WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric water vapor

  1. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line...

  2. Gravitational Condensation of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2015-01-01

    Devices that collect water from the atmospheric air using condensation are well-known. They operate in a manner very similar to that of a dehumidifier: air is passed through a cooled coil, making water to condense. This is the most common technology in use. Here, we present a device that can collect a large amount of water (more than 1m 3 /s) from the atmospheric air using gravitational condensation. Another novelty of this device is that it consumes little electricity. In addition, the new t...

  3. Atmospheric absorption of terahertz radiation and water vapor continuum effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water vapor continuum absorption spectrum was investigated using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. The transmission of broadband terahertz radiation from 0.300 to 1.500 THz was recorded for multiple path lengths and relative humidity levels. The absorption coefficient as a function of frequency was determined and compared with theoretical predictions and available water vapor absorption data. The prediction code is able to separately model the different parts of atmospheric absorption for a range of experimental conditions. A variety of conditions were accurately modeled using this code including both self and foreign gas broadening for low and high water vapor pressures for many different measurement techniques. The intensity and location of the observed absorption lines were also in good agreement with spectral databases. However, there was a discrepancy between the resonant line spectrum simulation and the observed absorption spectrum in the atmospheric transmission windows caused by the continuum absorption. A small discrepancy remained even after using the best available data from the literature to account for the continuum absorption. From the experimental and resonant line simulation spectra the air-broadening continuum parameter was calculated and compared with values available in the literature. -- Highlights: •Broadband absorption measurements of water vapor were performed at 300–1500 GHz. •The absorption coefficient of water vapor was modeled and compared with data. •The air-broadened continuum coefficient for water vapor was determined. •The modeled absorption coefficient is presented for 10–90% humidity at 0–3 THz

  4. High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the large number of rotational and vibrational transitions of many molecules of interest. This region of the spectrum has particular utility for applications such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow frequency windows, accurate measurements across a wide spectrum are lacking. The water vapor continuum absorption is an excess absorption that is unaccounted for in resonant line spectrum simulations. Currently a semiempirical model is employed to account for this absorption, however more measurements are necessary to properly describe the continuum absorption in this region. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy measurements from previous work are enhanced with high-resolution broadband measurements in the atmospheric transmission window at 1.5THz. The transmission of broadband terahertz radiation through pure water vapor as well as air with varying relative humidity levels was recorded for multiple path lengths. The pure water vapor measurements provide accurate determination of the line broadening parameters and experimental measurements of the transition strengths of the lines in the frequency region. Also these measurements coupled with the atmospheric air measurements allow the water vapor continuum absorption to be independently identified at 1.5THz. Simulations from an atmospheric absorption model using parameters from the HITRAN database are compared with the current and previous experimental results.

  5. Retrieving Atmospheric Precipitable Water Vapor Using Artificial Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Discussing of water vapor and its variation is the important issue for synoptic meteorology and meteorology. In physical Atmospheric, the moisture content of the earth atmosphere is one of the most important parameters, it is hard to represent water vapor because of its space-time variation. High-spectral resolution Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS data can be used to retrieve the small scale vertical structure of air temperature, which provided a more accurate and good initial field for the numerical forecasting and the large-scale weather analysis. This paper proposes an artificial neural network to retrieve the clear sky atmospheric radiation data from AIRS and comparing with the AIRS Level-2 standard product, and gain a good inversion results.

  6. Water vapor measurement system in global atmospheric sampling program, appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, D. R.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The water vapor measurement system used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is described. The system used a modified version of a commercially available dew/frostpoint hygrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled mirror sensor. The modifications extended the range of the hygrometer to enable air sample measurements with frostpoint temperatures down to -80 C at altitudes of 6 to 13 km. Other modifications were made to permit automatic, unattended operation in an aircraft environment. This report described the hygrometer, its integration with the GASP system, its calibration, and operational aspects including measurement errors. The estimated uncertainty of the dew/frostpoint measurements was + or - 1.7 Celsius.

  7. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Gabriel J Bowen

    2015-01-01

    Human activities affect the water cycle in many ways, some of which remain difficult to measure. One such process is emission of water vapor through combustion of fossil fuels, which may be a significant part of the atmospheric water budget in urban centers. It has not previously been possible to uniquely identify combustion-derived water vapor with atmospheric measurements. We introduce a method for the measurement of combustion-derived vapor, and show that this source contributes as much as...

  8. Trapping of water vapor from an atmosphere by condensed silicate matter formed by high-temperature pulse vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Dikov, Yu. P.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Wlotzka, F.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of planetary atmospheres is thought to be the result of bombardment of a growing planet by massive planetesimals. According to some models, the accumulation of released water vapor and/or carbon dioxide can result in the formation of a dense and hot primordial atmosphere. Among source and sink processes of atmospheric water vapor the formation of hydroxides was considered mainly as rehydration of dehydrated minerals (foresterite and enstatite). From our point of view, the formation of hydroxides is not limited to rehydration. Condensation of small silicate particles in a spreading vapor cloud and their interaction with a wet atmosphere can also result in the origin of hydrated phases which have no genetic connections with initial water bearing minerals. We present results of two experiments of a simulated interaction of condensed silicate matter which originated during vaporization of dry clinopyroxene in a wet helium atmosphere.

  9. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land–atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few secon...

  10. Potential energy of atmospheric water vapor and the air motions induced by water vapor condensation on different spatial scales

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, Anastassia M.; Gorshkov, Victor G.

    2010-01-01

    Basic physical principles are considered that are responsible for the origin of dynamic air flow upon condensation of water vapor, the partial pressure of which represents a store of potential energy in the atmosphere of Earth. Quantitative characteristics of such flow are presented for several spatial scales. It is shown that maximum condensation-induced velocities reach 160 m/s and are realized in compact circulation patterns like tornadoes.

  11. A simplified method to estimate atmospheric water vapor using MODIS near-infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinming; Gu, Xiaoping; Wu, Zhanping

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric water vapor plays a significant role in the study of climate change and hydrological cycle processes. In order to acquire the accurate distribution of atmospheric water vapor which is varying with time, location, and altitude, it is necessary to monitor it at high spatial and temporal resolution. Unfortunately, it is difficult to map the spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor due to the lack of meteorological instrumentation at adequate spatial and temporal observation scales. This paper introduces a simplified method to retrieve Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using the ratio of the apparent reflectance values of the 18th and 19th band of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Compared to the EOS PWV products of the same time and area, the PWV estimated using this simplified method is closer to the radiosonde results which is considered as the true PWV value. Results reveal that this simplified method is applicable over cloud-free atmospheric conditions of the mid-latitude regions.

  12. 3D Water Vapor Field in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed with Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Späth, F.; A. Behrendt; Muppa, S. K.; S. Metzendorf; A. Riede; V. Wulfmeyer

    2016-01-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) determines fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies which show that this high resolution combined with 2- and 3-dimensional scans allows for new insights in the 3-dimensional structure of the water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In spring 2013, th...

  13. Development and Validation of Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics for the Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. The formulation of the sources and sinks of tracer water is generally proportional to the prognostic water vapor variable. Because all water has been accounted for in tracers, the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The tracers have been implemented in a GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation consisting of several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. The recycling of water and interannual variability of the sources of water will be examined. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation will be discussed.

  14. A Plant-Based Proxy for the Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliker, B.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a major component of the global hydrological cycle, but the isotopic balance of vapor is largely unknown. It is shown here that the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water in the epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Tillandsia usneoides (Spanish Moss) is controlled by the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor in both field and lab studies. Assuming that the leaf-water isotopic signature (and hence the atmospheric water vapor signature) is recorded in plant organic material, the atmospheric water vapor oxygen isotope ratios for Miami, Florida (USA) were reconstructed for several years from 1878 to 2005 using contemporary and herbarium specimens. T. usneoides ranges from Virginia, USA southwards through the tropics to Argentina, and the CAM epiphytic lifeform is widespread in other species. Therefore, epiphytes may be used to reconstruct the isotope ratio of atmospheric water for spatial scales that span over 60° of latitude and temporal scales that cover the last century of global temperature increase.

  15. Solar geoengineering, atmospheric water vapor transport, and land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ken; Cao, Long

    2015-04-01

    This work, using the GeoMIP database supplemented by additional simulations, discusses how solar geoengineering, as projected by the climate models, affects temperature and the hydrological cycle, and how this in turn is related to projected changes in net primary productivity (NPP). Solar geoengineering simulations typically exhibit reduced precipitation. Solar geoengineering reduces precipitation because solar geoengineering reduces evaporation. Evaporation precedes precipitation, and, globally, evaporation equals precipitation. CO2 tends to reduce evaporation through two main mechanisms: (1) CO2 tends to stabilize the atmosphere especially over the ocean, leading to a moister atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean. This moistening of the boundary layer suppresses evaporation. (2) CO2 tends to diminish evapotranspiration, at least in most land-surface models, because higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations allow leaves to close their stomata and avoid water loss. In most high-CO2 simulations, these effects of CO2 which tend to suppress evaporation are masked by the tendency of CO2-warming effect to increase evaporation. In a geoengineering simulation, with the warming effect of CO2 largely offset by the solar geoengineering, the evaporation suppressing characteristics of CO2 are no longer masked and are clearly exhibited. Decreased precipitation in solar geoengineering simulations is a bit like ocean acidification - an effect of high CO2 concentrations that is not offset by solar geoengineering. Locally, precipitation ultimately either evaporates (much of that through the leaves of plants) or runs off through groundwater to streams and rivers. On long time scales, runoff equals precipitation minus evaporation, and thus, water runoff generated at a location is equal to the net atmospheric transport of water to that location. Runoff typically occurs where there is substantial soil moisture, at least seasonally. Locations where there is enough water to maintain

  16. An atmospheric radiative-convective model with interactive water vapor transport and cloud development

    OpenAIRE

    HUMMEL, JOHN R.; KUHN, WILLIAM R.

    2011-01-01

    In the present generation of radiative-convective models, clouds are assigned specific levels or temperatures that do not change during the course of the calculations. In addition, a single water vapor distribution is used for the “mean atmosphere” instead of separate distributions for the clear sky and cloudy sky atmospheres. We present results from a one-dimensional radiative-convective model that includes interactive water vapor transport and predicts cloud altitudes and thicknesses. The ...

  17. The slant path atmospheric refraction calibrator - An instrument to measure the microwave propagation delays induced by atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.; Bender, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    The water vapor-induced propagation delay experienced by a radio signal traversing the atmosphere is characterized by the Slant Path Atmospheric Refraction Calibrator (SPARC), which measures the difference in the travel times between an optical and a microwave signal propagating along the same atmospheric path with an accuracy of 15 picosec or better. Attention is given to the theoretical and experimental issues involved in measuring the delay induced by water vapor; SPARC measurements conducted along a 13.35-km ground-based path are presented, illustrating the instrument's stability, precision, and accuracy.

  18. The seasonal and global behavior of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere - Complete global results of the Viking atmospheric water detector experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A key question regarding the evolution of Mars is related to the behavior of its volatiles. The present investigation is concerned with the global and seasonal abundances of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere as mapped by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector (MAWD) instrument for almost 1-1/2 Martian years from June 1976 to April 1979. Attention is given to the implications of the observed variations for determining the relative importance of those processes which may be controlling the vapor cycle on a seasonal basis. The processes considered include buffering of the atmosphere water by a surface or subsurface reservior of ground ice, physically adsorbed water, or chemically bound water. Other processes are related to the supply of water from the residual or seasonal north polar ice cap, the redistribution of the vapor resulting from atmospheric circulation, and control of the vapor holding capacity of the atmosphere by the local atmospheric temperatures.

  19. Reactivity of water vapor in an atmospheric pressure DBD -Application to LDPE surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, S; Viville, Pascal; Reniers, François

    2016-01-01

    The reactivity of water vapor introduced in an atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge supplied in argon is investigated through optical emission spectroscopy measurements. This discharge is also used for the treatment of LDPE surfaces. Water contact angles measurements, XPS and AFM techniques are used to study the grafting of oxygen functions on the LDPE surface and increase its hydrophilicity.

  20. Inter-Annual Variability of Atmospheric Water Vapor as seen from the TOVS Pathfinder Path a Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amita; Susskind, Joel

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric water vapor is a major greenhouse gas and plays a critical role in determining energy and water cycle in the climate system. A new, global, long-term (1985-98) water vapor data set derived from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Path A system will be introduced in the presentation. An assessment of the accuracy of the TOVS Path A water vapor data will he presented. The focus of this oral presentation will be on the inter-annual variability of the water vapor distribution in the atmosphere. Also, water vapor distribution observed during 1997/98 ENSO event will be shown.

  1. Effect of Water Vapor Absorption on Measurements of Atmospheric Nitrate Radical by LP-DOAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-wen Li; Wen-qing Liu; Pin-hua Xie; Yi-jun Yang; De-bao Chen; Zheng Li

    2008-01-01

    During the measurement of atmospheric nitrate radical by long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy, water vapor strong absorption could affect the measurement of nitrate radical and detection limits of system. Under the tropospheric condition, the optical density of water vapor absorption is non-linearly dependent on column density. An effective method was developed to eliminate the effect of water vapor absorption. Reference spectra of water vapor based on the daytime atmospheric absorption spectra, when fitted together with change of cross section with water vapor column densities, gave a more accurate fitting of water vapor absorptions, thus its effect on the measurements of nitrate radical could he restricted to a minimum and detection limits of system reached 3.6 ppt. The modified method was applied during an intensive field campaign in the Pearl River Delta, China. The NO3 concentration in polluted air masses varied from 3.6 ppt to 82.5 ppt with an average level of 23.6±1.8 ppt.

  2. The Effect of Water Vapor on the Thermal Decomposition of Pyrite in N2 Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin BOYABAT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of water vapor on the thermal decomposition of pyrite mineral in nitrogen atmosphere has been investigated in a horizontal tube furnace. Temperature, time and water vapor concentration were used as experimental parameters. According to the data obtained at nitrogen/ water vapor environment, it was observed that the water vapor on the decomposition of pyrite increased the decomposition rate. The decomposition reaction is well represented by the "shrinking core" model and can be divided into two regions with different rate controlling step. The rate controlling steps were determined from the heat transfer through the gas film for the low conversions, while it was determined from the mass transfer through product ash layer for the high conversions. The activation energies of this gas and ash film mechanisms were found to be 77 and 81 kJ/mol-1, respectively.

  3. Trajectory mapping of middle atmospheric water vapor by a mini network of NDACC instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lainer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The important task to observe the global coverage of middle atmospheric trace gases like water vapor or ozone usually is accomplished by satellites. Climate and atmospheric studies rely upon the knowledge of trace gas distributions throughout the stratosphere and mesosphere. Many of these gases are currently measured from satellites, but it is not clear whether this capability will be maintained in the future. This could lead to a significant knowledge gap of the state of the atmosphere. We explore the possibilities of mapping middle atmospheric water vapor in the Northern Hemisphere by using Lagrangian trajectory calculations and water vapor profile data from a small network of five ground-based microwave radiometers. Four of them are operated within the frame of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Keeping in mind that the instruments are based on different hardware and calibration setups, a height-dependent bias of the retrieved water vapor profiles has to be expected among the microwave radiometers. In order to correct and harmonize the different data sets, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite is used to serve as a kind of traveling standard. A domain-averaging TM (trajectory mapping method is applied which simplifies the subsequent validation of the quality of the trajectory-mapped water vapor distribution towards direct satellite observations. Trajectories are calculated forwards and backwards in time for up to 10 days using 6 hourly meteorological wind analysis fields. Overall, a total of four case studies of trajectory mapping in different meteorological regimes are discussed. One of the case studies takes place during a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW accompanied by the polar vortex breakdown; a second takes place after the reformation of stable circulation system. TM cases close to the fall equinox and June solstice event from the year 2012 complete the study, showing the high

  4. Trajectory mapping of middle atmospheric water vapor by a mini network of NDACC instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lainer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The important task to observe the global coverage of middle atmospheric trace gases like water vapor or ozone usually is accomplished by satellites. Climate and atmospheric studies rely upon the knowledge of trace gas distributions throughout the stratosphere and mesosphere. Many of these gases are currently measured from satellites, but it is not clear whether this capability will be maintained in the future. This could lead to a significant knowledge gap of the state of the atmosphere. We explore the possibilities of mapping middle atmospheric water vapor in the Northern Hemisphere by using Lagrangian trajectory calculations and water vapor profile data from a small network of five ground-based microwave radiometers. Four of them are operated within the frame of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Keeping in mind that the instruments are based on different hardware and calibration setups, a height dependent bias of the retrieved water vapor profiles has to be expected among the microwave radiometers. In order to correct and harmonize the different datasets, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite is used to serve as a kind of travelling standard. A domain-averaging TM (trajectory mapping method is applied which simplifies the subsequent validation of the quality of the trajectory mapped water vapor distribution towards direct satellite observations. Trajectories are calculated forwards and backwards in time for up to 10 days using 6 hourly meteorological wind analysis fields. Overall, a total of four case studies of trajectory mapping in different meteorological regimes are discussed. One of the case studies takes place during a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW accompanied by the polar vortex breakdown, a second takes place after the reformation of stable circulation system. TM cases close to the fall equinox and June solstice event from the year 2012 complete the study, showing the high

  5. Development of a 266 nm Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, T.; Tsuda, T.; Yabuki, M.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    It is projected that localized extreme weather events could increase due to the effects of global warming, resulting in severe weather disasters, such as a torrential rain, floods, and so on. Understanding water vapor's behavior in the atmosphere is essen- tial to understand a fundamental mechanism of these weather events. Therefore, continuous monitoring system to measure the atmospheric water vapor with good spatio-temporal resolution is required. We have developed several water vapor Raman lidar systems employing the laser wavelengths of 355 and 532 nm. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman lidar strongly depends on the sky background because of the detection of the weak inelastic scattering of light by molecules. Therefore, these systems were mainly used during nighttime. Hence, we have newly developed a water vapor Raman lidar using a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 266 nm. This wavelength is in the ultraviolet (UV) range below 300 nm known as the "solar-blind" region, because practically all radiation at these wavelengths is absorbed by the ozone layer in the stratosphere. It has the advantage of having no daytime solar background radiation in the system. The lidar is equipped with a 25 cm receiving telescope and is used for measuring the light separated into an elastic backscatter signal and vibrational Raman signals of nitrogen and water vapor at wavelengths of 266.1, 283.6, and 294.6 nm, respectively. This system can be used for continuous water vapor measurements in the lower troposphere. This study introduces the design of the UV lidar system and shows the preliminary results of water vapor profiles.

  6. Rain pattern analysis and forecast model based on GPS estimated atmospheric water vapor content

    OpenAIRE

    Priego De Los Santos, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Rain is one of the fundamental processes of the hydrologic cycle as it can be the source of wealth or natural hazards. This experiment focuses in the relationship between rain occurrence and atmospheric pressure (Patm) and atmospheric water vapor content (PW), GPS estimated. The available nine years time series of each variable were analyzed. It allowed to state the existence of three rain patterns and monthly differences in the Patm-PW combinations. In spite of rain episodes take place only ...

  7. Sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric water vapor using GNSS and InSAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, Marion; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is a key element for weather forecasting and climate research. On the other hand, as water vapor causes a delay in the microwave signal propagation within the atmosphere, a precise determination of water vapor is required for accurate positioning and deformation monitoring using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). However, due to its high variability in time and space, the atmospheric water vapor distribution is difficult to model. Since GNSS meteorology was introduced about twenty years ago, it has increasingly been used as a geodetic technique to generate maps of 2D Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV). Moreover, several approaches for 3D tomographic water vapor reconstruction from GNSS-based estimates using the simple least squares adjustment were presented. In this poster, we present an innovative and sophisticated Compressive Sensing (CS) concept for sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of 3D atmospheric wet refractivity fields using data from GNSS and InSAR. The 2D zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimates are obtained by a combination of point-wise estimates of the wet delay using GNSS observations and partial InSAR wet delay maps. These ZWD estimates are aggregated to derive realistic wet delay input data of 100 points as if corresponding to 100 GNSS sites within an area of 100 km × 100 km in the test region of the Upper Rhine Graben. The made-up ZWD values can be mapped into different elevation and azimuth angles. Using the Cosine transform, a sparse representation of the wet refractivity field is obtained. In contrast to existing tomographic approaches, we exploit sparsity as a prior for the regularization of the underdetermined inverse system. The new aspects of this work include both the combination of GNSS and InSAR data for water vapor tomography and the sophisticated CS estimation. The accuracy of the estimated 3D water

  8. Millimeter-wave imaging radiometer for cloud, precipitation and atmospheric water vapor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, P. E.; Dod, L. R.; Shiue, J. C.; Adler, R. F.; Jackson, D. M.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Zacharias, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A millimeter-wave imaging radiometer (MIR) developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is described. The MIR is a nine-channel total power radiometer developed for atmospheric research. Three dual-pass band channels are centered about the strongly opaque 183-GHz water vapor absorption line; the frequencies are 183 +/- 1, +/- 3, and +/- 7 GHz. Another channel is located on the wing of this band at 150 GHz. These four channels have varying degrees of opacity from which the water vapor profile can be inferred. The design and salient characteristics of this instrument are discussed, together with its expected benefits.

  9. Materials, methods and devices to detect and quantify water vapor concentrations in an atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allendorf, Mark D; Robinson, Alex L

    2014-12-09

    We have demonstrated that a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a nanoporous framework material (NFM) film can perform ultrasensitive water vapor detection at concentrations in air from 0.05 to 12,000 ppmv at 1 atmosphere pressure. The method is extendable to other MEMS-based sensors, such as microcantilevers, or to quartz crystal microbalance sensors. We identify a specific NFM that provides high sensitivity and selectivity to water vapor. However, our approach is generalizable to detection of other species using NFM to provide sensitivity and selectivity.

  10. An Analytical Formula for Potential Water Vapor in an Atmosphere of Constant Lapse Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Varmaghani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of precipitable water vapor (PWV in the atmosphere has always been a matter of importance for meteorologists. Potential water vapor (POWV or maximum precipitable water vapor can be an appropriate base for estimation of probable maximum precipitation (PMP in an area, leading to probable maximum flood (PMF and flash flood management systems. PWV and POWV have miscellaneously been estimated by means of either discrete solutions such as tables, diagrams or empirical methods; however, there is no analytical formula for POWV even in a particular atmospherical condition. In this article, fundamental governing equations required for analytical calculation of POWV are first introduced. Then, it will be shown that this POWV calculation relies on a Riemann integral solution over a range of altitude whose integrand is merely a function of altitude. The solution of the integral gives rise to a series function which is bypassed by approximation of saturation vapor pressure in the range of -55 to 55 degrees Celsius, and an analytical formula for POWV in an atmosphere of constant lapse rate is proposed. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the suggested equation, exact calculations of saturated adiabatic lapse rate (SALR at different surface temperatures were performed. The formula was compared with both the diagrams from the US Weather Bureau and SALR. The results demonstrated unquestionable capability of analytical solutions and also equivalent functions.

  11. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  12. The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Fahey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The AquaVIT-1 Intercomparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor Measurement Techniques was conducted at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in October 2007. The overall objective was to intercompare state-of-the-art and prototype atmospheric hygrometers with each other and with independent humidity standards under controlled conditions. This activity was conducted as a blind intercomparison with coordination by selected referees. The effort was motivated by persistent discrepancies found in atmospheric measurements involving multiple instruments operating on research aircraft and balloon platforms, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere where water vapor reaches its lowest atmospheric values (less than 10 ppm. With the AIDA chamber volume of 84 m3, multiple instruments analyzed air with a common water vapor mixing ratio, either by extracting air into instrument flow systems, locating instruments inside the chamber, or sampling the chamber volume optically. The intercomparison was successfully conducted over 10 days during which pressure, temperature, and mixing ratio were systematically varied (50 to 500 hPa, 185 to 243 K, and 0.3 to 152 ppm. In the absence of an accepted reference instrument, the reference value was taken to be the ensemble mean of a core subset of the measurements. For these core instruments, the agreement between 10 and 150 ppm of water vapor is considered good with variation about the reference value of about ±10% (±1σ. In the region of most interest between 1 and 10 ppm, the core subset agreement is fair with variation about the reference value of ±20% (±1σ. The upper limit of precision was also derived for each instrument from the reported data. These results indicate that the core instruments, in general, have intrinsic skill to determine unknown water vapor mixing ratios with an accuracy of at least ±20%. The implication for atmospheric

  13. A new look at the atmospheric water cycle: measurements of water vapor and its main isotopologue using SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepmaker, Remco; Frankenberg, Christian; Aben, Ilse; Schrijver, Hans; Gloudemans, Annemieke; Roeckmann, Thomas; Yoshimura, Kei

    2010-05-01

    Water vapor is by far the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. As a warmer atmosphere can contain more water vapor, a positive feedback effect with respect to climate change is expected. The distribution of water vapor is very inhomogeneous and variable, unlike that of other greenhouse gases. In the light of climate reconstructions and predictions, it is therefore crucial to better understand the water cycle and its response to past and present climate change. The relative abundance of the heavy water isotopologue HDO provides a deeper insight in the water cycle, as evaporation and condensation processes deplete heavy water in the gas phase. In the application of isotopologues, however, the space-borne retrieval of atmospheric water vapor isotopologues near the surface has so far been overlooked. We provide, for the first time (Frankenberg et al., Science 2009), global HDO/H2O abundances using the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartography (SCIAMACHY) instrument onboard ENVISAT. This allows for an entirely new perspective on the near-surface distribution of water vapor isotopologues. We are using the 2.3 micron (SWIR) window of SCIAMACHY, which is also used for the first time (Schrijver et al., AMT 2009) to derive total water vapor columns. Because of this wavelength range, and because SCIAMACHY is an absorption spectrometer, we are sensitive down to the lowest parts of the atmosphere where most of the water vapor resides. We further exploit a novel method to correct for the scattering effects of an ice layer on the SWIR detector and in order to further improve the accuracy of our HDO/H2O dataset, we derived an improved spectral linelist for H2O in the 2.3 micron window. The total water vapor columns have been validated with collocated ECMWF data and show good agreement. First results of atmospheric HDO/H2O show an expected latitudinal gradient, but also strong evaporation signals over the Red Sea and highly depleted values

  14. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  15. The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.-S.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schiller, C.; Ebert, V.; Krämer, M.; Peter, T.; Amarouche, N.; Avallone, L. M.; Bauer, R.; Bozóki, Z.; Christensen, L. E.; Davis, S. M.; Durry, G.; Dyroff, C.; Herman, R. L.; Hunsmann, S.; Khaykin, S. M.; Mackrodt, P.; Meyer, J.; Smith, J. B.; Spelten, N.; Troy, R. F.; Vömel, H.; Wagner, S.; Wienhold, F. G.

    2014-09-01

    The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques was conducted at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in October 2007. The overall objective was to intercompare state-of-the-art and prototype atmospheric hygrometers with each other and with independent humidity standards under controlled conditions. This activity was conducted as a blind intercomparison with coordination by selected referees. The effort was motivated by persistent discrepancies found in atmospheric measurements involving multiple instruments operating on research aircraft and balloon platforms, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, where water vapor reaches its lowest atmospheric values (less than 10 ppm). With the AIDA chamber volume of 84 m3, multiple instruments analyzed air with a common water vapor mixing ratio, by extracting air into instrument flow systems, by locating instruments inside the chamber, or by sampling the chamber volume optically. The intercomparison was successfully conducted over 10 days during which pressure, temperature, and mixing ratio were systematically varied (50 to 500 hPa, 185 to 243 K, and 0.3 to 152 ppm). In the absence of an accepted reference instrument, the absolute accuracy of the instruments was not established. To evaluate the intercomparison, the reference value was taken to be the ensemble mean of a core subset of the measurements. For these core instruments, the agreement between 10 and 150 ppm of water vapor is considered good with variation about the reference value of about ±10% (±1σ). In the region of most interest between 1 and 10 ppm, the core subset agreement is fair with variation about the reference value of ±20% (±1σ). The upper limit of precision was also derived for each instrument from the reported data. The implication for atmospheric measurements is that the

  16. Isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor before and after the monsoon's end in the Nagqu River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wusheng; YAO Tandong; TIAN Lide; WANG Yu; YIN Changliang

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapor samples were collected in the Nagqu River Basin in the middle of Tibetan Plateau between August and October in 2004. Results show that there exist some fluctuations of the δ18O of atmospheric water vapor, especially before and after the monsoon's end. Moreover, the variety trend of the δ 18O of atmospheric water vapor inverse correlates with that of dew point. Precipitation events make an important effect upon the variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. During the whole sampling period, the δ18O values of atmospheric water vapor are low while precipitation events occurred. The moisture origins also contribute to the variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. The oceanic moisture transported by the southwest monsoon results in lower δ18O of atmospheric water vapor in the Nagqu River Basin. Compared with the influence of the oceanic moisture, the δ18O values, however, appear high resulting from the effect of the continental air mass in this region.

  17. Mesoscale Modeling of Water Vapor and Dust in Valles Marineris: Atmospheric Influences on Recurring Slope Lineae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, C. W. S.; Rafkin, S. C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive recurring slope lineae (RSL) activity has been detected in Valles Marineris on Mars and coincides with regions where water ice fogs appear [1]. The origin of the water driving RSL flow is not well understood, but observational evidence suggests atmospheric processes play a crucial role [2]. Provided the atmospheric vapor concentration is high enough, water ice fogs can form overnight if the surface temperature cools below the condensation temperature. Correlations between dust storms and flow rates suggest that atmospheric dust opacity, and its influence on air temperature, also has a significant effect on RSL activity. We investigate planetary boundary layer processes that govern the hydrological cycle and dust cycle on Mars using a mesoscale atmospheric model to simulate the distribution of water and dust with respect to regional atmospheric circulations. Our simulations in Valles Marineris show a curious temperature structure, where the inside of the canyon appears warmer relative to the plateaus immediately outside. For a well-mixed atmosphere, this temperature structure indicates that when the atmosphere inside the canyon is saturated and fog is present within Valles Marineris, fog and low-lying clouds should also be present on the cooler surrounding plateaus as well. However, images taken with the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) show instances where water ice fog appeared exclusively inside the canyon. These results have important implications for the origin and concentration of water vapor in Valles Marineris, with possible connections to RSL. The potential temperatures from our simulations show a high level of stability inside the canyon produced dynamically by sinking air. However, afternoon updrafts along the canyon walls indicate that over time, water vapor within the chasm would escape along the sides of the canyon. Again, this suggests a local source or mechanism to concentrate water vapor is needed to explain the fog

  18. Water Vapor Tacers as Diagnostics of the Regional Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle, especially in North America where moisture transport and local evaporation are important sources of water for precipitation. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. All evaporative sources of water are accounted for by tracers, and the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites General Circulation Model (GEOS GCM) is used to simulate several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. Using this methodology, a detailed analysis of the recycling of water, interannual variability of the sources of water and links to the Great Plains low-level jet and North American monsoon will be presented. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation especially regarding the North American monsoon and GEWEX America Prediction Project (GAPP) will be discussed.

  19. Spaceborne lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Mccormick, M. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The inclusion of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) is proposed. Functioning at 720 nm, the DIAL could provide atmospheric water vapor profiles in the troposphere and stratosphere, and provide data for characterizing the physical properties of clouds. The use of frequency doubling of the laser could also open a window on the 355 nm region, and thereby molecular density and temperature profiles. The date would be of use in studies of the global hydrological cycle, the global radiation balance, climate, meteorology, and atmospheric structure and transport phenomena.

  20. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  1. Satellite- and ground-based observations of atmospheric water vapor absorption in the 940 nm region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-based measurements of direct absorption of solar radiation between 9000 and 13,000 cm-1 (770-1100 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.05 cm-1 are compared with line-by-line simulations of atmospheric absorption based on different molecular databases (HITRAN 2000, HITRAN 99, HITRAN 96 and ESA-WVR). Differences between measurements and simulations can be reduced to a great amount by scaling the individual line intensities with spectral and database dependent scaling factors. Scaling factors are calculated for the selected databases using a Marquardt non-linear least-squares fit together with a forward model for 100 cm-1 wide intervals between 10,150 and 11,250 cm-1 as well as for the water vapor absorption channels of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) ENVISAT platform and the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) on the Indian IRSP-3 platform, developed by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). For the latter, the scaling coefficients are converted into correction factors for retrieved total columnar water vapor content and used for a comparison of MOS-based retrievals of total columnar atmospheric water vapor above cloud-free land surfaces with radio soundings. The scaling factors determined for 100 cm-1 wide intervals range from 0.85 for the ESA-WVR molecular database to 1.15 for HITRAN 96. The best agreement between measurements and simulations is achieved with HITRAN 99 and HITRAN 2000, respectively, using scaling factors between 0.9 and 1. The effects on the satellite-based retrievals of columnar atmospheric water vapor range from 2% (HITRAN 2000) to 12% (ESA-WVR)

  2. Laser scattering diagnostics of an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in contact with vaporized water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.; Seong, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The radial profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in contact with vaporized water, which is driven by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency by means of the Thomson and Raman laser scattering methods. There is a distinct difference in the radial profiles of the plasma parameters between plasmas in contact with water and those without water contact. In the case of plasmas without vaporized water contact, all the parameters have a single-peak distribution with maximum values at the center of the discharge. In the case of plasmas in contact with vaporized water, all parameters have double-peak distributions; a neighboring peak appears beside the main peak. The new peak may have originated from the ripple of the water surface, which works as a cathode, and the peak of the ripple offers a sharp curvature point, playing the role of a pin. Our experimental results and the underlying physics are described in detail.

  3. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  4. Sampling tritiated water vapor from the atmosphere by an active system using silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the different methods used to collect the tritiated water vapor (HTO) contained in the atmosphere, one of the most worldwide used is its collection using an air pump, which forces the air to pass through a dry silica gel trap. The silica gel is then distilled to remove the water collected, which is measured in a liquid scintillation counting system. In this paper, an analysis of the water collection efficiency of the silica gel has been done as a function of the temperatures involved, the dimensions of the pipe driving the air into the silica gel traps, the air volume passing through the trap and the flow rates used. Among the obtained conclusions, it can be pointed out that placing the traps inside a cooled container, the amount of silica gel needed to collect all the water contained in the air passing through these traps can be estimated using a weather forecast and a psychometric chart. To do this, and as thermal equilibrium between incoming and open air should be established, a suitable design of the sampling system is proposed. - Highlights: → To recollect the atmosphere air tritiated water vapor, an active system was used. → The system is an air pump and three traps with silica gel connected by a rubber pipe. → The silica gel retention depends on the meteorological conditions and the flow rate. → The amount of water collected and the mass of silica gel need were calculated, F.

  5. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, J E; Blair, F H; Bisson, S E; Turner, D D

    1998-07-20

    We describe an operational, self-contained, fully autonomous Raman lidar system that has been developed for unattended, around-the-clock atmospheric profiling of water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. During a 1996 three-week intensive observational period, the system operated during all periods of good weather (339 out of 504 h), including one continuous five-day period. The system is based on a dual-field-of-view design that provides excellent daytime capability without sacrificing nighttime performance. It is fully computer automated and runs unattended following a simple, brief (~5-min) start-up period. We discuss the theory and design of the system and present detailed analyses of the derivation of water-vapor profiles from the lidar measurements. PMID:18285967

  6. Validation of Atmospheric Water Vapor Derived from Ship-Borne GPS Measurements in the Chinese Bohai Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Jie Fan; Jian-Fei Zang; Xiu-Ying Peng; Su-Qin Wu; Yan-Xiong Liu; Ke-Fei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapor (AWV) was investigated for the first time in the Chinese Bohai Sea using a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver aboard a lightweight (300-ton) ship. An experiment was conducted to retrieve the AWV using the state-of-the-art GPS precise point positioning (PPP) technique. The effects of atmospheric weighted mean temperature model and zenith wet delay constraint on GPS AWV estimates were discussed in the PPP estimation system. The GPS-derived precipitable water vapor ...

  7. Altitude and Latitude Distribution of Atmospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor from the Narrow-Band Lunar Eclipse Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S

    2007-01-01

    The work contains the description of two narrow IR-bands observational data of total lunar eclipse of March, 3, 2007, one- and two-dimensional procedures of radiative transfer equation solution. The results of the procedure are the extinction values for atmospheric aerosol and water vapor at different altitudes in the troposphere along the Earth's terminator crossing North America, Arctic, Siberia and South-Eastern Asia. The altitude range and possible latitude and altitude resoltion of atmosphere remote sensing by the lunar eclipses observation are fixed. The results of water vapor retrieval are compared with data of space experiment, the scale of vertical water vapor distribution is found.

  8. Heat treatment's effects on hydroxyapatite powders in water vapor and air atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, A.; Baştan, F. E.; Erdoǧan, G.; Üstel, F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is the main chemical constituent of bone tissue (~70%) as well as HA which is a calcium phosphate based ceramic material forms inorganic tissue of bone and tooth as hard tissues is used in production of prosthesis for synthetic bone, fractured and broken bone restoration, coating of metallic biomaterials and dental applications because of its bio compatibility. It is known that Hydroxyapatite decomposes with high heat energy after heat treatment. Therefore hydroxyapatite powders that heated in water vapor will less decomposed phases and lower amorphous phase content than in air atmosphere. In this study high purity hydroxyapatite powders were heat treated with open atmosphere furnace and water vapor atmosphere with 900, 1000, 1200 °C. Morphology of same powder size used in this process by SEM analyzed. Chemical structures of synthesized coatings have been examined by XRD. The determination of particle size and morphological structure of has been characterized by Particle Sizer, and SEM analysis, respectively. Weight change of sample was recorded by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) during heating and cooling.

  9. Atmospheric water vapor monitoring from local GNSS networks: comparisons of GNSS data adjustment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, Martina; Fermi, Alessandro; Monti Guarnieri, Andrea; Realini, Eugenio; Venuti, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    Since many years GNSS has been regarded by the meteorological community as one of the systems for atmospheric water vapor remote sensing. Time series of GNSS wet delays are estimated as by-products of accurate positioning. Their assimilation into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is being investigated at both research and operational levels, although typically at coarse space resolutions (e.g. few tens of km). A dedicated use of this system for water vapor monitoring at higher resolutions is still under investigation. Ad hoc networks have been designed and implemented to collect data at a high spatial resolution (station inter-distances of 1-10 km), to have an insight into the spatial distribution of GNSS derived wet delays and/or into the impact of such information on high resolution NWP models. Within this research framework the paper reports the comparisons carried out between ZWD time series obtained from the data collected by an Italian and a Japanese dense networks of permanent geodetic GNSS receivers. Tropospheric delays have been estimated by applying different data adjustment strategies: relative positioning and PPP (precise point positioning). For this last strategy two different solutions have been analyzed and compared: the Bernese software batch solution, and the RTNet software Kalman filter solution. Assessment of the results were performed against IGS GNSS delays as well as by comparison with radiosonde-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV).

  10. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  11. A Comparison of Water Vapor Line Parameters for Modeling the Venus Deep Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the near infrared windows into the Venus deep atmosphere has enabled the use of remote sensing techniques to study the composition of the Venus atmosphere below the clouds. In particular, water vapor absorption lines can be observed in a number of the near-infrared windows allowing measurement of the H2O abundance at several different levels in the lower atmosphere. Accurate determination of the abundance requires a good database of spectral line parameters for the H2O absorption lines at the high temperatures (up to ~700 K) encountered in the Venus deep atmosphere. This paper presents a comparison of a number of H2O line lists that have been, or that could potentially be used, to analyze Venus deep atmosphere water abundances and shows that there are substantial discrepancies between them. For example, the early high-temperature list used by Meadows and Crisp (1996) had large systematic errors in line intensities. When these are corrected for using the more recent high-temperature BT2 list o...

  12. Parameterization of middle atmospheric water vapor photochemistry for high-altitude NWP and data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. McCormack

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes CHEM2D-H2O, a new parameterization of H2O photochemical production and loss based on the CHEM2D photochemical-transport model of the middle atmosphere. This parameterization accounts for the altitude, latitude, and seasonal variations in the photochemical sources and sinks of water vapor over the pressure region from 100–0.001 hPa (~16–90 km altitude. A series of free-running NOGAPS-ALPHA forecast model simulations offers a preliminary assessment of CHEM2D-H2O performance over the June 2007 period. Results indicate that the CHEM2D-H2O parameterization improves global 10-day forecasts of upper mesospheric water vapor compared to forecasts using an existing one-dimensional (altitude only parameterization. Most of the improvement is seen at high winter latitudes where the one-dimensional parameterization specifies photolytic H2O loss year round despite the lack of sunlight in winter. The new CHEM2D-H2O parameterization should provide a better representation of the downwelling of dry mesospheric air into the stratospheric polar vortex in operational analyses that do not assimilate middle atmospheric H2O measurements.

  13. Parameterization of middle atmospheric water vapor photochemistry for high-altitude NWP and data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. McCormack

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This report describes CHEM2D-H2O, a new parameterization of H2O photochemical production and loss based on the CHEM2D photochemical-transport model of the middle atmosphere. This parameterization accounts for the altitude, latitude, and seasonal variations in the photochemical sources and sinks of water vapor over the pressure region from 100–0.001 hPa (~16–90 km altitude. A series of free-running NOGAPS-ALPHA forecast model simulations offers a preliminary assessment of CHEM2D-H2O performance over the June 2007 period. Results indicate that the CHEM2D-H2O parameterization improves global 10-day forecasts of upper mesospheric water vapor compared to forecasts using an existing one-dimensional (altitude only parameterization. Most of the improvement is seen at high winter latitudes where the one-dimensional parameterization specifies photolytic H2O loss year round despite the lack of sunlight in winter. The new CHEM2D-H2O parameterization should provide a better representation of the downwelling of dry mesospheric air into the stratospheric polar vortex in operational analyses that do not assimilate middle atmospheric H2O measurements.

  14. RESEARCH ON THE LOCAL CORRECTION MODEL OF ATMOSPHERIC DRY DELAY IN GPS REMOTE SENSING WATER VAPOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Xiao-ping; WANG Chang-yao; WANG Wen; JIANG Guo-hua

    2005-01-01

    The precision of atmospheric dry delay model is closely correlated with the accuracy of GPS water vapor in the process of GPS (Global Position System) remote sensing. Radiosonde data (from 1996 to 2001) at Qingyuan are used to calculate the exact values of the atmospheric dry delay. Base on these calculations and the surface meteorological parameters, the local year and month correction models of dry delay at the zenith angle of 0° are established by statistical methods. The analysis result shows that the local model works better and is slight more sensitive to altitude angle than universal models and that it is not necessary to build models for each month due to the slight difference between year model and month model. Furthermore, when the altitude angle is less than 75°, the difference between curve path and straight path increases rapidly with altitude angle's decrease.

  15. Multispectral analysis of maritime clouds at night in the presence of atmospheric water vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Christopher K.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Multispectral analysis methods are exercised using AVHRR channels 3, 4, and 5 to improve upon single-wavelength thermal imagery at night. An algorithm was developed yielding cloud location and water vapor distribution from channel 3-4 and 4-5 differences, respectively. Water vapor effects on pixel registration for cloud were examined using two candidate subscenes, one cloudy and dry, the other, cloudy and moist. A positive water vapor...

  16. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Li, B -L

    2010-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from the fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in the lower atmosphere. This decline occurs up to a certain height, which ranges from 3 to 4 km for surface temperatures from 10 to 30 deg C. We then estimate the horizontal pressure differences associated with water vapor condensation and find that these are comparable in magnitude with the pressure differences driving observed circulation patterns. The water vapor delivered to the atmosphere via evaporation represents a store of potential energy available to accelerate air and thus drive winds. Our estimates suggest that the...

  17. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  18. Evolution of the Water Vapor Plume over Eastern Europe during Summer 2010 Atmospheric Blocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A. Sitnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of water vapor (WV plume evolution over Eastern Europe (EE during atmospheric blocking in the summer of 2010, carried out on the basis of satellite (MODIS and MLS instruments, aerological, and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. The obtained results show that the development of blocking was accompanied by the development of a positive anomaly of total column water vapor (TCWV content over the northern part of EE. Local TCWV content from 28 July to 6 August 2010 reached 3.35 cm, a value that exceeded by 3.3 times its content before the block. The surplus of WV was mainly conditioned by the advection of WV due to transfer of moist air from the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea into northern EE and also due to increased evaporation from the surface enriched with water due to increased temperature and wind. We hypothesize that the influx of latent heat in the block area can contribute to the energy supply of the blocking anticyclone and prolong the existence of block. Strong humidification of the troposphere and some dehumidification of the lower stratosphere during the block were accompanied by warming of the troposphere and cooling of the lower stratosphere.

  19. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alshawaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF modeling system is applied to provide complete, accurate grids of PWV. Our goal is to infer spatially continuous, precise grids of PWV from heterogeneous data sets. This is done by a geostatistical data fusion approach based on the method of fixed-rank kriging. The first data set contains absolute maps of atmospheric water vapor produced by combining observations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR. These PWV maps have a high spatial density and an accuracy of submillimeter; however, data are missing in regions of low coherence (e.g., forests and vegetated areas. The PWV maps simulated by the WRF model represent the second data set. The model maps are available for wide areas, but they have a coarse spatial resolution and a yet limited accuracy. The PWV maps inferred by the data fusion at any spatial resolution are more accurate than those inferred from single data sets. In addition, using the fixed-rank kriging method, the computational burden is significantly lower than that for ordinary kriging.

  20. Experimental evaluation of ground-based microwave radiometric sensing of atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profiles of atmospheric temperature and water vapor derived from ground-based microwave radiometric measurements are compared with concurrent rawinsonde profiles including both clear and cloudy cases. Accuracies of the temperature profiles including the cloudy cases are quite close to predicted accuracies. Mean virtual temperatures between commonly used pressure levels are also compared and resulting rms accuracies are 1.1, 1.6, 2.0 and 2.80C for the 1000--850, 850--700, 700--500 and 500--300 mb layers, respectively. The microwave technique is potentially useful in applications requiring high time resolution or in data-sparse regions of the oceans that might be covered by an ocean data buoy system

  1. Atmospheric water vapor transport: Estimation of continental precipitation recycling and parameterization of a simple climate model. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The advective transport of atmospheric water vapor and its role in global hydrology and the water balance of continental regions are discussed and explored. The data set consists of ten years of global wind and humidity observations interpolated onto a regular grid by objective analysis. Atmospheric water vapor fluxes across the boundaries of selected continental regions are displayed graphically. The water vapor flux data are used to investigate the sources of continental precipitation. The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from surrounding areas external to the region; and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. In a separate, but related, study estimates of ocean to land water vapor transport are used to parameterize an existing simple climate model, containing both land and ocean surfaces, that is intended to mimic the dynamics of continental climates.

  2. Influence of long-range transboundary transport on atmospheric water vapor mercury collected at the largest city of Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Tian, Lide; Guo, Junming; Zhang, Qianggong; Cong, Zhiyuan; Sillanpää, Mika; Sun, Shiwei; Tripathee, Lekhendra

    2016-10-01

    Monsoon circulation is an important process that affects long-range transboundary transport of anthropogenic contaminants such as mercury (Hg). During the Indian monsoon season of 2013, a total of 92 and 26 atmospheric water vapor samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of the Tibet, for Hg and major ions analysis, respectively. The relatively low pH/high electronic conductivity values, together with the fact that NH4(+) in atmospheric water vapor was even higher than that determined in precipitation of Lhasa, indicated the effects of anthropogenic perturbations through long-range transboundary atmospheric transport. Concentrations of Hg in atmospheric water vapor ranged from 2.5 to 73.7ngL(-1), with an average of 12.5ngL(-1). The elevated Hg and major ions concentrations, and electronic conductivity values were generally associated with weak acidic samples, and Hg mainly loaded with anthropogenic ions such as NH4(+). The results of principal component analysis and trajectory analysis suggested that anthropogenic emissions from the Indian subcontinent may have largely contributed to the determined Hg in atmospheric water vapor. Furthermore, our study reconfirmed that below-cloud scavenging contribution was significant for precipitation Hg in Lhasa, and evaluated that on average 74.1% of the Hg in precipitation could be accounted for by below-cloud scavenging. PMID:27265735

  3. Sampling tritiated water vapor from the atmosphere by an active system using silica gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, M.; Alegria, N.; Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2011-11-01

    Among the different methods used to collect the tritiated water vapor (HTO) contained in the atmosphere, one of the most worldwide used is its collection using an air pump, which forces the air to pass through a dry silica gel trap. The silica gel is then distilled to remove the water collected, which is measured in a liquid scintillation counting system. In this paper, an analysis of the water collection efficiency of the silica gel has been done as a function of the temperatures involved, the dimensions of the pipe driving the air into the silica gel traps, the air volume passing through the trap and the flow rates used. Among the obtained conclusions, it can be pointed out that placing the traps inside a cooled container, the amount of silica gel needed to collect all the water contained in the air passing through these traps can be estimated using a weather forecast and a psychometric chart. To do this, and as thermal equilibrium between incoming and open air should be established, a suitable design of the sampling system is proposed.

  4. Optimization of band-pass filtering parameters of a Raman lidar detecting atmospheric water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very important for daytime Raman lidar measurement of water vapor to determine the parameters of a band-pass filter, which are pertinent to the lidar signal to noise ratio (SNR). The simulated annealing (SA) algorithm method has an advantage in finding the extremum of a certain cost function. In this paper, the Raman spectrum of water vapor is simulated and then a first realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in the optimization of a band-pass filter of a Raman lidar system designed to detect daytime water vapor is presented. The simulated results indicate that the narrow band-pass filter has higher SNR than the wide filter does but there would be an increase in the temperature sensitivity of a narrowband Raman water vapor lidar in the upper troposphere. The numerical simulation indicates that the magnitude of the temperature dependent effect can reach 3.5% or more for narrow band-pass Raman water vapor measurements so it is necessary to consider a new water vapor Raman lidar equation that permits the temperature sensitivity of these equations to be confined to a single term. (paper)

  5. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  6. Analysis of the application of the optical method to the measurements of the water vapor content in the atmosphere – Part 1: Basic concepts – the measurements of the water vapor content in the atmosphere with the optical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Galkin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We retrieved the total content of the atmospheric water vapor from extensive sets of photometric data obtained since 1995 at Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory with star and sun photometers. Different methods of determination of the empirical parameters that are necessary for the retrieval are discussed. The instruments were independently calibrated using laboratory measurements made at Pulkovo Observatory with the VKM-100 multi-pass vacuum cell. The empirical parameters were also calculated by the simulation of the atmospheric absorption by water vapor, using the MODRAN-4 program package for different model atmospheres. The results are compared to those presented in the literature, obtained with different instruments and methods of the retrieval. The accuracy of the empirical parameters used for the power approximation that links the water vapor content with the observed absorption is analyzed. Currently, the calibration and measurement errors yield the uncertainty of about 10% in the total column water vapor. We discuss the possibilities for improving the accuracy of calibration to ~1%, which will make it possible to use data obtained by optical photometry as an independent reference for other methods (GPS, lidar, etc.

