WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric turbulence

  1. Atmospheric turbulence and diffusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (well known in the atmospheric dispersion community as the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory, ATDL) is one of several field facilities of NOAAs Air Resources Laboratory, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. The laboratory conducts research on matters of atmospheric diffusion and turbulent exchange, concerning air quality. ATDD focuses attention on the physics of the lower atmosphere, with special emphasis on the processes contributing to atmospheric transport, dispersion, deposition, and air-surface exchange, and on the development of predictive capabilities using the results of this research. Research is directed toward issues of national and global importance related to the missions of DOE, to DOE's Oak Ridge Field Office, and to NOAA. The program is divided into four major projects: plume transport and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer, complex topography, canopy micrometeorology, and air-surface exchange

  2. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a...... eigenfunctions and estimates of the distributions of the corresponding expansion coefficients. The simulation method utilizes the eigenfunction expansion procedure to produce preliminary time histories of the three velocity components simultaneously. As a final step, a spectral shaping procedure is then applied....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence....

  3. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  4. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Peng Kian; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement scheme...

  5. Atmospheric turbulence over crops : confronting theories with observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, van de A.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence plays a key role in hydrological and carbon cycles, and in weather and climate. Understanding and forecasting turbulence is thereby relevant for human life and environment. We deal with some major challenges for studying atmospheric turbulence over crops. Land-atmosphere inter

  6. General optical scintillation in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruizhong Rao

    2008-01-01

    A general expression of the scintillation index is proposed for optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere under arbitrary fluctuation conditions. The expression depends on extreme behaviors of the scintillation indices under both weak and strong fluctuations. The maximum scintillation index in the onset region and the corresponding Rytov index can be evaluated from the general expression. Plane and spherical waves in the cases of zero and non-zero turbulence inner scale are given as examples for illustration of the general behaviors of scintillation indices.

  7. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  8. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  9. Propagation of Gauss-Bessel beams in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Bao-Suan; Pu Ji-Xiong

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the propagation properties of Gauss鈥擝essel beams in a turbulent atmosphere. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, it derives the intensity distribution expression for such beams propagating in a turbulent atmosphere. Then the influence of turbulence and source beam parameters on the beam propagation is studied in great detail. It finds that the intensity distribution of Gauss-Bessel beams will change into Gaussian profile in a turbulent atmosphere, and that stronger turbulence and smaller topological charges will lead to a faster changing.

  10. Wind turbine wake in atmospheric turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethore, P.-E.

    2009-10-15

    This thesis describes the different steps needed to design a steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind farm wake model. The ultimate goal of the project was to design a tool that could analyze and extrapolate systematically wind farm measurements to generate wind maps in order to calibrate faster and simpler engineering wind farm wake models. The most attractive solution was the actuator disc method with the steady state k-epsilon turbulence model. The first step to design such a tool is the treatment of the forces. This thesis presents a computationally inexpensive method to apply discrete body forces into the finite-volume flow solver with collocated variable treatment (EllipSys), which avoids the pressure-velocity decoupling issue. The second step is to distribute the body forces in the computational domain accordingly to rotor loading. This thesis presents a generic flexible method that associates any kind of shapes with the computational domain discretization. The special case of the actuator disc performs remarkably well in comparison with Conway's heavily loaded actuator disc analytical solution and a CFD full rotor computation, even with a coarse discretization. The third step is to model the atmospheric turbulence. The standard k-epsilon model is found to be unable to model at the same time the atmospheric turbulence and the actuator disc wake and performs badly in comparison with single wind turbine wake measurements. A comparison with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) shows that the problem mainly comes from the assumptions of the eddy-viscosity concept, which are deeply invalidated in the wind turbine wake region. Different models that intent to correct the k-epsilon model's issues are investigated, of which none of them is found to be adequate. The mixing of the wake in the atmosphere is a deeply non-local phenomenon that is not handled correctly by an eddy-viscosity model such as k-epsilon. (author)

  11. Atmospheric turbulence over crops : confronting theories with observations

    OpenAIRE

    Boer

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence plays a key role in hydrological and carbon cycles, and in weather and climate. Understanding and forecasting turbulence is thereby relevant for human life and environment. We deal with some major challenges for studying atmospheric turbulence over crops. Land-atmosphere interactions are specifically complex because of surface heterogeneity. Also, boundary-layer entrainment complicates measuring and studying surface fluxes. Furthermore, the absence of high-frequency obs...

  12. Entropy studies on beam distortion by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C.

    2015-09-01

    When a beam propagates through atmospheric turbulence over a known distance, the target beam profile deviates from the projected profile of the beam on the receiver. Intuitively, the unwanted distortion provides information about the atmospheric turbulence. This information is crucial for guiding adaptive optic systems and improving beam propagation results. In this paper, we propose an entropy study based on the image from a plenoptic sensor to provide a measure of information content of atmospheric turbulence. In general, lower levels of atmospheric turbulence will have a smaller information size while higher levels of atmospheric turbulence will cause significant expansion of the information size, which may exceed the maximum capacity of a sensing system and jeopardize the reliability of an AO system. Therefore, the entropy function can be used to analyze the turbulence distortion and evaluate performance of AO systems. In fact, it serves as a metric that can tell the improvement of beam correction in each iteration step. In addition, it points out the limitation of an AO system at optimized correction as well as the minimum information needed for wavefront sensing to achieve certain levels of correction. In this paper, we will demonstrate the definition of the entropy function and how it is related to evaluating information (randomness) carried by atmospheric turbulence.

  13. Large-eddy simulations of contrails in a turbulent atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. This is the first paper where fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The initial flow-field is composed by the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail decent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex break-up dominates over background turbulence at the end of the vortex regime and dominates the mixing with ambient air. This results in global microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are be slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, the background humidity and temperature have a first order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent and ongoing studies in the literature.

