, Young; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Man; Nestler, Eric J.; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2001-01-01

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in ...

  19. Regulation of hepcidin transcription by interleukin-1 and interleukin-6

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Pauline; Peng, Hongfan; Gelbart, Terri; Wang, Lei; Beutler, Ernest

    2005-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide that regulates iron homeostasis by inhibiting iron absorption by the small intestine and release of iron from macrophages. Its production is stimulated by iron overload and by inflammation. It has been suggested that IL-6 is the only cytokine that stimulates hepcidin transcription. However, mice with targeted disruption of the gene encoding IL-6 (IL-6–/–) respond to endotoxin by increasing the expression of hepcidin transcripts in the liver. We show that incubating murin...

  20. Functional evidence of post-transcriptional regulation by pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Enrique M; Mah, Nancy; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-11-01

    Pseudogenes have been mainly considered as functionless evolutionary relics since their discovery in 1977. However, multiple mechanisms of pseudogene functionality have been proposed both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This review focuses on the role of pseudogenes as post-transcriptional regulators. Two lines of research have recently presented strong evidence of their potential function as post-transcriptional regulators of the corresponding parental genes from which they originate. First, pseudogene genomic sequences can encode siRNAs. Second, pseudogene transcripts can act as indirect post-transcriptional regulators decoying ncRNA, in particular miRNAs that target the parental gene. This has been demonstrated for PTEN and KRAS, two genes involved in tumorigenesis. The role of pseudogenes in disease has not been proven and seems to be the next research landmark. In this review, we chronicle the events following the initial discovery of the 'useless' pseudogene to its breakthrough as a functional molecule with hitherto unbeknownst potential to influence human disease. PMID:21816204

  1. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Grant Hussey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  3. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  5. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Louis R; Kumsta, Caroline; Sandri, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Hansen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major intracellular degradation process recognized as playing a central role in cell survival and longevity. This multistep process is extensively regulated at several levels, including post-translationally through the action of conserved longevity factors such as the nutrient sensor TOR. More recently, transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes has emerged as an important mechanism for ensuring the somatic maintenance and homeostasis necessary for a long life span. Autophagy is increased in many long-lived model organisms and contributes significantly to their longevity. In turn, conserved transcription factors, particularly the helix-loop-helix transcription factor TFEB and the forkhead transcription factor FOXO, control the expression of many autophagy-related genes and are important for life-span extension. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contribution of these transcription factors to macroautophagy regulation in the context of aging. We also review current research on epigenetic changes, such as histone modification by the deacetylase SIRT1, that influence autophagy-related gene expression and additionally affect aging. Understanding the molecular regulation of macroautophagy in relation to aging may offer new avenues for the treatment of age-related diseases.

  6. Microphthalmia transcription factor regulates pancreatic β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Magdalena A; Winkler, Marcus; Ganic, Elvira; Colberg, Jesper K; Johansson, Jenny K; Bennet, Hedvig; Fex, Malin; Nuber, Ulrike A; Artner, Isabella

    2013-08-01

    Precise regulation of β-cell function is crucial for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Pax6 is an essential regulator of β-cell-specific factors like insulin and Glut2. Studies in the developing eye suggest that Pax6 interacts with Mitf to regulate pigment cell differentiation. Here, we show that Mitf, like Pax6, is expressed in all pancreatic endocrine cells during mouse postnatal development and in the adult islet. A Mitf loss-of-function mutation results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin secretion but no increase in β-cell mass in adult mice. Mutant β-cells secrete more insulin in response to glucose than wild-type cells, suggesting that Mitf is involved in regulating β-cell function. In fact, the transcription of genes critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis (insulin and Glut2) and β-cell formation and function (Pax4 and Pax6) is significantly upregulated in Mitf mutant islets. The increased Pax6 expression may cause the improved β-cell function observed in Mitf mutant animals, as it activates insulin and Glut2 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that Mitf binds to Pax4 and Pax6 regulatory regions, suggesting that Mitf represses their transcription in wild-type β-cells. We demonstrate that Mitf directly regulates Pax6 transcription and controls β-cell function. PMID:23610061

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  8. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  9. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  10. Regulation of specialized metabolism by WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Yuan, Ling

    2015-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are well known for regulating plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, much less is known about how WRKY TFs affect plant-specialized metabolism. Analysis of WRKY TFs regulating the production of specialized metabolites emphasizes the values of the family outside of traditionally accepted roles in stress tolerance. WRKYs with conserved roles across plant species seem to be essential in regulating specialized metabolism. Overall, the WRKY family plays an essential role in regulating the biosynthesis of important pharmaceutical, aromatherapy, biofuel, and industrial components, warranting considerable attention in the forthcoming years. PMID:25501946

  11. Involvement of GATA transcription factors in the regulation of endogenous bovine interferon-tau gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hanako; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Kim, Min-Su; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ideta, Atsushi; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Nakajima, Hiromi; Takahashi, Masashi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Expression of interferon-tau (IFNT), necessary for pregnancy establishment in ruminant ungulates, is regulated in a temporal and spatial manner. However, molecular mechanisms by which IFNT gene transcription is regulated in this manner have not been firmly established. In this study, DNA microarray/RT-PCR analysis between bovine trophoblast CT-1 and Mardin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells was initially performed, finding that transcription factors GATA2, GATA3, and GATA6 mRNAs were specific to CT-1 cells. These mRNAs were also found in Days 17, 20, and 22 (Day 0 = day of estrus) bovine conceptuses. In examining other bovine cell lines, ovary cumulus granulosa (oCG) and ear fibroblast (EF) cells, GATA2 and GATA3, but not GATA6, were found specific to the bovine trophoblast cells. In transient transfection analyses using the upstream region (-631 to +59 bp) of bovine IFNT gene (bIFNT, IFN-tau-c1), over-expression of GATA2/GATA3 did not affect the transcription of bIFNT-reporter construct in human choriocarcinoma JEG3 cells. Transfection of GATA2, GATA3, ETS2, and/or CDX2, however, was effective in the up-regulation of the bIFNT construct transfected into bovine oCG and EF cells. One Point mutation studies revealed that among six potential GATA binding sites located on the upstream region of the bIFNT gene, the one next to ETS2 site exhibited reduced luciferase activity. In CT-1 cells, endogenous bIFNT gene transcription was up-regulated by over-expression of GATA2 or GATA3, but down-regulated by siRNA specific to GATA2 mRNA. These data suggest that GATA2/3 is involved in trophoblast-specific regulation of bIFNT gene transcription. PMID:19598245

  12. Non-equilibrium hyperbolic transport in transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández-Lemus

    Full Text Available In this work we studied memory and irreversible transport phenomena in a non-equilibrium thermodynamical model for genomic transcriptional regulation. Transcriptional regulation possess an extremely complex phenomenology, and it is, of course, of foremost importance in organismal cell development and in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. A better understanding of the way in which these processes occur is mandatory to optimize the construction of gene regulatory networks, but also to connect these networks with multi-scale phenomena (e.g. metabolism, signalling pathways, etc. under an integrative Systems Biology-like vision. In this paper we analyzed three simple mechanisms of genetic stimulation: an instant pulse, a periodic biochemical signal and a saturation process with sigmoidal kinetics and from these we derived the system's thermodynamical response, in the form of, for example, anomalous transcriptional bursts.

  13. VLDL Hydrolysis by Hepatic Lipase Regulates PPARδ Transcriptional Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jonathan D.; Oligino, Eric; Rader, Daniel J; Saghatelian, Alan; Plutzky, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background PPARs (α,γ,δ) are a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate energy balance, including lipid metabolism. Despite these critical functions, the integration between specific pathways of lipid metabolism and distinct PPAR responses remains obscure. Previous work has revealed that lipolytic pathways can activate PPARs. Whether hepatic lipase (HL), an enzyme that regulates VLDL and HDL catabolism, participates in PPAR responses is unknown. Methods/Principal Finding...

  14. VLDL Hydrolysis by Hepatic Lipase Regulates PPARδ Transcriptional Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jonathan D.; Eric Oligino; Rader, Daniel J; Alan Saghatelian; Jorge Plutzky

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PPARs (α,γ,δ) are a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate energy balance, including lipid metabolism. Despite these critical functions, the integration between specific pathways of lipid metabolism and distinct PPAR responses remains obscure. Previous work has revealed that lipolytic pathways can activate PPARs. Whether hepatic lipase (HL), an enzyme that regulates VLDL and HDL catabolism, participates in PPAR responses is unknown. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDIN...

  15. Transcriptional regulation of central amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the functional characterisation of the transcriptional regulators GlnR, ArgR and AhrC of Lactococcus lactis, which are responsible for the control of genes involved in the metabolism of the amino acids glutamine, glutamate and arginine. A chromosomal glnR deletion mutant was ma

  16. Myocardin-related Transcription Factor Regulates Nox4 Protein Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam;

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...

  17. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Martinez

    Full Text Available RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX, is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  18. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  19. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres eRomanowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes.

  20. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  1. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death

  2. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Results Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the β2, γ1, γ3, ε, θ and π subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the α1, β2, γ2 and α6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs. Conclusion The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the α6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  3. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line;

    2005-01-01

    extensively across the great apes and monkeys as well as in rodents while it is absent in non-mammals. As in humans, the VNTR sequence may be polymorphic within species and thus it may underlie both inter- and intraspecies differences. Also, we find new putative binding sites for several transcription factors...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression....

  4. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian autophagy at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Ghislat, Ghita; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-08-15

    Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that results in the lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic contents ranging from abnormal proteins to damaged cell organelles. It is activated  under diverse conditions, including nutrient deprivation and hypoxia. During autophagy, members of the core autophagy-related (ATG) family of proteins mediate membrane rearrangements, which lead to the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic cargo. Recently, the nuclear regulation of autophagy, especially by transcription factors and histone modifiers, has gained increased attention. These factors are not only involved in rapid responses to autophagic stimuli, but also regulate the long-term outcome of autophagy. Now there are more than 20 transcription factors that have been shown to be linked to the autophagic process. However, their interplay and timing appear enigmatic as several have been individually shown to act as major regulators of autophagy. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster highlights the main cellular regulators of transcription involved in mammalian autophagy and their target genes. PMID:27528206

  5. SIRT1 regulates HIV transcription via Tat deacetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pagans

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV Tat protein is acetylated by the transcriptional coactivator p300, a necessary step in Tat-mediated transactivation. We report here that Tat is deacetylated by human sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent class III protein deacetylase in vitro and in vivo. Tat and SIRT1 coimmunoprecipitate and synergistically activate the HIV promoter. Conversely, knockdown of SIRT1 via small interfering RNAs or treatment with a novel small molecule inhibitor of the SIRT1 deacetylase activity inhibit Tat-mediated transactivation of the HIV long terminal repeat. Tat transactivation is defective in SIRT1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and can be rescued by expression of SIRT1. These results support a model in which cycles of Tat acetylation and deacetylation regulate HIV transcription. SIRT1 recycles Tat to its unacetylated form and acts as a transcriptional coactivator during Tat transactivation.

  6. Stochastic Proofreading Mechanism Alleviates Crosstalk in Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Humerez, Sarah A; Rieckh, Georg; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-12-11

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by interactions between transcription factor proteins (TFs) and the regulatory DNA sequence, a process that can be captured well by thermodynamic models of regulation. These models, however, neglect regulatory crosstalk: the possibility that noncognate TFs could initiate transcription, with potentially disastrous effects for the cell. Here, we estimate the importance of crosstalk, suggest that its avoidance strongly constrains equilibrium models of TF binding, and propose an alternative nonequilibrium scheme that implements kinetic proofreading to suppress erroneous initiation. This proposal is consistent with the observed covalent modifications of the transcriptional apparatus and predicts increased noise in gene expression as a trade-off for improved specificity. Using information theory, we quantify this trade-off to find when optimal proofreading architectures are favored over their equilibrium counterparts. Such architectures exhibit significant super-Poisson noise at low expression in steady state. PMID:26705657

  7. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  8. Temperature regulates transcription in the zebrafish circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been well-documented that temperature influences key aspects of the circadian clock. Temperature cycles entrain the clock, while the period length of the circadian cycle is adjusted so that it remains relatively constant over a wide range of temperatures (temperature compensation. In vertebrates, the molecular basis of these properties is poorly understood. Here, using the zebrafish as an ectothermic model, we demonstrate first that in the absence of light, exposure of embryos and primary cell lines to temperature cycles entrains circadian rhythms of clock gene expression. Temperature steps drive changes in the basal expression of certain clock genes in a gene-specific manner, a mechanism potentially contributing to entrainment. In the case of the per4 gene, while E-box promoter elements mediate circadian clock regulation, they do not direct the temperature-driven changes in transcription. Second, by studying E-box-regulated transcription as a reporter of the core clock mechanism, we reveal that the zebrafish clock is temperature-compensated. In addition, temperature strongly influences the amplitude of circadian transcriptional rhythms during and following entrainment by light-dark cycles, a property that could confer temperature compensation. Finally, we show temperature-dependent changes in the expression levels, phosphorylation, and function of the clock protein, CLK. This suggests a mechanism that could account for changes in the amplitude of the E-box-directed rhythm. Together, our results imply that several key transcriptional regulatory elements at the core of the zebrafish clock respond to temperature.

  9. Modelling transcriptional interference and DNA looping in gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-06-22

    We describe a hybrid statistical mechanical and dynamical approach for modelling the formation of closed, open and elongating complexes of RNA polymerase, the interactions of these polymerases to produce transcriptional interference, and the regulation of these processes by a DNA-binding and DNA-looping regulatory protein. As a model system, we have used bacteriophage 186, for which genetic, biochemical and structural studies have suggested that the CI repressor binds as a 14-mer to form alternative DNA-looped complexes, and activates lysogenic transcription indirectly by relieving transcriptional interference caused by the convergent lytic promoter. The modelling showed that the original mechanisms proposed to explain this relief of transcriptional interference are not consistent with the available in vivo reporter data. However, a good fit to the reporter data was given by a revised model that incorporates a novel predicted regulatory mechanism: that RNA polymerase bound at the lysogenic promoter protects itself from transcriptional interference by recruiting CI to the lytic promoter. This mechanism and various estimates of in vivo biochemical parameters for the 186 CI system should be testable. Our results demonstrate the power of mathematical modelling for the extraction of detailed biochemical information from in vivo data. PMID:17498740

  10. Transcriptional regulation by nonclassical action of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeller Lars C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormone (TH is essential for normal development, growth and metabolism. Its effects were thought to be principally mediated through triiodothyronine (T3, acting as a ligand for the nuclear TH receptors (TRs α and β residing on thyroid hormone response elements (TREs in the promoter of TH target genes. In this classical model of TH action, T3 binding to TRs leads to recruitment of basal transcription factors and increased transcription of TH responsive genes. Recently, the concept of TH action on gene expression has become more diverse and now includes nonclassical actions of T3 and T4: T3 has been shown to activate PI3K via the TRs, which ultimately increases transcription of certain genes, e.g. HIF-1α. Additionally, both T3 and thyroxine (T4 can bind to a membrane integrin, αvβ3, which leads to activation of the PI3K and MAPK signal transduction pathways and finally also increases gene transcription, e.g. of the FGF2 gene. Therefore, these initially nongenomic, nonclassical actions seem to serve as additional interfaces for transcriptional regulation by TH. Aim of this perspective is to summarize the genes that are currently known to be induced by nonclassical TH action and the mechanisms involved.

  11. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  12. Global transcriptional regulator TrmB family members in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Park, Soyoung; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Members of the TrmB family act as global transcriptional regulators for the activation or repression of sugar ABC transporters and central sugar metabolic pathways, including glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and other metabolic pathways, and also as chromosomal stabilizers in archaea. As a relatively newly classified transcriptional regulator family, there is limited experimental evidence for their role in Thermococcales, halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC1, and crenarchaea Sulfolobus strains, despite being one of the extending protein families in archaea. Recently, the protein structures of Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB and TrmBL2 were solved, and the transcriptomic data uncovered by microarray and ChIP-Seq were published. In the present review, recent evidence of the functional roles of TrmB family members in archaea is explained and extended to bacteria.

  13. Transcriptional Enhancers In The Regulation Of T Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Michelle L. T.; Sarah A. Jones; Prier, Julia E.; Brendan Edward Russ

    2015-01-01

    The changes in phenotype and function that characterise the differentiation of naïve T cells to effector and memory states are underscored by large-scale, coordinated, and stable changes in gene expression. In turn, these changes are choreographed by the interplay between transcription factors and epigenetic regulators that act to restructure the genome, ultimately ensuring lineage-appropriate gene expression. Here, we focus on the mechanisms that control T cell differentiation, with a partic...

  14. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  15. Transcriptional Regulation and Signaling in Phosphorus Starvation: What About Legumes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oswaldo Valdés-Lóppez; Georgina Hernández

    2008-01-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P), an essential element, is one of the most important requirements for plant growth and crop production. The morphological and physiological adaptations evolved by plants to cope with P starvation have been well characterized. Several P deficiency plant responses are regulated at the transcriptional level. Microarray analysis has generated valuable information on global gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana grown under P-stress. Despite the identification of P responsive genes, little is known about the regulation of gene expression changes. Four transcription factors, PHR1, WRKY75, ZAT6 and BHLH32, involved in P starvation signaling have been characterized in Arabidopsis, and signaling pathways are deciphered. This review analyzes the current knowledge of transcriptional regulation of P starvation responses in Arabidopsis vis-a-vis legumes such as lupine, common bean and Medicago truncatula. The knowledge on regulatory and signaling mechanisms involved in P acquisition and use in legumes will be useful for improvement of these crops, which account for a large proportion of the world's crop production, providing good nutritional quality feed and food.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of the Streptococcus salivarius 57.I Urease Operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Mendelsohn, David R.; Burne, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The Streptococcus salivarius 57.I ure cluster was organized as an operon, beginning with ureI, followed by ureABC (structural genes) and ureEFGD (accessory genes). Northern analyses revealed transcripts encompassing structural genes and transcripts containing the entire operon. A ς70-like promoter could be mapped 5′ to ureI (PureI) by primer extension analysis. The intensity of the signal increased when cells were grown at an acidic pH and was further enhanced by excess carbohydrate. To determine the function(s) of two inverted repeats located 5′ to PureI, transcriptional fusions of the full-length promoter region (PureI), or a deletion derivative (PureIΔ100), and a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were constructed and integrated into the chromosome to generate strains PureICAT and PureIΔ100CAT, respectively. CAT specific activities of PureICAT were repressed at pH 7.0 and induced at pH 5.5 and by excess carbohydrate. In PureIΔ100CAT, CAT activity was 60-fold higher than in PureICAT at pH 7.0 and pH induction was nearly eliminated, indicating that expression was negatively regulated. Thus, it was concluded that PureI was the predominant, regulated promoter and that regulation was governed by a mechanism differing markedly from other known mechanisms for bacterial urease expression. PMID:9791132

  17. Role of Sam68 in Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Sánchez-Jiménez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The STAR family of proteins links signaling pathways to various aspects of post-transcriptional regulation and processing of RNAs. Sam68 belongs to this class of heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP K homology (KH single domain-containing family of RNA-binding proteins that also contains some domains predicted to bind critical components in signal transduction pathways. In response to phosphorylation and other post-transcriptional modifications, Sam68 has been shown to have the ability to link signal transduction pathways to downstream effects regulating RNA metabolism, including transcription, alternative splicing or RNA transport. In addition to its function as a docking protein in some signaling pathways, this prototypic STAR protein has been identified to have a nuclear localization and to take part in the formation of both nuclear and cytosolic multi-molecular complexes such as Sam68 nuclear bodies and stress granules. Coupling with other proteins and RNA targets, Sam68 may play a role in the regulation of differential expression and mRNA processing and translation according to internal and external signals, thus mediating important physiological functions, such as cell death, proliferation or cell differentiation.

  18. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulations of gene expression during leaf polarity formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xu; Li Yang; Hai Huang

    2007-01-01

    Leaf morphogenesis requires the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity after primordium initiation from the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several families of transcription factors are known to play critical roles in promoting adaxial or abaxial leaf fate. Recently, post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways have been shown to regulate the establishment of leaf polarity, providing novel and exciting insights into leaf development. For example, microRNAs (miR165/166)and a trans-acting siRNA (TAS3-derived tasiR-ARF) have been shown to repress the expression of several key transcription factor genes. In addition, yet another level of regulation, post-translational regulation, has been revealed recently by studies on the role of the 26S proteasome in leaf polarity. Although our understanding regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity has greatly improved, there is still much that remains elusive.This review aims to discuss recent progress, as well as the remaining questions, regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf polarity formation.

  19. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. ► An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. ► Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. ► Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca2+/calcineurin/NFAT.

  20. Phosphorylation Regulates Functions of ZEB1 Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, M Candelaria; Lorenzatti, Guadalupe; Cavallo, Natalia L; Vaglienti, Maria V; Perrone, Ana P; Carenbauer, Anne L; Darling, Douglas S; Cabanillas, Ana M

    2016-10-01

    ZEB1 transcription factor is important in both development and disease, including many TGFβ-induced responses, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by which many tumors undergo metastasis. ZEB1 is differentially phosphorylated in different cell types; however the role of phosphorylation in ZEB1 activity is unknown. Luciferase reporter studies and electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that a decrease in phosphorylation of ZEB1 increases both DNA-binding and transcriptional repression of ZEB1 target genes. Functional analysis of ZEB1 phosphorylation site mutants near the second zinc finger domain (termed ZD2) show that increased phosphorylation (due to either PMA plus ionomycin, or IGF-1) can inhibit transcriptional repression by either a ZEB1-ZD2 domain clone, or full-length ZEB1. This approach identifies phosphosites that have a substantial effect regulating the transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of ZEB1. Immunoprecipitation with anti-ZEB1 antibodies followed by western analysis with a phospho-Threonine-Proline-specific antibody indicates that the ERK consensus site at Thr-867 is phosphorylated in ZEB1. In addition to disrupting in vitro DNA-binding measured by EMSA, IGF-1-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation is sufficient to disrupt nuclear localization of GFP-ZEB1 fusion clones. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ZEB1 integrates TGFβ signaling with other signaling pathways such as IGF-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2205-2217, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868487

  1. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  2. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  3. Model-based redesign of global transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to the design or redesign of biological systems. In particular, one possible goal could be the rewiring of the transcription regulation network by exchanging the endogenous promoters. To achieve this objective, we have adapted current methods to the inference of a model based on ordinary differential equations that is able to predict the network response after a major change in its topology. Our procedure utilizes microarray data for training. We have experimentally validated our inferred global regulatory model in Escherichia coli by predicting transcriptomic profiles under new perturbations. We have also tested our methodology in silico by providing accurate predictions of the underlying networks from expression data generated with artificial genomes. In addition, we have shown the predictive power of our methodology by obtaining the gene profile in experimental redesigns of the E. coli genome, where rewiring the transcriptional network by means of knockouts of master regulators or by upregulating transcription factors controlled by different promoters. Our approach is compatible with most network inference methods, allowing to explore computationally future genome-wide redesign experiments in synthetic biology. PMID:19188257

  4. In silico detection of sequence variations modifying transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin C Andersen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of functional genetic variation associated with increased susceptibility to complex diseases can elucidate genes and underlying biochemical mechanisms linked to disease onset and progression. For genes linked to genetic diseases, most identified causal mutations alter an encoded protein sequence. Technological advances for measuring RNA abundance suggest that a significant number of undiscovered causal mutations may alter the regulation of gene transcription. However, it remains a challenge to separate causal genetic variations from linked neutral variations. Here we present an in silico driven approach to identify possible genetic variation in regulatory sequences. The approach combines phylogenetic footprinting and transcription factor binding site prediction to identify variation in candidate cis-regulatory elements. The bioinformatics approach has been tested on a set of SNPs that are reported to have a regulatory function, as well as background SNPs. In the absence of additional information about an analyzed gene, the poor specificity of binding site prediction is prohibitive to its application. However, when additional data is available that can give guidance on which transcription factor is involved in the regulation of the gene, the in silico binding site prediction improves the selection of candidate regulatory polymorphisms for further analyses. The bioinformatics software generated for the analysis has been implemented as a Web-based application system entitled RAVEN (regulatory analysis of variation in enhancers. The RAVEN system is available at http://www.cisreg.ca for all researchers interested in the detection and characterization of regulatory sequence variation.

  5. Patterns and regulation of ribosomal RNA transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Ira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borrelia burgdorferi contains one 16S and two tandem sets of 23S-5S ribosomal (r RNA genes whose patterns of transcription and regulation are unknown but are likely to be critical for survival and persistence in its hosts. Results RT-PCR of B. burgdorferi N40 and B31 revealed three rRNA region transcripts: 16S rRNA-alanine transfer RNA (tRNAAla; tRNAIle; and both sets of 23S-5S rRNA. At 34°C, there were no differences in growth rate or in accumulation of total protein, DNA and RNA in B31 cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK-H whether rabbit serum was present or not. At 23°C, B31 grew more slowly in serum-containing BSK-H than at 34°C. DNA per cell was higher in cells in exponential as compared to stationary phase at either temperature; protein per cell was similar at both temperatures in both phases. Similar amounts of rRNA were produced in exponential phase at both temperatures, and rRNA was down-regulated in stationary phase at either temperature. Interestingly, a relBbu deletion mutant unable to generate (pppGpp did not down-regulate rRNA at transition to stationary phase in serum-containing BSK-H at 34°C, similar to the relaxed phenotype of E. coli relA mutants. Conclusions We conclude that rRNA transcription in B. burgdorferi is complex and regulated both by growth phase and by the stringent response but not by temperature-modulated growth rate.

  6. Evolutionary rewiring and reprogramming of bacterial transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Fang-Fang Wang; Wei Qian

    2011-01-01

    Rewiring and reprogramming of transcriptional regulation took place during bacterial speciation. The mechanistic alterations among transcription factors, cis-regulatory elements and target genes confer bacteria novel ability to adapt to stochastic environmental changes. This process is critical to their survival, especially for bacterial pathogens subjected to accelerated evolution. In the past two decades, the investigators not only completed the sequences of numerous bacterial genomes, but also made great progress in understanding the molecular basis of evolution. Here we briefly reviewed the current knowledge on the mechanistic changes among orthologous, paralogous and xenogenic regulatory circuits, which were caused by genetic recombinations such as gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, transposable elements and different genetic contexts. We also discussed the potential impact of this area on theoretical and applied studies of microbes.

  7. An Atlas of Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse and Man

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Combinatorial interactions among transcription factors are critical to directing tissue-specific gene expression. To build a global atlas of these combinations, we have screened for physical interactions among the majority of human and mouse DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs). The complete networks contain 762 human and 877 mouse interactions. Analysis of the networks reveals that highly connected TFs are broadly expressed across tissues, and that roughly half of the measured interactions are conserved between mouse and human. The data highlight the importance of TF combinations for determining cell fate, and they lead to the identification of a SMAD3/FLI1 complex expressed during development of immunity. The availability of large TF combinatorial networks in both human and mouse will provide many opportunities to study gene regulation, tissue differentiation, and mammalian evolution.

  8. Transcriptional regulation by protein kinase A in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanggan Hu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A defect in the PKA1 gene encoding the catalytic subunit of cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA is known to reduce capsule size and attenuate virulence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Conversely, loss of the PKA regulatory subunit encoded by pkr1 results in overproduction of capsule and hypervirulence. We compared the transcriptomes between the pka1 and pkr1 mutants and a wild-type strain, and found that PKA influences transcript levels for genes involved in cell wall synthesis, transport functions such as iron uptake, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and glycolysis. Among the myriad of transcriptional changes in the mutants, we also identified differential expression of ribosomal protein genes, genes encoding stress and chaperone functions, and genes for secretory pathway components and phospholipid synthesis. The transcriptional influence of PKA on these functions was reminiscent of the linkage between transcription, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional analyses confirmed that the PKA mutants have a differential response to temperature stress, caffeine, and lithium, and that secretion inhibitors block capsule production. Importantly, we also found that lithium treatment limits capsule size, thus reinforcing potential connections between this virulence trait and inositol and phospholipid metabolism. In addition, deletion of a PKA-regulated gene, OVA1, revealed an epistatic relationship with pka1 in the control of capsule size and melanin formation. OVA1 encodes a putative phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that appears to negatively influence capsule production and melanin accumulation. Overall, these findings support a role for PKA in regulating the delivery of virulence factors such as the capsular polysaccharide to the cell surface and serve to highlight the importance of secretion and phospholipid metabolism as potential

  9. Engineering transcriptional regulation to control Pdu microcompartment formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Y Kim

    Full Text Available Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs show great promise for the organization of engineered metabolic pathways within the bacterial cytoplasm. This subcellular organelle is composed of a protein shell of 100-200 nm diameter that natively encapsulates multi-enzyme pathways. The high energy cost of synthesizing the thousands of protein subunits required for each MCP demands precise regulation of MCP formation for both native and engineered systems. Here, we study the regulation of the propanediol utilization (Pdu MCP, for which growth on 1,2-propanediol induces expression of the Pdu operon for the catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. We construct a fluorescence-based transcriptional reporter to investigate the activation of the Ppdu promoter, which drives the transcription of 21 pdu genes. Guided by this reporter, we find that MCPs can be expressed in strains grown in rich media, provided that glucose is not present. We also characterize the response of the Ppdu promoter to a transcriptional activator of the pdu operon, PocR, and find PocR to be a necessary component of Pdu MCP formation. Furthermore, we find that MCPs form normally upon the heterologous expression of PocR even in the absence of the natural inducer 1,2-propanediol and in the presence of glucose, and that Pdu MCPs formed in response to heterologous PocR expression can metabolize 1,2-propanediol in vivo. We anticipate that this technique of overexpressing a key transcription factor may be used to study and engineer the formation, size, and/or number of MCPs for the Pdu and related MCP systems.

  10. Concentration and length dependence of DNA looping in transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Han

    Full Text Available In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage, to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping.

  11. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Lanni

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation. An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1, starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis.

  12. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  13. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer

  14. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen A Leyn

    Full Text Available Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  15. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyn, Semen A; Suvorova, Inna A; Kholina, Tatiana D; Sherstneva, Sofia S; Novichkov, Pavel S; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria. PMID:25411846

  16. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  17. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  18. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  19. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations

  20. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  1. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Yan [Experimental Animal Center, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Sato, Toshinori [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Yamagata, Sadako [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Yamagata, Tatsuya, E-mail: tcyamagata@gmail.com [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  2. VLDL hydrolysis by hepatic lipase regulates PPARδ transcriptional responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PPARs (α,γ,δ are a family of ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate energy balance, including lipid metabolism. Despite these critical functions, the integration between specific pathways of lipid metabolism and distinct PPAR responses remains obscure. Previous work has revealed that lipolytic pathways can activate PPARs. Whether hepatic lipase (HL, an enzyme that regulates VLDL and HDL catabolism, participates in PPAR responses is unknown. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using PPAR ligand binding domain transactivation assays, we found that HL interacted with triglyceride-rich VLDL (>HDL≫LDL, IDL to activate PPARδ preferentially over PPARα or PPARγ, an effect dependent on HL catalytic activity. In cell free ligand displacement assays, VLDL hydrolysis by HL activated PPARδ in a VLDL-concentration dependent manner. Extended further, VLDL stimulation of HL-expressing HUVECs and FAO hepatoma cells increased mRNA expression of canonical PPARδ target genes, including adipocyte differentiation related protein (ADRP, angiopoietin like protein 4 and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4. HL/VLDL regulated ADRP through a PPRE in the promoter region of this gene. In vivo, adenoviral-mediated hepatic HL expression in C57BL/6 mice increased hepatic ADRP mRNA levels by 30%. In ob/ob mice, a model with higher triglycerides than C57BL/6 mice, HL overexpression increased ADRP expression by 70%, demonstrating the importance of triglyceride substrate for HL-mediated PPARδ activation. Global metabolite profiling identified HL/VLDL released fatty acids including oleic acid and palmitoleic acid that were capable of recapitulating PPARδ activation and ADRP gene regulation in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These data define a novel pathway involving HL hydrolysis of VLDL that activates PPARδ through generation of specific monounsaturated fatty acids. These data also demonstrate how integrating cell biology with metabolomic approaches provides insight

  3. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of cytokine mRNA controls the initiation and resolution of inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mino, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are critical mediators of inflammation and host defense. Cytokine production is regulated during transcription and post-transcription. Post-transcriptional regulation modifies mRNA stability and translation, allowing for the rapid and flexible control of gene expression, which is important for coordinating the initiation and resolution of inflammation. We review here a variety of post-transcriptional control mechanisms that regulate inflammation and discuss how these mechanisms are ...

  5. Jasmonate-responsive transcription factors regulating plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Memelink, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a large variety of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, glucosinolates, terpenoids and phenylpropanoids. These compounds play key roles in plant-environment interactions and many of them have pharmacological activity in humans. Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones which induce biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. JAs-responsive transcription factors (TFs) that regulate the JAs-induced accumulation of secondary metabolites belong to different families including AP2/ERF, bHLH, MYB and WRKY. Here, we give an overview of the types and functions of TFs that have been identified in JAs-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and highlight their similarities and differences in regulating various biosynthetic pathways. We review major recent developments regarding JAs-responsive TFs mediating secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and provide suggestions for further studies. PMID:26876016

  6. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Arabidopsis in Response to Salt Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhulong Chan

    2012-01-01

    Salt stress is a major factor limiting agricultural productivity worldwide.Adaptations to salt stress include avoidance by reduced sodium uptake,sequestration of toxic sodium ions away from the cytoplasm,or production of compatible solutes or osmoprotectants to reduce molecular disruption.Approaches to engineer salt stress resistance have included regulation of ion transport through introduction of Na+/H+ antiporter; synthesis of compatible solutes; or the introduction of transcription factors regulating expression of stress-responsive genes.On the other hand,naturally occurring variation among wild-type populations of plants also can be used to understand plant adaptive responses to their environments.In this study,we compared phenotypic and transcriptomic effects of constitutive expression of genes intended to confer salt stress tolerance by three different mechanisms:a transcription factor,CBF3/DREB1a; a metabolic gene,M6PR,for mannitol biosynthesis; and the Na+/H+ antiporter,SOS1.In the absence of salt,M6PR and SOS1 lines performed comparably with wild type; CBF3 lines exhibited dwarfing as reported previously.All three transgenes conferred fitness advantage when subjected to 100 mmol/L NaCI in the growth chamber.CBF3 and M6PR affected transcription of numerous abiotic stress-related genes as measured by Affymetrix microarray analysis.M6PR additionally modified expression of biotic stress and oxidative stress genes.Transcriptional effects of SOS1 were smaller and primarily limited to redox-related genes.In addition,we compared natural variations in salt tolerance between Ler and Sha ecotypes based on their responses to salt treatments and the results indicated that Ler was salt-sensitive,but Sha,which obtained a truncated RAS1 protein,was salt-tolerant.Transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes involved in secondary metabolism,photosynthesis,and protein synthesis were mainly down-regulated by salinity effects,while transposable element genes,microRNA and

  8. Protein kinase A regulates molecular chaperone transcription and protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 regulates one of the major pathways of protein quality control and is essential for deterrence of protein-folding disorders, particularly in neuronal cells. However, HSF1 activity declines with age, a change that may open the door to progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have investigated mechanisms of HSF1 regulation that may become compromised with age. HSF1 binds stably to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on at least one regulatory serine residue (S320. We show here that PKA is essential for effective transcription of HSP genes by HSF1. PKA triggers a cascade involving HSF1 binding to the histone acetylase p300 and positive translation elongation factor 1 (p-TEFb and phosphorylation of the c-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, a key mechanism in the downstream steps of HSF1-mediated transcription. This cascade appears to play a key role in protein quality control in neuronal cells expressing aggregation-prone proteins with long poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts. Such proteins formed inclusion bodies that could be resolved by HSF1 activation during heat shock. Resolution of the inclusions was inhibited by knockdown of HSF1, PKAcα, or the pTEFb component CDK9, indicating a key role for the HSF1-PKA cascade in protein quality control.

  9. Glutamine Metabolism Regulates the Pluripotency Transcription Factor OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Marsboom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of pluripotency by cellular metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are not fully understood. We found that high levels of glutamine metabolism are essential to prevent degradation of OCT4, a key transcription factor regulating hESC pluripotency. Glutamine withdrawal depletes the endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH, which results in the oxidation of OCT4 cysteine residues required for its DNA binding and enhanced OCT4 degradation. The emergence of the OCT4lo cell population following glutamine withdrawal did not result in greater propensity for cell death. Instead, glutamine withdrawal during vascular differentiation of hESCs generated cells with greater angiogenic capacity, thus indicating that modulating glutamine metabolism enhances the differentiation and functional maturation of cells. These findings demonstrate that the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 can serve as a metabolic-redox sensor in hESCs and that metabolic cues can act in concert with growth factor signaling to orchestrate stem cell differentiation.

  10. Mitochondrial transcription factor A regulates mitochondrial transcription initiation, DNA packaging, and genome copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christopher T; Kolesar, Jill E; Kaufman, Brett A

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA, mtTF1, TFAM) is an essential protein that binds mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with and without sequence specificity to regulate both mitochondrial transcription initiation and mtDNA copy number. The abundance of mtDNA generally reflects TFAM protein levels; however, the precise mechanism(s) by which this occurs remains a matter of debate. Data suggest that the usage of mitochondrial promoters is regulated by TFAM dosage, allowing TFAM to affect both gene expression and RNA priming for first strand mtDNA replication. Additionally, TFAM has a non-specific DNA binding activity that is both cooperative and high affinity. TFAM can compact plasmid DNA in vitro, suggesting a structural role for the non-specific DNA binding activity in genome packaging. This review summarizes TFAM-mtDNA interactions and describes an emerging view of TFAM as a multipurpose coordinator of mtDNA transactions, with direct consequences for the maintenance of gene expression and genome copy number. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression. PMID:22465614

  11. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  12. Multiple steps in the regulation of transcription-factor level and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Ab, G

    1996-01-01

    This review focuses on the regulation of transcription factors, many of which are DNA-binding proteins that recognize cis-regulatory elements of target genes and are the most direct regulators of gene transcription. Transcription factors serve as integration centres of the different signal-transduct

  13. RFX2 Is a Major Transcriptional Regulator of Spermiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, W Stephen; Baas, Dominique; Lemeille, Sylvain; Paschaki, Marie; Seguin-Estevez, Queralt; Barras, Emmanuèle; Ma, Wenli; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Morlé, Laurette; Durand, Bénédicte; Reith, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Spermatogenesis consists broadly of three phases: proliferation of diploid germ cells, meiosis, and finally extensive differentiation of the haploid cells into effective delivery vehicles for the paternal genome. Despite detailed characterization of many haploid developmental steps leading to sperm, only fragmentary information exists on the control of gene expression underlying these processes. Here we report that the RFX2 transcription factor is a master regulator of genes required for the haploid phase. A targeted mutation of Rfx2 was created in mice. Rfx2-/- mice are perfectly viable but show complete male sterility. Spermatogenesis appears to progress unperturbed through meiosis. However, haploid cells undergo a complete arrest in spermatid development just prior to spermatid elongation. Arrested cells show altered Golgi apparatus organization, leading to a deficit in the generation of a spreading acrosomal cap from proacrosomal vesicles. Arrested cells ultimately merge to form giant multinucleated cells released to the epididymis. Spermatids also completely fail to form the flagellar axoneme. RNA-Seq analysis and ChIP-Seq analysis identified 139 genes directly controlled by RFX2 during spermiogenesis. Gene ontology analysis revealed that genes required for cilium function are specifically enriched in down- and upregulated genes showing that RFX2 allows precise temporal expression of ciliary genes. Several genes required for cell adhesion and cytoskeleton remodeling are also downregulated. Comparison of RFX2-regulated genes with those controlled by other major transcriptional regulators of spermiogenesis showed that each controls independent gene sets. Altogether, these observations show that RFX2 plays a major and specific function in spermiogenesis. PMID:26162102

  14. RFX2 Is a Major Transcriptional Regulator of Spermiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Stephen Kistler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis consists broadly of three phases: proliferation of diploid germ cells, meiosis, and finally extensive differentiation of the haploid cells into effective delivery vehicles for the paternal genome. Despite detailed characterization of many haploid developmental steps leading to sperm, only fragmentary information exists on the control of gene expression underlying these processes. Here we report that the RFX2 transcription factor is a master regulator of genes required for the haploid phase. A targeted mutation of Rfx2 was created in mice. Rfx2-/- mice are perfectly viable but show complete male sterility. Spermatogenesis appears to progress unperturbed through meiosis. However, haploid cells undergo a complete arrest in spermatid development just prior to spermatid elongation. Arrested cells show altered Golgi apparatus organization, leading to a deficit in the generation of a spreading acrosomal cap from proacrosomal vesicles. Arrested cells ultimately merge to form giant multinucleated cells released to the epididymis. Spermatids also completely fail to form the flagellar axoneme. RNA-Seq analysis and ChIP-Seq analysis identified 139 genes directly controlled by RFX2 during spermiogenesis. Gene ontology analysis revealed that genes required for cilium function are specifically enriched in down- and upregulated genes showing that RFX2 allows precise temporal expression of ciliary genes. Several genes required for cell adhesion and cytoskeleton remodeling are also downregulated. Comparison of RFX2-regulated genes with those controlled by other major transcriptional regulators of spermiogenesis showed that each controls independent gene sets. Altogether, these observations show that RFX2 plays a major and specific function in spermiogenesis.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the carbohydrate utilization network in Thermotoga maritima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic bacteria from the Thermotogales lineage can produce hydrogen by fermenting a wide range of carbohydrates. Previous experimental studies identified a large fraction of genes committed to carbohydrate degradation and utilization in the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. Knowledge of these genes enabled comprehensive reconstruction of biochemical pathways comprising the carbohydrate utilization network. However, transcriptional factors (TFs and regulatory mechanisms driving this network remained largely unknown. Here, we used an integrated approach based on comparative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data for the reconstruction of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Thermotogales genomes. We identified DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 19 orthologous TFs in the Thermotogales. The inferred regulatory network in T. maritima contains 181 genes encoding TFs, sugar catabolic enzymes and ABC-family transporters. In contrast to many previously described bacteria, a transcriptional regulation strategy of Thermotoga does not employ global regulatory factors. The reconstructed regulatory network in T. maritima was validated by gene expression profiling on a panel of mono- and disaccharides and by in vitro DNA-binding assays. The observed upregulation of genes involved in catabolism of pectin, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, rhamnose, xylose, glucose, galactose, and ribose showed a strong correlation with the UxaR, TreR, BglR, CelR, AraR, RhaR, XylR, GluR, GalR, and RbsR regulons. Ultimately, this study elucidated the transcriptional regulatory network and mechanisms controlling expression of carbohydrate utilization genes in T. maritima. In addition to improving the functional annotations of associated transporters and catabolic enzymes, this research provides novel insights into the evolution of regulatory networks in Thermotogales.