  7. Atmospheric correction of MODIS thermal infrared bands by water vapor scaling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonooka, Hideyuki

    2005-10-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) project has operationally provided land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity imagery produced from mid-infrared bands by either of two atmospheric correction algorithms. One is the generalized split-window algorithm. This algorithm can be applied to each observed scene, and the spatial resolution of generated products is 1 km, but the emissivity data in the products are empirically estimated by a classification-based method. Another is the physics-based day/night algorithm. In this algorithm, both LST and emissivity are physically determined using mid-infrared measurements, but a pair of day/night scenes is necessary for each processing, and the spectral resolution of generated products is degraded to 5 km. In the present paper, the water vapor scaling (WVS) method (Tonooka, 2001 and 2005) is applied to three MODIS thermal infrared (TIR) bands (29, 31, and 32) as an alternative approach. This method is an atmospheric correction algorithm for TIR multi-spectral data including land surfaces, designed mainly for the five TIR spectral bands of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on the Terra satellite. The WVS method is on the basis of a traditional approach using a radiative transfer code, such as MODTRAN, combined with external atmospheric profiles, but the errors included in profiles are reduced on a pixel-by-pixel basis using an extended multi-channel approach. In the present paper, the WVS method for the three MODIS TIR bands is proposed, and applied to actual imagery for preliminary validation.

  8. Diurnal variation of atmospheric water vapor at Gale crater: Analysis from ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, German; McConnochie, Timothy; Renno, Nilton; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Fischer, Erik; Vicente-Retortillo, Alvaro; Borlina, Caue; Kemppinen, Osku; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; de la Torre-Juárez, Manuel; Zorzano, Mari-Paz; Martin-Torres, Javier; Bridges, Nathan; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    We analyze measurements obtained by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) and ChemCam (CCAM) instruments to shed light on the hydrological cycle at Gale crater. In particular, we use nighttime REMS measurements taken when the atmospheric volume mixing ratio (VMR) and its uncertainty are the lowest (between 05:00 and 06:00 LTST) [1], and daytime CCAM passive sky measurements taken when the VMR is expected to be the highest (between 10:00 and 14:00 LTST) [2]. VMR is calculated from simultaneous REMS measurements of pressure (P), temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at 1.6 m (VMR is defined as RH×es(T)/P , where es is the saturation water vapor pressure over ice). The REMS relative humidity sensor has recently been recalibrated (June 2015), providing RH values slightly lower than those in the previous calibration (Dec 2014). The full diurnal cycle of VMR cannot be analyzed using only REMS data because the uncertainty in daytime VMR derived from REMS measurements is extremely high. Daytime VMR is inferred by fitting the output of a multiple-scattering discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model to CCAM passive sky observations [3]. CCAM makes these observations predominately in the vicinity of 11:00 - 12:00 LTST, but occasionally in the early morning near 08:00 LTST. We find that throughout the Martian year, the daytime VMR is higher than at night, with a maximum day-to-night ratio of about 6 during winter. Various processes might explain the differences between nighttime REMS and daytime CCAM VMR values. Potential explanations include: (i) surface nighttime frost formation followed by daytime sublimation [1], (ii) surface nighttime adsorption of water vapor by the regolith followed by daytime desorption and (iii) large scale circulations changing vertical H2O profiles at different times of the year. Potential formation of surface frost can only occur in late fall and winter [1], coinciding with the time when the diurnal amplitude of the near

  9. Intercomparisons of high-resolution solar blind Raman lidar atmospheric profiles of water vapor with radiosondes and kytoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, K.; Salik, A.; Cooney, J.

    1986-01-01

    A report is given of measurements of atmospheric profiles of water vapor in the boundary layer by use of solar blind Raman lidar. These measurement episodes, occuring twice a day over a two week period, were accompanied by a dense net of supporting measurements. The support included two radiosonde launches per measurement episodes as well as a kytoon support measurement of water vapor using a wet bulb-dry bulb instrument. The kytoon strategy included ten minute stops at strategic altitudes. Additional kytoon measurements included ozone profiles and nephelometric extinction profiles in the visible. Typically, six or seven 1000 shot lidar profile averages were collected during a measurement episode. Overall performance comparisons are provided and intercomparisons between auxiliary measurement devices are presented. Data on the accuracy of the lidar water vapor profiles are presented.

  10. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawaf, F.; Fersch, B.; Hinz, S.; Kunstmann, H.; Mayer, M.; Meyer, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system are applied to provide complete grids of PWV with high quality. Our goal is to correctly infer PWV at spatially continuous, highly resolved grids from heterogeneous data sets. This is done by a geostatistical data fusion approach based on the method of fixed-rank kriging. The first data set contains absolute maps of atmospheric PWV produced by combining observations from the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). These PWV maps have a high spatial density and a millimeter accuracy; however, the data are missing in regions of low coherence (e.g., forests and vegetated areas). The PWV maps simulated by the WRF model represent the second data set. The model maps are available for wide areas, but they have a coarse spatial resolution and a still limited accuracy. The PWV maps inferred by the data fusion at any spatial resolution show better qualities than those inferred from single data sets. In addition, by using the fixed-rank kriging method, the computational burden is significantly lower than that for ordinary kriging.

  11. Ultra Narrowband Optical Filters for Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Atmospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenholm, Ingrid; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are being deployed to make vertical profile measurements of atmospheric water vapor from ground and airborne platforms. One goal of this work is to improve the technology of such DIAL systems that they could be deployed on space-based platforms. Since background radiation reduces system performance, it is important to reduce it. One way to reduce it is to narrow the bandwidth of the optical receiver system. However, since the DIAL technique uses two or more wavelengths, in this case separated by 0.1 nm, a fixed-wavelength narrowband filter that would encompass both wavelengths would be broader than required for each line, approximately 0.02 nm. The approach employed in this project is to use a pair of tunable narrowband reflective fiber Bragg gratings. The Bragg gratings are germanium-doped silica core fiber that is exposed to ultraviolet radiation to produce index-of-refraction changes along the length of the fiber. The gratings can be tuned by stretching. The backscattered laser radiation is transmitted through an optical circulator to the gratings, reflected back to the optical circulator by one of the gratings, and then sent to a photodiode. The filter reflectivities were >90 percent, and the overall system efficiency was 30 percent.

  12. Global estimates of water-vapor-weighted mean temperature of the atmosphere for GPS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Liangying; Dai, Aiguo

    2005-11-01

    Water-vapor-weighted atmospheric mean temperature, Tm, is a key parameter in the retrieval of atmospheric precipitable water (PW) from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of zenith path delay (ZPD), as the accuracy of the GPS-derived PW is proportional to the accuracy of Tm. We compare and analyze global estimates of Tm from three different data sets from 1997 to 2002: the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40-year reanalysis (ERA-40), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis, and the newly released Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) data set. Temperature and humidity profiles from both the ERA-40 and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses produce reasonable Tm estimates compared with those from the IGRA soundings. The ERA-40, however, is a better option for global Tm estimation because of its better performance and its higher spatial resolution. Tm is found to increase from below 255 K in polar regions to 295-300 K in the tropics, with small longitudinal variations. Tm has an annual range of ˜2-4 K in the tropics and 20-35 K over much of Eurasia and northern North America. The day-to-day Tm variations are 1-3 K over most low latitudes and 4-7 K (2-4 K) in winter (summer) Northern Hemispheric land areas. Diurnal variations of Tm are generally small, with mean-to-peak amplitudes less than 0.5 K over most oceans and 0.5-1.5 K over most land areas and a local time of maximum around 16-20 LST. The commonly used Tm-Ts relationship from Bevis et al. (1992) is evaluated using the ERA-40 data. Tm derived from this relationship (referred to as Tmb) has a cold bias in the tropics and subtropics (-1 ˜ -6 K, largest in marine stratiform cloud regions) and a warm bias in the middle and high latitudes (2-5 K, largest over mountain regions). The random error in Tmb is much smaller than the bias. A serious problem in Tmb is its erroneous large diurnal cycle owing to

  13. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment: quantification of the near-infrared water vapor continuum from atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Andreas; Sussmann, Ralf; Rettinger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Inaccuracies in the description of atmospheric radiative processes are among the major shortcomings of current climate models. Especially the contribution by water vapor, the primary greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere, currently still lacks sufficiently accurate quantification. The main focus of our study is on the so-called water vapor continuum absorption in the near-infrared spectral range, which is of crucial importance for atmospheric radiative processes. To date, the quantification of this contribution originates exclusively from laboratory experiments which show contradictory results and whose findings are not unambiguously transferable to atmospheric conditions. The aim of the Zugspitze radiative closure study is therefore to obtain, to our knowledge for the first time, an exact characterization of the near-infrared water vapor continuum absorption using atmospheric measurements. This enables validation and, if necessary, improvements of the radiative transfer codes used in current climate models. The closure experiment comprises near-infrared spectral radiance measurements using a solar absorption FTIR spectrometer. These measurements are then compared to synthetic radiance spectra computed by means of a high-resolution radiative transfer model. The spectral residuals, i.e. the difference between measured and calculated spectral radiances can then be used to quantify errors in the description of water vapor absorption. Due to the extensive permanent instrumentation available at the Zugspitze observatory, the atmospheric state used as an input to the model calculations can be constrained with high accuracy. Additionally, we employ a novel radiometric calibration strategy for the solar FTIR spectral radiance measurements based on a combination of the Langley method and measurements of a medium-temperature blackbody source. These prerequisites enable accurate quantification of the water vapor continuum in the near-infrared spectral region, where

  14. Estimation of the Total Atmospheric Water Vapor Content and Land Surface Temperature Based on AATSR Thermal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The total atmospheric water vapor content (TAWV and land surfacetemperature (LST play important roles in meteorology, hydrology, ecology and some otherdisciplines. In this paper, the ENVISAT/AATSR (The Advanced Along-Track ScanningRadiometer thermal data are used to estimate the TAWV and LST over the Loess Plateauin China by using a practical split window algorithm. The distribution of the TAWV isaccord with that of the MODIS TAWV products, which indicates that the estimation of thetotal atmospheric water vapor content is reliable. Validations of the LST by comparingwith the ground measurements indicate that the maximum absolute derivation, themaximum relative error and the average relative error is 4.0K, 11.8% and 5.0%respectively, which shows that the retrievals are believable; this algorithm can provide anew way to estimate the LST from AATSR data.

  15. Atmospheric remote sensing of water vapor, HCl and CH4 using a continuously tunable Co:MgF2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyuk, Norman; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1987-01-01

    A differential-absorption lidar system has been developed which uses a continuously tunable (1.5-2.3 micron) cobalt-doped magnesium fluoride laser as the radiation source. Preliminary atmospheric measurements of water vapor, HCl, and CH4 have been made with this system, including both path-averaged and ranged-resolved DIAL measurements at ranges up to 6 and 3 km, respectively.

  16. Interactions between atmospheric water vapor, dew and leaf waters in an open-canopy forest using in situ isotopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelhammer, M. B.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; Hu, J.; Still, C. J.; Gochis, D. J.; Hsiao, G.; Barnard, H. R.; Noone, D. C.; Rahn, T.; Turnipseed, A.

    2011-12-01

    The movement of moisture into, out-of and within a forest ecosystem is modulated by feedbacks between plants, soils and atmospheric processes. In this study, fine scale aspects of these interactions are explored using profiles of the isotopic composition of water vapor from within and above the canopy of a ponderosa pine forest in Colorado. Forty-eight isotopic (δD and δ18O) profiles are created each day with measurements beginning prior to the onset of this year's growing season and continuing into the Fall when growth ceases. On many days, there is a pronounced minimum in deuterium-excess (dxs) near-synchronously at all heights in the early morning, which is caused by the condensation and subsequent evaporation of dew. Measurements of near-surface leaf wetness independently validate the presence of dew at the times when these dxs excursions are observed. The interaction between dew and other water pools is characterized using paired measurements of the isotopic composition of dew and leaf waters. Initial results suggest that despite reduced gas flux from the leaves during periods of dew formation, isotopic exchange is occurring between these two pools. Analysis of the diurnal cycle of isotope ratios in vapor also reveals vertical gradients in dxs, whose magnitude varies on diurnal and synoptic timescales as well as in response to changes in ecosystem productivity. The significance of these changes in the vertical gradient is explored using sap flow measurements and surface energy flux data, which delineate transpiration and surface evaporation fluxes, respectively. Lastly, case studies on moisture characteristics in the canopy during convective summer storms are presented. These data are used to elucidate the relative significance of evaporation from hydrometeors and exchange between hydrometeors and antecedent atmospheric moisture. The data reported here were collected in coordination with measurements of the isotopic composition of soil water profiles

  17. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements from Ground-based and Space-based GPS Atmospheric Remote Sensing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Pagan, Ian; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we compare precipitable water vapor (PWV) values from ground-based GPS water vapor sensing and COSMIC radio occultation (RO) measurements over the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and United States regions as well as global analyses from NCEP and ECMWF models. The results show good overall agreement; however, the PWV values estimated by ground-based GPS receivers tend to have a slight dry bias for low PWV values and a slight wet bias for higher PWV values, when compared with GPS RO measurements and global analyses. An application of a student T-test indicates that there is a significant difference between both ground- and space-based GPS measured datasets. The dry bias associated with space-based GPS is attributed to the missing low altitude data, where the concentration of water vapor is large. The close agreements between space-based and global analyses are due to the fact that these global analyses assimilate space-based GPS RO data from COSMIC, and the retrieval of water vapor profiles from space-based technique requires the use of global analyses as the first guess. This work is supported by UCAR SOARS and a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Educational Partnership Program under the cooperative agreement NA06OAR4810187.

  18. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alshawaf, F.; B. Fersch; Hinz, S.; H. Kunstmann; M. Mayer; Meyer, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system are applied to provide complete grids of PWV with high quality. Our goal is to correctly infer PWV at spatially continuous, highly resolved grids from heter...

  19. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alshawaf, F.; B. Fersch; Hinz, S.; H. Kunstmann; M. Mayer; Meyer, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system is applied to provide complete, accurate grids of PWV. Our goal is to infer spatially continuous, prec...

  20. Decadal variations in atmospheric water vapor time series estimated using ground-based GNSS

    OpenAIRE

    Alshawaf, Fadwa; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Simeonov, Tzvetan; Vey, Sibylle; Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) have efficiently been used since the 1990s as a meteorological observing system. Recently scientists used GNSS time series of precipitable water vapor (PWV) for climate research. In this work, we use time series from GNSS, European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data, and meteorological measurements to evaluate climate evolution in Central Europe. The assessment of climate change requires moni...

  1. Water vapor mapping by fusing InSAR and GNSS remote sensing data and atmospheric simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alshawaf, F.; B. Fersch; Hinz, S.; H. Kunstmann; M. Mayer; Meyer, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Data fusion aims at integrating multiple data sources that can be redundant or complementary to produce complete, accurate information of the parameter of interest. In this work, data fusion of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimated from remote sensing observations and data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system is applied to provide complete, accurate grids of PWV. Our goal is to infer spatially continuous, precise grids of PWV from heterogeneous data sets. This is...

  2. Validation of Atmospheric Water Vapor Derived from Ship-Borne GPS Measurements in the Chinese Bohai Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Jie Fan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric water vapor (AWV was investigated for the first time in the Chinese Bohai Sea using a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver aboard a lightweight (300-ton ship. An experiment was conducted to retrieve the AWV using the state-of-the-art GPS precise point positioning (PPP technique. The effects of atmospheric weighted mean temperature model and zenith wet delay constraint on GPS AWV estimates were discussed in the PPP estimation system. The GPS-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV and slant-path water vapor (SWV were assessed by comparing with those derived from the Fifth Generation NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5. The results showed the PWV and SWV differences between those derived from both GPS and MM5 are 1.5 mm root mean square (RMS with a bias of 0.2 and 3.9 mm RMS with a bias of -0.7 mm respectively. These good agreements indicate that the GPS-derived AWV in dynamic environments has a comparable accuracy with that of the MM5 model. This suggests that high accuracy and high spatio-temporal resolution humidity fields can be obtained using GPS in the Chinese Bohai Sea, which offers significant potential for meteorological applications and climate studies in this region.

  3. ARIS-Campaign: Intercomparison of three 22GHz radiometers for middle atmospheric water vapor at the Zugspitze in winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Corinne; Kaempfer, Niklaus; Hallgren, Kristofer; Hartogh, Paul; Golchert, Sven; Hochschild, Gerd

    Upper stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor is mainly observed by passive remote sensing instruments, either space borne or ground based. While satellite instruments provide global coverage, their lifetime is limited to 5-10 years. Therefore a network of ground based microwave radiometers measuring water vapor at single spots, but having a much longer lifetime than space borne instruments, is of major importance for monitoring and for the merging of consecutive satellite missions. In addition the high temporal resolution (of the order of hours to days, depending on desired altitude coverage, observation conditions and instrument) of ground based instruments provides a good picture of temporal variability in water vapor, which allows to study dynamical phenomena. However, this requires that the network is consistent, hence, that the biases between the single instruments are known. Therefore intercomparison campaigns are crucial. During the Alpine Radiometer Intercomparison at the Schneefernerhaus (ARIS) on the Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2650 m) three new 22GHz middle atmospheric water vapor radiometers, namely MIRA 5 (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), CAWSES 3 (Max Planck Institute for Solar Research, Lindau) and MIAWARA-C (Institute of applied Physics, University of Bern), have been measuring from the same location at the same time. Even though the three instruments all measure water vapor in similar altitude regions using the same rotational transition line, there are major differences between the backends, the calibration concepts and the profile retrieval. For the comparison we focus on two time periods, one in the end of January and one in the beginning of April 2009. The profile retrievals for the three instruments have been standardized in a sense that the same line parameters, temperature-and a priori information is used. We will give a short overview of the three microwave radiometers with their backends, calibra-tion concepts and data retrieval

  4. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.; Fulda, P.; Howard, D.; Ritter, J.; Levan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and testing of a vacuum-swing adsorption process to remove metabolic 'water and carbon dioxide gases from NASA's Orion crew exploration vehicle atmosphere is presented. For the Orion spacecraft, the sorbent-based atmosphere revitalization (SBAR) system must remove all metabolic water, a technology approach 1Lhathas not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. Design and testing of a prototype SBAR in sub-scale and full-scale configurations is discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dual-ended and single-ended vacuum desorption are presented. An experimental investigation of thermal linking between adsorbing and desorbing columns is also presented.

  5. Retrieving of atmospheric parameters from multi-GNSS in real time: Validation with water vapor radiometer and numerical weather model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxing; Zus, Florian; Lu, Cuixian; Dick, Galina; Ning, Tong; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-07-01

    The multiconstellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) (e.g., GPS, GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS), Galileo, and BeiDou) offers great opportunities for real-time retrieval of atmospheric parameters for supporting numerical weather prediction nowcasting or severe weather event monitoring. In this study, the observations from different GNSS are combined to retrieve atmospheric parameters based on the real-time precise point positioning technique. The atmospheric parameters, retrieved from multi-GNSS observations of a 180 day period from about 100 globally distributed stations, including zenith total delay, integrated water vapor, horizontal gradient, and slant total delay (STD), are analyzed and evaluated. The water vapor radiometer data and a numerical weather model, the operational analysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), are used to independently validate the performance of individual GNSS and also demonstrate the benefits of multiconstellation GNSS for real-time atmospheric monitoring. Our results show that the GLONASS and BeiDou have the potential capability for real-time atmospheric parameter retrieval for time-critical meteorological applications as GPS does, and the combination of multi-GNSS observations can improve the performance of a single-system solution in meteorological applications with higher accuracy and robustness. The multi-GNSS processing greatly increases the number of STDs. The mean and standard deviation of STDs between each GNSS and ECMWF exhibit a good stability as function of the elevation angle, the azimuth angle, and time, in general. An obvious latitude dependence is confirmed by a map of station specific mean and standard deviations. Such real-time atmospheric products, provided by multi-GNSS processing with higher accuracy, stronger reliability, and better distribution, might be highly valuable for atmospheric sounding systems, especially for nowcasting of extreme weather.

  6. Simultaneous Retrieval of Temperature, Water Vapor and Ozone Atmospheric Profiles from IASI: Compression, De-noising, First Guess Retrieval and Inversion Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, F.; Rossow, W. B.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast temperature water vapor and ozone atmospheric profile retrieval algorithm is developed for the high spectral resolution Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) space-borne instrument. Compression and de-noising of IASI observations are performed using Principal Component Analysis. This preprocessing methodology also allows, for a fast pattern recognition in a climatological data set to obtain a first guess. Then, a neural network using first guess information is developed to retrieve simultaneously temperature, water vapor and ozone atmospheric profiles. The performance of the resulting fast and accurate inverse model is evaluated with a large diversified data set of radiosondes atmospheres including rare events.

  7. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1991-01-01

    The three major objectives of the project are outlined: (1) to describe atmospheric water vapor features as functions of space and time; (2) to evaluate remotely sensed measurements of water vapor content; and (3) to study relations between fine-scale water vapor fields and convective activity. Data from several remote sensors were used. The studies used the GOES/VAS, HIS, and MAMS instruments have provided a progressively finer scale view of water vapor features.

  8. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S M; K. H. Rosenlof

    2013-01-01

    We show observational evidence for a stratospheric water vapor feedback—a warmer climate increases stratospheric water vapor, and because stratospheric water vapor is itself a greenhouse gas, this leads to further warming. An estimate of its magnitude from a climate model yields a value of +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), suggesting that this feedback plays an important role in our climate system.

  9. The influence of water vapor content on electrical and spectral properties of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, A Yu; Sarani, A; Leys, Ch, E-mail: Anton.Nikiforov@Ugent.b [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-02-15

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated in Ar with water vapor is investigated. It is shown that an increase in the water content results in a decrease in the input power and asymmetry of the current waveform on positive and negative half-periods of the applied voltage. Space-resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of 1 mm and an imaging technique are applied for the characterization of the afterglow and investigation of the influence of water content on plasma properties. The rotational temperature of the jet is determined by simulation of the OH radical emission spectrum, transition A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}(v = 0) {yields} X {sup 2}{Pi}(v = 0). It is revealed that the temperature of the discharge increases from 450 K (Ar) up to 850 K with an increase in the water content up to 7600 ppm. Generation of the discharge in mixtures of argon with water vapor at a concentration of 350 ppm results in a maximal yield of OH radicals that can be useful in plasma jet applications. Preliminary tests of polypropylene surface modification are carried out in order to estimate the influence of water content on the results of treatment.

  10. Precipitation efficiency derived from isotope ratios in water vapor distinguishes dynamical and microphysical influences on subtropical atmospheric constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J.; Noone, D.

    2015-09-01

    With water vapor and clouds expected to effect significant feedbacks on climate, moisture transport through convective processes has important implications for future temperature change. The precipitation efficiency—the ratio of the rates at which precipitation and condensation form (e = P/C)—is useful for characterizing how much boundary layer moisture recycles through precipitation versus mixes into the free troposphere through cloud detrainment. Yet it is a difficult metric to constrain with traditional observational techniques. This analysis characterizes the precipitation efficiency of convection near the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, using a novel tracer: isotope ratios in water vapor. The synoptic circulation patterns associated with high and low precipitation efficiency are identified, and the importance of large-scale dynamics and local convective processes in regulating vertical distributions of atmospheric constituents important for climate is evaluated. The results suggest that high e days are correlated with plume-like transport originating from the relatively clean tropics, while low e days are associated with westerly transport, generated by a branching of the jet stream. Differences in transport pathway clearly modify background concentrations of water vapor and other trace gases measured at Mauna Loa Observatory; however, local convective processes appear to regulate aerosols there. Indeed, differences between observed and simulated diurnal cycles of particle number concentration indicate that precipitation scavenges aerosols and possibly facilitates new particle formation when e is high. As measurements of isotope ratios in water vapor expand across the subtropics, the techniques presented here can further our understanding of how synoptic weather, precipitation processes, and climate feedbacks interrelate.

  11. IR-BASED SATELLITE PRODUCTS FOR THE MONITORING OF ATMOSPHERIC WATER VAPOR OVER THE BLACK SEA

    OpenAIRE

    VELEA LILIANA; BOJARIU ROXANA

    2016-01-01

    The amount of precipitable water (TPW) in the atmospheric column is one of the important information used weather forecasting. Some of the studies involving the use of TPW relate to issues like lightning warning system in airports, tornadic events, data assimilation in numerical weather prediction models for short-range forecast, TPW associated with intense rain episodes. Most of the available studies on TPW focus on properties and products at global scale, with the drawback that regional cha...

  12. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  13. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  14. Atmospheric water vapor transport and recycling in Equatorial Central Africa through NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokam, Wilfried M.; Djiotang, Lucie A.T.; Mkankam, Francois K. [University of Yaounde 1, Laboratory for Environmental Modelling and Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2012-05-15

    The characteristics of the main components of the water cycle over Equatorial Central Africa (ECA) were analysed using the 32-year period, spanning from 1968 to 2000, of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Censearch (NCEP-) reanalysis project database. A special emphasis was given to identifying the causes of annual and interannual variability of water vapor flux and precipitation recycling. The results suggest that the first maximum of moisture convergence, during the rainy season MAM, comes from upper level moisture flux, related to the north component of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ-N). The second, and greatest, maximum in SON is found to be a consequence of low level moisture advection from the Atlantic Ocean. AEJ-N also drive the seasonal spatial pattern of moisture flux. The interannual variability of moisture flux is contributed mainly by the low level moisture advected from the Atlantic Ocean, underlying its crucial role for the regional climate. Studying the recycling ratio in ECA as a whole shows a low annual cycle whereas subregional scale analysis reveals high amplitude of the seasonal variation. Seasonal variability of the spatial gradient of precipitation recycling is regulated by both moisture flux direction and strength. The annual cycles of recycling ratio in the North and the South of ECA are regulated by both moisture transport and evapotranspiration. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of the Application of the Optical Method to the Measurements of the Water Vapor Content in the Atmosphere. I. Basic Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Berger, F -H; Leiterer, U; Naebert, T; Nikanorova, I N; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P; Sal'nikov, I B

    2010-01-01

    We retrieved the total content of the atmospheric water vapor from extensive sets of photometric data obtained since 1995 at Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory with star and sun photometers. Different methods of determination of the empirical parameters that are necessary for the retrieval are discussed. The instruments were independently calibrated using laboratory measurements made at Pulkovo Observatory with the VKM-100 multi-pass vacuum cell. The empirical parameters were also calculated by the simulation of the atmospheric absorption by water vapor, using the MODRAN-4 program package for different model atmospheres. The results are compared to those presented in the literature, obtained with different instruments and methods of the retrieval. The accuracy of the empirical parameters used for the power approximation that links the water vapor content with the observed absorption is analyzed. Currently, the calibration and measurement errors yield the uncertainty of about 10% in the total column water v...

  16. Aerosol optical properties and precipitable water vapor column in the atmosphere of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Frette, Øyvind; Stamnes, Jakob J; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hamre, Børge

    2015-02-20

    Between February 2012 and April 2014, we measured and analyzed direct solar radiances at a ground-based station in Bergen, Norway. We discovered that the spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor column (PWVC) retrieved from these measurements have a seasonal variation with highest values in summer and lowest values in winter. The highest value of the monthly median AOT at 440 nm of about 0.16 was measured in July and the lowest of about 0.04 was measured in December. The highest value of the monthly median PWVC of about 2.0 cm was measured in July and the lowest of about 0.4 cm was measured in December. We derived Ångström exponents that were used to deduce aerosol particle size distributions. We found that coarse-mode aerosol particles dominated most of the time during the measurement period, but fine-mode aerosol particles dominated during the winter seasons. The derived Ångström exponent values suggested that aerosols containing sea salt could have been dominating at this station during the measurement period. PMID:25968219

  17. Retrieval techniques and information content analysis to improve remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor, liquid water and temperature from ground-based microwave radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swaroop

    Observation of profiles of temperature, humidity and winds with sufficient accuracy and fine vertical and temporal resolution are needed to improve mesoscale weather prediction, track conditions in the lower to mid-troposphere, predict winds for renewable energy, inform the public of severe weather and improve transportation safety. In comparing these thermodynamic variables, the absolute atmospheric temperature varies only by 15%; in contrast, total water vapor may change by up to 50% over several hours. In addition, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are initialized using water vapor profile information, so improvements in their accuracy and resolution tend to improve the accuracy of NWP. Current water vapor profile observation systems are expensive and have insufficient spatial coverage to observe humidity in the lower to mid-troposphere. To address this important scientific need, the principal objective of this dissertation is to improve the accuracy, vertical resolution and revisit time of tropospheric water vapor profiles retrieved from microwave and millimeter-wave brightness temperature measurements. This dissertation advances the state of knowledge of retrieval of atmospheric water vapor from microwave brightness temperature measurements. It focuses on optimizing two information sources of interest for water vapor profile retrieval, i.e. independent measurements and background data set size. From a theoretical perspective, it determines sets of frequencies in the ranges of 20-23, 85-90 and 165-200 GHz that are optimal for water vapor retrieval from each of ground-based and airborne radiometers. The maximum number of degrees of freedom for the selected frequencies for ground-based radiometers is 5-6, while the optimum vertical resolution is 0.5 to 1.5 km. On the other hand, the maximum number of degrees of freedom for airborne radiometers is 8-9, while the optimum vertical resolution is 0.2 to 0.5 km. From an experimental perspective, brightness

  18. Time Resolved 3-D Mapping of Atmospheric Aerosols and Clouds During the Recent ARM Water Vapor IOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Miller, David; Wilkerson, Thomas; Andrus, Ionio; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The HARLIE lidar was deployed at the ARM SGP site in north central Oklahoma and recorded over 100 hours of data on 16 days between 17 September and 6 October 2000 during the recent Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period (IOP). Placed in a ground-based trailer for upward looking scanning measurements of clouds and aerosols, HARLIE provided a unique record of time-resolved atmospheric backscatter at 1 micron wavelength. The conical scanning lidar images atmospheric backscatter along the surface of an inverted 90 degree (full angle) cone up to an altitude of 20 km. 360 degree scans having spatial resolutions of 20 meters in the vertical and 1 degree in azimuth were obtained every 36 seconds. Various boundary layer and cloud parameters are derived from the lidar data, as well as atmospheric wind vectors where there is Sufficiently resolved structure that can be traced moving through the surface described by the scanning laser beam. Comparison of HARLIE measured winds with radiosonde measured winds validates the accuracy of this new technique for remotely measuring atmospheric winds without Doppler information.

  19. Using radiative transfer models to study the atmospheric water vapor content and to eliminate telluric lines from high-resolution optical spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gardini, A; Pérez, E; Quesada, J A; Funke, B

    2012-01-01

    The Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) and the retrieval algorithm, incorporated in the SCIATRAN 2.2 software package developed at the Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Enviromental Physics of Bremen University (Germany), allows to simulate, among other things, radiance/irradiance spectra in the 2400-24 000 {\\AA} range. In this work we present applications of RTM to two case studies. In the first case the RTM was used to simulate direct solar irradiance spectra, with different water vapor amounts, for the study of the water vapor content in the atmosphere above Sierra Nevada Observatory. Simulated spectra were compared with those measured with a spectrometer operating in the 8000-10 000 {\\AA} range. In the second case the RTM was used to generate telluric model spectra to subtract the atmospheric contribution and correct high-resolution stellar spectra from atmospheric water vapor and oxygen lines. The results of both studies are discussed.

  20. Measure and exploitation of multisensor and multiwavelength synergy for remote sensing: 2. Application to the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor from MetOp

    OpenAIRE

    Aires, F.; Paul, M; Prigent, C; Rommen, B.; Bouvet, M

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper, classical information content (IC) analysis was used to measure the potential synergy between the microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) observations from Atmospheric Microwave Sounding Unit-A, Microwave Humidity Sounder, and Improved Atmospheric Sounding in the Infrared instruments, used to retrieve the atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor over ocean, under clear-sky conditions. Some limitations of IC were pointed out that questioned the reliability of this t...

  1. Density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor, and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Koichi; Ishigame, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution. The densities of OH, Na and H2O had different spatial distributions, while the Na density had a similar distribution to mist, suggesting that mist is the source of Na in the gas phase. When the flow rate of helium toward the electrolyte surface was increased, the distributions of all the species densities concentrated in the neighbori...

  2. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    bottom positions with a few centimeters in accuracy. The system is now operational for more than ten sites along the Japanese coasts. Currently, however, the measurements are not continuous but have been done once to several times a year using a boat. If a GPS and acoustic system is placed on a buoy, ocean bottom position could be monitored in near real-time and continuous manner. This will allow us to monitor more detailed and short term crustal deformations at the sea bottom. Another application plan is for an atmospheric research. Previous researchers have shown that GPS is capable of measuring atmospheric water vapor through estimating tropospheric zenith delay measurements of GPS at the sea surface. Information of water vapor content and its temporal variation over sea surface will much contribute to weather forecast on land which has mostly been conducted only by land observations. Considering that the atmospheric mass moves from west to east in general in and around Japanese islands, information of water vapor together with other atmospheric data from an array of GPS buoy placed in the west of Japanese Islands, will much improve weather forecast. We try to examine if this is also feasible. As a conclusion of a series of GPS buoy experiments, we could assert that GPS buoy system will be a powerful tool to monitor ocean surface and much contribute to provide safe and secure life of people.

  3. Characterization of atmospheric pressure plasma treated pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles: Treatment in air/water vapor mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.zanini@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Grimoldi, Elisa [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Citterio, Attilio [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica “G. Natta”, Via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Riccardi, Claudia, E-mail: riccardi@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We treated cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with atmospheric pressure plasma. • Wettability of the fabrics was increased. • The increment in wettability derived from a surface oxidation of the fibers. • Only minor etching effects were observed with scanning electron microscopy. - Abstract: We performed atmospheric pressure plasma treatments of pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in humid air (air/water vapor mixtures). Treatment parameters have been optimized in order to enhance the wettability of the fabrics without changing their bulk properties as well as their touch. A deep characterization has been performed to study the wettability, the surface morphologies, the chemical composition and the mechanical properties of the plasma treated textiles. The chemical properties of the plasma treated samples were investigated with attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). The analyses reveal a surface oxidation of the treated fabrics, which enhances their surface wettability. Morphological characterization of the treated fibers with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals minor etching effects, an essential feature for the maintenance of the textile softness.

  4. Characterization of atmospheric pressure plasma treated pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles: Treatment in air/water vapor mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We treated cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with atmospheric pressure plasma. • Wettability of the fabrics was increased. • The increment in wettability derived from a surface oxidation of the fibers. • Only minor etching effects were observed with scanning electron microscopy. - Abstract: We performed atmospheric pressure plasma treatments of pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in humid air (air/water vapor mixtures). Treatment parameters have been optimized in order to enhance the wettability of the fabrics without changing their bulk properties as well as their touch. A deep characterization has been performed to study the wettability, the surface morphologies, the chemical composition and the mechanical properties of the plasma treated textiles. The chemical properties of the plasma treated samples were investigated with attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). The analyses reveal a surface oxidation of the treated fabrics, which enhances their surface wettability. Morphological characterization of the treated fibers with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals minor etching effects, an essential feature for the maintenance of the textile softness

  5. Temporal variations of atmospheric water vapor δD and δ18O above an arid artificial oasis cropland in the Heihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xue-Fa

    2015-04-01

    The high temporal resolution measurements of δD, δ18O, and deuterium excess (d) of atmospheric water vapor provide an improved understanding of atmospheric and ecohydrological processes at ecosystem to global scales. Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy has recently allowed high-frequency in situ measurements of atmospheric water vapor isotopic ratios in China (Wen et al., 2008, Journal of Hydrology; Wen et al., 2012, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology). For our group, in situ and continuous observations of δD, δ18O, and d of atmospheric water vapor have been performed at the surface air in Beijing (Wen et al., 2010, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres; Zhange et al., 2011, Journal of Geographical Sciences), a winter wheat and summer maize cropland in Luancheng (Wen et al., 2012, Oecologia; Xiao et al., 2012, Global Change Biology), a grassland in Duolun (Hu et al., 2014, Journal of Geophysical Research- Biogeosciences), a spring maize cropland (Huang and Wen, 2014, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres) and a subtropical coniferous plantation (Yang et al., 2015, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology). In this study (Huang and Wen, 2014), δD, δ18O, and d of water vapor and their flux ratios were continuously measured from May to September 2012 using an in situ technique above an arid artificial oasis in the Heihe River Basin, which has a typical continental arid climate. The monthly δD and δ18O increased slowly and then decreased, whereas the monthly d showed a steady decrease. δD, δ18O, and d exhibited a marked diurnal cycle, indicating the influence of the entrainment, local evapotranspiration (ET), and dewfall. The departures of δD, δ18O, and d from equilibrium prediction were significantly correlated with rain amount, relative humidity (RH), and air temperature (T). The "amount effect" was observed during one precipitation event. δD and δ18O were log linear dependent on water vapor mixing ratio with respective R2 of 17% and

  6. Use of Total Precipitable Water Classification of A Priori Error and Quality Control in Atmospheric Temperature and Water Vapor Sounding Retrieval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun-Han KWON; Jun LI; Jinlong LI; B. J. SOHN; Elisabeth WEISZ

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the use of dynamic a priori error information according to atmospheric moistness and the use of quality controls in temperature and water vapor profile retrievals from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders.Temperature and water vapor profiles are retrieved from Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) radiance measurements by applying a physical iterative method using regression retrieval as the first guess. Based on the dependency of first-guess errors on the degree of atmospheric moistness,the a priori first-guess errors classified by total precipitable water (TPW) are applied in the AIRS physical retrieval procedure.Compared to the retrieval results from a fixed a priori error,boundary layer moisture retrievals appear to be improved via TPW classification of a priori first-guess errors.Six quality control (QC)tests,which check non-converged or bad retrievals,large residuals,high terrain and desert areas,and large temperature and moisture deviations from the first guess regression retrieval,are also applied in the AIRS physical retrievals.Significantly large errors are found for the retrievals rejected by these six QCs,and the retrieval errors are substantially reduced via QC over land,which suggest the usefulness and high impact of the QCs,especially over land.In conclusion,the use of dynamic a priori error information according to atmospheric moistness,and the use of appropriate QCs dealing with the geographical information and the deviation from the first-guess as well as the conventional inverse performance are suggested to improve temperature and moisture retrievals and their applications.

  7. Remote sensing of water vapor features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1993-01-01

    Water vapor plays a critical role in the atmosphere. It is an important medium of energy exchange between air, land, and water; it is a major greenhouse gas, providing a crucial radiative role in the global climate system; and it is intimately involved in many regional scale atmospheric processes. Our research has been aimed at improving satellite remote sensing of water vapor and better understanding its role in meteorological processes. Our early studies evaluated the current GOES VAS system for measuring water vapor and have used VAS-derived water vapor data to examine pre-thunderstorm environments. Much of that research was described at the 1991 Research Review. A second research component has considered three proposed sensors--the High resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). We have focused on MAMS and AMSU research during the past year and the accomplishments made in this effort are presented.

  8. Simultaneous atmospheric nitrous oxide, methane and water vapor detection with a single continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P; Jiang, Wenzhe; Griffin, Robert J; Xie, Feng; Hughes, Lawrence C; Zah, Chung-en; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-02-01

    A continuous wave (CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL) based absorption sensor system was demonstrated and developed for simultaneous detection of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N(2)O), methane (CH(4)), and water vapor (H(2)O). A 7.73-µm CW QCL with its wavelength scanned over a spectral range of 1296.9-1297.6 cm(-1) was used to simultaneously target three neighboring strong absorption lines, N(2)O at 1297.05 cm(-1), CH(4) at 1297.486 cm(-1), and H(2)O at 1297.184 cm(-1). An astigmatic multipass Herriott cell with a 76-m path length was utilized for laser based gas absorption spectroscopy at an optimum pressure of 100 Torr. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection was employed for data processing. Minimum detection limits (MDLs) of 1.7 ppb for N(2)O, 8.5 ppb for CH(4), and 11 ppm for H(2)O were achieved with a 2-s integration time for individual gas detection. This single QCL based multi-gas detection system possesses applications in environmental monitoring and breath analysis. PMID:25836083

  9. Carbon monoxide and water vapor in the atmosphere of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 179949 b

    CERN Document Server

    Brogi, M; Birkby, J L; Schwarz, H; Snellen, I A G

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) In recent years, ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy has become a powerful tool for investigating exoplanet atmospheres. It allows the robust identification of molecular species, and it can be applied to both transiting and non-transiting planets. Radial-velocity measurements of the star HD 179949 indicate the presence of a giant planet companion in a close-in orbit. Here we present the analysis of spectra of the system at 2.3 micron, obtained at a resolution of R~100,000, during three nights of observations with CRIRES at the VLT. We targeted the system while the exoplanet was near superior conjunction, aiming to detect the planet's thermal spectrum and the radial component of its orbital velocity. We detect molecular absorption from carbon monoxide and water vapor with a combined S/N of 6.3, at a projected planet orbital velocity of K_P = (142.8 +- 3.4) km/s, which translates into a planet mass of M_P = (0.98 +- 0.04) Jupiter masses, and an orbital inclination of i = (67.7 +- 4.3) degrees, ...

  10. Retrieval Assimilation and Modeling of Atmospheric Water Vapor from Ground- and Space-Based GPS Networks: Investigation of the Global and Regional Hydrological Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty over the response of the atmospheric hydrological cycle (particularly the distribution of water vapor and cloudiness) to anthropogenic forcing is a primary source of doubt in current estimates of global climate sensitivity, which raises severe difficulties in evaluating its likely societal impact. Fortunately, a variety of advanced techniques and sensors are beginning to shed new light on the atmospheric hydrological cycle. One of the most promising makes use of the sensitivity of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to the thermodynamic state, and in particular the water vapor content, of the atmosphere through which the radio signals propagate. Our strategy to derive the maximum benefit for hydrological studies from the rapidly increasing GPS data stream will proceed in three stages: (1) systematically analyze and archive quality-controlled retrievals using state-of-the-art techniques; (2) employ both currently available and innovative assimilation procedures to incorporate these determinations into advanced regional and global atmospheric models and assess their effects; and (3) apply the results to investigate selected scientific issues of relevance to regional and global hydrological studies. An archive of GPS-based estimation of total zenith delay (TZD) data and water vapor where applicable has been established with expanded automated quality control. The accuracy of the GPS estimates is being monitored; the investigation of systematic errors is ongoing using comparisons with water vapor radiometers. Meteorological packages have been implemented. The accuracy and utilization of the TZD estimates has been improved by implementing a troposphere gradient model. GPS-based gradients have been validated as real atmospheric moisture gradients, establishing a link between the estimated gradients and the passage of weather fronts. We have developed a generalized ray tracing inversion scheme that can be used to analyze occultation data acquired from space

  11. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, A. M.; V. G. Gorshkov; D. Sheil; A. D. Nobre; B.-L. Li

    2013-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in t...

  12. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, A. M.; V. G. Gorshkov; D. Sheil; A. D. Nobre; B.-L. Li

    2010-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in t...

  13. Using in-situ observations of atmospheric water vapor isotopes to benchmark and isotope-enabled General Circulation Models and improve ice core paleo-climate reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Sveinbjörnsdottir, Arny; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Werner, Martin; Risi, Camille; Yoshimura, Kei

    2016-04-01

    We have since 2010 carried out in-situ continuous water vapor isotope observations on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet (3 seasons at NEEM), in Svalbard (1 year), in Iceland (4 years), in Bermuda (4 years). The expansive dataset containing high accuracy and precision measurements of δ18O, δD, and the d-excess allow us to validate and benchmark the treatment of the atmospheric hydrological cycle's processes in General Circulation Models using simulations nudged to reanalysis products. Recent findings from both Antarctica and Greenland have documented strong interaction between the snow surface isotopes and the near surface atmospheric water vapor isotopes on diurnal to synoptic time scales. In fact, it has been shown that the snow surface isotopes take up the synoptic driven atmospheric water vapor isotopic signal in-between precipitation events, erasing the precipitation isotope signal in the surface snow. This highlights the importance of using General or Regional Climate Models, which accurately are able to simulate the atmospheric water vapor isotopic composition, to understand and interpret the ice core isotope signal. With this in mind we have used three isotope-enabled General Circulation Models (isoGSM, ECHAM5-wiso, and LMDZiso) nudged to reanalysis products. We have compared the simulations of daily mean isotope values directly with our in-situ observations. This has allowed us to characterize the variability of the isotopic composition in the models and compared it to our observations. We have specifically focused on the d-excess in order to characterize why both the mean and the variability is significantly lower than our observations. We argue that using water vapor isotopes to benchmark General Circulation Models offers an excellent tool for improving the treatment and parameterization of the atmospheric hydrological cycle. Recent studies have documented a very large inter-model dispersion in the treatment of the Arctic water cycle under a future global

  14. Comparison of time series of integrated water vapor measured using radiosonde, GPS and microwave radiometer at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Franceso; Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Information about the amount and spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor is essential to improve our knowledge of weather forecasting and climate change. Water vapor is highly variable in space and time depending on the complex interplay of several phenomena like convection, precipitation, turbulence, etc. It remains one of the most poorly characterized meteorological parameters. Remarkable progress in using of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), in particular GPS, for the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor has been achieved during the last decades. Various studies have demonstrated that GPS could provide accurate water vapor estimates for the study of the atmosphere. Different GPS data processing provided within the scientific community made use of various tropospheric models that primarily differs for the assumptions on the vertical refractivity profiles and the mapping of the vertical delay with elevation angles. This works compares several models based on the use of surface meteorological data. In order to calculate the Integrated Water Vapour (IWV), an algorithm for calculating the zenith tropospheric delay was implemented. It is based upon different mapping functions (Niell, Saastamoinen, Chao and Herring Mapping Functions). Observations are performed at the Istituto di Metodologie per l'Analisi Ambientale (IMAA) GPS station located in Tito Scalo, Potenza (40.60N, 15.72E), from July to December 2014, in the framework of OSCAR project (Observation System for Climate Application at Regional scale). The retrieved values of the IWV using the GPS are systematically compared with the other estimation of IWV collected at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory) using the other available measurement techniques. In particular, in this work the compared IWV are retrieved from: 1. a Trimble GPS antenna (data processed by the GPS-Met network, see gpsmet.nooa.gov); 2. a Novatel GPS antenna (data locally processed using a software developed at CIAO); 3

  15. Isotopic exchange on the diurnal scale between near-surface snow and lower atmospheric water vapor at Kohnen station, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, François; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Werner, Martin; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Orsi, Anais; Behrens, Melanie; Birnbaum, Gerit; Freitag, Johannes; Risi, Camille; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2016-07-01

    Quantifying the magnitude of post-depositional processes affecting the isotopic composition of surface snow is essential for a more accurate interpretation of ice core data. To achieve this, high temporal resolution measurements of both lower atmospheric water vapor and surface snow isotopic composition are required. This study presents continuous measurements of water vapor isotopes performed in East Antarctica (Kohnen station) from December 2013 to January 2014 using a laser spectrometer. Observations have been compared with the outputs of two atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) equipped with water vapor isotopes: ECHAM5-wiso and LMDZ5Aiso. During our monitoring period, the signals in the 2 m air temperature T, humidity mixing ratio q and both water vapor isotopes δD and δ18O are dominated by the presence of diurnal cycles. Both AGCMs simulate similar diurnal cycles with a mean amplitude 30 to 70 % lower than observed, possibly due to an incorrect simulation of the surface energy balance and the boundary layer dynamics. In parallel, snow surface samples were collected each hour over 35 h, with a sampling depth of 2-5 mm. A diurnal cycle in the isotopic composition of the snow surface is observed in phase with the water vapor, reaching a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3 ‰ for δD over 24 h (compared to 36 ‰ for δD in the water vapor). A simple box model treated as a closed system has been developed to study the exchange of water molecules between an air and a snow reservoir. In the vapor, the box model simulations show too much isotopic depletion compared to the observations. Mixing with other sources (advection, free troposphere) has to be included in order to fit the observations. At the snow surface, the simulated isotopic values are close to the observations with a snow reservoir of ˜ 5 mm depth (range of the snow sample depth). Our analysis suggests that fractionation occurs during sublimation and that vapor-snow exchanges can no longer be

  16. Radiometric remote sensing of mesospheric and stratospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croskey, Charles L.; Olivero, John J.; Martone, Joseph P.

    1991-01-01

    The remote sensing of stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor by microwave and millimeter radiometry is described. The received radiation is emitted by and interacts with all levels of the atmosphere. The pressure dependence of the linewidth for the absorption cross section of water vapor permits retrieval of vapor mixing ratios. The 183.31-GHz line of water vapor can also be used for remote sensing of the water vapor concentration in the upper atmosphere, but due to the much stronger absorption cross section for this line, ground-based observations are difficult. To date all measurements at 183 GHz have been made from platforms above the troposphere.

  17. The impact of new water vapor spectroscopy on satellite retrievals

    OpenAIRE

    Maurellis, A. N.; Lang, R.; Williams, J. E.; W. J. van der Zande; Smith, K; D. A. Newnham; Tennyson, J.; Tolchenov, R. N.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor, arguably the most important trace gas constituent of Earth atmospheric physics, is also both a retrieval goal and a hindrance in the retrievals of other trace gases from nadir-measuring satellite spectrometers. This is because the atmospherically-attenuated solar spectrum in the visible and shortwave infrared is littered with water vapor bands. The recent plethora of water vapor spectroscopy databases in this spectral region has prompted us to study their utility in satellite ret...

  18. Water vapor data assimilation for the atmospheric correction of D-InSAR products:Case study over Mts. Baekdu and Datun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hye-Won; Kim, Jung-Rack; Lin, Shih-Yuan; Hong, Sung-Wook; Choi, Yun-Soo

    2013-04-01

    SAR campaign could be corrected. The test areas are two potential volcanoes, including Mt. Baekdu in Korea and Mt. Datun in Taiwan. Although the recent reports of crust activities have revealed that the Eastern Asian volcanoes are in dormant status, the two volcanoes have been the main focus of interests as they are very close to high population area. Therefore a monitoring for extracting correct deformation is critical. To the end the SAR data were proposed for the volcano monitoring task. However, in spite of several D-InSAR monitoring, the stratification water vapor and the erroneous base DTMs make it impossible to correctly observe true deformation. In this study, ENVISAT image sequences with error corrected D-InSAR technique were interpreted to detect the potential land deformation. As a result, small land deformations that might be interpreted as the influence caused at the stage of magmatic intrusion was identified in Mt. Baekdu. The whole D-InSAR processing was conducted over Mt. Datun again and the results were verified using the GPS data sets. Even if those are not genuine volcanic activities, continuous D-InSAR monitoring employing new SAR assets and the stable atmospheric correction are highly recommended to reduce the potential risks considering the reliable D-InSAR observation accuracy.