  14. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-05-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  15. Atmospheric Quantum Channels with Weak and Strong Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylyev, D; Semenov, A A; Vogel, W

    2016-08-26

    The free-space transfer of high-fidelity optical signals between remote locations has many applications, including both classical and quantum communication, precision navigation, clock synchronization, etc. The physical processes that contribute to signal fading and loss need to be carefully analyzed in the theory of light propagation through the atmospheric turbulence. Here we derive the probability distribution for the atmospheric transmittance including beam wandering, beam shape deformation, and beam-broadening effects. Our model, referred to as the elliptic beam approximation, applies to weak, weak-to-moderate, and strong turbulence and hence to the most important regimes in atmospheric communication scenarios. PMID:27610835

  16. Atmospheric Quantum Channels with Weak and Strong Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Vasylyev, D; Vogel, W

    2016-01-01

    The free-space transfer of high-fidelity optical signals between remote locations has many applications, including both classical and quantum communication, precision navigation, clock synchronization, etc. The physical processes that contribute to signal fading and loss need to be carefully analyzed in the theory of light propagation through the atmospheric turbulence. Here we derive the probability distribution for the atmospheric transmittance including beam-wandering, beam shape deformation, and beam broadening effects. Our model, referred to as elliptic beam approximation, applies to both weak and strong turbulence and hence to the most important regimes in atmospheric communication scenarios.

  17. Turbulence Scales Simulations in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Elena-Carmen Teleman; Radu Silion; Elena Axinte; Radu Pescaru

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of the air flow over models in atmospheric boundary layer tunnels is a research domain based on advanced scientific technologies imposed by the necessity of studying the turbulent fluid movements in the proximity of the Earth’s surface. The experiment presented herein is developed in the wind tunnel from the Laboratory of Structural Aerodynamics of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Building Services in Iassy. Measurements necessary for the determination of the turbulence sca...

  18. Numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric boundary layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennes, L.; Bodnar, T.; Kozel, K.; Sladek, I. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics; Fraunie, P. [Universite Toulon et du Var, La Garde (France). Lab. de Sondages Electromagnetiques de l' Environment Terrestre

    2001-07-01

    The work deals with the numerical solution of viscous turbulent steady flows in the atmospheric boundary layer including pollution propagation. For its description we use two different mathematical models: - a model based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows - a model based on a system of boundary layer equations. These systems are completed by two transport equations for the concentration of passive pollutants and the potential temperature in conservative form, respectively, and by an algebraic turbulence model. (orig.)

  19. Atmospheric turbulence parameters for modeling wind turbine dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, W. E.; Thresher, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A model which can be used to predict the response of wind turbines to atmospheric turbulence is given. The model was developed using linearized aerodynamics for a three-bladed rotor and accounts for three turbulent velocity components as well as velocity gradients across the rotor disk. Typical response power spectral densities are shown. The system response depends critically on three wind and turbulence parameters, and models are presented to predict desired response statistics. An equation error method, which can be used to estimate the required parameters from field data, is also presented.

  20. Why turbulence sustains in supercritically stratified free atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    It is widely believed that in very stable stratifications, at Richardson numbers (Ri) exceeding critical value Ric ˜ 0.25 turbulence decays and flow becomes laminar. This is so at low Reynolds numbers (Re), e.g., in lab experiments; but this is not true in very-high-Re geophysical flows. Free atmosphere and deep ocean are turbulent in spite of strongly supercritical stratifications: 1 self-control mechanisms. Until recently, the role of negative buoyancy flux, Fb > 0, in turbulence energetics was treated in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation and understood as just consumption of TKE by the buoyancy forces. This has led to the conclusion that sufficiently strong static stability causes the negative buoyancy flux sufficiently strong to exceed the TKE generation rate and thus to kill turbulence. However, considering TKE equation together with budget equation for turbulent potential energy (TPE proportional to the squared buoyancy fluctuations) shows that the role of Fb in turbulence energetics is nothing but conversion of TKE into TPE (Fb just quantifies the rate of this conversion); so that Fb does not affect total turbulent energy (TTE = TKE + TPE). Moreover, as follows from the buoyancy-flux budget equation, TPE generates positive (directed upward) buoyancy flux irrespective of the sign of the buoyancy gradient. Indeed, the warmer fluid particles (with positive buoyancy fluctuation) rise up, whereas the cooler particles sink down, so that both contribute to the positive buoyancy flux opposing to the usual, negative flux generated by mean buoyancy gradient. In this context, strengthening the negative buoyancy flux leads to decreasing TKE and increasing TPE. The latter enhances the counter-gradient share of the total flux, thus reduces |Fb| and, eventually, increases TKE. The above negative feedback was disregarded in the conventional concept of down-gradient turbulent transport. This mechanism imposes a limit on the maximal (independent of

  1. The theoretical model of atmospheric turbulence spectrum in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shida; Liu, Shikuo; Xin, Guojun; Liang, Fuming

    1994-12-01

    It is shown that the slope of energy spectrum obtained from the velocity solution of Kdv—Burgers equation lies between —5/3 and—2 in the dilogarithmic coordinates paper. The spectrum is very close to one of Kolmogorov's isotropic turbulence and Frisch's intermittent turbulence in inertial region. In this paper, the Kdv-Burgers equation to describe atmospheric boundary layer turbulence is obtained. In the equation, the 1 / R e corresponds to dissipative coefficient v, R /2 t to dispersive coefficient β, then ( v/2 β)2 corresponds to 1 / R 2 e • Ri. We prove that the wave number corresponding to maximum energy spectrum S(k) decreases with the decrease of stability (i.e., the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 in eddy—containing region. And the spectrim amplitude decreases with the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 (i.e., the decrease of stability). These results are consistent with actual turbulence spectrum of atmospheric surface layer from turbulence data.

  2. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  3. Atmospheric turbulence within and above an Amazon forest

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, F M; Sá, L D A; Rosa, R R; Ramos, Fernando M.; Bolzan, Mauricio J. A.; Sa, Leonardo D. A.; Rosa, Reinaldo R.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the impact of a rain forest canopy on the statistical characteristics of atmospheric turbulence. This issue is of particular interest for understanding on how the Amazon terrestrial biosphere interact with the atmosphere. For this, we used a probability density function model of velocity and temperature differences based on Tsallis' non-extensive thermostatistics. We compared theoretical results with experimental data measured in a 66 m micrometeorological tower, during the wet-season campaign of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). Particularly, we investigated how the value of the entropic parameter is affected when one moves into the canopy, or when one passes from day/unstable to night/stable conditions. We show that this new approach provides interesting insights on turbulence in a complex environment such as the Amazon forest.