  16. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transcriptional regulators directly bind two cellular transcription factors, TFIID and TFIIB.

    OpenAIRE

    Rank, N M; Lambert, P F

    1995-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) E2 translational open reading frame encodes three proteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication: the E2 transcriptional activator (E2TA), the E2 transcriptional repressor (E2TR) and the E8/E2 transcriptional repressor (E8/E2TR). E2TA is a strong activator of papillomaviral promoters and is required for viral DNA replication. E2TR and E8/E2TR inhibit the activities of E2TA but also possess weak transactivational properties of their own....

  17. Bmp indicator mice reveal dynamic regulation of transcriptional response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Javier

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Bmp ligands are regulated at multiple levels, both extracellularly and intracellularly. Therefore, the presence of these growth factors is not an accurate indicator of Bmp signaling activity. While a common approach to detect Bmp signaling activity is to determine the presence of phosphorylated forms of Smad1, 5 and 8 by immunostaining, this approach is time consuming and not quantitative. In order to provide a simpler readout system to examine the presence of Bmp signaling in developing animals, we developed BRE-gal mouse embryonic stem cells and a transgenic mouse line that specifically respond to Bmp ligand stimulation. Our reporter identifies specific transcriptional responses that are mediated by Smad1 and Smad4 with the Schnurri transcription factor complex binding to a conserved Bmp-Responsive Element (BRE, originally identified among Drosophila, Xenopus and human Bmp targets. Our BRE-gal mES cells specifically respond to Bmp ligands at concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml; and BRE-gal reporter mice, derived from the BRE-gal mES cells, show dynamic activity in many cellular sites, including extraembryonic structures and mammary glands, thereby making this a useful scientific tool.

  18. Cellular adaptation to hypoxia and p53 transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang ZHAO; Xue-qun CHEN; Ji-zeng DU

    2009-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Meanwhile, under stress conditions, p53 also acts as a transcription factor, regulating the expression of a series of target genes to maintain the integrity of genome. The target genes of p53 can be classified into genes regulating cell cycle arrest, genes involved in apoptosis, and genes inhibiting angiogenesis. p53 protein contains a transactivation domain, a sequence-specific DNA binding domain, a tetramerization domain, a non-specific DNA binding domain that recognizes damaged DNA, and a later identified proline-rich domain. Under stress, p53 proteins accumulate and are activated through two mechanisms. One, involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM), is that the interaction between p53 and its down-regulation factor murine double minute 2 (MDM2) decreases, leading to p53 phosphorylation on Ser15, as determined by the post-translational mechanism; the other holds that p53 increases and is activated through the binding of ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) or nucleolin to p53 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR), regulating p53 translation. Under hypoxia, p53 decreases transactivation and increases transrepression. The mutations outside the DNA binding domain of p53 also contribute to tumor progress, so further studies on p53 should also be focused on this direction. The subterranean blind mole rat Spalax in Israel is a good model for hypoxia-adaptation. The p53 of Spalax mutated in residue 172 and residue 207 from arginine to lysine, conferring it the ability to survive hypoxic conditions. This model indicates that p53 acts as a master gene of diversity formation during evolution.

  19. DMPD: Post-transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15075353 Post-transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. Anderson P, P...l) (.csml) Show Post-transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. PubmedID 15075353 Title Post-tr...anscriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. Authors Anderson P, Phillip

  20. Intracellular CMTM2 negatively regulates human immunodeficiency virus type-1 transcription through targeting the transcription factors AP-1 and CREB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hong-shuo; SHI Shuang; LU Xiao-zhi; GAO Feng; YAN Ling; WANG Ying; ZHUANG Hui

    2010-01-01

    Background The CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing family (CMTM) is a novel family of proteins linking chemokines and TM4SF. Different members exhibit diverse biological functions. In this study, the effect of intracellular CMTM2 on regulating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) transcription was evaluated.Methods The effects of CMTM2 on regulating full-length HIV-1 provirus and the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-directed transcription were assessed by luciferase assay. Transcription factor assays, using the luciferase reporter plasmids of AP-1, CRE, and NF-κB were conducted to explore the signaling pathway(s) that may be regulated by CMTM2. The potential relationship between CMTM2 and the transcription factor AP-1 was further analyzed by Western blotting analyses to investigate the effect of CMTM2 on PMA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.Results The results from the current study revealed that CMTM2 acts as a negative regulator of HIV-1 transcription.CMTM2 exerted a suppressive action on both full-length HIV-1 provirus and HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription.Transcription factor assays showed that CMTM2 selectively inhibited basal AP-1 and CREB activity. Co-expression of HIV-1 Tat, a potent AP-1 and CREB activator, can not reverse CMTM2-mediated AP-1 and CREB inhibition, suggesting a potent and specific effect of CMTM2 on negatively regulating these two signaling pathways.Conclusion Intracellular CMTM2 can negatively regulate HIV-1 transcription, at least in part, by targeting the AP-1 and CREB pathways. Exploring the mechanisms further may lead to new ways to control HIV-1 replication.

  1. Regulation of transcription and activity of Rhizobium etli glutaminase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Du Pont, Gisela; Durán, Socorro

    2004-08-01

    The present study determines the regulatory mechanisms that operate on Rhizobium etli glutaminase A. glsA gene expression levels were evaluated under several metabolic conditions by fusions of the glsA gene promoter and the transcriptional reporter cassette uidA2-aad. glsA expression was directly correlated to the glutaminase A activity found under the tested growth conditions, reaching its maximum level in the presence of glutamine and during exponential growth phase. Glutamine induces glsA expression. The influence of allosteric metabolites on glutaminase A activity was also determined. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate, whereas oxaloacetate and glyoxylate modulate it positively. Glutaminase A is not inhibited by glutamate and is activated by ammonium. Glutaminase A participates in an ATP-consuming cycle where glutamine is continually degraded and resynthesized by glutamine synthetase (GS). GS and glutaminase A activities appear simultaneously during bacterial growth under different metabolic conditions and their control mechanisms are not reciprocal. Slight overproduction in glutaminase A expression causes a reduction in growth yield and a dramatic decrease in bacterial growth. We propose a model for regulation of glutaminase A, and discuss its contribution to glutamine cycle regulation. PMID:15279892

  2. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  3. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Martínez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR, mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP, whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  4. Regulation of Transcriptional Networks by PKC Isozymes: Identification of c-Rel as a Key Transcription Factor for PKC-Regulated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Garg

    Full Text Available Activation of protein kinase C (PKC, a family of serine-threonine kinases widely implicated in cancer progression, has major impact on gene expression. In a recent genome-wide analysis of prostate cancer cells we identified distinctive gene expression profiles controlled by individual PKC isozymes and highlighted a prominent role for PKCδ in transcriptional activation.Here we carried out a thorough bioinformatics analysis to dissect transcriptional networks controlled by PKCα, PKCδ, and PKCε, the main diacylglycerol/phorbol ester PKCs expressed in prostate cancer cells. Despite the remarkable differences in the patterns of transcriptional responsive elements (REs regulated by each PKC, we found that c-Rel represents the most frequent RE in promoters regulated by all three PKCs. In addition, promoters of PKCδ-regulated genes were particularly enriched with REs for CREB, NF-E2, RREB, SRF, Oct-1, Evi-1, and NF-κB. Most notably, by using transcription factor-specific RNAi we were able to identify subsets of PKCδ-regulated genes modulated by c-Rel and CREB. Furthermore, PKCδ-regulated genes condensed under the c-Rel transcriptional regulation display significant functional interconnections with biological processes such as angiogenesis, inflammatory response, and cell motility.Our study identified candidate transcription factors in the promoters of PKC regulated genes, in particular c-Rel was found as a key transcription factor in the control of PKCδ-regulated genes. The deconvolution of PKC-regulated transcriptional networks and their nodes may greatly help in the identification of PKC effectors and have significant therapeutics implications.

  5. Molecular mechanisms regulating expression and function of transcription regulator "inhibitor of differentiation 3"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Wai-sui LIM; Jin-mei WU

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factor antagonist inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) has been implicated in many diverse developmental, physiological and pathophysiological processes. Its expression and function is subjected to many levels of complex regulation. This review summarizes the current understanding of these mechanisms and describes how they might be related to the diverse functions that have been attributed to the Id3 protein. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms should provide insights towards the development of therapeutic approaches to various diseases, including cancer and atherogenesis.

  6. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo;

    2012-01-01

    PRDM family members are transcriptional regulators involved in tissue specific differentiation. PRDM5 has been reported to predominantly repress transcription, but a characterization of its molecular functions in a relevant biological context is lacking. We demonstrate here that Prdm5 is highly e...... transcriptional program necessary to the proper assembly of osteoblastic extracellular matrix....

  7. Transcriptional regulation of bone sialoprotein gene expression by Osx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Huang, Yehong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chi

    2016-08-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. It is due to unbalance between bone formation and bone resorption. Bone formation is a complex process which involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. Osteoblasts produce a characteristic extracellular collagenous matrix that subsequently becomes mineralized. Osterix (Osx) is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation. Bone sialoprotein (Bsp) is a member of the SIBLING gene family. Expression of Bsp correlates with the differentiation of osteoblasts and the onset of mineralization. Our preliminary data showed that Bsp was abolished in Osx-null mice; however, the detailed mechanism of Osx regulation on Bsp is not fully understood. In this study, regulation of Bsp expression by Osx was further characterized. It was shown that overexpression of Osx led to Bsp upregulation. Inhibition of Osx by small interfering RNA resulted in Bsp downregulation in osteoblast. Transfection assay demonstrated that Osx was able to activate Bsp promoter reporter in a dose-dependent manner. To define minimal region of Bsp promoter activated by Osx, a series of deletion mutants of Bsp promoter were generated, and the minimal region was narrowed down to the proximal 100 bp. Point-mutagenesis studies showed that one GC-rich site was required for Bsp promoter activation by Osx. ChIP assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx associated with native Bsp promoter in primary osteoblasts. Our observations provide evidence that Osx targets Bsp expression directly. PMID:27261434

  8. Transcriptional regulation of cardiac genes balance pro- and anti-hypertrophic mechanisms in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Gennebäck

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. HCM is often hereditary, but our knowledge of the mechanisms leading from mutation to phenotype is incomplete. The transcriptional expression patterns in the myocar - dium of HCM patients may contribute to understanding the mechanisms that drive and stabilize the hypertrophy. Cardiac myectomies/biopsies from 8 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM and 5 controls were studied with whole genome Illumina microarray gene expression (detecting 18 189 mRNA. When comparing HOCM myocardium to controls, there was significant transcriptional down-regulation of the MYH6, EGR1, APOB and FOS genes, and significant transcriptional up-regulation of the ACE2, JAK2, NPPA (ANP, APOA1 and HDAC5 genes. The transcriptional regulation revealed both pro- and anti-hypertrophic mechanisms. The pro-hypertrophic response was explained by the transcriptional down-regulation of MYH6, indicating that the switch to the fetal gene program is maintained, and the transcriptional up-regulation of JAK2 in the JAK-STAT pathway. The anti-hypertrophic response was seen as a transcriptional down-regulation of the immediate early genes (IEGs, FOS and EGR1, and a transcriptional up-regulation of ACE2 and HDAC5. This can be interpreted as a transcriptional endogenous protection system in the heart of the HOCM patients, neither growing nor suppressing the already hypertrophic myocardium.

  9. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  11. CacyBP/SIP as a regulator of transcriptional responses in brain cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Anna; Hetman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The Calcyclin-Binding Protein/Siah-1-Interacting Protein (CacyBP/SIP) is highly expressed in the brain and was shown to regulate the β-catenin-driven transcription in thymocytes. Therefore, it was investigated whether in brain cells CacyBP/SIP might play a role as a transcriptional regulator. In BDNF- or forskolin-stimulated rat primary cortical neurons, overexpression of CacyBP/SIP enhanced transcriptional activity of the cAMP-response element (CRE). In addition, overexpressed...

  12. Deciphering transcriptional regulations coordinating the response to environmental changes

    OpenAIRE

    Acuña, Vicente; Aravena, Andrés; Guziolowski, Carito; Eveillard, Damien; Siegel, Anne; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Gene co-expression evidenced as a response to environmental changes has shown that transcriptional activity is coordinated, which pinpoints the role of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs). Nevertheless, the prediction of TRNs based on the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) with binding sites (BSs) generally produces an over-estimation of the observable TF/BS relations within the network and therefore many of the predicted relations are spurious. Results We present Lomba...

  13. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  14. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  15. Regulation of Transcription from Two ssrS Promoters in 6S RNA Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hongmarn; Bak, Geunu; Kim, Kwang-sun; Lee, Younghoon

    2013-01-01

    ssrS-encoded 6S RNA is an abundant noncoding RNA that binds σ70-RNA polymerase and regulates expression at a subset of promoters in Escherichia coli. It is transcribed from two tandem promoters, ssrS P1 and ssrS P2. Regulation of transcription from two ssrS promoters in 6S RNA biogenesis was examined. Both P1 and P2 were growth phase-dependently regulated. Depletion of 6S RNA had no effect on growth-phase-dependent transcription from either promoter, whereas overexpression of 6S RNA increased P1 transcription and decreased P2 transcription, suggesting that transcription from P1 and P2 is subject to feedback activation and feedback inhibition, respectively. This feedback regulation disappeared in Δfis strains, supporting involvement of Fis in this process. The differential feedback regulation may provide a means for maintaining appropriate cellular concentrations of 6S RNA. PMID:23864284

  16. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy M. Martinez- Vaz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation.

  17. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  18. Transcription regulation of HYPK by Heat Shock Factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijit Das

    Full Text Available HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast Partner K was originally identified by yeast two-hybrid assay as an interactor of Huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington's disease. HYPK was characterized earlier as an intrinsically unstructured protein having chaperone-like activity in vitro and in vivo. HYPK has the ability of reducing rate of aggregate formation and subsequent toxicity caused by mutant Huntingtin. Further investigation revealed that HYPK is involved in diverse cellular processes and required for normal functioning of cells. In this study we observed that hyperthermia increases HYPK expression in human and mouse cells in culture. Expression of exogenous Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, upon heat treatment could induce HYPK expression, whereas HSF1 knockdown reduced endogenous as well as heat-induced HYPK expression. Putative HSF1-binding site present in the promoter of human HYPK gene was identified and validated by reporter assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed in vivo interaction of HSF1 and RNA polymerase II with HYPK promoter sequence. Additionally, acetylation of histone H4, a known epigenetic marker of inducible HSF1 binding, was observed in response to heat shock in HYPK gene promoter. Overexpression of HYPK inhibited cells from lethal heat-induced death whereas knockdown of HYPK made the cells susceptible to lethal heat shock-induced death. Apart from elevated temperature, HYPK was also upregulated by hypoxia and proteasome inhibition, two other forms of cellular stress. We concluded that chaperone-like protein HYPK is induced by cellular stress and under transcriptional regulation of HSF1.

  19. Biogenesis of photosystem II complexes: transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral membrane proteins of photosystem II (PS II) reaction center complexes are encoded by chloroplast genomes. These proteins are absent from thylakoids of PS II mutants of algae and vascular plants as a result of either chloroplast or nuclear gene mutations. To resolve the molecular basis and the concurrent absence of the PS II polypeptides, protein synthesis rates and mRNA levels were measured in mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack PS II. The analyses show that one nuclear gene product regulates the levels of transcripts from the chloroplast gene encoding the 51-kD chlorophyll α-binding polypeptide (polypeptide 5) but is not involved in the synthesis of other chloroplast mRNAs. The other nuclear product is specifically required for translation of mRNA encoding the 32-34-kD polypeptide, D1. The absence of either D1 or polypeptide 5 does not eliminate the synthesis and thylakoid insertion of two other integral membrane proteins of PS II, the chlorophyll α-binding polypeptide of 46 kD (polypeptide 6) and the 30-kD D1-like protein, D2. However, these two unassembled subunits cannot be properly processed and/or are degraded in the mutants even though they reside in the membrane. In addition, pulse labeling of the nuclear mutants and a chloroplast mutant that does not synthesize D1 mRNA indicates that synthesis of polypeptide 5 and D1 is coordinated at the translational level. A model is presented to explain how absence of one of the two proteins could lead to translational arrest of the other

  20. Forkhead transcription factor foxe1 regulates chondrogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Chisako; Iida, Atsumi; Tabata, Yoko; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2009-12-15

    Forkhead transcription factor (Fox) e1 is a causative gene for Bamforth-Lazarus syndrome, which is characterized by hypothyroidism and cleft palate. Applying degenerate polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the conserved forkhead domain, we identified zebrafish foxe1 (foxe1). Foxe1 is expressed in the thyroid, pharynx, and pharyngeal skeleton during development; strongly expressed in the gill and weakly expressed in the brain, eye, and heart in adult zebrafish. A loss of function of foxe1 by morpholino antisense oligo (MO) exhibited abnormal craniofacial development, shortening of Meckel's cartilage and the ceratohyals, and suppressed chondrycytic proliferation. However, at 27 hr post fertilization, the foxe1 MO-injected embryos showed normal dlx2, hoxa2, and hoxb2 expression, suggesting that the initial steps of pharyngeal skeletal development, including neural crest migration and specification of the pharyngeal arch occurred normally. In contrast, at 2 dpf, a severe reduction in the expression of sox9a, colIIaI, and runx2b, which play roles in chondrocytic proliferation and differentiation, was observed. Interestingly, fgfr2 was strongly upregulated in the branchial arches of the foxe1 MO-injected embryos. Unlike Foxe1-null mice, normal thyroid development in terms of morphology and thyroid-specific marker expression was observed in foxe1 MO-injected zebrafish embryos. Taken together, our results indicate that Foxe1 plays an important role in chondrogenesis during development of the pharyngeal skeleton in zebrafish, probably through regulation of fgfr2 expression. Furthermore, the roles reported for FOXE1 in mammalian thyroid development may have been acquired during evolution.

  1. Analyzing phosphorylation-dependent regulation of subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of transcriptional coactivator NT-PGC-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji Suk; Gettys, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a nuclear transcriptional coactivator that regulates the genes involved in energy metabolism. Recent evidence has been provided that alternative splicing of PPARGC1A gene produces a functional but predominantly cytosolic isoform of PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α). We have demonstrated that transcriptional coactivation capacity of NT-PGC-1α is directly correlated with its nuclear localization in a PKA phosphorylation-dependent manner. In this chapter, we describe quantitative imaging analysis methods that are developed to measure the relative fluorescence intensity of the protein of interest in the nucleus and cytoplasm in a single cell and the frequency distribution of nuclear/cytoplasmic intensity ratios in the population of cells, respectively. This chapter also describes transient cotransfection and dual-luciferase reporter gene assay that examine the ability of coactivators to activate the transcriptional activity of transcription factors.

  2. A Genome-wide Screen for Neurospora crassa Transcription Factors Regulating Glycogen Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Luchessi, Augusto Ducati; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors play a key role in transcription regulation as they recognize and directly bind to defined sites in promoter regions of target genes, and thus modulate differential expression. The overall process is extremely dynamic, as they have to move through the nucleus and transiently bind to chromatin in order to regulate gene transcription. To identify transcription factors that affect glycogen accumulation in Neurospora crassa, we performed a systematic screen of a deletion strains set generated by the Neurospora Knockout Project and available at the Fungal Genetics Stock Center. In a wild-type strain of N. crassa, glycogen content reaches a maximal level at the end of the exponential growth phase, but upon heat stress the glycogen content rapidly drops. The gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) is transcriptionally down-regulated when the mycelium is exposed to the same stress condition. We identified 17 deleted strains having glycogen accumulation profiles different from that of the wild-type strain under both normal growth and heat stress conditions. Most of the transcription factors identified were annotated as hypothetical protein, however some of them, such as the PacC, XlnR, and NIT2 proteins, were biochemically well-characterized either in N. crassa or in other fungi. The identification of some of the transcription factors was coincident with the presence of DNA-binding motifs specific for the transcription factors in the gsn 5′-flanking region, and some of these DNA-binding motifs were demonstrated to be functional by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) experiments. Strains knocked-out in these transcription factors presented impairment in the regulation of gsn expression, suggesting that the transcription factors regulate glycogen accumulation by directly regulating gsn gene expression. Five selected mutant strains showed defects in cell cycle progression, and two transcription factors were light-regulated. The results indicate

  3. Transcription regulation by distal enhancers: who's in the loop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadhouders, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Jorna, Ruud; Leslie, Kris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin profiling efforts have shown that enhancers are often located at large distances from gene promoters within the noncoding genome. Whereas enhancers can stimulate transcription initiation by communicating with promoters via chromatin looping mechanisms, we propose that enhancers may also stimulate transcription elongation by physical interactions with intronic elements. We review here recent findings derived from the study of the hematopoietic system.

  4. Impacts of Pretranscriptional DNA Methylation, Transcriptional Transcription Factor, and Posttranscriptional microRNA Regulations on Protein Evolutionary Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Trees-Juen; Chiang, Tai-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is largely regulated by DNA methylation, transcription factor (TF), and microRNA (miRNA) before, during, and after transcription, respectively. Although the evolutionary effects of TF/miRNA regulations have been widely studied, evolutionary analysis of simultaneously accounting for DNA methylation, TF, and miRNA regulations and whether promoter methylation and gene body (coding regions) methylation have different effects on the rate of gene evolution remain uninvestigated. Here, we compared human–macaque and human–mouse protein evolutionary rates against experimentally determined single base-resolution DNA methylation data, revealing that promoter methylation level is positively correlated with protein evolutionary rates but negatively correlated with TF/miRNA regulations, whereas the opposite was observed for gene body methylation level. Our results showed that the relative importance of these regulatory factors in determining the rate of mammalian protein evolution is as follows: Promoter methylation ≈ miRNA regulation > gene body methylation > TF regulation, and further indicated that promoter methylation and miRNA regulation have a significant dependent effect on protein evolutionary rates. Although the mechanisms underlying cooperation between DNA methylation and TFs/miRNAs in gene regulation remain unclear, our study helps to not only illuminate the impact of these regulatory factors on mammalian protein evolution but also their intricate interaction within gene regulatory networks. PMID:24923326

  5. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  6. O-GlcNAc modification of Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors negatively regulates their transcriptional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Changhoon; Lim, Kihong

    2015-11-13

    The addition of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on serine or threonine modifies a myriad of proteins and regulates their function, stability and localization. O-GlcNAc modification is common among chromosome-associated proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting its extensive involvement in gene expression regulation. In this study, we demonstrate the O-GlcNAc status of the Sp family members of transcription factors and the functional impact on their transcriptional activities. We highlight the presence of O-GlcNAc residues in Sp3 and Sp4, but not Sp2, as demonstrated by their enrichment in GlcNAc positive protein fractions and by detection of O-GlcNAc residues on Sp3 and Sp4 co-expressed in Escherichia coli together with O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) using an O-GlcNAc-specific antibody. Deletion mutants of Sp3 and Sp4 indicate that the majority of O-GlcNAc sites reside in their N-terminal transactivation domain. Overall, using reporter gene assays and co-immunoprecipitations, we demonstrate a functional inhibitory role of O-GlcNAc modifications in Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Thereby, our study strengthens the current notion that O-GlcNAc modification is an important regulator of protein interactome.

  7. Nicotine regulates cocaine-amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (Cart) in the mesocorticolimbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Egemen; Gozen, Oguz; Ugur, Muzeyyen; Koylu, Ersin O; Kanit, Lutfiye; Balkan, Burcu

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Regulated Transcript (CART) mRNA and peptides are intensely expressed in the brain regions comprising mesocorticolimbic system. Studies suggest that CART peptides may have a role in the regulation of reward circuitry. The present study aimed to examine the effect of nicotine on CART expression in the mesocorticolimbic system. Three different doses of nicotine (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 mg/kg free base) were injected subcutaneously for 5 days, and on day 6, rats were decapitated following a challenge dose. CART mRNA and peptide levels in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (DST), amygdala (AMG), lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and ventral tegmental area (VTA) were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western Blot analysis, respectively. In the mPFC, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg nicotine, decreased CART peptide levels whereas there was no effect on CART mRNA levels. In the VTA, a down-regulation of CART peptide expression was observed with 0.2 and 0.6 mg/kg nicotine. Conversely, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg nicotine increased CART mRNA levels in the AMG without affecting the CART peptide expression. Nicotine did not regulate CART mRNA or CART peptide expression in the NAc, DST, and LHA. We conclude that nicotine regulates CART expression in the mesocorticolimbic system and this regulation may play an important role in nicotine reward. Synapse 70:283-292, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990424

  8. Escherichia coli pfs Transcription: Regulation and Proposed Roles in Autoinducer-2 Synthesis and Purine Excretion▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Youngbae; Lew, Chih M.; Gralla, Jay D.

    2006-01-01

    Pfs expression is required for several metabolic pathways and limits the production of autoinducer-2, a molecule proposed to play a central role in interspecies quorum sensing. The present study reveals physiological conditions and promoter DNA elements that regulate Escherichia coli pfs transcription. Pfs transcription is shown to rely on both sigma 70 and sigma 38 (rpoS), and the latter is subject to induction that increases pfs expression. Transcription is maximal as the cells approach sta...

  9. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of the Streptococcus salivarius 57.I Urease Operon

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Mendelsohn, David R.; Burne, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The Streptococcus salivarius 57.I ure cluster was organized as an operon, beginning with ureI, followed by ureABC (structural genes) and ureEFGD (accessory genes). Northern analyses revealed transcripts encompassing structural genes and transcripts containing the entire operon. A ς70-like promoter could be mapped 5′ to ureI (PureI) by primer extension analysis. The intensity of the signal increased when cells were grown at an acidic pH and was further enhanced by excess carbohydrate. To deter...

  11. Modeling Writing Development: Contribution of Transcription and Self-Regulation to Portuguese Students' Text Generation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpo, Teresa; Alves, Rui A.

    2013-01-01

    Writing is a complex activity that requires transcription and self-regulation. We used multiple-group structural equation modeling to test the contribution of transcription (handwriting and spelling), planning, revision, and self-efficacy to writing quality at 2 developmental points (Grades 4-6 vs. 7-9). In Grades 4-6, the model explained 76% of…

  12. Understanding Transcription Factor Regulation by Integrating Gene Expression and DNase I Hypersensitive Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to DNA sequences to regulate gene transcription. The transcription factor binding sites are short DNA sequences (5–20 bp long specifically bound by one or more transcription factors. The identification of transcription factor binding sites and prediction of their function continue to be challenging problems in computational biology. In this study, by integrating the DNase I hypersensitive sites with known position weight matrices in the TRANSFAC database, the transcription factor binding sites in gene regulatory region are identified. Based on the global gene expression patterns in cervical cancer HeLaS3 cell and HelaS3-ifnα4h cell (interferon treatment on HeLaS3 cell for 4 hours, we present a model-based computational approach to predict a set of transcription factors that potentially cause such differential gene expression. Significantly, 6 out 10 predicted functional factors, including IRF, IRF-2, IRF-9, IRF-1 and IRF-3, ICSBP, belong to interferon regulatory factor family and upregulate the gene expression levels responding to the interferon treatment. Another factor, ISGF-3, is also a transcriptional activator induced by interferon alpha. Using the different transcription factor binding sites selected criteria, the prediction result of our model is consistent. Our model demonstrated the potential to computationally identify the functional transcription factors in gene regulation.

  13. Regional regulation of transcription in the chicken genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nie, H.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the relationship between gene transcription and chromosomal location has been studied in a number of different vertebrate genomes. Regional differences in gene expression have been found in several different species. The chicken genome, as the closest sequenced genome

  14. Regulation of archicortical arealization by the transcription factor Zbtb20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga; Tonchev, Anton B; Stoykova, Anastassia;

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of regionalization of the medial pallium (MP), the anlage of the hippocampus, and transitional (cingulate and retrosplenial) cortices are largely unknown. Previous analyses have outlined an important role of the transcription factor (TF) Zbtb20 for hippocampal CA1 field...

  15. Transcription regulation by distal enhancers: Who's in the loop?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Stadhouders (Ralph); A. van den Heuvel (Anita); P. Kolovos (Petros); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); K. Leslie (Kris); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Soler (Eric)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide chromatin profiling efforts have shown that enhancers are often located at large distances from gene promoters within the noncoding genome. Whereas enhancers can stimulate transcription initiation by communicating with promoters via chromatin looping mechanisms, we propose th

  16. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergilli through genome-wide gene expression data anlysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar, Margarita Pena; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni;

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol is catabolized by a wide range of microorganisms including Aspergillus species. To identify the transcriptional regulation of glycerol metabolism in Aspergillus, we analyzed data from triplicate batch fermentations of three different Aspergilli (Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae...

  17. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  18. Foxj3 transcriptionally activates Mef2c and regulates adult skeletal muscle fiber type identity

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Matthew S.; Shi, Xiaozhong; Voelker, Kevin A.; Grange, Robert W.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Robert E Hammer; Garry, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate skeletal muscle differentiation, fiber type diversity and muscle regeneration are incompletely defined. Forkhead transcription factors are critical regulators of cellular fate determination, proliferation, and differentiation. We identified a forkhead/winged helix transcription factor, Foxj3, which was expressed in embryonic and adult skeletal muscle. To define the functional role of Foxj3, we examined Foxj3 mutant mice. Foxj3 mutant mice are viable but have signi...

  19. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  20. Multiple MAPK cascades regulate the transcription of IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  1. Multiple MAPK cascades regulate the transcription of IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smadar Kahana-Edwin

    Full Text Available The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UASru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs, Com2 and Sko1; (ii high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis.

  2. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  3. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn, E-mail: LoneB.Madsen@agrsci.dk

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  4. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of Sprouty1, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darimipourain, M; Wang, S; Ittmann, M; Kwabi-Addo, B

    2011-12-01

    Sprouty1 (Spry1) is a negative regulator of fibroblast growth factor signaling with a potential tumor suppressor function in prostate cancer (PCa). Spry1 is downregulated in human PCa, and Spry1 expression can markedly inhibit PCa proliferation in vitro. We have reported DNA methylation as a mechanism for controlling Spry1 expression. However, promoter methylation does not seem to explain gene silencing in all PCa cases studied to suggest other mechanisms of gene inactivation, such as alterations in trans-acting factors and/or post-transcriptional activity may be responsible for the decreased expression in those cases. Binding sites for Wilm's tumor (WT1) transcription factors EGR1, EGR3 and WTE are highly conserved between the mouse and human Spry1 promoter regions, suggesting an evolutionary conserved mechanism(s) involving WT1 and EGR in Spry1 regulation. Spry1 mRNA contains multiple microRNA (miRNA) binding sites in its 3'UTR region suggesting post-transcriptional control. We demonstrate that Spry1 is a target for miR-21-mediated gene silencing. miRNA-based therapeutic approaches to treat cancer are emerging. Spry1 is highly regulated by miRNAs and could potentially be an excellent candidate for such approaches. PMID:21826097

  5. Switched Dynamical Latent Force Models for Modelling Transcriptional Regulation

    CERN Document Server

    López-Lopera, Andrés F

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop statistical approaches for transcription networks, statistical community has proposed several methods to infer activity levels of proteins, from time-series measurements of targets' expression levels. A few number of approaches have been proposed in order to outperform the representation of fast switching time instants, but computational overheads are significant due to complex inference algorithms. Using the theory related to latent force models (LFM), the development of this project provide a switched dynamical hybrid model based on Gaussian processes (GPs). To deal with discontinuities in dynamical systems (or latent driving force), an extension of the single input motif approach is introduced, that switches between different protein concentrations, and different dynamical systems. This creates a versatile representation for transcription networks that can capture discrete changes and non-linearities in the dynamics. The proposed method is evaluated on both simulated data and real data,...

  6. Post-Transcriptional Mechanisms Regulating Epidermal Stem and Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingting; Sen, George L

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal stem and progenitor cells exist within the basal layer of the epidermis and serve to replenish the loss of differentiated cells because of normal turnover or injury. Current efforts have focused on elucidating the transcriptional regulation of epidermal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. However, recent studies have pointed to an emerging and prominent role for post-transcriptional regulation of epidermal cell fate decisions. In this review, we will focus on post-transcriptional mechanisms including noncoding RNAs, RNA binding proteins, and mRNA decay-mediated control of epidermal stem and progenitor cell function in the skin.

  7. Physical Module Networks: an integrative approach for reconstructing transcription regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Novershtern, Noa; Regev, Aviv; Friedman, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Deciphering the complex mechanisms by which regulatory networks control gene expression remains a major challenge. While some studies infer regulation from dependencies between the expression levels of putative regulators and their targets, others focus on measured physical interactions. Results: Here, we present Physical Module Networks, a unified framework that combines a Bayesian model describing modules of co-expressed genes and their shared regulation programs, and a phys...

  8. Associations between transcriptional changes and protein phenotypes provide insights into immune regulation in corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, Lauren E; Pinzόn C, Jorge H; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2016-09-01

    Disease outbreaks in marine ecosystems have driven worldwide declines of numerous taxa, including corals. Some corals, such as Orbicella faveolata, are particularly susceptible to disease. To explore the mechanisms contributing to susceptibility, colonies of O. faveolata were exposed to immune challenge with lipopolysaccharides. RNA sequencing and protein activity assays were used to characterize the response of corals to immune challenge. Differential expression analyses identified 17 immune-related transcripts that varied in expression post-immune challenge. Network analyses revealed several groups of transcripts correlated to immune protein activity. Several transcripts, which were annotated as positive regulators of immunity were included in these groups, and some were downregulated following immune challenge. Correlations between expression of these transcripts and protein activity results further supported the role of these transcripts in positive regulation of immunity. The observed pattern of gene expression and protein activity may elucidate the processes contributing to the disease susceptibility of species like O. faveolata. PMID:27109903

  9. Post-transcriptional regulation of the chicken thymidine kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groudine, M; Casimir, C

    1984-02-10

    In attempting to understand the molecular basis of the control of chicken thymidine kinase (cTK) gene expression, we have examined the steady state cTK RNA content, and the patterns of DNA methylation, chromatin structure and endogenous nuclear runoff transcription of this gene in dividing and non-dividing cells. Our results reveal that the steady state level of cTK poly A+ RNA is correlated with the divisional activity of normal avian cells and tissues. However, no differences in the pattern of Hpa II site methylation or chromatin structure are found among cells containing high or undetectable levels of steady state cTK RNA. In addition, no differences in cTK transcription as assayed by nuclear runoff experiments are detectable in isolated nuclei derived from dividing or non-dividing cells containing high or low levels of steady state cTK RNA. These results suggest that the principal control of chicken thymidine kinase gene expression is post-transcriptional in nature.

  10. Post-transcriptional regulation of the chicken thymidine kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groudine, M; Casimir, C

    1984-02-10

    In attempting to understand the molecular basis of the control of chicken thymidine kinase (cTK) gene expression, we have examined the steady state cTK RNA content, and the patterns of DNA methylation, chromatin structure and endogenous nuclear runoff transcription of this gene in dividing and non-dividing cells. Our results reveal that the steady state level of cTK poly A+ RNA is correlated with the divisional activity of normal avian cells and tissues. However, no differences in the pattern of Hpa II site methylation or chromatin structure are found among cells containing high or undetectable levels of steady state cTK RNA. In addition, no differences in cTK transcription as assayed by nuclear runoff experiments are detectable in isolated nuclei derived from dividing or non-dividing cells containing high or low levels of steady state cTK RNA. These results suggest that the principal control of chicken thymidine kinase gene expression is post-transcriptional in nature. PMID:6199739

  11. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Taniuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The α1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1 enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS. Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region −91 to −81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5′-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells.

  13. Regulation and function of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-Rong; Qi; Zeng-Ming; Yang

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3(STAT3), a member of the STAT family, is a key regulator of many physiological and pathological processes. Significant progress has been made in understanding the transcriptional control, posttranslational modification, cellular localization and functional regulation of STAT3. STAT3 can translocate into the nucleus and bind to specific promoter sequences, thereby exerting transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have shown that STAT3 can also translocate into mitochondria, participating in aerobic respiration and apoptosis. In addition, STAT3 plays an important role in inflammation and tumorigenesis by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. Conditional knockout mouse models make it possible to study the physiological function of STAT3 in specific tissues and organs. This review summarizes the latest advances in the understanding of the expression, regulation and function of STAT3 in physiological and tumorigenic processes.

  14. Characterization of TRAP-mediated regulation of the B. subtilis trp operon using in vitro transcription and transcriptional reporter fusions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Natalie M; Gollnick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism involving two alternative RNA secondary structures in the 5' leader region upstream of the structural genes. Regulation is accomplished, at least in part, by controlling which RNA structure forms during transcription of the operon. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) binds to the nascent trp mRNA to promote formation of a transcription terminator structure so as to induce transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind, the alternative antiterminator RNA structure forms, and the operon is transcribed. Several in vitro and in vivo assays have been utilized to study TRAP-mediated regulation of both transcription and translation. Here, we describe using in vitro transcription attenuation assays and in vivo trp-lacZ fusions to examine TRAP-mediated regulation of the trp genes. PMID:25579595

  15. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  16. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  17. General organisational principles of the transcriptional regulation system: a tree or a circle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Sobetzko, Patrick; Geertz, Marcel; Berger, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances of systemic approaches to gene expression and cellular metabolism provide unforeseen opportunities for relating and integrating extensive datasets describing the transcriptional regulation system as a whole. However, due to the multifaceted nature of the phenomenon, these datasets often contain logically distinct types of information determined by underlying approach and adopted methodology of data analysis. Consequently, to integrate the datasets comprising information on the states of chromatin structure, transcriptional regulatory network and cellular metabolism, a novel methodology enabling interconversion of logically distinct types of information is required. Here we provide a holistic conceptual framework for analysis of global transcriptional regulation as a system coordinated by structural coupling between the transcription machinery and DNA topology, acting as interdependent sensors and determinants of metabolic functions. In this operationally closed system any transition in physiological state represents an emergent property determined by shifts in structural coupling, whereas genetic regulation acts as a genuine device converting one logical type of information into the other.

  18. Systematic insertion mutagenesis of GntR family transcriptional regulator genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    GntR-type transcriptional regulators regulate the most diverse biological processes in bacteria. Although GntR-type transcriptional regulators consist of the second largest family of transcriptional regulators in Sinorhizobium meliloti, little is known about their functions. In this study, we investigated 54 putative genes encoding GntR family of transcriptional regulators in S. meliloti Rm1021. Secondary structure analysis of the C-terminal domain of these putative transcriptional regulators indicated that thirty-seven were members of the FadR subfamily, ten of the HutC subfamily and five of the MocR subfamily. The remaining two did not fall into any specific subfamily category, and may form two new subfamilies. The 54 gntR genes were mutagenized by plasmid insertion mutagenesis to investigate their roles. We found that, of the 54 mutants, only the gtrA1 and gtrB1 mutants had slower growth rates and cell maximal yields on both rich medium and minimal medium, and lower cell motility on swarming plate than wild type Rm1021. All mutants, with the exception of gtrA1 and gtrB1, can establish effective symbioses with alfalfa. Plants inoculated with gtrA1 and gtrB1 mutants grew shorter than those inoculated with wild type, and formed relatively smaller, round and light pink nodules, which were mainly located on lateral roots. And there was an abnormal increase in the number of nodules induced by both mutants. These results suggested that the gtrA1 and gtrB1 mutants were symbiotically deficient. Our work presents a global overview of GntR-like transcriptional regulators involved in symbiosis in S.meliloti, and provides new insight into the functions of GntR-like transcriptional regulators.

  19. Transcription factor ICBP90 regulates the MIF promoter and immune susceptibility locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Leng, Lin; Sauler, Maor; Fu, Weiling; Zheng, Junsong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lee, Patty; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The immunoregulatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus that is linked to the susceptibility of autoimmune and infectious diseases. The MIF promoter contains a 4-nucleotide microsatellite polymorphism (-794 CATT) that repeats 5 to 8 times in the locus, with greater numbers of repeats associated with higher mRNA levels. Because there is no information about the transcriptional regulation of these common alleles, we used oligonucleotide affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify nuclear proteins that interact with the -794 CATT5-8 site. An analysis of monocyte nuclear lysates revealed that the transcription factor ICBP90 (also known as UHRF1) is the major protein interacting with the MIF microsatellite. We found that ICBP90 is essential for MIF transcription from monocytes/macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, and synovial fibroblasts, and TLR-induced MIF transcription is regulated in an ICBP90- and -794 CATT5-8 length-dependent manner. Whole-genome transcription analysis of ICBP90 shRNA-treated rheumatoid synoviocytes uncovered a subset of proinflammatory and immune response genes that overlapped with those regulated by MIF shRNA. In addition, the expression levels of ICBP90 and MIF were correlated in joint synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings identify ICBP90 as a key regulator of MIF transcription and provide functional insight into the regulation of the polymorphic MIF locus.

  20. Regulation of Laccase and Cellulase Genes Transcription in Agaricus bisporus

    OpenAIRE

    Ohga, Shoji; Wood, David A.

    1998-01-01

    A time course for laccase and cellulase genes transcription of Agaricus bisporus compost culture are examined. The results of assays for laccase gene leel show that the expression of this gene increased in the compost until pinning stage of development. In the fruiting cultures the amount of leel declined rapidly over a 4-5 d period immediately. Cellulase gene celS expression contrasted sharply appeared with leel expression by remaining at a low level until after the pins were seen. The cel3...

  1. Transcriptional regulation of nitrogen fixation by molybdenum in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, M R; Premakumar, R; Bishop, P E

    1986-01-01

    Multiple genomic regions homologous to nifH were found in the diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii. The nifHDK gene cluster, located on a 12.8-kilobase (kb) XhoI fragment and two additional XhoI fragments (7.4 and 8.4 kb) hybridized to a nifH-specific DNA template but the 7.4- and 8.4-kb fragments did not hybridize to nifD- or nifK-specific DNA probes. In vivo transcription of the nifHDK gene cluster was ammonia-repressible and required the presence of at least 50 nM molybdenum in the derepressi...