  19. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrillard, I; Romanini, D; Mondelain, D; Campargue, A

    2015-10-01

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm(-1), respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, CS, were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the CS value at 4302 cm(-1) is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT_CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm(-1), our value is 5 times larger than the MT_CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS CS values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D0 ≈ 1100 cm(-1). PMID:26450311

  20. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm−1, respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, CS, were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the CS value at 4302 cm−1 is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT-CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm−1, our value is 5 times larger than the MT-CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS CS values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D0 ≈ 1100 cm−1

  1. Tritium content in atmospheric water vapor inside of the reactor hall (reactor R-A) in Institute Vinca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium content in atmospheric water vapour inside of the reactor hall was measured during the regular inspection of the fuel channels in Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', in March and May 2006. Tritium content in HTO form varied from 1.56·102 Bqm-3 to 4.05·102 Bqm-3. Tritium concentrations in precipitation collected at Zeleno Brdo and Institute 'Vinca' during the 2006. were (-1 and (3.52 - 13.09) Bql-1, respectively. (author)

  2. Monitoring System for Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Ground-Based Multi-Band Radiometer: Meteorological Application of Radio Astronomy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, T.; Araki, K.; Ishimoto, H.; Kominami, K.; Tajima, O.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution estimation of thermodynamic properties in the atmosphere can help to predict and mitigate meteorological disasters, such as local heavy rainfall and tornadic storms. For the purposes of short-term forecasting and nowcasting of severe storms, we propose a novel ground-based measurement system, which observes the intensity of atmospheric radiation in the microwave range. Our multi-band receiver system is designed to identify a rapid increase in water vapor before clouds are generated. At frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz, our system simultaneously measures water vapor as a broad absorption peak at 22 GHz as well as cloud liquid water. Another band at 50-60 GHz provides supplementary information from oxygen radiation to give vertical profiles of physical temperature. For the construction of this cold receiver system, novel technologies originally developed for observations of cosmic microwave background radiation were applied. The input atmospheric signal is amplified by a cold low-noise amplifier maintained below 10 K, while the spectrum of this amplified signal is measured using a signal analyzer under ambient conditions. The cryostat also contains a cold black body at 40 K to act as a calibration signal. This calibration signal is transported to each of the receivers via a wire grid. We can select either the atmospheric signal or the calibration signal by changing the orientation of this wire. Each receiver can be calibrated using this setup. Our system is designed to be compact (< 1 m3 ), with low power consumption (˜ 1.5 kW). Therefore, it is easy to deploy on top of high buildings, mountains, and ship decks.

  3. Monitoring System for Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Ground-Based Multi-Band Radiometer: Meteorological Application of Radio Astronomy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, T.; Araki, K.; Ishimoto, H.; Kominami, K.; Tajima, O.

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution estimation of thermodynamic properties in the atmosphere can help to predict and mitigate meteorological disasters, such as local heavy rainfall and tornadic storms. For the purposes of short-term forecasting and nowcasting of severe storms, we propose a novel ground-based measurement system, which observes the intensity of atmospheric radiation in the microwave range. Our multi-band receiver system is designed to identify a rapid increase in water vapor before clouds are generated. At frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz, our system simultaneously measures water vapor as a broad absorption peak at 22 GHz as well as cloud liquid water. Another band at 50-60 GHz provides supplementary information from oxygen radiation to give vertical profiles of physical temperature. For the construction of this cold receiver system, novel technologies originally developed for observations of cosmic microwave background radiation were applied. The input atmospheric signal is amplified by a cold low-noise amplifier maintained below 10 K, while the spectrum of this amplified signal is measured using a signal analyzer under ambient conditions. The cryostat also contains a cold black body at 40 K to act as a calibration signal. This calibration signal is transported to each of the receivers via a wire grid. We can select either the atmospheric signal or the calibration signal by changing the orientation of this wire. Each receiver can be calibrated using this setup. Our system is designed to be compact (<1 m3), with low power consumption (˜ 1.5 kW). Therefore, it is easy to deploy on top of high buildings, mountains, and ship decks.

  4. GPS meteorology in a low-latitude region: Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor over the Malaysian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, T. A.; Amir, S.; Othman, R.; Ses, S.; Omar, K.; Abdullah, K.; Lim, S.; Rizos, C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents an accuracy assessment of IWV data obtained from one year of GPS measurements in Peninsular Malaysia and the correlation between this GPS-derived IWV and radiosonde-derived IWV. Four GPS stations in close proximity to existing radiosonde stations are assessed; the root mean square errors of the GPS-derived IWVs are 3.447 kg/m2, 3.786 kg/m2, 4.122 kg/m2 and 4.253 kg/m2 and their linear correlation coefficients are 0.877, 0.797, 0.851 and 0.849, respectively. Such strong correlations indicate that GPS data has the potential to be used for water vapor observation in Peninsular Malaysia for locations with few weather stations.

  5. The formation of acid rain in the atmosphere, adjacent to the TTP with the joint-condensing of sulfur dioxide and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdyakov, D. V.; Gubin, V. E.; Matveeva, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    Presents the results of mathematical simulation of the condensation process of sulphur dioxide and water vapor on the condensation nuclei surface under the action of natural factors. Numerical investigations were carried out for the summer at a moderate speed of the wind. The influence of the parameter of condensation on the speed of the process of sulfuric acid drops formation in the air space was analyzed. Time ranges, sufficient for the formation of the acid rain sedimentation in the atmosphere, adjacent to the areas of thermal power station work were established. It is shown that the speed of air masses movement effects on the process of acid anthropogenic admixtures dispersion in the atmosphere. Approbation of the obtained results was carried out by checking the difference scheme conservative and solution of test problems.

  6. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  7. Quantifying biological and atmospheric processes with in-situ measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor isotopes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, X.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to make real-time, high-frequency measurements of CO2 and H2O isotopes in the atmosphere opens a new channel of scientific pursuit. The objectives of this paper are (1) to examine practical issues on using these measurements in biospheric and atmospheric research, and (2) to compare two different perspectives on isotopic surface-air fluxes. From the user’s perspective, three issues should be resolved in order to further realize the power of these in-situ measurements. The first one is related to instrument calibration. By their nature, isotopologue measurements by optical methods are prone to biases from nonlinear concentration dependence. Overcoming the nonlinear effect via calibration is important for the measurement of the isotopic abundance of CO2 or H2O and even more so for the measurement of the isotopic signal of their fluxes. Further, a portable calibration system is essential for deployment in remote sites. The second challenge that researchers face is instrument cost. We envision the development of a new flux network with real-time observations of isotopic fluxes of CO2 and H2O to help diagnose changes in atmospheric and biospheric processes. This can become a realistic goal if the instrument cost is brought down to a level comparable to that of broadband infrared analyzers. Third, speed of detection also deserves attention. In-situ measurements of CO2 and H2O isotope ratios in ambient air, especially if made on a long-term basis and calibrated precisely, can aid atmospheric inverse analysis of land carbon sink and the tracking of water transport in the atmosphere. Ambient monitoring alone is however not very useful in ecological studies. To measure the source/sink signature properly, one should interface the isotopic analyzer with a plant or soil chamber, deploy it in the gradient-diffusion mode either over a plant canopy or over the soil surface inside the canopy, or combine it with a sonic anemometer for direct eddy covariance measurement

  8. Recovery of atmospheric water vapor total column abundance from imaging spectrometer data around 940 nm - Sensitivity analysis and application to Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two simple techniques to retrieve path precipitable water from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) high spectral resolution radiance data (Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio, CIBR, and Narrow/Wide ratio, N/W), using the 940 nm water absorption band, are compared. Since the shape and depth of the atmospheric water bands are influenced not only by the water present but also by surface (background) reflectance, atmospheric scattering, and instrument radiance by calibration, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the radiative transfer code LOWTRAN 7 to determine which one of these two approaches will provide a better estimate over land and water areas. The CIBR proved to be the technique less sensitive to perturbing effects, except for errors in visibility estimate. Both techniques were applied to AVIRIS radiance data acquired over Salton Sea, California. Resulting images confirmed that the used of a constant gray reflectance in the model led to a higher overestimation of the amount of water retrieved for N/W over vegetated areas. Validation was performed through comparison between an independent estimate of water vapor from concurrent Reagan sunphotometer measurements and AVIRIS estimates. Amounts retrieved using the N/W approach match more closely in situ measurements, even after adjusting model parameters for background reflectance, viewing geometry and type of aerosol at the site. The 13% underestimation observed for the CIBR was explained by small differences ΔL(λi) between AVIRIS and LOWTRAN 7 modeled radiances. Results from this study emphasizes the importance of accurate instrument calibration in flight and correct physical modeling of atmospheric absorptions

  9. Development of Solid State Laser Materials for Application in Lasers for Atmospheric Ozone and Water Vapor Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noginov, Makhail A.; Loutts, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    We have grown neodymium doped mixed apatite crystals, (Sr(x)Ba(l-x)5(PO4)3F, Sr5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and Ba5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and spectroscopically studied them as potential gain media for a laser source for atmospheric water sensing operating at 944.11 nm0. We conclude that an appropriate apatite host material for a 944.11 nm laser should be a mixture of Sr5(PO4)3F with a small fraction of Ba5(PO4)3F. The precise wavelength tuning around 944.11 nm can be accomplished by varying the host composition, temperature, and threshold population inversion. In apatite crystals of mixed composition, the Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) loss at 1.06 microns is predicted to be significantly smaller than that in the end members.

  10. Simultaneous remote monitoring of atmospheric methane and water vapor using an integrated path DIAL instrument based on a widely tunable optical parametric source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos Barria, Jessica; Dobroc, Alexandre; Coudert-Alteirac, Hélène; Raybaut, Myriam; Cézard, Nicolas; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Schmid, Thomas; Faure, Basile; Souhaité, Grégoire; Pelon, Jacques; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Lefebvre, Michel

    2014-10-01

    We report on the remote sensing capability of an integrated path differential absorption lidar (IPDIAL) instrument, for multi-species gas detection and monitoring in the 3.3-3.7 µm range. This instrument is based on an optical parametric source composed of a master oscillator-power amplifier scheme—whose core building block is a nested cavity optical parametric oscillator—emitting up to 10 µJ at 3.3 µm. Optical pumping is realized with an innovative single-frequency, 2-kHz repetition rate, nanosecond microchip laser, amplified up to 200 µJ per pulse in a single-crystal fiber amplifier. Simultaneous monitoring of mean atmospheric water vapor and methane concentrations was performed over several days by use of a topographic target, and water vapor concentration measurements show good agreement compared with an in situ hygrometer measurement. Performances of the IPDIAL instrument are assessed in terms of concentration measurement uncertainties and maximum remote achievable range.

  11. Closure study between 183.31 GHz passive microwave and in-situ radiosonde measurements of water vapor in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Oleksandr; Brath, Manfred; John, Viju; Buehler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Water vapor is an effective greenhouse gas and has a strong effect on the Earth's Energy balance. Often water vapor is measured in-situ by radiosondes and remotely by passive microwave satellite sensors. Satellite and radiosonde measurements can not be compared directly because of their different nature. We can use the profiles measured by the radiosondes as an input data for a radiative transfer model and then compare the output of the model with the satellite data. One of the remote sensing techniques employs series measurements of radiant intensity at the water vapor absorption line centered at 183.31 GHz. Recently it was shown that there is a bias between the satellite and radiosonde measurements. Also this bias has a spectral shape - satellite data is warmer than radiosonde measurements near the center of the absorption line and satellite data is colder on the wings of the line. The source of the bias is not clear. The source can be problems with radiosonde or satellite data or imprecise spectroscopic data for radiative transfer models. Objective of this study is to make a closure study of 183.31 GHz satellite and radiosonde measurements to check the agreement between them. To accomplish this we utilized up-to-date spectroscopic parameters of 183.31 GHz water vapor absorption line and the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN) processed radiosonde data for 5 stations around the globe. We used data for microwave sensors the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit B (AMSU-B) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS). We examined data from 2009 to 2015. We used the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) to simulate radiosonde profiles. We will present the comprehensive analysis of comparison. In most of the examined cases the data are comparable and consistent within the estimated uncertainty. Our comparison does not show spectral dependence of the bias. The results indicate good agreement between the satellite and radiosonde

  12. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  13. An investigation of a GJ 1214b-like exoplanet with a water vapor atmosphere using a simple general circulation model

    CERN Document Server

    Zalucha, Angela M; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a simple general circulation model (GCM) of a GJ 1214b-like super-Earth exoplanet. The dynamical core of our model is a scaled-up version of a shallow atmosphere, terrestrial planet GCM that has previously been used for Mars and therefore employs different boundary conditions and physical processes than downsized gas giant models. We assume the planet is tidally locked and has the observed characteristics of GJ-1214b [Charbonneau et al. 2009] for surface mass, surface radius, orbital period, and surface gravitational acceleration. We assume the atmosphere is composed entirely of water vapor. We assume the planet has a surface (i.e., a density discontinuity at depth), which will provide a mechanical drag and affect the radiative balance at the bottom boundary. We assume a gray atmosphere in the IR. We find that a westerly jet is present aloft at the equator and that the longitude of maximum temperature is shifted eastward of the substellar point. A wavenumber-1 feature is present in the...

  14. Extratropical Influence of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor on Greenhouse Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Liu, W.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the impact of upper tropospheric water vapor on greenhouse warming in midlatitudes by analyzing the recent observations of the upper tropospheric water vapor from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), in conjuction with other space-based measurement and model simulation products.

  15. Seasonal Behavior of Tropical to Mid-Latitude Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from UARS MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, B.; Read, W.; Waters, J.; Rosenlof, K.

    1998-01-01

    Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) is a fundamental importance in understanding earth's atmosphere and climate. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas and it is in the upper troposphere that water vapor most strongly influences radiative forcing.

  16. Measure and exploitation of multisensor and multiwavelength synergy for remote sensing: 2. Application to the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor from MetOp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Filipe; Paul, Maxime; Prigent, Catherine; Rommen, BjöRn; Bouvet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper, classical information content (IC) analysis was used to measure the potential synergy between the microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) observations from Atmospheric Microwave Sounding Unit-A, Microwave Humidity Sounder, and Improved Atmospheric Sounding in the Infrared instruments, used to retrieve the atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor over ocean, under clear-sky conditions. Some limitations of IC were pointed out that questioned the reliability of this technique for synergy characterization. The goal of this second paper is to develop a methodology to measure realistic potential synergies and to construct retrieval methods able to exploit them. Three retrieval methods are considered: the k nearest neighbors, the linear regression, and the neural networks (NN). These statistical retrieval schemes are tested on an application involving IR and MW synergy. Only clear-sky, near-nadir radiances over ocean are considered. The IR/MW synergy is expected to be stronger in cloudy cases, but it will be shown that it can also be observed in clear situations. The inversion algorithms are calibrated and tested with simulated observations, without any loss of generality, using similar theoretical assumption (same radiative transfer model, observational noise, and a priori information) in order to truly compare the IC and the direct statistical retrieval approaches. Multivariate and nonlinear methods such as the NN approach show that there is a strong potential for synergy. Synergy measurement tools such as the method proposed in this study should be considered in the future for the definition of new missions: The instrument characteristics should be determined not independently, sensor by sensor, but taking into account all the instruments together as a whole observing system.

  17. The impact of data assimilation of ground-based GPS precipitable water vapor to numerical weather prediction model on estimation of ray-traced atmospheric slant delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, R.; Hobiger, T.; Shoji, Y.; Miyauchi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The ''KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)'' is capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. One advantage of KARAT is that the reduction of atmospheric path delay will become more accurate each time the numerical weather model is improved. On October 27, 2009 the JMA started data assimilation of zenith wet delays obtained by the GPS Earth Observation Network System (GEONET) operated by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) for meso-scale NWP model. The improved NWP model data assimilating the GPS PWV data has the potential to correct the atmospheric path delay more precisely. Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) of Japan has evaluated the impact of ground-based GPS precipitable water vapor (GPS PWV) derived from the GEONET on meso-scale NWP model under the localized heavy rainfall event in Tokyo, Japan on 5 August 2008. A terrific thunderstorm occurred across the Kanto area of Japan, and it caused flooding in downtown Tokyo. During the event, the rainfall intensity increased to over 100 mm per hour within thirty minutes. We have assessed the impacts of GPS PWV assimilation into the NWP model on the KARAT correction by comparisons of the precise point positioning (PPP) solutions. In the nationwide scale of Japan, the short time repeatability of the PPP results for both horizontal and height positions applying KARAT correction through the MRI NWP model with GPS PWV assimilation are about several percent better than that through the conventional MRI NPW model w/o GPS PWV assimilation. In addition we are now investigating the impact of GPS PWV data assimilation in more detail. We will present the updated results of the comparison study.

  18. ARIS-Campaign: intercomparison of three ground based 22 GHz radiometers for middle atmospheric water vapor at the Zugspitze in winter 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Alpine Radiometer Intercomparison at the Schneefernerhaus (ARIS, which took place in winter 2009 at the high altitude station at the Zugspitze, Germany (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2650 m. This campaign was the first direct intercomparison between three new ground based 22 GHz water vapor radiometers for middle atmospheric profiling with the following instruments participating: MIRA 5 (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, cWASPAM3 (Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau and MIAWARA-C (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern. Even though the three radiometers all measure middle atmospheric water vapor using the same rotational transition line and similar fundamental set-ups, there are major differences between the front ends, the back ends, the calibration concepts and the profile retrieval. The spectrum comparison shows that all three radiometers measure spectra without severe baseline artifacts and that the measurements are in good general agreement. The measurement noise shows good agreement to the values theoretically expected from the radiometer noise formula. At the same time the comparison of the noise levels shows that there is room for instrumental and calibration improvement, emphasizing the importance of low elevation angles for the observation, a low receiver noise temperature and an efficient calibration scheme.

    The comparisons of the retrieved profiles show that the agreement between the profiles of MIAWARA-C and cWASPAM3 with the ones of MLS is better than 0.3 ppmv (6% at all altitudes. MIRA 5 has a dry bias of approximately 0.5 ppm (8% below 0.1 hPa with respect to all other instruments. The profiles of cWASPAM3 and MIAWARA-C could not be directly compared because the vertical region of overlap was too small. The comparison of the time series at different altitude levels show a similar evolution of the H2O volume mixing ratio (VMR for the ground based

  19. ARIS-Campaign: intercomparison of three ground based 22 GHz radiometers for middle atmospheric water vapor at the Zugspitze in winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, C.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.; Golchert, S. H. W.; Hochschild, G.; Hallgren, K.; Hartogh, P.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the Alpine Radiometer Intercomparison at the Schneefernerhaus (ARIS), which took place in winter 2009 at the high altitude station at the Zugspitze, Germany (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2650 m). This campaign was the first direct intercomparison between three new ground based 22 GHz water vapor radiometers for middle atmospheric profiling with the following instruments participating: MIRA 5 (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), cWASPAM3 (Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau) and MIAWARA-C (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). Even though the three radiometers all measure middle atmospheric water vapor using the same rotational transition line and similar fundamental set-ups, there are major differences between the front ends, the back ends, the calibration concepts and the profile retrieval. The spectrum comparison shows that all three radiometers measure spectra without severe baseline artifacts and that the measurements are in good general agreement. The measurement noise shows good agreement to the values theoretically expected from the radiometer noise formula. At the same time the comparison of the noise levels shows that there is room for instrumental and calibration improvement, emphasizing the importance of low elevation angles for the observation, a low receiver noise temperature and an efficient calibration scheme. The comparisons of the retrieved profiles show that the agreement between the profiles of MIAWARA-C and cWASPAM3 with the ones of MLS is better than 0.3 ppmv (6%) at all altitudes. MIRA 5 has a dry bias of approximately 0.5 ppm (8%) below 0.1 hPa with respect to all other instruments. The profiles of cWASPAM3 and MIAWARA-C could not be directly compared because the vertical region of overlap was too small. The comparison of the time series at different altitude levels show a similar evolution of the H2O volume mixing ratio (VMR) for the ground based instruments as well as the space borne

  20. New mobile Raman lidar for measurement of tropospheric water vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chenbo; ZHOU Jun; YUE Guming; QI Fudi; FAN Aiyuan

    2007-01-01

    The content of water vapor in atmosphere is very little and the ratio of volume of moisture to air is about 0.1%-3%,but water vapor is the most active molecule in atmosphere.There are many absorption bands in infrared(IR)wavelength for water vapor,and water vapor is also an important factor in cloud formation and precipitation,therefore it takes a significant position in the global radiation budget and climatic changes.Because of the advantages of the high resolution,wide range,and highly automatic operation,the Raman lidar has become a new-style and useful tool to measure water vapor.In this paper,first,the new mobile Raman lidar's structure and specifications were introduced.Second,the process method of lidar data was described.Finally,the practical and comparative experiments were made over Hefei City in China.The results of measurement show that this lidar has the ability to gain profiles of ratio of water vapor mixing ratio from surface to a height of about 8 km at night.Mean-while,the measurement of water vapor in daytime has been taken,and the profiles of water vapor mixing ratio at ground level have been detected.

  1. The absorption spectrum of water vapor in the 1.25 μm atmospheric window (7911–8337 cm−1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption spectrum of water vapor in “natural” isotopic abundance has been recorded at room temperature by high sensitivity Continuous Wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) between 7911 and 8337 cm−1. The investigated region covers most of the 1.25 µm transparency window of importance for atmospheric applications. The recordings were performed with sensitivity on the order of αmin~2×10–11 cm−1, more than two orders of magnitude better than previous investigations by Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS). Measured line intensities cover a range of seven orders of magnitude (3×10–30–2×10–23 cm/molecule at room temperature). The experimental line list provided as Supplementary Material includes more than 5000 transitions. As a result of the achieved sensitivity, more than 1150 lines of the experimental list were identified as being due to ammonia present as an impurity at the 5 ppm concentration level in the water sample. Although incomplete, the obtained ammonia line list seems to be the first one in the region. More than 3193 water lines were assigned to 3560 transitions of five water isotopologues (H216O, H218O, H217O, HD16O and HD18O). The assignments were performed using known experimental energy levels and calculated spectra based on variational calculations by Schwenke and Partridge. The obtained results are compared to the most relevant previous studies by Fourier Transform Spectroscopy in the region and to the exhaustive review of rovibrational line positions and levels performed recently by an IUPAC sponsored task group. Two-hundred and sixty-six levels are newly determined and 46 are corrected by more than 0.015 cm−1 compared to those recommended by the water IUPAC task group. The overall agreement between variational and measured intensities is satisfactory. A complete empirical list of 4473 transitions incorporating all the experimental information at disposal was constructed for water in the studied region. The intensity

  2. Simultaneous and Independent Measurement of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide using a Triple-Pulsed, 2-micron Airborne IPDA Lidar - A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2013-12-01

    Water vapor (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are dominant greenhouse gases that are critical for Earth's radiation budget and global warming through the eco-system and the carbon cycle. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has a strong heritage in atmospheric remote sensing of both gases using several instruments adopting various DIAL techniques. This communication presents a feasibility study for measuring both H2O and CO2 simultaneously and independently using a single instrument. This instrument utilizes the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar technique to measure the weighted-average column dry-air mixing ratios of CO2 (XCO2) and H2O (XH2O) independently and simultaneously from an airborne platform. The key component of this instrument is a tunable triple-pulse 2-micron laser. The three laser pulses are transmitted sequentially within a short time interval of 200 microsec. The wavelength of each of the laser pulses can be tuned separately. The IPDA receiver design is based on low-risk, commercially available components, including 300-micron diameter InGaAs 2-micron pin detector, a low-noise, high speed trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) and 12-bit 400 MHz digitizer.

  3. Comparison of interpolation methods of elevation-dependent atmospheric water vapor%基于地形的大气水汽插值方法比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞晓莹; 许文斌; 杨亚夫

    2012-01-01

    Since the spatial resolutions between MERIS water vapor products and ASAR data are greatly different, the elevation-dependent ONN water vapor correction model is not sufficient in precision for spatial interpolation, especially in the area with large local elevation changes. In order to solve the problem, spaital interpolation methods, i.e. ordinary Kriging and von Karman Kriging, are proposed to combine with the ONN model for spatial interpolation. In order to correct the local over-smoothing in the Kriging model, Yamamoto's modified Kriging method was applied for spatial interpolation of regional atmospheric residuals. The results show that total atmospheric distribution in the studied area is the sum of the local atmospheric residual estimation and global ONN interpolation result. According to the cross-validation of the three different interpolation methods, von Karman Kriging for residual interpolation+ONN terrain model has better results than the other two methods in Ermse, Emae, Emre and ESTD. Additionally, von Karman Kriging for residual interpolation is more fit to the spatial distribution characteristics of the atmosphere, which is beneficial to correct the local over-smoothing in the von Karman Kriging for residual interpolation+ONN terrain model.%对于分辨率差别较大的MERIS水汽产品与ASAR数据,直接利用ONN地形模型进行大气空间插值对局部地形变化较大的区域插值精度不高.针对这一问题,在基于ONN地形水汽空间插值的基础上,提出应用普通Kriging和von Karman Kriging 2种插值模型对局部大气进行空间插值.为修正Kriging模型引起的局部过度平滑问题,运用这2种Kriging模型的基础上,提出运用Yamamoto修正的Kriging法对区域大气残差进行空间插值.将全局ONN插值结果与局部大气残差估计值相加,得到区域的大气分布状况.对3种不同的插值方法进行交叉验证比较发现:利用ONN地形模型+基于残差的von Karman Kriging方

  4. Precipitable water and vapor flux between Belem and Manaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water vapor flux and precipitable water was computated over the natural Amazon forest in the stretch between Belem and Manaus for 1972. The atmospheric branch of hidrological cycle theory was applied and the most significant conclusions on an annual basis are: Atlantic Ocean water vapor contributes 52% to the regional precipitation and is significant the role played by local evapotranspiration in the precipitation in the area; there were signs of the phenomenon of water vapor recycling nearly throughout the year. Evapotranspiration contributes to 48% of the precipitations in the area studied. The real evapotranspiration estimated by this method was 1,000mm year -1

  5. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    An application of the water vapor diffusion technique is examined whereby the permeated water vapor is vented to space vacuum to alleviate on-board waste storage and provide supplemental cooling. The work reported herein deals primarily with the vapor diffusion-heat rejection (VD-HR) as it applies to the Space Shuttle. A stack configuration was selected, designed and fabricated. An asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane, used in reverse osmosis application was selected and a special spacer was designed to enhance mixing and promote mass transfer. A skid-mount unit was assembled from components used in the bench unit although no attempt was made to render it flight-suitable. The operating conditions of the VD-HR were examined and defined and a 60-day continuous test was carried out. The membranes performed very well throughout the test; no membrane rupture and no unusual flux decay was observed. In addition, a tentative design for a flight-suitable VD-HR unit was made.

  6. CRISM Observations of Water Vapor and Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, R. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra returned by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, [1]) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) contain the clear spectral signature of several atmospheric gases including carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). Here we describe the seasonal and spatial mapping of water vapor and carbon dioxide for one full Martian year using CRISM spectra.

  7. Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Evans, K.D. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Melfi, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goldsmith, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.

  8. Equilibrium solubilities of iodine vapor in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium solubilities of iodine vapor in water were measured by introducing iodine vapor, in equilibrium with solid iodine, into water and by circulating it in a closed system, and Henry's law constants were determined. Equilibrium distributions of iodine vapor between a gas phase and an aqueous phase were also measured by another method, and partition coefficients were determined. The solubilities of iodine vapor in water estimated from both the Henry's law constants and the partition coefficients are compared with those of solid iodine reported in the literature. Thermodynamic parameters for the hydration of iodine vapor are evaluated experimentally. (author)

  9. Water vapor, water-ice clouds, and dust in the North Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Michael D.; Bass, Deborah S.; Hale, Amy S.

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of water vapor, water-ice and dust in the Martian atmosphere is important for understanding the overall Martian climate system, which is characterized by three main cycles: water, including water-ice, dust, and CO2. Understanding these cycles will lend insight into the behavior of the atmospheric dynamics, the atmosphere's ability to transport dust, water-ice, and vapor to different parts of the planet, and how that ability changes as a function of dust and water-ice loading.

  10. Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Tapio; O'Gorman, Paul A.; Levine, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus climate. Here we present an overview of how latent heat release affects atmosphere dynamics in a broad range of climates, ranging from extremely cold to extremely warm. Contrary to widely held beliefs, atmospheric circulation statistics can change nonmonotonically with globa...

  11. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  12. A steady-state analysis of the temperature responses of water vapor and aerosol lifetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, G.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The dominant removal mechanism of soluble aerosol is wet deposition. The atmospheric lifetime of aerosol, relevant for aerosol radiative forcing, is therefore coupled to the atmospheric cycling time of water vapor. This study investigates the coupling between water vapor and aerosol lifetimes in a w

  13. Water Vapor-Mediated Volatilization of High-Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschter, Peter J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2013-07-01

    Volatilization in water vapor-containing atmospheres is an important and often unexpected mechanism of degradation of high-temperature materials during processing and in service. Thermodynamic properties data sets for key (oxy)hydroxide vapor product species that are responsible for material transport and damage are often uncertain or unavailable. Estimation, quantum chemistry calculation, and measurement methods for thermodynamic properties of these species are reviewed, and data judged to be reliable are tabulated and referenced. Applications of water vapor-mediated volatilization include component and coating recession in turbine engines, oxidation/volatilization of ferritic steels in steam boilers, chromium poisoning in solid-oxide fuel cells, vanadium transport in hot corrosion and degradation of hydrocracking catalysts, Na loss from Na β"-Al2O3 tubes, and environmental release of radioactive isotopes in a nuclear reactor accident or waste incineration. The significance of water vapor-mediated volatilization in these applications is described.

  14. A New Neural Network Approach Including First-Guess for Retrieval of Atmospheric Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water Path, Surface Temperature and Emissivities Over Land From Satellite Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Rossow, W. B.; Rothstein, M.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of microwave observations over land to determine atmospheric and surface parameters is still limited due to the complexity of the inverse problem. Neural network techniques have already proved successful as the basis of efficient retrieval methods for non-linear cases, however, first-guess estimates, which are used in variational methods to avoid problems of solution non-uniqueness or other forms of solution irregularity, have up to now not been used with neural network methods. In this study, a neural network approach is developed that uses a first-guess. Conceptual bridges are established between the neural network and variational methods. The new neural method retrieves the surface skin temperature, the integrated water vapor content, the cloud liquid water path and the microwave surface emissivities between 19 and 85 GHz over land from SSM/I observations. The retrieval, in parallel, of all these quantities improves the results for consistency reasons. A data base to train the neural network is calculated with a radiative transfer model and a a global collection of coincident surface and atmospheric parameters extracted from the National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis, from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data and from microwave emissivity atlases previously calculated. The results of the neural network inversion are very encouraging. The r.m.s. error of the surface temperature retrieval over the globe is 1.3 K in clear sky conditions and 1.6 K in cloudy scenes. Water vapor is retrieved with a r.m.s. error of 3.8 kg/sq m in clear conditions and 4.9 kg/sq m in cloudy situations. The r.m.s. error in cloud liquid water path is 0.08 kg/sq m . The surface emissivities are retrieved with an accuracy of better than 0.008 in clear conditions and 0.010 in cloudy conditions. Microwave land surface temperature retrieval presents a very attractive complement to the infrared estimates in cloudy areas: time record of land

  15. Differential absorption radar techniques: water vapor retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Luis; Lebsock, Matthew; Livesey, Nathaniel; Tanelli, Simone

    2016-06-01

    Two radar pulses sent at different frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor line can be used to determine total column water vapor and water vapor profiles (within clouds or precipitation) exploiting the differential absorption on and off the line. We assess these water vapor measurements by applying a radar instrument simulator to CloudSat pixels and then running end-to-end retrieval simulations. These end-to-end retrievals enable us to fully characterize not only the expected precision but also their potential biases, allowing us to select radar tones that maximize the water vapor signal minimizing potential errors due to spectral variations in the target extinction properties. A hypothetical CloudSat-like instrument with 500 m by ˜ 1 km vertical and horizontal resolution and a minimum detectable signal and radar precision of -30 and 0.16 dBZ, respectively, can estimate total column water vapor with an expected precision of around 0.03 cm, with potential biases smaller than 0.26 cm most of the time, even under rainy conditions. The expected precision for water vapor profiles was found to be around 89 % on average, with potential biases smaller than 77 % most of the time when the profile is being retrieved close to surface but smaller than 38 % above 3 km. By using either horizontal or vertical averaging, the precision will improve vastly, with the measurements still retaining a considerably high vertical and/or horizontal resolution.

  16. Water vapor retrieval from OMI visible spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; González Abad, G.; Miller, C. Chan

    2014-06-01

    There are distinct spectral features of water vapor in the wavelength range covered by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) visible channel. Although these features are much weaker than those at longer wavelengths, they can be exploited to retrieve useful information about water vapor. They have an advantage in that their small optical depth leads to fairly simple interpretation as measurements of the total water vapor column density. We have used the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) OMI operational retrieval algorithm to derive the slant column density (SCD) of water vapor using the 430-480 nm spectral region after extensive optimization. We convert from SCD to vertical column density (VCD) using the air mass factor (AMF), which is calculated using look-up tables of scattering weights and assimilated water vapor profiles. Our Level 2 product includes not only water vapor VCD but also the associated scattering weights and AMF. In the tropics, our standard water vapor product has a median SCD of 1.3 × 1023 molecules cm-2 and a median relative uncertainty of about 11%, about a factor of 2 better than that from a similar OMI algorithm that uses a narrower retrieval window. The corresponding median VCD is about 1.2 × 1023 molecules cm-2. We have examined the sensitivities of SCD and AMF to various parameters and compared our results with those from the GlobVapour product, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET).

  17. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of L...

  18. Modeling UTLS water vapor: Transport/Chemistry interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis was initially meant to be a study on the impact on chemistry and climate from UTLS water vapor. However, the complexity of the UTLS water vapor and its recent changes turned out to be a challenge by it self. In the light of this, the overall motivation for the thesis became to study the processes controlling UTLS water vapor and its changes. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, involved in important climate feedback loops. Thus, a good understanding of the chemical and dynamical behavior of water vapor in the atmosphere is crucial for understanding the climate changes in the last century. Additionally, parts of the work was motivated by the development of a coupled climate chemistry model based on the CAM3 model coupled with the Chemical Transport Model Oslo CTM2. The future work will be concentrated on the UTLS water vapor impact on chemistry and climate. We are currently studying long term trends in UTLS water vapor, focusing on identification of the different processes involved in the determination of such trends. The study is based on natural as well as anthropogenic climate forcings. The ongoing work on the development of a coupled climate chemistry model will continue within our group, in collaboration with Prof. Wei-Chyung Wang at the State University of New York, Albany. Valuable contacts with observational groups are established during the work on this thesis. These collaborations will be continued focusing on continuous model validation, as well as identification of trends and new features in UTLS water vapor, and other tracers in this region. (Author)

  19. On the hydroclimate of southern South America: Water vapor transport and the role of shallow groundwater on land-atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Agudelo, John Alejandro

    The present work focuses on the sources and transport of water vapor to the La Plata Basin (LPB), and the role of groundwater dynamics on the simulation of hydrometeorological conditions over the basin. In the first part of the study an extension to the Dynamic Recycling Model (DRM) is developed to estimate the water vapor transported to the LPB from different regions in South America and the nearby oceans, and the corresponding contribution to precipitation over the LPB. It is found that more than 23% of the precipitation over the LPB is from local origin, while nearly 20% originates from evapotranspiration from the southern Amazon. Most of the moisture comes from terrestrial sources, with the South American continent contributing more than 62% of the moisture for precipitation over the LPB. The Amazonian contribution increases during the positive phase of El Nino and the negative phase of the Antarctic Oscillation. In the second part of the study the effect of a groundwater scheme on the simulation of terrestrial water storage, soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET) over the LPB is investigated. It is found that the groundwater scheme improves the simulation of fluctuations in the terrestrial water storage over parts of the southern Amazon. There is also an increase in the soil moisture in the root zone over those regions where the water table is closer to the surface, including parts of the western and southern Amazon, and of the central and southern LPB. ET increases in the central and southern LPB, where it is water limited. Over parts of the southeastern Amazon the effects of the groundwater scheme are only observed at higher resolution, when the convergence of lateral groundwater flow in local topographical depressions is resolved by the model. Finally, the effects of the groundwater scheme on near surface conditions and precipitation are explored. It is found that the increase in ET induced by the groundwater scheme over parts of the LPB induces an

  20. Water dimer and the atmospheric continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical origin of humidity-related atmospheric continuum absorption is examined. The existence of double water molecules (dimers) in equilibrium water vapor at room temperature is proved by direct spectroscopic experiments supported by ab initio calculations. It is demonstrated that diluting water vapor with air does not significantly reduce the abundance of dimers. Numerous previous studies have predicted the presence of water dimers in the atmosphere and their influence on chemical reactions, homogeneous condensation, and Earth's radiation balance. Our results provide experimental proof of the presence of dimers in the atmosphere, thus enabling a detailed study of their role in natural processes. Prospects for future research are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  2. High temperature oxidation of molybdenum in water vapor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; Sooby, E. S.; Kim, Y.-J.; Cheng, B.; Maloy, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum has recently gained attention as a candidate cladding material for use in light water reactors. Its excellent high temperature mechanical properties and stability under irradiation suggest that it could offer benefits to performance under a wide range of reactor conditions, but little is known about its oxidation behavior in water vapor containing atmospheres. The current study was undertaken to elucidate the oxidation behavior of molybdenum in water vapor environments to 1200 °C in order to provide an initial assessment of its feasibility as a light water reactor cladding. Initial observations indicate that at temperatures below 1000 °C, the kinetics of mass loss in water vapor would not be detrimental to cladding integrity during an off-normal event. Above 1000 °C, degradation is more rapid but remains slower than observed for optimized zirconium cladding alloys. The effect of hydrogen-water vapor and oxygen-water vapor mixtures on material loss was also explored at elevated temperatures. Parts-per-million levels of either hydrogen or oxygen will minimally impact performance, but hydrogen contents in excess of 1000 ppm were observed to limit volatilization at 1000 °C.

  3. High temperature oxidation of molybdenum in water vapor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum has recently gained attention as a candidate cladding material for use in light water reactors. Its excellent high temperature mechanical properties and stability under irradiation suggest that it could offer benefits to performance under a wide range of reactor conditions, but little is known about its oxidation behavior in water vapor containing atmospheres. The current study was undertaken to elucidate the oxidation behavior of molybdenum in water vapor environments to 1200 °C in order to provide an initial assessment of its feasibility as a light water reactor cladding. Initial observations indicate that at temperatures below 1000 °C, the kinetics of mass loss in water vapor would not be detrimental to cladding integrity during an off-normal event. Above 1000 °C, degradation is more rapid but remains slower than observed for optimized zirconium cladding alloys. The effect of hydrogen–water vapor and oxygen–water vapor mixtures on material loss was also explored at elevated temperatures. Parts-per-million levels of either hydrogen or oxygen will minimally impact performance, but hydrogen contents in excess of 1000 ppm were observed to limit volatilization at 1000 °C

  4. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 73 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, with different diurnal variations of the integrated total humidity content. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). The numerical tools, Singular Value Decomposition and classical Multidimensional Scaling methods, are used to study these variations, considering the measurements made at each stations, as sample in the analysis. The aim of this investigation is to identify the IWV variability with respect to the local time associated to the different climate regions. In order to improve our analysis, all available weather information, such as radiosondes measurements (which are few), measurements of pressure and temperature and Numerical Weather Models reanalysis data, are used. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl, 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402. KEYWORDS: water vapor, diurnal cycle, GNSS

  5. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  6. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, R. J.; Neveril, R. B.; Remus, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration (VD/VF) water recovery system are considered. As a functional model, the system converts urine and condensates waste water from six men to potable water on a steady-state basis. The system is designed for 180-day operating durations and for function on the ground, on zero-g aircraft, and in orbit. Preparatory tasks are summarized for conducting low gravity tests of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration system for recovering water from urine.

  7. DISTRIBUTION OF WATER VAPOR IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C2H, 13CO J = 5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N2H+. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to AV2O to C18O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large AV. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations of comparing measured water-vapor column densities with such traditional cloud tracers as 13CO or C18O. These results also support cloud models that incorporate freeze out of molecules as a critical component in determining the depth-dependent abundance of water vapor.

  8. What regulates the annual cycle of stratospheric water vapor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucker, Martin; Gerber, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is a potent greenhouse gas and active chemical tracer. Most of the stratosphere is well below saturation due to freeze drying at the tropical cold point -- the coldest region of the lower stratosphere where most air enters the middle atmosphere. The leading mode of variability of the tropical cold point is an annual cycle, despite the semi-annual cycle of radiative forcing in the tropics. This causes the stratospheric water vapor mixing ratio to follow a similar annual cycle, even remotely from the entry point, the so-called tape recorder. We develop an idealized GCM to investigate the origin of the annual cycle in the tropical cold point, with a particular focus on the interaction between dynamics and radiation. By varying the surface conditions of the model, we first show that planetary scale asymmetries in the midlatitude troposphere drive the annual cycle in the cold point. Both large scale topography and land sea contrast are important, influencing synoptic and planetary scale wave forcing. We then probe the impact of water vapor on the stratospheric circulation by comparing fully interactive integrations of the model to companion integrations where the coupling between the circulation and water vapor is disconnected. Our findings have implications in estimating the impacts of stratospheric water vapor feedbacks on decadal time scales and sensitivities to climate change.

  9. Determination of water vapor and ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere by microwave-spectroscopy. Bestimmung von Wasserdampf- und Ozonprofilen in der mittleren Atmosphaere durch Millimeterwellenspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puliafito, S.E.

    1989-10-17

    This work was performed at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie (F.R.G.) and treats the following points: 1. Satellite borne microwave radiometry. Principles for a real-time evaluation of the MAS-Limb-Sounding measurements. (MAS: Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Sounder from Space Shuttle as part of the NASA ATLAS Missions, 1991-1997). (a) Deconvolution of the 60 GHz-antenna. (b) Test of different inversion proceedings. A detailed study of the boundary conditions and 'error influence' as well as a discussion of the radiometer specifications. (c) Near real time inversion of microwave spectral lines of the Earth atmosphere. i. The possibility of a (near) real time evaluation (retrieval of the profiles of the atmospheric components) was proved for the first time with a space proof microprocessor. ii. Data reduction of about a factor > 10{sup 3} in comparison with other methods. 2. Airborne and ground based microwave radiometry. (a) Study of the possibilities of ground- and aircraft based measurements for validation and cross calibration of the satellite measurements. (b) Study of the possibilities of ground based radiometric measurements of water vapour in the Artic or Antartica. Precise boundary conditions were given for the first time in order to perform ground based millimeter radiometric measurements in these areas. (orig.).

  10. Water-vapor foreign-continuum absorption in the 8-12 and 3-5 μm atmospheric windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeshina, T. E.; Rodimova, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency and temperature dependence of the water vapor-nitrogen continuum in the 8-12 and 3-5 μm spectral regions obtained experimentally by CAVIAR and NIST is described with the use of the line contour constructed on the basis of asymptotic line shape theory. The parameters of the theory found from fitting the calculated values of the absorption coefficient to the pertinent experimental data enter into the expression for the classical potential describing the center-of-mass motion of interacting molecules and into the expression for the quantum potential of two interacting molecules. The frequency behavior of the line wing contours appears to depend on the band the lines of which make a major contribution to the absorption in a given spectral interval. The absorption coefficients in the wings of the band in question calculated with the line contours obtained for other bands are outside of experimental errors. The distinction in the line wing behavior may be explained by the difference in the quantum energies of molecules interacting in different vibrational states.

  11. Research on Water-Vapor Distribution in the Air over Qilian Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; ZHANG Jie; SUN Guowu; DI Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the re,note sensing data, the radiosonde data and precipitation data observed by weather stations, distributions of atmospheric water-vapor and cloud motion wind over the Qilian Mountains are analyzed. Moreover, on the basis of water-vapor and cloud motion wind analyses, relations of atmospheric water-vapor distribution with precipitation, atmospheric circulation, and terrain are investigated. The results show that distributions of atmospheric water-vapor and precipitation in the Qilian Mountains are affected by the westerly belt, the southerly monsoon (the South Asian monsoon and plateau monsoon), and the East Asian monsoon. In the northwest Qilian Mountains, water-vapor and precipitation are entirely affected by the westerly belt, and there is no other direction water-vapor transport except westerly water-vapor flux, hence, the northwest region is regarded as the westerly belt region. In the south and middle of the mountains, water-vapor is mainly controlled by the southerly monsoon, 37.7% of the total water-vapor is from the south, especially in summer, the southerly water-vapor flux accounts for 55.9% of the total, and furthermore the water-vapor content in the southerly flow is more than that in the westerly flow. The southerly monsoon water-vapor is influenced by the South Asian monsoon from the Indian Ocean and the plateau monsoon in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, thus, the south and middle region is called southerly monsoon region. But in the northeast Qilian Mountains, the East Asian monsoon is the main climate system affecting the water-vapor. Besides west and northwest water-vapor fluxes, there are a lot of easterly water-vapor fluxes in summer. The frequency of easterly cloud motion winds in summer half year accounts for 27.1% of the total, though the frequency is not high, it is the main water-vapor source of summer precipitation in this region, therefore, the northwest region is a marginal region of the East Asian monsoon. On the other hand

  12. Water-vapor foreign-continuum absorption in the 8–12 and 3–5 μm atmospheric windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency and temperature dependence of the water vapor–nitrogen continuum in the 8–12 and 3–5 μm spectral regions obtained experimentally by CAVIAR and NIST is described with the use of the line contour constructed on the basis of asymptotic line shape theory. The parameters of the theory found from fitting the calculated values of the absorption coefficient to the pertinent experimental data enter into the expression for the classical potential describing the center-of-mass motion of interacting molecules and into the expression for the quantum potential of two interacting molecules. The frequency behavior of the line wing contours appears to depend on the band the lines of which make a major contribution to the absorption in a given spectral interval. The absorption coefficients in the wings of the band in question calculated with the line contours obtained for other bands are outside of experimental errors. The distinction in the line wing behavior may be explained by the difference in the quantum energies of molecules interacting in different vibrational states. - Highlights: • We consider water vapor continuum absorption as a monomer line wing absorption. • Asymptotic line wing theory includes classical and quantum interaction potentials. • Potential parameters of line wing shape are found from comparison with experiment. • Line wing shape obtained describes spectral dependence of the H2O–N2 continuum. • The same procedure describes spectral dependence of the H2O–N2 absorption in 8–12 and 3–5 μm windows

  13. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  14. Geostationary Satellite Observation of Precipitable Water Vapor Using an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) based Reconstruction Technique over Eastern China

    OpenAIRE

    Man Sing Wong; Xiaomeng Jin; Zhizhao Liu; Janet Elizabeth Nichol; Shirong Ye; Peng Jiang; Pak Wai Chan

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor, as one of the most important greenhouse gases, is crucial for both climate and atmospheric studies. Considering the high spatial and temporal variations of water vapor, a timely and accurate retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV) is urgently needed, but has long been constrained by data availability. Our study derived the vertically integrated precipitable water vapor over eastern China using Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) data, which is in geostationary orbit ...

  15. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  16. Water vapor analysis with use of sunphotometry and radiosoundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakszys, Paulina; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomek; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Strzalkowska, Agata; Markuszewski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Information about vertically integrated content of water vapor in the atmosphere and type, composition and concentration of aerosols is relevant in many types of atmospheric studies. Such information is required to understand mechanisms of global climate and its further modeling (Smirnov et al., 2000). This work is devoted to the description of a basic technique of analysis and comparing the derivation of Columnar Water Vapor (CWV) from different instruments, such as a radiosonde and a sunphotometer. The measurements were carried out using Microtops II Ozone Monitor & Sunphotometer during the cruises onboard the R/V Oceania (13 cruises) and from one cruise onboard of the SY TASK in the southern Baltic Sea. Measurements were collected for the NASA program Maritime Aerosol Network. Data collected with the DiGICORA III Radiosonde (RS92) come from the webpage of the University of Wyoming, Department of Atmospheric Science. The first instrument, sunphotometer, allows us to collect data on days that are cloud-free. The Microtops II is capable of measuring the total ozone column, total precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical depth at 1020 nm (Morys et al. 2001; Ichoku et al., 2002). Each of these parameters is automatically derived. Data collected by Microtops have been processed with the pre- and post-field calibration and automatic cloud clearing. Precipitable water vapor in the column was derived from the 936nm channel. Detailed data description is available on the AERONET webpage. In radiousoundings the total precipitable water is the water that occurs in a vertical column of a unit cross-sectional area between any two specified levels, commonly expressed as from the earth's surface to the 'top' of the atmosphere. The Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPWV) is the height of liquid water that would result from the condensation of all water vapor in a column. The study of one cruise (29 March - 20 April) shows that 241 Microtops measurements were made, each of

  17. The annual cycle of stratospheric water vapor in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Philip W.

    1995-01-01

    The application of general circulation models (GCM's) to stratospheric chemistry and transport both permits and requires a thorough investigation of stratospheric water vapor. The National Center for Atmospheric Research has redesigned its GCM, the Community Climate Model (CCM2), to enable studies of the chemistry and transport of tracers including water vapor; the importance of water vapor to the climate and chemistry of the stratosphere requires that it be better understood in the atmosphere and well represented in the model. In this study, methane is carried as a tracer and converted to water; this simple chemistry provides an adequate representation of the upper stratospheric water vapor source. The cold temperature bias in the winter polar stratosphere, which the CCM2 shares with other GCM's, produces excessive dehydration in the southern hemisphere, but this dry bias can be ameliorated by setting a minimum vapor pressure. The CCM2's water vapor distribution and seasonality compare favorably with observations in many respects, though seasonal variations including the upper stratospheric semiannual oscillation are generally too small. Southern polar dehydration affects midlatitude water vapor mixing ratios by a few tenths of a part per million, mostly after the demise of the vortex. The annual cycle of water vapor in the tropical and northern midlatitude lower stratosphere is dominated by drying at the tropical tropopause. Water vapor has a longer adjustment time than methane and had not reached equilibrium at the end of the 9 years simulated here.

  18. Fuel for cyclones: How the water vapor budget of a hurricane depends on its motion

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, Anastassia M; Nefiodov, Andrei V; Chikunov, Alexander V; Sheil, Douglas; Nobre, Antonio D; Li, Bai-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Tropical cyclones are fueled by water vapor. Here we estimate the oceanic evaporation within an Atlantic hurricane to be less than one sixth of the total moisture flux precipitating over the same area. So how does the hurricane get the remaining water vapor? Our analysis of TRMM rainfall, MERRA atmospheric moisture and hurricane translation velocities suggests that access to water vapor relies on the hurricane's motion -- as it moves through the atmosphere, the hurricane consumes the water vapor it encounters. This depletion of atmospheric moisture by the hurricane leaves a "dry footprint" of suppressed rainfall in its wake. The thermodynamic efficiency of hurricanes -- defined as kinetic energy production divided by total latent heat release associated with the atmospheric moisture supply -- remains several times lower than Carnot efficiency even in the most intense hurricanes. Thus, maximum observed hurricane power cannot be explained by the thermodynamic Carnot limit.