  4. A computer-based simulator of the atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, Petr A.

    2015-11-01

    Computer software for modeling the atmospheric turbulence is developed on the basis of a time-varying random medium simulation algorithm and a split-step Fourier transform method for solving a wave propagation equation. A judicious choice of the simulator parameters, like the velocity of the evolution and motion of the medium, turbulence spectrum and scales, enables different effects of a random medium on the optical wavefront to be simulated. The implementation of the simulation software is shown to be simple and efficient due to parallel programming functions from the MKL Intel ® Parallel Studio libraries.

  5. Scintillation index of optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Rui-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A concise expression of the scintillation index is proposed for a plane optical wave and a spherical optical wave both propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with a zero inner scale and a finite inner scale under an arbitrary fluc- tuation condition. The expression is based on both the results in the Rytov approximation under a weak fluctuation condition and the numerical results in a strong fluctuation regime. The maximum value of the scintillation index and its corresponding Rytov index axe evaluated. These quantities are affected by the ratio of the turbulence inner scale to the Frcsnel size.

  6. Coherent Doppler wind lidars in a turbulent atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Banakh, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Radiophysical tools for measuring atmospheric dynamics include sodars, Doppler radars, and Doppler lidars. Among these, coherent Doppler lidars (CDLs) have been considered the best for remote measurement of wind turbulence. This is important not only for understanding the exchange processes in the boundary layer, but also in the applied aspect, such as aviation safety. CDLs significantly extend possibilities of experimental investigation of not only wind turbulence, but also coherent structures such as aircraft wake vortices. The authors of this book conducted field tests of the developed meth

  7. Restoring atmospheric-turbulence-degraded images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furhad, Md Hasan; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Image data experiences geometric distortions and spatial-temporal varying blur due to the strong effects of random spatial and temporal variations in the optical refractive index of the communication path. Simultaneously removing these effects from an image is a challenging task. An efficient approach is proposed in this paper to address this problem. The approach consists of four steps. First, a frame selection strategy is employed by proposing an unsupervised k-means clustering technique. Second, a B-spline-based nonrigid image registration is carried out to suppress geometric distortions. Third, a spatiotemporal kernel regression is proposed by introducing the local sharp patch concept to fuse the registered frame sequences into an image. Finally, a blind deconvolution technique is employed to deblur the fused image. Experiments are carried out with synthetic and real-world turbulence-degraded data by implementing the proposed method and two recently reported methods. The proposed method demonstrates significant improvement over the two reported methods in terms of alleviating blur and distortions, as well as improving visual quality. PMID:27409194

  8. Turbulence Scales Simulations in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Carmen Teleman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of the air flow over models in atmospheric boundary layer tunnels is a research domain based on advanced scientific technologies imposed by the necessity of studying the turbulent fluid movements in the proximity of the Earth’s surface. The experiment presented herein is developed in the wind tunnel from the Laboratory of Structural Aerodynamics of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Building Services in Iassy. Measurements necessary for the determination of the turbulence scales of the wind action in urban environment were conducted. The data obtained were processed and analyzed and interpreted with specific software. The results are used for a synthesis regarding the scales of turbulence of the model of flow and the actual accuracy of measurements. The paper presents some of the important elements of this synthesis.

  9. Aeroelectric structures and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Anisimov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex electrical measurements with the use of sodar data show that electric field pulsation analysis is useful for electrodynamics/turbulence monitoring under different conditions. In particular, the number of aeroelectric structures (AES generated per hour is a convenient measure of the turbulence intensity. During convectively unstable periods, as many as 5–10 AES form per hour. Under stable conditions, AES occasionally form as well, indicating the appearance of occasional mixing events reflected in the electric field perturbations. AES magnitudes under stable conditions are relatively small, except in special cases such as high humidity and fog. The analysis of electric field (EF spectra gives additional useful information on the parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer and its turbulence. A rather sharp change in the spectrum slope takes place in the vicinity of 0.02 Hz under stable conditions. The characteristic slope of the spectrum and its change are reproduced in a simple model of EF formation.

  10. Scattering from a rough surface in presence of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Santasri; Hyde, Milo W.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    A Gaussian Schell Model (GSM) might be a convenient way to model extended beacons created on diffuse targets. Earlier, we used a full wave computational technique called the Method of Moments (MoM) to evaluate the scattered field from a rough impedance surface in vacuum. The MoM model showed several deviations from GSM. The present work uses a simulation approach based on physical optics approximation to study the scattering behavior in presence of atmospheric turbulence. A fully coherent beam is propagated through weak turbulence and is incident on the rough surface. The light scattered from the rough surface is again propagated through turbulence back to the source plane and the properties of the scattered radiation are studied through numerical simulations. The simulation results are compared with a GSM.

  11. Higher order correlation beams in atmosphere under strong turbulence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, H; Monken, C H

    2016-02-01

    Higher order correlation beams, that is, two-photon beams obtained from the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by Hermite-Gauss or Laguerre-Gauss beams of any order, can be used to encode information in many modes, opening the possibility of quantum communication with large alphabets. In this paper we calculate, analytically, the fourth-order correlation function for the Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss coherent and partially coherent correlation beams propagating through a strong turbulent medium. We show that fourth-order correlation functions for correlation beams have, under certain conditions, expressions similar to those of intensities of classical beams and are degraded by turbulence in a similar way as the classical beams. Our results can be useful in establishing limits for the use of two-photon beams in quantum communications with larger alphabets under atmospheric turbulence. PMID:26906808

  12. Atmospheric waves and the nature of buoyancy turbulence in the context of the waves VS 2D-turbulence debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of how to empirically distinguish between velocity fluctuations due to turbulence and those due to atmospheric waves is addressed. The physical differences between waves and turbulence are reviewed. New theoretical ideas on the subject of bouyancy range turbulence are presented. A unique scale K sub B is given that allows one to differentiate between waves and turbulence for the special case of theta = 0 (i.e., horizontal propagating waves).

  13. Decoherence of orbital angular momentum entanglement in a turbulent atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Filippus S.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of an entangled photon state propagating through a turbulent atmosphere is formulated in terms of a set of coupled first order differential equations, by using an infinitesimal propagation approach. The orbital angular momentum (OAM) basis is used to described the density matrix of the state. Although the analysis is done in the paraxial limit for a monochromatic optical field, the formalism is comprehensive in the sense that it does not require any assumptions about the strengt...