  2. Genes regulated by AoXlnR, the xylanolytic and cellulolytic transcriptional regulator, in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yuji; Sano, Motoaki; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Ko, Taro; Takeuchi, Michio; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    XlnR is a Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator of xylanolytic and cellulolytic genes in Aspergillus. Overexpression of the aoxlnR gene in Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae xlnR gene) resulted in elevated xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities in the culture supernatant, in which nearly 40 secreted proteins were detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis. DNA microarray analysis to identify the transcriptional targets of AoXlnR led to the identification of 75 genes that showed more than fivefold increase in their expression in the AoXlnR overproducer than in the disruptant. Of these, 32 genes were predicted to encode a glycoside hydrolase, highlighting the biotechnological importance of AoXlnR in biomass degradation. The 75 genes included the genes previously identified as AoXlnR targets (xynF1, xynF3, xynG2, xylA, celA, celB, celC, and celD). Thirty-six genes were predicted to be extracellular, which was consistent with the number of proteins secreted, and 61 genes possessed putative XlnR-binding sites (5'-GGCTAA-3', 5'-GGCTAG-3', and 5'-GGCTGA-3') in their promoter regions. Functional annotation of the genes revealed that AoXlnR regulated the expression of hydrolytic genes for degradation of beta-1,4-xylan, arabinoxylan, cellulose, and xyloglucan and of catabolic genes for the conversion of D-xylose to xylulose-5-phosphate. In addition, genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase and L-arabinitol-4- dehydrogenase involved in D-glucose and L-arabinose catabolism also appeared to be targets of AoXlnR.

  3. Membrane estrogen receptors: genomic actions and post transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Julie; Sebastian, K S; Devassy, Sony; Priyadarsini, Lakshmi; Farook, Mohamed Febin; Shameem, A; Mathew, Deepa; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2006-02-26

    The primary cellular location of the nuclear estrogen receptor II (nER II) is the plasma membrane. A number of reports that have appeared in the recent past indicate that plasma membrane localized estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) also exists. Whether the membrane localized ERalpha represents the receptor that binds to the estrogen responsive element (ERE) remains to be known. The mechanisms that underlie the internalization of nER II (non-activated estrogen receptor, deglycosylated) have been identified to a certain extent. The question remains: is the primary location of the ERalpha also the plasma membrane? If that is the case, it will be a challenging task to identify the molecular events that underlie the plasma membrane-to-nucleus movement of ERalpha. The internalization mechanisms for the two 66kDa plasma membrane ERs, following hormone binding, appear to be distinct and without any overlaps. Interestingly, while the major gene regulatory role for ERalpha appears to be at the level of transcription, the nER II has its major functional role in post transcriptional mechanisms. The endoplasmic reticulum associated anchor protein-55 (ap55) that was recently reported from the author's laboratory needs a closer look. It is a high affinity estrogen binding protein that anchors the estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) in an estrogen-mediated event. It will be interesting to examine whether ap55 bears any structural similarity with either ERalpha or ERbeta. PMID:16423448

  4. The regulation of IGF-1 gene transcription and splicing during development and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita eOberbauer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that the insulin-like growth factor-I gene contains six exons that can be differentially spliced to create multiple transcript variants. Further, there are two mutually exclusive leader exons each having multiple promoter sites that are variably used. The mature IGF-I protein derived from the multiplicity of transcripts does not differ suggesting a regulatory role for the various transcript isoforms. The variant forms possess different stabilities, binding partners, and activity indicating a pivotal role for the isoforms. Research has demonstrated differential expression of the IGF-I mRNA transcripts in response to steroids, growth hormone, and developmental cues. Many studies of different tissues have focused on assessing the presence, or putative action, of the transcript isoforms with little consideration of the transcriptional mechanisms that generate the variants or the translational use of the transcript isoforms. Control points for the latter include epigenetic regulation of splicing and promoter usage in response to development or injury, RNA binding proteins and miRNA effects on transcript stability, and preferential use of two leader exons by GH and other hormones. This review will detail the current knowledge of the mechanical, hormonal, and developmental stimuli regulating IGF1 promoter usage and splicing machinery used to create the variants.

  5. The Regulation of IGF-1 Gene Transcription and Splicing during Development and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbauer, A M

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly known that the insulin-like growth factor-I gene contains six exons that can be differentially spliced to create multiple transcript variants. Further, there are two mutually exclusive leader exons each having multiple promoter sites that are variably used. The mature IGF-I protein derived from the multiplicity of transcripts does not differ suggesting a regulatory role for the various transcript isoforms. The variant forms possess different stabilities, binding partners, and activity indicating a pivotal role for the isoforms. Research has demonstrated differential expression of the IGF-I mRNA transcripts in response to steroids, growth hormone, and developmental cues. Many studies of different tissues have focused on assessing the presence, or putative action, of the transcript isoforms with little consideration of the transcriptional mechanisms that generate the variants or the translational use of the transcript isoforms. Control points for the latter include epigenetic regulation of splicing and promoter usage in response to development or injury, RNA binding proteins and microRNA effects on transcript stability, and preferential use of two leader exons by GH and other hormones. This review will detail the current knowledge of the mechanical, hormonal, and developmental stimuli regulating IGF-1 promoter usage and splicing machinery used to create the variants. PMID:23533068

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  7. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  8. Autogenous regulation of splicing of the transcript of a yeast ribosomal protein gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Dabeva, M. D.; Post-Beittenmiller, M A; Warner, J R

    1986-01-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  9. Deciphering the Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning the Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression by Master Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Sébastien; Kelemen, Zsolt; Thévenin, Johanne; Boulard, Céline; Blanchet, Sandrine; To, Alexandra; Payre, Manon; Berger, Nathalie; Effroy-Cuzzi, Delphine; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Godoy, Marta; Solano, Roberto; Thevenon, Emmanuel; Parcy, François; Lepiniec, Loïc; Dubreucq, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transcriptional control of seed maturation involves three related regulators with a B3 domain, namely LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2), ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), and FUSCA3 (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2 [AFLs]). Although genetic analyses have demonstrated partially overlapping functions of these regulators, the underlying molecular mechanisms remained elusive. The results presented here confirmed that the three proteins bind RY DNA elements (with a 5'-CATG-3' core sequence) but with different specificities for flanking nucleotides. In planta as in the moss Physcomitrella patens protoplasts, the presence of RY-like (RYL) elements is necessary but not sufficient for the regulation of the OLEOSIN1 (OLE1) promoter by the B3 AFLs. G box-like domains, located in the vicinity of the RYL elements, also are required for proper activation of the promoter, suggesting that several proteins are involved. Consistent with this idea, LEC2 and ABI3 showed synergistic effects on the activation of the OLE1 promoter. What is more, LEC1 (a homolog of the NF-YB subunit of the CCAAT-binding complex) further enhanced the activation of this target promoter in the presence of LEC2 and ABI3. Finally, recombinant LEC1 and LEC2 proteins produced in Arabidopsis protoplasts could form a ternary complex with NF-YC2 in vitro, providing a molecular explanation for their functional interactions. Taken together, these results allow us to propose a molecular model for the transcriptional regulation of seed genes by the L-AFL proteins, based on the formation of regulatory multiprotein complexes between NF-YBs, which carry a specific aspartate-55 residue, and B3 transcription factors. PMID:27208266

  10. SUMOylation of the ING1b tumor suppressor regulates gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Guérillon, Claire; Kim, Tae-Sun;

    2014-01-01

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are encoded as multiple isoforms in five ING genes (ING1 -5) and act as type II tumor suppressors. They are growth inhibitory when overexpressed and are frequently mislocalized or downregulated in several forms of cancer. ING1 and ING2 are stoichiometric mem......1b E195A), we further demonstrate that ING1b SUMOylation regulates the binding of ING1b to the ISG15 and DGCR8 promoters, consequently regulating ISG15 and DGCR8 transcription. These results suggest a role for ING1b SUMOylation in the regulation of gene transcription....

  11. Transcriptional regulator-mediated activation of adaptation genes triggers CRISPR de novo spacer acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Yingjun; Wang, Xiaodi;

    2015-01-01

    , it was demonstrated that the transcription level of csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 was significantly enhanced in a csa3a-overexpression strain and, moreover, the Csa1 and Cas1 protein levels were increased in this strain. Furthermore, we demonstrated the hyperactive uptake of unique spacers within both CRISPR loci......Acquisition of de novo spacer sequences confers CRISPR-Cas with a memory to defend against invading genetic elements. However, the mechanism of regulation of CRISPR spacer acquisition remains unknown. Here we examine the transcriptional regulation of the conserved spacer acquisition genes in Type I...... in the presence of the csa3a overexpression vector. The spacer acquisition process is dependent on the CCN PAM sequence and protospacer selection is random and non-directional. These results suggested a regulation mechanism of CRISPR spacer acquisition where a single transcriptional regulator senses the presence...

  12. In Silico Identification of Co-transcribed Core Cell Cycle Regulators and Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory networks involving transcription factors and core cell cycle regulators are expected to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this report, we describe the identification of two groups of co-transcribed core cell cycle regulators and transcription factors via a two-step in silico screening. The core cell cycle regulators include TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS (CYCA1;2), CYCB1;1, CYCB2;1, CDKB1;2, and CDKB2;2 while the transcription factors include CURLY LEAF, AINTEGUMENTA, a MYB protein, two Forkhead-associated domain proteins, and a SCARECROW family protein. Promoter analysis revealed a potential web of cross- and self-regulations among the identified proteins. Because one criterion for screening for these genes is that they are predominantly transcribed in young organs but not in mature organs, these genes are likely to be particularly involved in Arabidopsis organ growth.

  13. eQTL Regulating Transcript Levels Associated with Diverse Biological Processes in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Aashish; Budke, Jessica M; Rowland, Steven D; Chitwood, Daniel H; Kumar, Ravi; Carriedo, Leonela; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Zumstein, Kristina; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-09-01

    Variation in gene expression, in addition to sequence polymorphisms, is known to influence developmental, physiological, and metabolic traits in plants. Genetic mapping populations have facilitated identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the genetic determinants of variation in gene expression patterns. We used an introgression population developed from the wild desert-adapted Solanum pennellii and domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to identify the genetic basis of transcript level variation. We established the effect of each introgression on the transcriptome and identified approximately 7,200 eQTL regulating the steady-state transcript levels of 5,300 genes. Barnes-Hut t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding clustering identified 42 modules revealing novel associations between transcript level patterns and biological processes. The results showed a complex genetic architecture of global transcript abundance pattern in tomato. Several genetic hot spots regulating a large number of transcript level patterns relating to diverse biological processes such as plant defense and photosynthesis were identified. Important eQTL regulating transcript level patterns were related to leaf number and complexity as well as hypocotyl length. Genes associated with leaf development showed an inverse correlation with photosynthetic gene expression, but eQTL regulating genes associated with leaf development and photosynthesis were dispersed across the genome. This comprehensive eQTL analysis details the influence of these loci on plant phenotypes and will be a valuable community resource for investigations on the genetic effects of eQTL on phenotypic traits in tomato. PMID:27418589

  14. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  15. Arabidopsis TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA2 is directly regulated by R2R3 MYB transcription factors and is involved in regulation of GLABRA2 transcription in epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tetsuya; Hattori, Sayoko; Sano, Ryosuke; Inoue, Kayoko; Shirano, Yumiko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Shibata, Daisuke; Sato, Shusei; Kato, Tomohiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Wada, Takuji

    2007-08-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA2 (TTG2) encodes a WRKY transcription factor and is expressed in young leaves, trichomes, seed coats, and root hairless cells. An examination of several trichome and root hair mutants indicates that MYB and bHLH genes regulate TTG2 expression. Two MYB binding sites in the TTG2 5' regulatory region act as cis regulatory elements and as direct targets of R2R3 MYB transcription factors such as WEREWOLF, GLABRA1, and TRANSPARENT TESTA2. Mutations in TTG2 cause phenotypic defects in trichome development and seed color pigmentation. Transgenic plants expressing a chimeric repressor version of the TTG2 protein (TTG2:SRDX) showed defects in trichome formation, anthocyanin accumulation, seed color pigmentation, and differentiation of root hairless cells. GLABRA2 (GL2) expression was markedly reduced in roots of ProTTG2:TTG2:SRDX transgenic plants, suggesting that TTG2 is involved in the regulation of GL2 expression, although GL2 expression in the ttg2 mutant was similar to that in the wild type. Our analysis suggests a new step in a regulatory cascade of epidermal differentiation, in which complexes containing R2R3 MYB and bHLH transcription factors regulate the expression of TTG2, which then regulates GL2 expression with complexes containing R2R3 MYB and bHLH in the differentiation of trichomes and root hairless cells.

  16. Biophysics and bioinformatics of transcription regulation in bacteria and bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko

    2005-11-01

    Due to rapid accumulation of biological data, bioinformatics has become a very important branch of biological research. In this thesis, we develop novel bioinformatic approaches and aid design of biological experiments by using ideas and methods from statistical physics. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of the regulatory circuits that control expression of genes. We propose a novel, biophysics based algorithm, for the supervised detection of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. The method classifies potential binding sites by explicitly estimating the sequence-specific binding energy and the chemical potential of a given TF. In contrast with the widely used information theory based weight matrix method, our approach correctly incorporates saturation in the transcription factor/DNA binding probability. This results in a significant reduction in the number of expected false positives, and in the explicit appearance---and determination---of a binding threshold. The new method was used to identify likely genomic binding sites for the Escherichia coli TFs, and to examine the relationship between TF binding specificity and degree of pleiotropy (number of regulatory targets). We next address how parameters of protein-DNA interactions can be obtained from data on protein binding to random oligos under controlled conditions (SELEX experiment data). We show that 'robust' generation of an appropriate data set is achieved by a suitable modification of the standard SELEX procedure, and propose a novel bioinformatic algorithm for analysis of such data. Finally, we use quantitative data analysis, bioinformatic methods and kinetic modeling to analyze gene expression strategies of bacterial viruses. We study bacteriophage Xp10 that infects rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. Xp10 is an unusual bacteriophage, which has morphology and genome organization that most closely

  17. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  18. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenic gene transcription in the liver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirmala Yabaluri; Murali D Bashyam

    2010-09-01

    Glucose homeostasis in mammals is achieved by the actions of counterregulatory hormones, namely insulin, glucagon and glucocorticoids. Glucose levels in the circulation are regulated by the liver, the metabolic centre which produces glucose when it is scarce in the blood. This process is catalysed by two rate-limiting enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) whose gene expression is regulated by hormones. Hormone response units (HRUs) present in the two genes integrate signals from various signalling pathways triggered by hormones. How such domains are arranged in the regulatory region of these two genes, how this complex regulation is accomplished and the latest advancements in the field are discussed in this review.

  19. Regional regulation of transcription in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megens Hendrik-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years, the relationship between gene transcription and chromosomal location has been studied in a number of different vertebrate genomes. Regional differences in gene expression have been found in several different species. The chicken genome, as the closest sequenced genome relative to mammals, is an important resource for investigating regional effects on transcription in birds and studying the regional dynamics of chromosome evolution by comparative analysis. Results We used gene expression data to survey eight chicken tissues and create transcriptome maps for all chicken chromosomes. The results reveal the presence of two distinct types of chromosomal regions characterized by clusters of highly or lowly expressed genes. Furthermore, these regions correlate highly with a number of genome characteristics. Regions with clusters of highly expressed genes have higher gene densities, shorter genes, shorter average intron and higher GC content compared to regions with clusters of lowly expressed genes. A comparative analysis between the chicken and human transcriptome maps constructed using similar panels of tissues suggests that the regions with clusters of highly expressed genes are relatively conserved between the two genomes. Conclusions Our results revealed the presence of a higher order organization of the chicken genome that affects gene expression, confirming similar observations in other species. These results will aid in the further understanding of the regional dynamics of chromosome evolution. The microarray data used in this analysis have been submitted to NCBI GEO database under accession number GSE17108. The reviewer access link is: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?token=tjwjpscyceqawjk&acc=GSE17108

  20. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  1. Biosynthesis of milk fat, protein, and lactose: roles of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Johan S; Lohakare, Jayant; Bionaz, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The demand for high-quality milk is increasing worldwide. The efficiency of milk synthesis can be improved by taking advantage of the accumulated knowledge of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in the synthesis of fat, protein, and lactose in the mammary gland. Research in this area is relatively new, but data accumulated in the last 10 years provide a relatively clear picture. Milk fat synthesis appears to be regulated, at least in bovines, by an interactive network between SREBP1, PPARγ, and LXRα, with a potential role for other transcription factors, such as Spot14, ChREBP, and Sp1. Milk protein synthesis is highly regulated by insulin, amino acids, and amino acid transporters via transcriptional and posttranscriptional routes, with the insulin-mTOR pathway playing a central role. The transcriptional regulation of lactose synthesis is still poorly understood, but it is clear that glucose transporters play an important role. They can also cooperatively interact with amino acid transporters and the mTOR pathway. Recent data indicate the possibility of nutrigenomic interventions to increase milk fat synthesis by feeding long-chain fatty acids and milk protein synthesis by feeding amino acids. We propose a transcriptional network model to account for all available findings. This model encompasses a complex network of proteins that control milk synthesis with a cross talk between milk fat, protein, and lactose regulation, with mTOR functioning as a central hub.

  2. Regulation of cell proliferation by the E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data generated in the past year have further emphasized the essential role for the E2F transcription factors in the regulation of cell proliferation. Genetic studies have shown that E2F activity is required for normal development in fruitflies, and the generation of E2F-1(-/-) mice has...... demonstrated that individual members of the E2F transcription factor family are likely to have distinct roles in mammalian development and homeostasis. Additional mechanisms regulating the activity of the E2F transcription factors have been reported, including subcellular localization and proteolysis of the E2......Fs in the proteasomes. Novel target genes for the E2F transcription factors have been identified that link the E2Fs directly to the initiation of DNA replication....

  3. Novel biosensors based on flavonoid-responsive transcriptional regulators introduced into Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siedler, Solvej; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Malla, Sailesh;

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the construction of two flavonoid biosensors, which can be applied for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains. The biosensors are based on transcriptional regulators combined with autofluorescent proteins. The transcriptional activator FdeR from Herbaspirillum sero....... coli cells containing a flavonol synthase from Arabidopsis thaliana (fls1). We expect the designed biosensors to be applied for isolation of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. © 2013 The Authors.......This study describes the construction of two flavonoid biosensors, which can be applied for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains. The biosensors are based on transcriptional regulators combined with autofluorescent proteins. The transcriptional activator FdeR from Herbaspirillum...... seropedicae SmR1 responds to naringenin, while the repressor QdoR from Bacillus subtilis is inactivated by quercetin and kaempferol. Both biosensors showed over a 7-fold increase of the fluorescent signal after addition of their specific effectors, and a linear correlation between the fluorescence intensity...

  4. TTF-1 action on the transcriptional regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 gene in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ho Yun

    Full Text Available We have recently found that thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1, a homeodomain-containing transcription factor, is postnatally expressed in discrete areas of the hypothalamus and closely involved in neuroendocrine functions. We now report that transcription of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, the rate limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, was inhibited by TTF-1. Double immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TTF-1 was expressed in the astrocytes and endothelial cells of blood vessel in the hypothalamus. Promoter assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that TTF-1 inhibited COX-2 transcription by binding to specific binding domains in the COX-2 promoter. Furthermore, blocking TTF-1 synthesis by intracerebroventricular injection of an antisense oligomer induced an increase of COX-2 synthesis in non-neuronal cells of the rat hypothalamus, and resulted in animals' hyperthermia. These results suggest that TTF-1 is physiologically involved in the control of thermogenesis by regulating COX-2 transcription in the brain.

  5. Bigenomic transcriptional regulation of all thirteen cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes by specificity protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Shilpa S.; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is one of only four known bigenomic proteins, with three mitochondria-encoded subunits and 10 nucleus-encoded ones derived from nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multi-subunit, bigenomic enzyme is not fully understood. We hypothesize that specificity protein 1 (Sp1) functionally regulates the 10 nucleus-encoded COX subunit genes directly and the three mitochondrial COX subunit genes indirectly by regulating mitochondrial transcription fact...

  6. Exploring membrane-associated NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis: implications for membrane biology in genome regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Youn-Sung; Seo, Pil Joon; Bae, Mikyoung; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Park, Chung-Mo

    2006-01-01

    Controlled proteolytic cleavage of membrane-associated transcription factors (MTFs) is an intriguing activation strategy that ensures rapid transcriptional responses to incoming stimuli. Several MTFs are known to regulate diverse cellular functions in prokaryotes, yeast, and animals. In Arabidopsis, a few NAC MTFs mediate either cytokinin signaling during cell division or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses. Through genome-wide analysis, it was found that at least 13 members of the NA...

  7. Transcription of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus, may be regulated by attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Asher, E.; Aloni, Y.

    1984-10-01

    To characterize the transcriptional organization and regulation of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus, viral transcriptional complexes were isolated and cleaved with restriction enzymes. The in vivo preinitiated nascent RNA was elongated in vitro in the presence of (alpha-/sup 32/P)UTP to generate runoff transcripts. The lengths of the runoff transcripts were analyzed by gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. On the basis of the map locations of the restriction sites and the lengths of the runoff transcripts, the in vivo initiation sites were determined. Two major initiation sites having similar activities were thus identified at residues 201 +/- 5 and 2005 +/- 5; both of them were preceded by a TATAA sequence. When uncleaved viral transcriptional complexes or isolated nuclei were incubated in vitro in the presence of (alpha-/sup 32/P)UTP or (alpha-/sup 32/P)CTP, they synthesized labeled RNA that, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, contained a major band of 142 nucleotides. The RNA of the major band was mapped between the initiation site at residue 201 +/- 5 and residue 342. We noticed the potential of forming two mutually exclusive stem-and-loop structures in the 142-nucleotide RNA; one of them is followed by a string of uridylic acid residues typical of a procaryotic transcription termination signal. We propose that, as in the transcription of simian virus 40, RNA transcription in minute virus of mice may be regulated by attenuation and may involve eucaryotic polymerase B, which can respond to a transcription termination signal similar to that of the procaryotic polymerase.

  8. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Nunciada; Song, Jun S; Arany, Zoltan; Fisher, David E

    2015-10-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3's binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes.

  9. The tumor suppressor gene hypermethylated in cancer 1 is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenal, Mathias; Trinh, Emmanuelle; Britschgi, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    The Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that cooperates with p53 to suppress cancer development. We and others recently showed that HIC1 is a transcriptional target of p53. To identify additional transcriptional regulators of HIC1, we screened a...... the HIC1 promoter was shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in human TIG3 fibroblasts expressing tamoxifen-activated E2F1. In agreement, activation of E2F1 in TIG3-E2F1 cells markedly increased HIC1 expression. Interestingly, expression of E2F1 in the p53(-/-) hepatocellular carcinoma cell...

  10. Transcription-independent functions of MYC: regulation of translation and DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael D.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    MYC is a potent oncogene that drives unrestrained cell growth and proliferation. Shortly after its discovery as an oncogene, the MYC protein was recognized as a sequence-specific transcription factor. Since that time, MYC oncogene research has focused on the mechanism of MYC-induced transcription and on the identification of MYC transcriptional target genes. Recently, MYC was shown to control protein expression through mRNA translation and to directly regulate DNA replication, thus initiating exciting new areas of oncogene research. PMID:18698328

  11. Regulating retrotransposon activity through the use of alternative transcription start sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Jenna; Steglich, Babett; Smialowska, Agata;

    2016-01-01

    a new mechanism of retrotransposon regulation through transcription start site (TSS) selection by altered nucleosome occupancy. We show that Fun30 chromatin remodelers cooperate to maintain a high level of nucleosome occupancy at retrotransposon-flanking long terminal repeat (LTR) elements....... This enforces the use of a downstream TSS and the production of a truncated RNA incapable of reverse transcription and retrotransposition. However, in stressed cells, nucleosome occupancy at LTR elements is reduced, and the TSS shifts to allow for productive transcription. We propose that controlled...

  12. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  13. Transcriptional regulation and steady-state modeling of metabolic networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelezniak, Aleksej

    become a focal point in diagnosing and treating diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease which is recognized as one of the largest threats to human health in the 21st century. Recent studies of gene expression levels in human tissue samples have...... indicated that multiple metabolic pathways are dys-regulated in diabetes and in individuals at risk for diabetes; which of these are primary, or central to disease pathogenesis, remains a key question. Cellular metabolic networks are highly interconnected and often tightly regulated; any perturbations...... diagnostics for type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism. In a broader context, the study provides a framework for analysis of gene expression datasets from complex heterogeneous diseases, genetic, and environmental perturbations that are reflected in and/or mediated through changes in metabolism...

  14. Induction and Transcriptional Regulation of Laccases in Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Piscitelli, Alessandra; Giardina, Paola; Lettera, Vincenzo; Pezzella, Cinzia; Sannia, Giovanni; Faraco, Vincenza

    2011-01-01

    Fungal laccases are phenol oxidases widely studied for their use in several industrial applications, including pulp bleaching in paper industry, dye decolourisation, detoxification of environmental pollutants and revalorization of wastes and wastewaters. The main difficulty in using these enzymes at industrial scale ensues from their production costs. Elucidation of the components and the mechanisms involved in regulation of laccase gene expression is crucial for increasing the productivity o...

  15. Changing Faces of Transcriptional Regulation Reflected by Zic3

    OpenAIRE

    Winata, Cecilia Lanny; Kondrychyn, Igor; Deddens, J.C.; Korzh, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The advent of genomics in the study of developmental mechanisms has brought a trove of information on gene datasets and regulation during development, where the Zic family of zinc-finger proteins plays an important role. Genomic analysis of the modes of action of Zic3 in pluripotent cells demonstrated its requirement for maintenance of stem cells pluripotency upon binding to the proximal regulatory regions (promoters) of genes associated with cell pluripotency (Nanog, Sox2, Oct4, etc.) as wel...

  16. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates. PMID:27379389

  17. NFAT5 regulates transcription of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kotake, Yojiro; Yamashita, Makiko; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori, E-mail: katakura.yoshinori.528@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-10

    We aimed to clarify the transcription-regulation mechanisms of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (mTERT). First, we searched for the promoter region required for transcriptional activation of mTERT and identified an enhancer cis-element (named mTERT-EE) located between - 200 and - 179 bp of the mouse TERT gene (mTERT). EMSA results suggested that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) member proteins bind to mTERT-EE. We then identified NFAT5 as the factor binding to mTERT-EE and found that it activates the transcription of the mTERT core promoter. The results that siRNA directed against NFAT5 significantly reduced mTERT expression and mTERT core promoter activity and that the expressions of NFAT5 and mTERT were well correlated in various mouse tissues except liver suggest that NFAT5 dominantly and directly regulates mTERT expression. To clarify their functionality further, we investigated the effect of hypertonic stress, a known stimulus affecting the expression and transcriptional activity of NFAT5, on mTERT expression. The result indicated that hypertonic stress activates mTERT transcription via the activation and recruitment of NFAT5 to the mTERT promoter. These results provide useful information about the transcription-regulation mechanisms of mTERT.

  18. Checkpoint Kinases Regulate a Global Network of Transcription Factors in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Jaehnig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage activates checkpoint kinases that induce several downstream events, including widespread changes in transcription. However, the specific connections between the checkpoint kinases and downstream transcription factors (TFs are not well understood. Here, we integrate kinase mutant expression profiles, transcriptional regulatory interactions, and phosphoproteomics to map kinases and downstream TFs to transcriptional regulatory networks. Specifically, we investigate the role of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint kinases (Mec1, Tel1, Chk1, Rad53, and Dun1 in the transcriptional response to DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate. The result is a global kinase-TF regulatory network in which Mec1 and Tel1 signal through Rad53 to synergistically regulate the expression of more than 600 genes. This network involves at least nine TFs, many of which have Rad53-dependent phosphorylation sites, as regulators of checkpoint-kinase-dependent genes. We also identify a major DNA damage-induced transcriptional network that regulates stress response genes independently of the checkpoint kinases.

  19. Transcriptional regulation mechanism mediated by miRNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure stabilized by Argonaute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano-Garibay, Julia D; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    Transcription regulation depends on interactions between repressor or activator proteins with promoter sequences, while post-transcriptional regulation typically relies on microRNA (miRNA) interaction with sequences in 5' and 3'-Untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNA (mRNA). However, several pieces of evidence suggest that miRNA:Argonaute (AGO) complexes may also suppress transcription through RNA interference (RNAi) components and epigenetic mechanisms. However, recent observations suggest that miRNA-induced transcriptional silencing could be exerted by an unknown mechanism independent of chromatin modifiers. The RNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure has emerged as an important RNA tertiary motif in which successive non-canonical base pairs form between a DNA-DNA duplex and a third strand. Frequently, promoters have Purine (PU)-rich tracts, and some Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting these regulatory regions have been shown to inhibit transcription selectively. Here, we summarize observations suggesting that miRNAs exert regulation over promoter regions through miRNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure formation stabilized by AGO proteins which represents a plausible model of RNA-mediated Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). PMID:25086339

  20. SUMO modification regulates the transcriptional activity of FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm-Kristiansen, Anne Hege; Norman, Ingrid Louise; Matre, Vilborg [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke, E-mail: o.s.gabrielsen@imbv.uio.no [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2009-09-25

    FLASH is a huge multifunctional nuclear protein that has been linked to apoptotic signalling, transcriptional control and Cajal body function. To gain further insight into the functions of the FLASH protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening with FLASH as bait and identified the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 as an interaction partner. The main interaction surface for Ubc9 was found in the C-terminal part of FLASH, which is also a target for sumoylation. We identified K1813 as the major sumoylation site in FLASH, being enhanced by the SUMO E3 ligases Pc2 and PIASy. Disruption of this SUMO-conjugation site did not change the speckled subnuclear localization of FLASH, but it caused a reduction in FLASH activity as measured in a Gal4-tethering assay. Interestingly, the SUMO-specific protease SENP1 activated FLASH in the same assay. Overall, our results point to a complex involvement of sumoylation in modulating the function of FLASH.

  1. The transcriptional coactivator TAZ regulates mesenchymal differentiation in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Krishna P L; Salazar, Katrina L; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Wani, Khalida; Heathcock, Lindsey; Hollingsworth, Faith; James, Johanna D; Gumin, Joy; Diefes, Kristin L; Kim, Se Hoon; Turski, Alice; Azodi, Yasaman; Yang, Yuhui; Doucette, Tiffany; Colman, Howard; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Rao, Ganesh; Copray, Sjef; Vaillant, Brian D; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-12-15

    Recent molecular classification of glioblastoma (GBM) has shown that patients with a mesenchymal (MES) gene expression signature exhibit poor overall survival and treatment resistance. Using regulatory network analysis of available expression microarray data sets of GBM, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), to be highly associated with the MES network. TAZ expression was lower in proneural (PN) GBMs and lower-grade gliomas, which correlated with CpG island hypermethylation of the TAZ promoter compared with MES GBMs. Silencing of TAZ in MES glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased expression of MES markers, invasion, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Conversely, overexpression of TAZ in PN GSCs as well as murine neural stem cells (NSCs) induced MES marker expression and aberrant osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation in a TEAD-dependent fashion. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that TAZ is directly recruited to a majority of MES gene promoters in a complex with TEAD2. The coexpression of TAZ, but not a mutated form of TAZ that lacks TEAD binding, with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) resulted in high-grade tumors with MES features in a murine model of glioma. Our studies uncover a direct role for TAZ and TEAD in driving the MES differentiation of malignant glioma.

  2. Nutritional conditions regulate transcriptional activity of SF-1 by controlling sumoylation and ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon; Yang, Dong Joo; Lee, Syann; Hammer, Gary D; Kim, Ki Woo; Elmquist, Joel K

    2016-01-11

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor expressed in the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus that regulates energy homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of SF-1 in the control of energy balance are largely unknown. Here, we show that nutritional conditions, such as the presence or absence of serum, affect SF-1 action. Serum starvation significantly decreased hypothalamic SF-1 levels by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation, and sumoylation was required for this process. SF-1 transcriptional activity was also differentially regulated by nutritional status. Under normal conditions, the transcriptional activity of hypothalamic SF-1 was activated by SUMO, but this was attenuated during starvation. Taken together, these results indicate that sumoylation and ubiquitination play crucial roles in the regulation of SF-1 function and that these effects are dependent on nutritional conditions, further supporting the importance of SF-1 in the control of energy homeostasis.

  3. Transcript-specific translational regulation in the unfolded protein response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Tom; Hanfrey, Colin; Bishop, Amy L; Michael, Anthony J; Avery, Simon V; Archer, David B

    2008-02-20

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes stress and induces the unfolded protein response (UPR). Genome-wide analysis of translational regulation in response to the UPR-inducing agent dithiothreitol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reported. Microarray analysis, confirmed using qRT-PCR, identified transcript-specific translational regulation. Transcripts with functions in ribosomal biogenesis and assembly were translationally repressed. In contrast, mRNAs from known UPR genes, encoding the UPR transcription factor Hac1p, the ER-oxidoreductase Ero1p and the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) protein Der1p, were enriched in polysomal fractions, indicating translational up-regulation. Splicing of HAC1 mRNA is shown to be required for efficient ribosomal loading.

  4. Transcription factors and cognate signalling cascades in the regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vemika; Bhagyaraj, Ella; Parkesh, Raman; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains the equilibrium between biosynthesis and the recycling of cellular constituents; it is critical for avoiding the pathophysiology that results from imbalance in cellular homeostasis. Recent reports indicate the need for the design of high-throughput screening assays to identify targets and small molecules for autophagy modulation. For such screening, however, a better understanding of the regulation of autophagy is essential. In addition to regulation by various signalling cascades, regulation of gene expression by transcription factors is also critical. This review focuses on the various transcription factors as well as the corresponding signalling molecules that act together to translate the stimuli to effector molecules that up- or downregulate autophagy. This review rationalizes the importance of these transcription factors functioning in tandem with cognate signalling molecules and their interfaces as possible therapeutic targets for more specific pharmacological interventions. PMID:25651938

  5. Integration of the Transcription Factor-Regulated and Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Control of Keratinocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation program is regulated at several levels including signaling pathways, lineage-specific transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators that establish well-coordinated process of terminal differentiation resulting in formation of the epidermal barrier. The epigenetic regulatory machinery operates at several levels including modulation of covalent DNA/histone modifications, as well as through higher-order chromatin remodeling to establish long-range topological interactions between the genes and their enhancer elements. Epigenetic regulators exhibit both activating and repressive effects on chromatin in keratinocytes (KCs): whereas some of them promote terminal differentiation, the others stimulate proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as inhibit premature activation of terminal differentiation-associated genes. Transcription factor-regulated and epigenetic mechanisms are highly connected, and the p63 transcription factor has an important role in the higher-order chromatin remodeling of the KC-specific gene loci via direct control of the genome organizer Satb1 and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler Brg1. However, additional efforts are required to fully understand the complexity of interactions between distinct transcription factors and epigenetic regulators in the control of KC differentiation. Further understanding of these interactions and their alterations in different pathological skin conditions will help to progress toward the development of novel approaches for the treatment of skin disorders by targeting epigenetic regulators and modulating chromatin organization in KCs. PMID:26551942

  6. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  7. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  8. Sp1 and KLF15 regulate basal transcription of the human LRP5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yongxin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LRP5, a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily, regulates diverse developmental processes in embryogenesis and maintains physiological homeostasis in adult organisms. However, how the expression of human LRP5 gene is regulated remains unclear. Results In order to characterize the transcriptional regulation of human LRP5 gene, we cloned the 5' flanking region and evaluated its transcriptional activity in a luciferase reporter system. We demonstrated that both KLF15 and Sp1 binding sites between -72 bp and -53 bp contribute to the transcriptional activation of human LRP5 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the ubiquitous transcription factors KLF15 and Sp1 bind to this region. Using Drosophila SL2 cells, we showed that KLF15 and Sp1 trans-activated the LRP5 promoter in a manner dependent on the presence of Sp1-binding and KLF15-binding motifs. Conclusions Both KLF15 and Sp1 binding sites contribute to the basal activity of human LRP5 promoter. This study provides the first insight into the mechanisms by which transcription of human LRP5 gene is regulated.

  9. Basal transcription machinery: role in regulation of stress response in eukaryotes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parag Sadhale; Jiyoti Verma; Aruna Naorem

    2007-04-01

    The holoenzyme of prokaryotic RNA polymerase consists of the core enzyme, made of two , , ’ and subunits, which lacks promoter selectivity and a sigma () subunit which enables the core enzyme to initiate transcription in a promoter dependent fashion. A stress sigma factor s, in prokaryotes seems to regulate several stress response genes in conjunction with other stress specific regulators. Since the basic principles of transcription are conserved from simple bacteria to multicellular complex organisms, an obvious question is: what is the identity of a counterpart of s, that is closest to the core polymerase and that dictates transcription of stress regulated genes in general? In this review, we discuss the logic behind the suggestion that like in prokaryotes, eukaryotes also have a common functional unit in the transcription machinery through which the stress specific transcription factors regulate rapid and highly controlled induction of gene expression associated with generalized stress response and point to some candidates that would fit the bill of the eukaryotic s.

  10. Transcript Regulation of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase by c-myc and mad1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin ZOU; Peng-Hui ZHANG; Chun-Li LUO; Zhi-Guang TU

    2005-01-01

    Telomerase activity is highly positive correlated to most malignant neoplasms. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the rate-limiting factor of telomerase activity. Recent studies have shown that the expression of hTERT is mainly determined by its transcript regulation. Among the transcript regulation factors of hTERT, c-myc and mad1 are well known. Here, we constructed c-myc and mad1 eukaryotic expression vectors, then co-transfected them with the wild-type (Tw) or mutant hTERT promoter (Td)luciferase reporter plasmid, which were double-mutated in the E-box sequences from CACGTG to CACCTG of Tw. The change of luciferase activity in different cells was detected. The results showed that Tw was obviously activated in T24 and EJ bladder cancer cells, but not in normal fibrocytes. c-myc and mad1 had positive and negative effects respectively on the Tw transcript in a dose-dependent manner, while the roles of c-myc and mad1 in regulating the Td transcript were reversed. c-myc combined with mad1 can downregulate Tw but not Td. These observations indicate that c-myc and mad1 can regulate the hTERT transcript in a different manner in hTERT positive cells, but not in normal cells. This may provide an insight into some telomerase-related carcinogenesis mechanisms.

  11. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  12. Dexamethasone-mediated transcriptional regulation of rat carboxylesterase 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takeshi; Jin, Liangjing; Fujii, Ayako; Furihata, Tomomi; Nagahara, Yuko; Chiba, Kan; Hosokawa, Masakiyo

    2012-07-01

    Rat carboxylesterase 2 (rCES2), which was previously identified as a methylprednisolone 21-hemisuccinate hydrolase, is highly inducible by dexamethasone in the liver. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which this induction occurs. Injection of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg weight) into rats resulted in increases in the expression of rCES2 mRNA in a time-dependent manner with a peak at 12 h after injection. In primary rat hepatocytes, the expression level of rCES2 mRNA was increased by treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone, and the increase was completely blocked in the presence of 10 µM mifepristone (RU-486), a potent inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), or 10 µg/mL cycloheximide, a translation inhibitor. Luciferase assays revealed that 100 nM dexamethasone increased rCES2 promoter activities, although the effect of dexamethasone on the promoter activity was smaller than that on rCES2 mRNA expression. The increased activities were completely inhibited by treatment of the hepatocytes with 10 µM RU-486. Based on these results, it is concluded that dexamethasone enhances transcription of the rCES2 gene via GR in the rat liver and that the dexamethasone-mediated induction of rCES2 mRNA may be dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Our results provide clues to understanding what compounds induce rCES2. PMID:22235919

  13. Noise Effects on Oscillator Network of Transcription Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-Ju; AI Bao-Quan; LIU Guo-Tao; LIU Liang-Gang

    2002-01-01

    Based on the model describing the regulation of the PRM operator region of λ phage proposed by Jeff Hastyet al., we study the noise effects on the oscillator network. We find that the additive noise cannot change the period andthe amplitude of the relaxation oscillator, but in the multiplicative case, the period of the relaxation oscillator increasesto a constant value with the increase of the strength of noise, and the amplitude of the relaxation oscillator also showsincreases with the increase of the strength of noise. This novel results suggest that an external multiplicative noise sourcecould be used to control gene expression.

  14. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-01-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules. PMID:26626130

  15. Cloning of a novel insulin-regulated ghrelin transcript in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Lubik, Amy A; Lehman, Melanie L; Tomlinson, Nadine; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Nelson, Colleen C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional hormone, with roles in stimulating appetite and regulating energy balance, insulin secretion and glucose homoeostasis. The ghrelin gene locus (GHRL) is highly complex and gives rise to a range of novel transcripts derived from alternative first exons and internally spliced exons. The wild-type transcript encodes a 117 amino acid preprohormone that is processed to yield the 28 amino acid peptide ghrelin. Here, we identified insulin-responsive transcription corresponding to cryptic exons in intron 2 of the human ghrelin gene. A transcript, termed in2c-ghrelin (intron 2-cryptic), was cloned from the testis and the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. This transcript may encode an 83 amino acid preproghrelin isoform that codes for ghrelin, but not obestatin. It is expressed in a limited number of normal tissues and in tumours of the prostate, testis, breast and ovary. Finally, we confirmed that in2c-ghrelin transcript expression, as well as the recently described in1-ghrelin transcript, is significantly upregulated by insulin in cultured prostate cancer cells. Metabolic syndrome and hyperinsulinaemia have been associated with prostate cancer risk and progression. This may be particularly significant after androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, which induces hyperinsulinaemia, and this could contribute to castrate-resistant prostate cancer growth. We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates prostate cancer cell line proliferation in vitro. This study is the first description of insulin regulation of a ghrelin transcript in cancer and should provide further impetus for studies into the expression, regulation and function of ghrelin gene products.

  16. Computational identification of a p38SAPK regulated transcription factor network required for tumor cell quiescence

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Alejandro P.; George, Ajish; Schewe, Denis; Bragado, Paloma; Iglesias, Bibiana V.; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Kourtidis, Antonis; Conklin, Douglas S.; Julio A Aguirre-Ghiso

    2009-01-01

    The stress activated kinase p38 plays key roles in tumor suppression and induction of tumor cell dormancy. However, the mechanisms behind these functions remain poorly understood. Using computational tools we identified a transcription factor (TF) network regulated by p38α/β and required for human squamous carcinoma cell quiescence in vivo. We found that p38 transcriptionally regulates a core network of 46 genes that includes 16 TFs. Activation of p38 induced the expression of the TFs p53 and...

  17. HIPK2: a versatile switchboard regulating the transcription machinery and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Roscic, Ana; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2007-01-15

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of transcription factors and accessory components of the transcription machinery. HIPK2 is activated in response to DNA-damaging agents or morphogenic signals and accordingly HIPK2-guided gene expression programs trigger differentiation and development or alternatively apoptosis. The kinase contributes to the regulation of remarkably diverse pathways such as p53 activation or Wnt signaling. Here we discuss recent findings from biochemical and functional experiments that allow a deeper understanding of the pleiotropic effects mediated by HIPK2.