  19. Alumina Volatility in Water Vapor at Elevated Temperatures: Application to Combustion Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2003-01-01

    The volatility of alumina in high temperature water vapor was determined by measuring weight loss of sapphire coupons at temperatures between 1250 and 1500 C, water vapor partial pressures between 0.15 and 0.68 atm in oxygen, at one atmosphere total pressure, and a gas velocity of 4.4 centimeters per second. The variation of the volatility with water vapor partial pressure was consistent with Al(OH)3(g) formation. The enthalpy of reaction to form Al(OH)3(g) from alumina and water vapor was found to be 210 plus or minus 20 kJ/mol. Surface rearrangement of ground sapphire surfaces increased with water vapor partial pressure, temperature and volatility rate. Recession rates of alumina due to volatility were determined as a function of water vapor partial pressure and temperature to evaluate limits for use of alumina in long term applications in combustion environments.

  20. Sampling Impacts on the NVAP-M Global Water Vapor Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.; Forsythe, J. M.; Cronk, H. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a fundamental ingredient both for regulating climate as a greenhouse gas and as a necessary precursor for high impact weather events such as heavy precipitation. Water vapor concentration varies geographically because of its close linkage with surface temperature and as a component of synoptic and mesoscale weather systems. Satellite observations provide the only means to quantify the global occurrence and variability of water vapor. In common with other long-term climate data records such as clouds and precipitation, intercalibrating and blending diverse measurements of water vapor to create a consistent record through time is a challenge. The NASA Making Earth Science Data Records for Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program supported the development of the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP-M) dataset. The dataset was released to the science community in 2013 via the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center. The dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple satellite infrared and microwave sources of atmospheric water vapor along with surface data to form global gridded fields of total and layered precipitable water vapor. NVAP-M spans 22 years (1988-2009) of data. The challenges in creating this multisensor, multidecadal satellite-driven climate data record are illustrative of challenges for all satellite climate data records. While advances in sensor intercalibration and retrieval algorithms have improved the quality of the global water vapor climate data record, uncertainties arise due to sampling biases of the input sensors. These biases are particularly evident on a regional scale, in cloudy regions or over desert surfaces. The changing mixture of sensors with varying sensitivity to clear/cloudy, land/ocean and even day/night conditions can lead to different results on trends and variability of water vapor. We explore this variability via the NVAP-M data set. Connections and collaborations

  1. Vapor chambers for an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Scollon, T. R., Jr.; Loose, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The methanol/stainless steel vapor chambers (flat-plate heat pipes) discussed in this paper were developed for use in spaceborne atmospheric cloud chambers. This application imposed stringent thermal and mechanical requirements on the design. Flatness, low thermal mass, vibration, and structural integrity requirements were achieved in addition to precision temperature uniformity and thermal transport. Heat transfer coefficients on the order of 0.34 to 0.40 W/sq cm -C were measured. The vapor chambers are capable of transporting 170 W-cm per cm of width in either the axial or side-to-side direction.

  2. Studies on the tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor measurements for climate monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    杉立, 卓治

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapor plays a critical role in the climate system because it acts as a medium for heat exchange and transport, and because it is linked to the formation of clouds and precipitation. It is also the most dominant greenhouse gas. Thus, it is important to monitor and understand long-term variability in atmospheric water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Routine radiosonde observations provide the longest record of upper-air conditions. However, it is know...

  3. Water Vapor Products from Differential-InSAR with Auxiliary Calibration Data: Accuracy and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.

    2014-12-01

    Although water vapor disturbance has been long term recognized as the major error source in differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (d-InSAR) techniques for the ground deformation monitoring and topography reconstruction, it provides opportunities to extract the atmospheric water-vapor information from satellite SAR imageries that can be further used to support studies on earth energy budget, climate, the hydrological cycle, and meteorological forecasting, etc. The water vapor contribution in interferometric phases is normally referred as the atmospheric delay dominated by water vapor rather than condensed water (e.g. cloud). D-InSAR can produce maps of the column water vapor amounts (equivalent to integrated water vapor (IWV) or Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) in other literatures) that are important parameters quantitatively describe the total amount of water vapor overlying a point on the earth surface. Similar products have been operationally produced in multi-spectrum remote sensing, e.g. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with a spatial resolution in 500 m to 1km; Whereas, the PWV products derived by d-InSAR have remarkably high spatial resolution that can capture fine scale of water vapor variations in space as small as tens of meters or even less. In recent years, some efforts have been made to derive the water vapor products from interferogram and analyze the corresponding products quality, such as studies comparing integrated water vapor derived from interferometric phases to other measurements (e.g. MERIS, MODIS, GNSS), studies on deriving absolute water vapor products from d-InSAR, and studies on integrating d-InSAR water vapor products in meteorological numerical forecast. In this study, considering these limitation factors and based on previous studies, we discuss the accuracy and statistics of the water vapor products from satellite SAR, including (1) Accuracy of the differential water vapor products; (2) Sources of

  4. Possible near-IR channels for remote sensing precipitable water vapor from geostationary satellite platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B.-C.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, Ed R.; Conel, J. E.; Green, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of troposheric water vapor profiles from current geostationary weather satellites is made using a few broadband infrared (IR) channels in the 6-13 micron region. Uncertainties greater than 20% exist in derived water vapor values just above the surface from the IR emission measurements. In this paper, we propose three near-IR channels, one within the 0.94-micron water vapor band absorption region, and the other two in nearby atmospheric windows, for remote sensing of precipitable water vapor over land areas, excluding lakes and rivers, during daytime from future geostationary satellite platforms. The physical principles are as follows. The reflectance of most surface targets varies approximately linearly with wavelength near 1 micron. The solar radiation on the sun-surface-sensor ray path is attenuated by atmospheric water vapor. The ratio of the radiance from the absorption channel with the radiances from the two window channels removes the surface reflectance effects and yields approximately the mean atmospheric water vapor transmittance of the absorption channel. The integrated water vapor amount from ground to space can be obtained with a precision of better than 5% from the mean transmittance. Because surface reflectances vary slowly with time, temporal variation of precipitable water vapor can be determined reliably. High spatial resolution, precipitable water vapor images are derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visable-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, which measures solar radiation reflected by the surface in the 0.4-2.5 micron region in 10-nm channels and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20 m from its platform on an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km. The proposed near-IR reflectance technique would complement the IR emission techniques for remote sensing of water vapor profiles from geostationary satellite platforms, especially in the boundary layer where most of the water vapor is located.

  5. The Isotopic Composition of Water Vapor in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere Region : Modeling, Analysis and Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, P.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic composition of water vapor in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere:} Exact knowledge about the isotopic composition of water vapor in the tropopause region and the stratosphere provides important information for the understanding of atmospheric transport and photochemistry. The presented thesis describes with the help of models the processes governing the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor. The stable isotopologues - $HDO$, $H_2^{17}O$ and $H_2^{18}O$ - and the r...

  6. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyman alpha photons, since the Lyman alpha line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more ...

  7. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Mcllrath, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements

  8. Water-vapor source shift of Xinjiang region during the recent twenty years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Xingang; Li Weijing; Ma Zhuguo; Wang Ping

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the climate water-vapor sources of Xinjiang region and their shifts during the past 20 years. First, the principle and steps are roughly regulated to seek the water-vapor sources. Second, the climate stationary water-vapor transport in troposphere is calculated to distinguish where the water vapor comes from by ERA-40 reanalysis. In addition, the collocation between the transport and the atmospheric column water vapor content is analyzed. The results show that the major vapor comes from the west side of Xinjiang for mid-month of seasons, apart from July while the water vapor comes from the north or northwest direction. The water vapor sources are different for different seasons, for example, the Caspian Sea and Mediterranean are the sources in January and April, the North Atlantic and the Arctic sea in July, and the Black Sea and Caspian Sea in October, respectively. In recent ten years more water vapor above Xinjiang comes from the high latitudes and the Arctic sea with global warming, and less from Mediterranean in comparison with the case of 1973-1986. In fact, the air over subtropics becomes dry and the anomalous water vapor transport direction turns to west or southwest during 1987-2000. By contrast, the air over middle and high latitudes is warmer and wetter than 14 years ago.

  9. Water vapor diffusion in Mars subsurface environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Troy L.; Aharonson, Oded; Schorghofer, Norbert; Farmer, Crofton B.; Hecht, Michael H.; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2007-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of water vapor in unconsolidated porous media is measured for various soil simulants at Mars-like pressures and subzero temperatures. An experimental chamber which simultaneously reproduces a low-pressure, low-temperature, and low-humidity environment is used to monitor water flux from an ice source through a porous diffusion barrier. Experiments are performed on four types of simulants: 40–70 µm glass beads, sintered glass filter disks, 1–3 µm dust (b...

  10. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  11. Liquid-Desiccant Vapor Separation Reduces the Energy Requirements of Atmospheric Moisture Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gido, Ben; Friedler, Eran; Broday, David M

    2016-08-01

    An innovative atmospheric moisture harvesting system is proposed, where water vapor is separated from the air prior to cooling and condensation. The system was studied using a model that simulates its three interconnected cycles (air, desiccant, and water) over a range of ambient conditions, and optimal configurations are reported for different operation conditions. Model results were compared to specifications of commercial atmospheric moisture harvesting systems and found to represent saving of 5-65% of the electrical energy requirements due to the vapor separation process. We show that the liquid desiccant separation stage that is integrated into atmospheric moisture harvesting systems can work under a wide range of environmental conditions using low grade or solar heating as a supplementary energy source, and that the performance of the combined system is superior. PMID:27435379

  12. Fluxo de vapor de água atmosférico na obtenção do resíduo ET-P em três macrorregiões brasileiras Atmospheric water vapor flux in the determination of the residual ET-P in three Brazilian macro regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enilson P. Cavalcanti

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available São analisados, neste trabalho, a precipitação, a evapotranspiração e o resíduo (ET-P para três áreas de controle de 10 por 10 graus de latitude e longitude sobre as regiões Nordeste, Norte e Sudeste do Brasil. O fluxo de vapor d'água resultante é calculado e comparado com o resíduo. As análises são feitas a partir dos dados de reanálise mensais do National Center for Atmospheric Research/National Centers for Environmental Prediction - NCAR/NCEP, para o período de 1958 a 1998. Aspectos da variação sazonal e interanual dos elementos citados são apresentados para cada uma das áreas e, entre os resultados obtidos, destacam-se a boa correlação entre o resíduo e o fluxo de vapor d'água resultante, com coeficientes de determinação de 0,86, 0,84 e 0,74 para as áreas Nordeste, Norte e Sudeste, respectivamente.This paper presents an analysis of precipitation, evapotranspiration and ET-P residuals for three 10º by 10º latitude/longitude control areas over the northeast, north and southeast of Brazil. The resulting water vapor flux is calculated and compared to the residual. The analysis is performed through the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data for the period from 1958 to 1998. Some aspects of both seasonal and interannual variation of these variables are presented for each depicted area. The main result is the good correlation between the residuals and the resulting water vapor flux with determination coefficients of 0.86, 0.84 and 0.74 for these respective regions.

  13. Distribution of Water Vapor in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Melnick, Gary J; Snell, Ronald L; Bergin, Edwin A; Hollenbach, David J; Kaufman, Michael J; Li, Di; Neufeld, David A

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C2H, 13CO J =5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N2H+. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to Av < 15 mag., the ratio of H2O to C18O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large Av. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations...

  14. Applying the Water Vapor Radiometer to Verify the Precipitable Water Vapor Measured by GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Kang Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan is located at the land-sea interface in a subtropical region. Because the climate is warm and moist year round, there is a large and highly variable amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. In this study, we calculated the Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD of the troposphere using the ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS. The ZWD measured by two Water Vapor Radiometers (WVRs was then used to verify the ZWD that had been calculated using GPS. We also analyzed the correlation between the ZWD and the precipitation data of these two types of station. Moreover, we used the observational data from 14 GPS and rainfall stations to evaluate three cases. The offset between the GPS-ZWD and the WVR-ZWD ranged from 1.31 to 2.57 cm. The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.89 to 0.93. The results calculated from GPS and those measured using the WVR were very similar. Moreover, when there was no rain, light rain, moderate rain, or heavy rain, the flatland station ZWD was 0.31, 0.36, 0.38, or 0.40 m, respectively. The mountain station ZWD exhibited the same trend. Therefore, these results have demonstrated that the potential and strength of precipitation in a region can be estimated according to its ZWD values. Now that the precision of GPS-ZWD has been confirmed, this method can eventually be expanded to the more than 400 GPS stations in Taiwan and its surrounding islands. The near real-time ZWD data with improved spatial and temporal resolution can be provided to the city and countryside weather-forecasting system that is currently under development. Such an exchange would fundamentally improve the resources used to generate weather forecasts.

  15. Vaporization of the Earth: Application to Exoplanet Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Laura; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley Jr, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are about 3 dozen known super-Earth (M < 10 MEarth), of which 8 are transiting planets suitable for atmospheric follow-up observations. Some of the planets are exposed to extreme temperatures as they orbit close to their host stars, e.g., CoRot-7b, and all of these planets have equilibrium temperatures significantly hotter than the Earth. Such planets can develop atmospheres through (partial) vaporization of their crustal and/or mantle silicates. We investigated the chemical ...

  16. Upper tropospheric water vapor: A field campaign of two Raman lidars, Airborne hygrometers, and Radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfi, S. Harvey; Turner, Dave; Evans, Keith; Whiteman, Dave; Schwemmer, Geary; Ferrare, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Water vapor in the atmosphere plays an important role in radiative transfer and the process of radiative balance so critical for understanding global change. It is the principal ingredient in cloud formation, one of the most difficult atmospheric processes to model, and the most variable component of the Earth-atmosphere albedo. And as a free molecule, it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter, thus, the most important greenhouse gas. The radiative impact of water vapor is important at all levels of the atmosphere. Even though moisture decreases by several orders-of-magnitude from the Earth's surface to the tropopause, recent research has shown that, from a radiative standpoint, a small percentage change in water vapor at any level is nearly equivalent. Therefore accurate and precise measurements of this important atmospheric constituent are needed at all levels to evaluate the full radiative impact. The need for improved measurements in the upper troposphere is particularly important because of the generally hostile (very dry and cold) conditions encountered. Because of the importance of water vapor to the understanding of radiative transfer, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program initiated a series of measurement campaigns at the Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, especially focused on atmospheric water vapor. Three water vapor intensive observation period (water vapor IOP) campaigns were planned. Two of the water vapor IOP campaigns have been completed: the first IOP was held during the fall of 1996 with a focus on boundary layer water vapor measurements, and the second was conducted during the fall of 1997 with a focus on both boundary layer moisture e and moisture in the upper troposphere. This paper presents a review of the intercomparisons of water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere aquired during the second water vapor IOP. Data to be presented include water vapor measurements ements

  17. Introduction of water vapor dependent coefficients to multichannel algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The split-window algorithm produces a large error under humid conditions because of the dependence of each coefficient on the water vapor amount. The water vapor dependent (WVD) algorithm proposed by Francois et al. (1996) reduces such error by expressing each coefficient as a quadratic function of the water vapor amount. In the present article, the concept of the WVD algorithm is applied; to the multichannel (MC) algorithm which gives the surface temperature with the linear combination of the brightness temperatures measured at N channels; and to the extended multichannel (EMC) algorithm which gives the surface brightness temperature at each channel with the same combination. New algorithms named a MC/WVD and an EMC/WVD algorithms, as well as the WVD algorithm, express each coefficient as a quadratic function of the water vapor amount: in actual processing, a global data assimilation system, a sounder and the other data source provide the water vapor amount used in each coefficient. As the results of a simulation analysis with 964 atmospheric profiles, the rms errors of the new algorithms are showed to be 0.2-0.3 K smaller than those of the old algorithms under the conditions of sea observations. Particularly, the EMC/WVD algorithm is showed to be so robust against the emissivity uncertainty as to be applicable to land observations; the rms errors of the algorithm for AVHRR channel 4 and ASTER channel 12 are less than 1 K under the surface conditions including 97 terrestrial materials. And it is also showed that the land surface temperature (LST) offset (LST minus surface air temperature) is an important error factor for the new algorithms as well as the old algorithms. (author)

  18. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of surface evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote geographic sources of surface evaporation for precipitation, based on the implementation of three-dimensional constituent tracers of regional water vapor sources (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. The major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In the WVT approach, each tracer is associated with an evaporative source region for a prognostic three-dimensional variable that represents a partial amount of the total atmospheric water vapor. The physical processes that act on a WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be predicted within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional sources, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In most North American continental regions, the local source of precipitation is

  19. Water vapor release from biomass combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Parmar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the emission of water vapor from biomass combustion. Concurrent measurements of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are used to scale the concentrations of water vapor found, and are referenced to carbon in the biomass. The investigated fuel types include hardwood (oak and African musasa, softwood (pine and spruce, partly with green needles, and African savanna grass. The session-averaged ratio of H2O to the sum of CO and CO2 in the emissions from 16 combustion experiments ranged from 1.2 to 3.7, indicating the presence of water that is not chemically bound. This non-bound biomass moisture content ranged from 33% in the dry African hardwood, musasa, to 220% in fresh pine branches with needles. The moisture content from fresh biomass contributes significantly to the water vapor in biomass burning emissions, and its influence on the behavior of fire plumes and pyro-cumulus clouds needs to be evaluated.

  20. Advancements in water vapor electrolysis technology. [for Space Station ECLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda; Heppner, Dennis B.; Sudar, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a technology development program whose goal is to develop water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hardware that can be used selectively as localized topping capability in areas of high metabolic activity without oversizing the central air revitalization system on long-duration manned space missions. The WVE will be used primarily to generate O2 for the crew cabin but also to provide partial humidity control by removing water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The electrochemically based WVE interfaces with cabin air which is controlled in the following ranges: dry bulb temperature of 292 to 300 K; dew point temperature of 278 to 289 K; relative humidity of 25 to 75 percent; and pressure of 101 + or - 1.4 kPa. Design requirements, construction details, and results for both single-cell and multicell module testing are presented, and the preliminary sizing of a multiperson subsystem is discussed.

  1. Trends of total water vapor column above the Arctic from satellites observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraddawi, Dunya; Sarkissian, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Bock, Olivier; Claud, Chantal; Irbah, Abdenour

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric water vapor (H2O) is the most important natural (as opposed to man-made) greenhouse gas, accounting for about two-thirds of the natural greenhouse effect. Despite this importance, its role in climate and its reaction to climate change are still difficult to assess. Many details of the hydrological cycle are poorly understood, such as the process of cloud formation and the transport and release of latent heat contained in the water vapor. In contrast to other important greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, water vapor has a much higher temporal and spatial variability. Total precipitable water (TPW) or the total column of water vapor (TCWV) is the amount of liquid water that would result if all the water vapor in the atmospheric column of unit area were condensed. TCWV distribution contains valuable information on the vigor of the hydrological processes and moisture transport in the atmosphere. Measurement of TPW can be obtained based on atmospheric water vapor absorption or emission of radiation in the spectral range from UV to MW. TRENDS were found over the terrestrial Arctic by means of TCWV retrievals (using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) near-infrared (2001-2015) records). More detailed approach was made for comparisons with ground based instruments over Sodankyla - Finland (TCWV from: SCIAMACHY 2003-2011, GOME-2A 2007-2011, SAOZ 2003-2011, GPS 2003-2011, MODIS 2003-2011)

  2. Water vapor retrieval from OMI visible spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2014-01-01

    optimization of retrieval windows and parameters. The Air Mass Factor (AMF is calculated using look-up tables of scattering weights and monthly mean water vapor profiles from the GEOS-5 assimilation products. We convert from SCD to Vertical Column Density (VCD using the AMF and generate associated retrieval averaging kernels and shape factors. Our standard water vapor product has a median SCD of ~ 1.3 × 1023 molecule cm−2 and a median relative uncertainty of ~ 11% in the tropics, about a factor of 2 better than that from a similar OMI algorithm but using narrower retrieval window. The corresponding median VCD is ~ 1.2 × 1023 molecule cm−2. We have also explored the sensitivities to various parameters and compared our results with those from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET.

  3. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  4. The Response of Stratospheric Water Vapor to a Changing Climate: Insights from In Situ Water Vapor Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, Maryann Racine

    2012-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor plays an important role in the Earth system, both through its role in stratospheric ozone destruction and as a greenhouse gas contributing to radiative forcing of the climate. Highly accurate water vapor measurements are critical to understanding how stratospheric water vapor concentrations will respond to a changing climate. However, the past disagreement among water vapor instruments on the order of 1 – 2 ppmv hinders understanding of the mechanisms which control s...

  5. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  6. Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Properties on the Tibetan Plateau Using Multi-Lidar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Songhua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3rd Tibetan Plateau atmospheric expedition experiment campaign were operated in the Tibetan Plateau during July and August 2014 by utilizing the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL, Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar and ceilometer VAISALA CL31. The observation was carried out in Nagqu area (31.5°N, 92.05°E, which is 4508 meters above the mean sea level. Water vapor mixing ratio, cloud height, vertical wind speed and vertical water vapor flux was measured by these lidars. The inversion methods of data products of lidars are described in details in this paper. Furthermore, the clouds heights measured by lidar and ceilometer were compared to verify the performance of the lidar. Finally, the case studies of water vapor mixing ratio, water vapor flux and cloud height and statistics were provided.

  7. Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Properties on the Tibetan Plateau Using Multi-Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Dai, Guangyao; Wang, Dongxiang; Zhai, Xiaochun; Song, Xiaoquan

    2016-06-01

    The 3rd Tibetan Plateau atmospheric expedition experiment campaign were operated in the Tibetan Plateau during July and August 2014 by utilizing the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL), Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar and ceilometer VAISALA CL31. The observation was carried out in Nagqu area (31.5°N, 92.05°E), which is 4508 meters above the mean sea level. Water vapor mixing ratio, cloud height, vertical wind speed and vertical water vapor flux was measured by these lidars. The inversion methods of data products of lidars are described in details in this paper. Furthermore, the clouds heights measured by lidar and ceilometer were compared to verify the performance of the lidar. Finally, the case studies of water vapor mixing ratio, water vapor flux and cloud height and statistics were provided.

  8. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER VAPOR CONTENT USING GROUND-BASED GPS DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor content is useful in improving the accuracy of short-term weather prediction.Dense and continuously tracking regional GPS arrays will play an important role in remote sensing atmospheric water vapor content.In this study,a piecewise linear solution method was proposed to estimate the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content from ground-based GPS observations in Hong Kong.To evaluate the solution accuracy of the water vapor content sensed by GPS,the upper air sounding data (radiosonde) that are collected locally was used to calculate the precipitable water vapor during the same period.One-month results of PWV from both ground-based GPS sensing technique and radiosonde method are in agreement within 1~2 mm.This encouraging result will motivate the GPS meteorology application based on the establishment of a dense GPS array in Hong Kong.

  9. Vaporization of the Earth: Application to Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce; Jr,

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are about 3 dozen known super-Earth (M < 10 MEarth), of which 8 are transiting planets suitable for atmospheric follow-up observations. Some of the planets are exposed to extreme temperatures as they orbit close to their host stars, e.g., CoRot-7b, and all of these planets have equilibrium temperatures significantly hotter than the Earth. Such planets can develop atmospheres through (partial) vaporization of their crustal and/or mantle silicates. We investigated the chemical equilibrium composition of such heated systems from 500 - 4000 K and total pressures from 10-6 to 10+2 bars. The major gases are H2O and CO2 over broad temperature and pressure ranges, and Na, K, O2, SiO, and O at high temperatures and low pressures. We discuss the differences in atmospheric composition arising from vaporization of SiO2-rich (i.e., felsic) silicates (like Earth's continental crust) and MgO-, FeO-rich (i.e., mafic) silicates like the bulk silicate Earth. The computational results will be useful in plann...

  10. Precipitable Water Vapor: Considerations on the water vapor scale height, dry bias of the radiosonde humidity sensors, and spatial and temporal variability of the humidity field

    CERN Document Server

    Otarola, Angel C; Kerber, Florian

    2011-01-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) site testing teams have recently finalized their site testing studies. Since atmospheric water vapor is the dominant source of absorption and increased thermal background in the infrared, both projects included precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements in their corresponding site testing campaigns. TMT planned to monitor PWV at the sites of interest by means of using infrared radiometers. Technical failures and calibration issues prevented them from having a sufficiently long PWV time-series to characterize the sites using this method. Therefore, for the sites in Chile TMT used surface water vapor density measurements, which taken together with an assumed water vapor scale height, allowed for the estimation of PWV. On the other hand, the E-ELT team conducted dedicated PWV measurement campaigns at two of their observatory sites using radiosonde soundings to validate historical time-series of PWV reconstructed by way of a spec...

  11. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  12. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide and aluminum zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited via atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A second-generation precursor, bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)(N,N′-diethylethylenediamine) zinc, exhibited significant vapor pressure and good stability at one atmosphere where a vaporization temperature of 110 °C gave flux ∼ 7 μmol/min. Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that addition of H2O to the carrier gas stream mitigated F contamination giving nearly 1:1 metal:oxide stoichiometries for both ZnO and AZO with little precursor-derived C contamination. ZnO and AZO thin film resistivities ranged from 14 to 28 Ω·cm for the former and 1.1 to 2.7 Ω·cm for the latter. - Highlights: • A second generation precursor was utilized for atmospheric pressure film growth. • Addition of water vapor to the carrier gas stream led to a marked reduction of ZnF2. • Carbonaceous contamination from the precursor was minimal

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide and aluminum zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Kyle W. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Sailer, Robert A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Ahrenkiel, S. Phillip [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Schulz, Douglas L., E-mail: SBRconsulting@hotmail.com [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States)

    2013-12-02

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited via atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A second-generation precursor, bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)(N,N′-diethylethylenediamine) zinc, exhibited significant vapor pressure and good stability at one atmosphere where a vaporization temperature of 110 °C gave flux ∼ 7 μmol/min. Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that addition of H{sub 2}O to the carrier gas stream mitigated F contamination giving nearly 1:1 metal:oxide stoichiometries for both ZnO and AZO with little precursor-derived C contamination. ZnO and AZO thin film resistivities ranged from 14 to 28 Ω·cm for the former and 1.1 to 2.7 Ω·cm for the latter. - Highlights: • A second generation precursor was utilized for atmospheric pressure film growth. • Addition of water vapor to the carrier gas stream led to a marked reduction of ZnF{sub 2}. • Carbonaceous contamination from the precursor was minimal.

  14. Effects of vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature on total column water vapor retrieval error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a test of the physically based total column water vapor retrieval algorithm of Wentz (1992) for sensitivity to realistic vertical distributions of temperature and water vapor. The ECMWF monthly averaged temperature and humidity fields are used to simulate the spatial pattern of systematic retrieval error of total column water vapor due to this sensitivity. The estimated systematic error is within 0.1 g/sq cm over about 70 percent of the global ocean area; systematic errors greater than 0.3 g/sq cm are expected to exist only over a few well-defined regions, about 3 percent of the global oceans, assuming that the global mean value is unbiased.

  15. Nd:Glass-Raman laser for water vapor dial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagann, R. H.; Petheram, J. C.; Rosenberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A tunable solid-state Raman shifted laser which was used in a water vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system at 9400 A is described. The DIAL transmitter is based on a tunable glass laser operating at 1.06 microns, a hydrogen Raman cell to shift the radiation to 1.88 microns, and a frequency doubling crystal. The results of measurements which characterize the output of the laser with respect to optimization of optical configuration and of Raman parameters were reported. The DIAL system was also described and preliminary atmospheric returns shown.

  16. Global monitoring of tropospheric water vapor with GPS radio occultation aboard CHAMP

    CERN Document Server

    Heise, S; Beyerle, G; Schmidt, T; Reigber, C

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with application of GPS radio occultation (RO) measurements aboard CHAMP for the retrieval of tropospheric water vapor profiles. The GPS RO technique provides a powerful tool for atmospheric sounding which requires no calibration, is not affected by clouds, aerosols or precipitation, and provides an almost uniform global coverage. We briefly overview data processing and retrieval of vertical refractivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from GPS RO observations. CHAMP RO data are available since 2001 with up to 200 high resolution atmospheric profiles per day. Global validation of CHAMP water vapor profiles with radiosonde data reveals a bias of about 0.2 g/kg and a standard deviation of less than 1 g/kg specific humidity in the lower troposphere. We demonstrate potentials of CHAMP RO retrievals for monitoring the mean tropospheric water vapor distribution on a global scale.

  17. Cloud area determination from AVIRIS data using water vapor channels near 1 micron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Gai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1991-01-01

    Fractional cloud area is derived from spectral images collected by the Airborne Visible-IR Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The derivation is made by ratioing radiances near the 0.94- and the 1.14-microns water vapor band centers against those in the intermediate atmospheric window regions. The derivation makes use of the facts that (1) the reflectances of most ground targets vary approximately linearly with wavelength in the 0.94- and the 1.14-micron water vapor band absorption regions, and (2) the peak absorptions of the water vapor band over cloudy areas are smaller than those over nearby clear surface areas because of the rapidly decreasing atmospheric water vapor concentration with height. The band ratioing technique effectively discriminates among clouds and surface areas having similar reflectance values.

  18. The rate of water vapor evaporation from ice substrates in the presence of HCl and HBr: implications for the lifetime of atmospheric ice particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delval

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a multidiagnostic approach the rate Rev [ molec cm-3 s-1] or flux Jev [ molec cm-2 s-1] of evaporation of H2O and its corresponding rate constant for condensation, kcond [s-1 ], on a 1 µm thick ice film have been studied in the temperature range 190 to 240 K as well as in the presence of small amounts of HCl and HBr that left the vapor pressure of H2O on ice unchanged. The resulting Arrhenius expressions for pure ice are Jev = 1.6 · 10 28 ± 1 · exp  (- 10.3 ± 1.2/ RT  [ molec cm-2 s-1] , kcond = 1.7 · 10 - 2 ± 1 · exp  (+ 1.6 ± 1.5/ RT [s -1], in the presence of a HCl mole fraction in the range 3.2 · 10 - 5 - 6.4 · 10 - 3 : Jev = 6.4 · 10 26 ± 1 · exp  (- 9.7 ± 1.2/ RT  [ molec cm-2 s-1] , kcond = 2.8 · 10 - 2 ± 1 · exp ( + 1.5 ± 1.6 /RT  [s -1], and a HBr mole fraction smaller than 6.4 · 10 - 3 : Jev = 7.4 · 10 25 ± 1 · exp ( - 9.1 ± 1.2 /RT  [ molec cm-2 s-1] , kcond = 7.1 · 10 - 5 ± 1 · exp (+ 2.6 ± 1.5/ RT [s -1]. The small negative activation energy for H2O condensation on ice points to a precursor mechanism. The corresponding enthalpy of sublimation is DHsubl = Eev - Econd = 11.9 ± 2.7 kcal mol-1 , DHsubl = 11.2 ± 2.8 kcal mol-1, and DHsubl = 11.7 ± 2.8 kcal mol-1 whose values are identical within experimental uncertainty to the accepted literature value of 12.3 kcal mol-1 . Interferometric data at 633 nm and FTIR absorption spectra in transmission support the kinetic results. The data are consistent with a significant lifetime enhancement for HCl- and HBr-contaminated ice particles by a factor of 3–6 and 10–20, respectively, for submonolayer coverages of HX once the fraction of the ice not contaminated by HX has evaporated.

  19. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  20. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  1. The Infrared Astronomical Characteristics of Roque de los Muchachos Observatory: precipitable water vapor statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Lorenzo, B.; Eff-Darwich, A.; Castro-Almazan, J.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Muñoz-Tuñon, C.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The atmospheric water vapor content above the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) obtained from Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is presented. GPS measurements have been evaluated by comparison with 940nm-radiometer observations. Statistical analysis of GPS measurements points to ORM as an observing site with suitable conditions for infrared (IR) observations, with a median column of precipitable water vapor (PWV) of 3.8 mm. PWV presents a clear seasonal behavior, being Winter and Spring...

  2. Tissue free water tritium and organically bound tritium in the rice plant acutely exposed to atmospheric HTO vapor under semi-outdoor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potted rice plants were exposed to atmospheric HTO in a box outdoors for 1 h at 9 different times from booting to yellow-ripe stages. It is indicated that the leaf TFWT concentration may reach equilibrium within 1 h in clear weather. The plant TFWT concentration decreased at a rapid rate for the first several hours and at a much slower rate thereafter. The decrease till harvest was by factors of 600-95,000 depending on the plant parts and exposure times. The time course of the ear OBT concentration was characterized by the exposure time. After exposure at the booting to heading stages, the leaf OBT concentration decreased rapidly for the first several hours and then very slowly. The plant OBT concentration was initially about 2 orders of magnitude lower, but at harvest an order of magnitude higher, than the TFWT concentration. The OBT concentration in hulled seeds at harvest varied with exposure times by a factor of 70, being highest in the exposure performed at the earlier stage of rapid grain growth. Also in this exposure, the plant total OBT was greatest due to the seed OBT

  3. The rate of water vapor evaporation from ice substrates in the presence of HCl and HBr: Implications for the lifetime of atmospheric ice particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delval

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a multidiagnostic approach the rate Rev or flux Jevof evaporation of H2O and its condensation, kcond, on a 1mm thick ice film have been studied in the temperature range 190 to 240 K as well as in the presence of small amounts of HCl and HBr that left the vapor pressure of H2O on ice unchanged. The resulting Arrhenius expressions with RT in kcal mol-1 for pure ice are Jev=1.6×1028+/−1·exp({−10.3+−1.2}/{RT} [molec cm−2 s−1], kcond=1.7×10−2+-1×exp({+1.6+−1.5}/{RT} [s−1], in the presence of an HCl mole fraction in the range 3.2×10−5-6.4×10−3: Jev=6.4×1026+/−1×exp({−9.7+/−1.2}/{RT} [molec cm−2 s−1], kcond=2.8×10−2+/-1×exp({+1.5+/−1.6}/{RT} [s−1], and an HBr mole fraction smaller than 6.4×10−3:Jev=7.4×1025+/−1×exp({−9.1+/−1.2}/{RT} [molec cm−2 s−1], kcond=7.1×10−5+−1×exp({+2.6+/−1.5}/{RT} [s−1]}. The small negative activation energy for H2O condensation on ice points to a precursor mechanism. The corresponding enthalpy of sublimation is DHsubl=Eev-Econd=11.9+/−2.7 kcal mol−1, DHsubl=11.2+/−2.8 kcal mol−1, and DHsubl=11.7+/−2.8 kcal mol−1 whose values are identical within experimental uncertainty to the accepted literature value of 12.3 kcal mol−1. Interferometric data at 633 nm and FTIR absorption spectra in transmission support the kinetic results. The data are consistent with a significant lifetime enhancement for HCl- and HBr-contaminated ice particles by a factor of 3–6 and 10–20, respectively, for submonolayer coverages

  4. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere: Validation Experiments (MOHAVE I and MOHAVE II). Results Overview and Implication for the Long-Term Lidar Monitoring of Water Vapor in the UT/LS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. S.; Vomel, H.; Whiteman, D.; Twigg, Larry; McGee, T. G.

    2008-01-01

    1. MOHAVE+MOHAVE II = very successful. 2. MOHAVE -> Fluorescence was found to be inherent to all three participating lidars. 3. MOHAVE II -> Fluorescence was removed and agreement with CFH was extremely good up to 16-18 km altitude. 4. MOHAVE II -> Calibration tests revealed unsuspected shortfalls of widely used techniques, with important implications for their applicability to longterm measurements. 5. A factor of 5 in future lidar signal-to-noise ratio is reasonably achievable. When this level is achieved water vapor Raman lidar will become a key instrument for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS

  5. Tritium source and behavior of tritiated water vapor in KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total tritium release rate from all of nuclear facilities, including thermonuclear experimental facilities, to environment as a gaseous form (HT) or a liquid form (HTO) reaches recently to the production rate of tritium in atmosphere by cosmic ray, although tritium effluent amounts from a single reactor facility is a few in comparison with nuclear explosion experiments in atmosphere. Tritium is produced by the nuclear reaction, D(n,γ)T. Tritium sources in KUR are divided into three pathways as follows: (1) heavy water contained in the primary light water cooling system, (2) heavy were as a moderator in preliminary tank which is installed in the reactor side, (3) liquid deuterium (∼4 L) in a cold neutron source facility (CNS). The tritiated water (HTO) in air-condensed water during stack exhaustion is sampled, and it's concentration is measured by a liquid scintillation method. The HTO concentration of reactor room during ventilation changes at every repair work of heavy water-transport pipe system. An ionization chamber (∼1.5 L) for continuous monitoring is installed near the reactor side. The ionization monitoring system, however, didn't work during reactor operation because of the radioactivity of Ar-41. The behavior of HTO concentration in the decay tank of heavy water exhaustion system is measured, and a tritium gas leakage from the system is detected. The behaviors of tritiated water vapor in KUR containment building are discussed in details. (Suetake, M.)

  6. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  7. Laser remote sensing of water vapor: Raman lidar development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this research is the development of a critical design for a Raman lidar system optimized to match ARM Program needs for profiling atmospheric water vapor at CART sites. This work has emphasized the development of enhanced daytime capabilities using Raman lidar techniques. This abstract touches briefly on the main components of the research program, summarizing results of the efforts. A detailed Raman lidar instrument model has been developed to predict the daytime and nighttime performance capabilities of Raman lidar systems. The model simulates key characteristics of the lidar system, using realistic atmospheric profiles, modeled background sky radiance, and lidar system parameters based on current instrument capabilities. The model is used to guide development of lidar systems based on both the solar-blind concept and the narrowband, narrow field-of-view concept for daytime optimization

  8. Projected Regime Shift in Arctic Cloud and Water Vapor Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yonghua; Miller, James R.; Francis, Jennifer; Russel, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than any other large-scale region on Earth. A variety of positive feedback mechanisms are responsible for the amplification, most of which are linked with changes in snow and ice cover, surface temperature (T(sub s)), atmospheric water vapor (WV), and cloud properties. As greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, air temperature and water vapor content also increase, leading to a warmer surface and ice loss, which further enhance evaporation and WV. Many details of these interrelated feedbacks are poorly understood, yet are essential for understanding the pace and regional variations in future Arctic change. We use a global climate model (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Atmosphere-Ocean Model) to examine several components of these feedbacks, how they vary by season, and how they are projected to change through the 21st century. One positive feedback begins with an increase in T(sub s) that produces an increase in WV, which in turn increases the downward longwave flux (DLF) and T(sub s), leading to further evaporation. Another associates the expected increases in cloud cover and optical thickness with increasing DLF and T(sub s). We examine the sensitivities between DLF and other climate variables in these feedbacks and find that they are strongest in the non-summer seasons, leading to the largest amplification in Ts during these months. Later in the 21st century, however, DLF becomes less sensitive to changes in WV and cloud optical thickness, as they cause the atmosphere to emit longwave radiation more nearly as a black body. This regime shift in sensitivity implies that the amplified pace of Arctic change relative to the northern hemisphere could relax in the future.

  9. Water vapor and gas transport through polymeric membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor transport through polymeric materials plays an important role in a large number of applications such as: food packaging, breathable clothing, roofing membranes, diapers, and the removal of water vapor from gas streams (e.g. dehydration of natural gas or the drying of compressed air). Depending on the application a high or low permeability or selectivity is preferable. This thesis investigates the transport of water vapor and various gases through polyethylene oxide (PEO) polybutyl...

  10. Correction technique for Raman water vapor lidar signal-dependent bias and suitability for water vapor trend monitoring in the upper troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Cadirola, M.; Venable, D.; Calhoun, M.; Miloshevich, L.; Vermeesch, K.; Twigg, L.; Dirisu, A.; Hurst, D.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Vömel, H.

    2012-11-01

    The MOHAVE-2009 campaign brought together diverse instrumentation for measuring atmospheric water vapor. We report on the participation of the ALVICE (Atmospheric Laboratory for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education) mobile laboratory in the MOHAVE-2009 campaign. In appendices we also report on the performance of the corrected Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements during the campaign, on a new radiosonde based calibration algorithm that reduces the influence of atmospheric variability on the derived calibration constant, and on other results of the ALVICE deployment. The MOHAVE-2009 campaign permitted the Raman lidar systems participating to discover and address measurement biases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The ALVICE lidar system was found to possess a wet bias which was attributed to fluorescence of insect material that was deposited on the telescope early in the mission. Other sources of wet biases are discussed and data from other Raman lidar systems are investigated, revealing that wet biases in upper tropospheric (UT) and lower stratospheric (LS) water vapor measurements appear to be quite common in Raman lidar systems. Lower stratospheric climatology of water vapor is investigated both as a means to check for the existence of these wet biases in Raman lidar data and as a source of correction for the bias. A correction technique is derived and applied to the ALVICE lidar water vapor profiles. Good agreement is found between corrected ALVICE lidar measurments and those of RS92, frost point hygrometer and total column water. The correction is offered as a general method to both quality control Raman water vapor lidar data and to correct those data that have signal-dependent bias. The influence of the correction is shown to be small at regions in the upper troposphere where recent work indicates detection of trends in atmospheric water vapor may be most robust. The correction shown here holds promise for permitting useful upper

  11. Water vapor from sunradiometry in comparison wit microwave and balloon-sonde measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States); Liljegren, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Water vapor plays an important role in weather in climate; it is the most important greenhouse gas and the most variable in space and time. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is studying the column abundance and distribution of water vapor with altitude. Although the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is mainly for measurements of spectral short-wave radiation and spectral extinction by aerosol, it can also measure total column water vapor. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of MFRSR`s capabilities for total column water vapor under cloudless conditions.

  12. Factors governing water condensation in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, David S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Modeling results are presented suggesting a diurnal condensation cycle at high altitudes at some seasons and latitudes. In a previous paper, the use of atmospheric optical depth measurements at the Viking lander site to show diurnal variability of water condensation at different seasons of the Mars year was described. Factors influencing the amount of condensation include latitude, season, atmospheric dust content and water vapor content at the observation site. A one-dimensional radiative-convective model is used herein based on the diabatic heating routines under development for the Mars General Circulation Model. The model predicts atmospheric temperature profiles at any latitude, season, time of day and dust load. From these profiles and an estimate of the water vapor, one can estimate the maximum occurring at an early morning hour (AM) and the minimum in the late afternoon (PM). Measured variations in the atmospheric optical density between AM and PM measurements were interpreted as differences in AM and PM condensation.

  13. Electron transport analysis in water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    A reliable set of electron collision cross sections for water vapor, including elastic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic excitation, electron attachment, and ionization cross sections, is estimated by the electron swarm method. In addition, anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collisions is considered in the cross section set. Electron transport coefficients such as electron drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization coefficient are calculated from the cross section set by Monte Carlo simulation in a wide range of E/N values, where E and N are the applied electric field and the number density of H2O molecules, respectively. The calculated transport coefficients are in good agreement with those measured. The obtained results confirm that the anisotropic electron scattering is important for the calculation at low E/N values. Furthermore, the cross section set assuming the isotropic electron scattering is proposed for practical use.

  14. An Analysis of the Precipitable Water Vapor Observed over the PIMO GPS Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Cruz

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of the atmosphere using Global Positioning Systems has been made possible with thederivation of the precipitable water vapor (PWV from the tropospheric wet delay experienced by thesignal propagation. Although limited by the missing observational data from the receiver, it is observedthat the PWV obtained from this data gives reasonable values when considered for the cases of wet anddry seasons and when analyzed with a measurable meteorological variable, such as the amount of rainfall.A continual update of the record for PWV is highly recommended for further studies on the behavior ofthe atmospheric water vapor and its contribution to the changing climate.

  15. Exploring the active role of water vapor in creating more extreme SSTs and climate variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. C.; Hoell, A.

    2015-12-01

    While it is well-known that water vapor will play an important role in amplifying the direct warming effects of well-mixed greenhouse gasses like CO2 and methane, to date relatively little attention has been placed on the spatial variability of water vapor warming effects: increased diabatic forcing from precipitation and long wave radiation. Here, using 1850-2012 atmospheric simulations from the GEOS5 model, 1948-2015 NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis 1 fields, 1979-2015 MERRA atmospheric reanalyses, and 1979-2015 NOAA OLR observations, we explore two potential thermodynamic contributions associated with water vapor. One contribution comes from the diabatic heating of the atmosphere by longwave radiation emissions. Another contribution comes from diabatic heating of the atmosphere by precipitation. This diabatic heating warms the local atmosphere, and over the tropical oceans, typically warms areas that are already warm. This increases local temperature gradients and potentially increases available potential energy both in the vertical (i.e. CAPE) and in the horizontal (i.e. APE). Using MERRA's detailed thermodynamic budget terms, we examine several recent climate extremes, like the 2011 La Niña and the 2015 El Niño, suggesting that exceptional increases in water vapor radiative warming and precipitation may have helped to make both events more extreme: exceptionally high levels of water vapor in the western Pacific may have helped increase the warm west Pacific - cool Niño 4 SST gradient during the 2011 La Niña. Conversely, in 2015, exceptionally high levels of water vapor in the eastern Pacific may have helped increase the warm Niño 3.4 - cool western Pacific El Niño SST gradient. These water vapor influences can be radiative (warming warm SSTs), as well as dynamic, as enhanced precipitation releases more latent heat. Thus 'anthropogenic' water vapor may move around the climate system, helping to exacerbate warming in warm areas of the atmosphere. We examine this

  16. Remote Sensing of Water Vapor and Thin Cirrus Clouds using MODIS Near-IR Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a major facility instrument on board the Terra Spacecraft, was successfully launched into space in December of 1999. MODIS has several near-IR channels within and around the 0.94 micrometer water vapor bands for remote sensing of integrated atmospheric water vapor over land and above clouds. MODIS also has a special near-IR channel centered at 1.375-micron with a width of 30 nm for remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In this paper, we describe briefly the physical principles on remote sensing of water vapor and cirrus clouds using these channels. We also present sample water vapor images and cirrus cloud images obtained from MODIS data.

  17. Shortwave absorption by water vapor and clouds as a source of equability in warm climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, R. F.; Huber, M.; Shaffer, G.

    2014-12-01

    During warm climates as those experienced during the Early Eocene, water vapor content is expected to locally increase at about 6%/K as warmer temperatures allow for larger values of water vapor saturation, and near surface relative humidity is bound to remain relatively constant. This increase in water vapor results in larger clear sky water vapor absorption near the Equator that decreases towards the poles providing a more equable distribution of shortwave radiation at the surface. Additionally, clouds in mid-latitudes are expected to shift polewards, increasing cloudiness in regions that receive less shortwave radiation and decreasing cloudiness in regions that receive more, again acting as a source of equability for climate. We quantify these two effects using atmospheric GCM simulations run under Eocene boundary conditions for 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 times present concentrations of CO2. We attempt to isolate the effect of the surface radiation distribution on the surface temperature gradient using a simple energy balance model.

  18. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  19. Terrestrial atmosphere, water and astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coradini M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Primitive life, defined as a chemical system capable to transfer its molecular information via self-replication and also capable to evolve, originated about 4 billion years ago from the processing of organic molecules by liquid water. Terrestrial atmosphere played a key role in the process by allowing the permanent presence of liquid water and by participating in the production of carbon-based molecules. Water molecules exhibit specific properties mainly due to a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The carbon-based molecules were either home made in the atmosphere and/or in submarine hydrothermal systems or delivered by meteorites and micrometeorites. The search for possible places beyond the earth where the trilogy atmosphere/water/life could exist is the main objective of astrobiology. Within the Solar System, exploration missions are dedicated to Mars, Europa, Titan and the icy bodies. The discovery of several hundreds of extrasolar planets opens the quest to the whole Milky Way.

  20. Projected regime shift in Arctic cloud and water vapor feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than any other large-scale region on Earth. A variety of positive feedback mechanisms are responsible for the amplification, most of which are linked with changes in snow and ice cover, surface temperature (Ts), atmospheric water vapor (WV), and cloud properties. As greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, air temperature and water vapor content also increase, leading to a warmer surface and ice loss, which further enhance evaporation and WV. Many details of these interrelated feedbacks are poorly understood, yet are essential for understanding the pace and regional variations in future Arctic change. We use a global climate model (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Atmosphere–Ocean Model) to examine several components of these feedbacks, how they vary by season, and how they are projected to change through the 21st century. One positive feedback begins with an increase in Ts that produces an increase in WV, which in turn increases the downward longwave flux (DLF) and Ts, leading to further evaporation. Another associates the expected increases in cloud cover and optical thickness with increasing DLF and Ts. We examine the sensitivities between DLF and other climate variables in these feedbacks and find that they are strongest in the non-summer seasons, leading to the largest amplification in Ts during these months. Later in the 21st century, however, DLF becomes less sensitive to changes in WV and cloud optical thickness, as they cause the atmosphere to emit longwave radiation more nearly as a black body. This regime shift in sensitivity implies that the amplified pace of Arctic change relative to the northern hemisphere could relax in the future.

  1. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  2. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires ni≅ne, where ni is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires ni+=ni-+ne. The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production.

  3. Sulfuric acid vapor and other cloud-related gases in the Venus atmosphere - Abundances inferred from observed radio opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, P. G.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile what had been thought to be an inconsistency among measurements and deductions regarding the constituents of the Venus atmosphere and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. Laboratory measurements of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are used to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height in a way that is consistent with observations of the constituents and absorbing properties of the atmosphere. It is concluded that sulfuric acid vapor is likely to be the principal microwave absorber in the 30-50 km altitude range of the middle atmosphere of Venus.

  4. Terrestrial atmosphere, water and astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Coradini M.; Brack A.

    2010-01-01

    Primitive life, defined as a chemical system capable to transfer its molecular information via self-replication and also capable to evolve, originated about 4 billion years ago from the processing of organic molecules by liquid water. Terrestrial atmosphere played a key role in the process by allowing the permanent presence of liquid water and by participating in the production of carbon-based molecules. Water molecules exhibit specific properties mainly due to a dense network of hydrogen bon...

  5. Seasonal and Global Variations of Water Vapor and High Clouds Observed with MODIS near-IR Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Yang, Ping; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on the Terra Spacecraft has been collecting scientific data since February of 2000. MODIS is a major facility instrument for remote sensing of the atmosphere, land surfaces, and ocean color. On the MODIS instruments, there are five channels located within and around the .0.94 micron water vapor band absorption region for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. There is also a channel located at 1.375 micron for detecting thin cirrus clouds. We will describe the basic principles for using these near-IR channels for remote sensing of water vapor and high clouds. Based on our analysis of two years# measurements with these channels, we have found that reliable observations of water vapor and high clouds on regional and global scales can be made. We will present results on daily, seasonal and annual variations of water vapor and high clouds.