  14. PROPAGATION OF ADAPTIVELY CORRECTED LASER BEAMS THROUGH A TURBULENT ATMOSPHERE

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonnette, L

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model for solving the propagation problem of laser beams travelling in atmospheric turbulence and corrected by adaptive optics. The modeling of the adaptive optics is mathematically simple but sufficiently general to encompass the majority of the existing systems. The method allows the prediction of the average irradiance and the irradiance variance beam profiles for arbitrary scintillation levels. Typical solutions are presented for 3.8 and 10.6 µm laser b...

  15. Time frequency spectrum of atmospheric turbulence and sweeping hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The present study is focused on the structure of time frequency spectrum.A scaling law for Eulerian time frequency spectrum and the corresponding temporal structure function are calculated from the sweeping hypothesis and Kolmogorov's similarity law regarding spatial structure function.An experiment is designed to study this scaling law in the atmospheric turbulent boundary layer.The results well support the conclusion derived from relevant theoretical analysis.

  16. Registration of vortex beam parameters in a turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper detection of vortex beam parameters in a turbulent atmosphere is considered numerically. The characteristics of singular radiation were obtained with the use of wavefront gradients, i.e. an ideal system was simulated. After that, a model of a Shack–Hartmann sensor was included in the calculation schematic which allowed us to assess the influence of the device limitations on the precision of registration and optimize its parameters. (paper)

  17. Scintillation reduction for laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We numerically examine the spatial evolution of the structure of coherent and partially coherent laser beams, including the optical vortices, propagating in turbulent atmospheres. The influence of beam fragmentation and wandering relative to the axis of propagation (z-axis) on the value of the scintillation index (SI) of the signal at the detector is analysed. These studies were performed for different dimensions of the detector, distances of propagation, and strengths of the atmospheric turbulence. Methods for significantly reducing the SI are described. These methods utilize averaging of the signal at the detector over a set of partially coherent beams (PCBs). It is demonstrated that the most effective approach is using a set of PCBs with definite initial directions of propagation relative to the z-axis. This approach results in a significant compensation of the beam wandering which in many cases is the main contributor to the SI. A novel method is to generate the PCBs by combining two laser beams-Gaussian and vortex beams, with different frequencies (the difference between these two frequencies being significantly smaller than the frequencies themselves). In this case, the effective suppression of the SI does not require high-frequency modulators. This result is important for achieving gigabit data rates in long-distance laser communication through turbulent atmospheres.

  18. Efficient Turbulent Compressible Convection in the Deep Stellar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Chun-Lin; Chan, Kwing-Lam; Xiong, Da-Run

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports an application of gas-kinetic BGK scheme to the computation of turbulent compressible convection in the stellar interior. After incorporating the Sub-grid Scale (SGS) turbulence model into the BGK scheme, we tested the effects of numerical parameters on the quantitative relationships among the thermodynamic variables, their fluctuations and correlations in a very deep, initially gravity-stratified stellar atmosphere. Comparison indicates that the thermal properties and dynamic properties are dominated by different aspects of numerical models separately. An adjustable Deardorff constant in the SGS model $c_\\mu=0.25$ and an amplitude of artificial viscosity in the gas-kinetic BGK scheme $C_2=0$ are appropriate for current study. We also calculated the density-weighted auto- and cross-correlation functions in Xiong's (\\cite{xiong77}) turbulent stellar convection theories based on which the gradient type of models of the non-local transport and the anisotropy of the turbulence are preliminarily...

  19. Theoretical comparison of subgrid turbulence in the atmosphere and ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsios, V.; Frederiksen, J. S.; Zidikheri, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the massive disparity between the largest and smallest eddies in the atmosphere and ocean, it is not possible to simulate these flows by explicitly resolving all scales on a computational grid. Instead the large scales are explicitly resolved, and the interactions between the unresolved subgrid turbulence and large resolved scales are parameterised. If these interactions are not properly represented then an increase in resolution will not necessarily improve the accuracy of the large scales. This has been a significant and long standing problem since the earliest climate simulations. Historically subgrid models for the atmosphere and ocean have been developed in isolation, with the structure of each motivated by different physical phenomena. Here we solve the turbulence closure problem by determining the parameterisation coefficients (eddy viscosities) from the subgrid statistics of high resolution quasi-geostrophic atmospheric and oceanic simulations. These subgrid coefficients are characterised into a set of simple unifying scaling laws, for truncations made within the enstrophy cascading inertial range. The ocean additionally has an inverse energy cascading range, within which the subgrid model coefficients have alternative scaling properties. Simulations adopting these scaling laws are shown to reproduce the statistics of the reference benchmark simulations across resolved scales, with orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency. This reduction in both resolution dependence and computational effort will improve the efficiency and accuracy of geophysical research and operational activities that require data generated by general circulation models, including: weather, seasonal and climate prediction; transport studies; and understanding natural variability and extreme events.

  20. Theoretical comparison of subgrid turbulence in the atmosphere and ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kitsios

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the massive disparity between the largest and smallest eddies in the atmosphere and ocean, it is not possible to simulate these flows by explicitly resolving all scales on a computational grid. Instead the large scales are explicitly resolved, and the interactions between the unresolved subgrid turbulence and large resolved scales are parameterised. If these interactions are not properly represented then an increase in resolution will not necessarily improve the accuracy of the large scales. This has been a significant and long standing problem since the earliest climate simulations. Historically subgrid models for the atmosphere and ocean have been developed in isolation, with the structure of each motivated by different physical phenomena. Here we solve the turbulence closure problem by determining the parameterisation coefficients (eddy viscosities from the subgrid statistics of high resolution quasi-geostrophic atmospheric and oceanic simulations. These subgrid coefficients are characterised into a set of simple unifying scaling laws, for truncations made within the enstrophy cascading inertial range. The ocean additionally has an inverse energy cascading range, within which the subgrid model coefficients have alternative scaling properties. Simulations adopting these scaling laws are shown to reproduce the statistics of the reference benchmark simulations across resolved scales, with orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency. This reduction in both resolution dependence and computational effort will improve the efficiency and accuracy of geophysical research and operational activities that require data generated by general circulation models, including: weather, seasonal and climate prediction; transport studies; and understanding natural variability and extreme events.