  18. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  19. Regulation of MCP-1 gene transcription by Smads and HIV-1 Tat in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of several cytokines involved in signal transduction such as TGFβ-1 and the inflammatory chemokines including MCP-1 is elevated during the course of AIDS progression. The enhancement of these cellular proteins in astrocytic cells is mediated, at least in part, by HIV-1 Tat protein. Here, we investigate the possible regulation of MCP-1 transcription by Tat and the Smad family of transcription factors whose activities are induced by the TGFβ-1 pathway. Results from transfection studies revealed that Smad-3 stimulates basal and Tat-mediated transcription of MCP-1 in human astrocytic cells. Smad-4, on the other hand, had no effect on the basal activity of the MCP-1 promoter, but showed the ability to decrease both Smad-3 and Tat-induced transcription of the MCP promoter. Results from protein-binding studies revealed the ability of both Smad-3 and Smad-4 to associate with the region of Tat spanning residues 1-40. Examination of the transcriptional activity of the various domains of Smad including MH1, at the N-terminus, and MH2, at the C-terminus of the protein indicated that neither MH1 or MH2 alone positively cooperate with Tat in modulating MCP-1 transcription. However, ectopic expression of MH1 and, more notably, MH2 severely suppressed transcriptional activation of MCP-1 by Tat in astrocytic cells. Binding studies revealed that similar to the full-length Smad protein, both MH1 and MH2 associate with Tat protein and that the residues between 1 and 40 of Tat are important for their interaction. These observations reveal a novel mechanism for Tat-mediated transcriptional activation via TGFβ signaling pathway and provide evidence for regulation of MCP-1 gene transcription by this signaling pathway in human astrocytic cells

  20. Intrinsic noise in post-transcriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ya; Liu, Wangheng; Li, Anbang; Yang, Lijian; Zhan, Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Small non-coding RNA (sRNA) plays very important role in the post transcriptional regulation in various organisms. In complex regulatory networks, highly significant relative fluctuations in RNAs copy numbers can not be neglected due to very small copy number of individual RNA molecules. Here we consider two simple regulation schemes, where one is single target gene regulated by a sRNA and the other is two target mRNAs (mRNA(R) and mRNA(T)) regulated by one sRNA. The Fano factor (a measure of the relative size of the internal fluctuations) formulae of RNA molecules in the post transcriptional regulation are theoretically derived by using of the Langevin theory. For single target gene regulated by a sRNA, it is shown that the intrinsic noise of both mRNA and sRNA approaches the bare Poissonian limit in the regimen of both target RNA silencing and surviving. However, the strong anti-correlation between the fluctuations of two components result in a large intrinsic fluctuations in the level of RNA molecules in the regimen of crossover. For two target mRNAs regulated by one sRNA, in the regimen of crossover, it is found that, with the increasing of transcription rate of target mRNA(T), the maximal intrinsic fluctuation of RNA molecules is shifted from sRNA to target mRNA(R), and then to target mRNA(T). The intrinsic noise intensity of target mRNA(R) is determined by both the transcriptional rate of itself and that of sRNA, and independent of the transcriptional rate of the other target mRNA(T). PMID:19403234

  1. Specificity protein 4 (Sp4) transcriptionally regulates inhibitory GABAergic receptors in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bindu; Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that the neuron-specific specificity protein 4 (Sp4) transcriptionally regulates many excitatory neurotransmitter receptor subunit genes, such as those for GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and Gria2 of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. It also regulates Atp1a1 and Atp1b1 subunit genes of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, a major energy-consuming enzyme, as well as all 13 subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), an important energy-generating enzyme. Thus, there is a tight coupling between energy consumption, energy production, and excitatory neuronal activity at the transcriptional level in neurons. The question is whether inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors are also regulated by Sp4. In the present study, we tested our hypothesis that Sp4 regulates receptor subunit genes of a major inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA, specifically GABAA receptors. By means of multiple approaches, including in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, real-time quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, over-expression and shRNA of Sp4, functional assays, and western blots, we found that Sp4 functionally regulates the transcription of Gabra1 (GABAA α1) and Gabra2 (GABAA α2), but not Gabra3 (GABAA α3) subunit genes. The binding sites of Sp4 are conserved among rats, humans, and mice. Thus, our results substantiate our hypothesis that Sp4 plays a key role in regulating the transcription of GABAA receptor subunit genes. They also indicate that Sp4 is in a position to transcriptionally regulate the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurochemical expressions in neurons. PMID:26469128

  2. HTRIdb: an open-access database for experimentally verified human transcriptional regulation interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovolenta Luiz A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modeling of interactions among transcription factors (TFs and their respective target genes (TGs into transcriptional regulatory networks is important for the complete understanding of regulation of biological processes. In the case of experimentally verified human TF-TG interactions, there is no database at present that explicitly provides such information even though many databases containing human TF-TG interaction data have been available. In an effort to provide researchers with a repository of experimentally verified human TF-TG interactions from which such interactions can be directly extracted, we present here the Human Transcriptional Regulation Interactions database (HTRIdb. Description The HTRIdb is an open-access database that can be searched via a user-friendly web interface and the retrieved TF-TG interactions data and the associated protein-protein interactions can be downloaded or interactively visualized as a network through the web version of the popular Cytoscape visualization tool, the Cytoscape Web. Moreover, users can improve the database quality by uploading their own interactions and indicating inconsistencies in the data. So far, HTRIdb has been populated with 284 TFs that regulate 18302 genes, totaling 51871 TF-TG interactions. HTRIdb is freely available at http://www.lbbc.ibb.unesp.br/htri. Conclusions HTRIdb is a powerful user-friendly tool from which human experimentally validated TF-TG interactions can be easily extracted and used to construct transcriptional regulation interaction networks enabling researchers to decipher the regulation of biological processes.

  3. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  4. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  5. Genome-wide analysis of growth phase-dependent translational and transcriptional regulation in halophilic archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raddatz Günter

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differential expression of genes can be regulated on many different levels. Most global studies of gene regulation concentrate on transcript level regulation, and very few global analyses of differential translational efficiencies exist. The studies have revealed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and human cell lines translational regulation plays a significant role. Additional species have not been investigated yet. Particularly, until now no global study of translational control with any prokaryotic species was available. Results A global analysis of translational control was performed with two haloarchaeal model species, Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii. To identify differentially regulated genes, exponentially growing and stationary phase cells were compared. More than 20% of H. salinarum transcripts are translated with non-average efficiencies. By far the largest group is comprised of genes that are translated with above-average efficiency specifically in exponential phase, including genes for many ribosomal proteins, RNA polymerase subunits, enzymes, and chemotaxis proteins. Translation of 1% of all genes is specifically repressed in either of the two growth phases. For comparison, DNA microarrays were also used to identify differential transcriptional regulation in H. salinarum, and 17% of all genes were found to have non-average transcript levels in exponential versus stationary phase. In H. volcanii, 12% of all genes are translated with non-average efficiencies. The overlap with H. salinarum is negligible. In contrast to H. salinarum, 4.6% of genes have non-average translational efficiency in both growth phases, and thus they might be regulated by other stimuli than growth phase. Conclusion For the first time in any prokaryotic species it was shown that a significant fraction of genes is under differential translational control. Groups of genes with different regulatory patterns

  6. Structure of noncoding RNA is a determinant of function of RNA binding proteins in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyoshi Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of the noncoding regions of mammalian genomes have been found to be transcribed to generate noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, resulting in intense interest in their biological roles. During the past decade, numerous ncRNAs and aptamers have been identified as regulators of transcription. 6S RNA, first described as a ncRNA in E. coli, mimics an open promoter structure, which has a large bulge with two hairpin/stalk structures that regulate transcription through interactions with RNA polymerase. B2 RNA, which has stem-loops and unstructured single-stranded regions, represses transcription of mRNA in response to various stresses, including heat shock in mouse cells. The interaction of TLS (translocated in liposarcoma with CBP/p300 was induced by ncRNAs that bind to TLS, and this in turn results in inhibition of CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity in human cells. Transcription regulator EWS (Ewing's sarcoma, which is highly related to TLS, and TLS specifically bind to G-quadruplex structures in vitro. The carboxy terminus containing the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG repeat domains in these proteins are necessary for cis-repression of transcription activation and HAT activity by the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain. Especially, the RGG domain in the carboxy terminus of EWS is important for the G-quadruplex specific binding. Together, these data suggest that functions of EWS and TLS are modulated by specific structures of ncRNAs.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the VEGF gene in dependence of individual genomic variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Carmen S; Koutsimpelas, Dimitrios; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-12-01

    Overexpression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene has been associated with advanced stage and poor survival in several cancers. The majority of disease-associated VEGF-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) locate within regulatory regions. Therefore, an influence of SNPs located in the promoter/5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) on transcription factor binding (TFB) and gene expression seems feasible. We reviewed the literature investigating a potential connection of VEGF-SNPs and transcriptional regulation of the VEGF gene. In addition, we employed transcription factor databases to search for VEGF-SNPs which have already been associated with diseases. The objective of this review is to gain an overview about an association of VEGF-SNPs and the transcription factor dependent regulation of the VEGF gene. A decreasing binding specificity of the transcription factor MZF1 in presence of the VEGF-SNP +405 C-allele has been reported. TF databases indicated a potential HIF binding site for the -2578 C-allele representing an important potential inducer of VEGF expression. Additionally, linkage disequilibrium of the -2578 A-allele and an 18 bp insertion increases the number of potential TFB sites. For the VEGF promoter SNP -1154 A/G an interaction with the HRE under participation of the SNP +405 C/G was supposed. The comprehension of the association of specific SNPs and TFB could be an essential part in our understanding of individual differences of VEGF regulation and course of diseases. PMID:26209503

  8. Transcription factor KLF4 regulates microRNA-544 that targets YWHAZ in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Xiaolong; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in various tumor processes. Here, we report that microRNA-544 (miR-544) is decreased in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues. To identify the mechanisms involved in miR-544 deregulation, we studied the regulation of miR-544 expression at the transcriptional level. We first identified the transcriptional start site of miR-544 by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently determined the miR-544 promoter. We discovered that the transcription factor Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of miR-544 through interaction with the miR-544 promoter. In addition, we found that miR-544 directly targets the YWHAZ oncogene and functions as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells. miR-544 is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in a manner associated with YWHAZ downregulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that KLF4 upregulates miR-544 transcription by activating the miR-544 promoter and that miR-544 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting YWHAZ. Therefore, miR-544 may be a potential novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  9. Distinguishing the Transcription Regulation Patterns in Promoters of Human Genes with Different Function or Evolutionary Age

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2012-07-01

    Distinguishing transcription regulatory patterns of different gene groups is a common problem in various bioinformatics studies. In this work we developed a methodology to deal with such a problem based on machine learning techniques. We applied our method to two biologically important problems related to detecting a difference in transcription regulation of: a/ protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human, as well as b/ a difference between primate-specific and non-primate-specific long non-coding RNAs. Our method is capable to classify RNAs using various regulatory features of genes that transcribe into these RNAs, such as nucleotide frequencies, transcription factor binding sites, de novo sequence motifs, CpG islands, repetitive elements, histone modification marks, and others. Ten-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish protein-coding and non-coding RNAs with accuracy above 80%. Twenty-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish primate-specific from non-primate-specific promoters of lncRNAs with accuracy above 80%. Consequently, we can hypothesize that transcription of the groups of genes mentioned above are regulated by different mechanisms. Feature selection techniques allowed us to reduce the number of features significantly while keeping the accuracy around 80%. Consequently, we can conclude that selected features play significant role in transcription regulation of coding and non-coding genes, as well as primate-specific and non-primate-specific lncRNA genes.

  10. SUMOylation can regulate the activity of ETS-like transcription factor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Sanna; Makkonen, Harri; Rytinki, Miia; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2010-08-01

    ETS-like transcription factor 4 (ELK4) (a.k.a. serum response factor accessory protein 1) belongs to the ternary complex factor (TCF) subfamily of E twenty-six (ETS) domain transcription factors. Compared to the other TCF subfamily members, ELK1 and ELK3 (NET), there is limited information of the mechanisms regulating the ELK4 activity. Here, we show that the ELK4 can be covalently modified (SUMOylated) by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) 1 protein, an important regulator of signaling and transcription. SUMOylation of ELK4 was reversed by SUMO-specific proteases (SENP) 1 and 2 and stimulated by SUMO E3 ligase PIAS3. Conserved lysine residue 167 that is located in the NET inhibitory domain of ELK4 was identified as the main site of SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, mutation of the K167 disrupting the SUMOylation markedly enhanced the transcriptional activity of the ELK4, but weakened its repressive function on c-fos promoter. In conclusion, our results suggest that covalent modification by SUMO-1 can regulate the activity of ELK4, contributing to the transcriptional repression by the ELK4. PMID:20637912

  11. Reversible Histone Acetylation Involved in Transcriptional Regulation of WT1 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangguang SHAO; Jun LU; Cao CHENG; Liguo CUI; Guoping ZHANG; Baiqu HUANG

    2007-01-01

    To validate the involvement of reversible histone acetylation in the transcriptional regulation of human Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1), we analyzed the roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferase in this epigenetic process. Of the six HDACs (HDAC1-6) examined, HDAC4 and HDAC5 were found to have significant repressing effects on the activity of the WT1 reporter gene, as revealed by luciferase reporter assays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays.Luciferase reporter assays showed that the histone acetyltransferase p300 was able to counteract the HDAC4/HDAC5-mediated repression and that p300/CBP synergized with transcription factors Sp1, c-Myb, and Ets-1 in activation of the WT1 reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that p300 promotes the acetylation level of histone H3 at the WT1 intronic enhancer. Based on these data, we proposed a hypothetical model for the involvement of reversible histone acetylation in transcriptional regulation of the WT1 gene. This study provides further insight into the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the WT1 gene and WT1-associated diseases treatment.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of adipocyte hormone-sensitive lipase by glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe; Lucas, Stéphanie; Mairal, Aline; Sengenes, Coralie; Lafontan, Max; Vaulont, Sophie; Casado, Marta; Langin, Dominique

    2002-02-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue, thus determining the supply of energy substrates in the body. HSL mRNA was positively regulated by glucose in human adipocytes. Pools of stably transfected 3T3-F442A adipocytes were generated with human adipocyte HSL promoter fragments from -2,400/+38 to -31/+38 bp linked to the luciferase gene. A glucose-responsive region was mapped within the proximal promoter (-137 bp). Electromobility shift assays showed that upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and USF2 and Sp1 and Sp3 bound to a consensus E-box and two GC-boxes in the -137-bp region. Cotransfection of the -137/+38 construct with USF1 and USF2 expression vectors produced enhanced luciferase activity. Moreover, HSL mRNA levels were decreased in USF1- and USF2-deficient mice. Site-directed mutagenesis of the HSL promoter showed that the GC-boxes, although contributing to basal promoter activity, were dispensable for glucose responsiveness. Mutation of the E-box led to decreased promoter activity and suppression of the glucose response. Analogs and metabolites were used to determine the signal metabolite of the glucose response. The signal is generated downstream of glucose-6-phosphate in the glycolytic pathway before the triose phosphate step. PMID:11812735

  13. Transient and etiology-related transcription regulation in cirrhosis prior to hepatocellular carcinoma occurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédérique Caillot; Céine Derambure; Paulette Bioulac-Sage; Arnaud Fran(c)ois; Michel Scotte; Odile Goria; Martine Hiron; Maryvonne Daveau; Jean-Philippe Salier

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To search for transcription dysregulation that could (1) differentiate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-free from HCC-related cirrhosis (2) differentiate HCCfree cirrhosis related to HCV from that related to alcohol intake.METHODS: Using microarray analysis, we compared transcript levels in HCC-free cirrhosis (alcoholism: 7;hepatitis C: 7), HCC-associated cirrhosis (alcoholism:10; hepatitis C: 10) and eight control livers. The identified transcripts were validated by qRT-PCR in an independent cohort of 45 samples (20 HCCfree cirrhosis; 15 HCC-associated cirrhosis and 10 control livers). We also confirmed our results by immunohistochemistry.transcripts which differentiated between alcoholicrelated cirrhosis, HCV-related cirrhosis and control livers. They mainly corresponded to down-regulation.Dysregulation of Signal Transduction and Activator of Transcription-3 (STAT-3) was found along with related changes in STAT-3 targets which occurred in an etiology-dependent fashion in HCC-free cirrhosis.In contrast, in HCC, such transcription dysregulations were not observed.CONCLUSION: We report that transcriptional dysregulations exist in HCC-free cirrhosis, are transiently observed prior to detectable HCC onset and may be appear like markers from cirrhosis to HCC transition.

  14. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangqing; Schones, Dustin E.; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer nucleosome linker region surrounding the GATA1 sites by shifting the flanking nucleosomes away. Intriguingly, we find that the nucleosome shifting specifically facilitates binding of TAL1 but not GATA1 and is linked to subsequent transcriptional regulation of target genes. PMID:21795385

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  16. Transcriptional regulation of long-term memory in the marine snail Aplysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yong-Seok

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whereas the induction of short-term memory involves only covalent modifications of constitutively expressed preexisting proteins, the formation of long-term memory requires gene expression, new RNA, and new protein synthesis. On the cellular level, transcriptional regulation is thought to be the starting point for a series of molecular steps necessary for both the initiation and maintenance of long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF. The core molecular features of transcriptional regulation involved in the long-term process are evolutionally conserved in Aplysia, Drosophila, and mouse, and indicate that gene regulation by the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB acting in conjunction with different combinations of transcriptional factors is critical for the expression of many forms of long-term memory. In the marine snail Aplysia, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the storage of long-term memory have been extensively studied in the monosynaptic connections between identified sensory neuron and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. One tail shock or one pulse of serotonin (5-HT, a modulatory transmitter released by tail shocks, produces a transient facilitation mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase leading to covalent modifications in the sensory neurons that results in an enhancement of transmitter release and a strengthening of synaptic connections lasting minutes. By contrast, repeated pulses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT induce a transcription- and translation-dependent long-term facilitation (LTF lasting more than 24 h and trigger the activation of a family of transcription factors in the presynaptic sensory neurons including ApCREB1, ApCREB2 and ApC/EBP. In addition, we have recently identified novel transcription factors that modulate the expression of ApC/EBP and also are critically involved in LTF. In this review, we examine the roles of these transcription factors during consolidation of LTF induced

  17. GSK3beta is a negative regulator of the transcriptional coactivator MAML1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Just Ribeiro, Mariana; Hansson, Magnus L; Lindberg, Mikael J; Popko-Scibor, Anita E; Wallberg, Annika E

    2009-11-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) is involved in several cellular signaling systems through regulation of the activity of diverse transcription factors such as Notch, p53 and beta-catenin. Mastermind-like 1 (MAML1) was originally identified as a Notch coactivator, but has also been reported to function as a transcriptional coregulator of p53, beta-catenin and MEF2C. In this report, we show that active GSK3beta directly interacts with the MAML1 N-terminus and decreases MAML1 transcriptional activity, suggesting that GSK3beta might target a coactivator in its regulation of gene expression. We have previously shown that MAML1 increases global acetylation of histones, and here we show that the GSK3 inhibitor SB41, further enhances MAML1-dependent histone acetylation in cells. Finally, MAML1 translocates GSK3beta to nuclear bodies; this function requires full-length MAML1 protein.

  18. Domains Required for Transcriptional Activation Show Conservation in the Mga Family of Virulence Gene Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Vahling, Cheryl M.; McIver, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    Mga, or the multigene regulator of the group A streptococcus (GAS) (Streptococcus pyogenes), is a transcriptional regulator of virulence genes important for colonization and immune evasion. All serotypes of the GAS possess one of two divergent mga alleles (mga-1 or mga-2), and orthologues of Mga have also been identified in other pathogenic streptococci. To date, the only functional motifs established within Mga are two amino-terminal DNA-binding domains (HTH-3 and HTH-4). To uncover novel do...

  19. Activator Role of the Pneumococcal Mga-Like Virulence Transcriptional Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Solano-Collado, Virtu; Espinosa, Manuel; Bravo, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Global transcriptional regulators that respond to specific environmental signals are crucial in bacterial pathogenesis. In the case of the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), the sp1800 gene of the clinical isolate TIGR4 encodes a protein that exhibits homology to the Mga “stand-alone” response regulator of the group A Streptococcus. Such a pneumococcal protein was shown to play a significant role in both nasopharyngeal colonization and development of pneumonia...

  20. Regulation of endothelial metabolism by laminar shear stress and flow-induced transcription factor KLF2

    OpenAIRE

    Doddaballapur, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Flow hemodynamics regulates endothelial cell (EC) responses and laminar shear stress induces an atheroprotective and quiescent phenotype. The flow-responsive transcription factor KLF2 is a pivotal mediator of endothelial quiescence, but the precise mechanism is unclear. In this doctoral study, we assessed the hypothesis that laminar shear stress and KLF2 regulate endothelial quiescence by controlling endothelial metabolism. Laminar flow exposure and KLF2 over expression in HUVECs reduced g...

  1. Differential Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transcripts during the Consolidation of Fear Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Kerry J.; Rattiner, Lisa M.; Davis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated as a molecular mediator of learning and memory. The BDNF gene contains four differentially regulated promoters that generate four distinct mRNA transcripts, each containing a unique noncoding 5[prime]-exon and a common 3[prime]-coding exon. This study describes novel evidence for the…

  2. An R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates Eugenol Production in Ripe Strawberry Fruit Receptacles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Medina-Puche; F.J. Molina-Hidalgo; M. Boersma; R.C. Schuurink; I. López-Vidriero; R. Solano; J.M. Franco-Zorrilla; J.L. Caballero; R. Blanco-Portales; J. Muñoz-Blanco

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol is a volatile phenylpropanoid that contributes to flower and ripe fruit scent. In ripe strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit receptacles, eugenol is biosynthesized by eugenol synthase (FaEGS2). However, the transcriptional regulation of this process is still unknown. We have identified and

  3. Drosophila genome-wide RNAi screen identifies multiple regulators of HIF-dependent transcription in hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Dekanty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1 gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF-dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF-related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke.

  4. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  5. Regulation of IL-17 in autoimmune diseases by transcriptional factors and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deena eKhan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, IL-17A (IL-17, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has received intense attention of researchers and clinicians alike with documented effects in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. IL-17 mobilizes, recruits and activates different cells to increase inflammation. Although protective in infections, overproduction of IL-17 promotes inflammation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, among others. Regulating IL-17 levels or action by using IL-17-blocking antibodies or IL-17R antagonist has shown to attenuate experimental autoimmune diseases. It is now known that in addition to IL-17-specific transcription factor, RORγt, several other transcription factors and select microRNAs (miRNA regulate IL-17. Given that miRNAs are dysregulated in autoimmune diseases, a better understanding of transcriptional factors and miRNA regulation of IL-17 expression and function will be essential for devising potential new therapies. In this review, we will overview IL-17 induction and function in relation to autoimmune diseases. In addition, current findings on transcriptional regulation of IL-17 induction and plausible interplay between IL-17 and miRNA in autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  6. Amplified in Breast Cancer Regulates Transcription and Translation in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra M. Ochnik

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: The oncogenic transcription factor AIB1 has a novel role in the regulation of polyribosome recruitment and formation of the translational complex. Combinatorial therapies targeting IGF signaling and mRNA translation in AIB1 expressing breast cancers may have clinical benefit and warrants further investigation.

  7. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Qing; Plath Kathrin; Fan Guoping; Mason Mike J; Horvath Steve

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs) regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we...

  8. Mediator MED23 regulates basal transcription in vivo via an interaction with P-TEFb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Xiao; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiangming; Liu, Runzhong; Hou, Dongming; Chen, Ruichuan; Wang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator is a multi-subunit complex that transduces regulatory information from transcription regulators to the RNA polymerase II apparatus. Growing evidence suggests that Mediator plays roles in multiple stages of eukaryotic transcription, including elongation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Mediator regulates elongation remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 subunit controls a basal level of transcription by recruiting elongation factor P-TEFb, via an interaction with its CDK9 subunit. The mRNA level of Egr1, a MED23-controlled model gene, is reduced 4-5 fold in Med23 (-/-) ES cells under an unstimulated condition, but Med23-deficiency does not alter the occupancies of RNAP II, GTFs, Mediator complex, or activator ELK1 at the Egr1 promoter. Instead, Med23 depletion results in a significant decrease in P-TEFb and RNAP II (Ser2P) binding at the coding region, but no changes for several other elongation regulators, such as DSIF and NELF. ChIP-seq revealed that Med23-deficiency partially reduced the P-TEFb occupancy at a set of MED23-regulated gene promoters. Further, we demonstrate that MED23 interacts with CDK9 in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, these results provide the mechanistic insight into how Mediator promotes RNAP II into transcription elongation.

  9. A Myb transcription factor regulates genes of the phenylalanine pathway in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Pascual, M Belen; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción

    2013-06-01

    During the life cycles of conifer trees, such as maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), large quantities of carbon skeletons are irreversibly immobilized in the wood. In energetic terms this is an expensive process, in which carbon from photosynthesis is channelled through the shikimate pathway for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. This crucial metabolic pathway is finely regulated, primarily through transcriptional control, and because phenylalanine is the precursor for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, the precise regulation of phenylalanine synthesis and use should occur simultaneously. The promoters of three genes encoding the enzymes prephenate aminotransferase (PAT), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and glutamine synthetase (GS1b) contain AC elements involved in the transcriptional activation mediated by R2R3-Myb factors. We have examined the capacity of the R2R3-Myb transcription factors Myb1, Myb4 and Myb8 to co-regulate the expression of PAT, PAL and GS1b. Only Myb8 was able to activate the transcription of the three genes. Moreover, the expression of this transcription factor is higher in lignified tissues, in which a high demand for phenylpropanoids exits. In a gain-of-function experiment, we have shown that Myb8 can specifically bind a well-conserved eight-nucleotide-long AC-II element in the promoter regions of PAT, PAL and GS1b, thereby activating their expression. Our results show that Myb8 regulates the expression of these genes involved in phenylalanine metabolism, which is required for channelling photosynthetic carbon to promote wood formation. The co-localization of PAT, PAL, GS1b and MYB8 transcripts in vascular cells further supports this conclusion.

  10. Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Regulates Renal Cholesterol Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudehen, Karam; Kim, Min Soo; Mitsche, Matthew; Garland, Kristina; Anderson, Norma; Noureddine, Lama; Pontoglio, Marco; Patel, Vishal; Xie, Yang; DeBose-Boyd, Russell; Igarashi, Peter

    2016-08-01

    HNF-1β is a tissue-specific transcription factor that is expressed in the kidney and other epithelial organs. Humans with mutations in HNF-1β develop kidney cysts, and HNF-1β regulates the transcription of several cystic disease genes. However, the complete spectrum of HNF-1β-regulated genes and pathways is not known. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation/next generation sequencing and gene expression profiling, we identified 1545 protein-coding genes that are directly regulated by HNF-1β in murine kidney epithelial cells. Pathway analysis predicted that HNF-1β regulates cholesterol metabolism. Expression of dominant negative mutant HNF-1β or kidney-specific inactivation of HNF-1β decreased the expression of genes that are essential for cholesterol synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding factor 2 (Srebf2) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr). HNF-1β mutant cells also expressed lower levels of cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates and had a lower rate of cholesterol synthesis than control cells. Additionally, depletion of cholesterol in the culture medium mitigated the inhibitory effects of mutant HNF-1β on the proteins encoded by Srebf2 and Hmgcr, and HNF-1β directly controlled the renal epithelial expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9, a key regulator of cholesterol uptake. These findings reveal a novel role of HNF-1β in a transcriptional network that regulates intrarenal cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26712526

  11. Effect of BRAFV600E mutation on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in a papillary thyroid carcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenther Simone M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are a group of non-coding single stranded RNAs measuring approximately 22 nucleotides in length that have been found to control cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. They negatively regulate target genes and have recently been implicated in tumourigenesis. Furthermore, miRNA expression profiling correlates with various cancers, with these genes thought to act as both tumour suppressors and oncogenes. Recently, a point mutation in the BRAF gene leading to a V600E substitution has been identified as the most common genetic change in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC occurring in 29–69% of cases. This mutation leads to aberrant MAPK activation that is implicated in tumourigenesis. Aim The aim of this study was to identify the effect that BRAF oncogene has on post-transcriptional regulation in PTC by using microRNA analysis. Results A unique miRNA expression signature differentiated between PTC cell lines with BRAF mutations and a normal thyroid cell line. 15 miRNAs were found to be upregulated and 23 miRNAs were downregulated. Several of these up/down regulated miRNAs may be involved in PTC pathogenesis. miRNA profiling will assist in the elucidation of disease pathogenesis and identification biomarkers and targets.

  12. Differences in expression, actions and cocaine regulation of two isoforms for the brain transcriptional regulator NAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korutla, L; Wang, P J; Lewis, D M; Neustadter, J H; Stromberg, M F; Mackler, S A

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ proteins can influence the cell cycle and contribute to oncogenesis. Many family members are present in the mammalian CNS. Previous work demonstrated elevated NAC1 mRNA levels in the rat nucleus accumbens in response to cocaine. NAC1 acts like other BTB/POZ proteins that regulate transcription but is unusual because of the absence of identifiable DNA binding domains. cDNAs were isolated encoding two NAC1 isoforms differing by only 27 amino acids (the longer isoform contains 514 amino acids). The mRNAs for both isoforms were simultaneously expressed throughout the rat brain and peripheral tissues. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the mRNA of the longer isoform was more abundant than the mRNA of the shorter isoform. Western blot analysis demonstrated a similar unequal distribution between the isoforms in the CNS. The longer isoform was the more abundant of the two NAC1 proteins and the ratio between them differed throughout the rat brain. The shorter isoform was not detected in most of the examined peripheral tissues, suggesting differences from the CNS in post-transcriptional processing. Both isoforms repressed transcription in H293T cells using a Gal4-luciferase reporter system. However, the shorter isoform did not repress transcription as effectively as the longer isoform. Transfection of different ratios for both isoforms, in order to replicate the relative amounts observed throughout the CNS, supported an interaction between the isoforms. The net effect on transcriptional repression was determined by the ratio of the two NAC1 isoforms. Each isoform exhibited the subnuclear localization that is characteristic of many BTB/POZ proteins. A rapid and transient increase in the level of the shorter isoform occurred in the nucleus accumbens 2 h following a single i.p. cocaine injection. We conclude that the two isoforms of NAC1 may differentially affect neuronal functions, including the regulation of

  13. Identification and transcript profiles of citrus growth-regulating factor genes involved in the regulation of leaf and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Guo, Ling-Xia; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Liu, Tao; Fan, Yu-Hua; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2016-10-01

    Growth-regulating factor (GRF) is an important protein in GA-mediated response, with key roles in plant growth and development. However, it is not known whether or how the GRF proteins in citrus to regulate organ size. In this study, nine citrus GRF genes (CsGRF1-9) were validated from the 'Anliu' sweet orange (AL, Citrus sinensis cv. Anliu) by PCR amplification. They all contain two conserved motifs (QLQ and WRC) and have 3-4 exons. The transcript levels of genes were detected by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis showed that (1) CsGRF 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 expressed predominantly in young leaf, CsGRF 3 and 4 expressed predominantly in fruit immature juice sacs and CsGRF 8 expressed predominantly in root; (2) all citrus GRF genes had significantly higher expression in young leaves than mature leaf; (3) in juice sacs, the transcript levels of CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 increased significantly while the transcript levels of CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 had no significant change from 80 DAF to 100 DAF. Besides, GA3 treatment did not affect the transcript levels of CsGRF5 and CsGRF6 but significantly increased the transcript levels of the other seven CsGRF genes in young leaves. These results suggested that all CsGRF genes involve in the leaf development, CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 act developmentally whilst CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 play fundamental roles in fruit cell enlargement, which may be through GA pathway or GA-independent pathway.

  14. Complex SUMO-1 regulation of cardiac transcription factor Nkx2-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro W Costa

    Full Text Available Reversible post-translational protein modifications such as SUMOylation add complexity to cardiac transcriptional regulation. The homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2-5/Csx is essential for heart specification and morphogenesis. It has been previously suggested that SUMOylation of lysine 51 (K51 of Nkx2-5 is essential for its DNA binding and transcriptional activation. Here, we confirm that SUMOylation strongly enhances Nkx2-5 transcriptional activity and that residue K51 of Nkx2-5 is a SUMOylation target. However, in a range of cultured cell lines we find that a point mutation of K51 to arginine (K51R does not affect Nkx2-5 activity or DNA binding, suggesting the existence of additional Nkx2-5 SUMOylated residues. Using biochemical assays, we demonstrate that Nkx2-5 is SUMOylated on at least one additional site, and this is the predominant site in cardiac cells. The second site is either non-canonical or a "shifting" site, as mutation of predicted consensus sites and indeed every individual lysine in the context of the K51R mutation failed to impair Nkx2-5 transcriptional synergism with SUMO, or its nuclear localization and DNA binding. We also observe SUMOylation of Nkx2-5 cofactors, which may be critical to Nkx2-5 regulation. Our data reveal highly complex regulatory mechanisms driven by SUMOylation to modulate Nkx2-5 activity.

  15. Regulation of CAPRICE transcription by MYB proteins for root epidermis differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshino-Kimura, Yoshihiro; Wada, Takuji; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Tsugeki, Ryuji; Ishiguro, Sumie; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2005-06-01

    Epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis root is studied as a model system for understanding cell fate specification. Two types of MYB-related transcription factors are involved in this cell differentiation. One of these, CAPRICE (CPC), encoding an R3-type MYB protein, is a positive regulator of hair cell differentiation and is preferentially transcribed in hairless cells. We analyzed the regulatory mechanism of CPC transcription. Deletion analyses of the CPC promoter revealed that hairless cell-specific transcription of the CPC gene required a 69 bp sequence, and a tandem repeat of this region was sufficient for its expression in epidermis. This region includes two MYB-binding sites, and the epidermis-specific transcription of CPC was abolished when base substitutions were introduced in these sites. We showed by gel mobility shift experiments and by yeast one-hybrid assay that WEREWOLF (WER), which is an R2R3-type MYB protein, directly binds to this region. We showed that WER also binds to the GL2 promoter region, indicating that WER directly regulates CPC and GL2 transcription by binding to their promoter regions.

  16. Transcriptional coactivator p300 regulates glucose-induced gene expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shali; Feng, Biao; George, Biju; Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Sustained hyperglycemia in diabetes causes alteration of a large number of transcription factors and mRNA transcripts, leading to tissue damage. We investigated whether p300, a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyl transferase activity, regulates glucose-induced activation of transcription factors and subsequent upregulation of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated in varied glucose concentrations and were studied after p300 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, p300 overexpression, or incubation with the p300 inhibitor curcumin. Histone H2AX phosphorylation and lysine acetylation were examined for oxidative DNA damage and p300 activation. Screening for transcription factors was performed with the Luminex system. Alterations of selected transcription factors were validated. mRNA expression of p300, endothelin-1 (ET-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibronectin (FN) and its splice variant EDB(+)FN and FN protein production were analyzed. HUVECs in 25 mmol/l glucose showed increased p300 production accompanied by increased binding of p300 to ET-1 and FN promoters, augmented histone acetylation, H2AX phosphorylation, activation of multiple transcription factors, and increased mRNA expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins. p300 overexpression showed a glucose-like effect on the mRNA expression of ET-1, VEGF, and FN. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated p300 blockade or chemical inhibitor of p300 prevented such glucose-induced changes. Similar mRNA upregulation was also seen in the organ culture of vascular tissues, which was prevented by p300 siRNA transfection. Data from these studies suggest that glucose-induced p300 upregulation is an important upstream epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins in endothelial cells and is a potential therapeutic target for diabetic complications.

  17. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli- cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl- transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in- hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran- scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi- nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  18. Lysine methylation of HIV-1 Tat regulates transcriptional activity of the viral LTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flynn Elizabeth K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of transcription of the HIV-1 viral genome is mediated by the interaction of the viral protein Tat with the LTR and other transcriptional machinery. These specific interactions can be affected by the state of post-translational modifications on Tat. Previously, we have shown that Tat can be phosphorylated and acetylated in vivo resulting in an increase in the rate of transcription. In the present study, we investigated whether Tat could be methylated on lysine residues, specifically on lysine 50 and 51, and whether this modification resulted in a decrease of viral transcription from the LTR. Results We analyzed the association of Tat with histone methyltransferases of the SUV39-family of SET domain containing proteins in vitro. Tat was found to associate with both SETDB1 and SETDB2, two enzymes which exhibit methyltransferase activity. siRNA against SETDB1 transfected into cell systems with both transient and integrated LTR reporter genes resulted in an increase in transcription of the HIV-LTR in the presence of suboptimal levels of Tat. In vitro methylation assays with Tat peptides containing point mutations at lysines 50 and 51 showed an increased incorporation of methyl groups on lysine 51, however, both residues indicated susceptibility for methylation. Conclusion The association of Tat with histone methyltransferases and the ability for Tat to be methylated suggests an interesting mechanism of transcriptional regulation through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling proteins to the HIV-1 promoter.

  19. Regulation of Virulence of Entamoeba histolytica by the URE3-BP Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Moore, Ellyn S; Zhang, Yan; Bousquet, Christina B; Lannigan, Joanne A; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2010-05-18

    It is not understood why only some infections with Entamoeba histolytica result in disease. The calcium-regulated transcription factor upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) was initially identified by virtue of its role in regulating the expression of two amebic virulence genes, the Gal/GalNac lectin and ferredoxin. Here we tested whether this transcription factor has a broader role in regulating virulence. A comparison of in vivo to in vitro parasite gene expression demonstrated that 39% of in vivo regulated transcripts contained the URE3 motif recognized by URE3-BP, compared to 23% of all promoters (P < 0.0001). Amebae induced to express a dominant positive mutant form of URE3-BP had an increase in an elongated morphology (30% +/- 6% versus 14% +/- 5%; P = 0.001), a 2-fold competitive advantage at invading the intestinal epithelium (P = 0.017), and a 3-fold increase in liver abscess size (0.1 +/- 0.1 g versus 0.036 +/- 0.1 g; P = 0.03). These results support a role for URE3-BP in virulence regulation.

  20. Alu-directed transcriptional regulation of some novel miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xi W

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite many studies on the biogenesis, molecular structure and biological functions of microRNAs, little is known about the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms controlling the spatiotemporal expression pattern of human miRNA gene loci. Several lines of experimental results have indicated that both polymerase II (Pol-II and polymerase III (Pol-III may be involved in transcribing miRNAs. Here, we assessed the genomic evidence for Alu-directed transcriptional regulation of some novel miRNA genes in humans. Our data demonstrate that the expression of these Alu-related miRNAs may be modulated by Pol-III. Results We present a comprehensive exploration of the Alu-directed transcriptional regulation of some new miRNAs. Using a new computational approach, a variety of Alu-related sequences from multiple sources were pooled and filtered to obtain a subset containing Alu elements and characterized miRNA genes for which there is clear evidence of full-length transcription (embedded in EST. We systematically demonstrated that 73 miRNAs including five known ones may be transcribed by Pol-III through Alu or MIR. Among the new miRNAs, 33 were determined by high-throughput Solexa sequencing. Real-time TaqMan PCR and Northern blotting verified that three newly identified miRNAs could be induced to co-express with their upstream Alu transcripts by heat shock or cycloheximide. Conclusion Through genomic analysis, Solexa sequencing and experimental validation, we have identified candidate sequences for Alu-related miRNAs, and have found that the transcription of these miRNAs could be governed by Pol-III. Thus, this study may elucidate the mechanisms by which the expression of a class of small RNAs may be regulated by their upstream repeat elements.

  1. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  2. The plant heat stress transcription factors (HSFs: structure, regulation and function in response to abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eGuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity and drought adversely affect the survival, growth and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs, including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs. HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps. In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  3. mTOR: a link from the extracellular milieu to transcriptional regulation of oligodendrocyte development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Wood

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte development is controlled by numerous extracellular signals that regulate a series of transcription factors that promote the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to myelinating cells in the central nervous system. A major element of this regulatory system that has only recently been studied is the intracellular signalling from surface receptors to transcription factors to down-regulate inhibitors and up-regulate inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. The current review focuses on one such pathway: the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which integrates signals in many cell systems and induces cell responses including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. This review describes the known functions of mTOR as they relate to oligodendrocyte development, and its recently discovered impact on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. A potential model for its role in oligodendrocyte development is proposed.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor: Implications for tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter S Yoo; Abby L Mulkeen; Charles H Cha

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent secreted mitogen critical for physiologic and tumor angiogenesis. Regulation of VEGF occurs at several levels, including transcription, mRNA stabilization,translation, and differential cellular localization of various isoforms. Recent advances in our understanding of posttranscriptional regulation of VEGF include identification of the stabilizing mRNA binding protein, HuR, and the discovery of internal ribosomal entry sites in the 5'UTR of the VEGF mRNA. Monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody was recently approved for use in humans, but suffers from the need for high systemic doses. RNA interference (RNAi)technology is being used in vitro and in animal models with promising results. Here, we review the literature on post-transcriptional regulation of VEGF and describe recent progress in targeting these mechanisms for therapeutic benefit.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Wor4, a New Transcriptional Regulator of White-Opaque Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can switch between two cell types, “white” and “opaque,” each of which is heritable through many cell divisions. Switching between these two cell types is regulated by six transcriptional regulators that form a highly interconnected circuit with multiple feedback loops. Here, we identify a seventh regulator of white-opaque switching, which we have named Wor4. We show that ectopic expression of Wor4 is sufficient to drive switching from the white to t...

  6. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  7. Growth phase and ompR regulation of transcription of microcin B17 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Chico, C; San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1986-09-01

    The synthesis of the peptide antibiotic microcin B17 was shown to occur as the cells entered the stationary phase of growth. This type of growth phase regulation is commonly observed in the production of a number of different bacterial products such as toxins and antibiotics. Microcin B17 synthesis is also dependent on the product of the ompR gene. To determine the role of transcription in this double regulation of microcin B17 production, operon fusions with Mu d1 (Ap lac) were constructed. Insertions were obtained in all four plasmid genes involved in production of microcin B17 (mcbA-D) and in the immunity region. Three classes of fusions were obtained. Fusions into mcbA, mcbB, and mcbC (first class) exhibited an increase in their transcription as the cells approached the stationary phase. These increases as well as basal levels of transcription were dependent on OmpR. Expression of fusions in mcbD and in the immunity region (second class) was also dependent on OmpR, but their expression remained constant throughout growth. One fusion in mcbC (third class) was obtained which was transcribed in the opposite direction than the others. It showed no growth phase regulation and no OmpR dependence. The implications of these results in terms of the transcriptional organization of the mbc genes are discussed.