  6. Characterization of merged AIRS and MLS water vapor sensitivity through integration of averaging kernels and retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Liang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze averaging kernels to assess the sensitivity of the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS to water vapor. The averaging kernels, in the tropical and extra-tropical upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric region of the atmosphere, indicate that AIRS is primarily sensitive to water vapor concentrations typical of tropospheric values up to a level around 260 hPa. At lower pressures AIRS retrievals lose sensitivity to water vapor, though not completely as indicated by the non-zero verticalities at pressures less than 260 hPa. The MLS is able to provide high quality retrievals, with verticalities ~1 for all pressure levels, down to the same level for where AIRS begins to lose sensitivity. Previous analyses have estimated both instruments to have overlapping sensitivity to water vapor over a half temperature scale height layer, within the upper troposphere, for concentrations between ~30–400 ppmv. Thus, we implement a method using the averaging kernel information to join the AIRS and MLS profiles into an merged set of water vapor profiles. The final combined profiles are not only smooth functions with height but preserve the atmospheric state as interpreted by both the AIRS and MLS instruments.

  7. Water Vapor and Cloud Radiative Feedback Processes in the Ocean- Atmosphere Coupled Model FGOALS_gl%海气耦合模式FGOALS_gl模拟的水汽和云辐射反馈过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘景卫; 周天军; 吴春强; 郭准

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of greenhouse effect of water vapor (Ga) and cloud radiative forcings (CRFs) over the low-latitude Pacific simulated by a coupled model developed by the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling forAtmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), ChineseAcademy of Sciences (CAS), namely FGOALS_gl, are analyzed in this paper. The reasons for model discrepancies are discussed. While the spatial distributions of climatological Ga and CRFs are generally well reproduced by the FGOALS_gl, some discrepancies are also evident. The model underestimates the intensities of Ga over the cold tongue and the northwestern Pacific, due to the biases in the simulated Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and the water vapor amount especially in the middle troposphere The model generally overestimates the amplitudes of both C1and Cs. The minimum center of C1 in the northern subtropical Pacific and the maximum center of Cs over the southeast Pacific are not evident in the model. The discrepancies in C1 (C8) are mainly due to the biases in the simulated high (total) cloud amount. The biases in the cloud vertical structure and optical thickness also have contributions.The spatial distributions of the responses of Ga, C1, and Cs to El Ni(n)o warming are well reproduced by the FGOALS_gl,even though the model overestimates the westward extent of maximum centers compared to the observations. The biases in Ga responses are caused by the discrepancies in magnitude and spatial pattern of SST anomalies associated with ENSO events, and the water vapor response to ENSO forcing. The responses of C1 (Cs) to ENSO forcing are closely related to the high (total) cloud amount anomalies, while biases in the cloud top altitude and optical thickness also have impacts.%本文分析了中国科学院大气物理研究所大气科学和地球流体力学数值模拟国家重点实验室(LASG)发展的快速耦合模式FGOALS_gl对低纬太平

  8. Detection of water vapor in Halley's comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, M. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Larson, H. P.; Williams, M.; Davis, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    Gaseous, neutral H2O was detected in the coma of comet Halley on 22.1 and 24.1 December 1985 Universal Time. Nine spectral lines of the nus band (2.65 micrometers) were found by means of a Fourier transform spectrometer on the NASA-Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The water production rate was about 6 x 10 to the 28th molecules per second on 22.1 December and 1.7 x 10 to the 29th molecules per second on 24.1 December UT. The numbers of spectral lines and their intensities are in accord with nonthermal-equilibrium cometary models. Rotational populations are derived from the observed spectral line intensities and excitation conditions are discussed. The ortho-para ratio was found to be 2.66 + or - 0.13, corresponding to a nuclear-spin temperature of 32 K (+5 K, -2 K), possibly indicating that the observed water vapor originated from a low-temperature ice.

  9. Particle/vapor concentrations and distributions of PAHs in the atmosphere of southern Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric PAH concentrations were measured at four sites characterized as rural (Haven Beach), semiurban (York River), urban (Hampton), and industrialized (Elizabeth River) areas as part of a study to quantify gaseous exchange fluxes across the air-water interface of southern Chesapeake Bay. Aerosol particle-associated PAH concentrations were similar at all sites; however, PAH vapor concentrations in the urban areas were as much as a factor of 50 greater than those at the rural site. Mean total PAH concentrations ranged from 7.87 ng/m3 at the rural site to 92.8 ng/m3 at the urban site. Daily total PAH concentrations ranged from 1.60 to 198 ng/m3. Exponential increases in PAH vapor concentrations with temperature were observed at the non-rural sites, suggesting volatilization from contaminated surfaces during warmer weather; whereas PAH vapor concentrations at the rural Haven Beach site exhibited little seasonal variability. Aerosol particle-associated PAH levels were similar at all sites and increased in winter due to the temperature dependence of vapor-particle partitioning, increased sources from combustion of fossil fuel and wood for home heating, and cold condensation of source vapors to background aerosols as air masses are dispersed to remote regions. Plots of log Kd vs. log Psat,SC1 indicate PAH partitioning is not at equilibrium in rural areas of Southern Chesapeake Bay. In addition, plots of log Kd vs. 1/T for individual PAHs indicate difference particle characteristics or partitioning processes influence particle/vapor distributions at the urban and rural sites

  10. Water vapor diffusion into a nanostructured iron oxyhydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaowei; Boily, Jean-François

    2013-06-17

    Water diffusion through 0.4 nm × 0.4 nm wide tunnels of synthesized akaganéite (β-FeOOH) nanoparticles was studied by a coupled experimental-molecular modeling approach. A sorption isotherm model obtained from quartz crystal microbalance measurements suggests that the akaganéite bulk can accommodate a maximum of 22.4 mg of water/g (44% bulk site occupancy) when exposed to atmospheres of up to 16 Torr water vapor. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy also showed that water molecules interact with (hydr)oxo groups on both the akaganéite bulk and surface. Diffusion reactions through the akaganéite bulk were confirmed through important changes in the hydrogen-bonding environment of bulk hydroxyl groups. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that water molecules are localized in cavities that are bound by eight hydroxyl groups, forming short-lived (tunnel openings are exposed, revealed sluggish rates of incorporation between interfacial water species and their tunnel counterparts. The presence of defects in the synthesized particles are suspected to contribute to different diffusion rates in the laboratory when compared to those observed in pristine crystalline materials, as studied by molecular modeling. PMID:23701490

  11. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  12. Upper limits for absorption by water vapor in the near-UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eoin M.; Wenger, John C.; Venables, Dean S.

    2016-02-01

    There are few experimental measurements of absorption by water vapor in the near-UV. Here we report the results of spectral measurements of water vapor absorption at ambient temperature and pressure from 325 nm to 420 nm, covering most tropospherically relevant short wavelengths. Spectra were recorded using a broadband optical cavity in the chemically controlled environment of an atmospheric simulation chamber. No absorption attributable to the water monomer (or the dimer) was observed at the 0.5 nm resolution of our system. Our results are consistent with calculated spectra and recent DOAS field observations, but contradict a report of significant water absorption in the near-UV. Based on the detection limit of our instrument, we report upper limits for the water absorption cross section of less than 5×10-26 cm2 molecule-1 at our instrument resolution. For a typical, indicative slant column density of 4×1023 cm2, we calculate a maximum optical depth of 0.02 arising from absorption of water vapor in the atmosphere at wavelengths between 340 nm and 420 nm, with slightly higher maximum optical depths below 340 nm. The results of this work, together with recent atmospheric observations and computational results, suggest that water vapor absorption across most of the near-UV is small compared to visible and infrared wavelengths.

  13. ROCKETMAS: A sounding-rocket-based remote sensing measurement of mesospheric water vapor and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croskey, C. L.; Olivero, J. J.; Puliafito, S. E.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The ROCKETMAS rocketborne technique, based on the shuttle-borne millimeter wave atmospheric sounder (MAS), to obtain water vapor and ozone measurements with vertical resolution, is described. The concentrations of mesospheric water vapor and ozone are not well known, yet both contribute significantly to the chemical and radiative structure of that region. In situ measurements of water vapor are difficult to make because water that was absorbed on the instrument surfaces outgasses in space and contaminates the local environment of the payload. However, a remote sensing technique that uses a long pathlength through the atmosphere greatly reduces the effect of such local contamination. The 183.3 GHz line of water vapor and 184.4 GHz line of ozone are good choices for spaceborne radiometer measurements because one front-end mixer assembly can be used to simultaneously observe both gases. The design of a sounding rocket based millimeter wave radiometer for measuring water vapor and ozone with a height resolution not possible by either ground based or limb sounding techniques is described.

  14. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    OpenAIRE

    Kasting, James F.; Chen, Howard; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3-D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a '...

  15. Line parameter validation using ground-based solar occultation measurements: Water vapor--A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veihelmann, B.; Maurellis, A.N.; Smith, K.M.; Tolchenov, R.N.; Tennyson, J.; Zande, W.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Water vapor spectroscopy data for the 720 nm absorption band (4[nu] polyad) are validated in the context of atmospheric radiative transfer calculations. We validate line parameters from the HITRAN-2000 database and from the ULB-UFR-BIRA database which have been used for the 2004 release of HITRAN. F

  16. FEATURES OF WATER VAPOR TRANSPORT OF TYPHOON DAN (9914)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Guo; ZHOU Yu-shu; YU Zhan-jiang

    2006-01-01

    The 2.5°×2.5°gridded ECMWF reanalysis data are used to diagnose the genesis, development and dissipation of typhoon Dan by calculated stream function, velocity potential and vapor budget. It is shown in the result that when typhoon Dan moved westwards, water vapor mainly came from the eastern and western boundaries, with most of it was transferred by the easterly flow south of the western North Pacific subtropical high; after Dan swerved northwards, water vapor mainly came from western boundary of the typhoon, and the vapor came from the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean. The transfer of water vapor was mainly concentrated on the mid-lower troposphere, especially the level of 925hPa, at which the most intensive transfer belt was located. During the different period of typhoon Dan, there was great water vapor change as indicated by stream function, velocity potential and vapor budget, which suggest the importance of water vapor in the development of typhoon Dan.

  17. Indirect radiative forcing of aerosols via water vapor above non-precipitating maritime cumulus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Pfeffer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol-cloud-water vapor interactions in clean maritime air have been described for different aerosol sources using the WRF-Chem atmospheric model. The simulations were made over the Lesser Antilles in the region of the RICO measurement campaign where the clouds are low, patchy, typical trade-wind cumuli. In this very clean air, sea salt and DMS are found to have greater effects than anthropogenic pollution on the cloud droplets' effective radii and longwave and shortwave outgoing top of atmosphere radiation. The changes in radiation due to each aerosol source are a function of how each source influences aerosol concentration, cloud droplet number concentration, cloud droplet sizes, and water vapor concentration. Changes in outgoing shortwave radiation are due predominantly to changes in the clouds, followed by the direct aerosol effect which is about 2/3 as important, followed by the effects of water vapor which is in turn about 2/3 as important as the direct effect. Changes in outgoing longwave radiation are due predominantly to changes in the clouds, with changes in water vapor being about 1/10 as important. The simulated changes in water vapor concentration are due to the competing effects of aerosol particles being able to both enhance condensation of available water vapor and enhance evaporation of smaller droplets. These changes are independent of precipitation effects as there is essentially no drizzle in the domain. It is expected that the indirect radiative forcing of aerosols via water vapor may be stronger in dirtier and more strongly convective conditions.

  18. An Algorithm for Retrieving Precipitable Water Vapor over Land Based on Passive Microwave Satellite Data

    OpenAIRE

    Fang-Cheng Zhou; Xiaoning Song; Pei Leng; Hua Wu; Bo-Hui Tang

    2016-01-01

    Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is one of the most variable components of the atmosphere in both space and time. In this study, a passive microwave-based retrieval algorithm for PWV over land without land surface temperature (LST) data was developed. To build the algorithm, two assumptions exist: (1) land surface emissivities (LSE) at two adjacent frequencies are equal and (2) there are simple parameterizations that relate transmittance, atmospheric effective radiating temperature, and PWV. Er...

  19. Static Water Vapor Feed Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can...

  20. Raman lidar measurements of tropospheric water vapor over Hefei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghua Wu(吴永华); Huanling Hu(胡欢陵); Shunxing Hu(胡顺星); Jun Zhou(周军)

    2003-01-01

    L625 Raman lidar has been developed for water vapor measurements over Hefei, China since September2000. By transmitting laser beam of frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser, Raman scattering signals of watervapor and nitrogen molecules are simultaneously detected by the cooled photomultipliers with photoncounting mode. Water vapor mixing ratios measured by Raman lidar show the good agreements withradiosonde observations, which indicates this Raman lidar is reliable. Many observation cases show thataerosol optical parameters have the good correlation with water vapor distribution in the lower troposphere.

  1. Reactivity of carborane-4 in the water vapor medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivity of carborane-4 with respect to water vapor was investigated with the use of shock tubes and fast compression plant. Reculiarities of interaction of mentioned components in the mixture 0.056C-2B4H6+0.444H2O+0.5Ar were determined. It was established that carborane reacted intensively with water vapor at temperatures above 1300 K, its reactivity at that exceeded one of hydrogen in the air. Chemical activity of carborane in water vapor medium decreased almost by two orders with decrease of temperature from 1000 to 900 K

  2. Back-trajectory Analyses of Water Vapor in Northern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Y.; Asanuma, J.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of precipitation sources is indispensable for prediction of extreme events as droughts and flood [Dirmeyer and Brubaker, 1999]. In this paper, the transport pathways of water vapor that precipitates in northern Mongolia were identified using back-trajectory analyses in order to find out factors causing such events in arid/semi-arid area. First, a back-trajectory model of atmospheric water vapor was developed. An air parcel is placed on an isentropic plane over the target site at each time of precipitation. Then, back trajectories was calculated with a kinematic method following the implicit technique [Merrill et al., 1986; Merrill, 1989]. Each of the air parcels was tagged with the precipitation time and the altitude, and then tracked back in time for 5 days on the isentropic surface. Japanese 25-year Reanalysis/JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JRA-25/JCDAS) of Japan Meteorological Agency [Onogi et al., 2007] was used for 3D field of meteorological variables for the calculation. As a validation, the model was compared with two others, namely, Meteorological Data Explorer of the Center for Global Environmental Reserch (METEX/CGER) [Zeng et al., 2003], and the trajectory model of the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) [Tomikawa and Sato, 2005]. The comparison found that model results are fairly robust within 5 days from the computational start, i.e., the end of the trajectory, regardless of different datasets and different schemes employed in these models. Then, the back-trajectory model was applied to the observed precipitation at the target site, a surface station in northern Mongolia called Kherlenbayan-Ulaan(KBU), where highly accurate and temporarily dense precipitation measurements are available. Back trajectory lines were calculated for each of the observed precipitation during the warm season of the years 2003 to 2009, on the isentropic surfaces of 300K, 310K and 320K where the highest value of water vapor is observed. The results show

  3. CART Raman Lidar Aerosol and Water Vapor Measurements in the Vicinity of Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Marian B.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Newsom, Rob; Sivaraman, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and water vapor profiles acquired by the Raman lidar instrument located at the Climate Research Facility (CRF) at Southern Great Plains (SGP) provide data necessary to investigate the atmospheric variability in the vicinity of clouds near the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Recent CARL upgrades and modifications to the routine processing algorithms afforded the necessarily high temporal and vertical data resolutions for these investigations. CARL measurements are used to investigate the behavior of aerosol backscattering and extinction and their correlation with water vapor and relative humidity.

  4. Volatility of Common Protective Oxides in High-Temperature Water Vapor: Current Understanding and Unanswered Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    Many structural materials rely on the formation of chromia, silica or alumina as a protective layer when exposed in high temperature oxidizing environments. The presence of these oxide layers provides a protective diffusion barrier which slows down further oxidation. In atmospheres containing water vapor, however, reactions to form volatile hydroxide species occur which remove the surface oxide, thus, lowering the protective capability of the oxide scale. This paper summarizes the current understanding of volatility of chromia, silica and alumina in water vapor containing combustion environments. In addition unanswered questions in each system are discussed. Th current paper represents an update on the considerable information learned in the past five years for these systems.

  5. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  6. Condensation of water vapor in the gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Gorshkov, Victor G.; Makarieva, Anastassia M.; Nefiodov, Andrei V.

    2012-01-01

    Physical peculiarities of water vapor condensation under conditions of hydrostatic equilibrium are considered. The power of stationary dynamic air fluxes and the vertical temperature distribution caused by condensation on large horizontal scales are estimated.

  7. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; Nieber, John

    2016-04-01

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle - an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from -40.2 to -15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from -278.7 to -113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol-1) indicate that regional evaporation can account

  8. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol/clouds during the FIRE/SPECTRE field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Ferrare, R.; Evans, K.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Lapp, M.; Bisson, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important constituents of the earth's atmosphere. It has a major impact on both atmospheric dynamics and radiative transfer. From a dynamic standpoint, the distribution of water vapor with height determines convective stability which is the major indicator of destructive storm development. Also, water vapor stored in the planetary boundary layer acts as the fuel to intensify severe weather. In regards to radiative transfer, water vapor is the most active IR molecule in the atmosphere. It is more effective in absorbing and emitting IR radiation than either carbon dioxide or methane, and thus plays an important role in global change. The main objective of FIRE (First ISSCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment) was to study the development and radiative characteristics of cirrus clouds. The SPECTRE (Spectral Radiation Experiment) project was designed to acquire the necessary atmospheric observations to compare radiative measurements with radiative transfer theory, with special emphasis on understanding the water vapor spectral continuum. The FIRE/SPECTRE field campaign was conducted during Nov. - Dec. 1991 in Coffeyville, Kansas. A complete understanding of water vapor, its distribution with height, and its temporal variation was important for both experiments.

  9. High resolution acetic acid survey and water vapor radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Yu-Shao

    2008-08-01

    Planets, comets, stars, galaxies and the interstellar medium (ISM) emit complex but distinct molecular spectra. These spectra reveal the chemical composition and physical conditions in the objects. For example, many biologically important molecules, such as acetic acid, formic acid, vinyl cyanide and ethyl cyanide, have been detected in hot molecular cores in the ISM. A diversity of molecules creates complicated and yet interesting astrochemistry in hot cores. However, the formation mechanisms of large molecules are still unclear. Hence large molecule observations are essential to understand hot core chemistry. Among these molecules, acetic acid is one of the most important large species in hot cores. It is a possible precursor of glycine, the simplest amino acid. It only has been detected in high-mass hot cores without oxygen/nitrogen chemical differentiation, which is key to hot core chemical models. Using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), we have conducted an acetic acid survey in hot cores. In our survey, we have discovered a new acetic acid hot core, G19.61-0.23, which also shows no chemical differentiation. Therefore, we suggest that both large oxygen and nitrogen- bearing species play important roles in acetic acid formation. Ground-based interferometric observations are severely affected by atmospheric conditions. Phase correction is a technique to obtain high quality data and achieve great scientific goals. For our acetic acid survey, a better phase correction technique can not only detect weaker transitions of large molecules, but also increase the map resolution of hot cores. Water vapor radiometers (WVRs) are designed to improve the technique by observing tropospheric water vapor along the lines of sight of interferometers. We have numerically demonstrated the importance of phase correction for interferometric observations and examined the water vapor phase correction technique. Furthermore, we have built two WVR

  10. Research of remote sensing technology of atmospheric water vapor by using ground-based GPS and application system of meteorological operations%地基GPS水汽监测技术及气象业务化应用系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国平

    2011-01-01

    本研究建立了川渝地区地基GPS(global positioning system,全球定位系统)遥感水汽的本地化计算模型,开发出GPS遥感水汽的计算软件包,开展了局域地基GPS观测网遥感大气水汽的试验及业务应用,反演出30 min间隔的高时间分辨率GPS可降水量序列。评估了反演精度,研究了GPS水汽产品在气象业务应用的可行性。研发了可搭建在MICAPS(meteorological information comprehensive analysis and process system)平台上的地基G%This study established local computing model of remote sensing water vapor by using ground-based GPS(global positioning system) in the region of Sichuan-Chongqing,and developed computing software packages of GPS remote sensing water vapor.Then the experiment and operational application of remote sensing water vapor by using ground-based GPS in this local network was done,by which the high time resolution GPS precipitable water vapor(PWV) sequence of 30 min intervals was derived.This paper also gives the assessment of the retrieval accuracy,as well as the feasibility of meteorological operations application of GPS water vapor products.The major results of this study include developing the operations application system of remote sensing atmospheric water vapor by using ground-based GPS,which can be build on the MICAPS(meteorological information comprehensive analysis and process system) as an operational application system,and realizing the real-time transmission,data solution,deriving of PWV by a local ground-based GPS network and visualization of GPS water vapor products.This meteorological operations system played a unique role in the heavy rain,blizzard and other severe weather forecast in its trial-run.Systematical study of the temporal variation,horizontal distribution of GPS-PWV was done by our research group.Furthermore,the relationship between PWV derived by GPS among surface air temperature,pressure,specific humidity,solar radiation

  11. Global Distribution of Water Vapor and Cloud Cover--Sites for High Performance THz Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Jonathan Y; Lubin, Philip M

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of terahertz radiation by atmospheric water vapor is a serious impediment for radio astronomy and for long-distance communications. Transmission in the THz regime is dependent almost exclusively on atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV). Though much of the Earth has PWV that is too high for good transmission above 200 GHz, there are a number of dry sites with very low attenuation. We performed a global analysis of PWV with high-resolution measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on two NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites over the year of 2011. We determined PWV and cloud cover distributions and then developed a model to find transmission and atmospheric radiance as well as necessary integration times in the various windows. We produced global maps over the common THz windows for astronomical and satellite communications scenarios. Notably, we show that up through 1 THz, systems could be built in excellent sites of Chile, Greenland and the Tibetan Plateau, ...

  12. In-Situ Water Vapor Probe for a Robot Arm-Mounted, Compact Water Vapor Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to test a prototype water vapor sampling end-effector in the laboratory and in the field thatwill eventually be integrated with a small, infrared...

  13. Cirrus cloud detection from airborne imaging spectrometer data using the 1.38 micron water vapor band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1993-01-01

    Using special images acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) at 20 km altitude, we show that wavelengths close to the center of the strong 1.38 micron water vapor band are useful for detecting thin cirrus clouds. The detection makes use of the fact that cirrus clouds are located above almost all the atmospheric water vapor. Because of the strong water vapor absorption in the lower atmosphere, AVIRIS channels near 1.38 micron receive little scattered solar radiance from the surface of low level clouds. When cirrus clouds are present, however, these channels receive large amounts of scattered solar radiance from the cirrus clouds. Our ability to determine cirrus cloud cover using space-based remote sensing will be improved if channels near the center of the 1.38 micron water vapor band are added to future satellites.

  14. The Influence of Water Vapor Absorption in the 290-350 nm Region on Solar Irradiance: Laboratory Studies and Model Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Du, J.; Huang, L.; Min, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Water vapor is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the earth's atmosphere. Absorption of the solar radiation by water vapor in the near UV region may partially account for the up to 30% discrepancy between the modeled and the observed solar energy absorbed by the atmosphere. But the magnitude of water vapor absorption in the near UV region at wavelengths shorter than 384 nm was not known prior to this study. We have determined absorption cross sections of water vapor at 5 nm intervals in the 290-350 nm region, by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Water vapor cross section values range from 2.94×10-24 to 2.13×10-25 cm2/molecule in the wavelength region studied. The effect of the water vapor absorption in the 290-350 nm region on the modeled radiation flux at the ground level has been evaluated using radiative transfer model.

  15. The Infrared Astronomical Characteristics of Roque de los Muchachos Observatory: precipitable water vapor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Lorenzo, B; Castro-Almazan, J; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Muñoz-Tuñon, C; Rodriguez-Espinosa, J M

    2010-01-01

    The atmospheric water vapor content above the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) obtained from Global Positioning Systems (GPS) is presented. GPS measurements have been evaluated by comparison with 940nm-radiometer observations. Statistical analysis of GPS measurements points to ORM as an observing site with suitable conditions for infrared (IR) observations, with a median column of precipitable water vapor (PWV) of 3.8 mm. PWV presents a clear seasonal behavior, being Winter and Spring the best seasons for IR observations. The percentage of nighttime showing PWV values smaller than 3 mm is over 60% in February, March and April. We have also estimated the temporal variability of water vapor content at the ORM. A summary of PWV statistical results at different astronomical sites is presented, recalling that these values are not directly comparable as a result of the differences in the techniques used to recorded the data.

  16. Application of the Spectral Structure Parameterization technique: retrieval of total water vapor columns from GOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a recently proposed spectral sampling technique for measurements of atmospheric transmissions called the Spectral Structure Parameterization (SSP in order to retrieve total water vapor columns (WVC from reflectivity spectra measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME. SSP provides a good compromise between efficiency and speed when performing retrievals on highly structured spectra of narrow-band absorbers like water vapor. We show that SSP can be implemented in a radiative transfer scheme which treats both direct-path absorption and absorption by singly-scattered light directly. For the retrieval we exploit a ro-vibrational overtone band of water vapor located in the visible around 590 nm. We compare our results to independent values given by the data assimilation model of ECMWF. In addition, results are compared to those obtained from the more accurate, but more computationally expensive, Optical Absorption Coefficient Spectroscopy (OACS.

  17. Investigating the Source, Transport, and Isotope Composition of Water in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, T. J.; Schultz, N. M.; Lee, X.

    2011-12-01

    The isotope composition of water (liquid and vapor phases) can provide important insights regarding the source of water used by plants, the origins of atmospheric water vapor, and the sources of carbon dioxide. In recent years there have been significant advances in the ability to quantify the isotope composition of water and water vapor using optical isotope techniques. We have used and helped develop some of these techniques to determine the isotope composition of soil and plant waters, to measure the isoflux of water vapor between the land surface and atmosphere, and to examine the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this presentation we will discuss three related issues: 1) Identification and correction of spectral contamination in soil and plant water samples using optical techniques; 2) The benefits and practical limitations of quantifying the isotope composition of evapotranspiration using the eddy covariance approach; and 3) The scientific value and feasibility of tracking the long-term (seasonal and interannual) behavior of the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. A few short stories will be provided from experiments conducted in the lab, at the field scale, and from a very tall tower at the University of Minnesota from 2008 to 2011.

  18. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.

  19. Estimation Accuracy of air Temperature and Water Vapor Amount Above Vegetation Canopy Using MODIS Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomosada, M.

    2005-12-01

    Estimation accuracy of the air temperature and water vapor amount above vegetation canopy using MODIS satellite data is indicated at AGU fall meeting. The air temperature and water vapor amount which are satisfied the multilayer energy budget model from the ground surface to the atmosphere are estimated. Energy budget models are described the fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat exchange for the ground surface and the vegetated surface. Used MODIS satellite data is the vegetated surface albedo which is calculated from visible and near infrared band data, the vegetated surface temperature, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), LAI (Leaf Area Index). Estimation accuracy of air temperature and water vapor amount above vegetation canopy is evaluated comparing with the value which is measured on a flux research tower in Tomakomai northern forest of Japan. Meteorological parameters such as temperature, wind speed, water vapor amount, global solar radiation are measured on a flux tower from the ground to atmosphere. Well, MODIS satellite observes at day and night, and it snows in Tomakomai in winter. Therefore, estimation accuracy is evaluated dividing on at daytime, night, snowfall day, and not snowfall day. There is the investigation of the undeveloped region such as dense forest and sea in one of feature of satellite observation. Since there is almost no meteorological observatory at the undeveloped region so far, it is hard to get the meteorological parameters. Besides, it is the one of the subject of satellite observation to get the amount of physical parameter. Although the amount of physical parameter such as surface temperature and concentration of chlorophyll-a are estimated by satellite, air temperature and amount of water vapor above vegetation canopy have not been estimated by satellite. Therefore, the estimation of air temperature and water vapor amount above vegetation canopy using satellite data is significant. Further, a highly accurate

  20. Assessing the Temperature Dependence of Narrow-Band Raman Water Vapor Lidar Measurements: A Practical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Walker, Monique; Cardirola, Martin; Sakai, Tetsu; Veselovskii, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Narrow-band detection of the Raman water vapor spectrum using the lidar technique introduces a concern over the temperature dependence of the Raman spectrum. Various groups have addressed this issue either by trying to minimize the temperature dependence to the point where it can be ignored or by correcting for whatever degree of temperature dependence exists. The traditional technique for performing either of these entails accurately measuring both the laser output wavelength and the water vapor spectral passband with combined uncertainty of approximately 0.01 nm. However, uncertainty in interference filter center wavelengths and laser output wavelengths can be this large or larger. These combined uncertainties translate into uncertainties in the magnitude of the temperature dependence of the Raman lidar water vapor measurement of 3% or more. We present here an alternate approach for accurately determining the temperature dependence of the Raman lidar water vapor measurement. This alternate approach entails acquiring sequential atmospheric profiles using the lidar while scanning the channel passband across portions of the Raman water vapor Q-branch. This scanning is accomplished either by tilt-tuning an interference filter or by scanning the output of a spectrometer. Through this process a peak in the transmitted intensity can be discerned in a manner that defines the spectral location of the channel passband with respect to the laser output wavelength to much higher accuracy than that achieved with standard laboratory techniques. Given the peak of the water vapor signal intensity curve, determined using the techniques described here, and an approximate knowledge of atmospheric temperature, the temperature dependence of a given Raman lidar profile can be determined with accuracy of 0.5% or better. A Mathematica notebook that demonstrates the calculations used here is available from the lead author.

  1. Water vapor detection with individual tin oxide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual tin oxide nanowires (NWs), contacted to platinum electrodes using focused ion beam assisted nanolithography, were used for detecting water vapor (1500-32 000 ppm) in different gaseous environments. Responses obtained in synthetic air (SA) and nitrogen atmospheres suggested differences in the sensing mechanism, which were related to changes in surface density of the adsorbed oxygen species in the two cases. A model describing the different behaviors has been proposed together with comparative evaluation of NW responses against sensors based on bulk tin oxide. The results obtained on ten individual devices (tested >6 times) revealed the interfering effect of water in the detection of carbon monoxide and illustrated the intrinsic potential of nanowire-based devices as humidity sensors. Investigations were made on sensitivity, recovery time and device stability as well as surface-humidity interactions. This is the first step towards fundamental understanding of single-crystalline one-dimensional (1D) tin oxide nanostructures for sensor applications, which could lead to integration in real devices

  2. Monitoring tropospheric water vapor changes using radiosonde data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant increases in the water vapor content of the troposphere are expected to accompany temperature increases due to rising concentrations of the greenhouse gases. Thus it is important to follow changes in water vapor over time. There are a number of difficulties in developing a homogeneous data set, however, because of changes in radiosonde instrumentation and reporting practices. The authors report here on preliminary attempts to establish indices of water vapor which can be monitored. The precipitable water between the surface and 500 mb is the first candidate. They describe their method for calculating this quantity from radiosonde data for a network very similar to the network Angell uses for detecting temperature trends. Preliminary results suggest that the noise level is low enough to detect trends in water vapor at the individual stations. While a slight increase in global water vapor is hinted at in the data, and the data suggest there may have been a net transfer of water from the Southern Hemisphere to the Northern Hemisphere, these conclusions are tentative. The authors also discuss the future course of this investigation

  3. Compact Raman Lidar Measurement of Liquid and Vapor Phase Water Under the Influence of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Chigira, Tomoyuki; Saito, Hayato; Manago, Naohiro; Kuze, Hiroaki; Hanyu, Toshinori; Kanayama, Fumihiko; Fukushima, Mineo

    2016-06-01

    A compact Raman lidar has been developed for studying phase changes of water in the atmosphere under the influence of ionization radiation. The Raman lidar is operated at the wavelength of 349 nm and backscattered Raman signals of liquid and vapor phase water are detected at 396 and 400 nm, respectively. Alpha particles emitted from 241Am of 9 MBq ionize air molecules in a scattering chamber, and the resulting ions lead to the formation of liquid water droplets. From the analysis of Raman signal intensities, it has been found that the increase in the liquid water Raman channel is approximately 3 times as much as the decrease in the vapor phase water Raman channel, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the Raman cross-sections. In addition, the radius of the water droplet is estimated to be 0.2 μm.

  4. Compact Raman Lidar Measurement of Liquid and Vapor Phase Water Under the Influence of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiina Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact Raman lidar has been developed for studying phase changes of water in the atmosphere under the influence of ionization radiation. The Raman lidar is operated at the wavelength of 349 nm and backscattered Raman signals of liquid and vapor phase water are detected at 396 and 400 nm, respectively. Alpha particles emitted from 241Am of 9 MBq ionize air molecules in a scattering chamber, and the resulting ions lead to the formation of liquid water droplets. From the analysis of Raman signal intensities, it has been found that the increase in the liquid water Raman channel is approximately 3 times as much as the decrease in the vapor phase water Raman channel, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the Raman cross-sections. In addition, the radius of the water droplet is estimated to be 0.2 μm.

  5. Mars' water vapor mapping by the SPICAM IR spectrometer: Five martian years of observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Fedorova, Anna; Korablev, Oleg; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Rodin, Alexander; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-05-01

    The SPICAM IR instrument on the Mars Express mission continuously observes the water vapor in the martian atmosphere starting from 2004 in the 1.38-μm spectral band. The water vapor column abundance is retrieved from nadir observations to characterize its spatial, seasonal and interannual variations. A reference set of SPICAM water vapor column abundances (zonally averaged) covering the time period from 2004 to 2013 (martian years 27-31) is available for a grid of 2° Ls × 2° latitude, along with an average reference map of water vapor abundance combining all the martian years of Mars Express observations. Compared to the previous data retrieval by Fedorova et al. (Fedorova, A., Korablev, O., Bertaux, J.L., Rodin, A., Kiselev, A., Perrier, S. [2006]. J. Geophys. Res. 111, E09S08) the new processing algorithm includes many improvements concerning the calibration and assumed parameters. A major improvement is the account for aerosol scattering based on dust and water ice cloud optical depths measured by THEMIS/Mars Odyssey (Smith, M.D. [2009]. Icarus 202, 444-452). The account for multiple scattering by aerosol particles increases the retrieved water vapor amount by ∼10% in polar areas during summer, and up to 60-70% for large solar zenith angles. The sensitivity of the results to aerosol properties, surface albedo, solar spectrum, and water vapor vertical distribution has also been studied. The retrieved water vapor reveals nominal annual cycle with maximum abundance of about 60-70 pr. μm for the Northern summer and ∼20 pr. μm for the Southern summer. The annual average amount of water has been estimated to be of 10-20 pr. μm, in agreement with other measurements. From year to year the seasonal cycle of water vapor abundance is very stable. An observed decrease during the MY 28 global dust storm cannot be fully attributed to the masking effect of dust, and indicates a real decrease of water amount near or above the surface. No evidence of diurnal variation

  6. Observations of water vapor mixing ratio profile and flux in the Tibetan Plateau based on the lidar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Dai, Guangyao; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Liping

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the third Tibetan Plateau Experiment of Atmospheric Sciences (TIPEX III) in China, a Raman water vapor, cloud and aerosol lidar and a coherent wind lidar were operated in Naqu (31.48° N, 92.06° E) with a mean elevation of more than 4500 m a.m.s.l. in summer of 2014. During the field campaign, the water vapor mixing ratio profiles were obtained and validated by radiosonde observations. The mean water vapor mixing ratio in Naqu in July and August was about 9.4 g kg-1 and the values vary from 6.0 to 11.7 g kg-1 near the ground according to the lidar measurements, from which a diurnal variation of water vapor mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer was also illustrated in this high-elevation area. Furthermore, using concurrent measurements of vertical wind speed profiles from the coherent wind lidar, we calculated the vertical flux of water vapor that indicates the water vapor transport through updraft and downdraft. The fluxes were for a case at night with large-scale non-turbulent upward transport of moisture. It is the first application, to our knowledge, to operate continuously atmospheric observations by utilizing multi-disciplinary lidars at the altitude higher than 4000 m, which is significant for research on the hydrologic cycle in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere in the Tibetan Plateau.

  7. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  8. Sevoflurane Contamination: Water Accumulation in Sevoflurane Vaporizers Can Allow Bacterial Growth in the Vaporizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Arthur W

    2016-06-15

    Sevoflurane vaporizers (GE Tec 7) were difficult to fill with "slow flow" and a need to "burp." Evaluation of the bottle of sevoflurane (AbbVie Ultane) demonstrated a contaminant. Four of the facilities' 13 sevoflurane vaporizers had the contaminant. Unopened sevoflurane bottles did not have evidence of contamination. The contaminant was found to be water at pH 6.0 growing Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gas chromatography revealed the production of multiple metabolites of sevoflurane, including primarily urea and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (83% and 9.6% of volatiles) in addition to multiple other organic molecules. Sevoflurane contains water that can accumulate in vaporizers allowing bacterial growth. PMID:27301057

  9. Mobile multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for water vapor, cloud and aerosol measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Liping

    2015-12-28

    Aiming at the detection of atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio, depolarization ratio, backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL) is developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The lidar consists of transmitter, receiver, data acquisition and auxiliary system. For the measurement of various atmospheric physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in WACAL. The integration and working principle of these channels are introduced in details. The optical setup, the housekeeping of the system and the data retrieval routines are also presented. After the completion of the construction of the lidar, the WACAL system was installed in Ocean University of China (36.165°N, 120.5°E), Qingdao for the measurement of atmosphere during 2013 and 2014. The measurement principles and some case studies corresponding to various atmospheric physical properties are provided. Finally, the result of one continuous measurement example operated on 13 June 2014 is presented. The WACAL can measure the aerosol and cloud optical properties as well as the water vapor mixing ratio. It is useful for studying the direct and indirect effects of the aerosol on the climate change. PMID:26832047

  10. Radiation Damage to Artemia Cysts:Effects of Water Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, W C; Gordy, W

    1963-10-25

    Water vapor altered the form and greatly increased the rate of decay of the electron-spin resonance pattern of long-lived free radicals obtained upon gamma irradiation of Artemia salina cysts ( brine shrimp eggs). These results, combined with data on radiation survival, indicate that the water vapor protects the cysts from radiation damage, or heals the damage. They also indicate that water protects the cysts from the effect of oxygen by neutralizing the radiation-induced free radicals before they can interact with oxygen to produce irreversible damage. PMID:17748168

  11. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Merete; Zardini, Alessandro Alessio; Hong, Juan;

    allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using...

  12. Water vapor toward starless cores: The Herschel view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Caselli; E. Keto; L. Pagani; Y. Aikawa; U.A. Yıldız; F.F.S. van der Tak; M. Tafalla; E.A. Bergin; B. Nisini; C. Codella; E.F. van Dishoeck; R. Bachiller; A. Baudry; M. Benedettini; A.O. Benz; P. Bjerkeli; G.A. Blake; S. Bontemps; J. Braine; S. Bruderer; J. Cernicharo; F. Daniel; A.M. Di Giorgio; C. Dominik; S.D. Doty; P. Encrenaz; M. Fich; A. Fuente; T. Gaier; T. Giannini; J.R. Goicoechea; T. de Graauw; F. Helmich; G.J. Herczeg; F. Herpin; M.R. Hogerheijde; B. Jackson; T. Jacq; H. Javadi; D. Johnstone; J.K. Jørgensen; D. Kester; L.E. Kristensen; W. Laauwen; B. Larsson; D. Lis; R. Liseau; W. Luinge; M. Marseille; C. McCoey; A. Megej; G. Melnick; D. Neufeld; M. Olberg; B. Parise; J.C. Pearson; R. Plume; C. Risacher; J. Santiago-García; P. Saraceno; R. Shipman; P. Siegel; T.A. van Kempen; R. Visser; S.F. Wampfler; F. Wyrowski

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Previous studies by the satellites SWAS and Odin provided stringent upper limits on the gas phase water abundance of dark clouds (x(H2O) < 7 x 10(-9)). We investigate the chemistry of water vapor in starless cores beyond the previous upper limits using the highly improved angular resolution an

  13. Water vapor toward starless cores : The Herschel view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, P.; Keto, E.; Pagani, L.; Aikawa, Y.; Yildiz, U. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Tafalla, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Nisini, B.; Codella, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G.A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Gaier, T.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Jackson, B.; Jacq, T.; Javadi, H.; Johnstone, D.; Jorgensen, J. K.; Kester, D.; Kristensen, L. E.; Laauwen, W.; Larsson, B.; Lis, D.; Liseau, R.; Luinge, W.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Megej, A.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-Garcia, J.; Saraceno, P.; Shipman, R.; Siegel, P.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Previous studies by the satellites SWAS and Odin provided stringent upper limits on the gas phase water abundance of dark clouds (x(H2O) <7 x 10(-9)). We investigate the chemistry of water vapor in starless cores beyond the previous upper limits using the highly improved angular resolution and

  14. Analysis of Water Vapor Characteristics of Regional Rainfall Around Poyang Lake Using Ground-based GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yujing; Guo, Hang; Liao, Rongwei; Uradzinski, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric precipitation of Poyang Lake area can be analyzed using ground-based GPS observation data. Analysis of the atmosphere can precipitate rainfall changes in the weather characteristics. At the same time we can use National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) data analysis of weather system, water vapor transmission, convergence and precipitation power mechanism, high-density grid point data analysis of rainfall. The atmospheric precipitation and rainfall contrast analysis show that rainfall and atmospheric precipitation are not directly in corresponding relation. Size and atmospheric rainfall can be precipitation size and also does not always correspond. Before the precipitation can be increased, atmospheric precipitation process is a continuous change process. It may be 1 hour before rainfall around spurt. Rainfall is not always smaller than the maximum atmospheric precipitation. There may be a far outweigh to the atmospheric precipitation water quantity. Rain occurrence and atmosphere can change rainfall and weather system of water vapor transport. Water vapor convergence is closely related to the dynamic conditions.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  16. Clouds and Water Vapor in the Climate System: Remotely Piloted Aircraft and Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work was to attack unanswered questions that lie at the intersection of radiation, dynamics, chemistry and climate. Considerable emphasis was placed on scientific collaboration and the innovative development of instruments required to address these scientific issues. The specific questions addressed include: Water vapor distribution in the Tropical Troposphere: An understanding of the mechanisms that dictate the distribution of water vapor in the middle-upper troposphere; Atmospheric Radiation: In the spectral region between 200 and 600/cm that encompasses the water vapor rotational and continuum structure, where most of the radiative cooling of the upper troposphere occurs, there is a critical need to test radiative transfer calculations using accurate, spectrally resolved radiance observations of the cold atmosphere obtained simultaneously with in situ species concentrations; Thin Cirrus: Cirrus clouds play a central role in the energy and water budgets of the tropical tropopause region; Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange: Assessment of our ability to predict the behavior of the atmosphere to changes in the boundary conditions defined by thermal, chemical or biological variables; Correlative Science with Satellite Observations: Linking this research to the developing series of EOS observations is critical for scientific progress.

  17. Carbon and water vapor balance in a subtropical pine plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posse G

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Afforestation has been proposed as an effective tool for protecting primary and/or secondary forests and for mitigating atmospheric CO2. However, the dynamics of primary productivity differs between plantations and natural forests. The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential for carbon storage of a commercial pine plantation by determining its carbon balance. Measurements started when trees were aged 6 and ended when they were older than 8 years. We measured CO2 and water vapor concentrations using the Eddy covariance method. Gross primary productivity in 2010 and 2011 was 4290 ± 473 g C m-2 and 4015 ± 485 g C m-2, respectively. Ecosystem respiration ranged between 7 and 20 g C m-2 d-1, reaching peaks in all Februaries. Of the 30 months monitored, the plantation acted as carbon source for 21 months and as carbon sink for 6 months, while values close to neutrality were obtained during 3 months. The positive balance representing CO2 loss by the system was most likely due to the cut branches left on the ground following pruning activities. The plantation was subjected to pruning in January and September 2008 and to sanitary pruning in October 2010. In all cases, cut branches were not removed but remained on the ground. Residue management seems to have a very important impact on carbon balance.

  18. Validation of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's OMI Water Vapor Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2015-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive validation of SAO's OMI water vapor product. The SAO OMI water vapor slant column is retrieved using the 430 - 480 nm wavelength range. In addition to water vapor, the retrieval considers O3, NO2, liquid water, O4, C2H2O2, the Ring effect, water ring, 3rd order polynomial, common mode and under-sampling. The slant column is converted to vertical column using AMF. AMF is calculated using GEOS-Chem water vapor profile shape, OMCLDO2 cloud information and OMLER surface albedo information. We validate our product using NCAR's GPS network data over the world and RSS's gridded microwave data over the ocean. We also compare our product with the total precipitable water derived from the AERONET ground-based sun photometer data, the GlobVapour gridded product, and other datasets. We investigate the influence of sub-grid scale variability and filtering criteria on the comparison. We study the influence of clouds, aerosols and a priori profiles on the retrieval. We also assess the long-term performance and stability of our product and seek ways to improve it.

  19. Air sparging and soil vapor extraction to remediate ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Air Sparging and Soil Vapor Extraction System was chosen to remediate petroleum impacted ground water over traditional remedial alternatives, such as ''pump and treat'', to expedite site closure. Field pilot testing, computer modeling and cost benefit analyses performed for several alternatives. Air Sparging and Soil Vapor Extraction pilot studies proved this technology to be the most effective with respect to remedial and economic concerns. Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) were closed at the facility located in North Eastern North Carolina in August of 1992. During UST closure, petroleum impacted ground water and soils were encountered. ATEC performed a Comprehensive Site assessment to delineate the impacted soil and ground water plume. Following completion of the site assessment, a Corrective Action Plan was prepared. As part of the Corrective Action Plan preparation, field pilot testing was performed to evaluate remedial alternatives and provide information for full scale design. The full scale treatment system was installed and started in January 1994. This effective Remedial System was selected over other options due to successful pilot testing results with site closure petitioning scheduled within 12 to 14 months after start up. The Air Sparging System, properly applied, is an effective and ''quick'' remedial option with no generation of ground water for disposal and permitting. This paper concentrates on the Air Sparging application applied at this North Carolina site. Although Vapor extraction was also implemented, this presentation does not elaborate on vapor extraction design or implementation and only discusses vapor extraction where it is directly related to the Air Sparging System

  20. The Kinetics of Oxidation of Molybdenite Concentrate by Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Edgar; Sohn, Hong Yong; Han, Gilsoo; Hakobyan, Kliment Y.

    2007-08-01

    A thermodynamic and kinetics investigation on the oxidation of MoS2 in molybdenite concentrate to MoO2 by water vapor was carried out as part of new process development. The kinetics of the reaction were determined by measuring the weight change of a sample with time in water vapor at temperatures between 700 °C and 1000 °C. The reaction rate followed the shrinking-unreacted-core model under chemical reaction control, which showed activation energy of 102 kJ/mol. In addition, the behavior of rhenium and selenium in molybdenum concentrate during the process was investigated. While most rhenium remained with the molybdenum dioxide during the water vapor oxidation, almost all selenium was volatilized in agreement with thermodynamic analysis.

  1. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  2. Tritiated water vapor in the surface air at Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium concentration in water vapor in the air near the surface and in the precipitation at Tokyo was measured during the period from 9 August to 20 November in 1974. From August to the middle of October, tritium mixing ratios in the surface air had relatively higher values except those in air masses which were associated with a typhoon. The mixing ratios of tritium in the air decreased abruptly at the middle of October, which indicates the decrease of tritium influx from aloft. These data exhibit the salient feature that variations in tritium concentration in TR are linear to the reciprocal of the content of water vapor during each period. Tritium concentrations in vapor and rain water collected simultaneously show nearly equal values. One of the reasons for the good correlation of tritium concentration between falling drops and ambient air is considered to be the result of the rapid isotopic exchange. (author)

  3. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components. 20 references

  4. SPARC Data Initiative: Comparison of water vapor climatologies from international satellite limb sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Tegtmeier, S.; Anderson, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Fuller, R.; Funke, B.; Jones, A.; Lingenfelser, G.; Lumpe, J.; Pendlebury, D.; Remsberg, E.; Rozanov, A.; Toohey, M.; Urban, J.; Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, R.; Weigel, K.

    2013-10-01

    Within the SPARC Data Initiative, the first comprehensive assessment of the quality of 13 water vapor products from 11 limb-viewing satellite instruments (LIMS, SAGE II, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM III, SMR, SAGE III, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, and Aura-MLS) obtained within the time period 1978-2010 has been performed. Each instrument's water vapor profile measurements were compiled into monthly zonal mean time series on a common latitude-pressure grid. These time series serve as basis for the "climatological" validation approach used within the project. The evaluations include comparisons of monthly or annual zonal mean cross sections and seasonal cycles in the tropical and extratropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere averaged over one or more years, comparisons of interannual variability, and a study of the time evolution of physical features in water vapor such as the tropical tape recorder and polar vortex dehydration. Our knowledge of the atmospheric mean state in water vapor is best in the lower and middle stratosphere of the tropics and midlatitudes, with a relative uncertainty of ±2-6% (as quantified by the standard deviation of the instruments' multiannual means). The uncertainty increases toward the polar regions (±10-15%), the mesosphere (±15%), and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere below 100 hPa (±30-50%), where sampling issues add uncertainty due to large gradients and high natural variability in water vapor. The minimum found in multiannual (1998-2008) mean water vapor in the tropical lower stratosphere is 3.5 ppmv (±14%), with slightly larger uncertainties for monthly mean values. The frequently used HALOE water vapor data set shows consistently lower values than most other data sets throughout the atmosphere, with increasing deviations from the multi-instrument mean below 100 hPa in both the tropics and extratropics. The knowledge gained from these comparisons and regarding the quality of the individual data sets in different regions

  5. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Havlík; Tomáš Dlouhý

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The...

  6. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  7. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  8. Precipitable Water Vapor Estimates in the Australian Region from Ground-Based GPS Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Suelynn Choy; Chuan-Sheng Wang; Ta-Kang Yeh; John Dawson; Minghai Jia; Yuriy Kuleshov

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparison of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from ground-based global positioning system (GPS) receiver with traditional radiosonde measurement and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique for a five-year period (2008–2012) using Australian GPS stations. These stations were selectively chosen to provide a representative regional distribution of sites while ensuring conventional meteorological observations were available. Good agreement of PWV estimat...

  9. Indirect radiative forcing of aerosols via water vapor above non-precipitating maritime cumulus clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeffer, M.A; Kristjansson, J. E.; Stordal, F.; Berntsen, T.; J. Fast

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud-water vapor interactions in clean maritime air have been described for different aerosol sources using the WRF-Chem atmospheric model. The simulations were made over the Lesser Antilles in the region of the RICO measurement campaign where the clouds are low, patchy, typical trade-wind cumuli. In this very clean air, sea salt and DMS are found to have greater effects than anthropogenic pollution on the cloud droplets' effective radii and longwave and shortwave outgoing top of atm...

  10. Clouds, water vapor and the response of the extratropical jets to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.; Shaw, T.