  1. Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence Effect on Terrestrial FSO Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbulence results in many effects causing fluctuation in the received optical power. Terrestrial laser beam communication is affected above all by scintillations. The paper deals with modeling the influence of scintillation on link performance, using the modified Rytov theory. The probability of correct signal detection in direct detection system in dependence on many parameters such as link distance, power link margin, refractive-index structure parameter, etc. is discussed and different approaches to the evaluation of scintillation effect are compared. The simulations are performed for a horizontal-path propagation of the Gaussian-beam wave.

  2. Compensating image degradation due to atmospheric turbulence in anisoplanatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Claudia S.

    2009-05-01

    In imaging applications the prevalent effects of atmospheric turbulence comprise image dancing and image blurring. Suggestions from the field of image processing to compensate for these turbulence effects and restore degraded imagery include Motion-Compensated Averaging (MCA) for image sequences. In isoplanatic conditions, such an averaged image can be considered as a non-distorted image that has been blurred by an unknown Point Spread Function (PSF) of the same size as the pixel motions due to the turbulence and a blind deconvolution algorithm can be employed for the final image restoration. However, when imaging over a long horizontal path close to the ground, conditions are likely to be anisoplanatic and image dancing will effect local image displacements between consecutive frames rather than global shifts only. Therefore, in this paper, a locally operating variant of the MCA-procedure is proposed, utilizing Block Matching (BM) in order to identify and re-arrange uniformly displaced image parts. For the final restoration a multistage blind deconvolution algorithm is used and the corresponding deconvolution results are presented and evaluated.

  3. Two-color correlation between intensity fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meilan; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between intensity fluctuations generated by two varying wavelengths through a turbulent medium is investigated, where the influences arising from source correlation and perturbation of atmosphere are mainly emphasized. It is demonstrated that the correlation between intensity fluctuations can be enhanced or reduced by modulating the difference of two incident wavelengths. For shorter wavelength, the correlation between intensity fluctuations is stronger at the far field. In addition, in the case of single wavelength, a relationship λ1z1 =λ2z2 =λnzn holding in free space could be found, from which the distance where the peak value occurs may be inferred. However, it can be destroyed by increasing the strength of atmosphere.

  4. Some issues on modeling atmospheric turbulence experienced by helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Mark; Gaonkar, G. H.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence velocities seen by nonrotating aircraft components and rotating blades can be substantially different. The differences are due to the spatial motion of the rotor blades, which move fore and aft through the gust waves. Body-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the actual atmospheric turbulence experienced by a point fixed on a nonrotating aircraft component such as the aircraft's center of gravity or the rotor hub, while blade-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the atmospheric turbulence experienced by an element of the rotating rotor blade. An example is presented, which, though overly simplified, shows important differences between blade- and body-fixed rotorcraft atmospheric turbulence models. All of the information necessary to develop the dynamic equations describing the atmospheric turbulence velocity field experienced by an aircraft is contained in the atmospheric turbulence velocity correlation matrix. It is for this reason that a generalized formulation of the correlation matrix describing atmospheric turbulence that a rotating blade encounters is developed. From this correlation matrix, earlier treated cases restricted to a rotor flying straight and level directly into the mean wind can be recovered as special cases.

  5. Review of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Yagüe Anguis, Carlos; otros, ...

    2015-01-01

    Flow in a stably stratified environment is characterized by anisotropic and intermittent turbulence and wavelike motions of varying amplitudes and periods. Understanding turbulence intermittency and wave-turbulence interactions in a stably stratified flow remains a challenging issue in geosciences including planetary atmospheres and oceans. The stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) commonly occurs when the ground surface is cooled by longwave radiation emission such as at night over land s...

  6. Atmospheric turbulence profiling using multiple laser star wavefront sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Angela; Guesalaga, Andrés; Osborn, James; Rigaut, Francois; Guzman, Dani

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the data preprocessing and reduction methods together with SLODAR analysis and wind profiling techniques for GeMS: the Gemini MCAO System. The wavefront gradient measurements of the five GeMS's Shack-Hartmann sensors, each one pointing to a laser guide star, are combined with the DM commands sent to three deformable mirrors optically conjugated at 0, 4.5 and 9 km in order to reconstruct pseudo-open loop slopes. These pseudo-open loop slopes are then used to reconstruct atmospheric turbulence profiles, based on the SLODAR and wind-profiling methods. We introduce the SLODAR method, and how it has been adapted to work in a close-loop, multi Laser Guide Star system. We show that our method allows characterizing the turbulence of up to 16 layers for altitudes spanning from 0 to 19 km. The data preprocessing and reduction methods are described, and results obtained from observations made in 2011 are presented. The wind profiling analysis is shown to be a powerful technique not only for characte...

  7. Investigation of the influence of atmospheric stability and turbulence on land-atmosphere exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osibanjo, O.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes are exchanged between the surface of the earth and the atmosphere and impact weather, climate, and air quality. The radiation from the sun triggers the surface-atmosphere interaction during the day as heat is transmitted to the surface and the surface heats the air directly above generating wind (i.e., thermal turbulence) that transports heat, moisture, and momentum in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This process is impacted by greenhouse gasses (i.e., water vapor, carbon dioxide and other trace gases) that absorb heat emitted by the earth's surface. The concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gasses are increasing leading to changes in ABL dynamics as a result of the changing surface energy balance. The ABL processes are important to characterize because they are difficult to parameterize in global and regional scale atmospheric models. Empirical data can be collected using eddy covariance micrometeorological methods to measure turbulent fluxes (e.g., sensible heat, moisture, and CO2) and quantify the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. The objective of this work is to calculate surface fluxes using observational data collected during one week in September 2014 from a monitoring site in Echo, Oregon. The site is located in the Columbia Basin with rolling terrain, irrigated farmland, and over 100 wind turbines. The 10m tower was placed in a small valley depression to isolate nighttime cold air pools. This work will present observations of momentum, sensible heat, moisture, and carbon dioxide fluxes from data collected at a sampling frequency of 10Hz at four heights. Atmospheric stability is determined using Monin-Obukov length and flux Richardson number, and the impact of stability on surface-atmosphere exchange is investigated. This work will provide a better understanding of surface fluxes and mixing, particularly during stable ABL periods, and the results can be used to compare with numerical models.