  8. Discrete redox signaling pathways regulate photosynthetic light-harvesting and chloroplast gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Allen

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II. Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced (32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system.

  9. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Todor

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  10. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Gooding, Jessica; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Schmid, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  11. Post-transcriptional regulation of wnt8a is essential to zebrafish axis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Annika D; Fleming, Jo-Ann G W; Whitener, Amy E; Lekven, Arne C

    2014-02-01

    wnt8a Is essential for normal patterning during vertebrate embryonic development, and either gain or loss-of-function gene dysregulation results in severe axis malformations. The zebrafish wnt8a locus is structured such that transcripts may possess two regulatory 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), raising the possibility of post-transcriptional regulation as an important mode of wnt8a signaling control. To determine whether both UTRs contribute to post-transcriptional wnt8a gene regulation, each UTR (UTR1 and UTR2) was tested in transient and transgenic reporter assays. Both UTRs suppress EGFP reporter expression in cis, with UTR2 exhibiting a more pronounced effect. UTR2 contains a 6 base sequence necessary for UTR2 regulatory function that is complementary to the seed of the microRNA, miR-430. A target protector morpholino that overlaps the seed complement stabilizes both reporter mRNAs and wnt8a mRNAs, and produces phenotypic abnormalities consistent with wnt8a gain-of-function. In rescue assays, specific functions can be attributed to each of the two wnt8a proteins encoded by the locus. An interplay of wnt8a.1 and wnt8a.2 regulates neural and mesodermal patterning and morphogenesis as well as patterning between brain subdivisions. Thus, post-transcriptional control of wnt8a is essential to fine tune the balance of the signaling outputs of the complex wnt8a locus.

  12. Regulation of expression of two LY-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallya Meera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of the expression of particular genes can rely on mechanisms that are different from classical transcriptional and translational control. The LY6G5B and LY6G6D genes encode LY-6 domain proteins, whose expression seems to be regulated in an original fashion, consisting of an intron retention event which generates, through an early premature stop codon, a non-coding transcript, preventing expression in most cell lines and tissues. Results The MHC LY-6 non-coding transcripts have shown to be stable and very abundant in the cell, and not subject to Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. This retention event appears not to be solely dependent on intron features, because in the case of LY6G5B, when the intron is inserted in the artificial context of a luciferase expression plasmid, it is fully spliced but strongly stabilises the resulting luciferase transcript. In addition, by quantitative PCR we found that the retained and spliced forms are differentially expressed in tissues indicating an active regulation of the non-coding transcript. EST database analysis revealed that these genes have an alternative expression pathway with the formation of Transcription Induced Chimeras (TIC. This data was confirmed by RT-PCR, revealing the presence of different transcripts that would encode the chimeric proteins CSNKβ-LY6G5B and G6F-LY6G6D, in which the LY-6 domain would join to a kinase domain and an Ig-like domain, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, the LY6G5B and LY6G6D intron-retained transcripts are not subjected to NMD and are more abundant than the properly spliced forms. In addition, these genes form chimeric transcripts with their neighbouring same orientation 5' genes. Of interest is the fact that the 5' genes (CSNKβ or G6F undergo differential splicing only in the context of the chimera (CSNKβ-LY6G5B or G6F-LY6G6C and not on their own.

  13. The JNKs differentially regulate RNA polymerase III transcription by coordinately modulating the expression of all TFIIIB subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong and, Shuping; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III-dependent transcription is subject to stringent regulation by tumor suppressors and oncogenic proteins and enhanced RNA pol III transcription is essential for cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Since the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) display both oncogenic and tumor suppressor properties, the roles of these proteins in regulating RNA pol III transcription were examined. In both mouse and human cells, loss or reduction in JNK1 expression represses RNA pol III...

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of connexin43 in H-Ras-transformed cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Kandouz

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 expression is lost in cancer cells and many studies have reported that Cx43 is a tumor suppressor gene. Paradoxically, in a cellular NIH3T3 model, we have previously shown that Ha-Ras-mediated oncogenic transformation results in increased Cx43 expression. Although the examination of transcriptional regulation revealed essential regulatory elements, it could not solve this paradox. Here we studied post-transcriptional regulation of Cx43 expression in cancer using the same model in search of novel gene regulatory elements. Upon Ras transformation, both Cx43 mRNA stability and translation efficiency were increased. We investigated the role of Cx43 mRNA 3' and 5'Untranslated regions (UTRs and found an opposing effect; a 5'UTR-driven positive regulation is observed in Ras-transformed cells (NIH-3T3(Ras, while the 3'UTR is active only in normal NIH-3T3(Neo cells and completely silenced in NIH-3T3(Ras cells. Most importantly, we identified a previously unknown regulatory element within the 3'UTR, named S1516, which accounts for this 3'UTR-mediated regulation. We also examined the effect of other oncogenes and found that Ras- and Src-transformed cells show a different Cx43 UTRs post-transcriptional regulation than ErbB2-transformed cells, suggesting distinct regulatory pathways. Next, we detected different patterns of S1516 RNA-protein complexes in NIH-3T3(Neo compared to NIH-3T3(Ras cells. A proteomic approach identified most of the S1516-binding proteins as factors involved in post-transcriptional regulation. Building on our new findings, we propose a model to explain the discrepancy between the Cx43 expression in Ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells and the data in clinical specimens.

  15. SacY, a Transcriptional Antiterminator from Bacillus subtilis, Is Regulated by Phosphorylation In Vivo†

    OpenAIRE

    Idelson, Maria; Amster-Choder, Orna

    1998-01-01

    SacY antiterminates transcription of the sacB gene in Bacillus subtilis in response to the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. We have found that it can substitute for BglG, a homologous protein, in antiterminating transcription of the bgl operon in Escherichia coli. We therefore sought to determine whether, similarly to BglG, SacY is regulated by reversible phosphorylation in response to the availability of the inducing sugar. We show here that two forms of SacY, phosphorylated and non...

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Chemokine Genes: A Link to Pancreatic Islet Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Burke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced expression of chemotactic cytokines (aka chemokines within pancreatic islets likely contributes to islet inflammation by regulating the recruitment and activation of various leukocyte populations, including macrophages, neutrophils, and T-lymphocytes. Because of the powerful actions of these chemokines, precise transcriptional control is required. In this review, we highlight what is known about the signals and mechanisms that govern the transcription of genes encoding specific chemokine proteins in pancreatic islet β-cells, which include contributions from the NF-κB and STAT1 pathways. We further discuss increased chemokine expression in pancreatic islets during autoimmune-mediated and obesity-related development of diabetes.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fumiko Taniuchi; Koji Higai; Tomomi Tanaka; Yutaro Azuma; Kojiro Matsumoto

    2013-01-01

    The α 1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1) enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α 1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT) activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in...

  18. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    The covalent attachment of methyl groups to the side-chain of arginine residues is known to play essential roles in regulation of transcription, protein function and RNA metabolism. The specific N-methylation of arginine residues is catalyzed by a small family of gene products known as protein......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  19. Liver receptor homolog 1 transcriptionally regulates human bile salt export pump expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiulong; Kaimal, Rajani; Yan, Bingfang; Deng, Ruitang

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic conversion of cholesterol into bile acids in liver is initiated by the rate-limiting cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), whereas the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is responsible for the canalicular secretion of bile acids. Liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) is a key transcriptional factor required for the hepatic expression of CYP7A1. We hypothesized that LRH-1 was also involved in the transcriptional regulation of BSEP. In support of our hypothesis, we found that overexpression o...

  20. Regulation of the malic enzyme gene malE by the transcriptional regulator MalR in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jens P; Polen, Tino; Youn, Jung-Won; Emer, Denise; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a Gram-positive nonpathogenic bacterium that is used for the biotechnological production of amino acids. Here, we investigated the transcriptional control of the malE gene encoding malic enzyme (MalE) in C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, which is known to involve the nitrogen regulator AmtR. Gel shift experiments using purified regulators RamA and RamB revealed binding of these regulators to the malE promoter. In DNA-affinity purification experiments a hitherto uncharacterized transcriptional regulator belonging to the MarR family was found to bind to malE promoter DNA and was designated as MalR. C. glutamicum cells overexpressing malR showed reduced MalE activities in LB medium or in minimal media with acetate, glucose, pyruvate or citrate. Deletion of malR positively affected MalE activities during growth in LB medium and minimal media with pyruvate, glucose or the TCA cycle dicarboxylates l-malate, succinate and fumarate. Transcriptional fusion analysis revealed elevated malE promoter activity in the malR deletion mutant during growth in pyruvate minimal medium suggesting that MalR acts as a repressor of malE. Purified MalR bound malE promoter DNA in gel shift experiments. Two MalR binding sites were identified in the malE promoter by mutational analysis. Thus, MalR contributes to the complex transcriptional control of malE which also involves RamA, RamB and AmtR. PMID:22261175

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Jesse R.; Resnick, Samuel; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain) subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer. PMID:26716708

  2. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes.

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    Jesse R Raab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer.

  3. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

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    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  4. Berry skin development in Norton grape: Distinct patterns of transcriptional regulation and flavonoid biosynthesis

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    Yu Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex and dynamic changes during grape berry development have been studied in Vitis vinifera, but little is known about these processes in other Vitis species. The grape variety 'Norton', with a major portion of its genome derived from Vitis aestivalis, maintains high levels of malic acid and phenolic acids in the ripening berries in comparison with V. vinifera varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon. Furthermore, Norton berries develop a remarkably high level of resistance to most fungal pathogens while Cabernet Sauvignon berries remain susceptible to those pathogens. The distinct characteristics of Norton and Cabernet Sauvignon merit a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation and metabolite pathways. Results A microarray study was conducted on transcriptome changes of Norton berry skin during the period of 37 to 127 days after bloom, which represents berry developmental phases from herbaceous growth to full ripeness. Samples of six berry developmental stages were collected. Analysis of the microarray data revealed that a total of 3,352 probe sets exhibited significant differences at transcript levels, with two-fold changes between at least two developmental stages. Expression profiles of defense-related genes showed a dynamic modulation of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR resistance genes and pathogenesis-related (PR genes during berry development. Transcript levels of PR-1 in Norton berry skin clearly increased during the ripening phase. As in other grapevines, genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway were up-regulated in Norton as the berry developed. The most noticeable was the steady increase of transcript levels of stilbene synthase genes. Transcriptional patterns of six MYB transcription factors and eleven structural genes of the flavonoid pathway and profiles of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs during berry skin development were analyzed comparatively in Norton and Cabernet

  5. Inter- and intra-combinatorial regulation by transcription factors and microRNAs

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    Chang Joseph T

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a novel class of non-coding small RNAs. In mammalian cells, miRNAs repress the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs or degrade mRNAs. miRNAs play important roles in development and differentiation, and they are also implicated in aging, and oncogenesis. Predictions of targets of miRNAs suggest that they may regulate more than one-third of all genes. The overall functions of mammalian miRNAs remain unclear. Combinatorial regulation by transcription factors alone or miRNAs alone offers a wide range of regulatory programs. However, joining transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms enables higher complexity regulatory programs that in turn could give cells evolutionary advantages. Investigating coordinated regulation of genes by miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs from a statistical standpoint is a first step that may elucidate some of their roles in various biological processes. Results Here, we studied the nature and scope of coordination among regulators from the transcriptional and miRNA regulatory layers in the human genome. Our findings are based on genome wide statistical assessment of regulatory associations ("interactions" among the sets of predicted targets of miRNAs and sets of putative targets of transcription factors. We found that combinatorial regulation by transcription factor pairs and miRNA pairs is much more abundant than the combinatorial regulation by TF-miRNA pairs. In addition, many of the strongly interacting TF-miRNA pairs involve a subset of master TF regulators that co-regulate genes in coordination with almost any miRNA. Application of standard measures for evaluating the degree of interaction between pairs of regulators show that strongly interacting TF-miRNA, TF-TF or miRNA-miRNA pairs tend to include TFs or miRNAs that regulate very large numbers of genes. To correct for this potential bias we introduced an additional Bayesian measure that incorporates

  6. Transcription Regulation of the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT Gene

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    Muhammad Khairul Ramlee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to maintain their telomere length via expression of an enzymatic complex called telomerase. Similarly, more than 85%–90% of cancer cells are found to upregulate the expression of telomerase, conferring them with the potential to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, is the rate-limiting factor in reconstituting telomerase activity in vivo. To date, the expression and function of the human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT gene are known to be regulated at various molecular levels (including genetic, mRNA, protein and subcellular localization by a number of diverse factors. Among these means of regulation, transcription modulation is the most important, as evident in its tight regulation in cancer cell survival as well as pluripotent stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we discuss how hTERT gene transcription is regulated, mainly focusing on the contribution of trans-acting factors such as transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, as well as genetic alterations in hTERT proximal promoter.

  7. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-03-01

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly. PMID:26772748

  8. Transcription Regulation of the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene.

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    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Wang, Jing; Toh, Wei Xun; Li, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to maintain their telomere length via expression of an enzymatic complex called telomerase. Similarly, more than 85%-90% of cancer cells are found to upregulate the expression of telomerase, conferring them with the potential to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, is the rate-limiting factor in reconstituting telomerase activity in vivo. To date, the expression and function of the human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) gene are known to be regulated at various molecular levels (including genetic, mRNA, protein and subcellular localization) by a number of diverse factors. Among these means of regulation, transcription modulation is the most important, as evident in its tight regulation in cancer cell survival as well as pluripotent stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we discuss how hTERT gene transcription is regulated, mainly focusing on the contribution of trans-acting factors such as transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, as well as genetic alterations in hTERT proximal promoter. PMID:27548225

  9. Sigma factor RpoN (σ54) regulates pilE transcription in commensal Neisseria elongata.

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    Rendón, María A; Hockenberry, Alyson M; McManus, Steven A; So, Magdalene

    2013-10-01

    Human-adapted Neisseria includes two pathogens, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, and at least 13 species of commensals that colonize many of the same niches as the pathogens. The Type IV pilus plays an important role in the biology of pathogenic Neisseria. In these species, Sigma factor RpoD (σ(70)), Integration Host Factor, and repressors RegF and CrgA regulate transcription of pilE, the gene encoding the pilus structural subunit. The Type IV pilus is also a strictly conserved trait in commensal Neisseria. We present evidence that a different mechanism regulates pilE transcription in commensals. Using Neisseria elongata as a model, we show that Sigma factor RpoN (σ(54)), Integration Host Factor, and an activator we name Npa regulate pilE transcription. Taken in context with previous reports, our findings indicate pilE regulation switched from an RpoN- to an RpoD-dependent mechanism as pathogenic Neisseria diverged from commensals during evolution. Our findings have implications for the timing of Tfp expression and Tfp-mediated host cell interactions in these two groups of bacteria. PMID:23899162

  10. Identification of a missing link in the evolution of an enzyme into a transcriptional regulator.

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    Gonzalo Durante-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The evolution of transcriptional regulators through the recruitment of DNA-binding domains by enzymes is a widely held notion. However, few experimental approaches have directly addressed this hypothesis. Here we report the reconstruction of a plausible pathway for the evolution of an enzyme into a transcriptional regulator. The BzdR protein is the prototype of a subfamily of prokaryotic transcriptional regulators that controls the expression of genes involved in the anaerobic degradation of benzoate. We have shown that BzdR consists of an N-terminal DNA-binding domain connected through a linker to a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows significant identity to the shikimate kinase (SK. The construction of active synthetic BzdR-like regulators by fusing the DNA-binding domain of BzdR to the Escherichia coli SKI protein strongly supports the notion that an ancestral SK domain could have been involved in the evolutionary origin of BzdR. The loss of the enzymatic activity of the ancestral SK domain was essential for it to evolve as a regulatory domain in the current BzdR protein. This work also supports the view that enzymes precede the emergence of the regulatory systems that may control their expression.

  11. Is transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways an optimal strategy for fitness?

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    Carl Troein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional regulation of the genes in metabolic pathways is a highly successful strategy, which is virtually universal in microorganisms. The lac operon of E. coli is but one example of how enzyme and transporter production can be made conditional on the presence of a nutrient to catabolize. METHODOLOGY: With a minimalist model of metabolism, cell growth and transcriptional regulation in a microorganism, we explore how the interaction between environmental conditions and gene regulation set the growth rate of cells in the phase of exponential growth. This in silico model, which is based on biochemical rate equations, does not describe a specific organism, but the magnitudes of its parameters are chosen to match realistic values. Optimizing the parameters of the regulatory system allows us to quantify the fitness benefit of regulation. When a second nutrient and its metabolic pathway are introduced, the system must further decide whether and how to activate both pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Even the crudest transcriptional network is shown to substantially increase the fitness of the organism, and this effect persists even when the range of nutrient levels is kept very narrow. We show that maximal growth is achieved when pathway activation is a more or less steeply graded function of the nutrient concentration. Furthermore, we predict that bistability of the system is a rare phenomenon in this context, but outline a situation where it may be selected for.

  12. An R2R3-MYB transcription factor regulates carotenoid pigmentation in Mimulus lewisii flowers.

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    Sagawa, Janelle M; Stanley, Lauren E; LaFountain, Amy M; Frank, Harry A; Liu, Chang; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-02-01

    Carotenoids are yellow, orange, and red pigments that contribute to the beautiful colors and nutritive value of many flowers and fruits. The structural genes in the highly conserved carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been well characterized in multiple plant systems, but little is known about the transcription factors that control the expression of these structural genes. By analyzing a chemically induced mutant of Mimulus lewisii through bulk segregant analysis and transgenic experiments, we have identified an R2R3-MYB, Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), as the first transcription factor that positively regulates carotenoid biosynthesis during flower development. Loss-of-function mutations in RCP1 lead to down-regulation of all carotenoid biosynthetic genes and reduced carotenoid content in M. lewisii flowers, a phenotype recapitulated by RNA interference in the wild-type background. Overexpression of this gene in the rcp1 mutant background restores carotenoid production and, unexpectedly, results in simultaneous decrease of anthocyanin production in some transgenic lines by down-regulating the expression of an activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Identification of transcriptional regulators of carotenoid biosynthesis provides the 'toolbox' genes for understanding the molecular basis of flower color diversification in nature and for potential enhancement of carotenoid production in crop plants via genetic engineering. PMID:26377817

  13. Escherichia coli pfs transcription: regulation and proposed roles in autoinducer-2 synthesis and purine excretion.

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    Kim, Youngbae; Lew, Chih M; Gralla, Jay D

    2006-11-01

    Pfs expression is required for several metabolic pathways and limits the production of autoinducer-2, a molecule proposed to play a central role in interspecies quorum sensing. The present study reveals physiological conditions and promoter DNA elements that regulate Escherichia coli pfs transcription. Pfs transcription is shown to rely on both sigma 70 and sigma 38 (rpoS), and the latter is subject to induction that increases pfs expression. Transcription is maximal as the cells approach stationary phase, and this level can be increased by salt stress through induction of sigma 38-dependent expression. The pfs promoter is shown to contain both positive and negative elements, which can be used by both forms of RNA polymerase. The negative element is contained within the overlapping dgt promoter, which is involved in purine metabolism. Consideration of the physiological roles of sigma 38 and dgt leads to a model for how autoinducer production is controlled under changing physiological conditions. PMID:16950920

  14. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

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    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks.

  15. Computational identification of transcriptionally co-regulated genes, validation with the four ANT isoform genes

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    Dupont Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of gene promoters is essential to understand the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation required under the effects of physiological processes, nutritional intake or pathologies. In higher eukaryotes, transcriptional regulation implies the recruitment of a set of regulatory proteins that bind on combinations of nucleotide motifs. We developed a computational analysis of promoter nucleotide sequences, to identify co-regulated genes by combining several programs that allowed us to build regulatory models and perform a crossed analysis on several databases. This strategy was tested on a set of four human genes encoding isoforms 1 to 4 of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier ANT. Each isoform has a specific tissue expression profile linked to its role in cellular bioenergetics. Results From their promoter sequence and from the phylogenetic evolution of these ANT genes in mammals, we constructed combinations of specific regulatory elements. These models were screened using the full human genome and databases of promoter sequences from human and several other mammalian species. For each of transcriptionally regulated ANT1, 2 and 4 genes, a set of co-regulated genes was identified and their over-expression was verified in microarray databases. Conclusions Most of the identified genes encode proteins with a cellular function and specificity in agreement with those of the corresponding ANT isoform. Our in silico study shows that the tissue specific gene expression is mainly driven by promoter regulatory sequences located up to about a thousand base pairs upstream the transcription start site. Moreover, this computational strategy on the study of regulatory pathways should provide, along with transcriptomics and metabolomics, data to construct cellular metabolic networks.

  16. ETS-4 is a transcriptional regulator of life span in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Bargavi Thyagarajan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a complex phenotype responsive to a plethora of environmental inputs; yet only a limited number of transcriptional regulators are known to influence life span. How the downstream expression programs mediated by these factors (or others are coordinated into common or distinct set of aging effectors is an addressable question in model organisms, such as C. elegans. Here, we establish the transcription factor ETS-4, an ortholog of vertebrate SPDEF, as a longevity determinant. Adult worms with ets-4 mutations had a significant extension of mean life span. Restoring ETS-4 activity in the intestine, but not neurons, of ets-4 mutant worms rescued life span to wild-type levels. Using RNAi, we demonstrated that ets-4 is required post-developmentally to regulate adult life span; thus uncoupling the role of ETS-4 in aging from potential functions in worm intestinal development. Seventy ETS-4-regulated genes, identified by gene expression profiling of two distinct ets-4 alleles and analyzed by bioinformatics, were enriched for known longevity effectors that function in lipid transport, lipid metabolism, and innate immunity. Putative target genes were enriched for ones that change expression during normal aging, the majority of which are controlled by the GATA factors. Also, some ETS-4-regulated genes function downstream of the FOXO factor, DAF-16 and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. However, epistasis and phenotypic analyses indicate that ets-4 functioned in parallel to the insulin/IGF-1 receptor, daf-2 and akt-1/2 kinases. Furthermore, ets-4 required daf-16 to modulate aging, suggesting overlap in function at the level of common targets that affect life span. In conclusion, ETS-4 is a new transcriptional regulator of aging, which shares transcriptional targets with GATA and FOXO factors, suggesting that overlapping pathways direct common sets of lifespan-related genes.

  17. Analysis of wide-domain transcriptional regulation in solid-state cultures of Aspergillus oryzae.

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    McKelvey, Shauna M; Murphy, Richard A

    2010-05-01

    Many filamentous fungi secrete considerable quantities of enzymes including protease, cellulase and xylanase, which are of major industrial importance. Over the past few decades, many of these fungal enzymes have been isolated and their relevant genes characterised. Solid-state fermentation (SSF), an ancient technique described as a fermentation process performed on non-soluble material whereby the material acts as a physical support and as a source of nutrients, is widely employed in the production of industrially important enzymes. Control mechanisms governing gene expression in SSF however, have been rarely studied. The influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on the production and transcriptional regulation of hydrolase enzymes secreted by an Aspergillus strain was investigated with the hope of expanding on the relatively small amount of knowledge regarding cellular control of gene expression. This study involved screening a collection of fungal strains for protease, cellulase and xylanase production under SSF conditions. From this, one fungal strain was then chosen for further analysis. Factors affecting the secretion of the hydrolase enzymes were optimised, and following this, the influence of nutritional supplementation on the production and transcriptional regulation of the enzymes was investigated. Real-time PCR techniques were used to assess the relative expression levels of genes encoding hydrolase activities and of the genes encoding regulatory elements such as AreA, PacC and CreA in an effort to identify possible transcriptional regulation mechanisms. The complexity of gene regulation under SSF conditions became apparent during the study, as other factors such as post-transcriptional regulation appeared to play a far greater role than previously imagined.

  18. Autoimmune regulator is acetylated by transcription coactivator CBP/p300

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    Saare, Mario, E-mail: mario.saare@ut.ee [Molecular Pathology, Institute of General and Molecular Pathology, University of Tartu, 19th Ravila Str, Tartu (Estonia); Rebane, Ana [Molecular Pathology, Institute of General and Molecular Pathology, University of Tartu, 19th Ravila Str, Tartu (Estonia); SIAF, Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research, University of Zuerich, Davos (Switzerland); Rajashekar, Balaji; Vilo, Jaak [BIIT, Bioinformatics, Algorithmics and Data Mining group, Institute of Computer Science, University of Tartu, Tartu (Estonia); Peterson, Paert [Molecular Pathology, Institute of General and Molecular Pathology, University of Tartu, 19th Ravila Str, Tartu (Estonia)

    2012-08-15

    The Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) is a regulator of transcription in the thymic medulla, where it controls the expression of a large set of peripheral-tissue specific genes. AIRE interacts with the transcriptional coactivator and acetyltransferase CBP and synergistically cooperates with it in transcriptional activation. Here, we aimed to study a possible role of AIRE acetylation in the modulation of its activity. We found that AIRE is acetylated in tissue culture cells and this acetylation is enhanced by overexpression of CBP and the CBP paralog p300. The acetylated lysines were located within nuclear localization signal and SAND domain. AIRE with mutations that mimicked acetylated K243 and K253 in the SAND domain had reduced transactivation activity and accumulated into fewer and larger nuclear bodies, whereas mutations that mimicked the unacetylated lysines were functionally similar to wild-type AIRE. Analogously to CBP, p300 localized to AIRE-containing nuclear bodies, however, the overexpression of p300 did not enhance the transcriptional activation of AIRE-regulated genes. Further studies showed that overexpression of p300 stabilized the AIRE protein. Interestingly, gene expression profiling revealed that AIRE, with mutations mimicking K243/K253 acetylation in SAND, was able to activate gene expression, although the affected genes were different and the activation level was lower from those regulated by wild-type AIRE. Our results suggest that the AIRE acetylation can influence the selection of AIRE activated genes. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE is acetylated by the acetyltransferases p300 and CBP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation occurs between CARD and SAND domains and within the SAND domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation increases the size of AIRE nuclear dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation increases AIRE protein stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE acetylation mimic regulates a different set of AIRE

  19. CDK2 Regulates HIV-1 Transcription by Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Serine 90

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    Breuer Denitra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 transcription is activated by the viral Tat protein that recruits host positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb containing CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. P-TEFb in the cells exists as a lower molecular weight CDK9/cyclin T1 dimer and a high molecular weight complex of 7SK RNA, CDK9/cyclin T1, HEXIM1 dimer and several additional proteins. Our previous studies implicated CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription regulation. We also found that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators leads to the inhibition of CDK9 activity, suggesting a functional link between CDK2 and CDK9. Here, we investigate whether CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 and regulates its activity. Results The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CDK2 inhibited CDK9 kinase activity and reduced CDK9 phosphorylation. Stable shRNA-mediated CDK2 knockdown inhibited HIV-1 transcription, but also increased the overall level of 7SK RNA. CDK9 contains a motif (90SPYNR94 that is consensus CDK2 phosphorylation site. CDK9 was phosphorylated on Ser90 by CDK2 in vitro. In cultured cells, CDK9 phosphorylation was reduced when Ser90 was mutated to an Ala. Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Ser90 was also detected with phospho-specific antibodies and it was reduced after the knockdown of CDK2. CDK9 expression decreased in the large complex for the CDK9-S90A mutant and was correlated with a reduced activity and an inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. In contrast, the CDK9-S90D mutant showed a slight decrease in CDK9 expression in both the large and small complexes but induced Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. Molecular modeling showed that Ser 90 of CDK9 is located on a flexible loop exposed to solvent, suggesting its availability for phosphorylation. Conclusion Our data indicate that CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 on Ser 90 and thereby contributes to HIV-1 transcription. The phosphorylation of Ser90 by CDK2 represents a novel mechanism of HIV-1 regulated transcription and provides a new strategy for

  20. Diurnal Transcriptional Regulation of Endosymbiotically Derived Genes in the Chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans.

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    Suzuki, Shigekatsu; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Chlorarachniophyte algae possess complex plastids acquired by the secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga, and the plastids harbor a relict nucleus of the endosymbiont, the so-called nucleomorph. Due to massive gene transfer from the endosymbiont to the host, many proteins involved in plastid and nucleomorph are encoded by the nuclear genome. Genome sequences have provided a blueprint for the fate of endosymbiotically derived genes; however, transcriptional regulation of these genes remains poorly understood. To gain insight into the evolution of endosymbiotic genes, we performed genome-wide transcript profiling along the cell cycle of the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans, synchronized by light and dark cycles. Our comparative analyses demonstrated that transcript levels of 7,751 nuclear genes (35.7% of 21,706 genes) significantly oscillated along the diurnal/cell cycles, and those included 780 and 147 genes for putative plastid and nucleomorph-targeted proteins, respectively. Clustering analysis of those genes revealed the existence of transcriptional networks related to specific biological processes such as photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, translation, and DNA replication. Interestingly, transcripts of many plastid-targeted proteins in B. natans were induced before dawn, unlike other photosynthetic organisms. In contrast to nuclear genes, 99% nucleomorph genes were found to be constitutively expressed during the cycles. We also found that the nucleomorph DNA replication would be controlled by a nucleus-encoded viral-like DNA polymerase. The results of this study suggest that nucleomorph genes have lost transcriptional regulation along the diurnal cycles, and nuclear genes exert control over the complex plastid including the nucleomorph. PMID:27503292

  1. The homeobox transcription factor Even-skipped regulates acquisition of electrical properties in Drosophila neurons

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    Brand Andrea H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While developmental processes such as axon pathfinding and synapse formation have been characterized in detail, comparatively less is known of the intrinsic developmental mechanisms that regulate transcription of ion channel genes in embryonic neurons. Early decisions, including motoneuron axon targeting, are orchestrated by a cohort of transcription factors that act together in a combinatorial manner. These transcription factors include Even-skipped (Eve, islet and Lim3. The perdurance of these factors in late embryonic neurons is, however, indicative that they might also regulate additional aspects of neuron development, including the acquisition of electrical properties. Results To test the hypothesis that a combinatorial code transcription factor is also able to influence the acquisition of electrical properties in embryonic neurons we utilized the molecular genetics of Drosophila to manipulate the expression of Eve in identified motoneurons. We show that increasing expression of this transcription factor, in two Eve-positive motoneurons (aCC and RP2, is indeed sufficient to affect the electrical properties of these neurons in early first instar larvae. Specifically, we observed a decrease in both the fast K+ conductance (IKfast and amplitude of quantal cholinergic synaptic input. We used charybdotoxin to pharmacologically separate the individual components of IKfast to show that increased Eve specifically down regulates the Slowpoke (a BK Ca2+-gated potassium channel, but not Shal, component of this current. Identification of target genes for Eve, using DNA adenine methyltransferase identification, revealed strong binding sites in slowpoke and nAcRα-96Aa (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. Verification using real-time PCR shows that pan-neuronal expression of eve is sufficient to repress transcripts for both slo and nAcRα-96Aa. Conclusion Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Eve

  2. Observation of Transcription Regulation in the Mouse Heart Nuclear DNA Fragments and the Specific-protein Interaction by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using atom force microscopy (AFM), in vitro transcription, PAGE and other experimental technologies, it is observed that, in active genes of mice (Balb/c) nuclear DNA fragments of non-transcriptional state, only regulation sequences at both ends are associated with scaffold proteins (indissociable proteins) and some transcriptional factors such as complexes (dissociable proteins) made of gene-coding proteins and specific auxiliary small molecules, while there are no combining proteins in intermediate coding sequences. However, in active genes of transcriptional state, both regulation sequences and intermediate coding sequences are associated with active transcriptional factors by non-covalent bonds.This paper shows the prospective application of AFM observation and in vitro transcription in the research on gene expression and regulation. It also offers some theoretical basis for localization of specific genes in human genomes.

  3. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  4. Multiple oxygen tension environments reveal diverse patterns of transcriptional regulation in primary astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Chadwick

    Full Text Available The central nervous system normally functions at O(2 levels which would be regarded as hypoxic by most other tissues. However, most in vitro studies of neurons and astrocytes are conducted under hyperoxic conditions without consideration of O(2-dependent cellular adaptation. We analyzed the reactivity of astrocytes to 1, 4 and 9% O(2 tensions compared to the cell culture standard of 20% O(2, to investigate their ability to sense and translate this O(2 information to transcriptional activity. Variance of ambient O(2 tension for rat astrocytes resulted in profound changes in ribosomal activity, cytoskeletal and energy-regulatory mechanisms and cytokine-related signaling. Clustering of transcriptional regulation patterns revealed four distinct response pattern groups that directionally pivoted around the 4% O(2 tension, or demonstrated coherent ascending/decreasing gene expression patterns in response to diverse oxygen tensions. Immune response and cell cycle/cancer-related signaling pathway transcriptomic subsets were significantly activated with increasing hypoxia, whilst hemostatic and cardiovascular signaling mechanisms were attenuated with increasing hypoxia. Our data indicate that variant O(2 tensions induce specific and physiologically-focused transcript regulation patterns that may underpin important physiological mechanisms that connect higher neurological activity to astrocytic function and ambient oxygen environments. These strongly defined patterns demonstrate a strong bias for physiological transcript programs to pivot around the 4% O(2 tension, while uni-modal programs that do not, appear more related to pathological actions. The functional interaction of these transcriptional 'programs' may serve to regulate the dynamic vascular responsivity of the central nervous system during periods of stress or heightened activity.

  5. The role of master regulators in the metabolic/transcriptional coupling in breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Baca-López

    Full Text Available Metabolic transformations have been reported as involved in neoplasms survival. This suggests a role of metabolic pathways as potential cancer pharmacological targets. Modulating tumor's energy production pathways may become a substantial research area for cancer treatment. The significant role of metabolic deregulation as inducing transcriptional instabilities and consequently whole-system failure, is thus of foremost importance. By using a data integration approach that combines experimental evidence for high-throughput genome wide gene expression, a non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis, nonlinear correlation networks as well as database mining, we were able to outline the role that transcription factors MEF2C and MNDA may have as main master regulators in primary breast cancer phenomenology, as well as the possible interrelationship between malignancy and metabolic dysfunction. The present findings are supported by the analysis of 1191 whole genome gene expression experiments, as well as probabilistic inference of gene regulatory networks, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of such data. Other evidence sources include pathway enrichment and gene set enrichment analyses, as well as motif comparison with a comprehensive gene regulatory network (of homologue genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our key finding is that the non-equilibrium free energies provide a realistic description of transcription factor activation that when supplemented with gene regulatory networks made us able to find deregulated pathways. These analyses also suggest a novel potential role of transcription factor energetics at the onset of primary tumor development. Results are important in the molecular systems biology of cancer field, since deregulation and coupling mechanisms between metabolic activity and transcriptional regulation can be better understood by taking into account the way that master regulators respond to physicochemical constraints imposed by different

  6. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  7. Down-regulation of EPHX2 gene transcription by Sp1 under high-glucose conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Oida, Shoko; Imaoka, Susumu

    2015-09-15

    sEH (soluble epoxide hydrolase), which is encoded by the EPHX2 gene, regulates the actions of bioactive lipids, EETs (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids). Previously, we found that high-glucose-induced oxidative stress suppressed sEH levels in a hepatocarcinoma cell line (Hep3B) and sEH was decreased in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms underlying EPHX2 transcriptional suppression under high-glucose conditions. The decrease in sEH was prevented by an Sp1 (specificity protein 1) inhibitor, mithramycin A, and overexpression or knockdown of Sp1 revealed that Sp1 suppressively regulated sEH expression, in contrast with the general role of Sp1 on transcriptional activation. In addition, we found that AP2α (activating protein 2α) promoted EPHX2 transcription. The nuclear transport of Sp1, but not that of AP2α, was increased under high glucose concomitantly with the decrease in sEH. Within the EPHX2 promoter -56/+32, five Sp1-binding sites were identified, and the mutation of each of these sites showed that the first one (SP1_1) was important in both suppression by Sp1 and activation by AP2α. Furthermore, overexpression of Sp1 diminished the binding of AP2α by DNA-affinity precipitation assay and ChIP, suggesting competition between Sp1 and AP2α on the EPHX2 promoter. These findings provide novel insights into the role of Sp1 in transcriptional suppression, which may be applicable to the transcriptional regulation of other genes.

  8. Bidirectional regulation between WDR83 and its natural antisense transcript DHPS in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Yu Su; Xuan Kong; Qin-Yan Gao; Li-Ping Wei; Jing-Yuan Fang; Jiong-Tang Li; Yun Cui; Jie Hong; Wan Du; Ying-Chao Wang; Yan-Wei Lin; Hua Xiong; Ji-Lin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) exist ubiquitously in mammalian genomes and play roles in the regulation of gene expression.However,both the existence of bidirectional antisense RNA regulation and the possibility of proteincoding genes that function as antisense RNAs remain speculative.Here,we found that the protein-coding gene,deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS),as the NAT of WDR83,concordantly regulated the expression of WDR83 mRNA and protein.Conversely,WDR83 also regulated DHPS by antisense pairing in a concordant manner.WDR83 and DHPS were capable of forming an RNA duplex at overlapping 3′ untranslated regions and this duplex increased their mutual stability,which was required for the bidirectional regulation.As a pair of protein-coding cis-sense/antisense transcripts,WDR83 and DHPS were upregulated simultaneously and correlated positively in gastric cancer (GC),driving GC pathophysiology by promoting cell proliferation.Furthermore,the positive relationship between WDR83 and DHPS was also observed in other cancers.The bidirectional regulatory relationship between WDR83 and DHPS not only enriches our understanding of antisense regulation,but also provides a more complete understanding of their functions in tumor development.

  9. The transcriptional coactivator Cbp regulates self-renewal and differentiation in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai-In; Hannah, Rebecca L; Dawson, Mark A; Pridans, Clare; Foster, Donna; Joshi, Anagha; Göttgens, Berthold; Van Deursen, Jan M; Huntly, Brian J P

    2011-12-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Cbp plays an important role in a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although studies have shown its requirement for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, its role in adult HSC maintenance, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Cbp function, is not clear. Here, we demonstrate a gradual loss of phenotypic HSCs and differentiation defects following conditional ablation of Cbp during adult homeostasis. In addition, Cbp-deficient HSCs reconstituted hematopoiesis with lower efficiency than their wild-type counterparts, and this response was readily exhausted under replicative stress. This phenotype relates to an alteration in cellular fate decisions for HSCs, with Cbp loss leading to an increase in differentiation, quiescence, and apoptosis. Genome-wide analyses of Cbp occupancy and differential gene expression upon Cbp deletion identified HSC-specific genes regulated by Cbp, providing a molecular basis for the phenotype. Finally, Cbp binding significantly overlapped at genes combinatorially bound by 7 major hematopoietic transcriptional regulators, linking Cbp to a critical HSC transcriptional regulatory network. Our data demonstrate that Cbp plays a role in adult HSC homeostasis by maintaining the balance between different HSC fate decisions, and our findings identify a putative HSC-specific transcriptional network coordinated by Cbp.

  10. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  11. Transcriptional regulation induced by cAMP elevation in mouse Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schmid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be modulated by forskolin. One of the strongest differentially regulated gene transcripts was the transcription factor Olig1 (oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1, whose mRNA expression levels were reduced in treated Schwann cells. Olig1 protein was localized in myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells within the sciatic nerve as well as in primary Schwann cells, proposing it as a novel transcription factor of the Schwann cell lineage. Data analysis further revealed that a number of differentially expressed genes in forskolin-treated Schwann cells were associated with the ECM (extracellular matrix, underlining its importance during Schwann cell differentiation in vitro. Comparison of samples derived from postnatal sciatic nerves and from both treated and untreated Schwann cell cultures showed considerable differences in gene expression between in vivo and in vitro, allowing us to separate Schwann cell autonomous from tissue-related changes. The whole data set of the cell culture microarray study is provided to offer an interactive search tool for genes of interest.

  12. Utrophin up-regulation by an artificial transcription factor in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Mattei

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle degenerative disease, due to absence of dystrophin. There is currently no effective treatment for DMD. Our aim is to up-regulate the expression level of the dystrophin related gene utrophin in DMD, complementing in this way the lack of dystrophin functions. To this end we designed and engineered several synthetic zinc finger based transcription factors. In particular, we have previously shown that the artificial three zinc finger protein named Jazz, fused with the appropriate effector domain, is able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the utrophin promoter "A". Here we report on the characterization of Vp16-Jazz-transgenic mice that specifically over-express the utrophin gene at the muscular level. A Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP demonstrated the effective access/binding of the Jazz protein to active chromatin in mouse muscle and Vp16-Jazz was shown to be able to up-regulate endogenous utrophin gene expression by immunohistochemistry, western blot analyses and real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a transgenic mouse expressing an artificial gene coding for a zinc finger based transcription factor. The achievement of Vp16-Jazz transgenic mice validates the strategy of transcriptional targeting of endogenous genes and could represent an exclusive animal model for use in drug discovery and therapeutics.

  13. IscR regulates RNase LS activity by repressing rnlA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Miki, Kumiko; Koga, Mitsunori; Katayama, Natsu; Morimoto, Wakako; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yonesaki, Tetsuro

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease LS was originally identified as a potential antagonist of bacteriophage T4. When the T4 dmd gene is defective, RNase LS cleaves T4 mRNAs and antagonizes T4 reproduction. This RNase also plays an important role in RNA metabolisms in E. coli. rnlA is an essential gene for RNase LS activity, but the transcriptional regulation of this gene remains to be elucidated. An Fe-S cluster protein, IscR, acts as a transcription factor and controls the expression of genes that are necessary for Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Here, we report that overexpression of IscR suppressed RNase LS activity, causing the loss of antagonist activity against phage T4. This suppressive effect did not require the ligation of Fe-S cluster into IscR. beta-Galactosidase reporter assays showed that transcription from an rnlA promoter increased in iscR-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells, and gel-mobility shift assays revealed specific binding of IscR to the rnlA promoter region. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that endogenous rnlA mRNA was reduced by overexpression of IscR and increased by deletion of iscR. From these results, we conclude that IscR negatively regulates transcription of rnlA and represses RNase LS activity.