    2015-12-01

    Climate models suggest that global warming will cause substantial changes of the mid-latitude circulation, including meridional shifts of the extratropical jets and storm tracks. The magnitude, and in some circumstances even the sign, of these shifts remains subject to large model uncertainties, however. In this talk I will report on recent work that demonstrates the importance of longwave radiative effects of clouds and water vapor for the jet position and its response to warming. To this end, I will apply a hierarchy of climate models ranging from CMIP5 models in realisitic setups to dry idealized general circulation models. I will show that cloud changes, in particular those of the tropics and mid-latitudes, and high-latitude water vapor changes push the jet towards the pole under global warming, whereas equatorial water vapor changes pull the jet towards the equator. These radiative impacts of clouds and water vapor on the jet are found to be consistent with our understanding of the response of the dry circulation to diabatic heating. I will also discuss the extent to which mid-latitude clouds are controlled by the jet. Finally, I will show that CMIP5 model spread in warming-induced jet shifts is correlated with model spread in regional changes of clouds and water vapor. These results provide evidence that part of the climate model uncertainty in projections of future jet shifts might result from uncertainty in how clouds and water vapor respond to global warming, and how they modify the longwave radiation inside the atmosphere.

  11. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  12. Comparison of atmospheric water vapour content with GNSS, Radiosonde, Microwave radiometer, and Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, D.; Park, K.

    2012-12-01

    The increased amount of saturated water vapor due to the Earth's temperature rise frequently causes abnormal meteorological phenomena such as local severe rainfall in Korea. The National Institute of Meteorological Research of Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) conducted observation experiments using a variety of water-vapor measuring equipments to improve the accuracy of weather forecasts and accurately measure the precipitable water vapor in the atmosphere. Equipments used were GNSS, water vapor radiometers (WVR), radiosonde, and LiDAR. For GNSS measurements we used two receivers that can collect not only GPS but also GLONASS signals: Trimble NetR5 and Septentrio PolaRx4. The two WVR makers are Raidometrics and RPG. For radiosonde observations, KMA launched Vaisala GPSondes every 6 hours during the experiment period. The LiDAR system was made locally by Hanbat University in Daejeon. Thus, we could obtain collocation experiment results from 6 different kinds of water vapor measurement and analyze the characteristics of each device.

  13. Condensation of Water Vapor on Waterproof Breathable Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小红; 王善元; 袁观洛

    2003-01-01

    Condensation occurs when the local vapor pressure rises above the saturation vapor pressure at the local temperature in theory. A new measuring apparatus were made to obtain temperature and relative humidity simultaneously for the purpose of investigating the mechanism of condensation occurred on the fabrics. The experiment conducted at the standard condition of temperature of 20°C and relative humidity of 65%. The result obtained from experiment showed that condensation could occur under the situation closed to saturation line as the temperature on fabric may be lower than dew point of water vapor in the measuring box depending on the experiment conducted at an ambient environment temperature of 20℃. The range of fabrics studied showed that PTFE laminated fabrics except nylon gingham PTFE laminated fabric facilitates the loss of water vapor and therefore prevent condensation. It is necessary to develop studies from a wide range of fabrics, especially breathable fabrics and under bad experiment condition in order to develop fabrics,which could eliminate condensation, or transport water vapor through the fabric while remaining waterproof.

  14. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds and Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Rush, Kurt; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultraviolet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground- based, upward-looking tests. RASL is an airborne Raman Lidar system designed to measure water vapor mixing ratio, and aerosol backscatter/extinction/depolarization. It also possesses the capability to make experimental measurements of cloud liquid water and carbon dioxide. It is being prepared for first flight tests during the summer of 2006. With the newly developed filters installed in RASL, measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction- to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1-minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. Downward-looking from an airborne RASL should possess the same measurement statistics with approximately a factor of 5 - 10 decrease in averaging time. A description of the technology improvements are provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  15. Continuation of the NVAP Global Water Vapor Data Sets for Pathfinder Science Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonderHaar, Thomas H.; Engelen, Richard J.; Forsythe, John M.; Randel, David L.; Ruston, Benjamin C.; Woo, Shannon; Dodge, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report covers August 2000 - August 2001 under NASA contract NASW-0032, entitled "Continuation of the NVAP (NASA's Water Vapor Project) Global Water Vapor Data Sets for Pathfinder Science Analysis". NASA has created a list of Earth Science Research Questions which are outlined by Asrar, et al. Particularly relevant to NVAP are the following questions: (a) How are global precipitation, evaporation, and the cycling of water changing? (b) What trends in atmospheric constituents and solar radiation are driving global climate? (c) How well can long-term climatic trends be assessed or predicted? Water vapor is a key greenhouse gas, and an understanding of its behavior is essential in global climate studies. Therefore, NVAP plays a key role in addressing the above climate questions by creating a long-term global water vapor dataset and by updating the dataset with recent advances in satellite instrumentation. The NVAP dataset produced from 1988-1998 has found wide use in the scientific community. Studies of interannual variability are particularly important. A recent paper by Simpson, et al. that examined the NVAP dataset in detail has shown that its relative accuracy is sufficient for the variability studies that contribute toward meeting NASA's goals. In the past year, we have made steady progress towards continuing production of this high-quality dataset as well as performing our own investigations of the data. This report summarizes the past year's work on production of the NVAP dataset and presents results of analyses we have performed in the past year.

  16. Geodesy by radio interferometry - Water vapor radiometry for estimation of the wet delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgered, G.; Davis, J. L.; Herring, T. A.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1991-01-01

    An important source of error in VLBI estimates of baseline length is unmodeled variations of the refractivity of the neutral atmosphere along the propagation path of the radio signals. This paper presents and discusses the method of using data from a water vapor radiomete (WVR) to correct for the propagation delay caused by atmospheric water vapor, the major cause of these variations. Data from different WVRs are compared with estimated propagation delays obtained by Kalman filtering of the VLBI data themselves. The consequences of using either WVR data or Kalman filtering to correct for atmospheric propagation delay at the Onsala VLBI site are investigated by studying the repeatability of estimated baseline lengths from Onsala to several other sites. The repeatability obtained for baseline length estimates shows that the methods of water vapor radiometry and Kalman filtering offer comparable accuracies when applied to VLBI observations obtained in the climate of the Swedish west coast. For the most frequently measured baseline in this study, the use of WVR data yielded a 13 percent smaller weighted-root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length estimates compared to the use of a Kalman filter. It is also clear that the 'best' minimum elevationi angle for VLBI observations depends on the accuracy of the determinations of the total propagation delay to be used, since the error in this delay increases with increasing air mass.

  17. Radiative Forcing at the Surface by Clouds, Aerosols, and Water Vapor Over Tropical Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, E.; Minnett, P.; Szczodrak, G.; Caniaux, G.; Voss, K.; Bourras, D.

    2007-12-01

    Data from recent campaigns conducted in the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans provide thorough testbeds for determining the contribution of clouds, aerosols, and water vapor to surface radiative forcing, with particular focus on areas of extreme SST gradients. Oceanographic cruises conducted during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis included sampling monsoon onset in the Gulf of Guinea, which was characterized nearshore by rain and haze, the latter being a combination of water vapor and continental and pollution aerosols. Offshore and nearer to the equatorial cold tongue, the ITCZ was the dominant northern hemisphere cloud feature, while drier, cooler air masses existed south of the equator. The R/V Ronald H. Brown, operating a north-south transect along 23 W, encountered both atmospheric tropical wave conditions as well as dry Saharan Air Layers. In the Indian Ocean, the N/O Le Suroit occupied a point station near a positive SST anomaly to observe the onset of convection associated with the MJO and strong diurnal warming signatures. Combining radiative and turbulent flux data with measured and modeled profiles of the marine and atmospheric boundary layer, the evolution and interaction of the total air-sea column is observed. Particular emphasis is placed on the radiative forcing of clouds, aerosols, and water vapor on the sea surface skin temperature, towards the improvement of current diurnal warming models, which simplify atmospheric radiative effects into a general cloud parameter.

  18. Geostationary Satellite Observation of Precipitable Water Vapor Using an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF based Reconstruction Technique over Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Sing Wong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor, as one of the most important greenhouse gases, is crucial for both climate and atmospheric studies. Considering the high spatial and temporal variations of water vapor, a timely and accurate retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV is urgently needed, but has long been constrained by data availability. Our study derived the vertically integrated precipitable water vapor over eastern China using Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT data, which is in geostationary orbit with high temporal resolution. The missing pixels caused by cloud contamination were reconstructed using an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF decomposition method over both spatial and temporal dimensions. GPS meteorology data were used to validate the retrieval and the reconstructed results. The diurnal variation of PWV over eastern China was analyzed using harmonic analysis, which indicates that the reconstructed PWV data can depict the diurnal cycle of PWV caused by evapotranspiration and local thermal circulation.

  19. NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds during WVIOP2000 and AFWEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; DiGirolamo, P.; Demoz, B. B.; Turner, D.; Comstock, J.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Southern Great Plains CART site from September - December, 2000 and participated in two field campaigns devoted to comparisons of various water vapor measurement technologies and calibrations. These campaigns were the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period 2000 (WVIOP2000) and the ARM FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX). WVIOP2000 was devoted to validating water vapor measurements in the lower atmosphere while AFWEX had similar goals but for measurements in the upper troposphere. The SRL was significantly upgraded both optically and electronically prior to these field campaigns. These upgrades enabled the SRL to demonstrate the highest resolution lidar measurements of water vapor ever acquired during the nighttime and the highest S/N Raman lidar measurements of water vapor in the daytime; more than a factor of 2 increase in S/N versus the DOE CARL Raman Lidar. Examples of these new measurement capabilities along with comparisons of SRL and CARL, LASE, MPI-DIAL, in-situ sensors, radiosonde, and others will be presented. The profile comparisons of the SRL and CARL have revealed what appears to be an overlap correction or countrate correction problem in CARL. This may be involved in an overall dry bias in the precipitable water calibration of CARL with respect to the MWR of approx. 4%. Preliminary analysis indicates that the application of a temperature dependent correction to the narrowband Raman lidar measurements of water vapor improves the lidar/Vaisala radiosonde comparisons of upper tropospheric water vapor. Other results including the comparison of the first-ever simultaneous measurements from four water vapor lidar systems, a bore-wave event captured at high resolution by the SRL and cirrus cloud optical depth studies using the SRL and CARL will be presented at the meeting.

  20. Venus cloud structure and water vapor abundance from Mariner 10 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the Venus atmosphere with the infrared radiometer on Mariner 10 have been analyzed by Taylor (1975) in terms of the vertical distribution of opacity at wavelengths near 11 microns and 45 microns in the thermal infrared. In this paper, we discuss models of the Venus atmosphere which are consistent with the inferred opacity structure. Either a two-layer cloud structure, or a single cloud deck overlaid by a layer containing approximately 40 precipitable microns of water vapor, would have the required limb-darkening characteristics at the wavelengths of observation.

  1. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  2. Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation at the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Characterizing water vapor and cloud effects on the surface radiation budget is critical for understanding the current climate because water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and clouds are one of the largest sources of uncertainty in predicting potential future climate change. Several studies have shown that insolation over land declined until 1990 then increased until the present. Using 8 years of data collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) surface site, we found that the insolation increased from 1997 to 2000, but significantly decreased from 2001 to 2004, changes that exactly mirror the variation in the second-order fit of cloud fraction. Under clear-sky conditions, the rates of water vapor, insolation and downwelling longwave (LW) flux are -0.166 cm/yr, 0.48 Wm(exp -2)/yr, and -1.16 Wm(exp -2)/yr, respectively, indicating that water vapor changes are more important for LW flux than for insolation.

  3. Advection-condensation of water vapor with coherent stirring: a stochastic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Yue-Kin; Vanneste, Jacques; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of atmospheric water is an essential ingredient of weather and climate. Water vapor, in particular, is an important greenhouse gas whose distribution has a strong impact on climate. To gain insight into the factors controlling the distribution of atmospheric moisture, we study an advection-condensation model in which water vapor is passively advected by a prescribed velocity and condensation acts as a sink that maintains the specific humidity below a prescribed, spatially dependent saturation value. The velocity consists of two parts: a single vortex representing large-scale coherent flow (e.g. the Hadley cell) and a white noise component mimicking small-scale turbulence. Steady-state is achieved in the presence of a moisture source at a boundary. We formulate this model as a set of stochastic differential equations. In the fast advection limit, analytical expression for the water vapor distribution is obtained by matched asymptotics. This allows us to make various predictions including the dependence of total precipitation on the vortex strength. These analytical results are verified by Monte Carlo simulations. This work is supported by the UK EPSRC Grant EP/I028072/1 and the Feasibility Fund from the UK EPSRC Network ReCoVER.

  4. Comparison of Columnar Water-Vapor Measurements from Solar Transmittance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Beat; Michalsky, J.; Slater, Donald W.; Barnard, James C.; Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Liljegren, James C.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philp B.

    2001-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program studied water vapor abundance measurement at its southern Great Plains site in the fall of 1997. The program used a large number of instruments, including four solar radiometers. By measuring solar transmittance in the 0.94 micrometer water apor absorption band, they were able to measure columnar water vapor (CWV). In the second round of comparison we used the same radiative transfer model, and the same line-by-line code (which includes recently corrected H2O spectroscopy) to retrieve CWV from all four solar radiometers, thus decreasing the mean CWV by 8 - 13 %. The model was not responsible for the 8 % spread in CWV which remained.

  5. The interaction of the theophylline metastable phase with water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvienko, A. A.; Boldyrev, V. V.; Sidel'Nikov, A. A.; Chizhik, S. A.

    2008-07-01

    The conditions of hydration of the stable and metastable theophylline phases were determined. Two-phase metastable phase/monohydrate and stable phase/monohydrate equilibrium pressures were measured at 25, 30, and 35°C. The metastable phase began to react with water vapor at lower relative humidities than the stable phase. Processes that occurred with the metastable and stable theophylline phases over various water pressure ranges were considered. The metastable phase exhibited an unusual behavior at 25°C and relative humidity 47%. At constant water vapor pressure and temperature, theophylline was initially hydrated and then lost water and again became anhydrous. Two consecutive processes occurred in the system, the formation of theophylline monohydrate from the metastable phase and its decomposition to the stable phase. The ratio between the rates of these processes determined the content of the monohydrate at the given time moment.

  6. The Effects of Water Vapor and Hydrogen on the High-Temperature Oxidation of Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, N; Jung, K; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Holcomb, G R; Howard, B H; Meier, G H

    2013-06-01

    Essentially all alloys and coatings that are resistant to corrosion at high temperature require the formation of a protective (slowly-growing and adherent) oxide layer by a process known as selective oxidation. The fundamental understanding of this process has been developed over the years for exposure in pure oxygen or air. However, the atmospheres in most applications contain significant amounts of water vapor which can greatly modify the behavior of protective oxides. The development of oxy-fuel combustion systems in which fossil fuels are burned in a mixture of recirculated flue gas and oxygen, rather than in air, has caused renewed interest in the effects of water vapor and steam on alloy oxidation. The focus of this paper is on the ways the presence of water vapor can directly alter the selective oxidation process. The paper begins with a brief review of the fundamentals of selective oxidation followed by a description of recent experimental results regarding the effect of water vapor on the oxidation of a variety of chromia-forming alloys (Fe- and Ni-base) in the temperature range 600 to 700 °C. The atmospheres include air, air-H{sub 2}O, Ar-H{sub 2}O and Ar-H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2}. Then the behavior of alumina-forming alloys in H{sub 2}O-containing atmospheres is briefly described. As hydrogen is produced during oxidation of alloys in H{sub 2}O, it can be released back into the gas phase or injected into the metal (where it can diffuse through to the other side). Experiments in which hydrogen concentrations have been measured on both sides of thin specimens during oxidation by H{sub 2}O on only one side are described. Finally, it is attempted to catalogue the various experimental observations under a few general principles.

  7. Tube transport of water vapor with condensation and desorption

    OpenAIRE

    Nordbo, Annika; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Siivola, Erkki.; Lehto, Roope; Vesala , Timo; Timonen, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation and delay of active tracers in tube transport is an important current problem, but its full explanation is still lacking. To this end a model is introduced, where part of a tracer undergoes condensation and evaporation, treated as a diffusion-type process, in addition to Taylor dispersion. Condensation of water was verified by high-speed imaging, and the model solution fitted the breakthrough curves of laboratory measurements with pulses of water vapor of varying relat...

  8. Effect of Atmospheric Ions on Interfacial Water

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Chang Kurt Kung; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of atmospheric positivity on the electrical properties of interfacial water was explored. Interfacial, or exclusion zone (EZ) water was created in the standard way, next to a sheet of Nafion placed horizontally at the bottom of a water-filled chamber. Positive atmospheric ions were created from a high voltage source placed above the chamber. Electrical potential distribution in the interfacial water was measured using microelectrodes. We found that beyond a threshold, the positive ...

  9. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  10. Water vapor toward starless cores: the Herschel view

    CERN Document Server

    Caselli, P; Pagani, L; Aikawa, Y; Yildiz, U A; van der Tak, F F S; Tafalla, M; Bergin, E A; Nisini, B; Codella, C; van Dishoeck, E F; Bachiller, R; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Benz, A O; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G A; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Bruderer, S; Cernicharo, J; Daniel, F; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Doty, S D; Encrenaz, P; Fich, M; Fuente, A; Gaier, T; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; de Graauw, Th; Helmich, F; Herczeg, G J; Herpin, F; Hogerheijde, M R; Jackson, B; Jacq, T; Javadi, H; Johnstone, D; Jorgensen, J K; Kester, D; Kristensen, L E; Laauwen, W; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Liseau, R; Luinge, W; Marseille, M; McCoey, C; Megej, A; Melnick, G; Neufeld, D; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Pearson, J C; Plume, R; Risacher, C; Santiago-Garcia, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; Siegel, P; van Kempen, T A; Visser, R; Wampfler, S F; Wyrowski, F

    2010-01-01

    SWAS and Odin provided stringent upper limits on the gas phase water abundance of dark clouds (x(H2O) 7000 AU and ~2x10^-10 toward the center. The radiative trans fer analysis shows that this is consistent with a x(o-H2O) profile peaking at ~10^-8, 0.1 pc away from the core center, where both freeze-out and photodissociation are negligible. Herschel has provided the first measurement of water vapor in dark regions. Prestellar cores such as L1544 (with their high central densities, strong continuum, and large envelopes) are very promising tools to finally shed light on the solid/vapor balance of water in molecular clouds.

  11. Alumina Volatility in Water Vapor at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2003-01-01

    The volatility of alumina in high temperature water vapor was determined by a weight loss technique. Sapphire coupons were exposed at temperatures between 1250 and 1500 C, water partial pressures between 0.15 and 0.68 atm in oxygen, total pressure of 1 atm, and flowing gas velocities of 4.4 cm/s. The pressure dependence of sapphire volatility was consistent with AI(OH)3(g) formation. The enthalpy of reaction to form Al(OH)3(g) from sapphire and water vapor was determined to be 210 +/- 20 kJ/mol, comparing favorably to other studies. Microstructural examination of tested sapphire coupons revealed surface etching features consistent with a volatilization process.

  12. Q Conversion Factor Models for Estimating Precipitable Water Vapor for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Ilke; Mekik, Cetin; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2015-04-01

    precipitable water vapor is the conversion factor Q which is shown in Emardson and Derks' studies and also Jade and Vijayan's. Developing a regional model using either Tm-Ts equation or the conversion factor Q will provide a basis for GNSS Meteorology in Turkey which depends on the analysis of the radiosonde profile data. For this purpose, the radiosonde profiles from Istanbul, Ankara, Diyarbaki r, Samsun, Erzurum, Izmir, Isparta and Adana stations are analyzed with the radiosonde analysis algorithm in the context of the 'The Estimation of Atmospheric Water Vapour with GPS' Project which is funded by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK). The Project is also in the COST Action ES1206: Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems tropospheric products for monitoring severe weather events and climate (GNSS4SWEC). In this study, regional models using the conversion factor Q are used for the determination of precipitable water vapor, and applied to the GNSS derived wet tropospheric zenith delays. Henceforth, the estimated precipitable water vapor and the precipitable water vapor obtained from the radiosonde station are compared. The average of the differences between RS and models for Istanbul and Ankara stations are obtained as 2.0±1.6 mm, 1.6±1.6 mm, respectively.

  13. Analysis of far-infrared spectral radiance observations of the water vapor continuum in the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) took place in Barrow, Alaska, in February and March 2007. During RHUBC, high resolution far-infrared spectra were measured simultaneously and independently by two different spectrometers – the Imperial College Tropospheric Airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TAFTS) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer – Extended Range (AERI-ER). Co-incidental far-infrared downwelling radiance measurements from the two instruments show good agreement within their overlapping wavenumber measurement range (400–550 cm−1). Radiance measurements taken using the TAFTS instrument are compared to the current Mlawer–Tobin–Clough–Kneizys–Davies (MT-CKD) version 2.5 water vapor continuum parameterization for the spectral range 350–500 cm−1 (20–29 μm). Simulated values agree with the TAFTS observations within uncertainties, enhancing confidence that MT-CKD 2.5 accurately represents the foreign-broadened water vapor continuum in this crucial spectral region. - Highlights: • Coincident far-infrared spectra measured by two independent radiometers compared. • TAFTS and AERI-ER instruments show good agreement within measurement range overlap. • A case study of far-infrared Arctic radiance measurements by the TAFTS instrument. • Simulated and observed radiances used to test the MT-CKD water vapor continuum model. • Measured TAFTS radiances show agreement with simulations and previous studies

  14. Modeling and measurement of boiling point elevation during water vaporization from aqueous urea for SCR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Ho Jin; Lee, Joon Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Understanding of water vaporization is the first step to anticipate the conversion process of urea into ammonia in the exhaust stream. As aqueous urea is a mixture and the urea in the mixture acts as a non-volatile solute, its colligative properties should be considered during water vaporization. The elevation of boiling point for urea water solution is measured with respect to urea mole fraction. With the boiling-point elevation relation, a model for water vaporization is proposed underlining the correction of the heat of vaporization of water in the urea water mixture due to the enthalpy of urea dissolution in water. The model is verified by the experiments of water vaporization as well. Finally, the water vaporization model is applied to the water vaporization of aqueous urea droplets. It is shown that urea decomposition can begin before water evaporation finishes due to the boiling-point elevation.

  15. Correction of water vapor absorption for aerosol remote sensing with ceilometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wiegner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years attention was increasingly paid to backscatter profiles of ceilometers as a new source of aerosol information. Several case studies have shown that – although originally intended for cloud detection only – ceilometers can provide the planetary boundary layer height and even quantitative information such as the aerosol backscatter coefficient βp, provided that the signals have been calibrated. It is expected that the retrieval of aerosol parameters will become widespread as the number of ceilometers is steadily increasing, and continuous and unattended operation is provided. In this context however one should be aware of the fact that the majority of ceilometers emit wavelengths that are influenced by atmospheric water vapor. As a consequence, profiles of aerosol parameters can only be retrieved if water vapor absorption is taken into account. In this paper we describe the influence of water vapor absorption on ceilometer signals at wavelengths in the range around λ = 910 nm. Spectrally high resolved absorption coefficients are calculated from HITRAN on the basis of realistic emission spectra of ceilometers. These results are used as reference to develop a methodology ("WAPL" for routine and near real time corrections of the water vapor influence. Comparison of WAPL with the reference demonstrates its very high accuracy. Extensive studies with simulations based on measurements reveal that the error when water vapor absorption is ignored in the βp retrieval can be in the order of 20 % for mid-latitudes and more than 50 % for the tropics. It is concluded that the emission spectrum of the laser source should be provided by the manufacturer to increase the accuracy of WAPL, and that 910 nm is better suited than 905 nm. With WAPL systematic errors can be avoided, that would exceed the inherent random errors of the Klett solutions by far.

  16. CHARM: A CubeSat Water Vapor Radiometer for Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Boon; Mauro, David; DeRosee, Rodolphe; Sorgenfrei, Matthew; Vance, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Ames Research Center (ARC) are partnering in the CubeSat Hydrometric Atmospheric Radiometer Mission (CHARM), a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform, selected for implementation under NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE-3). CHARM will measure 4 channels at 183 GHz water vapor line, subsets of measurements currently performed by larger and more costly spacecraft (e.g. ATMS, AMSU-B and SSMI/S). While flying a payload that supports SMD science objectives, CHARM provides a hands-on opportunity to develop technical, leadership, and project skills. CHARM will furthermore advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and the CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7.

  17. IR spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous silica aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Yu N; Petrova, T M; Solodov, A M; Solodov, A A

    2010-12-01

    The absorption spectrum of the water vapor, confined in the nanoporous silica aerogel, was measured within 5000-5600 cm(-1) with the IFS 125 HR Fourier spectrometer. It has been shown, that tight confinement of the molecules by the nanoporous size leads to the strong lines broadening and shift. For water vapor lines, the HWHM of confined molecules are on the average 23 times larger than those for free molecules. The shift values are in the range from -0.03 cm(-1) to 0.09 cm(-1). Some spectral lines have negative shift. The data on the half-widths and center shifts for some strongest H(2)O lines have been presented. PMID:21164954

  18. New progress of research on water cycle in atmosphere in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    New progresses are introduced briefly about the water cycle study on atmosphere of China made in recent years. The introduction includes eight aspects as follows: 1) precipitation characteristics, 2) stability of climatic system, 3) precipitation sensitive region, 4) regional evaporation and evapotranspiration, 5) water surface evaporation, 6) vegetation transpiration, 7) cloud physics, and 8) vapor source.

  19. High Spatial Resolution mapping of Precipitable Water Vapor using SAR interferograms, GPS observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    W. Tang; M. S. Liao; Zhang, L.; Li, W.; Yu, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    A high spatial resolution of the Precipitable Water Vapor (PW V) in the atmosphere is a key requirement for the short-scale weather forecasting and climate research. The aim of this work is to derive temporally-differenced maps of the spatial distribution of PWV by analyzing the atmospheric delay "noise" in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSA R). A time series maps of differential PW V were obtained by processing a set of ENVISAT ASAR images cover the...

  20. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  1. A feasibility study for the retrieval of the total column precipitable water vapor from satellite observations in the blue spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new algorithm for satellite retrievals of the atmospheric water vapor column in the blue spectral range. The water vapor absorption cross section in the blue spectral range is much weaker than in the red spectral range. Thus the detection limit and the uncertainty of individual observations is systematically larger than for retrievals at longer wavelengths. Nevertheless, water vapor retrievals in the blue spectral range have also several advantages: since the surface albedo in the blue spectral range is similar over land and ocean, water vapor retrievals are more consistent than for longer wavelengths. Compared to retrievals at longer wavelengths, over ocean the sensitivity for atmospheric layers close to the surface is higher due to the (typically 2 to 3 times higher ocean albedo in the blue. Water vapor retrievals in the blue spectral range are also possible for satellite sensors, which do not measure at longer wavelengths of the visible spectral range like the Ozone Monitoring instrument (OMI. We investigated details of the water vapor retrieval in the blue spectral range based on radiative transfer simulations and observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2 and OMI. It is demonstrated that it is possible to retrieve the atmospheric water vapor column density in the blue spectral range over most parts of the globe. The findings of our study are of importance also for future satellite missions like e.g. Sentinel 4 and 5.

  2. Rhodium catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalysts were prepared by depositing rhodium on porous polystyrene copolymer. The activity of the catalysts for the isotopic exchange reaction in the hydrogen-water vapor system was determined by the nearness of approach to isotopic equilibrium between the two reactants after passing through the column. A known quantity of catalyst was packed in a 1 cm diameter glass column to depth varying 2 to 5 cm. The degree of approach to isotopic equilibrium was as high as 60 to 100 %

  3. EDITORIAL: The global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Lennart

    2010-06-01

    the hydrological cycle in the ECHAM5 model J. Climate 19 3810-27 Hall A and Manabe S 1999 The role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed climate variability and global warming J. Climate 12 2327-46 Held I M and Soden B J 2006 Robust responses of the hydrological cycle to global warming J. Climate 19 5686-99 Juras J 1994 Some common features of probability distribution for precipitation Theor. Appl. Climatol. 49 69-76 Karl T R and Knight R W 1998 Secular trends of precipitation amount, frequency, and intensity in the United States Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 79 231-41 Kondratev K Ya 1972 Radiation Processes in the Atmosphere (Geneva: World Meteorological Organization) Omstedt A and Rutgersson A 2000 Closing the water cycle of the Baltic Sea Meteorol. Z. 9 57-66 Onogi K et al 2007 The JRA-25 reanalysis J. Meteorol. Soc. Japan 85 369-432 Oouchi K et al 2006 Tropical cyclone climatology in a global-warming climate as simulated in a 20 km-mesh global atmospheric model: frequency and wind intensity analysis J. Meteorol. Soc. Japan 84 259-76 Pierrehumbert R T, Brogniez H and Roca R 2007 On the relative humidity of the Earth's atmosphere The Global Circulation of the Atmosphere ed T Schneider and A H Sobel (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press) pp 143-85 Randell D A et al 2007 Climate models and their evaluation Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis ed S Solomon et al (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) pp 591-662 Raschke E et al 2001 The Baltic Sea Experiment (BALTEX): a european contribution to the investigation of the energy and water cycle over a large drainage basin Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 82 2389-413 Richter I and Xie S 2008 Muted precipitation increase in global warming simulations: a surface evaporation perspective J. Geophys. Res. 113 D24118 Roeckner E et al 2003 The atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5. Part I: Model description Report 349 Max Planck Institute for Meteorology 127 pp (available from MPI for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 53, 20146

  4. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on ferroaluminophosphate for desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of microporous ferroaluminophosphate adsorbent (FAM-Z01, Mitsubishi Plastics) are evaluated for possible application in adsorption desalination and cooling (AD) cycles. A particular interest is its water vapor uptake behavior at assorted adsorption temperatures and pressures whilst comparing them to the commercial silica gels of AD plants. The surface characteristics are first carried out using N2 gas adsorption followed by the water vapor uptake analysis for temperature ranging from 20°C to 80°C. We propose a hybrid isotherm model, composing of the Henry and the Sips isotherms, which can be integrated to satisfactorily fit the experimental data of water adsorption on the FAM-Z01. The hybrid model is selected to fit the unusual isotherm shapes, that is, a low adsorption in the initial section and followed by a rapid vapor uptake leading to a likely micropore volume filling by hydrogen bonding and cooperative interaction in micropores. It is shown that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FAM-Z01 can be up to 5 folds higher than that of conventional silica gels. Owing to the quantum increase in the adsorbate uptake, the FAM-Z01 has the potential to significantly reduce the footprint of an existing AD plant for the same output capacity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Temperature Dependency of Water Vapor Permeability of Shape Memory Polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yue-min; HU Jin-lian; YAN Hao-jing

    2002-01-01

    Solution-cast films of shape memory polyurethane have beea investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry,DMA, tensile test, water vapor permeability and the shape merry effect were carried out to characterize these polyurethane membranes. Samples cast at higher temperatures contained more hard segment in the crystalline state than a sample cast at lower temperature. The change in the water vapor permeability (WVP) of SMPU films with respect to the temperature follows an S- shaped curve, and increases abruptly at Tm of the soft segment for the fractional free volume (FFV, the ratio of free volume and specific volume in polymers) increased linearly with temperature. The water vapor permeability dependency of the temperature and humidity contribute to the result of the change of diffusion and solubility with the surrounding air condition. The diffusion coefficient (D)are the function of temperature and show good fit the Arrhenius form but show different parameter values when above and below Tg. The crystalline state hardsegment is necessary for the good shape memory effect.

  6. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.; Chen, Howard; Kopparapu, Ravi K.

    2015-11-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a moist greenhouse explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing inverse climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1D models.

  7. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3-D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a 'moist greenhouse' explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing 'inverse' climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1-D models.

  8. Liquid-vapor oscillations of water in hydrophobic nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Beckstein, O; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2003-01-01

    Water plays a key role in biological membrane transport. In ion channels and water-conducting pores (aquaporins), one dimensional confinement in conjunction with strong surface effects changes the physical behavior of water. In molecular dynamics simulations of water in short (0.8 nm) hydrophobic pores the water density in the pore fluctuates on a nanosecond time scale. In long simulations (460 ns in total) at pore radii ranging from 0.35 nm to 1.0 nm we quantify the kinetics of oscillations between a liquid-filled and a vapor-filled pore. This behavior can be explained as capillary evaporation alternating with capillary condensation, driven by pressure fluctuations in the water outside the pore. The free energy difference between the two states depends linearly on the radius. The free energy landscape shows how a metastable liquid state gradually develops with increasing radius. For radii larger than ca. 0.55 nm it becomes the globally stable state and the vapor state vanishes. One dimensional confinement af...

  9. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  10. Effect of Water Vapor, Temperature, and Rapid Annealing on Formamidinium Lead Triiodide Perovskite Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Wozny, Sarah; Alkurd, Nooraldeen R.; Yang, Mengjin; Kovarik, Libor; Holesinger, Terry G.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Zhu, Kai; Zhou, Weilie; Berry, Joseph J.

    2016-07-08

    Perovskite-based solar cells are one of the emerging candidates for radically lower cost photovoltaics. Herein, we report on the synthesis and crystallization of organic-inorganic formamidinium lead triiodide perovskite films under controlled atmospheric and environmental conditions. Using in situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy, we make observations of the crystallization process of these materials in nitrogen and oxygen gas with and without the presence of water vapor. Complementary planar samples were also fabricated in the presence of water vapor and characterized by in situ X-ray diffraction. Direct observations of the material structure and final morphology indicate that the exposure to water vapor results in a porous film that is metastable, regardless of the presence of argon, nitrogen, or oxygen. However, the optimal crystallization temperature of 175 degrees C is unperturbed across conditions. Rapid modulation about the annealing temperature of 175 degrees C in +/-25 degrees C steps (150-200 degrees C) promotes crystallization and significantly improves the film morphology by overcoming the presence of impregnated water trapped in the material. Following this processing protocol, we demonstrate substantial growth to micron-size grains via observation inside of an environmentally controlled transmission electron microscope. Adapting this insight from our in situ microscopy, we are able to provide an informed materials protocol to control the structure and morphology of these organic-inorganic semiconductors, which is readily applicable to benchtop device growth strategies.

  11. [The measurement of water vapor isotope based on mid-infrared difference frequency generation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu-Qing; Wang, Huan P; Cao, Zhen-Song; Yuan, Yi-Qian; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Gong, Zhi-Ben; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2009-12-01

    Stable-isotope ratio analysis of water is an important tool for geology, meteorology, and earth sciences. Measurements of water vapor isotopes are very helpful to explaining stratospheric aridity and related issues in atmospheric sciences. The absorption of water vapor near 2.7 microm is very strong so it is suitable for measuring high sensitivity spectra. Based on difference frequency generation and quasi-phase matching, by mixing an Nd : YAG laser with Ti : Sapphire tunable from 750 to 840 nm in a 50 mm long periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal, a widely tunable CW laser source was generated for the mid-infrared spectral range from 2.5 to 4 microm. We chose lambda = 20 microm for PPLN crystal, the generated laser was around 2.7 microm. This laser is widely tunable and of inherent narrow linewidth based on difference-frequency generation. Using this idler laser and 100 m multi-pass cell, and direct absorption the water vapor isotopes were measured in the laboratory air. The authors measured isotopes ratios and delta17O, delta18O and deltaD. The values were found to be in excellent agreement with the standard value for three individual lines. PMID:20210148

  12. Water vapor stable isotope observations from tropical Australia

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The response of the tropical hydrological cycle to anthropogenically induced changes in radiative forcing is one of the largest discrepancies between climate models. Paleoclimate archives of the stable isotopic composition of precipitation in the tropics indicate a relationship with precipitation amount that could be exploited to study past hydroclimate and improve our knowledge of how this region responds to changes in climate forcing. Recently modelling studies of convective parameterizations fitted with water isotopes and remote sensing of water vapor isotopes in the tropics have illustrated uncertainty in the assumed relationship with rainfall amount. Therefore there is a need to collect water isotope data in the tropics that can be used to evaluate these models and help identify the relationships between the isotopic composition of meteoric waters and rainfall intensity. However, data in this region is almost non-existent. Here we present in-situ water vapor isotopic measurements and the HDO retrievals from the co-located Total Column Carbon Observing Network (TCCON) site at Darwin in Tropical Australia. The Darwin site is interestingly placed within the tropical western pacific region and is impacted upon by a clear monsoonal climate, and key climate cycles including ENSO and Madden Julian Oscillations. The analysis of the data illustrated relationships between water vapor isotopes and humidity which demonstrated the role of precipitation processes in the wet season and air mass mixing during the dry season. Further the wet season observations show complex relationships between humidity and isotopes. A simple Rayleigh distillation model was not obeyed, instead the importance of rainfall re-evaporation in generating the highly depleted signatures was demonstrated. These data potentially provide a useful tool for evaluating model parameterizations in monsoonal regions as they demonstrate relationships with precipitation processes that cannot be observed with

  13. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  14. Kinetics of water vapor diffusion in activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmasheva, D. M.; Kapralov, P. O.; Travkin, V. D.; Artemov, V. G.; Tikhonov, V. I.; Volkov, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    We describe an experimental method for studying rapid processes of water vapor sorption by fine-dispersed and porous materials. The concentration of gas-phase water molecules is detected during adsorption by a laser-diode spectrometer. The kinetic pressure curves are recorded in a time window of 10-1 to 103 s and are analyzed using analogy of the diffusion flow with the electric current in a branched RC circuit. The proposed model establishes the relation between the kinetics curves being measured and the structural parameters of the medium.

  15. Modeling and Prediction of Soil Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Soil water vapor sorption isotherms describe the relationship between water activity (aw) and moisture content along adsorption and desorption paths. The isotherms are important for modeling numerous soil processes and are also used to estimate several soil (specific surface area, clay content...... wide range of soils; and (ii) develop and test regression models for estimating the isotherms from clay content. Preliminary results show reasonable fits of the majority of the investigated empirical and theoretical models to the measured data although some models were not capable to fit both sorption...

  16. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  17. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-boar...

  18. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explanation for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 W/sq m. The origin of this anomalous absorption is not yet known, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in these models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere. We found that the amount of sunlight absorbed by a cloudy atmosphere is inversely proportional to the solar zenith angle and the cloud top height, and directly proportional to the cloud optical depth and the water vapor concentration within the clouds. Atmospheres with saturated, optically-thick, low clouds absorbed about 12 W/sq m more than clear atmospheres. This accounts for about 1/2 to 1/3 of the anomalous ab- sorption. Atmospheres with optically thick middle and high clouds usually absorb less than clear atmospheres. Because water vapor is concentrated within and below the cloud tops, this absorber is most effective at small solar zenith angles. An additional absorber that is distributed at or above the cloud tops is needed to produce the amplitude and zenith angle dependence of the observed anomalous absorption.

  19. Water vapor, cloud, and surface rainfall budgets associated with the landfall of Typhoon Krosa (2007): A two-dimensional cloud-resolving modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Caijun; Shou, Shaowen; Li, Xiaofan

    2009-11-01

    Water vapor, cloud, and surface rainfall budgets associated with the landfall of Typhoon Krosa on 6-8 October 2007 are analyzed based on a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation. The model is integrated with imposed zonally-uniform vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal temperature, and vapor advection from NCEP/Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) data. The simulation data that are validated with observations are examined to study physical causes associated with surface rainfall processes during the landfall. The time- and domain-mean analysis shows that when Krosa approached the eastern coast of China on 6 October, the water vapor convergence over land caused a local atmospheric moistening and a net condensation that further produced surface rainfall and an increase of cloud hydrometeor concentration. Meanwhile, latent heating was balanced by advective cooling and a local atmospheric warming. One day later, the enhancement of net condensation led to an increase of surface rainfall and a local atmospheric drying, while the water vapor convergence weakened as a result of the landfall-induced deprivation of water vapor flux. At the same time, the latent heating is mainly compensated the advective cooling. Further weakening of vapor convergence on 8 October enhanced the local atmospheric drying while the net condensation and associated surface rainfall was maintained. The latent heating is balanced by advective cooling and a local atmospheric cooling.

  20. Water vapor and cloud water measurements over Darwin during the STEP 1987 tropical mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.; Chan, K. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, E.; Wilson, J. C.; Kley, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric cloud water plus water vapor (total water) and water vapor were made with two Lyman alpha hygrometers as part of the STEP tropical experiment. The in situ measurements were made in the Darwin, Australia, area in January and February of 1987 on an ER-2 aircraft. Average stratospheric water vapor at a potential temperature of 375 K (the average value of Theta at the tropopause) was 2.4 parts per million by volume (ppmv). This water mixing ratio is below the 3.0 to 4.0 ppmv necessary to be consistent with the observed upper stratospheric dryness. Saturation with respect to ice and the potential for dehydration was observed up to Theta = 402 K.

  1. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - Water Vapor Measurement, October, 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows atmospheric water vapor in Earth's upper troposphere, about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument flying aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. These data collected in early October 1997 indicate the presence of El Nino by showing a shift of humidity from west to east (blue and red areas) along the equatorial Pacific Ocean. El Nino is the term used when the warmest equatorial Pacific Ocean water is displaced toward the east. The areas of high atmospheric moisture correspond to areas of very warm ocean water. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air then rises, forming tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. The MLS instrument, developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, measures humidity at the top of these clouds, which are very moist. This rain is now occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean and has left Indonesia (deep blue region) unusually dry, resulting in the current drought in that region. This image also shows moisture moving north into Mexico, an effect of several hurricanes spawned by the warm waters of El Nino.

  2. Observation of Mountain Lee Waves with MODIS NIR Column Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapustin, A.; Alexander, M. J.; Ott, L.; Molod, A.; Holben, B.; Susskind, J.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Mountain lee waves have been previously observed in data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) "water vapor" 6.7 micrometers channel which has a typical peak sensitivity at 550 hPa in the free troposphere. This paper reports the first observation of mountain waves generated by the Appalachian Mountains in the MODIS total column water vapor (CWV) product derived from near-infrared (NIR) (0.94 micrometers) measurements, which indicate perturbations very close to the surface. The CWV waves are usually observed during spring and late fall or some summer days with low to moderate CWV (below is approx. 2 cm). The observed lee waves display wavelengths from3-4 to 15kmwith an amplitude of variation often comparable to is approx. 50-70% of the total CWV. Since the bulk of atmospheric water vapor is confined to the boundary layer, this indicates that the impact of thesewaves extends deep into the boundary layer, and these may be the lowest level signatures of mountain lee waves presently detected by remote sensing over the land.

  3. Fourier transform measurements of water vapor line parameters in the 4200-6600 cm-1 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New high-resolution water vapor absorption spectra were obtained at room temperature in the 4200-6600 cm-1 spectral region by combining Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) with single and multiple reflection cells. With absorption paths from 0.3 to 1800 m in pure and air diluted water vapor, accurate measurements of about 10400 lines in an intensity range from 10-29 to 10-19 cm/molecule have been performed. Positions, intensities, self- and air-broadening coefficients and air-induced shifts were determined for the H216O, H217O, H218O and HDO isotopologues. The rovibrational assignment of the observed lines was performed with the use of global variational predictions and allowed the identification of several new energy levels. One major contribution of this work consists of the identification of 3280 new weak lines. A very close agreement between the new measured parameters and those listed in the database is reported as well as between the observations and the most recent variational calculations for the positions and the intensities. The present parameters provide an extended and homogeneous data set for water vapor, which is shown to significantly improve the databases for atmospheric applications, especially in the transmission windows on both sides of the band centered at 5400 cm-1

  4. WATER VAPOR IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK OF DG Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Aresu, G. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Codella, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Florence (Italy); Cabrit, S. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Nisini, B. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Sandell, G. [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Rm. 146, P.O. Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Williams, J. P. [Institute for Astronomy (IfA), University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Testi, L. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Woitke, P. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-20

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are stored, was only reported in the nearby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para-water ground-state transitions at 557 and 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are {approx}19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H{sub 2}O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K and producing the observed bright water lines. The models suggest a disk mass of 0.015-0.1 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the estimated minimum mass of the solar nebula before planet formation, and a water reservoir of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} Earth oceans in vapor and {approx}100 times larger in the form of ice. Hence, this detection supports the scenario of ocean delivery on terrestrial planets by the impact of icy bodies forming in the outer disk.

  5. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  6. Analysis and forecast experiments incorporating satellite soundings and cloud and water vapor drift wind information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brian M.; Diak, George R.; Mills, Graham A.

    1986-01-01

    A system for assimilating conventional meteorological data and satellite-derived data in order to produce four-dimensional gridded data sets of the primary atmospheric variables used for updating limited area forecast models is described. The basic principles of a data assimilation scheme as proposed by Lorenc (1984) are discussed. The design of the system and its incremental assimilation cycles are schematically presented. The assimilation system was tested using radiosonde, buoy, VAS temperature, dew point, gradient wind data, cloud drift, and water vapor motion data. The rms vector errors for the data are analyzed.

  7. Correction Technique for Raman Water Vapor Lidar Signal-Dependent Bias and Suitability for Water Wapor Trend Monitoring in the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Cadirola, M.; Venable, D.; Calhoun, M.; Miloshevich, L; Vermeesch, K.; Twigg, L.; Dirisu, A.; Hurst, D.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Voemel, H.

    2012-01-01

    The MOHAVE-2009 campaign brought together diverse instrumentation for measuring atmospheric water vapor. We report on the participation of the ALVICE (Atmospheric Laboratory for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education) mobile laboratory in the MOHAVE-2009 campaign. In appendices we also report on the performance of the corrected Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements during the campaign, on a new radiosonde based calibration algorithm that reduces the influence of atmospheric variability on the derived calibration constant, and on other results of the ALVICE deployment. The MOHAVE-2009 campaign permitted the Raman lidar systems participating to discover and address measurement biases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The ALVICE lidar system was found to possess a wet bias which was attributed to fluorescence of insect material that was deposited on the telescope early in the mission. Other sources of wet biases are discussed and data from other Raman lidar systems are investigated, revealing that wet biases in upper tropospheric (UT) and lower stratospheric (LS) water vapor measurements appear to be quite common in Raman lidar systems. Lower stratospheric climatology of water vapor is investigated both as a means to check for the existence of these wet biases in Raman lidar data and as a source of correction for the bias. A correction technique is derived and applied to the ALVICE lidar water vapor profiles. Good agreement is found between corrected ALVICE lidar measurments and those of RS92, frost point hygrometer and total column water. The correction is offered as a general method to both quality control Raman water vapor lidar data and to correct those data that have signal-dependent bias. The influence of the correction is shown to be small at regions in the upper troposphere where recent work indicates detection of trends in atmospheric water vapor may be most robust. The correction shown here holds promise for permitting useful upper

  8. Perspective: Water cluster mediated atmospheric chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of water in atmospheric and environmental chemistry initiated recent studies with results documenting catalysis, suppression and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical reactions due to hydrogen bonding of reagents with water. Water, even one water molecule in binary complexes, has been shown by quantum chemistry to stabilize the transition state and lower its energy. However, new results underscore the need to evaluate the relative competing rates between reaction and dissipation to elucidate the role of water in chemistry. Water clusters have been used successfully as models for reactions in gas-phase, in aqueous condensed phases and at aqueous surfaces. Opportunities for experimental and theoretical chemical physics to make fundamental new discoveries abound. Work in this field is timely given the importance of water in atmospheric and environmental chemistry.

  9. Observed Land Impacts on Clouds, Water Vapor, and Rainfall at Continental Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Menglin; King, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    How do the continents affect large-scale hydrological cycles? How important can one continent be to the climate system? To address these questions, 4-years of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations, and the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) global precipitation analysis, were used to assess the land impacts on clouds, rainfall, and water vapor at continental scales. At these scales, the observations illustrate that continents are integrated regions that enhance the seasonality of atmospheric and surface hydrological parameters. Specifically, the continents of Eurasia and North America enhance the seasonality of cloud optical thickness, cirrus fraction, rainfall, and water vapor. Over land, both liquid water and ice cloud effective radii are smaller than over oceans primarily because land has more aerosol particles. In addition, different continents have similar impacts on hydrological variables in terms of seasonality, but differ in magnitude. For example, in winter, North America and Eurasia increase cloud optical thickness to 17.5 and 16, respectively, while in summer, Eurasia has much smaller cloud optical thicknesses than North America. Such different land impacts are determined by each continent s geographical condition, land cover, and land use. These new understandings help further address the land-ocean contrasts on global climate, help validate global climate model simulated land-atmosphere interactions, and help interpret climate change over land.

  10. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  11. ACA phase calibration scheme with the ALMA water vapor radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaki, Yoshiharu; Matsushita, Satoki; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Nikolic, Bojan

    2012-09-01

    In Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) commissioning and science verification we have conducted a series of experiments of a novel phase calibration scheme for Atacama Compact Array (ACA). In this scheme water vapor radiometers (WVRs) devoted to measurements of tropospheric water vapor content are attached to ACA’s four total-power array (TP Array) antennas surrounding the 7 m dish interferometer array (7 m Array). The excess path length (EPL) due to the water vapor variations aloft is fitted to a simple two-dimensional slope using WVR measurements. Interferometric phase fluctuations for each baseline of the 7 m Array are obtained from differences of EPL inferred from the two-dimensional slope and subtracted from the interferometric phases. In the experiments we used nine ALMA 12-m antennas. Eight of them were closely located in a 70-m square region, forming a compact array like ACA. We supposed the most four outsiders to be the TP Array while the inner 4 antennas were supposed to be the 7 m Array, so that this phase correction scheme (planar-fit) was tested and compared with the WVR phase correction. We estimated residual root-mean-square (RMS) phases for 17- to 41-m baselines after the planar-fit phase correction, and found that this scheme reduces the RMS phase to a 70 - 90 % level. The planar-fit phase correction was proved to be promising for ACA, and how high or low PWV this scheme effectively works in ACA is an important item to be clarified.

  12. Oxidation of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + 20v/0 SiC (HS), ZrB2 + 20v/0 SiC (ZS), and ZrB2 + 30v/0 C + 14v/0 SiC (ZCS) have been investigated for use as potential aeropropulsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90 percent) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 h at temperatures of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluated as a baseline for comparison. Weight change, X-ray diffraction analyses, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results are compared with tests ran in a stagnant air furnace at temperatures of 1327 C for 100 min, and with high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C at 6 atm for 50 h. Low velocity water vapor does not make a significant contribution to the oxidation rates of UHTCs when compared to stagnant air. The parabolic rate constants at 1300 C, range from 0.29 to 16.0 mg(sup 2)cm(sup 4)/h for HS and ZCS, respectively, with ZS results between these two values. Comparison of results for UHTCs tested in the furnace in 90 percent water vapor with HPBR results was difficult due to significant sample loss caused by spallation in the increased velocity of the HPBR. Total recession measurements are also reported for the two test environments.