  8. Random bits, true and unbiased, from atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Davide G; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Random numbers represent a fundamental ingredient for secure communications and numerical simulation as well as to games and in general to Information Science. Physical processes with intrinsic unpredictability may be exploited to generate genuine random numbers. The optical propagation in strong atmospheric turbulence is here taken to this purpose, by observing a laser beam after a 143 km free-space path. In addition, we developed an algorithm to extract the randomness of the beam images at the receiver without post-processing. The numbers passed very selective randomness tests for qualification as genuine random numbers. The extracting algorithm can be easily generalized to random images generated by different physical processes. PMID:24976499

  9. Energy extraction from atmospheric turbulence to improve flight vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chinmay Karsandas

    Small 'bird-sized' Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have now become practical due to technological advances in embedded electronics, miniature sensors and actuators, and propulsion systems. Birds are known to take advantage of wind currents to conserve energy and fly long distances without flapping their wings. This dissertation explores the possibility of improving the performance of small UAVs by extracting the energy available in atmospheric turbulence. An aircraft can gain energy from vertical gusts by increasing its lift in regions of updraft and reducing its lift in downdrafts - a concept that has been known for decades. Starting with a simple model of a glider flying through a sinusoidal gust, a parametric optimization approach is used to compute the minimum gust amplitude and optimal control input required for the glider to sustain flight without losing energy. For small UAVs using optimal control inputs, sinusoidal gusts with amplitude of 10--15% of the cruise speed are sufficient to keep the aircraft aloft. The method is then modified and extended to include random gusts that are representative of natural turbulence. A procedure to design optimal control laws for energy extraction from realistic gust profiles is developed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). A feedback control law is designed to perform well over a variety of random gusts, and not be tailored for one particular gust. A small UAV flying in vertical turbulence is shown to obtain average energy savings of 35--40% with the use of a simple control law. The design procedure is also extended to determine optimal control laws for sinusoidal as well as turbulent lateral gusts. The theoretical work is complemented by experimental validation using a small autonomous UAV. The development of a lightweight autopilot and UAV platform is presented. Flight test results show that active control of the lift of an autonomous glider resulted in approximately 46% average energy savings compared to glides with fixed

  10. Synthetic atmospheric turbulence and wind shear in large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels; de Maré, Martin; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2014-01-01

    A method of generating a synthetic ambient wind field in neutral atmosphere is described and verified for modelling the effect of wind shear and turbulence on a wind turbine wake using the flow solver EllipSys3D. The method uses distributed volume forces to represent turbulent fluctuations...... developed stage in the domain. The performance of the method is verified by comparing the turbulence intensity and spectral distribution of the turbulent energy to the spectral distribution of turbulence generated by the IEC suggested Mann model. Second, the synthetic turbulence and wind shear is used as...... the synthetic methods is found to be adequate to model atmospheric turbulence, and the wake flow results of the model are in good agreement with field data. An investigation is also carried out to estimate the wake transport velocity, used to model wake meandering in lower-order models. The conclusion...

  11. The collapse of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Wiel, B J H; Clercx, H J H [Department of Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Moene, A F [Department of Meteorology and Air Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre (Netherlands); Jonker, H J J, E-mail: b.j.h.v.d.wiel@tue.nl [Department of Multi-scale Pysics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    A well-known phenomenon in the atmospheric boundary layer is the fact that winds may become very weak in the evening after a clear sunny day. In these quiet conditions usually hardly any turbulence is present. Consequently this type of boundary layer is referred to as the quasi-laminar boundary layer. In spite of its relevance, the appearance of laminar boundary layers is poorly understood and forms a long standing problem in meteorological research. Here we investigate an analogue problem in the form of a stably stratified channel flow. The flow is studied with a simplified atmospheric model as well as with Direct Numerical Simulations. Both models show remarkably similar behaviour with respect to the mean variables such as temperature and wind speed. The similarity between both models opens new way for understanding and predicting the laminarization process. Mathematical analysis on the simplified model shows that relaminarization can be understood from the existence of a definite limit in the maximum sustainable heat flux under stably stratified conditions. This fascinating aspect will be elaborated in future work.

  12. Non-Markovian evolution of photonic quantum states in atmospheric turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Roux, Filippus S

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the spatial degrees of freedom of a photon propagating through atmospheric turbulence is treated as a non-Markovian process. Here, we derive and solve the evolution equation for this process. The turbulent medium is modeled by a sequence of multiple phase screens for general turbulence conditions. The non-Markovian perspective leads to a second-order differential equation with respect to the propagation distance. The solution for this differential equation is obtained with the aid of a perturbative analysis, assuming the turbulence is relatively weak. We also provide another solution for more general turbulence strength, but where we introduced a simplification to the differential equation.

  13. Non-Markovian evolution of photonic quantum states in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Filippus S.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the spatial degrees of freedom of a photon propagating through atmospheric turbulence is treated as a non-Markovian process. Here, we derive and solve the evolution equation for this process. The turbulent medium is modeled by a sequence of multiple phase screens for general turbulence conditions. The non-Markovian perspective leads to a second-order differential equation with respect to the propagation distance. The solution for this differential equation is obtained with the aid of a perturbative analysis, assuming the turbulence is relatively weak. We also provide another solution for more general turbulence strengths, but where we introduce a simplification to the differential equation.

  14. Non-Markovian evolution of photonic quantum states in atmospheric turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the spatial degrees of freedom of a photon propagating through atmospheric turbulence is treated as a non-Markovian process. Here, we derive and solve the evolution equation for this process. The turbulent medium is modeled by a sequence of multiple phase screens for general turbulence conditions. The non-Markovian perspective leads to a second-order differential equation with respect to the propagation distance. The solution for this differential equation is obtained with the aid of a perturbative analysis, assuming the turbulence is relatively weak. We also provide another solution for more general turbulence strengths, but where we introduce a simplification to the differential equation. (paper)

  15. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based FSO system with use of realistic link model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Yu, Zhongyuan; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based free-space optical (FSO) communication by using the Pump turbulence spectrum model which accurately characterizes the realistic FSO link. A comprehensive comparison is made between the Pump and Kolmogorov spectrum models with respect to the turbulence impact. The calculated results show that obtained turbulence-induced crosstalk is lower, which means that a higher channel capacity is projected when the realistic Pump spectrum is used instead of the Kolmogorov spectrum. We believe that our results prove that performance of practical OAM-based FSO is better than one predicted by using the original Kolmogorov turbulence model.