  14. Mechanism of CREB recognition and coactivation by the CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator CRTC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qianyi; Viste, Kristin; Urday-Zaa, Janny Concha; Senthil Kumar, Ganesan; Tsai, Wen-Wei; Talai, Afsaneh; Mayo, Kelly E; Montminy, Marc; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2012-12-18

    Basic leucine zipper (bZip) transcription factors regulate cellular gene expression in response to a variety of extracellular signals and nutrient cues. Although the bZip domain is widely known to play significant roles in DNA binding and dimerization, recent studies point to an additional role for this motif in the recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus. For example, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC) family of transcriptional coactivators has been proposed to promote the expression of calcium and cAMP responsive genes, by binding to the CREB bZip in response to extracellular signals. Here we show that the CREB-binding domain (CBD) of CRTC2 folds into a single isolated 28-residue helix that seems to be critical for its interaction with the CREB bZip. The interaction is of micromolar affinity on palindromic and variant half-site cAMP response elements (CREs). The CBD and CREB assemble on the CRE with 2:2:1 stoichiometry, consistent with the presence of one CRTC binding site on each CREB monomer. Indeed, the CBD helix and the solvent-exposed residues in the dimeric CREB bZip coiled-coil form an extended protein-protein interface. Because mutation of relevant bZip residues in this interface disrupts the CRTC interaction without affecting DNA binding, our results illustrate that distinct DNA binding and transactivation functions are encoded within the structural constraints of a canonical bZip domain.

  15. Transcription regulates HIF-1α expression in CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Thomas; Bollinger, Annalena; Gies, Sydney; Feldhoff, Lea; Solbach, Werner; Rupp, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediates the metabolic adaptation of cells to hypoxia and T-helper cell fate. However, HIF-1α regulation in CD4(+) T cells (T cells) remains elusive. Here we observed that depletion of oxygen (O2⩽2%) alone was not sufficient to induce HIF-1α expression in T cells. However, when hypoxic T cells were stimulated, HIF-1α was expressed and this was dependent on nuclear factor-κB- and nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT)-mediated transcriptional upregulation of Hif-1α mRNA. HIF-1α upregulation could be blocked by drugs inhibiting NF-κB, NFAT or mammalian target of rapamycin precluding CD4(+) T-cell stimulation or translation in T cells, as well as by blocking transcription. CD3, CD28, phorbol-12-myristat-13-acetat (PMA) or ionomycin-stimulated T cells did not express HIF-1α under normoxic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of HIF-1α expression in CD4(+) T cells in hypoxia gravely relies on its transcriptional upregulation and subsequent enhanced protein stabilization. PMID:26150319

  16. Hippo Component TAZ Functions as a Co-repressor and Negatively Regulates ΔNp63 Transcription through TEA Domain (TEAD) Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Sama, Ivette; Zhao, Yulei; Lai, Dulcie; Janse van Rensburg, Helena J; Hao, Yawei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-07-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ binding domain (TAZ) is a WW domain-containing transcriptional co-activator and a core component of an emerging Hippo signaling pathway that regulates organ size, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. TAZ regulates these biological functions by up-regulating downstream cellular genes through transactivation of transcription factors such as TEAD and TTF1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TAZ-induced tumorigenesis, we have recently performed a gene expression profile analysis by overexpressing TAZ in mammary cells. In addition to the TAZ-up-regulated genes that were confirmed in our previous studies, we identified a large number of cellular genes that were down-regulated by TAZ. In this study, we have confirmed these down-regulated genes (including cytokines, chemokines, and p53 gene family members) as bona fide downstream transcriptional targets of TAZ. By using human breast and lung epithelial cells, we have further characterized ΔNp63, a p53 gene family member, and shown that TAZ suppresses ΔNp63 mRNA, protein expression, and promoter activity through interaction with the transcription factor TEAD. We also show that TEAD can inhibit ΔNp63 promoter activity and that TAZ can directly interact with ΔNp63 promoter-containing TEAD binding sites. Finally, we provide functional evidence that down-regulation of ΔNp63 by TAZ may play a role in regulating cell migration. Altogether, this study provides novel evidence that the Hippo component TAZ can function as a co-repressor and regulate biological functions by negatively regulating downstream cellular genes.

  17. Gibberellic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bastian, René

    2010-03-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3\\',5\\'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. © 2010 Landes Bioscience.

  18. Regulation of rDNA transcription in response to growth factors, nutrients and energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnadi, Eric P; Hannan, Katherine M; Hicks, Rodney J; Hannan, Ross D; Pearson, Richard B; Kang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Exquisite control of ribosome biogenesis is fundamental for the maintenance of cellular growth and proliferation. Importantly, synthesis of ribosomal RNA by RNA polymerase I is a key regulatory step in ribosome biogenesis and a major biosynthetic and energy consuming process. Consequently, ribosomal RNA gene transcription is tightly coupled to the availability of growth factors, nutrients and energy. Thus cells have developed an intricate sensing network to monitor the cellular environment and modulate ribosomal DNA transcription accordingly. Critical controllers in these sensing networks, which mediate growth factor activation of ribosomal DNA transcription, include the PI3K/AKT/mTORC1, RAS/RAF/ERK pathways and MYC transcription factor. mTORC1 also responds to amino acids and energy status, making it a key hub linking all three stimuli to the regulation of ribosomal DNA transcription, although this is achieved via overlapping and distinct mechanisms. This review outlines the current knowledge of how cells respond to environmental cues to control ribosomal RNA synthesis. We also highlight the critical points within this network that are providing new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancers through modulation of RNA polymerase I activity and potential novel imaging strategies.

  19. Ethanol sensitivity: a central role for CREB transcription regulation in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswal Shyam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lowered sensitivity to the effects of ethanol increases the risk of developing alcoholism. Inbred mouse strains have been useful for the study of the genetic basis of various drug addiction-related phenotypes. Inbred Long-Sleep (ILS and Inbred Short-Sleep (ISS mice differentially express a number of genes thought to be implicated in sensitivity to the effects of ethanol. Concomitantly, there is evidence for a mediating role of cAMP/PKA/CREB signalling in aspects of alcoholism modelled in animals. In this report, the extent to which CREB signalling impacts the differential expression of genes in ILS and ISS mouse cerebella is examined. Results A training dataset for Machine Learning (ML and Exploratory Data Analyses (EDA was generated from promoter region sequences of a set of genes known to be targets of CREB transcription regulation and a set of genes whose transcription regulations are potentially CREB-independent. For each promoter sequence, a vector of size 132, with elements characterizing nucleotide composition features was generated. Genes whose expressions have been previously determined to be increased in ILS or ISS cerebella were identified, and their CREB regulation status predicted using the ML scheme C4.5. The C4.5 learning scheme was used because, of four ML schemes evaluated, it had the lowest predicted error rate. On an independent evaluation set of 21 genes of known CREB regulation status, C4.5 correctly classified 81% of instances with F-measures of 0.87 and 0.67 respectively for the CREB-regulated and CREB-independent classes. Additionally, six out of eight genes previously determined by two independent microarray platforms to be up-regulated in the ILS or ISS cerebellum were predicted by C4.5 to be transcriptionally regulated by CREB. Furthermore, 64% and 52% of a cross-section of other up-regulated cerebellar genes in ILS and ISS mice, respectively, were deemed to be CREB-regulated. Conclusion These

  20. Regulation of nucleolus assembly by non-coding RNA polymerase II transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-05-01

    The nucleolus is a nuclear subcompartment for tightly regulated rRNA production and ribosome subunit biogenesis. It also acts as a cellular stress sensor and can release enriched factors in response to cellular stimuli. Accordingly, the content and structure of the nucleolus change dynamically, which is particularly evident during cell cycle progression: the nucleolus completely disassembles during mitosis and reassembles in interphase. Although the mechanisms that drive nucleolar (re)organization have been the subject of a number of studies, they are only partly understood. Recently, we identified Alu element-containing RNA polymerase II transcripts (aluRNAs) as important for nucleolar structure and rRNA synthesis. Integrating these findings with studies on the liquid droplet-like nature of the nucleolus leads us to propose a model on how RNA polymerase II transcripts could regulate the assembly of the nucleolus in response to external stimuli and during cell cycle progression.

  1. CaSfl1 plays a dual role in transcriptional regulation in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TingTing; LI Di; LI WanJie; WANG Yue; SANG JianLi

    2008-01-01

    As a newly identified transcription factor in Candida albcians, CaSfl1 has been shown to be involved in cell flocculation and filamentation and in the negative regulation of several genes involved in hyphal growth. In this study, we constructed Casfl1△/△ mutants and confirmed that deletion of this gene in-deed affected cell flocculation and filamentation. In addition, by RT-PCR we found that while Casfl1 repressed the expression of several hypha-specific genes including HWP1, ECE1, ALS1, ALS3, and FL08, it strongly activated the expression of the heat-shock protein genes HSP30 and HSP90 under certain stress conditions. Therefore, we propose that CaSfl1 can act as both positive and negative regulators, thereby playing a dual role in transcriptional controls in Candida albicans.

  2. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1: important roles in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhan-Cheng; Wang, Chuang; Wang, Qin-Wen; Zhang, Jun-Fang

    2015-04-25

    The cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator, CRTC (also known as transducer of regulated CREB, TORC), is identified as a potent modulator of cAMP response element (CRE)-driven gene transcription. The CRTC family consists of three members (CRTC1-3), among which the CRTC1 shows the highest expression in the brain. Several studies have demonstrated that the CRTC1 plays critical roles in neuronal dendritic growth, long-term synaptic plasticity, memory consolidation and reconsolidation etc., whereas dysfunction of CRTC1 is mainly involved in neurodegenerative disorders. In light of these findings, we aim to review recent research reports that indicate the CRTC1 dysfunction and its underlying mechanisms in the neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) and Estrogen Related Receptor α (ERRα) are both transcriptional regulators of the Runx2-I isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Martial; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Stauffer, Daniela; Delhon, Isabelle; Seltenmeyer, Yves; Fournier, Brigitte

    2013-04-30

    Runx2 is a master regulator of bone development and has also been described as an oncogene. Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) and Estrogen Related Receptor α (ERRα), both implicated in bone metabolism and breast cancer, have been shown to share common transcriptional targets. Here, we show that ERα is a positive regulator of Runx2-I transcription. Moreover, ERRα can act as a transcriptional activator of Runx2-I in presence of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α). In contrast, ERRα behaves as a negative regulator of Runx2-I transcription in presence of PGC-1β. ERα and ERRα cross-talk via a common estrogen receptor response element on the Runx2-I promoter. In addition, estrogen regulates PGC-1β that in turn is able to modulate both ERα and ERRα transcriptional activity.

  4. Structural Determinants of DNA Binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 Transcriptional Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel (Princeton); (UW-MED)

    2010-11-05

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan Apetala2 (AP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical Apicomplexan AP2 protein, PF14{_}0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a {beta}-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent {alpha}-helix supports the {beta}-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the {alpha}-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the {beta}-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14{_}0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multisite binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14{_}0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation.

  5. STAT3 is a key transcriptional regulator of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Sarani; Fuchs, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) marker CD133 was found to be upregulated in many cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanism of CD133 regulation in the liver tumor microenvironment has remained elusive. In this study Won and colleagues report that interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) signaling and hypoxia enhance the expression of CD133 and promote the progression of HCC. PMID:27275460

  6. Crystal structure of the BTB domain from the LRF/ZBTB7 transcriptional regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Peter J. Stogios; Chen, Lu; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2007-01-01

    BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF) proteins are transcription regulators with roles in development, differentiation, and oncogenesis. In these proteins, the BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a protein–protein interaction motif that contains a dimerization interface, a possible oligomerization surface, and surfaces for interactions with other factors, including nuclear co-repressors and histone deacetylases. The BTB-ZF protein LRF (also known as ZBTB7, FBI-1, OCZF, and Pokemon) is a master re...

  7. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates domain-specific inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Bloodgood, Brenda L.; Sharma, Nikhil; Browne, Heidi Adlman; Trepman, Alissa Z.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    A heterogeneous population of inhibitory neurons controls the flow of information through a neural circuit1–3. Inhibitory synapses that form on pyramidal neuron dendrites modulate the summation of excitatory synaptic potentials4–6 and prevent the generation of dendritic calcium spikes7,8. Precisely timed somatic inhibition limits both the number of action potentials and the time window during which firing can occur8,9. The activity-dependent transcription factor NPAS4 regulates inhibitory syn...

  8. REST Regulates DYRK1A Transcription in a Negative Feedback Loop*

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Mei; Zheng, Lanlan; Han, Bo; Wang, Luanluan; Wang, Pin; Liu, Heng; Sun, Xiulian

    2011-01-01

    DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) has been shown to be involved in learning and memory impairments in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. As a homolog of Drosophila minibrain gene, DYRK1A also plays important roles in neurodevelopment; however, the function and regulatory mechanism of DYRK1A in neurodevelopment remain elusive. REST (RE1 silencing transcription factor) plays vital roles in neuronal differentiation. Here, we found that REST can activate DYR...

  9. The Adipocyte-Expressed Forkhead Transcription Factor Foxc2 Regulates Metabolism Through Altered Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Lidell, Martin E.; Seifert, Erin L.; Westergren, Rickard; Heglind, Mikael; Gowing, Adrienne; Sukonina, Valentina; Arani, Zahra; Itkonen, Paula; Wallin, Simonetta; Westberg, Fredrik; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Laakso, Markku; Nilsson, Tommy; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous findings demonstrate that enhanced expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxc2 in adipose tissue leads to a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. These findings prompted us to further investigate the role of Foxc2 in the regulation of genes of fundamental importance for metabolism and mitochondrial function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of Foxc2 on expression of genes involved in mitochondriogenesis and mitochondrial function were assessed by quantitati...

  10. Transcription Factors Foxi3 and Sox2 in the Regulation of Tooth Development

    OpenAIRE

    Jussila, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are ectodermal organs, which form from the embryonic epithelium and mesenchyme. Reciprocal interactions between these two tissues, regulated by the conserved signaling pathways, guide tooth morphogenesis. Activity of each signaling pathway is mediated by transcription factors, which activate or repress target genes of the pathway. During morphogenesis, the shape of the dental epithelium undergoes dramatic changes as it proceeds though placode, bud, and cap stages, finally forming the sh...

  11. Zinc finger transcription factors displaced SREBP proteins as the major Sterol regulators during Saccharomycotina evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Maguire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs, which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1 and C. albicans (Cph2 have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1 and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina.

  12. Human Maf1 negatively regulates RNA Polymerase III transcription via the TFIIB family members Brf1 and Brf2

    OpenAIRE

    Rollins, Janet; Veras, Ingrid; Cabarcas, Stephanie; Willis, Ian; Schramm, Laura

    2007-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNA pol III) transcribes many of the small structural RNA molecules involved in processing and translation, thereby regulating the growth rate of a cell. Initiation of pol III transcription requires the evolutionarily conserved pol III initiation factor TFIIIB. TFIIIB is the molecular target of regulation by tumor suppressors, including p53, RB and the RB-related pocket proteins. However, our understanding of negative regulation of human TFIIIB-mediated transcription by ot...

  13. Integration of Multiple Nutrient Cues and Regulation of Lifespan by Ribosomal Transcription Factor Ifh1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome biogenesis requires an enormous commitment of energy and resources in growing cells. In budding yeast, the transcriptional coactivator Ifh1p is an essential regulator of ribosomal protein (RP gene transcription. Here, we report that Ifh1p is dynamically acetylated and phosphorylated as a function of the growth state of cells. Ifh1p is acetylated at numerous sites in its N-terminal region by Gcn5p and deacetylated by NAD+-dependent deacetylases of the sirtuin family. Acetylation of Ifh1p is responsive to intracellular acetyl-CoA levels and serves to regulate the stability of Ifh1p. The phosphorylation of Ifh1p is mediated by protein kinase A and is dependent on TORC1 signaling. Thus, multiple nutrient-sensing mechanisms converge on Ifh1p. However, instead of modulating overall rates of RP gene transcription or cell growth, the nutrient-responsive phosphorylation of Ifh1p plays a more prominent role in the regulation of cellular replicative lifespan.

  14. Nuclear localization signal in a cancer-related transcriptional regulator protein NAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kosuke; Nakayama, Naomi; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Kohji; Maruyama, Riruke; Kato, Hiroaki; Kosugi, Shunichi; Urano, Takeshi; Sakashita, Gyosuke

    2012-10-01

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) might have potential oncogenic properties and participate in regulatory networks for pluripotency. Although NAC1 is described as a transcriptional regulator, the nuclear import machinery of NAC1 remains unclear. We found, using a point mutant, that dimer formation was not committed to the nuclear localization of NAC1 and, using deletion mutants, that the amino-terminal half of NAC1 harbored a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS). Wild type, but not mutants of this region, alone was sufficient to drive the importation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the nucleus. Bimax1, a synthetic peptide that blocks the importin α/β pathway, impaired nuclear localization of NAC1 in cells. We also used the binding properties of importin to demonstrate that this region is an NLS. Furthermore, the transcriptional regulator function of NAC1 was dependent on its nuclear localization activity in cells. Taken together, these results show that the region with a bipartite motif constitutes a functional nuclear import sequence in NAC1 that is independent of NAC1 dimer formation. The identification of an NAC1 NLS thus clarifies the mechanism through which NAC1 translocates to the nucleus to regulate the transcription of genes involved in oncogenicity and pluripotency.

  15. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  16. Autopalmitoylation of TEAD proteins regulates transcriptional output of the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, PuiYee; Han, Xiao; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Yu, Jianzhong; Jarugumilli, Gopala K; Deng, Hua; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian; Wu, Xu

    2016-04-01

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors bind to the coactivators YAP and TAZ and regulate the transcriptional output of the Hippo pathway, playing critical roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Protein S-palmitoylation attaches a fatty acid, palmitate, to cysteine residues and regulates protein trafficking, membrane localization and signaling activities. Using activity-based chemical probes, we discovered that human TEADs possess intrinsic palmitoylating enzyme-like activities and undergo autopalmitoylation at evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues under physiological conditions. We determined the crystal structures of lipid-bound TEADs and found that the lipid chain of palmitate inserts into a conserved deep hydrophobic pocket. Strikingly, palmitoylation did not alter TEAD's localization, but it was required for TEAD's binding to YAP and TAZ and was dispensable for its binding to the Vgll4 tumor suppressor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient TEAD mutants impaired TAZ-mediated muscle differentiation in vitro and tissue overgrowth mediated by the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie in vivo. Our study directly links autopalmitoylation to the transcriptional regulation of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26900866

  17. Nuclear glycolytic enzyme enolase of Toxoplasma gondii functions as a transcriptional regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mouveaux

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii have complex life cycles within different hosts and their infectivity relies on their capacity to regulate gene expression. However, little is known about the nuclear factors that regulate gene expression in these pathogens. Here, we report that T. gondii enolase TgENO2 is targeted to the nucleus of actively replicating parasites, where it specifically binds to nuclear chromatin in vivo. Using a ChIP-Seq technique, we provide evidence for TgENO2 enrichment at the 5' untranslated gene regions containing the putative promoters of 241 nuclear genes. Ectopic expression of HA-tagged TgENO1 or TgENO2 led to changes in transcript levels of numerous gene targets. Targeted disruption of TgENO1 gene results in a decrease in brain cyst burden of chronically infected mice and in changes in transcript levels of several nuclear genes. Complementation of this knockout mutant with ectopic TgENO1-HA fully restored normal transcript levels. Our findings reveal that enolase functions extend beyond glycolytic activity and include a direct role in coordinating gene regulation in T. gondii.

  18. Nuclear glycolytic enzyme enolase of Toxoplasma gondii functions as a transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouveaux, Thomas; Oria, Gabrielle; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Slomianny, Christian; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii have complex life cycles within different hosts and their infectivity relies on their capacity to regulate gene expression. However, little is known about the nuclear factors that regulate gene expression in these pathogens. Here, we report that T. gondii enolase TgENO2 is targeted to the nucleus of actively replicating parasites, where it specifically binds to nuclear chromatin in vivo. Using a ChIP-Seq technique, we provide evidence for TgENO2 enrichment at the 5' untranslated gene regions containing the putative promoters of 241 nuclear genes. Ectopic expression of HA-tagged TgENO1 or TgENO2 led to changes in transcript levels of numerous gene targets. Targeted disruption of TgENO1 gene results in a decrease in brain cyst burden of chronically infected mice and in changes in transcript levels of several nuclear genes. Complementation of this knockout mutant with ectopic TgENO1-HA fully restored normal transcript levels. Our findings reveal that enolase functions extend beyond glycolytic activity and include a direct role in coordinating gene regulation in T. gondii. PMID:25153525

  19. Sucrose regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase subunit genes transcript levels in leaves and fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Xing, Jinpeng; Gianfagna, Thomas J.; Janes, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase, EC2.7.7.27) is a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. The enzyme is a heterotetramer with two S and two B subunits. In tomato, there are three multiple forms of the S subunit gene. Agp S1, S2 and B are highly expressed in fruit from 10 to 25 days after anthesis. Agp S3 is only weakly expressed in fruit. Sucrose significantly elevates expression of Agp S1, S2 and B in both leaves and fruits. Agp S1 exhibits the highest degree of regulation by sucrose. In fact, sucrose may be required for Agp S1 expression. For excised leaves incubated in water, no transcripts for Agp S1 could be detected in the absence of sucrose, whereas it took up to 16 h in water before transcripts were no longer detectable for Agp S2 and B. Neither Agp S3 nor the tubulin gene is affected by sucrose, demonstrating that this response is specifically regulated by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and is not due to a general increase in metabolism caused by sucrose treatment. Truncated versions of the promoter for Agp S1 indicate that a specific region 1.3-3.0 kb upstream from the transcription site is responsible for sucrose sensitivity. This region of the S1 promoter contains several cis-acting elements present in the promoters of other genes that are also regulated by sucrose. c2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. LARP1 post-transcriptionally regulates mTOR and contributes to cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, M; Hopkins, T G; Michael, T; Abd-Latip, N; Weir, J; Aboagye, E; Mauri, F; Jameson, C; Sturge, J; Gabra, H; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; Curry, E; Blagden, S P

    2015-09-24

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to and post-transcriptionally regulate the stability of mRNAs. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) is a conserved RBP that interacts with poly-A-binding protein and is known to regulate 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) mRNA translation. Here, we show that LARP1 is complexed to 3000 mRNAs enriched for cancer pathways. A prominent member of the LARP1 interactome is mTOR whose mRNA transcript is stabilized by LARP1. At a functional level, we show that LARP1 promotes cell migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that LARP1 expression is elevated in epithelial cancers such as cervical and non-small cell lung cancers, where its expression correlates with disease progression and adverse prognosis, respectively. We therefore conclude that, through the post-transcriptional regulation of genes such as mTOR within cancer pathways, LARP1 contributes to cancer progression. PMID:25531318

  1. Situational Awareness: Regulation of the Myb Transcription Factor in Differentiation, the Cell Cycle and Oncogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Olivia L.; Ness, Scott A., E-mail: sness@salud.unm.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Molecular Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, MSC07 4025-CRF 121, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    This review summarizes the mechanisms that control the activity of the c-Myb transcription factor in normal cells and tumors, and discusses how c-Myb plays a role in the regulation of the cell cycle. Oncogenic versions of c-Myb contribute to the development of leukemias and solid tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, breast cancer and colon cancer. The activity and specificity of the c-Myb protein seems to be controlled through changes in protein-protein interactions, so understanding how it is regulated could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Computational characterization of modes of transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear receptors are a large structural class of transcription factors that act with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. They are activated through the binding of small ligands, which can be replaced by drug molecules, making nuclear receptors promising drug targets. Transcriptional regulation of the genes that encode them is central to gaining a deeper understanding of the diversity of their biochemical and biophysical roles and their role in disease and therapy. Even though they share evolutionary history, nuclear receptor genes have fundamentally different expression patterns, ranging from ubiquitously expressed to tissue-specific and spatiotemporally complex. However, current understanding of regulation in nuclear receptor gene family is still nascent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigate the relationship between long-range regulation of nuclear receptor family and their known functionality. Towards this goal, we identify the nuclear receptor genes that are potential targets based on counts of highly conserved non-coding elements. We validate our results using publicly available expression (RNA-seq and histone modification (ChIP-seq data from the ENCODE project. We find that nuclear receptor genes involved in developmental roles show strong evidence of long-range mechanism of transcription regulation with distinct cis-regulatory content they feature clusters of highly conserved non-coding elements distributed in regions spanning several Megabases, long and multiple CpG islands, bivalent promoter marks and statistically significant higher enrichment of enhancer mark around their gene loci. On the other hand nuclear receptor genes that are involved in tissue-specific roles lack these features, having simple transcriptional controls and a greater variety of mechanisms for producing paralogs. We

  3. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas El Sahili

    Full Text Available Quorum-quenching (QQ are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL. Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  4. Regulation of Nox enzymes expression in vascular pathophysiology: Focusing on transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona-Adriana Manea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases (Nox represent a family of hetero-oligomeric enzymes whose exclusive biological function is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Nox-derived ROS are essential modulators of signal transduction pathways that control key physiological activities such as cell growth, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis, immune responses, and biochemical pathways. Enhanced formation of Nox-derived ROS, which is generally associated with the up-regulation of different Nox subtypes, has been established in various pathologies, namely cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The detrimental effects of Nox-derived ROS are related to alterations in cell signalling and/or direct irreversible oxidative damage of nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Thus, understanding of transcriptional regulation mechanisms of Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in an attempt to find ways to counteract the excessive formation of Nox-derived ROS in various pathological states. Despite the numerous existing data, the molecular pathways responsible for Nox up-regulation are not completely understood. This review article summarizes some of the recent advances and concepts related to the regulation of Nox expression in the vascular pathophysiology. It highlights the role of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms in this process. Identification of the signalling molecules involved in Nox up-regulation, which is associated with the onset and development of cardiovascular dysfunction may contribute to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of Petunia seedlings reveals candidate regulators of the cold stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei eLi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Petunias are important ornamentals with the capacity for cold acclimation. So far, there is limited information concerning gene regulation and signaling pathways related to the cold stress response in petunias. A custom-designed petunia microarray representing 24816 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in petunia seedlings subjected to cold at 2°C for 0.5 h, 2 h, 24 h and 5 d. A total of 2071 transcripts displayed differential expression patterns under cold stress, of which 1149 were up-regulated and 922 were down-regulated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis demarcated related biological processes, suggesting a possible link between flavonoid metabolism and plant adaptation to low temperatures. Many novel stress-responsive regulators were revealed, suggesting that diverse regulatory pathways may exist in petunias in addition to the well-characterized CBF pathway. The expression changes of selected genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, weighted gene co-expression network analysis divided the petunia genes on the array into 65 modules that showed high co-expression and identified stress-specific hub genes with high connectivity. Our identification of these transcriptional responses and groups of differentially expressed regulators will facilitate the functional dissection of the molecular mechanism in petunias responding to environment stresses and extend our ability to improve cold tolerance in plants.

  6. Control of the C. albicans cell wall damage response by transcriptional regulator Cas5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall is vital for growth, development, and interaction of cells with their environment. The response to cell wall damage is well understood from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where numerous cell wall integrity (CWI genes are activated by transcription factor ScRlm1. Prior evidence suggests the hypothesis that both response and regulation may be conserved in the major fungal pathogen Candida albicans. We have tested this hypothesis by using a new C. albicans genetic resource: we have screened mutants defective in putative transcription factor genes for sensitivity to the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor caspofungin. We find that the zinc finger protein CaCas5, which lacks a unique ortholog in S. cerevisiae, governs expression of many CWI genes. CaRlm1 has a modest role in this response. The transcriptional coactivator CaAda2 is also required for expression of many CaCas5-dependent genes, as expected if CaCas5 recruits CaAda2 to activate target gene transcription. Many caspofungin-induced C. albicans genes specify endoplasmic reticulum and secretion functions. Such genes are not induced in S. cerevisiae, but promote its growth in caspofungin. We have used a new resource to identify a key C. albicans transcriptional regulator of CWI genes and antifungal sensitivity. Our gene expression findings indicate that both divergent and conserved response genes may have significant functional roles. Our strategy may be broadly useful for identification of pathogen-specific regulatory pathways and critical response genes.

  7. RNA-guided Transcriptional Regulation in Plants via dCas9 Chimeric Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Baazim, Hatoon

    2014-05-01

    Developing targeted genome regulation approaches holds much promise for accelerating trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs)/CRISPR associated (Cas) system provides bacteria and archaea with an adaptive molecular immunity mechanism against invading nucleic acids through phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing purposes across a variety of cell types and organisms. Recently, the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate the expression patterns in bacterial, yeast and human cells. Here, we employed this DNA-targeting system for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based activators and repressors. For example, we fused to the C-terminus of dCas9 with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors, respectively, to generate transcriptional activators, and the SRDX repression domain to generate transcriptional repressor. Our data demonstrate that the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators, guided by gRNAs complementary to promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on episomal targets in plant cells. Moreover, our data suggest that the dCas9:SRDX repressor and the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators are capable of markedly repressing or activating, respectively, the transcription of an endogenous genomic target. Our data indicate that the CRISPR/dCas9:TFs DNA targeting system can be used in plants as a functional genomic tool and for biotechnological applications.

  8. Terminal regions of β-catenin are critical for regulating its adhesion and transcription functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Mohd Saleem; Singh, Paramjeet; Singh, Gurjinder; Jamwal, Gayatri; Hussain, Syed Sajad; Rana, Aarti; Akhter, Yusuf; Monga, Satdarshan P; Dar, Mohd Jamal

    2016-09-01

    β-Catenin, the central molecule of canonical Wnt signaling pathway, has multiple binding partners and performs many roles in the cell. Apart from being a transcriptional activator, β-catenin acts as a crucial effector component of cadherin/catenin complex to physically interact with actin cytoskeleton along with α-catenin and E-cadherin for regulating cell-cell adhesion. Here, we have generated a library of β-catenin point and deletion mutants to delineate regions within β-catenin that are important for α-catenin-β-catenin interaction, nuclear localization, and transcriptional activity of β-catenin. We observed a unique mechanism for nuclear localization of β-catenin and its mutants and show that N-terminal exon-3 region and C-terminal domain of β-catenin are critical for this activity of β-catenin. Furthermore, we show HepG2 cells have high β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity due to the presence of an interstitial deletion at the N-terminal region of β-catenin. Due to this deletion mutant (hereupon called TM), GSK3β and HDAC inhibitors failed to show any impact whereas curcumin significantly inhibited β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity reiterating that TM is primarily responsible for the high transcriptional activity of HepG2 cells. Moreover, we show the recombinant TM does not physically interact with α-catenin, localizes predominantly in the nucleus, and has nearly two-fold higher transcriptional activity than the wildtype β-catenin. PMID:27368802

  9. Distinct and histone-specific modifications mediate positive versus negative transcriptional regulation of TSHalpha promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormonally-regulated histone modifications that govern positive versus negative transcription of target genes are poorly characterized despite their importance for normal and pathological endocrine function. There have been only a few studies examining chromatin modifications on target gene promoters by nuclear hormone receptors. Moreover, these studies have focused on positively-regulated target genes. TSHalpha, a heterodimer partner for thyrotropin (TSH, is secreted by the pituitary gland. T(3 negatively regulates TSHalpha gene expression via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs which belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, whereas thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH positively regulates via the TRH receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied regulation of the TSHalpha gene by cAMP and T(3 using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays in stably-transfected rat pituitary cells containing the human TSHalpha promoter. Interestingly, cAMP selectively increased histone H4 acetylation whereas, as previously reported, T(3 induced histone H3 acetylation. In particular, cAMP increased H4K5 and H4K8 acetylation and decreased H4K20 trimethylation, modifications associated with transcriptional activation. T(3 increased H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation; however, it also decreased H3K27 acetylation and increased H3K27 trimethylation which are associated with transcriptional repression. Of note, cAMP recruited pCREB, CBP/p300, and PCAF to the promoter whereas T(3 caused dissociation of NCoR/SMRT and HDAC3. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant thyroid hormone receptor (TR from a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH led to less T(3-dependent negative regulation and partially blocked histone H3 modifications of the TSHalpha promoter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings show that non-overlapping and specific histone modifications determine positive versus negative

  10. An R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates Eugenol Production in Ripe Strawberry Fruit Receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Puche, Laura; Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco Javier; Boersma, Maaike; Schuurink, Robert C; López-Vidriero, Irene; Solano, Roberto; Franco-Zorrilla, José-Manuel; Caballero, José Luis; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Eugenol is a volatile phenylpropanoid that contributes to flower and ripe fruit scent. In ripe strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit receptacles, eugenol is biosynthesized by eugenol synthase (FaEGS2). However, the transcriptional regulation of this process is still unknown. We have identified and functionally characterized an R2R3 MYB transcription factor (emission of benzenoid II [FaEOBII]) that seems to be the orthologous gene of PhEOBII from Petunia hybrida, which contributes to the regulation of eugenol biosynthesis in petals. The expression of FaEOBII was ripening related and fruit receptacle specific, although high expression values were also found in petals. This expression pattern of FaEOBII correlated with eugenol content in both fruit receptacle and petals. The expression of FaEOBII was repressed by auxins and activated by abscisic acid, in parallel to the ripening process. In ripe strawberry receptacles, where the expression of FaEOBII was silenced, the expression of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase1 and FaEGS2, two structural genes involved in eugenol production, was down-regulated. A subsequent decrease in eugenol content in ripe receptacles was also observed, confirming the involvement of FaEOBII in eugenol metabolism. Additionally, the expression of FaEOBII was under the control of FaMYB10, another R2R3 MYB transcription factor that regulates the early and late biosynthetic genes from the flavonoid/phenylpropanoid pathway. In parallel, the amount of eugenol in FaMYB10-silenced receptacles was also diminished. Taken together, these data indicate that FaEOBII plays a regulating role in the volatile phenylpropanoid pathway gene expression that gives rise to eugenol production in ripe strawberry receptacles.

  11. Regulation by gravity of the transcript levels of MAP65 in azuki bean epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kotake, Toshihisa

    2012-07-01

    Development of a short and thick body by reorientation of cortical microtubules is required for the resistance of plants to the gravitational force. The 65 kDa microtubule-associated protein (MAP65) has microtubule bundling activity and is involved in the reorientation of cortical microtubules. Here, we investigated the relation between the orientation of cortical microtubules and the transcript levels of VaMAP65-1 under centrifugal hypergravity conditions in azuki bean epicotyls. The percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased, in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. The orientation of microtubules was restored to the original direction after removal of the hypergravity stimulus. The transcript level of VaMAP65-1 was down-regulated in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity (R=-0.99). By removal of hypergravity stimulus, expression of VaMAP65-1 was increased to control levels. Strong correlations were observed between the percentage of cells with longitudinal or transverse microtubules and the transcript levels of VaMAP65-1 (R=-0.93, 0.91). These results suggest that down-regulation of VaMAP65-1 expression is involved in the regulation by gravity of the orientation of cortical microtubules in azuki bean epicotyls. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified the down-regulation of expression of VaMAP65-1 gene, suggesting that mechanoreceptors are responsible for regulation by gravity of VaMAP65-1 expression.

  12. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M Hildebrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4 is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4 for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4 misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4 in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4 is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1 nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1 is not required for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1 from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4. Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4. The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation.

  13. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Erica M; Biggins, Sue

    2016-03-01

    The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4) is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4) for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4) misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4) in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4) is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1) nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1) is not required for CENP-A(Cse4) mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1) from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4). Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4). The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4) mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation.

  14. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

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    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  15. The Ets transcription factor EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial cell identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Denise N; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Salmans, Michael L; Gordon, William; Ho, Hsiang; Andersen, Bogi

    2013-11-29

    The cornea is the clear, outermost portion of the eye composed of three layers: an epithelium that provides a protective barrier while allowing transmission of light into the eye, a collagen-rich stroma, and an endothelium monolayer. How cornea development and aging is controlled is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mouse cornea transcriptome from early embryogenesis through aging and compare it with transcriptomes of other epithelial tissues, identifying cornea-enriched genes, pathways, and transcriptional regulators. Additionally, we profiled cornea epithelium and stroma, defining genes enriched in these layers. Over 10,000 genes are differentially regulated in the mouse cornea across the time course, showing dynamic expression during development and modest expression changes in fewer genes during aging. A striking transition time point for gene expression between postnatal days 14 and 28 corresponds with completion of cornea development at the transcriptional level. Clustering classifies co-expressed, and potentially co-regulated, genes into biologically informative categories, including groups that exhibit epithelial or stromal enriched expression. Based on these findings, and through loss of function studies and ChIP-seq, we show that the Ets transcription factor EHF promotes cornea epithelial fate through complementary gene activating and repressing activities. Furthermore, we identify potential interactions between EHF, KLF4, and KLF5 in promoting cornea epithelial differentiation. These data provide insights into the mechanisms underlying epithelial development and aging, identifying EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial identity and pointing to interactions between Ets and KLF factors in promoting epithelial fate. Furthermore, this comprehensive gene expression data set for the cornea is a powerful tool for discovery of novel cornea regulators and pathways.

  16. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  17. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of respiration in yeast metabolizing differently repressive carbon substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fendt Sarah-Maria

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depending on the carbon source, Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays various degrees of respiration. These range from complete respiration as in the case of ethanol, to almost complete fermentation, and thus very low degrees of respiration on glucose. While many key regulators are known for these extreme cases, we focus here on regulators that are relevant at intermediate levels of respiration. Results We address this question by linking the functional degree of respiration to transcriptional regulation via enzyme abundances. Specifically, we investigated aerobic batch cultures with the differently repressive carbon sources glucose, mannose, galactose and pyruvate. Based on 13C flux analysis, we found that the respiratory contribution to cellular energy production was largely absent on glucose and mannose, intermediate on galactose and highest on pyruvate. In vivo abundances of 40 respiratory enzymes were quantified by GFP-fusions under each condition. During growth on the partly and fully respired substrates galactose and pyruvate, several TCA cycle and respiratory chain enzymes were significantly up-regulated. From these enzyme levels and the known regulatory network structure, we determined the probability for a given transcription factor to cause the coordinated expression changes. The most probable transcription factors to regulate the different degrees of respiration were Gcr1p, Cat8p, the Rtg-proteins and the Hap-complex. For the latter three ones we confirmed their importance for respiration by quantifying the degree of respiration and biomass yields in the corresponding deletion strains. Conclusions Cat8p is required for wild-type like respiration, independent of its known activation of gluconeogenic genes. The Rtg-proteins and the Hap-complex are essential for wild-type like respiration under partially respiratory conditions. Under fully respiratory conditions, the Hap-complex, but not the Rtg-proteins are essential

  19. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation. PMID:25762996

  20. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression.

  1. Molecular Characterization and Transcriptional Regulation Analysis of the Bovine PDHB Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anning; Zhang, Yaran; Zhao, Zhidong; Wang, Mingming; Zan, Linsen

    2016-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase beta subunit (PDHB) is a subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), which catalyzes pyruvate into acetyl-CoA and provides a linkage between the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and the glycolysis pathway. Previous studies demonstrated PDHB to be positively related to the intramuscular fat (IMF) content. However, the transcriptional regulation of PDHB remains unclear. In our present study, the cDNA of bovine PDHB was cloned and the genomic structure was analyzed. The phylogenetic tree showed bovine PDHB to be closely related to goat and sheep, and least related to chicken. Spatial expression pattern analysis revealed the products of bovine PDHB to be widely expressed with the highest level in the fat of testis. To understand the transcriptional regulation of bovine PDHB, 1899 base pairs (bp) of the 5’-regulatory region was cloned. Sequence analysis neither found consensus TATA-box nor CCAAT-box in the 5’-flanking region of bovine PDHB. However, a CpG island was predicted from nucleotides -284 to +117. Serial deletion constructs of the 5’-flanking region, evaluated in dual-luciferase reporter assay, revealed the core promoter to be located 490bp upstream from the transcription initiation site (+1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP) in combination with asite-directed mutation experiment indicated both myogenin (MYOG) and the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPß) to be important transcription factors for bovine PDHB in skeletal muscle cells and adipocytes. Our results provide an important basis for further investigation of the bovine PDHB function and regulation in cattle. PMID:27379520

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-II regulates bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jin; Sasaki, Yoko; Zhou, Liming; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) have been found in bone extracts of several different species, and IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor stored in bone. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a noncollagenous extracellular matrix glycoprotein associated with mineralized connective tissues. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of BSP transcription by IGF-II in rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. IGF-II (50 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA and protein levels after 6-h stimulation, and enhanced luciferase activities of the constructs pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60), pLUC5 (-801 to +60) and pLUC6 (-938 to +60). Effects of IGF-II were inhibited by tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, and abrogated by 2-bp mutations in cAMP response element (CRE), FGF2 response element (FRE) and homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). The results of gel shift assays showed that nuclear proteins binding to CRE, FRE and HOX sites were increased by IGF-II (50 ng/ml) at 3 and 6 h. CREB1, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos and c-Jun antibodies disrupted the formation of the CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5 and Runx2 antibodies disrupted the FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies therefore demonstrated that IGF-II increased BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX elements in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos, c-Jun, Dlx5 and Runx2 transcription factors appear to be key regulators of IGF-II effects on BSP transcription.

  3. DNMT3L is a regulator of X chromosome compaction and post-meiotic gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M Zamudio

    Full Text Available Previous studies on the epigenetic regulator DNA methyltransferase 3-Like (DNMT3L, have demonstrated it is an essential regulator of paternal imprinting and early male meiosis. Dnmt3L is also a paternal effect gene, i.e., wild type offspring of heterozygous mutant sires display abnormal phenotypes suggesting the inheritance of aberrant epigenetic marks on the paternal chromosomes. In order to reveal the mechanisms underlying these paternal effects, we have assessed X chromosome meiotic compaction, XY chromosome aneuploidy rates and global transcription in meiotic and haploid germ cells from male mice heterozygous for Dnmt3L. XY bodies from Dnmt3L heterozygous males were significantly longer than those from wild types, and were associated with a three-fold increase in XY bearing sperm. Loss of a Dnmt3L allele resulted in deregulated expression of a large number of both X-linked and autosomal genes within meiotic cells, but more prominently in haploid germ cells. Data demonstrate that similar to embryonic stem cells, DNMT3L is involved in an auto-regulatory loop in germ cells wherein the loss of a Dnmt3L allele resulted in increased transcription from the remaining wild type allele. In contrast, however, within round spermatids, this auto-regulatory loop incorporated the alternative non-coding alternative transcripts. Consistent with the mRNA data, we have localized DNMT3L within spermatids and sperm and shown that the loss of a Dnmt3L allele results in a decreased DNMT3L content within sperm. These data demonstrate previously unrecognised roles for DNMT3L in late meiosis and in the transcriptional regulation of meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells. These data provide a potential mechanism for some cases of human Klinefelter's and Turner's syndromes.