  13. Radiolysis of water vapor in the presence of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An influence of a radiation and doze rate on radiolysis of water vapor at the presence of various cationic forms of aluminosilicate and borosilicate glasses are investigated. The various valency cations of Zr, Rb, P, Ce, Li and Cs were entered into aluminosilicate with mass percents from 3 up to 6. After warming-up of researched substances in ampoules they were filled by a twice-distilled water. Then the ampoules were gamma-irradiated thermostatically by 60Co source with dose rate 1,5-5,0 Gy/sec. The analysis of product of radiolysis was conducted by the gas-chromatographic method. The quantity and life time of electronic defects which are catalytically active centers of the water steam decomposition depend on a dose, temperature and dose rate. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  14. Titanium Dioxide Volatility in High Temperature Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, QynhGiao N.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) containing materials are of high interest to the aerospace industry due to its high temperature capability, strength, and light weight. As with most metals an exterior oxide layer naturally exists in environments that contain oxygen (i.e. air). At high temperatures, water vapor plays a key role in the volatility of materials including oxide surfaces. This study will evaluate cold pressed titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder pellets at a temperature range of 1400 C - 1200 C in water containing environments to determine the volatile hydroxyl species using the transpiration method. The water content ranged from 0-76 mole% and the oxygen content range was 0-100 mole % during the 20-250 hour exposure times. Preliminary results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor at these temperatures and the following reaction is the primary volatile equation for all three temperatures: TiO2 (s) + H2O (g) = TiO(OH)2 (g).

  15. Remote sensing evidence for regolith water vapor sources on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenin, R. L.; Clifford, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    McCord et al. (1977) have presented earth-based photometric imaging data of an event associated with the 1973 dust storm on Mars. The initial dust cloud in Solis Lacus and two regions to the north and south appeared anomalously bright at blue wavelengths. Water frosts, hazes, and/or clouds were identified, and it was suggested that the water responsible for these findings may have originated from Solis Lacus. More recently, a more intensive review of the observational record of Mars was undertaken. Earth-based telescope observations and data from the Mariner and Viking missions have revealed that Solis Lacus has been a center of repeated activity. Persistent activity in the vicinity of Noachis-Hellespontus and in the border regions of Syrtis Major was also discovered. A review of the observations is provided and possible interpretations are discussed. The obtained results appear to support the original proposal that Solis Lacus may be a source of water vapor. Noachis-Hellespontus seems to be a similar vapor source

  16. Carbon dioxide and water vapor high temperature electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Verostko, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The design, fabrication, breadboard testing, and the data base obtained for solid oxide electrolysis systems that have applications for planetary manned missions and habitats are reviewed. The breadboard tested contains sixteen tubular cells in a closely packed bundle for the electrolysis of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The discussion covers energy requirements, volume, weight, and operational characteristics related to the measurement of the reactant and product gas compositions, temperature distribution along the electrolyzer tubular cells and through the bundle, and thermal energy losses. The reliability of individual cell performance in the bundle configuration is assessed.

  17. Interactions of Water Vapor with Oxides at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Copland, Evan; Myers, Dwight

    2003-01-01

    Many volatile metal hydroxides form by reaction of the corresponding metal oxide with water vapor. These reactions are important in a number of high temperature corrosion processes. Experimental methods for studying the thermodynamics of metal hydroxides include: gas leak Knudsen cell mass spectrometry, free jet sampling mass spectrometry, transpiration and hydrogen-oxygen flame studies. The available experimental information is reviewed and the most stable metal hydroxide species are correlated with position in the periodic table. Current studies in our laboratory on the Si-O-H system are discussed.

  18. Mapping Water Vapor Bands using AIRS Measurements for NPOESS/NPP VIIRS Pre-launch End-to-End Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, J. J.; Hao, X.; Hauss, B.; Wang, C.; Xiong, J.

    2005-12-01

    NPOESS/NPP pre-launch end to end testing is very important for establishing the long-term high quality Environmental Data Records (EDRs). In our early studies, we have developed spatial and spectral mapping technology and demonstrated the AIRS-MODIS-VIIRS band mapping approaches successfully. In this paper, we will focus on VIIRS water vapor band mapping for proxy dataset generating based on our recently established proxy database which includes the AIRS simulated MODIS, AIRS simulated VIIRS and aggregated MODIS radiances/ brightness temperatures. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach by presenting results of the cross-comparison of water vapor band measurements from AIRS, MODIS and simulated VIIRS. We also investigate the dependence of the quality of water vapor band mapping as a function of the surface emissivity spectrum, phenomenology, and atmospheric conditions. The same approach can be used to map CrIS to VIIRS for post-launch calibration and validation. It is also valuable to keep the continuity between MODIS and VIIRS water vapor measurements. This approach can provide increased confidence in evaluating EDR retrieval algorithms performances. It also can be used to map 6.75 μm band using AIRS or CrIS measurements for water vapor algorithm testing.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Water Vapor in the Free Troposphere Investigated by Dial and Ftir Vertical Soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, H.; Sussmann, R.; Trickl, T.; Reichert, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the free tropospheric spatio-temporal variability of water vapor investigated by the analysis of a five-year period of water vapor vertical soundings above Mt. Zugspitze (2962 m a.s.l., Germany). Our results are obtained from a combination of measurements of vertically integrated water vapor (IWV), recorded with a solar Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer and of water vapor profiles recorded with the nearby differential absorption lidar (DIAL). The special geometrical arrangement of one zenith-viewing and one sun-pointing instrument and the temporal resolution of both optical instruments allow for an investigation of the spatio-temporal variability of IWV on a spatial scale of less than one kilometer and on a time scale of less than one hour. We investigated the short-term variability of both IWV and water vapor profiles from statistical analyses. The latter was also examined by case studies with a clear assignment to certain atmospheric processes as local convection or long-range transport. This study is described in great detail in our recent publication [1].

  20. Water cycle dynamic increases resilience of vegetation under higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, L. A.; Gentine, P.; Stéfanon, M.; Drobinski, P. J.; Fatichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Photosynthesis requires stomata to open to take up carbon dioxide. In the process water vapor is released as transpiration. As atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, for the same amount of CO2 uptake, less water vapor is transpired, translating into higher water use efficiency. Reduced water vapor losses will increase soil water storage if the leaf area coverage remains similar. This will in turn alter the surface energy partitioning: more heat will be dissipated as sensible heat flux, resulting in possibly higher surface temperatures. In contrast with this common hypothesis, our study shows that the water saved during the growing season by increased WUE can be mobilized by the vegetation and help reduce the maximum temperature of mid-latitude heat waves. The large scale meteorological conditions of 2003 are the basis of four regional model simulations coupling an atmospheric model to a surface model. We performed two simulations with respectively 2003 (CTL) and 2100 (FUT) atmospheric CO2 applied to both the atmospheric and surface models. A third (RAD) and a fourth (FER) simulations are run with 2100 CO2 concentration applied to respectively the atmospheric model only and the surface model only. RAD investigates the impact of the radiative forcing, and FER the response to vegetation CO2 fertilization. Our results show that the water saved through higher water use efficiency during the growing season enabled by higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations helps the vegetation to cope during severe heat and dryness conditions in the summer of mid-latitude climate. These results demonstrate that consideration of the vegetation carbon cycle is essential to model the seasonal water cycle dynamic and land-atmosphere interactions, and enhance the accuracy of the model outputs especially for extreme events. They also have important implications for the future of agriculture, water resources management, ecosystems

  1. Monitoring variations of dimethyl sulfide and dimethylsulfoniopropionate in seawater and the atmosphere based on sequential vapor generation and ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadomi, Satoshi; Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-04-20

    To monitor the fluctuations of dimethyl sulfur compounds at the seawater/atmosphere interface, an automated system was developed based on sequential injection analysis coupled with vapor generation-ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry (SIA-VG-IMRMS). Using this analytical system, dissolved dimethyl sulfide (DMSaq) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a precursor to DMS in seawater, were monitored together sequentially with atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMSg). A shift from the equilibrium point between DMSaq and DMSg results in the emission of DMS to the atmosphere. Atmospheric DMS emitted from seawater plays an important role as a source of cloud condensation nuclei, which influences the oceanic climate. Water samples were taken periodically and dissolved DMSaq was vaporized for analysis by IMRMS. After that, DMSP was hydrolyzed to DMS and acrylic acid, and analyzed in the same manner as DMSaq. The vaporization behavior and hydrolysis of DMSP to DMS were investigated to optimize these conditions. Frequent (every 30 min) determination of the three components, DMSaq/DMSP (nanomolar) and DMSg (ppbv), was carried out by SIA-VG-IMRMS. Field analysis of the dimethyl sulfur compounds was undertaken at a coastal station, which succeeded in showing detailed variations of the compounds in a natural setting. Observed concentrations of the dimethyl sulfur compounds both in the atmosphere and seawater largely changed with time and similar variations were repeatedly observed over several days, suggesting diurnal variations in the DMS flux at the seawater/atmosphere interface. PMID:27046734

  2. Atmospheric water balance over oceanic regions as estimated from satellite, merged, and reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Shin, Dong-Bin; Yoo, Jung-Moon

    2013-05-01

    The column integrated atmospheric water balance over the ocean was examined using satellite-based and merged data sets for the period from 2000 to 2005. The data sets for the components of the atmospheric water balance include evaporation from the HOAPS, GSSTF, and OAFlux and precipitation from the HOAPS, CMAP, and GPCP. The water vapor tendency was derived from water vapor data of HOAPS. The product for water vapor flux convergence estimated using satellite observation data was used. The atmospheric balance components from the MERRA reanalysis data were also examined. Residuals of the atmospheric water balance equation were estimated using nine possible combinations of the data sets over the ocean between 60°N and 60°S. The results showed that there was considerable disagreement in the residual intensities and distributions from the different combinations of the data sets. In particular, the residuals in the estimations of the satellite-based atmospheric budget appear to be large over the oceanic areas with heavy precipitation such as the intertropical convergence zone, South Pacific convergence zone, and monsoon regions. The lack of closure of the atmospheric water cycle may be attributed to the uncertainties in the data sets and approximations in the atmospheric water balance equation. Meanwhile, the anomalies of the residuals from the nine combinations of the data sets are in good agreement with their variability patterns. These results suggest that significant consideration is needed when applying the data sets of water budget components to quantitative water budget studies, while climate variability analysis based on the residuals may produce similar results.

  3. The Relative Importance of Random Error and Observation Frequency in Detecting Trends in Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Vermeesch, Kevin C.; Oman, Luke D.; Weatherhead, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent published work assessed the amount of time to detect trends in atmospheric water vapor over the coming century. We address the same question and conclude that under the most optimistic scenarios and assuming perfect data (i.e., observations with no measurement uncertainty) the time to detect trends will be at least 12 years at approximately 200 hPa in the upper troposphere. Our times to detect trends are therefore shorter than those recently reported and this difference is affected by data sources used, method of processing the data, geographic location and pressure level in the atmosphere where the analyses were performed. We then consider the question of how instrumental uncertainty plays into the assessment of time to detect trends. We conclude that due to the high natural variability in atmospheric water vapor, the amount of time to detect trends in the upper troposphere is relatively insensitive to instrumental random uncertainty and that it is much more important to increase the frequency of measurement than to decrease the random error in the measurement. This is put in the context of international networks such as the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN) and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) that are tasked with developing time series of climate quality water vapor data.

  4. Condensation of water vapor in rarefaction waves. I - Homogeneous nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation has been made of the condensation of water vapor/carrier gas mixtures in the nonstationary rarefaction wave generated in a shock tube. It is assumed that condensation takes place by homogeneous nucleation. The equations of motion together with the nucleation rate and the droplet growth equations were solved numerically by the method of characteristics and Lax's method of implicit artificial viscosity. It is found that, for the case considered, the condensation wave formed by the collapse of the metastable nonequilibrium state is followed by a shock wave generated by the intersection of characteristics of the same family. The expansion is practically isentropic up to the onset of condensation. The condensation front accelerates in the x,t plane. The results of the computations for a chosen case of water vapor/nitrogen mixture are presented by plotting variations of pressure, nucleation rate, number density of critical clusters, and condensate mass-fraction along three particle paths. Some consideration is given to homogeneous condensation experiments conducted in a shock tube. Although a direct comparison of the present theoretical work and these experiments is not possible, several worthwhile interpretative features have resulted nevertheless.

  5. Water vapor line parameters from 6450 to 9400 cm−1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of natural water vapor were recorded in the spectral range 6450–9400 cm−1 with a step-by-step Fourier transform spectrometer at room temperature with absorption path lengths up to 1200 m. Positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients of about 11,000 lines were determined. This paper focuses on the intensity parameters: the lines of four isotopologues H216O, H218O, H217O and HD16O were observed and assigned; it presents a new experimental dataset in the 6450–9400 cm−1 spectral range. Obtained results were compared to the literature data. Fifty-nine new and corrected energy levels of H216O and H217O were determined from the vibration–rotation analysis of the observed lines. A brief discussion is added for self-broadening coefficients at the end of this paper. - Highlights: • New water vapor spectra recorded by FT Spectroscopy from 6450 to 9400 cm-1. • Retrieval of line parameters by multispectrum fitting procedure at room temperature. • Comparison of the line intensity measurements with data found in the literature. • Preliminary study of measured self-broadening coefficients

  6. Estimate of the J'J'' dependence of water vapor line broadening parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of water line broadening coefficients on the 'good' quantum numbers - angular momentum and symmetry of the upper and lower levels - is analyzed for rotational quantum numbers up to J=50. Trends are investigated separately for P-, Q-, and R-branch transitions for the atmospherically important isotopologue of water. Results are presented which were obtained using two different methods: By averaging the broadening coefficients from HITRAN-2008 for small J values and also by averaging of data calculated using a semi-empirical method for higher J. The resulting air-broadening coefficients allow water vapor spectra with millions of weak lines to be calculated with an accuracy reasonable for many applications, for example estimation of sun radiation with low resolution. Sample results of calculations are presented.

  7. Water vapor in the protoplanetary disk of DG Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Podio, L; Codella, C; Cabrit, S; Nisini, B; Dougados, C; Sandell, G; Williams, J P; Testi, L; Thi, W -F; Woitke, P; Meijerink, R; Spaans, M; Aresu, G; Menard, F; Pinte, C

    2013-01-01

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most of water ice reservoir is stored, was only reported in the closeby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para- water ground-state transitions at 557, 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are ~19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H2O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K...

  8. Water Vapor in the Spectrum of the Extrasolar Planet HD 189733b: 1. the Transit

    CERN Document Server

    McCullough, P R; Deming, D; Madhusudhan, N

    2014-01-01

    We report near-infrared spectroscopy of the gas giant planet HD 189733b in transit. We used the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST WFC3) with its G141 grism covering 1.1 um to 1.7 um and spatially scanned the image across the detector at 2\\arcsec$s^{-1}$. When smoothed to 75 nm bins, the local maxima of the transit depths in the 1.15 um and 1.4 um water vapor features respectively are 83+/-53 ppm and 200+/-47 ppm greater than the local minimum at 1.3 um. We compare the WFC3 spectrum with the composite transit spectrum of HD 189733b assembled by Pont et al. (2013), extending from 0.3 um to 24 um. Although the water vapor features in the WFC3 spectrum are compatible with the model of non-absorbing, Rayleigh-scattering dust in the planetary atmosphere (Pont et al. 2013), we also re-interpret the available data with a clear planetary atmosphere. In the latter interpretation, the slope of increasing transit depth with shorter wavelengths from the near infrared, through the visible and into the ultravi...

  9. Analysis of the distribution of precipitable water vapor in the Chajnantor area

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Fernando; Bustos, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present results from a long-term precipitable water vapor (PWV) study in the Chajnantor area, in northern Chile. Data from several instruments located at relevant sites for sub-millimeter and mid-infrared astronomy were processed to obtain relations between the atmospheric conditions among the sites. The data used for this study can be considered the richest dataset to date, because of the geographical sampling of the region, including sites at different altitudes, a time span from 2005 to 2014, and the different techniques and instruments used for the measurements. We validate a method to convert atmospheric opacity from 350 $\\mu$m tipper radiometers to PWV. An average of 0.68 PWV ratio between Cerro Chajnantor and Llano of Chajnantor was found.

  10. Measuring temperature-dependent water vapor and gas permeation through high barrier films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new test device for temperature-dependent permeation measurement, existing of a mass spectrometer and sample holders inside a climatic chamber was developed. The front face of a sample is loaded with the atmosphere in the cabinet or a test gas mixture, respectively. The permeated species are accumulated in a cell behind the sample. The increasing partial pressures of the permeants are measured by the mass spectrometer and than transferred into a transmission rate. The time-lag technique enables the determination of the diffusion coefficient. Results are given for atmospheric components as O2, N2, and water vapor permeated through different barrier films and laminates at temperatures from 23 to 80 deg. C. The limits of the detection of the transmission rates are in the range of 10-6 g/m2 d.

  11. Vaporization Rate Analysis of Primary Cooling Water from Reactor PUSPATI TRIGA (RTP) Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary cooling system consists of pumps, heat exchangers, probes, a nitrogen-16 diffuser and associated valves is connected to the reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) tank by aluminium pipes. Both the primary cooling system and the reactor tank is filled with demineralized light water (H2O), which serves as a coolant, moderator as well as shielding. During reactor operation, vaporization in the reactor tank will reduce the primary water and contribute to the formation of vapor in the reactor hall. The vaporization may influence the function of the water subsequently may affect the safety of the reactor operation. It is essential to know the vaporization rate of the primary water to ensure its functionality. This paper will present the vaporization rate of the primary cooling water from the reactor tank and the influence of temperature of the water in the reactor tank to the vaporization rate. (author)

  12. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Water vapor in the spectrum of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b. I. The transit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report near-infrared spectroscopy of the gas giant planet HD 189733b in transit. We used the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST WFC3) with its G141 grism covering 1.1 μm to 1.7 μm and spatially scanned the image across the detector at 2'' s–1. When smoothed to 75 nm bins, the local maxima of the transit depths in the 1.15 μm and 1.4 μm water vapor features are, respectively, 83 ± 53 ppm and 200 ± 47 ppm greater than the local minimum at 1.3 μm. We compare the WFC3 spectrum with the composite transit spectrum of HD 189733b assembled by Pont et al., extending from 0.3 μm to 24 μm. Although the water vapor features in the WFC3 spectrum are compatible with the model of non-absorbing, Rayleigh-scattering dust in the planetary atmosphere, we also re-interpret the available data with a clear planetary atmosphere. In the latter interpretation, the slope of increasing transit depth with shorter wavelengths from the near infrared, through the visible, and into the ultraviolet is caused by unocculted star spots, with a smaller contribution of Rayleigh scattering by molecular hydrogen in the planet's atmosphere. At relevant pressures along the terminator, our model planetary atmosphere's temperature is ∼700 K, which is below the condensation temperatures of sodium- and potassium-bearing molecules, causing the broad wings of the spectral lines of Na I and K I at 0.589 μm and 0.769 μm to be weak.

  14. Airborne Observations of Urban-Derived Water Vapor and Potential Impacts on Chemistry and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, O. E.; Shepson, P. B.; Grundman, R. M., II; Stirm, B. H.; Ren, X.; Dickerson, R. R.; Fuentes, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric conditions typical of wintertime, such as lower boundary layer heights and reduced turbulent mixing, provide a unique environment for anthropogenic pollutants to accumulate and react. Wintertime enhancements in water vapor (H2O) have been observed in urban areas, and are thought to result from fossil fuel combustion and urban heat island-induced evaporation. The contribution of urban-derived water vapor to the atmosphere has the potential to locally influence atmospheric chemistry and weather for the urban area and surrounding region due to interactions between H2O and other chemical species, aerosols, and clouds. Airborne observations of urban-derived H2O, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone, and aerosols were conducted from Purdue University's Airborne Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (ALAR) and the University of Maryland's (UMD) Twin Cessna research aircraft during the winter of 2015. Measurements were conducted as part of the collaborative airborne campaign, Wintertime INvestigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity (WINTER), which investigated seasonal trends in anthropogenic emissions and reactivity in the Northeastern United States. ALAR and the UMD aircraft participated in mass balance experiments around Washington D.C.-Baltimore to determine total city emission rates of H2O and other greenhouse gases. Average enhancements in H2O mixing ratio of 0.048%, and up to 0.13%, were observed downwind of the urban centers on ten research flights. In some cases, downwind H2O concentrations clearly track CO2 and NO2 enhancements, suggesting a strong combustion signal. Analysis of Purdue and UMD data collected during the WINTER campaign shows an average urban-derived H2O contribution of 5.3%, and as much as 13%, to the local boundary layer from ten research flights flown in February and March of 2015. In this paper, we discuss the potential chemical and physical implications of these results.

  15. Remote sensing of atmospheric water content from Bhaskara SAMIR data. [using statistical linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, B. S.; Hariharan, T. A.; Sharma, A. K.; Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    The 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz passive microwave radiometers (SAMIR) on board the Indian satellite Bhaskara have provided very useful data. From these data has been demonstrated the feasibility of deriving atmospheric and ocean surface parameters such as water vapor content, liquid water content, rainfall rate and ocean surface winds. Different approaches have been tried for deriving the atmospheric water content. The statistical and empirical methods have been used by others for the analysis of the Nimbus data. A simulation technique has been attempted for the first time for 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz radiometer data. The results obtained from three different methods are compared with radiosonde data. A case study of a tropical depression has been undertaken to demonstrate the capability of Bhaskara SAMIR data to show the variation of total water vapor and liquid water contents.

  16. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirström, E. S.; Persson, C. M. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Mailstop 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States); Buckle, J. V. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Takakuwa, S., E-mail: eva.wirstrom@chalmers.se [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-20

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (∼10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H{sub 2}O (J = 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01}) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  17. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Wirström, E S; Persson, C M; Buckle, J V; Cordiner, M A; Takakuwa, S

    2014-01-01

    After more than 30 years of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds, however, there is only one region where cold (~10 K) water vapor has been detected - L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work -- likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 1_10 - 1_01) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  18. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (∼10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal

  19. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Persson, C. M.; Buckle, J. V.; Cordiner, M. A.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold ((is) approximately 10 K) water vapor has been detected-L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work-likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  20. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratoy, Boulder, CO (United States); Rye, B.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  1. Surface Reaction of TiAl with Water Vapor and Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yexin CHEN; Xiaojing WAN; Weixin XU

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of water vapor and oxygen with TiAl-based alloy has been studied with Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that both surface reactions initiate at a very short exposure water vapor reacts firstly with Al, and then reacts with Ti after certain exposure. The surface reaction of Al with water vapor may be responsible for the environmental embrittlement at room temperature in TiAl-based alloy.

  2. First-time lidar measurement of water vapor flux in a volcanic plume

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorani, L.; Colao, F.; A. PALUCCI; Poreh, D.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.

    2011-01-01

    The CO2 laser-based lidar ATLAS has been used to study the Stromboli volcano plume. ATLAS measured water vapor concentration in cross-sections of the plume and wind speed at the crater. Water vapor concentration and wind speed were retrieved by differential absorption lidar and correlation technique, respectively. Lidar returns were obtained up to a range of 3 km. The spatial resolution was 15 mand the temporal resolution was 20 s. By combining these measurements, the water vapor ...

  3. Spatiotemporal variability of water vapor investigated using lidar and FTIR vertical soundings above the Zugspitze

    OpenAIRE

    H. Vogelmann; R. Sussmann; T. Trickl; A. Reichert

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas and its spatiotemporal variability strongly exceeds that of all other greenhouse gases. However, this variability has hardly been studied quantitatively so far. We present an analysis of a 5-year period of water vapor measurements in the free troposphere above the Zugspitze (2962 m a.s.l., Germany). Our results are obtained from a combination of measurements of vertically integrated water vapor (IWV), recorded with a solar Fou...

  4. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment. PMID:26368414

  5. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionizataion and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry for explosives vapor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Glish, G.L.; Grant, B.C.; Chambers, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    The detection and identification of trace vapors of hidden high explosives is an excellent example of a targeted analysis problem. It is desirable to push to ever lower levels the quantity or concentration of explosives material that provides an analytical signal, while at the same time discriminating against all other uninteresting material. The detection system must therefore combine high sensitivity with high specificity. This report describes the philosophy behind the use of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, which is a sensitive, rugged, and convenient means for forming anions from explosives molecules, with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides unparalleled specificity in the identification of explosives-related ions. Forms of tandem mass spectrometry are compared and contrasted to provide a summary of the characteristics to be expected from an explosives detector employing mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The instrument developed for the FAA, an atmospheric sampling glow discharge/triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, is described in detail with particular emphasis on the ion source/spectrometer interface and on the capabilities of the spectrometer. Performance characteristics of the system are also described as they pertain to explosives of interest including a description of an automated procedure for the detection and identification of specific explosives. A comparison of various tandem mass spectrometers mated with atmospheric sampling glow discharge is then described and preliminary studies with a vapor preconcentration system provided by the FAA will be described.

  6. Comparison of ground-based and Viking Orbiter measurements of Martian water vapor - Variability of the seasonal cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Barker, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    Earth-based observations of Mars atmospheric water vapor are presented for the 1975-1976, 1977-1978, and 1983 apparitions. Comparisons are made with near-simultaneous spacecraft measurements made from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detection experiment during 1976-1978 and with previous earth-based measurements. Differences occur between the behavior in the different years, and may be related to the Mars climate. Measurements during the southern summer in 1969 indicate a factor of three times as much water as is present at this same season in other years. This difference may have resulted from the sublimation of water from the south polar residual cap upon removal of most or all of the CO2 ice present; sublimation of all of the CO2 ice during some years could be a result of a greater thermal load being placed on the cap due to the presence of differing amounts of atmospheric dust.

  7. Analysis of the retention of water vapor on silica gel; Analisis de la retencion del vapor de agua en silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, M.; Pinilla, J. L.; Alegria, N.; Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2011-07-01

    Among the various sampling systems tritium content in the atmosphere as water vapor, one of the most basic and, therefore, of widespread use in the environmental field, is the retention on silica gel. However, the behavior of the collection efficiency of silica gel under varying conditions of air temperature and relative humidity makes it difficult to define the amount of this necessary for proper completion of sampling, especially in situations of prolonged sampling. This paper presents partial results obtained in a study on the analysis of these efficiencies under normal conditions of sampling. (Author)

  8. Remote sensing of water vapor in the near IR from EOS/MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the selection of spectral channels in the near-infrared IR which are to be employed for the derivation of total column water vapor using the MODIS instrument on the NASA's Earth Observing System. Data obtained show that the three near-IR water vapor channels on the MODIS instrument enable remote sensing of the total column water vapor with an absolute accuracy of +/- 13 percent. An absolute accuracy of +/-7 percent can be obtained if additional MODIS channels are used to decrease the effect of uncertainty in the spectral reflectance of the surface, subpixel clouds, haze, and temperature profile on the derived water vapor.

  9. Inclusion of high resolution MODIS maps on a 3D tropospheric water vapor GPS tomography model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Pedro; Catalao, Joao; Nico, Giovanni; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Observing the water vapor distribution on the troposphere remains a challenge for the weather forecast. Radiosondes provide precise water vapor profiles of the troposphere, but lack geographical and temporal coverage, while satellite meteorological maps have good spatial resolution but even poorer temporal resolution. GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapor in all weather conditions with high temporal sampling frequency. However these measurements lack a vertical water vapor discretization. Reconstruction of the slant path GPS observation to the satellite allows oblique water vapor measurements. Implementation of a 3D grid of voxels along the troposphere over an area where GPS stations are available enables the observation ray tracing. A relation between the water vapor density and the distanced traveled inside the voxels is established, defining GPS tomography. An inverse problem formulation is needed to obtain a water vapor solution. The combination of precipitable water vapor (PWV) maps obtained from MODIS satellite data with the GPS tomography is performed in this work. The MODIS PWV maps can have 1 or 5 km pixel resolution, being obtained 2 times per day in the same location at most. The inclusion of MODIS PWV maps provides an enhanced horizontal resolution for the tomographic solution and benefits the stability of the inversion problem. A 3D tomographic grid was adjusted over a regional area covering Lisbon, Portugal, where a GNSS network of 9 receivers is available. Radiosonde measurements in the area are used to evaluate the 3D water vapor tomography maps.

  10. Regularities of ignition in the system of carborane-4-water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on kinetics of condensed phase formation in carboran-argon and carborane-water vapor-argon systems at 920-1020 K temperature, and 0.1 mPa pressure. It was revealed, that carborane pyrolysis products were subjected to oxidation by water vapor, and carborant itself didn't react with water vapor. Correlation of time characteristics of carborane pyrolysis and ignition in carborane-water vapor system in 900-1600 K range was conducted. It is shown that at T> 1000 K the ignition takes place at the stage of carborane pyrolysis, and at T<1000 K -after its termination

  11. On the characteristics of water vapor transport from atmosphere boundary layer to stratosphere over Tibetan Plateau regions in summer%夏季青藏高原地区近地层水汽进入平流层的特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斌; 徐祥德; 杨帅; 卞建春

    2012-01-01

    Identification of the main mechanism of water vapor transportation from atmosphere surface layer into stratosphere over Asian monsoon region, especially for the region of Tibetan Plateau (TP), plays a significant role in understanding the global climate change and globalenvironment. In order to investigate the possible mechanism of water vapor transportation from the surface layer to upper troposphere and stratosphere, we used the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART driven by the hourly output generated by the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model for the period from 20 to 26 August, 2006. Based on the three-dimensional trajectories backward tracing analysis and their changes in temperature, humidity and other physical variables, our results show that small-scale convection lift and the large-scale transportation are the two main factors responsible for the water vapor entry from surface layer to stratosphere. Air parcels from the surface layer could be lifted up to 9~12 km height via active convention within 24 hours, and then passed through the tropopause in the Tibetan Plateau southeast, which was driven by the large scale advection associated with the south Asian anticyclone circulation. Most air parcels could further transport to lower latitudes and impact the global troposphere-stratosphere water vapor budget. Air parcels on the cloud top height were largely located over the northwest of TP, whereas their locations of Laglangrian minimum temperature, I. E. , where the air parcels dehydration happened, were mostly located in the south of TP. The potential temperature difference between these two regions is about 15 ~ 35 K, implying a significant dehydration processes for all air parcels. This result indicates that that the mechanism of water vapor transportation from atmosphere surface layer to stratosphere over Tibetan Plateau regions in summer is potentially controlled by large scale circulation associated with southern Asian monsoon, while

  12. Simulations of the effects of water vapor, cloud liquid water, and ice on AMSU moisture channel brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bradley M.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Xiang, Xuwu

    1994-01-01

    Radiative transfer simulations are performed to determine how water vapor and nonprecipitating cloud liquid water and ice particles within typical midlatitude atmospheres affect brightness temperatures T(sub B)'s of moisture sounding channels used in the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and AMSU-like instruments. The purpose is to promote a general understanding of passive top-of-atmosphere T(sub B)'s for window frequencies at 23.8, 89.0, and 157.0 GHz, and water vapor frequencies at 176.31, 180.31, and 182.31 GHz by documenting specific examples. This is accomplished through detailed analyses of T(sub B)'s for idealized atmospheres, mostly representing temperate conditions over land. Cloud effects are considered in terms of five basic properties: droplet size distribution, phase, liquid or ice water content, altitude, and thickness. Effects on T(sub B) of changing surface emissivity also are addressed. The brightness temperature contribution functions are presented as an aid to physically interpreting AMSU T(sub B)'s. Both liquid and ice clouds impact the T(sub B)'s in a variety of ways. The T(sub B)'s at 23.8 and 89 GHz are more strongly affected by altostratus liquid clouds than by cirrus clouds for equivalent water paths. In contrast, channels near 157 and 183 GHz are more strongly affected by ice clouds. Higher clouds have a greater impact on 157- and 183-GHz T(sub B)'s than do lower clouds. Clouds depress T(sub B)'s of the higher-frequency channels by suppressing, but not necessarily obscuring, radiance contributions from below. Thus, T(sub B)'s are less closely associated with cloud-top temperatures than are IR radiometric temperatures. Water vapor alone accounts for up to 89% of the total attenuation by a midtropospheric liquid cloud for channels near 183 GHz. The Rayleigh approximation is found to be adequate for typical droplet size distributions; however, Mie scattering effects from liquid droplets become important for droplet size distribution

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe—reactor design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Peter V.; Kee, Robert J.; Raja, Laxminarayan; Wolden, Colin A.; Aire, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of polycrystalline thin-film CdTe appears to offer several practical advantages over state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques. APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry utilized to produce 16% efficient CdTe cells (i.e., same reaction chemistry as Close Spaced Sublimation), avoids use of vacuum equipment, allows for physical separation of the source and substrate, and employs forced convection to ensure uniform delivery of source material over large-area substrates. Reactor design considerations and preliminary numerical simulations of mass transport are presented.

  14. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  16. Biophysical controls on carbon and water vapor fluxes across a grassland climatic gradient in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagle, Pradeep; Xiao, Xiangming; Scott, Russell L.; Kolb, Thomas E.; Cook, David R.; Brunsell, Nathaniel; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Basara, Jeffrey; Matamala, Roser; Zhou, Yuting; Bajgain, Rajen

    2015-12-01

    Understanding of the underlying causes of spatial variation in exchange of carbon and water vapor fluxes between grasslands and the atmosphere is crucial for accurate estimates of regional and global carbon and water budgets, and for predicting the impact of climate change on biosphere–atmosphere feedbacks of grasslands. We used ground-based eddy flux and meteorological data, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from 12 grasslands across the United States to examine the spatial variability in carbon and water vapor fluxes and to evaluate the biophysical controls on the spatial patterns of fluxes. Precipitation was strongly associated with spatial and temporal variability in carbon and water vapor fluxes and vegetation productivity. Grasslands with annual average precipitation <600 mm generally had neutral annual carbon balance or emitted small amount of carbon to the atmosphere. Despite strong coupling between gross primary production (GPP)and evapotranspiration (ET) across study sites, GPP showed larger spatial variation than ET, and EVI had a greater effect on GPP than on ET. Consequently, large spatial variation in ecosystem water use efficiency (EWUE = annual GPP/ET; varying from 0.67 ± 0.55 to 2.52 ± 0.52 g C mm⁻¹ET) was observed. Greater reduction in GPP than ET at high air temperature and vapor pressure deficit caused a reduction in EWUE in dry years, indicating a response which is opposite than what has been reported for forests. Our results show that spatial and temporal variations in ecosystem carbon uptake, ET, and water use efficiency of grasslands were strongly associated with canopy greenness and coverage, as indicated by EVI.

  17. Shortwave heating response to water vapor as a significant source of uncertainty in global hydrological sensitivity in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, A. M.; Qu, X.; Hall, A. D.; Klein, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrological cycle is expected to undergo substantial changes in response to global warming, with all climate models predicting an increase in global-mean precipitation. There is considerable spread among models, however, in the projected increase of global-mean precipitation, even when normalized by surface temperature change. In an attempt to develop a better physical understanding of the causes of this intermodel spread, we investigate the rapid and temperature-mediated responses of global-mean precipitation to CO2 forcing in an ensemble of CMIP5 models by applying regression analysis to pre-industrial and abrupt quadrupled CO2 simulations, and focus on the atmospheric radiative terms that balance global precipitation. The intermodel spread in the temperature-mediated component, which dominates the spread in total hydrological sensitivity, is highly correlated with the spread in temperature-mediated clear-sky shortwave (SW) atmospheric heating among models. Upon further analysis of the sources of intermodel variability in SW heating, we find that increases of upper atmosphere and (to a lesser extent) total column water vapor in response to 1K surface warming only partly explain intermodel differences in the SW response. Instead, most of the spread in the SW heating term is explained by intermodel differences in the sensitivity of SW absorption to fixed changes in column water vapor. This suggests that differences in SW radiative transfer codes among models are the dominant source of variability in the response of atmospheric SW heating to warming. Better understanding of the SW heating sensitivity to water vapor in climate models appears to be critical for reducing uncertainty in the global hydrological response to future warming. Current work entails analysis of observations to potentially constrain the intermodel spread in SW sensitivity to water vapor, as well as more detailed investigation of the radiative transfer schemes in different models and how

  18. Clouds and Water Vapor in the Climate System and Radiative Transfer in Clear Air and Cirrus Clouds in the Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.; DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Strow, L. Larrabee

    2002-01-01

    Research supported under this grant was aimed at attacking unanswered scientific questions that lie at the intersection of radiation, dynamics, chemistry, and climate. Considerable emphasis was placed on scientific collaboration and the innovative development of instruments required to address these issues. Specific questions include water vapor distribution in the tropical troposphere, atmospheric radiation, thin cirrus clouds, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and correlative science with satellite observations.

  19. How closely do changes in surface and column water vapor follow Clausius-Clapeyron scaling in climate change simulations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors governing the rate of change in the amount of atmospheric water vapor are analyzed in simulations of climate change. The global-mean amount of water vapor is estimated to increase at a differential rate of 7.3% K-1 with respect to global-mean surface air temperature in the multi-model mean. Larger rates of change result if the fractional change is evaluated over a finite change in temperature (e.g., 8.2% K-1 for a 3 K warming), and rates of change of zonal-mean column water vapor range from 6 to 12% K-1 depending on latitude. Clausius-Clapeyron scaling is directly evaluated using an invariant distribution of monthly-mean relative humidity, giving a rate of 7.4% K-1 for global-mean water vapor. There are deviations from Clausius-Clapeyron scaling of zonal-mean column water vapor in the tropics and mid-latitudes, but they largely cancel in the global mean. A purely thermodynamic scaling based on a saturated troposphere gives a higher global rate of 7.9% K-1. Surface specific humidity increases at a rate of 5.7% K-1, considerably lower than the rate for global-mean water vapor. Surface specific humidity closely follows Clausius-Clapeyron scaling over ocean. But there are widespread decreases in surface relative humidity over land (by more than 1% K-1 in many regions), and it is argued that decreases of this magnitude could result from the land/ocean contrast in surface warming.

  20. Rapid vapor bubble growth during decompression of superheated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both analytical and experimental investigations are performed for vapor bubble growth in a uniformly superheated water under rapid decompression. Numerical and analytical solutions are obtained by solving a complete set of governing equations for bubble growth, and compared with experimental data obtained in the present experiment and previously by Toda and Kitamura. Bubble growth rates calculated numerically are lower than the experimental data, however, they approach more favorably our experimental data than the analytical solutions without the added correction factor given by Toda and Kitamura. Their solutions with the correction factor of π/2 are the best-fit solutions reported thus far. Available solutions by other researchers are found to underpredict bubble growth rates. Transient temperature distributions across the thermal boundary layer on the bubble interface are also estimsted. It is found that for initial periods thermal boundary layer fully develops and the bubble interface temperature approaches that of saturation corresponding to decompressed liquid pressure. (author)

  1. Oxidation of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, QuynGiao N.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + 20% SiC (HS), and ZrB2 + 20% SiC (ZC), and ZrB2 + 30% C + 14% SiC (ZCS) have been investigated for use as potential aeropropolsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90%) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 hours at temperature of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluate as a baseline for comparison. Weight change, X-ray diffraction analysis, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results are compared with tests conducted in a stagnant air furnace at temperatures of 1327 C for 100 minutes, and with high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C at 6 atm for 50 h. Total recession measurements are also reported for the two tests environments.

  2. IASI temperature and water vapor retrievals – error assessment and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pougatchev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The METOP-A satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI Level 2 products comprise retrievals of vertical profiles of temperature and water vapor. The error covariance matrices and biases of the most recent version (4.3.1 of the L2 data were assessed, and the assessment was validated using radiosonde data for reference. The radiosonde data set includes dedicated and synoptic time launches at the Lindenberg station in Germany. For optimal validation, the linear statistical Validation Assessment Model (VAM was used. The VAM uses radiosonde profiles as input and provides optimal estimate of the nominal IASI retrieval by utilizing IASI averaging kernels and statistical characteristics of the ensembles of the reference radiosondes. For temperature temperatures above 900 mb and water retrievals above 700 mb, level expected and assessed errors are in good agreement. Below those levels, noticeable excess in assessed error is observed, possibly due to inaccurate surface parameters and undetected clouds/haze.

  3. Long-term trends and interannual variability of water vapor over the tropics in reanalyses, CMIP5 models and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi G.

    2015-04-01

    The strength of the hydrological cycle in the atmosphere and its long-term changes are of considerable interest, especially as the climate changes. The hydrological cycle in the atmosphere is summarized as evaporation of moisture from the earth surface (land and ocean) and precipitation into the earth surface. The global warming can modulate the strength of hydrological cycle. Many previous studies have investigated the long-term changes in precipitation. However, the investigation of the long-term changes in water vapor has been limited. We investigated the changes and interannual variability in water vapor in the atmosphere of the global scale using multiple reanalyses, CMIP5 models and observations. In reanalyses, the long-term changes in surface air temperature and PW over the tropical ocean were out of range of some observations. Both long-term changes in surface air temperature and PW may have problems. There may be no common systematic bias. The observation shows PW over ocean probably increases for recent two decades. However, the trend in PW was reduced. The reduction of the trend is associated with the hiatus of global warming after 2000's. The relationship between surface air temperature and PW was not fitted to CC relationship on the long-term trend. The long-term changes in surface air temperature and PW in the CMIP5 models are basically fitted to the CC relationship (Global mean values of water vapor were approximately 6.5-7.5% per K).

  4. Effect of Atmospheric Ions on Interfacial Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Kurt Kung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atmospheric positivity on the electrical properties of interfacial water was explored. Interfacial, or exclusion zone (EZ water was created in the standard way, next to a sheet of Nafion placed horizontally at the bottom of a water-filled chamber. Positive atmospheric ions were created from a high voltage source placed above the chamber. Electrical potential distribution in the interfacial water was measured using microelectrodes. We found that beyond a threshold, the positive ions diminished the magnitude of the negative electrical potential in the interfacial water, sometimes even turning it to positive. Additionally, positive ions produced by an air conditioner were observed to generate similar effects; i.e., the electrical potential shifted in the positive direction but returned to negative when the air conditioner stopped blowing. Sometimes, the effect of the positive ions from the air conditioner was strong enough to destroy the structure of interfacial water by turning the potential decidedly positive. Thus, positive air ions can compromise interfacial water negativity and may explain the known negative impact of positive ions on health.

  5. Effects of 1997-1998 El Nino on Tropospheric Ozone and Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S.; Ziemke, J. R.; Min, W.; Read, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of the 1997-1998 El Nino on tropospheric column ozone and tropospheric water vapor derived respectively from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Earth Probe and the Microwave Limb Scanning instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The 1997-1998 El Nino, characterized by an anomalous increase in sea-surface temperature (SST) across the eastern and central tropical Pacific Ocean, is one of the strongest El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events of the century, comparable in magnitude to the 1982-1983 episode. The major impact of the SST change has been the shift in the convection pattern from the western to the eastern Pacific affecting the response of rain-producing cumulonimbus. As a result, there has been a significant increase in rainfall over the eastern Pacific and a decrease over the western Pacific and Indonesia. The dryness in the Indonesian region has contributed to large-scale burning by uncontrolled wildfires in the tropical rainforests of Sumatra and Borneo. Our study shows that tropospheric column ozone decreased by 4-8 Dobson units (DU) in the eastern Pacific and increased by about 10-20 DU in the western Pacific largely as a result of the eastward shift of the tropical convective activity as inferred from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data. The effect of this shift is also evident in the upper tropospheric water vapor mixing ratio which varies inversely as ozone (O3). These conclusions are qualitatively consistent with the changes in atmospheric circulation derived from zonal and vertical wind data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation analyses. The changes in tropospheric column O3 during the course of the 1997-1998 El Nino appear to be caused by a combination of large-scale circulation processes associated with the shift in the tropical convection pattern and surface/boundary layer processes associated with

  6. Retrieving Precipitable Water Vapor Data Using GPS Zenith Delays and Global Reanalysis Data in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available GPS has become a very effective tool to remotely sense precipitable water vapor (PWV information, which is important for weather forecasting and nowcasting. The number of geodetic GNSS stations set up in China has substantially increased over the last few decades. However, GPS PWV derivation requires surface pressure to calculate the precise zenith hydrostatic delay and weighted mean temperature to map the zenith wet delay to precipitable water vapor. GPS stations without collocated meteorological sensors can retrieve water vapor using standard atmosphere parameters, which lead to a decrease in accuracy. In this paper, a method of interpolating NWP reanalysis data to site locations for generating corresponding meteorological elements is explored over China. The NCEP FNL dataset provided by the NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction and over 600 observed stations from different sources was selected to assess the quality of the results. A one-year experiment was performed in our study. The types of stations selected include meteorological sites, GPS stations, radio sounding stations, and a sun photometer station. Compared with real surface measurements, the accuracy of the interpolated surface pressure and air temperature both meet the requirements of GPS PWV derivation in most areas; however, the interpolated surface air temperature exhibits lower precision than the interpolated surface pressure. At more than 96% of selected stations, PWV differences caused by the differences between the interpolation results and real measurements were less than 1.0 mm. Our study also indicates that relief amplitude exerts great influence on the accuracy of the interpolation approach. Unsatisfactory interpolation results always occurred in areas of strong relief. GPS PWV data generated from interpolated meteorological parameters are consistent with other PWV products (radio soundings, the NWP reanalysis dataset, and sun photometer PWV data. The

  7. Variation characteristics of water vapor distribution during 2000-2008 over Hefei (31.9°N, 117.2°E) observed by L625 lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Fang, Xin; Hu, Shunxing; Hu, Huanling; Li, Tao; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-10-01

    Observations of monthly and seasonal nightly water vapor variations over Hefei utilizing L625 lidar water vapor data observed from 2000 to 2008 is the focus of this study. The experimental setup and main parameters of the L625 lidar for water vapor measurement are first presented, then the measurement principle of water vapor and data processing methods are introduced. The water vapor measurement precision of the lidar system was analyzed by comparison with radiosonde. Monthly and seasonal water vapor profiles were built by analyzing 2000-2008 lidar data. In the vertical direction, results show that water vapor content decreases gradually with height. The more the water vapor content in the low atmosphere, the faster the decay rate with altitude. As far as monthly variation, the water vapor content first increases and then decreases with month. The maximum content of water vapor appears in July, at mixing ratio of 15.6 g/kg at 1 km. The seasonal variability of water vapor content is rather obvious. In summer the water vapor mixing ratio reaches up to 15.0 g/kg at 1 km, and in winter it is only 3.9 g/kg at the same altitude. Interannual variation of water vapor content differs between seasons (as revealed in the standard deviation of data) where summer is least stable and autumn is the most stable. Precipitable water vapor is calculated from water vapor mean profiles at 1-4 km and the relationship between precipitable water vapor and precipitation is also investigated. A clear positive correlation is found with Pearson correlation coefficients (R) 0.933 between monthly precipitation and mean precipitable water vapor, as well a clear positive correlation between seasonal precipitation and seasonal mean precipitable water vapor (R = 0.988). Precipitation conversion efficiency (PCE) is calculated from precipitation and precipitable water vapor. The monthly PCE reaches its maximum in October at 25.8%, and drops to its minimum in January at 11.5%. Seasonal PCE's minimum

  8. Field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    A field-deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes was constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with optomechanical and thermal stability; multistage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions; rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions; and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing, and intercomparisons are performed and discussed. In general, the instrument has a 150 m range resolution with a 10 min temporal resolution; 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument is shown capable of autonomous long-term field operation - 50 days with a > 95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  9. Field deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2014-11-01

    A field deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes has been constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including: a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with opto-mechanical and thermal stability, multi-stage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions, rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions, and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing and intercomparisons have been performed and are discussed. In general, the instrument has 150 m range resolution with 10 min temporal resolution - 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument was shown capable of autonomous long term field operation - 50 days with a >95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  10. MAIC-2, a latitudinal model for the Martian surface temperature, atmospheric water transport and surface glaciation

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf; Stenzel, Oliver J

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere-Ice Coupler MAIC-2 is a simple, latitudinal model, which consists of a set of parameterizations for the surface temperature, the atmospheric water transport and the surface mass balance (condensation minus evaporation) of water ice. It is driven directly by the orbital parameters obliquity, eccentricity and solar longitude (Ls) of perihelion. Surface temperature is described by the Local Insolation Temperature (LIT) scheme, which uses a daily and latitude-dependent radiation balance, includes a treatment of the seasonal CO2 cap, and has been validated against the surface temperatures from the Mars Climate Database. The evaporation rate of water is calculated by an expression for free convection, driven by density differences between water vapor and ambient air, and the condensation rate follows from the assumption that any water vapour which exceeds the local saturation pressure condenses instantly. Atmospheric transport of water vapour is assumed to be purely diffusive, with an adjustable...

  11. The photosynthetic response of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant aquaporin McMIPB to a soil water deficit and high vapor pressure deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Kawase, Miki; Hanba, Yuko T.; Katsuhara, Maki

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic capacity and plant growth of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) aquaporin McMIPB under (1) a well-watered growth condition, (2) a well-watered and temporal higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) condition, and (3) a soil water deficit growth condition to investigate the effect of McMIPB on photosynthetic responses under moderate soil and atmospheric humidity and water deficit conditions. Transgenic plants showed a signifi...

  12. Retrieval of water vapor mixing ratio from a multiple channel Raman-scatter lidar using an optimal estimation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, R J; Haefele, A

    2016-02-01

    Lidar measurements of the atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio provide an excellent complement to radiosoundings and passive, ground-based remote sensors. Lidars are now routinely used that can make high spatial-temporal resolution measurements of water vapor from the surface to the stratosphere. Many of these systems can operate during the day and night, with operation only limited by clouds thick enough to significantly attenuate the laser beam. To enhance the value of these measurements for weather and climate studies, this paper presents an optimal estimation method (OEM) to retrieve the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol optical depth profile, Ångstrom exponent, lidar constants, detector dead times, and measurement backgrounds from multichannel vibrational Raman-scatter lidars. The OEM retrieval provides the systematic uncertainties due to the overlap function, calibration factor, air density and Rayleigh-scatter cross sections, in addition to the random uncertainties of the retrieval due to measurement noise. The OEM also gives the vertical resolution of the retrieval as a function of height, as well as the height to which the contribution of the a priori is small. The OEM is applied to measurements made by the Meteoswiss Raman Lidar for Meteorological Observations (RALMO) in the day and night for clear and cloudy conditions. The retrieved water vapor mixing ratio is in excellent agreement with both the traditional lidar retrieval method and coincident radiosoundings. PMID:26836078

  13. High Temperature Corrosion of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride in Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, E. J.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are proposed for applications in high temperature combustion environments containing water vapor. Both SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica (SiO2) scale. It is therefore important to understand the durability of SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 in water vapor. Thermogravimetric analyses, furnace exposures and burner rig results were obtained for these materials in water vapor at temperatures between 1100 and 1450 C and water vapor partial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 3.1 atm. First, the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4 in water vapor is considered. The parabolic kinetic rate law, rate dependence on water vapor partial pressure, and oxidation mechanism are discussed. Second, the volatilization of silica to form Si(OH)4(g) is examined. Mass spectrometric results, the linear kinetic rate law and a volatilization model based on diffusion through a gas boundary layer are discussed. Finally, the combined oxidation and volatilization reactions, which occur when SiC or Si3N4 are exposed in a water vapor-containing environment, are presented. Both experimental evidence and a model for the paralinear kinetic rate law are shown for these simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions.