  16. A Fast-Response Atmospheric Turbulence (FRAT) Probe with Gas-Sampling Ducts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to design, construct and test a high-frequency-response air-data probe, the Fast Response Atmospheric Turbulence probe (FRAT...

  17. Propagation of radially polarized beams diffracted at a circular aperture in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xinting; Yang, Yingping

    2012-12-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and the beam coherence-polarization matrix, the analytical formulae for the average intensity and the degree of polarization of the radially polarized beams diffracted at a circular aperture in turbulent atmosphere are derived, which provide a convenient approach to study the propagation and polarization properties of the apertured radially polarized beams in turbulent atmosphere. The unapertured and free-space cases can be viewed as the special cases of our general result. The analyses indicate that the average intensity and the degree of polarization are closely related to the propagation distance, the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence, and the truncation parameter. The existence of the circular aperture weakens the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the evolution properties of the radially polarized beams.

  18. Partially Coherent cosh-Gaussian Beams in Atmospheric Turbulence with the Same Directionality as a Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Su-Ye; JI Xiao-Ling; L(U) Bai-Da

    2007-01-01

    Directionality of a class of partially coherent cosh-Gaussian beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence is studied. It is shown that two partially coherent cosh-Gaussian beams may generate the same angular spread,and there exist equivalent partially coherent cosh-Gaussian beams which may have the same directionality as a fully coherent Gaussian laser beam in free space and also in atmospheric turbulence. The theoretical results are interpreted physically and illustrated numerically.

  19. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    OpenAIRE

    R. Paugam; R. Paoli; D. Cariolle

    2010-01-01

    This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distributi...

  20. Infulence of atmospheric stability on the spatial structure of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.

    interval. The dissipation rate above the forest was 9 times that at the agricultural site. No significant differences were observed in the turbulence length scales between the forested and agricultural areas. A small difference was observed in the turbulence anisotropy at the two sites, except near the...

  1. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO2 lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser speckle can influence lidar measurements from a diffuse hard target. Atmospheric optical turbulence will also affect the lidar return signal. We present a numerical simulation that models the propagation of a lidar beam and accounts for both reflective speckle and atmospheric turbulence effects. Our simulation is based on implementing a Huygens-Fresnel approximation to laser propagation. A series of phase screens, with the appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics, are used to simulate the effect of atmospheric turbulence. A single random phase screen is used to simulate scattering of the entire beam from a rough surface. We compare the output of our numerical model with separate CO2 lidar measurements of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle. We also compare the output of our model with separate analytical predictions for atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle. Good agreement was found between the model and the experimental data. Good agreement was also found with analytical predictions. Finally, we present results of a simulation of the combined effects on a finite-aperture lidar system that are qualitatively consistent with previous experimental observations of increasing rms noise with increasing turbulence level. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  2. Effect of turbulent atmosphere on the on-axis average intensity of Pearcey–Gaussian beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    F, Boufalah; L, Dalil-Essakali; H, Nebdi; A, Belafhal

    2016-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of the Pearcey–Gaussian (PG) beam in turbulent atmosphere are investigated in this paper. The Pearcey beam is a new kind of paraxial beam, based on the Pearcey function of catastrophe theory, which describes diffraction about a cusp caustic. By using the extended Huygens–Fresnel integral formula in the paraxial approximation and the Rytov theory, an analytical expression of axial intensity for the considered beam family is derived. Some numerical results for PG beam propagating in atmospheric turbulence are given by studying the influences of some factors, including incident beam parameters and turbulence strengths.

  3. The performance of heterodyne detection system for partially coherent beams in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengqiang, Li; Tingfeng, Wang; Heyong, Zhang; Jingjiang, Xie; Lisheng, Liu; Shuai, Zhao; Jin, Guo

    2015-12-01

    The performance of heterodyne system is discussed for partially coherent beams in turbulent atmosphere by introducing turbulence spectrum of refractive-index fluctuations. Several analytic formulae for the heterodyne detection system using the partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beam are presented. Based on Tatarskii spectrum model, some numerical results are given for the variation in the heterodyne efficiency with the misalignment angle, detector diameter, turbulence conditions, and parameters of the overlapping beams. According to the numerical results, we find that the turbulent atmosphere degrades the heterodyne efficiency significantly, and the variation in heterodyne efficiency is even slower against the misalignment angle in turbulence. For the deterministic received signal and the detector, the performance of the heterodyne detection can be adjusted by controlling the local oscillator signal parameters.

  4. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  5. Influence of turbulent atmosphere on the far-field coherent combined beam quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Zhou; Zejin Liu; Xiaojun Xu; Xiaolin Wang; Xiao Li; Zilun Chen

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of coherent combined laser beams in turbulent atmosphere is numerically studied based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. By choosing beam propagation factor (BPF) and beam quality factor (BQ) to characterize the far-field irradiance distribution properties, the influence of turbulence on far-field coherent combined beam quality is studied in detail. The investigation reveals that with the coherence length decreasing, the irradiance distribution pattern evolves from typical non-Gaussian shape with multiple side-lobes into Gaussian shape which is seen in the incoherent combining case. In weak turbulent atmosphere, the far-field beam quality suffers less when the 1aser array gets more compact and operates at a longer wavelength. In strong turbulent atmosphere, the far-field beam quality degrades into the incoherent combining case without any relationship with the fill factor and laser wavelength.