  4. Occludin controls HIV transcription in brain pericytes via regulation of SIRT-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Victor; Bertrand, Luc; Luethen, Mareen; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Lombardi, Jorge; Morgan, Laura; Sharova, Natalia; Stevenson, Mario; Blasig, Ingolf E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    HIV invades the brain early after infection; however, its interactions with the cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain poorly understood. Our goal was to evaluate the role of occludin, one of the tight junction proteins that regulate BBB functions in HIV infection of BBB pericytes. We provide evidence that occludin levels largely control the metabolic responses of human pericytes to HIV. Occludin in BBB pericytes decreased by 10% during the first 48 h after HIV infection, correlating with increased nuclear translocation of the gene repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP)-1 and NFκB-p65 activation. These changes were associated with decreased expression and activation of the class III histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT)-1. Occludin levels recovered 96 h after infection, restoring SIRT-1 and reducing HIV transcription to 20% of its highest values. We characterized occludin biochemically as a novel NADH oxidase that controls the expression and activation of SIRT-1. The inverse correlation between occludin and HIV transcription was then replicated in human primary macrophages and differentiated monocytic U937 cells, in which occludin silencing resulted in 75 and 250% increased viral transcription, respectively. Our work shows that occludin has previously unsuspected metabolic properties and is a target of HIV infection, opening the possibility of designing novel pharmacological approaches to control HIV transcription.

  5. High-resolution structure of TBP with TAF1 reveals anchoring patterns in transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Andresen, Cecilia; Helander, Sara; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Siponen, Marina I.; Lundström, Patrik; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Moche, Martin; Sunnerhagen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor TFIID provides a regulatory platform for transcription initiation. Here we present the crystal structure (1.97 Å) and NMR analysis of yeast TAF1 N-terminal domains TAND1 and TAND2 when bound to yeast TBP, together with mutational data. The yTAF1-TAND1, which in itself acts as a transcriptional activator, binds into the DNA-binding TBP concave surface by presenting similar anchor residues to TBP as E. coli Mot1 but from a distinct structural scaffold. Furthermore, we show how yTAF1-TAND2 employs an aromatic and acidic anchoring pattern to bind a conserved yTBP surface groove traversing the basic helix region, and we find highly similar TBP-binding motifs also presented by the structurally distinct TFIIA, Mot1 and Brf1 proteins. Our identification of these anchoring patterns, which can be easily disrupted or enhanced, provides compelling insight into the competitive multiprotein TBP interplay critical to transcriptional regulation. PMID:23851461

  6. Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor JUB1 regulates GA/BR metabolism and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnejat-Bushehri, Sara; Tarkowska, Danuse; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) and brassinosteroids (BRs) are important phytohormones that control plant development and responses to environmental cues by involving DELLA proteins and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1) respectively as key transcription factors. Here, we reveal a new role for JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1) as a transcriptional regulator of GA/BR signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana. JUB1 directly represses the hormone biosynthesis genes GA3ox1 and DWARF4 (DWF4), leading to reduced levels of GAs and BRs and typical GA/BR deficiency phenotypes exhibiting short hypocotyls, dwarfism, late flowering and male sterility. JUB1 also directly represses PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4), a transcription factor connecting hormonal and environmental stimuli. On the other hand, JUB1 activates the DELLA genes GA INSENSITIVE (GAI) and RGA-LIKE 1 (RGL1). In addition, BZR1 and PIF4 act as direct transcriptional repressors upstream of JUB1, establishing a negative feedback loop. Thus, JUB1 forms the core of a robust regulatory module that triggers DELLA accumulation, thereby restricting cell elongation while concomitantly enhancing stress tolerance. PMID:27249348

  7. Occludin controls HIV transcription in brain pericytes via regulation of SIRT-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Victor; Bertrand, Luc; Luethen, Mareen; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Lombardi, Jorge; Morgan, Laura; Sharova, Natalia; Stevenson, Mario; Blasig, Ingolf E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-03-01

    HIV invades the brain early after infection; however, its interactions with the cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain poorly understood. Our goal was to evaluate the role of occludin, one of the tight junction proteins that regulate BBB functions in HIV infection of BBB pericytes. We provide evidence that occludin levels largely control the metabolic responses of human pericytes to HIV. Occludin in BBB pericytes decreased by 10% during the first 48 h after HIV infection, correlating with increased nuclear translocation of the gene repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP)-1 and NFκB-p65 activation. These changes were associated with decreased expression and activation of the class III histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT)-1. Occludin levels recovered 96 h after infection, restoring SIRT-1 and reducing HIV transcription to 20% of its highest values. We characterized occludin biochemically as a novel NADH oxidase that controls the expression and activation of SIRT-1. The inverse correlation between occludin and HIV transcription was then replicated in human primary macrophages and differentiated monocytic U937 cells, in which occludin silencing resulted in 75 and 250% increased viral transcription, respectively. Our work shows that occludin has previously unsuspected metabolic properties and is a target of HIV infection, opening the possibility of designing novel pharmacological approaches to control HIV transcription. PMID:26601824

  8. Engineering synthetic TALE and CRISPR/Cas9 transcription factors for regulating gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Ami M; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that can be targeted to specific sites in the genome to manipulate gene expression have enabled many advances in biomedical research. This includes generating tools to study fundamental aspects of gene regulation and the development of a new class of gene therapies that alter the expression of endogenous genes. Designed transcription factors have entered clinical trials for the treatment of human diseases and others are in preclinical development. High-throughput and user-friendly platforms for designing synthetic DNA-binding proteins present innovative methods for deciphering cell biology and designing custom synthetic gene circuits. We review two platforms for designing synthetic transcription factors for manipulating gene expression: Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and the RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. We present an overview of each technology and a guide for designing and assembling custom TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcription factors. We also discuss characteristics of each platform that are best suited for different applications.

  9. RNA Polymerase II Regulates Topoisomerase 1 Activity to Favor Efficient Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Cui, Kairong; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Chung, Hye-Jung; Chan-Salis, Ka Yim; Guha, Rajarshi; Wilson, Kelli; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hongliang; Piotrowski, Jason; Thomas, Craig J; Singer, Dinah S; Pugh, B Franklin; Pommier, Yves; Przytycka, Teresa M; Kouzine, Fedor; Lewis, Brian A; Zhao, Keji; Levens, David

    2016-04-01

    We report a mechanism through which the transcription machinery directly controls topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) activity to adjust DNA topology throughout the transcription cycle. By comparing TOP1 occupancy using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) versus TOP1 activity using topoisomerase 1 sequencing (TOP1-seq), a method reported here to map catalytically engaged TOP1, TOP1 bound at promoters was discovered to become fully active only after pause-release. This transition coupled the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal-domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with stimulation of TOP1 above its basal rate, enhancing its processivity. TOP1 stimulation is strongly dependent on the kinase activity of BRD4, a protein that phosphorylates Ser2-CTD and regulates RNAPII pause-release. Thus the coordinated action of BRD4 and TOP1 overcame the torsional stress opposing transcription as RNAPII commenced elongation but preserved negative supercoiling that assists promoter melting at start sites. This nexus between transcription and DNA topology promises to elicit new strategies to intercept pathological gene expression.

  10. Study on the Regulation of Bcl-2 Gene on Rat Spermatogenic Cells Apoptosis in Transcription Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董强; 杨宇如; 黄明孔; 李虹; 张卫东; 徐震波

    2000-01-01

    Objective To detect the change of Bcl-2 gene expression in the apopototic process of spermatogenic cells in rat with vasoligation and vasostomy, and to find out the relationship between the transcription of Bcl-2 and the apoptosis of spermatognic cells.Materials & Methods Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in 3 groups were operated with vasoligation and vasostomy. Then hybridization in situ with hypersensitive Bcl-2 RNA probe was used to detect the change of Bcl-2 mRNA.Results The transcription of Bcl-2 gene in spermatogenic cells was obviously inhibited in the vasoligation group compared with that in the control group (P<0. 05), and the transcription in the vasostomy group showed no difference from that of the control group.Conclusion Bcl-2 gene has an anti-apoptotic effect in rats with vasostomy, and there was a transcriptional regulation of Bcl-2 gene in rat spermatogenic cell during the period of pre-vasoligation to post-vasoligation and to post-vasosotomy.

  11. Structure and functions of transcriptional coactivators p300/CBP and their roles in regulation of interleukin gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Yangguang; ZHANG Guoping; LU Jun; HUANG Baiqu

    2004-01-01

    p300/CBP are versatile transcriptional coacti-vators that participate in many physiological processes, including cell cycle control, differentiation and apoptosis. p300/CBP possess histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and they are involved in transcriptional regulation by acetylating histone and nonhistone proteins. Moreover, they act as protein bridges connecting specific transcription factors to the basal transcription machinery and provide a scaffold to integrate multiple transcription cofactors. Several studies suggest that p300/CBP may serve as tumor suppressors since mutations or translocations in p300/Cbp genes have been observed in a number of cancers. Furthermore, in many neurodegenerative diseases, inhibition of p300/CBP function may be one of the underlying causes of cytotoxicity. Several studies have demonstrated that p300/CBP are implicated in the regulation of many interleukin genes. This review focuses on the structures and functions of p300/CBP and their roles in the regulation of interleukin genes based on the work performed in our laboratory.

  12. Signal-dependent Regulation of Transcription by Histone Deacetylase 7 Involves Recruitment to Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Nuclear Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chengzhuo; Cheng, Xiwen; Lam, Minh; Yu LIU; Liu, Qing; Chang, Kun-Sang; Kao, Hung-Ying

    2008-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) are dynamic subnuclear compartments that play roles in several cellular processes, including apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, and DNA repair. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) 7 is a potent corepressor that inhibits transcription by myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors. We show here that endogenous HDAC7 and PML interact and partially colocalize in PML NBs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α treatment recruits HDAC7 to PML ...

  13. Recombinant NFAT1 (NFATp) is regulated by calcineurin in T cells and mediates transcription of several cytokine genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, C.; Burgeon, E; Carew, J A; McCaffrey, P G; Badalian, T M; Lane, W S; Hogan, P G; Rao, A

    1996-01-01

    Transcription factors of the NFAT family play a key role in the transcription of cytokine genes and other genes during the immune response. We have identified two new isoforms of the transcription factor NFAT1 (previously termed NFATp) that are the predominant isoforms expressed in murine and human T cells. When expressed in Jurkat T cells, recombinant NFAT1 is regulated, as expected, by the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, and its function is inhibited by the immunosuppressive a...

  14. Rice ASR1 and ASR5 are complementary transcription factors regulating aluminium responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenhart, Rafael Augusto; Schunemann, Mariana; Bucker Neto, Lauro; Margis, Rogerio; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2016-03-01

    Rice is the most tolerant staple crop to aluminium (Al) toxicity, which is a limiting stress for grain production worldwide. This Al tolerance is the result of combined mechanisms that are triggered in part by the transcription factor ASR5. ASRs are dual target proteins that participate as chaperones in the cytoplasm and as transcription factors in the nucleus. Moreover, these proteins respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salt, drought and Al. Rice plants with silenced ASR genes are highly sensitive to Al. ASR5, a well-characterized protein, binds to specific cis elements in Al responsive genes and regulates their expression. Because the Al sensitive phenotype found in silenced rice plants could be due to the mutual silencing of ASR1 and ASR5, we investigated the effect of the specific silencing of ASR5. Plants with artificial microRNA silencing of ASR5 present a non-transformed phenotype in response to Al because of the induction of ASR1. ASR1 has the same subcellular localization as ASR5, binds to ASR5 cis-regulatory elements, regulates ASR5 regulated genes in a non-preferential manner and might replace ASR5 under certain conditions. Our results indicate that ASR1 and ASR5 act in concert and complementarily to regulate gene expression in response to Al. PMID:26476017

  15. RNA synthetic biology inspired from bacteria: construction of transcription attenuators under antisense regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among all biopolymers, ribonucleic acids or RNA have unique functional versatility, which led to the early suggestion that RNA alone (or a closely related biopolymer) might have once sustained a primitive form of life based on a single type of biopolymer. This has been supported by the demonstration of processive RNA-based replication and the discovery of 'riboswitches' or RNA switches, which directly sense their metabolic environment. In this paper, we further explore the plausibility of this 'RNA world' scenario and show, through synthetic molecular design guided by advanced RNA simulations, that RNA can also perform elementary regulation tasks on its own. We demonstrate that RNA synthetic regulatory modules directly inspired from bacterial transcription attenuators can efficiently activate or repress the expression of other RNA by merely controlling their folding paths 'on the fly' during transcription through simple RNA–RNA antisense interaction. Factors, such as NTP concentration and RNA synthesis rate, affecting the efficiency of this kinetic regulation mechanism are also studied and discussed in the light of evolutionary constraints. Overall, this suggests that direct coupling among synthesis, folding and regulation of RNAs may have enabled the early emergence of autonomous RNA-based regulation networks in absence of both DNA and protein partners

  16. Preliminary structural studies of the transcriptional regulator CmeR from Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chih-Chia [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Shi, Feng [Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Ruoyu; Li, Ming [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); McDermott, Gerry [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Yu, Edward W., E-mail: ewyu@iastate.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Zhang, Qijing [Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator CmeR from C. jejuni has been purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. In Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the CmeR regulatory protein controls transcription of the multidrug transporter gene operon cmeABC. CmeR belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The 210-residue CmeR consists of two functional motifs: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. It is predicted that the DNA-binding domain interacts directly with target promoters, while the C-terminal motif interacts with inducing ligands (such as bile salts). As an initial step towards confirming this structural model, recombinant CmeR protein containing a 6×His tag at the N-terminus was crystallized. Crystals of ligand-free CmeR belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.4, b = 57.6, c = 93.3 Å. Diffraction was observed to at least 2.2 Å at 100 K. Analysis of the detailed CmeR structure is currently in progress.

  17. The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Berne)

    2009-12-25

    Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

  18. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  19. DksA and ppGpp Directly Regulate Transcription of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Justin J.; Durfee, Tim; Gourse, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The components of the Escherichia coli flagella apparatus are synthesized in a three-level transcriptional cascade activated by the master regulator FlhDC. The cascade coordinates the synthesis rates of a large number of gene products with each other and with nutritional conditions. Recent genome-wide studies have reported that flagellar transcription is altered in cells lacking the transcription regulators DksA or ppGpp, but some or all reported effects could be indirect, and some are contradictory. We report here that the activities of promoters at all three levels of the cascade are much higher in strains lacking dksA, resulting in overproduction of flagellin and hyperflagellated cells. In vitro, DksA/ppGpp inhibits the flhDC promoter and the σ70-dependent fliA promoter transcribing the gene for σ28. However, DksA and ppGpp do not affect the σ28-dependent fliA promoter or the σ28-dependent fliC promoter in vitro, suggesting that the dramatic effects on expression of those genes in vivo are mediated indirectly through direct effects of DksA/ppGpp on FlhDC and σ28 expression. We conclude that DksA/ppGpp inhibits expression of the flagellar cascade during stationary phase and following starvation, thereby coordinating flagella and ribosome assembly and preventing expenditure of scarce energy resources on synthesis of two of the cell’s largest macromolecular complexes. PMID:19889089

  20. Dimer formation and transcription activation in the sporulation response regulator Spo0A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard J; Scott, David J; Brannigan, James A; Ladds, Joanne C; Cervin, Marguerite A; Spiegelman, George B; Hoggett, James G; Barák, Imrich; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2002-02-15

    The response regulator Spo0A is the master control element in the initiation of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Like many other multi-domain response regulators, the latent activity of the effector, C-terminal domain is stimulated by phosphorylation on a conserved aspartic acid residue in the regulatory, N-terminal domain. If a threshold concentration of phosphorylated Spo0A is achieved, the transcription of genes required for sporulation is activated, whereas the genes encoding stationary phase sentinels are repressed, and sporulation proceeds. Despite detailed genetic, biochemical and structural characterisation, it is not understood how the phosphorylation signal in the receiver domain is transduced into DNA binding and transcription activation in the distal effector domain. An obstacle to our understanding of Spo0A function is the uncertainty concerning changes in quaternary structure that accompany phosphorylation. Here we have revisited this question and shown unequivocally that Spo0A forms dimers upon phosphorylation and that the subunit interactions in the dimer are mediated principally by the receiver domain. Purified dimers of two mutants of Spo0A, in which the phosphorylatable aspartic acid residue has been substituted, activate transcription from the spoIIG promoter in vitro, whereas monomers do not. This suggests that dimers represent the activated form of Spo0A. PMID:11851334

  1. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-07-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages. PMID:22379133

  2. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages. PMID:22379133

  3. Eos negatively regulates human γ-globin gene transcription during erythroid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Chuan Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human globin gene expression is precisely regulated by a complicated network of transcription factors and chromatin modifying activities during development and erythropoiesis. Eos (Ikaros family zinc finger 4, IKZF4, a member of the zinc finger transcription factor Ikaros family, plays a pivotal role as a repressor of gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the role of Eos in globin gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR detected a gradual decrease in Eos expression during erythroid differentiation of hemin-induced K562 cells and Epo-induced CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPCs. DNA transfection and lentivirus-mediated gene transfer demonstrated that the enforced expression of Eos significantly represses the expression of γ-globin, but not other globin genes, in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. Consistent with a direct role of Eos in globin gene regulation, chromatin immunoprecipitaion and dual-luciferase reporter assays identified three discrete sites located in the DNase I hypersensitivity site 3 (HS3 of the β-globin locus control region (LCR, the promoter regions of the Gγ- and Aγ- globin genes, as functional binding sites of Eos protein. A chromosome conformation capture (3C assay indicated that Eos may repress the interaction between the LCR and the γ-globin gene promoter. In addition, erythroid differentiation was inhibited by enforced expression of Eos in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of the γ-globin gene during erythroid differentiation.

  4. PINCH1 is transcriptional regulator in podocytes that interacts with WT1 and represses podocalyxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PINCH1, an adaptor protein containing five LIM domains, plays an important role in regulating the integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PINCH1 is induced in the fibrotic kidney after injury, and it primarily localizes at the sites of focal adhesion. Whether it can translocate to the nucleus and directly participate in gene regulation is completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using cultured glomerular podocytes as a model system, we show that PINCH1 expression was induced by TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes podocyte dysfunction. Interestingly, increased PINCH1 not only localized at the sites of focal adhesions, but also underwent nuclear translocation after TGF-β1 stimulation. This nuclear translocation of PINCH1 was apparently dependent on the putative nuclear export/localization signals (NES/NLS at its C-terminus, as deletion or site-directed mutations abolished its nuclear shuttling. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that PINCH1 interacted with Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for regulating podocyte-specific gene expression in adult kidney. Interaction of PINCH1 and WT1 was mediated by the LIM1 domain of PINCH1 and C-terminal zinc-finger domain of WT1, which led to the suppression of the WT1-mediated podocalyxin expression in podocytes. PINCH1 also repressed podocalyxin gene transcription in a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PINCH1 can shuttle into the nucleus from cytoplasm in podocytes, wherein it interacts with WT1 and suppresses podocyte-specific gene expression. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized, novel function of PINCH1, in which it acts as a transcriptional regulator through controlling specific gene expression.

  5. Factors that influence the response of the LysR type transcriptional regulators to aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinski Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcriptional regulators DntR, NagR and NtdR have a high sequence identity and belong to the large family of LysR type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs. These three regulators are all involved in regulation of genes identified in pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds. They activate the transcription of these genes in the presence of an inducer, but the inducer specificity profiles are different. Results The results from this study show that NtdR has the broadest inducer specificity, responding to several nitro-aromatic compounds. Mutational studies of residues that differ between DntR, NagR and NtdR suggest that a number of specific residues are involved in the broader inducer specificity of NtdR when compared to DntR and NagR. The inducer response was also investigated as a function of the experimental conditions and a number of parameters such as the growth media, plasmid arrangement of the LTTR-encoding genes, promoter and gfp reporter gene, and the presence of a His6-tag were shown to affect the inducer response in E.coli DH5α. Furthermore, the response upon addition of both salicylate and 4-nitrobenzoate to the growth media was larger than the sum of responses upon addition of each of the compounds, which suggests the presence of a secondary binding site, as previously reported for other LTTRs. Conclusions Optimization of the growth conditions and gene arrangement resulted in improved responses to nitro-aromatic inducers. The data also suggests the presence of a previously unknown secondary binding site in DntR, analogous to that of BenM.

  6. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Qing

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we investigated the use of unsigned and signed network analysis to identify pluripotency and differentiation related genes. Results We show that signed networks provide a better systems level understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of ES cells than unsigned networks, using two independent murine ES cell expression data sets. Specifically, using signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA, we found a pluripotency module and a differentiation module, which are not identified in unsigned networks. We confirmed the importance of these modules by incorporating genome-wide TF binding data for key ES cell regulators. Interestingly, we find that the pluripotency module is enriched with genes related to DNA damage repair and mitochondrial function in addition to transcriptional regulation. Using a connectivity measure of module membership, we not only identify known regulators of ES cells but also show that Mrpl15, Msh6, Nrf1, Nup133, Ppif, Rbpj, Sh3gl2, and Zfp39, among other genes, have important roles in maintaining ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. We also report highly significant relationships between module membership and epigenetic modifications (histone modifications and promoter CpG methylation status, which are known to play a role in controlling gene expression during ES cell self-renewal and differentiation. Conclusion Our systems biologic re-analysis of gene expression, transcription factor binding, epigenetic and gene ontology data provides a novel integrative view of ES cell biology.

  7. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A.J.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the

  8. Post-translational Control of the Temporal Dynamics of Transcription Factor Activity Regulates Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiao-Jiang; Yuan, Liqun; Tiberi, Luca; Claeys, Annelies; De Geest, Natalie; Yan, Jiekun; van der Kant, Rob; Xie, Wei R; Klisch, Tiemo J; Shymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-01-28

    Neurogenesis is initiated by the transient expression of the highly conserved proneural proteins, bHLH transcriptional regulators. Here, we discover a conserved post-translational switch governing the duration of proneural protein activity that is required for proper neuronal development. Phosphorylation of a single Serine at the same position in Scute and Atonal proneural proteins governs the transition from active to inactive forms by regulating DNA binding. The equivalent Neurogenin2 Threonine also regulates DNA binding and proneural activity in the developing mammalian neocortex. Using genome editing in Drosophila, we show that Atonal outlives its mRNA but is inactivated by phosphorylation. Inhibiting the phosphorylation of the conserved proneural Serine causes quantitative changes in expression dynamics and target gene expression resulting in neuronal number and fate defects. Strikingly, even a subtle change from Serine to Threonine appears to shift the duration of Atonal activity in vivo, resulting in neuronal fate defects. PMID:26824657

  9. Ethylene Control of Fruit Ripening: Revisiting the Complex Network of Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingchun; Pirrello, Julien; Chervin, Christian; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2015-12-01

    The plant hormone ethylene plays a key role in climacteric fruit ripening. Studies on components of ethylene signaling have revealed a linear transduction pathway leading to the activation of ethylene response factors. However, the means by which ethylene selects the ripening-related genes and interacts with other signaling pathways to regulate the ripening process are still to be elucidated. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as a reference species, the present review aims to revisit the mechanisms by which ethylene regulates fruit ripening by taking advantage of new tools available to perform in silico studies at the genome-wide scale, leading to a global view on the expression pattern of ethylene biosynthesis and response genes throughout ripening. Overall, it provides new insights on the transcriptional network by which this hormone coordinates the ripening process and emphasizes the interplay between ethylene and ripening-associated developmental factors and the link between epigenetic regulation and ethylene during fruit ripening.

  10. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 regulation by novel binding partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadashi; Matsuda; Ryuta; Muromoto; Yuichi; Sekine; Sumihito; Togi; Yuichi; Kitai; Shigeyuki; Kon; Kenji; Oritani

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription(STATs) mediate essential signals for various biological processes,including immune responses,hematopoiesis,and neurogenesis. STAT3,for example,is involved in the pathogenesis of various human diseases,including cancers,autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. STAT3 activation is therefore tightly regulated at multiple levels to prevent these pathological conditions. A number of proteins have been reported to associate with STAT3 and regulate its activity. These STAT3-interacting proteins function to modulate STAT3-mediated signaling at various steps and mediate the crosstalk of STAT3 with other cellular signaling pathways. This article reviews the roles of novel STAT3 binding partners such as DAXX,zipperinteracting protein kinase,Krüppel-associated box-associated protein 1,Y14,PDZ and LIM domain 2 and signal transducing adaptor protein-2,in the regulation of STAT3-mediated signaling.

  11. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.;

    2009-01-01

    of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... Gcn4p. Although mRNA expression alone did not directly predict metabolic response, this correlation improved through incorporating a network-based model of amino acid biosynthesis (from r = 0.07 to 0.80 for mRNA-flux agreement). The model provides evidence of general biological principles: rewiring...

  12. Characterization of a novel radiation-inducible transcript, uscA, and analysis of its transcriptional regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcriptional expression of the uscA promote (PuscA) only occurred under aerobic conditions and a dose of 2Gy maximally activated transcription of PuscA. However, various environmental stress including physical shocks (pH, temperature, osmotic shock), DNA damaging agents (UV and MMC) or oxidative stressagents (paraquat, menadione, and H2O2) didn't cause the transcriptional activationof PuscA. The transcription of uscA was initiated at 170 bp upstream of the cyoA start codon, and ended around the ampG stop codon. The size of uscA was determined through reverse transcription assay, approximately 250 bp. The deletion analysis of uscA promoter demonstrates that radiation inducibility of PuscA is mediated by sequences present between -20 and +111 relativeto +1 of PuscA and radiation causes PuscA activation thorough permitting the expression that is repressed under non-irradiated conditions

  13. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus;

    2008-01-01

    kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from...... MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  14. Resistin does not down-regulate the transcription of insulin receptor promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-zhi QIAO; Xian-feng WANG; Zhe-rong XU; Yun-mei YANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect of resistin on the transcription of insulin receptor promoter. Methods: Luciferase reporter gene was fused downstream of human insulin receptor promoter and the enzymatic activity of luciferase was determined in the presence or absence of resistin. The resistin expressed with plasmid was stained with antibody against Myc tag which was in frame fused with resistin coding sequence, and then imaged with confocal microscopy. Results: The treatment of pIRP-LUC transfected cells with recombinant resistin did not result in significant difference in the enzymatic activity of luciferase compared to the untreated cells. Cell staining showed that green fluorescence could be observed in the cytoplasm, but not in the nucleus. Conclusion: The results suggest that the endogenous resistin may functionally locate in the cytoplasm, but does not enter the nucleus and not down-regulate the transcription of insulin receptor promoter.

  15. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Vaughn Greg Harrington Daniel R Bush

    2002-08-06

    This project was based on our discovery that sucrose acts as a signaling molecule that regulates the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. A major objective here was determining how sucrose transporter activity is being regulated. When sucrose accumulates in the phloem sucrose transport activity drops dramatically. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins isolated from sucrose treated leaves showed that the loss of sucrose transport activity was proportional to a decline in symporter abundance, demonstrating that sucrose transport is regulated by changes in the amount of BvSUT1 protein. BvSUT1 transcript levels decreased in parallel with the loss of sucrose transport activity. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that BvSUT1 gene transcription was repressed significantly in nuclei from leaves fed 100 mM exogenous sucrose, showing that sucrose-dependent modulation of BvSUT1 mRNA levels is mediated by changes in transcription. To identify which secondary messenger systems might be involved in regulating symporter activity, we used a variety of pharmacological agents to probe for a role of calcium or protein phosphorylation in sucrose signaling. In a detailed analysis, only okadaic acid altered sucrose transport activity. These results suggest a protein phosphatase is involved. We hypothesized that protein kinase inhibitors would have a neutral affect or increase symporter transcription. Transpirational feeding of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine had no impact on sucrose transport while calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, caused a 60% increase. These data provided good evidence that protein phosphorylation plays a central role in regulating sucrose symporter expression and sucrose transport activity. To determine whether protein phosphorylation is involved in sucrose regulation of proton-sucrose symporter activity, we pre-fed leaves with staurosporine for 4 h and then fed the treated leaves water or 100 mM sucrose

  16. Crystal Structure of the Transcriptional Regulator CmeR From Campylobacter Jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, R.; Su, C.-C.; Shi, F.; McDermott, G.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, E.W.

    2009-06-01

    The CmeABC multidrug efflux pump, which belongs to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family, recognizes and extrudes a broad range of antimicrobial agents and is essential for Campylobacter jejuni colonization of the animal intestinal tract by mediating the efflux of bile acids. The expression of CmeABC is controlled by the transcriptional regulator CmeR, whose open reading frame is located immediately upstream of the cmeABC operon. To understand the structural basis of CmeR regulation, we have determined the crystal structure of CmeR to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a dimeric two-domain molecule with an entirely helical architecture similar to members of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. Unlike the rest of the TetR regulators, CmeR has a large center-to-center distance (54 {angstrom}) between two N termini of the dimer, and a large flexible ligand-binding pocket in the C-terminal domain. Each monomer forms a 20 {angstrom} long tunnel-like cavity in the ligand-binding domain of CmeR and is occupied by a fortuitous ligand that is identified as glycerol. The binding of glycerol to CmeR induces a conformational state that is incompatible with target DNA. As glycerol has a chemical structure similar to that of potential ligands of CmeR, the structure obtained mimics the induced form of CmeR. These findings reveal novel structural features of a TetR family regulator, and provide new insight into the mechanisms of ligand binding and CmeR regulation.

  17. Transcriptional and Phenotypic Characterization of Novel Spx-Regulated Genes in Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia C C Galvão

    Full Text Available In oral biofilms, two of the major environmental challenges encountered by the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans are acid and oxidative stresses. Previously, we showed that the S. mutans transcriptional regulators SpxA1 and SpxA2 (formerly SpxA and SpxB, respectively are involved in stress survival by activating the expression of classic oxidative stress genes such as dpr, nox, sodA and tpx. We reasoned that some of the uncharacterized genes under SpxA1/A2 control are potentially involved in oxidative stress management. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use Spx-regulated genes as a tool to identify novel oxidative stress genes in S. mutans. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate the responses of ten Spx-regulated genes during H2O2 stress in the parent and Δspx strains. Transcription activation of the H2O2-induced genes (8 out of 10 was strongly dependent on SpxA1 and, to a lesser extent, SpxA2. In vitro transcription assays revealed that one or both Spx proteins directly regulate three of these genes. The gene encoding the FeoB ferrous permease was slightly repressed by H2O2 but constitutively induced in strains lacking SpxA1. Nine genes were selected for downstream mutational analysis but inactivation of smu127, encoding a subunit of the acetoin dehydrogenase was apparently lethal. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the viable mutants indicated that, in addition to the transcriptional activation of reducing and antioxidant pathways, Spx performs an important role in iron homeostasis by regulating the intracellular availability of free iron. In particular, inactivation of the genes encoding the Fe-S biogenesis SUF system and the previously characterized iron-binding protein Dpr resulted in impaired growth under different oxidative stress conditions, increased sensitivity to iron and lower infectivity in rats. These results serve as an entryway into the characterization of novel genes and pathways that allow S. mutans to

  18. B-GATA transcription factors - insights into their structure, regulation and role in plant development

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    Claus eSchwechheimer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available GATA transcription factors are evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulators that recognize promoter elements with a G-A-T-A core sequence. In comparison to animal genomes, the GATA transcription factor family in plants is comparatively large with approximately 30 members. In spite of a long-standing interest of plant molecular biologists in GATA factors, only research conducted in the last years has led to reliable insights into their functions during plant development. Here, we review the current knowledge on B-GATAs, one of four GATA factor subfamilies from Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that B-GATAs can be subdivided based on structural features and their biological function into family members with a C-terminal LLM- (leucine-leucine-methionine domain or an N-terminal HAN- (HANABA TARANU domain. The paralogous GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON-METABOLISM INVOLVED and CGA1/GNL (CYTOKININ-INDUCED GATA1/GNC-LIKE are introduced as LLM-domain containing B-GATAs from Arabidopsis that control germination, greening, senescence and flowering time downstream from several growth regulatory signals including light and the hormones gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin. Arabidopsis HAN and its monocot-specific paralogs from rice (NECK LEAF1, maize (TASSEL SHEATH1, and barley (THIRD OUTER GLUME are HAN-domain-containing B-GATAs with a predominant role in embryo development and floral development. We also review GATA23, a regulator of lateral root initiation from Arabidopsis, that is closely related to GNC and GNL but has a degenerate LLM-domain that is seemingly specific for the Brassicaceae family. The Brassicaceae-specific GATA23 together with the above-mentioned monocot-specific HAN-domain GATAs provide evidence that neofunctionalization of the B-GATAs was used during plant evolution to expand the functional repertoire of these transcription factors.

  19. Molecular characterization of Quercus suber MYB1, a transcription factor up-regulated in cork tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Tânia; Menéndez, Esther; Capote, Tiago; Ribeiro, Teresa; Santos, Conceição; Gonçalves, Sónia

    2013-01-15

    The molecular processes associated with cork development in Quercus suber L. are poorly understood. A previous molecular approach identified a list of genes potentially important for cork formation and differentiation, providing a new basis for further molecular studies. This report is the first molecular characterization of one of these candidate genes, QsMYB1, coding for an R2R3-MYB transcription factor. The R2R3-MYB gene sub-family has been described as being involved in the phenylpropanoid and lignin pathways, both involved in cork biosynthesis. The results showed that the expression of QsMYB1 is putatively mediated by an alternative splicing (AS) mechanism that originates two different transcripts (QsMYB1.1 and QsMYB1.2), differing only in the 5'-untranslated region, due to retention of the first intron in one of the variants. Moreover, within the retained intron, a simple sequence repeat (SSR) was identified. The upstream regulatory region of QsMYB1 was extended by a genome walking approach, which allowed the identification of the putative gene promoter region. The relative expression pattern of QsMYB1 transcripts determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that both transcripts were up-regulated in cork tissues; the detected expression was several times higher in newly formed cork harvested from trees producing virgin, second or reproduction cork when compared with wood. Moreover, the expression analysis of QsMYB1 in several Q. suber organs showed very low expression in young branches and roots, whereas in leaves, immature acorns or male flowers, no expression was detected. These preliminary results suggest that QsMYB1 may be related to secondary growth and, in particular, with the cork biosynthesis process with a possible alternative splicing mechanism associated with its regulatory function.

  20. Disruption of the transcriptional regulator Cas5 results in enhanced killing of Candida albicans by Fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicek, Erin M; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David

    2014-11-01

    Azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole exhibit fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. Strategies to enhance azole antifungal activity would be therapeutically appealing. In an effort to identify transcriptional pathways that influence the killing activity of fluconazole, we sought to identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in this process. From a collection of C. albicans strains disrupted for genes encoding TFs (O. R. Homann, J. Dea, S. M. Noble, and A. D. Johnson, PLoS Genet. 5:e1000783, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000783), four strains exhibited marked reductions in minimum fungicidal concentration (MFCs) in both RPMI and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media. One of these genes, UPC2, was previously characterized with regard to its role in azole susceptibility. Of mutants representing the three remaining TF genes of interest, one (CAS5) was unable to recover from fluconazole exposure at concentrations as low as 2 μg/ml after 72 h in YPD medium. This mutant also showed reduced susceptibility and a clear zone of inhibition by Etest, was unable to grow on solid medium containing 10 μg/ml fluconazole, and exhibited increased susceptibility by time-kill analysis. CAS5 disruption in highly azole-resistant clinical isolates exhibiting multiple resistance mechanisms did not alter susceptibility. However, CAS5 disruption in strains with specific resistance mutations resulted in moderate reductions in MICs and MFCs. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed in the presence of fluconazole and was consistent with the suggested role of CAS5 in cell wall organization while also suggesting a role in iron transport and homeostasis. These findings suggest that Cas5 regulates a transcriptional network that influences the response of C. albicans to fluconazole. Further delineation of this transcriptional network may identify targets for potential cotherapeutic strategies to enhance the activity of the azole class of antifungals.

  1. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases.

  2. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Maliszewska-Olejniczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs. Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium

  3. Regulation of Transcription through Light-Activation and Light-Deactivation of Triplex-Forming Oligonucleotides in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Hemphill, James; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are efficient tools to regulate gene expression through the inhibition of transcription. Here, nucleobase-caging technology was applied to the first temporal regulation of transcription through light-activated TFOs. Through site-specific incorporation of caged thymidine nucleotides, the TFO:DNA triplex formation is blocked, rendering the TFO inactive. However, after a brief UV irradiation, the caging groups are removed, activating the TFO, and leading t...

  4. Cell Cycle-dependent Regulation of the Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 by CDK·Cyclin Complexes*

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, Anett; Ji, Zongling; Child, Emma S.; Krause, Eberhard; Mann, David J.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Several mammalian forkhead transcription factors have been shown to impact on cell cycle regulation and are themselves linked to cell cycle control systems. Here we have investigated the little studied mammalian forkhead transcription factor FOXK2 and demonstrate that it is subject to control by cell cycle-regulated protein kinases. FOXK2 exhibits a periodic rise in its phosphorylation levels during the cell cycle, with hyperphosphorylation occurring in mitotic cells. Hyperphosphorylation occ...

  5. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation in the myo1Δ mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akamine Pearl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae myosin type II-deficient (myo1Δ strains remain viable and divide, despite the absence of a cytokinetic ring, by activation of the PKC1-dependent cell wall integrity pathway (CWIP. Since the myo1Δ transcriptional fingerprint is a subset of the CWIP fingerprint, the myo1Δ strain may provide a simplified paradigm for cell wall stress survival. Results To explore the post-transcriptional regulation of the myo1Δ stress response, 1,301 differentially regulated ribosome-bound mRNAs were identified by microarray analysis of which 204 were co-regulated by transcription and translation. Four categories of mRNA were significantly affected - protein biosynthesis, metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and unknown functions. Nine genes of the 20 CWIP fingerprint genes were post-transcriptionally regulated. Down and up regulation of selected ribosomal protein and cell wall biosynthesis mRNAs was validated by their distribution in polysomes from wild type and myo1Δ strains. Western blot analysis revealed accumulation of the phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α-P and a reduction in the steady state levels of the translation initiation factor eIF4Gp in myo1Δ strains. Deletion of GCN2 in myo1Δ abolished eIF2αp phosphorylation, and showed a severe growth defect. The presence of P-bodies in myo1Δ strains suggests that the process of mRNA sequestration is active, however, the three representative down regulated RP mRNAs, RPS8A, RPL3 and RPL7B were present at equivalent levels in Dcp2p-mCh-positive immunoprecipitated fractions from myo1Δ and wild type cells. These same RP mRNAs were also selectively co-precipitated with eIF2α-P in myo1Δ strains. Conclusions Quantitative analysis of ribosome-associated mRNAs and their polyribosome distributions suggests selective regulation of mRNA translation efficiency in myo1Δ strains. Inhibition of translation initiation factor eIF2α (e

  7. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidian, Arash; Stedingk, Kristoffer von; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven, E-mail: sven.pahlman@med.lu.se

    2015-06-05

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma. - Highlights: • Transcriptional control of HIF-2α is restricted to neural cell-derived tumors. • Enhanced transcription of HIF2A is not due to increased mRNA stability. • Chemical stabilization of the HIF-α subunits leads to increased HIF2A transcription. • ERRα regulates HIF2A mRNA expression in neuroblastoma. • High expression of ESRRA correlates to poor outcome in neuroblastoma.

  8. SUMOylation of DEC1 Protein Regulates Its Transcriptional Activity and Enhances Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Bi, Hailian; Yang, Chunhua; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Ying; Ao, Xiang; Chang, Alan K.; Wu, Huijian

    2011-01-01

    Differentiated embryo-chondrocyte expressed gene 1 (DEC1, also known as sharp2, stra13, or BHLHB2) is a mammalian basic helix-loop-helix protein that is involved in many aspects of gene regulation through acting as a transcription factor. Changes in DEC1 expression levels have been implicated in the development of cancers. Using COS-7 cell, we showed that DEC1 can be modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers, SUMO1, 2 and 3. Two major SUMOylation sites (K159 and K279) were identified in the C-terminal domain of DEC1. Substitution of either K159 or K279 with arginine reduced DEC1 SUMOylation, but substitution of both K159 and K279 abolished SUMOylation, and more protein appeared to be retained in the cytoplasm compared to wild-type DEC1. The expression of DEC1 was up-regulated after serum starvation as previously reported, but at the same time, serum starvation also led to more SUMOylation of DEC1. In MCF-7 cells SUMOylation also stabilized DEC1 through inhibiting its ubiquitination. Moreover, SUMOylation of DEC1 promoted its repression of CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activity through recruitment of histone deacetylase1. These findings suggested that posttranslational modification of DEC1 in the form of SUMOylation may serve as a key factor that regulates the function of DEC1 in vivo. PMID:21829689

  9. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016. PMID:27087581

  10. SUMOylation of DEC1 protein regulates its transcriptional activity and enhances its stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongde Hong

    Full Text Available Differentiated embryo-chondrocyte expressed gene 1 (DEC1, also known as sharp2, stra13, or BHLHB2 is a mammalian basic helix-loop-helix protein that is involved in many aspects of gene regulation through acting as a transcription factor. Changes in DEC1 expression levels have been implicated in the development of cancers. Using COS-7 cell, we showed that DEC1 can be modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers, SUMO1, 2 and 3. Two major SUMOylation sites (K(159 and K(279 were identified in the C-terminal domain of DEC1. Substitution of either K(159 or K(279 with arginine reduced DEC1 SUMOylation, but substitution of both K(159 and K(279 abolished SUMOylation, and more protein appeared to be retained in the cytoplasm compared to wild-type DEC1. The expression of DEC1 was up-regulated after serum starvation as previously reported, but at the same time, serum starvation also led to more SUMOylation of DEC1. In MCF-7 cells SUMOylation also stabilized DEC1 through inhibiting its ubiquitination. Moreover, SUMOylation of DEC1 promoted its repression of CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activity through recruitment of histone deacetylase1. These findings suggested that posttranslational modification of DEC1 in the form of SUMOylation may serve as a key factor that regulates the function of DEC1 in vivo.

  11. The role of transcriptional regulation in maintaining the availability of mycobacterial adenylate cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium species have a complex cAMP regulatory network indicated by the high number of adenylate cyclases annotated in their genomes. However the need for a high level of redundancy in adenylate cyclase genes remains unknown. We have used semiquantitiative RT-PCR to examine the expression of eight Mycobacterium smegmatis cyclases with orthologs in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where cAMP has recently been shown to be important for virulence. All eight cyclases were transcribed in all environments tested, and only four demonstrated environmental-mediated changes in transcription. M. smegmatis genes MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4279 were upregulated during starvation conditions while MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4924 were downregulated in H2O2 and MSMEG_3780 was downregulated in low pH and starvation. Promoter fusion constructs containing M. tuberculosis H37Rv promoters showed consistent regulation compared to their M. smegmatis orthologs. Overall our findings indicate that while low levels of transcriptional regulation occur, regulation at the mRNA level does not play a major role in controlling cellular cyclase availability in a given environment.