  14. Improved Remote Sensing Retrieval of Land Surface Temperature in the Thermal Infrared (TIR) Using Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometer Estimated Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, S.; Hulley, G. C.; Roberts, D. A.; Scheele, C. J.; Ustin, S.; Alsina, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important parameter in many ecological studies, where processes such as evapotranspiration have impacts at temperature gradients less than 1 K. Current errors in standard MODIS and ASTER LST products are greater than 1 K, and for ASTER can be greater than 2 K in humid conditions due to incomplete atmospheric correction of atmospheric water vapor. Estimates of water vapor, either derived from visible-to-shortwave-infrared (VSWIR) remote sensing data or taken from weather simulation data such as NCEP, can be combined with coincident Thermal-Infrared (TIR) remote sensing data to yield improved accuracy in LST measurements. This study compares LST retrieval accuracies derived using the standard JPL MASTER Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm, and the Water Vapor Scaling (WVS) atmospheric correction method proposed for the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager, or HyspIRI, mission with ground observations. The 2011 ER-2 Delano/Lost Hills flights acquired TIR data from the MODIS/ASTER Simulator (MASTER) and VSWIR data from Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instruments flown concurrently. The TES and WVS retrieval methods are run with and without high spatial resolution AVIRIS-derived water vapor maps to assess the improvement using VSWIR water vapor estimates. We find improvement using VSWIR derived water vapor maps in both cases, with the WVS method being most accurate overall. For closed canopy agricultural vegetation we observed canopy temperature retrieval RMSEs of 0.49 K and 0.70 K using the WVS method on MASTER data with and without AVIRIS derived water vapor, respectively.

  15. Microwave radiometer observations of interannual water vapor variability and vertical structure over a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renju, R.; Suresh Raju, C.; Mathew, Nizy; Antony, Tinu; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2015-05-01

    The intraseasonal and interannual characteristics and the vertical distribution of atmospheric water vapor from the tropical coastal station Thiruvananthapuram (TVM) located in the southwestern region of the Indian Peninsula are examined from continuous multiyear, multifrequency microwave radiometer profiler (MRP) measurements. The accuracy of MRP for precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimation, particularly during a prolonged monsoon period, has been demonstrated by comparing with the PWV derived from collocated GPS measurements based on regression model between PWV and GPS wet delay component which has been developed for TVM station. Large diurnal and intraseasonal variations of PWV are observed during winter and premonsoon seasons. There is large interannual PWV variability during premonsoon, owing to frequent local convection and summer thunderstorms. During monsoon period, low interannual PWV variability is attributed to the persistent wind from the ocean which brings moisture to this coastal station. However, significant interannual humidity variability is seen at 2 to 6 km altitude, which is linked to the monsoon strength over the station. Prior to monsoon onset over the station, the specific humidity increases up to 5-10 g/kg in the altitude region above 5 km and remains consistently so throughout the active spells.

  16. Comparison of GNSS integrated water vapor and NWM reanalysis data over Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Laura Isabel; Natali, Maria Paula; Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Integrated water vapor (IWV) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Numerical Weather Models (NWM) reanalysis data were compared in order to assess the consistency between the different datasets over the extended geographical region of Central and South America. The analysis was performed for the seven years period between 2007 and 2013. We analyzed two different NWM: the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data (ERA Interim) and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The statistical analysis of the differences was performed in 110 GNSS sites (GPS + GLONASS), although the most interesting results came from the 73 sites which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, and it is characterized by large temporal variability of the integrated total humidity content. Moreover, the scarce coverage of operational radio sounding stations is noticeable in large areas of the selected region; hence the contribution of IWV-GNSS is essential to improve the weather understanding. Considering that the atmospheric water vapor has a highly variable and complex distribution which knowledge is essential for weather prediction and local meteorological studies. This study aims to provide IWV-GNSS observations able to be assimilated by operational weather centers, for both prediction and simulation, as well for improving regional modeling.

  17. Application of an automatic cloud tracking technique to Meteosat water vapor and infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endlich, R. M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The automatic cloud tracking system was applied to METEOSAT 6.7 micrometers water vapor measurements to learn whether the system can track the motions of water vapor patterns. Data for the midlatitudes, subtropics, and tropics were selected from a sequence of METEOSAT pictures for 25 April 1978. Trackable features in the water vapor patterns were identified using a clustering technique and the features were tracked by two different methods. In flat (low contrast) water vapor fields, the automatic motion computations were not reliable, but in areas where the water vapor fields contained small scale structure (such as in the vicinity of active weather phenomena) the computations were successful. Cloud motions were computed using METEOSAT infrared observations (including tropical convective systems and midlatitude jet stream cirrus).

  18. Simulation of water vapor condensation on LOX droplet surface using liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eugene A.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of ice or water layers on liquid oxygen (LOX) droplets in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) environment was investigated. Formulation of such ice/water layers is indicated by phase-equilibrium considerations under conditions of high partial pressure of water vapor (steam) and low LOX droplet temperature prevailing in the SSME preburner or main chamber. An experimental investigation was begun using liquid nitrogen as a LOX simulant. A monodisperse liquid nitrogen droplet generator was developed which uses an acoustic driver to force the stream of liquid emerging from a capillary tube to break up into a stream of regularly space uniformly sized spherical droplets. The atmospheric pressure liquid nitrogen in the droplet generator reservoir was cooled below its boiling point to prevent two phase flow from occurring in the capillary tube. An existing steam chamber was modified for injection of liquid nitrogen droplets into atmospheric pressure superheated steam. The droplets were imaged using a stroboscopic video system and a laser shadowgraphy system. Several tests were conducted in which liquid nitrogen droplets were injected into the steam chamber. Under conditions of periodic droplet formation, images of 600 micron diameter liquid nitrogen droplets were obtained with the stroboscopic video systems.

  19. The Sources and Significance of Stratospheric Water Vapor: Mechanistic Studies from Equator to Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica Birte

    It is the future of the stratospheric ozone layer, which protects life at Earth's surface from harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation, that is the focus of the present work. Fundamental changes in the composition and structure of the stratosphere in response to anthropogenic climate forcing may lead to catastrophic ozone loss under current, and even reduced, stratospheric halogen loading. In particular, the evolution toward a colder, wetter stratosphere, threatens to enhance the heterogeneous conversion of inorganic halogen from its reservoir species to its catalytically active forms, and thus promote in situ ozone loss. Water vapor concentrations control the availability of reactive surface area, which facilitates heterogeneous chemistry. Furthermore, the rates of the key heterogeneous processes are tightly controlled by the ambient humidity. Thus, credible predictions of UV dosage require a quantitative understanding of both the sensitivity of these chemical mechanisms to water vapor concentrations, and an elucidation of the processes controlling stratospheric water vapor concentrations. Toward this end, we present a set of four case studies utilizing high resolution in situ data acquired aboard NASA aircraft during upper atmospheric research missions over the past two decades. 1) We examine the broad scale humidity structure of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from the midlatitudes to the tropics, focusing on cirrus formation and dehydration at the cold-point tropical tropopause. The data show evidence for frequent supersaturation in clear air, and sustained supersaturation in the presence of cirrus. These results challenge the strict thermal control of the tropical tropopause. 2) We investigate the likelihood of cirrus-initiated activation of chlorine in the midlatitude lower stratosphere. At midlatitudes the transition from conditions near saturation below the local tropopause to undersaturated air above greatly reduces the probability of heterogeneous

  20. Transport of water in a transient impact-generated lunar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prem, P.; Artemieva, N. A.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2015-07-01

    In recent decades, several missions have detected signs of water and other volatiles in cold, permanently shadowed craters near the lunar poles. Observations suggest that some of these volatiles could have been delivered by comet impacts and therefore, understanding the impact delivery mechanism becomes key to explaining the origin and distribution of lunar water. During impact, the constituent ices of a comet nucleus vaporize; a significant part of this vapor remains gravitationally bound to the Moon, transforming the tenuous, collisionless lunar exosphere into a collisionally thick, transient atmosphere. Here, we use numerical simulations to investigate the physical processes governing volatile transport in the transient atmosphere generated after a comet impact, with a focus on how these processes influence the accumulation of water in polar cold traps. It is observed that the transient atmosphere maintains a certain characteristic structure for at least several Earth days after impact, during which time volatile transport occurs primarily through low-altitude winds that sweep over the lunar day-side. Meanwhile, reconvergence of vapor antipodal to the point of impact results in preferential redistribution of water in the vicinity of the antipode. Due to the quantity of vapor that remains gravitationally bound, the atmosphere is sufficiently dense that lower layers are shielded from photodestruction, prolonging the lifetime of water molecules and allowing greater amounts of water to reach cold traps. Short-term ice deposition patterns are markedly non-uniform and the variations that arise in simulated volatile abundance between different cold traps could potentially explain variations that have been observed through remote sensing.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Atmosphere Water Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2011-07-04

    Understanding and quantifying the interaction of the atmosphere with underlying water surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of scientific fields such as water resources management, climate studies of ocean-atmosphere exchange, and regional weat

  2. Corrosion of copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated air/water vapor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to investigate the atmospheric corrosion of copper-based materials in an irradiated air/water vapor system. The three materials investigated were oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 7% aluminum-bronze (CDA-613), and 70-30 cupronickel (CDA-715). To support the corrosion studies, a number of irradiation studies were performed to characterize the gas phase radiation chemistry of the system. Both copper oxide and nitrate phases were identified as corrosion products depending on the dose rate, humidity and temperature. Uniform corrosion rates increased with temperature, humidity, and dose rate. A clear tie between the radiolytic products generated in the gas phase and the corrosion observed was established

  3. Relationships of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor, Clouds and SST: MLS Observations, ECMWF Analyses and GCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui; Waliser, Duane E.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Li, Jui-lin; Read, William G.; Waters, Joe W.; Tompkins, Adrian M.

    2006-01-01

    The relationships of upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV), cloud ice and sea surface temperature (SST) are examined in the annual cycles of ECMWF analyses and simulations from 15 atmosphere-ocean coupled models which were contributed to the IPCC AR4. The results are compared with the observed relationships based on UTWV and cloud ice measurements from MLS on Aura. It is shown that the ECMWF analyses produce positive correlations between UTWV, cloud ice and SST, similar to the MLS data. The rate of the increase of cloud ice and UTWV with SST is about 30% larger than that for MLS. For the IPCC simulations, the relationships between UTWV, cloud ice and SST are qualitatively captured. However, the magnitudes of the simulated cloud ice show a considerable disagreement between models, by nearly a factor of 10. The amplitudes of the approximate linear relations between UTWV, cloud ice and SST vary by a factor up to 4.

  4. N2O增加对大气环境影响的模拟及其与甲烷和平流层水汽影响的比较%Simulation of influence of N2O's increase on atmospheric environment and comparison with the influences of methane and stratospheric water vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕云; 许利; 周任君; 陈月娟; 易明建; 邓淑梅

    2013-01-01

    本文利用美国国家大气环境中心(NCAR)的二维化学、辐射和动力相互作用的模式(SOCRATES),模拟了大气中N2O增加对O3和温度的影响,并从化学、辐射和动力过程讨论了影响原因,此外还与大气甲烷和平流层水汽增加对大气环境的影响进行了对比.分析表明:大气中N2O浓度增加以后,将通过化学过程引起30 km以上O3损耗,30~40 km损耗较多;30 km以上降温明显,下平流层中低纬度地区以及对流层O3增加并有微弱升温;30~40 km附近,北半球中高纬地区O3减少以及降温幅度都大于南半球.对流层升温主要是N2O和O3增加所致,而平流层温度变化主要受O3控制.北半球中高纬地区动力过程对温度变化的反馈较其它地区明显,这种反馈对平流层中高层北半球中高纬地区温度和O3的变化都有明显影响.大气中甲烷增加引起的O3损耗在45 km以上,45 km以下O3增加.平流层水汽增加会引起40 km以上O3减少,20~40 km大部分地区O3增加.N2O增加造成的O3损耗正好位于臭氧层附近,其排放对未来O3层恢复至关重要.N2O增加引起下平流层15~25 km中低纬度地区有弱的升温,这与其它温室气体增加对该地区温度的影响不同,CO2,CH4和H2O等增加后下平流层通常是降温.%A sensitivity experiment, with the increasing N2O volume mixing ratio, was carried out to study the influence of an increase of N2O on O3 and temperature using the 2D interactive chemical radiative dynamical (SCORATES) model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the reasons for O3 and temperature change were analyzed from chemistry, radiation and dynamical processes. Moreover, the differences in influences on the atmospheric environment of methane and water vapor increase as well as N2O increases were compared. The results show that when N2O concentration increases, the chemical process results in O3 depletion over 30 km, and the high value appear between 30

  5. Material gap membrane distillation: A new design for water vapor flux enhancement

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2013-08-19

    A new module design for membrane distillation, namely material gap membrane distillation (MGMD), for seawater desalination has been proposed and successfully tested. It has been observed that employing appropriate materials between the membrane and the condensation plate in an air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) module enhanced the water vapor flux significantly. An increase in the water vapor flux of about 200-800% was observed by filling the gap with sand and DI water at various feed water temperatures. However, insulating materials such as polypropylene and polyurethane have no effect on the water vapor flux. The influence of material thickness and characteristics has also been investigated in this study. An increase in the water gap width from 9. mm to 13. mm increases the water vapor flux. An investigation on an AGMD and MGMD performance comparison, carried out using two different commercial membranes provided by different manufacturers, is also reported in this paper. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Water vapor total column measurements using the Elodie Archive at Observatoire de Haute Provence from 1994 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarkissian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor total column measurements at Observatoire de Haute Provence (5°42' E, +43°55' N, south of France, were obtained using observations of astronomical objects made between July 1994 and December 2004 on the 193-cm telescope with the high-resolution spectrometer Elodie. Spectra of stars, nebulae, and other astronomical objects were taken regularly during 10 years. More than 18 000 spectra from 400 nm to 680 nm are available on-line in the Elodie Archive. This archive, usually explored by astronomers, contains information to study the atmosphere of the Earth. Water vapor absorption lines appear in the visible in delimited bands that astronomers often avoid for their spectral analysis. We used the Elodie Archive with two objectives: firstly, to retrieve seasonal variability and long-term trend of atmospheric water vapor, and secondly, to remove signatures in spectra for further astronomical or geophysical use. The tools presented here are developed following, when possible, formats and standards recommended by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance.

  7. Water vapor in nearby infrared galaxies as probed by Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chentao; Omont, A; Liu, Daizhong; Isaak, K G; Downes, D; van der Werf, P P; Lu, Nanyao

    2013-01-01

    We report the first systematic study of the submillimeter water vapor rotational emission lines in infrared (IR) galaxies based on the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) data of {\\it Herschel} SPIRE. Among the 176 galaxies with publicly available FTS data, 45 have at least one H$_2$O emission line detected. The H$_2$O line luminosities range from $\\sim 1 \\times 10^5$ L$_{\\odot}$ to $\\sim 5 \\times 10^7$ L$_{\\odot}$ while the total IR luminosities (L$_\\mathrm{IR}$) have a similar spread ($\\sim$1-300 $\\times 10^{10}$ L$_{\\odot}$). In addition, emission lines of H$_2$O$^+$ and H$_2^{18}$O are also detected. H$_2$O is found, for most galaxies, to be the strongest molecular emitter after CO in FTS spectra. The luminosity of the five most important H$_2$O lines is near-linearly correlated with L$_\\mathrm{IR}$ no matter strong AGN signature is present or not. However, the luminosity of H$_2$O(2$_{11}-2_{02}$) and H$_2$O(2$_{20}-2_{11}$) appears to increase slightly faster than linear with L$_\\mathrm{IR}$. Although ...

  8. Thermal Water Vapor Emission from Shocked Regions in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, M; Melnick, G J; Kaufman, M J; Harwit, Martin; Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Kaufman, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have observed thermal water vapor emission from a roughly circular field of view approximately 75 arc seconds in diameter centered on the Orion BN-KL region. The Fabry-Perot line strengths, line widths, and spectral line shifts observed in eight transitions between 71 and 125 microns show good agreement with models of thermal emission arising from a molecular cloud subjected to a magnetohydrodynamic C-type shock. Both the breadth and the relative strengths of the observed lines argue for emission from a shock rather than from warm quiescent gas in the Orion core. Though one of the eight transitions appears anomalously strong, and may be subject to the effects of radiative pumping, the other seven indicate an H2O/H2 abundance ratio of order 5E-4, and a corresponding gas-phase oxygen-to-hydrogen abundance ratio of order 4E-4. Given current estimates of the interstellar, gas-phase, oxygen and carbon abundances in the so...

  9. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  10. Modeling Convective Injection of Water Vapor into the Lower Stratosphere in the Mid-Latitudes over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, C.; Leroy, S. S.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) from the tropics to the poles is important both radiatively and chemically. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, and increases in water vapor concentrations in the UTLS lead to cooling at these levels and induce warming at the surface [Forster and Shine, 1999; 2002;Solomon et al., 2010]. Water vapor is also integral to stratospheric chemistry. It is the dominant source of OH in the lower stratosphere [ Hanisco et al. , 2001], and increases in water vapor concentrations promote stratospheric ozone loss by raising the reactivity of several key heterogeneous reactions as well as by promoting the growth of reactive surface area [Anderson et al., 2012; Carslaw et al., 1995; Carslaw et al., 1997; Drdla and Muller , 2012; Kirk-Davidoff et al., 1999; Shi et al., 2001]. However, the processes that control the distribution and phase of water in this region of the atmosphere are not well understood. This is especially true at mid-latitudes where several different dynamical mechanisms are capable of influencing UTLS water vapor concentrations. The contribution by deep convective storm systems that penetrate into the lower stratosphere is the least well understood and the least well represented in global models because of the small spatial scales and short time scales over which convection occurs. To address this issue, we have begun a modeling study to investigate the convective injection of water vapor from the troposphere into the stratosphere in the mid-latitudes. Fine-scale models have been previously used to simulate convection from the troposphere to the stratosphere [e.g., Homeyer et al., 2014]. Here we employ the Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting model (ARW) at 3-km resolution to resolve convection over the eastern United States during August of 2007 and August of 2013. We conduct a comparison of MERRA, the reanalysis used to initialize ARW, and the model output to assess

  11. Catalytic combustion of styrene over copper based catalyst: inhibitory effect of water vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongyan; Xu, Mingyao; Li, Zhong; Huang, Sisi; He, Chun

    2009-07-01

    The effects of water vapor on the activity of the copper based catalysts with different supports such as CuO/gamma-Al2O3, CuO/SiO2 and CuO/TiO2 for styrene combustion were investigated. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was tested in the absence of and presence of water vapor and the catalysts were characterized. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments and diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements were conducted in order to estimate and explain the water effects. Results showed that the existence of water vapor had a significant negative effect on the catalytic activity of these copper based catalysts due to the competition adsorption of water molecule. DRIFTS studies showed that the catalyst CuO/gamma-Al2O3 had the strongest adsorption of water, while the catalyst CuO/TiO2 had the weakest adsorption of water. H2O-TPD studies also indicated that the order of desorption activation energies of water vapor on the catalysts or the strength of interactions of water molecules with the surfaces of the catalysts was CuO/gamma-Al2O3>CuO/SiO2>CuO/TiO2. As a consequence of that, the CuO/TiO2 exhibited the better durability to water vapor, while CuO/gamma-Al2O3 had the poorest durability to water vapor among these three catalysts. PMID:19427660

  12. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deelen, J. van, E-mail: joop.vandeelen@tno.nl [TNO, Department of Thin Film Technology, De Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven (Netherlands); Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Beckers, E.H.A. [TNO, Department of Thin Film Technology, De Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven (Netherlands); Simons, P.J.P.M.; Lankhorst, A. [Celsian, De Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-03-31

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/min were obtained. The reaction kinetics were studied and detailed process modeling based on a reaction mechanism that includes the formation of an alkylzinc alkoxide intermediate product is discussed. This mechanism can explain the temperature dependent variety in deposition profiles observed in the static deposition experiments. The capability of modeling to gain insight in the local process conditions inside a reactor is demonstrated. - Highlights: • ZnO deposition at high rates of 800 nm/min • Modeling based on two step mechanism gives good fit. • Modeling gives insight in the inside of the reactor. • Modeling can even predict static deposition profiles.

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/min were obtained. The reaction kinetics were studied and detailed process modeling based on a reaction mechanism that includes the formation of an alkylzinc alkoxide intermediate product is discussed. This mechanism can explain the temperature dependent variety in deposition profiles observed in the static deposition experiments. The capability of modeling to gain insight in the local process conditions inside a reactor is demonstrated. - Highlights: • ZnO deposition at high rates of 800 nm/min • Modeling based on two step mechanism gives good fit. • Modeling gives insight in the inside of the reactor. • Modeling can even predict static deposition profiles

  14. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm−1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm

  15. Atmospheric vapor phase deposition of nanometer-thick anti-stiction fluoropolymer coatings for silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Shintaro; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Morita, Hiroyuki; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Zhang, Hedong

    2016-06-01

    Anti-stiction coatings for silicon surfaces are a key technology to prevent the failure of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) during operation and improve the forming accuracy in nanoimprint technology. In this study, we propose an atmospheric vapor phase deposition method to coat a silicon surface with fluoropolymers such as the perfluoropolyethers Fomblin Zdol 2000 and Zdol 4000. Thickness distributions, surface energies, coverages, and stiction forces for the deposited films were evaluated experimentally. The proposed method resulted in over 90% coverage with a film thickness of about 1 nm. The film thickness uniformity was around 0.1 nm over an area of 5 × 5 mm2. This coating effectively reduced the stiction forces by half compared with a bare silicon surface.

  16. Two decades of water vapor measurements with the FISH fluorescence hygrometer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.; Rolf, C.; Schiller, C.; Rohs, S.; Spelten, N.; Afchine, A.; Zöger, M.; Sitnikov, N.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Bozóki, Z.; Tátrai, D.; Ebert, V.; Kühnreich, B.; Mackrodt, P.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Krämer, M.

    2015-07-01

    For almost two decades, the airborne Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH) has stood for accurate and precise measurements of total water mixing ratios (WMR, gas phase + evaporated ice) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). Here, we present a comprehensive review of the measurement technique (Lyman-α photofragment fluorescence), calibration procedure, accuracy and reliability of FISH. Crucial for FISH measurement quality is the regular calibration to a water vapor reference, namely the commercial frost-point hygrometer DP30. In the frame of this work this frost-point hygrometer is compared to German and British traceable metrological water standards and its accuracy is found to be 2-4 %. Overall, in the range from 4 to 1000 ppmv, the total accuracy of FISH was found to be 6-8 %, as stated in previous publications. For lower mixing ratios down to 1 ppmv, the uncertainty reaches a lower limit of 0.3 ppmv. For specific, non-atmospheric conditions, as set in experiments at the AIDA chamber - namely mixing ratios below 10 and above 100 ppmv in combination with high- and low-pressure conditions - the need to apply a modified FISH calibration evaluation has been identified. The new evaluation improves the agreement of FISH with other hygrometers to ± 10 % accuracy in the respective mixing ratio ranges. Furthermore, a quality check procedure for high total water measurements in cirrus clouds at high pressures (400-500 hPa) is introduced. The performance of FISH in the field is assessed by reviewing intercomparisons of FISH water vapor data with other in situ and remote sensing hygrometers over the last two decades. We find that the agreement of FISH with the other hygrometers has improved over that time span from overall up to ± 30 % or more to about ± 5-20 % @ 10 ppmv. As presented here, the robust and continuous calibration and operation procedures of the FISH instrument over the last two decades establish the position of FISH as one of the

  17. Two decades of water vapor measurements with the FISH fluorescence hygrometer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meyer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH is an airborne Lyman-α photofragment fluorescence hygrometer for accurate and precise measurement of total water mixing ratios (WMR (gas phase + evaporated ice in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS since almost two decades. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the measurement technique, calibration procedure, accuracy and reliability of FISH. A crucial part for the FISH measurement quality is the regular calibration to a water vapor reference, namely the commercial frostpoint hygrometer DP30. In the frame of this work this frostpoint hygrometer is compared to German and British traceable metrological water standards and its accuracy is found to be 2–4%. Overall, in the range from 4–1000 ppmv, the total accuracy of FISH was found to be 6–8% as stated also in previous publications. For lower mixing ratios down to 1 ppmv, the uncertainty reaches a lower limit of 0.3 ppmv. For specific, non-atmospheric conditions, as set in experiments at the AIDA chamber – namely mixing ratios below 10 and above 100 ppmv in combination with high and low pressure conditions – the need to apply a modified FISH calibration evaluation has been identified. The new evaluation improves the agreement of FISH with other hygrometers to ± 10% accuracy in the respective mixing ratio ranges. Further, a quality check procedure for high total water measurements in cirrus clouds at high pressures (400–500 hPa is introduced. The performance of FISH in the field is assessed by reviewing intercomparisons of FISH water vapor data with other in-situ and remote sensing hygrometers over the last two decades. We find that the agreement of FISH with the other hygrometers has improved over that time span from overall up to ±30% or more to about ±5–20% @ 10 ppmv. As presented here, the robust and continuous calibration and operation procedures of the FISH instrument over the last two decades, establish

  18. Two decades of water vapor measurements with the FISH fluorescence hygrometer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For almost two decades, the airborne Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH has stood for accurate and precise measurements of total water mixing ratios (WMR, gas phase + evaporated ice in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the measurement technique (Lyman-α photofragment fluorescence, calibration procedure, accuracy and reliability of FISH. Crucial for FISH measurement quality is the regular calibration to a water vapor reference, namely the commercial frost-point hygrometer DP30. In the frame of this work this frost-point hygrometer is compared to German and British traceable metrological water standards and its accuracy is found to be 2–4 %. Overall, in the range from 4 to 1000 ppmv, the total accuracy of FISH was found to be 6–8 %, as stated in previous publications. For lower mixing ratios down to 1 ppmv, the uncertainty reaches a lower limit of 0.3 ppmv. For specific, non-atmospheric conditions, as set in experiments at the AIDA chamber – namely mixing ratios below 10 and above 100 ppmv in combination with high- and low-pressure conditions – the need to apply a modified FISH calibration evaluation has been identified. The new evaluation improves the agreement of FISH with other hygrometers to ± 10 % accuracy in the respective mixing ratio ranges. Furthermore, a quality check procedure for high total water measurements in cirrus clouds at high pressures (400–500 hPa is introduced. The performance of FISH in the field is assessed by reviewing intercomparisons of FISH water vapor data with other in situ and remote sensing hygrometers over the last two decades. We find that the agreement of FISH with the other hygrometers has improved over that time span from overall up to ± 30 % or more to about ± 5–20 % @ 10 ppmv. As presented here, the robust and continuous calibration and operation procedures of the FISH instrument over the last two decades establish the

  19. Comparing Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Profiles and Cloud Vertical Structure from Multiwavelength Raman Lidar Retrievals and Radiosounding Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    A study of comparison of water vapor mixing ratio profiles, relative humidity profiles, and cloud vertical structures using two different instruments, a multiwavelength Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman lidar and radiosoundings, is presented. The observations were taken by the lidar located in Warsaw center and the radiosoundings located about 30km to the North in Legionowo (Poland). We compared the ground-based remote sensing technology with in-situ method in order to improve knowledge about water content thought the atmosphere and cloud formation. The method used for retrieving the cloud vertical structure can be improved comparing the radiosonde results with the lidar observations, which show promising results.

  20. Water vapor in the spectrum of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b. II. The eclipse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are crucial to infer the composition and properties of their atmospheres. HD 189733b is one of the most extensively studied exoplanets and is a cornerstone for hot Jupiter models. In this paper, we report the dayside emission spectrum of HD 189733b in the wavelength range 1.1-1.7 μm obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in spatial scan mode. The quality of the data is such that even a straightforward analysis yields a high-precision Poisson noise-limited spectrum: the median 1σ uncertainty is 57 ppm per 0.02 μm bin. We also build a white-light curve correcting for systematic effects and derive an absolute eclipse depth of 96 ± 39 ppm. The resulting spectrum shows marginal evidence for water vapor absorption, but can also be well explained by a blackbody spectrum. However, the combination of these WFC3 data with previous Spitzer photometric observations is best explained by a dayside atmosphere of HD 189733b with no thermal inversion and a nearly solar or subsolar H2O abundance in a cloud-free atmosphere. Alternatively, this apparent subsolar abundance may be the result of clouds or hazes that future studies need to investigate.

  1. Precipitable Water Vapor Estimates in the Australian Region from Ground-Based GPS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelynn Choy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV derived from ground-based global positioning system (GPS receiver with traditional radiosonde measurement and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI technique for a five-year period (2008–2012 using Australian GPS stations. These stations were selectively chosen to provide a representative regional distribution of sites while ensuring conventional meteorological observations were available. Good agreement of PWV estimates was found between GPS and VLBI comparison with a mean difference of less than 1 mm and standard deviation of 3.5 mm and a mean difference and standard deviation of 0.1 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively, between GPS and radiosonde measurements. Systematic errors have also been discovered during the course of this study, which highlights the benefit of using GPS as a supplementary atmospheric PWV sensor and calibration system. The selected eight GPS sites sample different climates across Australia covering an area of approximately 30° NS/EW. It has also shown that the magnitude and variation of PWV estimates depend on the amount of moisture in the atmosphere, which is a function of season, topography, and other regional climate conditions.

  2. Water vapor in the spectrum of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b. II. The eclipse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouzet, Nicolas [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku, E-mail: crouzet@dunlap.utoronto.ca [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are crucial to infer the composition and properties of their atmospheres. HD 189733b is one of the most extensively studied exoplanets and is a cornerstone for hot Jupiter models. In this paper, we report the dayside emission spectrum of HD 189733b in the wavelength range 1.1-1.7 μm obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in spatial scan mode. The quality of the data is such that even a straightforward analysis yields a high-precision Poisson noise-limited spectrum: the median 1σ uncertainty is 57 ppm per 0.02 μm bin. We also build a white-light curve correcting for systematic effects and derive an absolute eclipse depth of 96 ± 39 ppm. The resulting spectrum shows marginal evidence for water vapor absorption, but can also be well explained by a blackbody spectrum. However, the combination of these WFC3 data with previous Spitzer photometric observations is best explained by a dayside atmosphere of HD 189733b with no thermal inversion and a nearly solar or subsolar H{sub 2}O abundance in a cloud-free atmosphere. Alternatively, this apparent subsolar abundance may be the result of clouds or hazes that future studies need to investigate.

  3. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liukang [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); McDermitt, Dayle [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Anderson, Tyler [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Riensche, Brad [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Komissarov, Anatoly [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Howe, Julie [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been

  5. Enhanced water vapor separation by temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotube membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Wonjae; Yun, Jongju; Khan, Fakhre Alam; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of magnitude higher than the Knudsen prediction regardless of membrane temperature. The water vapor separation performance of hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene membranes could also be significantly enhanced at low temperatures. This work combines the membrane-based separation technology with temperature control to enhance water vapor separation performance.Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of

  6. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol and water vapor properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is an Earth-viewing sensor being developed as a facility instrument for the Earth Observing System (EOS) to be launched in the late 1990s. MODIS consists of two separate instruments that scan a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, Sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. Of primary interest for studies of atmospheric physics is the MODIS-N (nadir) instrument which will provide images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resoulutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean and atmosperhic processes. The intent of this lecture is to describe the current status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning radiometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micrometers, and to describe the physical principles behind the development of MODIS for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties. Primary emphasis will be placed on the main atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles form spectral-reflection and thermal-emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be utilized for the determination of the total precipitable water vapor over land and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described herein.

  7. Seasonal Trends in Stratospheric Water Vapor as Derived from SAGE II Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roell, Marilee M.; Fu, Rong

    2008-01-01

    Published analysis of HALOE and Boulder balloon measurements of water vapor have shown conflicting trends in stratospheric water vapor for the periods of 1981 through 2005. Analysis of the SAGE II monthly mean water vapor data filtered for large aerosol events for time periods from 1985-1991, 1995-1999, and 2000-2005 have shown a globally decreasing water vapor trend at 17.5km. Seasonal analysis for these three time periods show a decreasing trend in water vapor at 17.5km for the winter and spring seasons. The summer and autumn seasonal analysis show a decreasing trend from 1985-2005, however, there is a increasing trend in water vapor at 17.5km for these seasons during 1995-2005. Latitude vs height seasonal analysis show a decreasing trend in the lower stratosphere between 20S - 20N for the autumn season, while at the latitudes of 30-50S and 30-50N there is an increasing trend in water vapor at heights up to 15km for that season. Comparison with regions of monsoon activity (Asian and North American) show that the Asian monsoon region had some effect on the lower stratospheric moistening in 1995-1999, however, for the time period of 2000-2005, there was no change in the global trend analysis due to either monsoon region. This may be due to the limitations of the SAGE II data from 2000-2005.

  8. Simulation of the Effect of Water-vapor Increase on Temperature in the Stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Yun; CHEN Yuejuan; ZHOU Renjun; YI Mingjian; DENG Shumei

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the mechanism by which water vapor increase leads to cooling in the stratosphere, the effects of water-vapor increases on temperature in the stratosphere were simulated using the two-dimensional,interactive chemical dynamical radiative model (SOCRATES) of NCAR. The results indicate that increases in stratospheric water vapor lead to stratospheric cooling, with the extent of cooling increasing with height,and that cooling in the middle stratosphere is stronger in Arctic regions. Analysis of the radiation process showed that infiared radiative cooling by water vapor is a pivotal factor in niddle-lower stratospheric cooling. However. in the npper stratosphere (above 45 kn), infrared radiation is not a factor in cooling;there, cooling is caused by the decreased solar radiative heating rate resulting from ozone decrease due to increased stratospheric water vapor. Dynamical cooling is important in the middle-upper stratosphere,and dynamical feedback to temperature change is more distinct in the Northern Hemisphere middle-high latitudes than in other regions and significantly affects temperature and ozone in winter over Arctic regions.Increasing stratospheric water vapor will strengthen ozone depletion through the chemical process. However,ozone will increase in the middle stratosphere. The change in ozone due to increasing water vapor has an important effect on the stratospheric teinperature change.

  9. NEAR-IR DIRECT DETECTION OF WATER VAPOR IN TAU BOÖTIS b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, Alexandra C.; Johnson, John A.; Blake, Geoffrey A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bender, Chad F.; Richert, Alexander J. W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Carr, John S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Barman, Travis, E-mail: alock@caltech.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We use high dynamic range, high-resolution L-band spectroscopy to measure the radial velocity (RV) variations of the hot Jupiter in the τ Boötis planetary system. The detection of an exoplanet by the shift in the stellar spectrum alone provides a measure of the planet's minimum mass, with the true mass degenerate with the unknown orbital inclination. Treating the τ Boo system as a high flux ratio double-lined spectroscopic binary permits the direct measurement of the planet's true mass as well as its atmospheric properties. After removing telluric absorption and cross-correlating with a model planetary spectrum dominated by water opacity, we measure a 6σ detection of the planet at K{sub p} = 111 ± 5 km s{sup –1}, with a 1σ upper limit on the spectroscopic flux ratio of 10{sup –4}. This RV leads to a planetary orbital inclination of i=45{sub −4}{sup +3}° and a mass of M{sub P}=5.90{sub −0.20}{sup +0.35} M{sub Jup}. We report the first detection of water vapor in the atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter, τ Boo b.

  10. Near-IR Direct Detection of Water Vapor in Tau Boo b

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, Alexandra C; Bender, Chad F; Carr, John S; Barman, Travis; Richert, Alexander J W; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2014-01-01

    We use high dynamic range, high-resolution L-band spectroscopy to measure the radial velocity variations of the hot Jupiter in the tau Bootis planetary system. The detection of an exoplanet by the shift in the stellar spectrum alone provides a measure of the planet's minimum mass, with the true mass degenerate with the unknown orbital inclination. Treating the tau Boo system as a high flux ratio double-lined spectroscopic binary permits the direct measurement of the planet's true mass as well as its atmospheric properties. After removing telluric absorption and cross-correlating with a model planetary spectrum dominated by water opacity, we measure a 6-sigma detection of the planet at K_p = 111 +- 5 km/s, with a 1-sigma upper limit on the spectroscopic flux ratio of 10^-4. This radial velocity leads to a planetary orbital inclination of i = 45+3-4degrees and a mass of M_P = 5.90+0.35-0.20 M_ Jup. We report the first detection of water vapor in the atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter, tau Boo b.

  11. Relating tropical ocean clouds to moist processes using water vapor isotope measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J.; Worden, J; D. Noone; Bowman, K.; Eldering, A.; A. LeGrande; Li, J.-L.F.; Schmidt, G.; H. Sodemann

    2011-01-01

    We examine the co-variations of tropospheric water vapor, its isotopic composition and cloud types and relate these distributions to tropospheric mixing and distillation models using satellite observations from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) over the summertime tropical ocean. Interpretation of these process distributions must take into account the sensitivity of the TES isotope and water vapor measurements to variations in cloud, water, and temperature amount. Consequently...

  12. Preliminary Results of 4-D Water Vapor Tomography in the Troposphere Using GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Slant-path water vapor amounts (SWV) from a station to all the GPS (Global Positioning System)satellites in view can be estimated by using a ground-based GPS receiver. In this paper, a tomographic method was utilized to retrieve the local horizontal and vertical structure of water vapor over a local GPS receiver network using SWV amounts as observables in the tomography. The method of obtaining SWV using ground-based GPS is described first, and then the theory of tomography using GPS is presented.A water vapor tomography experiment was made using a small GPS network in the Beijing region. The tomographic results were analyzed in two ways: (1) a pure GPS method, i.e., only using GPS observables as input to the tomography; (2) combining GPS observables with vertical constraints or a priori information,which come from average radiosonde measurements over three days. It is shown that the vertical structure of water vapor is well resolved with a priori information. Comparisons of profiles between radiosondes and GPS show that the RMS error of the tomography is about 1-2 mm. It is demonstrated that the tomography can monitor the evolution of tropospheric water vapor in space and time. The vertical resolution of the tomography is tested with layer thicknesses of 600 m, 800 m and 1000 m. Comparisons with radiosondes show that the result from a resolution of 800 m is slightly better than results from the other two resolutions in the experiment. Water vapor amounts recreated from the tomography field agree well with precipitable water vapor (PWV) calculated using GPS delays. Hourly tomographic results are also shown using the resolution of 800 m. Water vapor characteristics under the background of heavy rainfall development are analyzed using these tomographic results. The water vapor spatio-temporal structures derived from the GPS network show a great potential in the investigation of weather disasters.

  13. Comparative measurements of water vapor fluxes over a tall forest using open- and closed-path eddy covariance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eddy covariance using infrared gas analyses has been a useful tool for gas exchange measurements between soil, vegetation and atmosphere. So far, comparisons between the open- and closed-path eddy covariance (CP system have been extensively made on CO2 flux estimations, while lacking in the comparison of water vapor flux estimations. In this study, the specific performance of water vapor flux measurements of an open-path eddy covariance (OP system was compared against a CP system over a tall temperate forest in Northeast China. The results show that the fluxes from the OP system (LEop were generally greater than the (LEcp though the two systems shared one sonic anemometer. The tube delay of closed-path analyser depended on relative humidity, and the fixed median time lag contributed to a significant underestimation of (LEcp between the forest and atmosphere, while slight systematic overestimation was also found for covariance maximization method with single broad time lag search window. After the optimized time lag compensation was made, the average difference between the 30 min (LEop and (LEcp was generally within 6%. Integrated over the annual cycle, the CP system yielded a 5.1% underestimation of forest evapotranspiration as compared to the OP system measurements (493 vs. 469 mm yr−1. This study indicates the importance to estimate the sampling tube delay accurately for water vapor flux calculations with closed-path analysers, and it also suggests that when discuss the energy balance closure problem in flux sites with closed-path eddy covariance systems, it has to be aware that some of the imbalance is possibly caused by the systematic underestimation of water vapor fluxes.

  14. Variability of mesospheric water vapor above Bern in relation to the 27-day solar rotation cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainer, Martin; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-06-01

    Many studies investigated solar-terrestrial responses (thermal state, O3, OH, H2O) with emphasis on the tropical upper atmosphere. In this paper the focus is switched to water vapor in the mesosphere at a mid-latitudinal location. Eight years of water vapor profile measurements above Bern (46.88 ° N / 7.46 ° E) are investigated to study oscillations with the focus on periods between 10 and 50 days. Different spectral analyses revealed prominent features in the 27-day oscillation band, which are enhanced in the upper mesosphere (above 0.1 hPa, ∼ 64 km) during the rising sunspot activity of solar cycle 24. Local as well as zonal mean Aura MLS observations support these results by showing a similar behavior. The relationship between mesospheric water and the solar Lyman-α flux is studied by comparing the similarity of their temporal oscillations. The H2O oscillation is negatively correlated to solar Lyman-α oscillation with a correlation coefficient of up to - 0.3 to - 0.4, and the phase lag is 6-10 days at 0.04 hPa. The confidence level of the correlation is ≥ 99 %. This finding supports the assumption that the 27-day oscillation in Lyman-α causes a periodical photodissociation loss in mesospheric water. Wavelet power spectra, cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence analysis (WTC) complete our study. More periods of high common wavelet power of H2O and solar Lyman-α are present when amplitudes of the Lyman-α flux increase. Since this is not a measure of physical correlation a more detailed view on WTC is necessary, where significant (two sigma level) correlations occur intermittently in the 27 and 13-day band with variable phase lock behavior. Large Lyman-α oscillations appeared after the solar superstorm in July 2012 and the H2O oscillations show a well pronounced anti-correlation. The competition between advective transport and photodissociation loss of mesospheric water vapor may explain the sometimes variable phase relationship of mesospheric H2

  15. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  16. Isotopic Controls of Rainwater and Water Vapor on Mangrove Leaf Water and Lipid Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, N.; Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of sedimentary mangrove lipid biomarkers can be used as a proxy of past salinity and water isotopes. This approach is based on the observation that apparent 2H/1H fractionation between surface water and mangrove lipids increases with surface water salinity in six species of mangroves with different salt management strategies growing at sites spanning a range of relative humidities throughout Australia and Micronesia. In order to more robustly apply mangrove lipid δ2H as a paleoclimate proxy, we investigated the cause of the correlation between apparent 2H fractionation and salinity. We present results from two related experiments that assessed controls on isotopes of mangrove leaf water, the direct source of hydrogen in lipids: (1) Measurements of natural δ2H in precipitation, surface water, and mangrove tissue water from a series of lakes with varying salinity and water isotope composition in Palau, and (2) measurements of mangrove tissue water and treatment water from a controlled simulation in which mangroves were treated with artificial rain of varying isotopic composition. Rainwater 2H/1H fluctuations of 30‰ over a one-month period explain up to 65% of the variance in leaf water δ2H for Bruguiera gymnorhiza mangroves from Palau despite lake water isotope differences among sites of up to 35‰. This indicates that in humid tropical settings, leaf water isotopes are more closely related to those of precipitation and water vapor than to those of lake surface water, explaining the observed change in apparent fractionation in B. gymnorhiza lipids with salinity. The relationship between leaf water and rainwater isotopes may be due to either equilibration of leaf water with water vapor in the nearly saturated air or direct foliar uptake of rain and/or dew. Foliar uptake is an important water source for many plants, but has not been documented in mangroves. We tested the capacity for mangroves to perform this function by

  17. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C. [CBD, Salisbury (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  18. The verification of millennial-scale monsoon water vapor transport channel in northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Chengqi; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Long-term changes of the Asian summer monsoon water vapor transport play a pivotal role in the variability of monsoon precipitation. Paleo-climate simulations have shown that there is an important monsoon vapor transport channel in western China. Previous studies mostly focused on the correlation between monsoon precipitation and intensity. Little research has been done on the verification of the water vapor channel. Compared with speleothem and lacustrine systems, the hydrological cycle of land surface sediments is more directly related to the monsoon water vapor. In this study, we used carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of the surface eolian sediments from the piedmont of the northern Qilian Mountains to verify the monsoon water vapor on the Holocene millennial-scale. Two surface sedimentary sections were selected to study paleo-monsoon water vapor transport. Proxy data, including carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of surface eolian sediments, as well as total organic matter and carbonate content were obtained from the two eolian sections. We also synthesized transient simulations of the CCSM3 and the Kiel climate models. The PMIP 3.0 project and TRACE isotopic simulations were also compared with the reconstructed monsoon water vapor transport. Our findings indicate that the strength of the Holocene Asian summer monsoon is consistent with the water vapor transport in western China that has significant impacts to long-term monsoon precipitation in northern China. This study verifies a significant millennial-scale correlation between the monsoon strength and monsoon water vapor transport intensity along the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  19. Atmospheric pressure growth of Eu-doped GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Naoki; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Takashi; Terai, Yoshikazu; Fujiwara, Yasufumi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    We investigated the luminescence properties of the Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu) grown at atmospheric (100kPa) and low (10kPa) pressures by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). Although Eu concentration of atmospheric pressure GaN:Eu (AP-GaN:Eu) is lower than that of low pressure GaN:Eu (LP-GaN:Eu), the integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the AP-GaN:Eu was 10 times higher than that of the LP-GaN:Eu (A. Nishikawa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 051113 (2010)). Temperature dependent PL and time-resolved PL measurements revealed that the improved PL intensity was attributed to the higher crystal quality of the AP-GaN:Eu compared to that of the LP-GaN:Eu, which resulted in the enhancement of the energy transfer efficiency from the GaN host material to the Eu ions and in the increase in the number of optically active Eu ions. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Flux induced growth of atmospheric nano-particles by organic vapors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play critical roles in air quality, public health, and visibility. In addition, they strongly influence climate by scattering solar radiation and by changing the reflectivity and lifetime of clouds. One major but still poorly understood source of atmospheric aerosol is new particle formation, which consists of the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters from trace gas molecules (homogeneous nucleation followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size (~3 nm. Because freshly nucleated clusters are most susceptible to loss due to high rate of coagulation with pre-existing aerosol population, the initial growth rate strongly influences the rate of new particle formation and ambient aerosol population. Whereas many field observations and modeling studies indicate that organics enhance the initial growth of the clusters and therefore new particle formation, thermodynamic considerations would suggest that the strong increase of equilibrium vapor concentration due to cluster surface curvature (Kelvin effect may prevent ambient organics from condensing on these small clusters. Here the initial condensational growth of freshly nucleated clusters is described as heterogeneous nucleation of organic molecules onto these clusters. We find that the strong gradient in cluster population with respect to its size lead to positive cluster number flux, and therefore driving the growth of clusters substantially smaller than the Kelvin diameter, conventionally considered as the minimum particle size that can be grown through condensation. The conventional approach neglects this contribution from the cluster concentration gradient, and underestimates the rate of new particle formation by a factor of up to 60.

  1. Vertical Distribution of Aersols and Water Vapor Using CRISM Limb Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, R. Todd

    2011-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb allows the vertical distribution of both dust and ice aerosols to be retrieved. These data serve as an important supplement to the aerosol profiling provided by the MRO/MCS instrument allowing independent validation and giving additional information on particle physical and scattering properties through multi-wavelength studies. A total of at least ten CRISM limb observations have been taken so far covering a full Martian year. Each set of limb observations nominally contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude over the Tharsis and Syrtis/Hellas regions, respectively. At each longitude, limb scans are spaced roughly 10 degrees apart in latitude, with a vertical spatial resolution on the limb of roughly 800 m. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations. We compute synthetic CRISM limb spectra using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer code that accounts for multiple scattering from aerosols and accounts for spherical geometry of the limb observations by integrating the source functions along curved paths in that coordinate system. Retrieved are 14-point vertical profiles for dust and water ice aerosols with resolution of 0.4 scale heights between one and six scale heights above the surface. After the aerosol retrieval is completed, the abundances of C02 (or surface pressure) and H20 gas are retrieved by matching the depth of absorption bands at 2000 nm for carbon dioxide and at 2600 run for water vapor. In addition to the column abundance of water vapor, limited information on its vertical structure can also be retrieved depending on the signal

  2. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Heterogeneous condensation of combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. I.; Filippov, B. V.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines during last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmospheric with different types of fuels is considered. Particle heating is taken into account with emission of latent heat of condensation and energy loss due to radiation and heat exchange with combustion products. Using the solution of the heat balance and condensed particle mass equations, the temporal change in the temperature and thickness of the condensate layer is obtained. Practically, no condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhaust of a Start launcher occurs. In plumes of Proton and Molniya launchers, the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can start at distances of 120-170 m and 450-650 m from the engine nozzle, respectively. In the course of condensation, the thickness of the "water" layer on particles can exceed 100 Å, and the thickness of carbon dioxide can exceed 60 Å.

  3. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  4. Stratospheric profiles of heavy water vapor isotopes and CH3D from analysis of the ATMOS Spacelab 3 infrared solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Foster, J. C.; Toth, R. A.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor and methane was investigated. Stratospheric profiles of HDO, (H-18)2O, (H-17)2O, and CH3D were derived from solar occultation spectra recorded on April 30 - May 1, 1985 by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer aboard Spacelab 3. The profiles of the three water-vapor isotopes showed an increase in the volume mixing ratio with altitude. The measured profiles of D/H in water vapor showed a large depletion in the lower stratosphere (about 63 percent relative to standard mean ocean water, SMOW, at 20 km) and a small increase in D/H with altitude at higher altitudes, up to 34 km. The D/H ratio in stratospheric methane was close to the corresponding isotopic ratio in SMOW.

  5. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    an important example. Understanding surface solar 'dimming' and 'brightening' trends in the context of past and current changes in the water cycle are discussed in a guest editorial by Wild and Liepert (2010). The key roles anthropogenic aerosols can play on a regional scale are discussed by Lau et al (2010) through their study of the regional impact of absorbing aerosols on warming and snow melt over the Himalayas. The overarching goal of climate prediction is to provide reliable, probabilistic estimates of future changes. Relating hydrological responses back to a sound physical basis, the motivation for this special focus issue, is paramount in building confidence in anticipated changes, especially in the global water cycle. We are grateful to the reviewers and the journal editorial board for making this focus issue possible. Focus on Anticipated Changes in the Global Atmospheric Water Cycle Contents Editorials The global atmospheric water cycle Lennart Bengtsson The Earth radiation balance as driver of the global hydrological cycle Martin Wild and Beate Liepert Letters Enhanced surface warming and accelerated snow melt in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau induced by absorbing aerosols William K M Lau, Maeng-Ki Kim, Kyu-Myong Kim and Woo-Seop Lee Current changes in tropical precipitation Richard P Allan, Brian J Soden, Viju O John, William Ingram and Peter Good Direct versus indirect effects of tropospheric humidity changes on the hydrologic cycle S C Sherwood How closely do changes in surface and column water vapor follow Clausius-Clapeyron scaling in climate change simulations? P A O'Gorman and C J Muller Linking increases in hourly precipitation extremes to atmospheric temperature and moisture changes Geert Lenderink and Erik van Meijgaard Are climate-related changes to the character of global-mean precipitation predictable? Graeme L Stephens and Yongxiang Hu A comparison of large scale changes in surface humidity over land in observations and CMIP3 general

  6. Experimental Research on Water