  12. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl- cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P.; Serizier, Sandy B.; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na+/H+ exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca2+ channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl− uptake in zebrafish for the first time.

  13. Analysis of DNA binding and transcriptional activation by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR of Xanthobacter flavus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, G; Ridder, ANJA; Dijkhuizen, L; Meijer, WG; Meijer, Wim G.

    2003-01-01

    The LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR controls the expression of the cbb and gap-pgk operons in Xanthobacter flavus, which encode the majority of the enzymes of the Calvin cycle required for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The cbb operon promoter of this chemoautotrophic bacterium contains three po

  14. ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 negatively regulates flowering through directly promoting Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Yang, Wenyu; Xie, Qi

    2016-01-01

    During the life cycle of a plant, one of the major biological processes is the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. In Arabidopsis, flowering time is precisely controlled by extensive environmental and internal cues. Gibberellins (GAs) promote flowering, while abscisic acid (ABA) is considered as a flowering suppressor. However, the detailed mechanism through which ABA inhibits the floral transition is poorly understood. Here, we report that ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4), a key component in the ABA signalling pathway, negatively regulates floral transition by directly promoting FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) transcription. The abi4 mutant showed the early flowering phenotype whereas ABI4-overexpressing (OE-ABI4) plants had delayed floral transition. Consistently, quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) assay revealed that the FLC transcription level was down-regulated in abi4, but up-regulated in OE-ABI4. The change in FT level was consistent with the pattern of FLC expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-qPCR (ChIP-qPCR), electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and tobacco transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 promotes FLC expression by directly binding to its promoter. Genetic analysis demonstrated that OE-ABI4::flc-3 could not alter the flc-3 phenotype. OE-FLC::abi4 showed a markedly delayed flowering phenotype, which mimicked OE-FLC::WT, and suggested that ABI4 acts upstream of FLC in the same genetic pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that ABA inhibits the floral transition by activating FLC transcription through ABI4. PMID:26507894

  15. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  16. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. → mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. → Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). → Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  17. A MYB transcription factor regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) fruit during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palapol, Yossapol; Ketsa, Saichol; Lin-Wang, Kui; Ferguson, Ian B; Allan, Andrew C

    2009-05-01

    Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) fruit undergo rapid red colour development, both on the tree and after harvest, resulting in high anthocyanin production in the pericarp. Here, we report the isolation of three full-length mangosteen MYB transcription factors (GmMYB1, GmMYB7 and GmMYB10) and all the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway genes (GmPal to GmUFGT). Phylogenetic analysis at the protein level of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor family showed GmMYB10 had a high degree of similarity with production of anthocyanin pigment1 in Arabidopsis and as well as sequences from other plant species related to the elevation of anthocyanin pigmentation. In transient transactivation assays, GmMYB10, co-expressed with AtbHLH2, strongly activated the GmDFR and AtDFR promoters. Transcripts of GmMYB10 and GmUFGT were highly abundant with onset of pigmentation and subsequently during red colouration. Our results suggest that GmMYB10 plays an important role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis both on the tree and after harvest, while GmUFGT may be a key biosynthetic gene in mangosteen pigmentation. The expression patterns of GmMYB10 and GmUFGT correlated with ethylene production that increased linearly until stage 5 (dark purple) and decreased thereafter. 1-Methycyclopropene (1-MCP) clearly delayed red colouration with resulting down-regulation of GmMYB10. These results suggest that the effect of ethylene on anthocyanin biosynthesis may be via the regulation of GmMYB10 expression.

  18. Transcription factor NFE2L2/NRF2 is a regulator of macroautophagy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Marta; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; García-Yagüe, Ángel J.; Escoll, Maribel; de Ceballos, María L.; Van Leuven, Fred; Rábano, Alberto; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Rojo, Ana I.; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a highly coordinated process that is controlled at several levels including transcriptional regulation. Here, we identify the transcription factor NFE2L2/NRF2 (nuclear factor, erythroid 2 like 2) as a regulator of autophagy gene expression and its relevance in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD) that reproduces impaired APP (amyloid β precursor protein) and human (Hs)MAPT/TAU processing, clearance and aggregation. We screened the chromatin immunoprecipitation database ENCODE for 2 proteins, MAFK and BACH1, that bind the NFE2L2-regulated enhancer antioxidant response element (ARE). Using a script generated from the JASPAR's consensus ARE sequence, we identified 27 putative AREs in 16 autophagy-related genes. Twelve of these sequences were validated as NFE2L2 regulated AREs in 9 autophagy genes by additional ChIP assays and quantitative RT-PCR on human and mouse cells after NFE2L2 activation with sulforaphane. Mouse embryo fibroblasts of nfe2l2-knockout mice exhibited reduced expression of autophagy genes, which was rescued by an NFE2L2 expressing lentivirus, and impaired autophagy flux when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. NFE2L2-deficient mice co-expressing HsAPPV717I and HsMAPTP301L, exhibited more intracellular aggregates of these proteins and reduced neuronal levels of SQSTM1/p62, CALCOCO2/NDP52, ULK1, ATG5 and GABARAPL1. Also, colocalization of HsAPPV717I and HsMAPTP301L with the NFE2L2-regulated autophagy marker SQSTM1/p62 was reduced in the absence of NFE2L2. In AD patients, neurons expressing high levels of APP or MAPT also expressed SQSTM1/p62 and nuclear NFE2L2, suggesting their attempt to degrade intraneuronal aggregates through autophagy. This study shows that NFE2L2 modulates autophagy gene expression and suggests a new strategy to combat proteinopathies. PMID:27427974

  19. New family of tungstate-responsive transcriptional regulators in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Alexey E; Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Zane, Grant M; Siddartha, Kavya; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Novichkov, Pavel S

    2013-10-01

    The trace elements molybdenum and tungsten are essential components of cofactors of many metalloenzymes. However, in sulfate-reducing bacteria, high concentrations of molybdate and tungstate oxyanions inhibit growth, thus requiring the tight regulation of their homeostasis. By a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, we identified a novel regulator family, tungstate-responsive regulator (TunR), controlling the homeostasis of tungstate and molybdate in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. The effector-sensing domains of these regulators are similar to those of the known molybdate-responsive regulator ModE, while their DNA-binding domains are homologous to XerC/XerD site-specific recombinases. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 40 TunR family members. Positional analysis of TunR sites and putative promoters allowed us to classify most TunR proteins into two groups: (i) activators of modABC genes encoding a high-affinity molybdenum and tungsten transporting system and (ii) repressors of genes for toluene sulfonate uptake (TSUP) family transporters. The activation of modA and modBC genes by TunR in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was confirmed in vivo, and we discovered that the activation was diminished in the presence of tungstate. A predicted 30-bp TunR-binding motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays. A novel TunR family of bacterial transcriptional factors controls tungstate and molybdate homeostasis in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. We proposed that TunR proteins participate in protection of the cells from the inhibition by these oxyanions. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a family of bacterial transcriptional factors evolved from site-specific recombinases. PMID:23913324

  20. Transcriptional regulation of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) by the tumor suppressor protein p53

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Melendez, Matias Eliseo; Waters, Timothy; Swann, Peter; Hainaut, Pierre; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) belongs to the superfamily of uracil DNA glycosylases (UDG) and is the first enzyme in the base-excision repair pathway (BER) that removes thymine from G:T mismatches at CpG sites. This glycosylase activity has also been found to be critical for active demethylation of genes involved in embryonic development. Here we show that wild-type p53 transcriptionally regulates TDG expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase assays indicate that wild-ty...

  1. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  2. Identification and characterization of seed-specific transcription factors regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in black rice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C.-K; Cho, M.-A.; Choi, Y.-H.; Kim, J.-A.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kim, Y.-K.; Park, S.-H

    2011-01-01

    Black rice is rich in anthocyanin and is expected to have more healthful dietary potential than white rice. We assessed expression of anthocyanin in black rice cultivars using a newly designed 135 K Oryza sativa microarray. A total of 12,673 genes exhibited greater than 2.0-fold up- or down-regulation in comparisons between three rice cultivars and three seed developmental stages. The 137 transcription factor genes found to be associated with production of anthocyanin pigment were classified ...

  3. A new role for plant R2R3-MYB transcription factors in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleonora Cominelli; Chiara Tonelli

    2009-01-01

    @@ MYB proteins are transcription factors present in all eukaryotes,sharing a common DNA-binding domain that consists of one to three imperfect helix-helix-turn-helix repeats of about 50 amino acids,called RI,R2,and R3 respectively [1].In animals and yeast these proteins represent a small gene family [1].Animal R1R2R3-MYB proteins have been described for their role in cell cycle regulation mainly at the G1/S,but also at the G2/M transition,as firstly demonstrated in Drosophila [2].

  4. The interplay between the master transcription factor PU.1 and miR-424 regulates human monocyte/macrophage differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, A.; Ballarino, M.; Sorrentino, A; Sthandier, O.; De Angelis, F. G.; Marchioni, M; Masella, B; Guarini, A.; Fatica, A.; Peschle, C; Bozzoni, I

    2007-01-01

    We describe a pathway by which the master transcription factor PU.1 regulates human monocyte/macrophage differentiation. This includes miR-424 and the transcriptional factor NFI-A. We show that PU.1 and these two components are interlinked in a finely tuned temporal and regulatory circuitry: PU.1 activates the transcription of miR-424, and this up-regulation is involved in stimulating monocyte differentiation through miR-424-dependent translational repression of NFI-A. In turn, the decrease i...

  5. E2F1-Mediated Induction of NFYB Attenuates Apoptosis via Joint Regulation of a Pro-Survival Transcriptional Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Jiang

    Full Text Available The E2F1 transcription factor regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis through the control of a considerable variety of target genes. Previous work has detailed the role of other transcription factors in mediating the specificity of E2F function. Here we identify the NF-YB transcription factor as a novel direct E2F1 target. Genome-wide expression analysis of the effects of NFYB knockdown on E2F1-mediated transcription identified a large group of genes that are co-regulated by E2F1 and NFYB. We also provide evidence that knockdown of NFYB enhances E2F1-induced apoptosis, suggesting a pro-survival function of the NFYB/E2F1 joint transcriptional program. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that deregulation of these NFY-dependent E2F1 target genes might play a role in sarcomagenesis as well as drug resistance.

  6. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also. PMID:16207912

  7. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-02-18

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. PMID:26748097

  8. CitI, a Transcription Factor Involved in Regulation of Citrate Metabolism in Lactic Acid Bacteria†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mauricio G.; Magni, Christian; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma

    2005-01-01

    A large variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can utilize citrate under fermentative conditions. Although much information concerning the metabolic pathways leading to citrate utilization by LAB has been gathered, the mechanisms regulating these pathways are obscure. In Weissella paramesenteroides (formerly called Leuconostoc paramesenteroides), transcription of the citMDEFCGRP citrate operon and the upstream divergent gene citI is induced by the presence of citrate in the medium. Although genetic experiments have suggested that CitI is a transcriptional activator whose activity can be modulated in response to citrate availability, specific details of the interaction between CitI and DNA remained unknown. In this study, we show that CitI recognizes two A+T-rich operator sites located between citI and citM and that the DNA-binding affinity of CitI is increased by citrate. Subsequently, this citrate signal propagation leads to the activation of the cit operon through an enhanced recruitment of RNA polymerase to its promoters. Our results indicate that the control of CitI by the cellular pools of citrate provides a mechanism for sensing the availability of citrate and adjusting the expression of the cit operon accordingly. In addition, this is the first reported example of a transcription factor directly functioning as a citrate-activated switch allowing the cell to optimize the generation of metabolic energy. PMID:16030208

  9. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  10. ETS family transcriptional regulators drive chromatin dynamics and malignancy in squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanseul; Schramek, Daniel; Adam, Rene C; Keyes, Brice E; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating stem cells (SCs) exhibit distinct patterns of transcription factors and gene expression compared to healthy counterparts. Here, we show that dramatic shifts in large open-chromatin domain (super-enhancer) landscapes underlie these differences and reflect tumor microenvironment. By in vivo super-enhancer and transcriptional profiling, we uncover a dynamic cancer-specific epigenetic network selectively enriched for binding motifs of a transcription factor cohort expressed in squamous cell carcinoma SCs (SCC-SCs). Many of their genes, including Ets2 and Elk3, are themselves regulated by SCC-SC super-enhancers suggesting a cooperative feed-forward loop. Malignant progression requires these genes, whose knockdown severely impairs tumor growth and prohibits progression from benign papillomas to SCCs. ETS2-deficiency disrupts the SCC-SC super-enhancer landscape and downstream cancer genes while ETS2-overactivation in epidermal-SCs induces hyperproliferation and SCC super-enhancer-associated genes Fos, Junb and Klf5. Together, our findings unearth an essential regulatory network required for the SCC-SC chromatin landscape and unveil its importance in malignant progression. PMID:26590320

  11. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  12. CTCF regulates NELF, DSIF and P-TEFb recruitment during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitem, Clélia; Zaborowska, Justyna; Tellier, Michael; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Cao, Qingfu; Egloff, Sylvain; Handa, Hiroshi; Murphy, Shona

    2015-01-01

    CTCF is a versatile transcription factor with well-established roles in chromatin organization and insulator function. Recent findings also implicate CTCF in the control of elongation by RNA polymerase (RNAP) II. Here we show that CTCF knockdown abrogates RNAP II pausing at the early elongation checkpoint of c-myc by affecting recruitment of DRB-sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF). CTCF knockdown also causes a termination defect on the U2 snRNA genes (U2), by affecting recruitment of negative elongation factor (NELF). In addition, CTCF is required for recruitment of positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which phosphorylates NELF, DSIF, and Ser2 of the RNAP II CTD to activate elongation of transcription of c-myc and recognition of the snRNA gene-specific 3' box RNA processing signal. These findings implicate CTCF in a complex network of protein:protein/protein:DNA interactions and assign a key role to CTCF in controlling RNAP II transcription through the elongation checkpoint of the protein-coding c-myc and the termination site of the non-coding U2, by regulating the recruitment and/or activity of key players in these processes.

  13. Homeodomain Protein Scr Regulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in the Silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Meng; Liu, Chun; Peng, Jian; Qian, Wenliang; Qian, Heying; Tian, Ling; Li, Jiarui; Dai, Dandan; Xu, Anying; Li, Sheng; Xia, Qingyou; Cheng, Daojun

    2015-11-02

    The silkworm Dominant trimolting (Moltinism, M³) mutant undergoes three larval molts and exhibits precocious metamorphosis. In this study, we found that compared with the wild-type (WT) that undergoes four larval molts, both the juvenile hormone (JH) concentration and the expression of the JH-responsive gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) began to be greater in the second instar of the M³ mutant. A positional cloning analysis revealed that only the homeodomain transcription factor gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is located in the genomic region that is tightly linked to the M³ locus. The expression level of the Scr gene in the brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (Br-CC-CA) complex, which controls the synthesis of JH, was very low in the final larval instar of both the M³ and WT larvae, and exhibited a positive correlation with JH titer changes. Importantly, luciferase reporter analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that the Scr protein could promote the transcription of genes involved in JH biosynthesis by directly binding to the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of homeodomain protein on their promoters. These results conclude that the homeodomain protein Scr is transcriptionally involved in the regulation of JH biosynthesis in the silkworm.

  14. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-02-18

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE.

  15. Transcriptional profiles of hybrid Eucalyptus genotypes with contrasting lignin content reveal that monolignol biosynthesis-related genes regulate wood composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotaka eShinya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected three-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis genotypes (AM063 and AM380 that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0% and 48.2%, -cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA and sucrose synthase (SUSY were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase (XTH than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis- related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL. Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents

  16. Identification of a Membrane-Bound Transcriptional Regulator That Links Chitin and Natural Competence in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia, Ankur B.; Lazinski, David W.; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is naturally competent when grown on chitin. It is known that expression of the major regulator of competence, TfoX, is controlled by chitin; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this requirement for chitin have remained unclear. In the present study, we identify and characterize a membrane-bound transcriptional regulator that positively regulates the small RNA (sRNA) TfoR, which posttranscriptionally enhances tfoX translation. We show that this regulation of ...

  17. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulation by NFAT transcription factors: new roles for an old player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognol, G P; Carneiro, F R G; Robbs, B K; Faget, D V; Viola, J P B

    2016-01-01

    The NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) family of transcription factors consists of four Ca(2+)-regulated members (NFAT1-NFAT4), which were first described in T lymphocytes. In addition to their well-documented role in T lymphocytes, where they control gene expression during cell activation and differentiation, NFAT proteins are also expressed in a wide range of cells and tissue types and regulate genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The NFAT proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD), which allows all NFAT members to bind to the same DNA sequence in enhancers or promoter regions. The same DNA-binding specificity suggests redundant roles for the NFAT proteins, which is true during the regulation of some genes such as IL-2 and p21. However, it has become increasingly clear that different NFAT proteins and even isoforms can have unique functions. In this review, we address the possible reasons for these distinct roles, particularly regarding N- and C-terminal transactivation regions (TADs) and the partner proteins that interact with these TADs. We also discuss the genes regulated by NFAT during cell cycle regulation and apoptosis and the role of NFAT during tumorigenesis. PMID:27100893

  18. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  19. TAp63 is a master transcriptional regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaohua; Gi, Young Jin; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Chan, Io Long; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY TAp63 prevents premature aging suggesting a link to genes that regulate longevity. Further characterization of TAp63−/− mice revealed that these mice develop obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, similar to those seen in mice lacking two key metabolic regulators, Silent information regulator T1 (Sirt1) and AMPK. While the roles of Sirt1 and AMPK in metabolism have been well studied, their upstream regulators are not well understood. We found that TAp63 is important in regulating energy metabolism by accumulating in response to metabolic stress and transcriptionally activating Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 resulting in increased fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, we found that TAp63 lowers blood glucose levels in response to metformin. Restoration of Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 in TAp63−/− mice rescued some of the metabolic defects of the TAp63−/− mice. Our study defines a role for TAp63 in metabolism and weight control. PMID:23040072

  20. Transcriptional activation of human CDCA8 gene regulated by transcription factor NF-Y in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Miao, Cong-Xiu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Lv-Jun; Gu, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Di; Chen, Lian-Sheng; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2015-09-11

    The cell division cycle associated 8 (CDCA8) gene plays an important role in mitosis. Overexpression of CDCA8 was reported in some human cancers and is required for cancer growth and progression. We found CDCA8 expression was also high in human ES cells (hESCs) but dropped significantly upon hESC differentiation. However, the regulation of CDCA8 expression has not yet been studied. Here, we characterized the CDCA8 promoter and identified its cis-elements and transcription factors. Three transcription start sites were identified. Reporter gene assays revealed that the CDCA8 promoter was activated in hESCs and cancer cell lines. The promoter drove the reporter expression specifically to pluripotent cells during early mouse embryo development and to tumor tissues in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that CDCA8 is transcriptionally activated in hESCs and cancer cells. Mechanistically, two key activation elements, bound by transcription factor NF-Y and CREB1, respectively, were identified in the CDCA8 basic promoter by mutation analyses and electrophoretic motility shift assays. NF-Y binding is positively correlated with promoter activities in different cell types. Interestingly, the NF-YA subunit, binding to the promoter, is primarily a short isoform in hESCs and a long isoform in cancer cells, indicating a different activation mechanism of the CDCA8 transcription between hESCs and cancer cells. Finally, enhanced CDCA8 promoter activities by NF-Y overexpression and reduced CDCA8 transcription by NF-Y knockdown further verified that NF-Y is a positive regulator of CDCA8 transcription. Our study unearths the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CDCA8 expression in hESCs and cancer cells, which provides a better understanding of its biological functions.

  1. Differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in neuroblastoma: Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) regulates HIF2A transcription and correlates to poor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Arash; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Munksgaard Thorén, Matilda; Mohlin, Sofie; Påhlman, Sven

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are differentially regulated in tumor cells. While the current paradigm supports post-translational regulation of the HIF-α subunits, we recently showed that hypoxic HIF-2α is also transcriptionally regulated via insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II in the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of HIF-2α seems to be restricted to neural cell-derived tumors, while HIF-1α is canonically regulated at the post-translational level uniformly across different tumor forms. Enhanced expression of HIF2A mRNA at hypoxia is due to de novo transcription rather than increased mRNA stability, and chemical stabilization of the HIF-α proteins at oxygen-rich conditions unexpectedly leads to increased HIF2A transcription. The enhanced HIF2A levels do not seem to be dependent on active HIF-1. Using a transcriptome array approach, we identified members of the Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)/Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) complex families as potential regulators of HIF2A. Knockdown or inhibition of one of the members, ERRα, leads to decreased expression of HIF2A, and high expression of the ERRα gene ESRRA correlates with poor overall and progression-free survival in a clinical neuroblastoma material consisting of 88 tumors. Thus, targeting of ERRα and pathways regulating transcriptional HIF-2α are promising therapeutic avenues in neuroblastoma.

  2. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity. PMID:21653699

  3. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  5. Transcriptional up-regulation in expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A and transcriptional down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors during organ culture of rat mesenteric artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Guogang; Xu, Cang-Bao; Cao, Yong-Xiao;

    2004-01-01

    receptors (5-HT(2A)) and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT(1)) demonstrated that the contractions occurred via 5-HT(2A) and AT(1) receptors, respectively. Real-time PCR revealed that the 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA was up-regulated in parallel with the contractile response while there was a down-regulation of...... AT(1) receptor mRNA. Transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D and specific protein kinase C inhibitor Ro31-8220 demonstrated that it was a transcriptional mechanism with involvement of protein kinase C that regulated the enhanced expression of 5-HT(2A) receptors in the mesenteric artery....

  6. Ribbon regulates morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland through transcriptional activation and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Lee, Joslynn S; Wells, Michael B; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Slattery, Matthew; Andrew, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors affect spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression often regulating multiple aspects of tissue morphogenesis, including cell-type specification, cell proliferation, cell death, cell polarity, cell shape, cell arrangement and cell migration. In this work, we describe a distinct role for Ribbon (Rib) in controlling cell shape/volume increases during elongation of the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). Notably, the morphogenetic changes in rib mutants occurred without effects on general SG cell attributes such as specification, proliferation and apoptosis. Moreover, the changes in cell shape/volume in rib mutants occurred without compromising epithelial-specific morphological attributes such as apicobasal polarity and junctional integrity. To identify the genes regulated by Rib, we performed ChIP-seq analysis in embryos driving expression of GFP-tagged Rib specifically in the SGs. To learn if the Rib binding sites identified in the ChIP-seq analysis were linked to changes in gene expression, we performed microarray analysis comparing RNA samples from age-matched wild-type and rib null embryos. From the superposed ChIP-seq and microarray gene expression data, we identified 60 genomic sites bound by Rib likely to regulate SG-specific gene expression. We confirmed several of the identified Rib targets by qRT-pCR and/or in situ hybridization. Our results indicate that Rib regulates cell growth and tissue shape in the Drosophila salivary gland via a diverse array of targets through both transcriptional activation and repression. Furthermore, our results suggest that autoregulation of rib expression may be a key component of the SG morphogenetic gene network.

  7. Epigenetic modulation of Homer1a transcription regulation in amygdala and hippocampus with pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Amy L; Mou, Liping; Shah, Nirali; Hu, Jia-Hua; Worley, Paul F; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-03-28

    The consolidation of conditioned fear involves upregulation of genes necessary for long-term memory formation. An important question remains as to whether this results in part from epigenetic regulation and chromatin modulation. We examined whether Homer1a, which is required for memory formation, is necessary for Pavlovian cued fear conditioning, whether it is downstream of BDNF-TrkB activation, and whether this pathway utilizes histone modifications for activity-dependent transcriptional regulation. We initially found that Homer1a knock-out mice exhibited deficits in cued fear conditioning (5 tone-shock presentations with 70 dB, 6 kHz tones and 0.5 s, 0.6 mA footshocks). We then demonstrated that: (1) Homer1a mRNA increases after fear conditioning in vivo within both amygdala and hippocampus of wild-type mice; (2) it increases after BDNF application to primary hippocampal and amygdala cultures in vitro; and (3) these increases are dependent on transcription and MAPK signaling. Furthermore, using chromatin immunoprecipitation we found that both in vitro and in vivo manipulations result in decreases in Homer1 promoter H3K9 methylation in amygdala cells but increases in Homer1 promoter H3 acetylation in hippocampal cells. However, no changes were observed in H4 acetylation or H3K27 dimethylation. Inhibition of histone deacetylation by sodium butyrate enhanced contextual but not cued fear conditioning and enhanced Homer1 H3 acetylation in the hippocampus. These data provide evidence for dynamic epigenetic regulation of Homer1a following BDNF-induced plasticity and during a BDNF-dependent learning process. Furthermore, upregulation of this gene may be regulated through distinct epigenetic modifications in the hippocampus and amygdala.

  8. Circadian metabolic regulation through crosstalk between casein kinase 1δ and transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siming; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Yu, Lei; Saltiel, Alan R; Lin, Jiandie D

    2011-12-01

    Circadian clock coordinates behavior and physiology in mammals in response to light and feeding cycles. Disruption of normal clock function is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, underscoring the emerging concept that temporal regulation of tissue metabolism is a fundamental aspect of energy homeostasis. We have previously demonstrated that transcriptional coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), coordinates circadian metabolic rhythms through simultaneous regulation of metabolic and clock gene expression. In this study, we found that PGC-1α physically interacts with, and is phosphorylated by, casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ), a core component of the circadian pacemaker. CK1δ represses the transcriptional function of PGC-1α in cultured hepatocytes, resulting in decreased gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose secretion. At the molecular level, CK1δ phosphorylation of PGC-1α within its arginine/serine-rich domain enhances its degradation through the proteasome system. Together, these results elucidate a novel mechanism through which circadian pacemaker transduces timing signals to the metabolic regulatory network that controls hepatic energy metabolism.

  9. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function.

  10. Crystal structure of the BTB domain from the LRF/ZBTB7 transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogios, Peter J; Chen, Lu; Privé, Gilbert G

    2007-02-01

    BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF) proteins are transcription regulators with roles in development, differentiation, and oncogenesis. In these proteins, the BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a protein-protein interaction motif that contains a dimerization interface, a possible oligomerization surface, and surfaces for interactions with other factors, including nuclear co-repressors and histone deacetylases. The BTB-ZF protein LRF (also known as ZBTB7, FBI-1, OCZF, and Pokemon) is a master regulator of oncogenesis, and represses the transcription of a variety of important genes, including the ARF, c-fos, and c-myc oncogenes and extracellular matrix genes. We determined the crystal structure of the BTB domain from human LRF to 2.1 A and observed the canonical BTB homodimer fold. However, novel features are apparent on the surface of the homodimer, including differences in the lateral groove and charged pocket regions. The residues that line the lateral groove have little similarity with the equivalent residues from the BCL6 BTB domain, and we show that the 17-residue BCL6 Binding Domain (BBD) from the SMRT co-repressor does not bind to the LRF BTB domain. PMID:17189472

  11. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation. PMID:20930516

  12. PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally regulates the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in primary neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jing; Zhang, Lang; Liu, Shubo; Zhang, Chi [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Jian [The Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital and Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhao, Nanming [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-06-12

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that has been demonstrated to play a key role in degrading both A{beta} and insulin and deficient in IDE function is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) pathology. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular regulation of IDE expression. Here we show IDE levels are markedly decreased in DM2 patients and positively correlated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) levels. Further studies show that PPAR{gamma} plays an important role in regulating IDE expression in rat primary neurons through binding to a functional peroxisome proliferator-response element (PPRE) in IDE promoter and promoting IDE gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that PPAR{gamma} participates in the insulin-induced IDE expression in neurons. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally induces IDE expression which provides a novel mechanism for the use of PPAR{gamma} agonists in both DM2 and AD therapies.

  13. Soybean GmPHD-type transcription regulators improve stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD played a major role in DNA binding. Using a protoplast assay system, we find that GmPHD1 to GmPHD5 had transcriptional suppression activity whereas GmPHD6 did not have. In yeast assay, the GmPHD6 can form homodimer and heterodimer with the other GmPHDs except GmPHD2. The N-terminal plus the variable regions but not the PHD-finger is required for the dimerization. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the GmPHD2 showed salt tolerance when compared with the wild type plants. This tolerance was likely achieved by diminishing the oxidative stress through regulation of downstream genes. SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide important clues for soybean stress tolerance through manipulation of PHD-type transcription regulator.

  14. The E2F transcription factors: key regulators of cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    Ever since its discovery, the RB-1 gene and the corresponding protein, pRB, have been a focal point of cancer research. The isolation of E2F transcription factors provided the key to our current understanding of RB-1 function in the regulation of the cell cycle and in tumor suppression. It is bec......Ever since its discovery, the RB-1 gene and the corresponding protein, pRB, have been a focal point of cancer research. The isolation of E2F transcription factors provided the key to our current understanding of RB-1 function in the regulation of the cell cycle and in tumor suppression....... It is becoming more and more evident that the regulatory circuits governing the cell cycle are very complex and highly interlinked. Certain aspects of RB-1 function, for instance its role in differentiation, cannot be easily explained by the current models of pRB-E2F interaction. One reason is that pRB has...... targets different from E2F, molecules like MyoD for instance. Another reason may be that we have not completely understood the full complexity of E2F function, itself. In this review, we will try to illuminate the role of E2F in pRB- and p53-mediated tumor suppression pathways with particular emphasis...

  15. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates gene expression through transcription factor release in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Botanga, Christopher J; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Palma, Kristoffer; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina; Sandbech-Clausen, Signe; Lichota, Jacek; Brodersen, Peter; Grasser, Klaus D; Mattsson, Ole; Glazebrook, Jane; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-08-20

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation.

  16. PPP1, a plant-specific regulator of transcription controls Arabidopsis development and PIN expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamins, René; Barbez, Elke; Ortbauer, Martina; Terpstra, Inez; Lucyshyn, Doris; Moulinier-Anzola, Jeanette; Khan, Muhammad Asaf; Leitner, Johannes; Malenica, Nenad; Butt, Haroon; Korbei, Barbara; Scheres, Ben; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Luschnig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directional transport of auxin is essential for plant development, with PIN auxin transport proteins representing an integral part of the machinery that controls hormone distribution. However, unlike the rapidly emerging framework of molecular determinants regulating PIN protein abundance and subcellular localization, insights into mechanisms controlling PIN transcription are still limited. Here we describe PIN2 PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PPP1), an evolutionary conserved plant-specific DNA binding protein that acts on transcription of PIN genes. Consistent with PPP1 DNA-binding activity, PPP1 reporter proteins are nuclear localized and analysis of PPP1 null alleles and knockdown lines indicated a function as a positive regulator of PIN expression. Furthermore, we show that ppp1 pleiotropic mutant phenotypes are partially reverted by PIN overexpression, and results are presented that underline a role of PPP1-PIN promoter interaction in PIN expression control. Collectively, our findings identify an elementary, thus far unknown, plant-specific DNA-binding protein required for post-embryonic plant development, in general, and correct expression of PIN genes, in particular. PMID:27553690

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Yeon

    2016-06-01

    Expression of each gene can be controlled at several steps during the flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. Tight regulation of gene expression is especially important for stem cells because of their greater ripple effects, compared with terminally differentiated cells. Dysregulation of gene expression arising in stem cells can be perpetuated within the stem cell pool via self-renewal throughout life. In addition, transcript profiles within stem cells can determine the selective advantage or disadvantage of each cell, leading to changes in cell fate, such as a tendency for proliferation, death, and differentiation. The identification of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) and greater understanding of their cellular physiology have raised the possibility of using NSPCs to replace damaged or injured neurons. However, an accurate grasp of gene expression control must take precedence in order to use NSPCs in therapies for neurological diseases. Recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in NSPC fate decisions. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recent findings on key mRNA modulators and their vital roles in NSPC homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  19. Estradiol-Induced Transcriptional Regulation of Long Non-Coding RNA, HOTAIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Arunoday; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) is a 2.2 kb long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), transcribed from the antisense strand of homeobox C (HOXC) gene locus in chromosome 12. HOTAIR acts as a scaffolding lncRNA. It interacts and guides various chromatin-modifying complexes such as PRC2 (polycomb-repressive complex 2) and LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) to the target gene promoters leading to their gene silencing. Various studies have demonstrated that HOTAIR overexpression is associated with breast cancer. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate that HOTAIR is required for viability of breast cancer cells and is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol (E2) in vitro and in vivo. This chapter describes protocols for analysis of the HOTAIR promoter, cloning, transfection and dual luciferase assays, knockdown of protein synthesis by antisense oligonucleotides, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. These protocols are useful for studying the estrogen-mediated transcriptional regulation of lncRNA HOTAIR, as well as other protein coding genes and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26585152

  20. Role of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in estradiol-mediated neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Zhang, Wenri; Klaus, Judith; Young, Jennifer; Koerner, Ines; Sheldahl, Laird C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Martínez-Murillo, Francisco; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2006-09-01

    Estrogen reduces brain injury after experimental cerebral ischemia in part through a genomic mechanism of action. Using DNA microarrays, we analyzed the genomic response of the brain to estradiol, and we identified a transcript, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), that is highly induced in the cerebral cortex by estradiol under ischemic conditions. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neural injury, we confirmed and characterized CART mRNA and protein up-regulation by estradiol in surviving neurons, and we demonstrated that i.v. administration of a rat CART peptide is protective against ischemic brain injury in vivo. We further demonstrated binding of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein to a CART promoter CRE site in ischemic brain and rapid activation by CART of ERK in primary cultured cortical neurons. The findings suggest that CART is an important player in estrogen-mediated neuroprotection and a potential therapeutic agent for stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. ischemia | stroke | estrogen

  1. Identification of transcription factors regulating CTNNAL1 expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    Full Text Available Adhesion molecules play important roles in airway hyperresponsiveness or airway inflammation. Our previous study indicated catenin alpha-like 1 (CTNNAL1, an alpha-catenin-related protein, was downregulated in asthma patients and animal model. In this study, we observed that the expression of CTNNAL1 was increased in lung tissue of the ozone-stressed Balb/c mice model and in acute ozone stressed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC. In order to identify the possible DNA-binding proteins regulating the transcription of CTNNAL1 gene in HBEC, we designed 8 oligo- nucleotide probes corresponding to various regions of the CTNNAL1 promoter in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. We detected 5 putative transcription factors binding sites within CTNNAL1 promoter region that can recruit LEF-1, AP-2α and CREB respectively by EMSA and antibody supershift assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay verified that AP-2 α and LEF-1 could be recruited to the CTNNAL1 promoter. Therefore we further analyzed the functions of putative AP-2 and LEF-1 sites within CTNNAL1 promoter by site-directed mutagenesis of those sites within pGL3/FR/luc. We observed a reduction in human CTNNAL1 promoter activity of mutants of both AP-2α and LEF-1 sites. Pre-treatment with ASOs targeting LEF-1and AP-2α yielded significant reduction of ozone-stress-induced CTNNAL1 expression. The activation of AP-2α and LEF-1, followed by CTNNAL1 expression, showed a correlation during a 16-hour time course. Our data suggest that a robust transcriptional CTNNAL1 up-regulation occurs during acute ozone-induced stress and is mediated at least in part by ozone-induced recruitments of LEF-1 and AP-2α to the human CTNNAL1 promoter.

  2. The transcription factor AREB1 regulates primary metabolic pathways in tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastías, Adriana; Yañez, Mónica; Osorio, Sonia; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Fernie, Alisdair R; Casaretto, José A

    2014-06-01

    Tomato fruit development is regulated both by the action of plant hormones and by tight genetic control. Recent studies suggest that abscisic acid (ABA) signalling may affect different aspects of fruit maturation. Previously, it was shown that SlAREB1, an ABA-regulated transcription factor involved in stress-induced responses, is expressed in seeds and in fruit tissues in tomato. Here, the role of SlAREB1 in regulating the expression of genes relevant for primary metabolic pathways and affecting the metabolic profile of the fruit was investigated using transgenic tomato lines. Metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on pericarp tissue from fruits harvested at three stages of fruit development. Principal component analysis of the data could distinguish the metabolite profiles of non-transgenic fruits from those that overexpress and down-regulate SlAREB1. Overexpression of SlAREB1 resulted in increased content of organic acids, hexoses, hexose-phosphates, and amino acids in immature green, mature green, and red ripe fruits, and these modifications correlated with the up-regulation of enzyme-encoding genes involved in primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. A non-targeted LC-MS analysis indicated that the composition of secondary metabolites is also affected in transgenic lines. In addition, gene expression data revealed that some genes associated with fruit ripening are also up-regulated in SlAREB1-overexpressing lines compared with wild-type and antisense lines. Taken together, the results suggest that SlAREB1 participates in the regulation of the metabolic programming that takes place during fruit ripening and that may explain part of the role of ABA in fruit development in tomato.

  3. Flowering Time-Regulated Genes in Maize Include the Transcription Factor ZmMADS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Philipp; Bircheneder, Susanne; Zhou, Liang-Zi; Schlüter, Urte; Gahrtz, Manfred; Sonnewald, Uwe; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Flowering time (FTi) control is well examined in the long-day plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and increasing knowledge is available for the short-day plant rice (Oryza sativa). In contrast, little is known in the day-neutral and agronomically important crop plant maize (Zea mays). To learn more about FTi and to identify novel regulators in this species, we first compared the time points of floral transition of almost 30 maize inbred lines and show that tropical lines exhibit a delay in flowering transition of more than 3 weeks under long-day conditions compared with European flint lines adapted to temperate climate zones. We further analyzed the leaf transcriptomes of four lines that exhibit strong differences in flowering transition to identify new key players of the flowering control network in maize. We found strong differences among regulated genes between these lines and thus assume that the regulation of FTi is very complex in maize. Especially genes encoding MADS box transcriptional regulators are up-regulated in leaves during the meristem transition. ZmMADS1 was selected for functional studies. We demonstrate that it represents a functional ortholog of the central FTi integrator SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) of Arabidopsis. RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of ZmMADS1 resulted in a delay of FTi in maize, while strong overexpression caused an early-flowering phenotype, indicating its role as a flowering activator. Taken together, we report that ZmMADS1 represents a positive FTi regulator that shares an evolutionarily conserved function with SOC1 and may now serve as an ideal stating point to study the integration and variation of FTi pathways also in maize. PMID:27457125

  4. Systematic identification of cell cycle regulated transcription factors from microarray time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell cycle has long been an important model to study the genome-wide transcriptional regulation. Although several methods have been introduced to identify cell cycle regulated genes from microarray data, they can not be directly used to investigate cell cycle regulated transcription factors (CCRTFs, because for many transcription factors (TFs it is their activities instead of expressions that are periodically regulated across the cell cycle. To overcome this problem, it is useful to infer TF activities across the cell cycle by integrating microarray expression data with ChIP-chip data, and then examine the periodicity of the inferred activities. For most species, however, large-scale ChIP-chip data are still not available. Results We propose a two-step method to identify the CCRTFs by integrating microarray cell cycle data with ChIP-chip data or motif discovery data. In S. cerevisiae, we identify 42 CCRTFs, among which 23 have been verified experimentally. The cell cycle related behaviors (e.g. at which cell cycle phase a TF achieves the highest activity predicted by our method are consistent with the well established knowledge about them. We also find that the periodical activity fluctuation of some TFs can be perturbed by the cell synchronization treatment. Moreover, by integrating expression data with in-silico motif discovery data, we identify 8 cell cycle associated regulatory motifs, among which 7 are binding sites for well-known cell cycle related TFs. Conclusion Our method is effective to identify CCRTFs by integrating microarray cell cycle data with TF-gene binding information. In S. cerevisiae, the TF-gene binding information is provided by the systematic ChIP-chip experiments. In other species where systematic ChIP-chip data is not available, in-silico motif discovery and analysis provide us with an alternative method. Therefore, our method is ready to be implemented to the microarray cell cycle data sets from

  5. Hyperosmotic stress regulates the distribution and stability of myocardin-related transcription factor, a key modulator of the cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ly, Donald L.; Waheed, Faiza; Lodyga, Monika;

    2013-01-01

    -regulated coactivator of serum response factor, is a major link between the actin skeleton and transcriptional control. We therefore investigated whether MRTF is regulated by hyperosmotic stress. Here we show that hypertonicity induces robust, rapid, and transient translocation of MRTF from the cytosol to the nucleus...

  6. The nickel-responsive regulator NikR controls activation and repression of gene transcription in Helicobacter pylori.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A. Heijens (Angela); R. Sarwari (Roya); J. Stoof (Jeroen); C.W. Penn (Charles); J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe NikR protein is a nickel-dependent regulatory protein which is a member of the ribbon-helix-helix family of transcriptional regulators. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori expresses a NikR ortholog, which was previously shown to mediate regulation of metal metabolism and urease

  7. A global transcriptional regulator in Thermococcus kodakaraensis controls the expression levels of both glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme-encoding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanai, T.; Akerboom, A.P.; Takedomi, S.; Werken, van de H.J.G.; Blombach, F.; Oost, van der J.; Murakami, T.; Atomi, H.; Imanaka, T.

    2007-01-01

    We identified a novel regulator, Thermococcales glycolytic regulator (Tgr), functioning as both an activator and a repressor of transcription in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Tgr (TK1769) displays similarity (28% identical) to Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB (PF1743), a tr

  8. Molecular Basis for the Regulation of Transcriptional Coactivator p300 in Myogenic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jihong; Wang, Yingjian; Hamed, Munerah; Lacroix, Natascha; Li, Qiao

    2015-09-10

    Skeletal myogenesis is a highly ordered process which specifically depends on the function of transcriptional coactivator p300. Previous studies have established that Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), a positive regulator of p300 in proliferating cells, is also important for proper skeletal muscle development. Nevertheless, it is not clear as to how the p300 is regulated by myogenic signaling events given that both p300 and Akt are involved in many cellular processes. Our studies revealed that the levels of p300 protein are temporally maintained in ligand-enhanced skeletal myocyte development. Interestingly, this maintenance of p300 protein is observed at the stage of myoblast differentiation, which coincides with an increase in Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, regulation of p300 during myoblast differentiation appears to be mediated by Akt signaling. Blunting of p300 impairs myogenic expression and myoblast differentiation. Thus, our data suggests a particular role for Akt in myoblast differentiation through interaction with p300. Our studies also establish the potential of exploiting p300 regulation and Akt activation to decipher the complex signaling cascades involved in skeletal muscle development.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf infection, we investigated expression and regulatory me