  6. Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Limitations of the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald; LeMone, Margaret; Mahrt, Larry

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment are further analyzed for both day- and nighttime as a follow-on to the investigation of the nighttime turbulence in Sun et al. (2012). The behavior of momentum and heat fluxes is investigated as functions of wind speed and the bulk temperature difference between observation heights and the surface. Vertical variations of momentum and heat flux at a given height z are correlated and are explained in terms of the energy and heat balance in a layer above the ground surface in which the surface heating/cooling and momentum sink need to be included. In addition, the surface also plays an important role in constraining the size of the dominant turbulent eddies, which is directly related to turbulence strength and the length scale of turbulence generation. The turbulence generation is not related to local vertical gradients especially under neutral condition as assumed in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on the observed relationships between momentum and heat fluxes, a new bulk formula for turbulence parameterization is developed to mainly examine the above-mentioned surface effects on vertical variation of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. The new understanding of the observed relationships between these turbulent variables and mean variables explains the observed nighttime turbulence regime change observed in Sun et al. (2012) as well as the daytime momentum and heat flux variations with height up to the maximum observation height of 55 m.

  7. Propagation of partially coherent beams carrying an edge dislocation through atmospheric turbulence along a slant path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper derives the explicit expressions for the average intensity, beam width and angular spread of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams with edge dislocation propagating through atmospheric turbulence along a slant path. The propagation of GSM beams with edge dislocation through horizontal atmospheric turbulence can be treated as a special case through a slant one. The propagation properties of GSM beams with edge dislocation through slant atmospheric turbulence are studied, where the influence of edge dislocation parameters including the slope p and off-axis distance d on the spreading of GSM beams with edge dislocation in atmospheric turbulence is stressed. It shows that the spreading of the intensity profile of GSM beams with edge dislocation along a slant path is smaller than that along a horizontal path in the long-distance atmospheric propagation. The larger the slope |p| and the smaller the off-axis distance |d| are, the less the beam-width spreading and angular spread of GSM beams with edge dislocation are affected by turbulence. The GSM beams with edge dislocation is less affected by turbulence than that of GSM beams without edge dislocation. The results are illustrated numerically and their validity is interpreted physically. (geophysics, astronomy and astrophysics)

  8. Lidar sounding of the optical parameter of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvich, A. S.; Fortus, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a lidar intended for clear air turbulence (CAT) positioning on the basis of the backscatter enhancement (BSE) effect is analyzed using a turbulence model with a power-law spectrum. Systematic distortions occurring due to a need to regularize the lidar positioning problem solution are estimated. It is shown that the effect of molecular viscosity of air on the positioning result can be neglected if the wave parameter, which characterizes the diffraction manifestation, is higher than 3. This corresponds to sounding ranges of more than 1 km for optical or UV lidars. The analysis results show that the BSE lidar positioning accuracy weakly depends on the exponent in the turbulence spectrum in regions of severe turbulence. The results can justify a physical experiment for the design of an aircraft system for the lidar detection of CAT regions ahead of the flight course.

  9. Application of a heterodyne laser system to determine parameters of turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a heterodyne laser system in atmospheric measurements has been proposed. The continuous registration of optical phase variations of radiation propagating in the atmospheric channel has been carried out. From recorded data, the integral characteristics of a turbulence state in the radiation propagation channel are obtained.

  10. Modelling atmospheric turbulence effects on ground-based telescope systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradford, L.W.; Flatte, S.M. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Max, C.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-09-30

    Questions still exist concerning the appropriate model for turbulence- induced phase fluctuations seen in ground-based telescopes. Bester et al. used a particular observable (slope of the Allan variance) with an infrared interferometer in an attempt to distinguish models. The authors have calculated that observable for Kolmogorov and {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} models with a variety of outer scales and altitude-dependent turbulence and wind velocity. The authors have found that clear distinction between models requires good data on the vertical distribution of wind and turbulence. Furthermore, measurements at time separations of order 60 s are necessary to distinguish the {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} model from the Kolmogorov model.

  11. Atmosphere turbulence effect on the hot particle charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charging of hot beta-active aerosol articles of the micron size range in the turbulent current has been studied experimentally . For this purpose hot particles, obtained by the neutron activation of gold placed on the surface of glass microspheres by the cathode spraying method, were introduced into the turbulent current with the Reynolds number of 104 - 105. Results of the determination of particle charges within the current velocity range from 0.5 to 3 m/s confirm the reliability of the previously obtained model of the charging of hot particles in the turbulent current of the near - ground atmospere layer which is described by the function directly proportional to the radius of particles and the half-cube of the wind velocity, and inversely proportional to the square root of the height. The scheme is suggested and specific features are described of experimental installations used in the process of studies

  12. Strong scintillations of pulsed Laguerrian beams in a turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakh, Viktor A; Gerasimova, Liliya O

    2016-08-22

    Turbulent fluctuations of the energy density of broadband pulsed Laguerre-Gaussian beams are studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It is shown that in the regime of strong scintillations, the relative variance of energy density of the pulsed beams can take values smaller than unity, in contrast to the strong scintillation index of the continuous-wave beams, which tends to unity with increasing the turbulence strength. The level of residual spatial correlation of the energy density of pulsed beams exceeds that for the continuous-wave beams. It increases with shortening of the pulse duration and increasing of the refractive turbulence strength. PMID:27557206

  13. Effect of atmospheric turbulence on propagation properties of optical vortices formed by using coherent laser beam arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Li-Gang; Zheng, Wei-wei; Wang, Li-qin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of optical vertex formed from the radial coherent laser beam array, with the initially well-defined phase distribution. The propagation formula of the radial coherent laser array passing through the turbulent atmosphere is analytically derived by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral. Based on the derived formula, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation properties of su...

  14. Integral momenta of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Igor P

    2016-04-20

    The orbital angular momentum of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere is studied theoretically. The field of an optical beam is determined through the solution of the paraxial wave equation for a randomly inhomogeneous medium with fluctuations of the refraction index of the turbulent atmosphere. Peculiarities in the behavior of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam at the receiver (or transmitter) are examined. The dependence of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam on optical beam parameters, namely, the transverse wave number of optical radiation, amplitude factor radius, and, especially, topological charge of the optical beam, is analyzed in detail. It turns out that the mean value of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam remains constant during propagation in the turbulent atmosphere. It is shown that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere calculated with the "mean-intensity" approximation is equal to zero identically. Thus, it is possible to declare confidently that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere is not very large. PMID:27140133

  15. Note: A balloon-borne accelerometer technique for measuring atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, Graeme J.; Giles Harrison, R.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Williams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    A weather balloon and its suspended instrument package behave like a pendulum with a moving pivot. This dynamical system is exploited here for the detection of atmospheric turbulence. By adding an accelerometer to the instrument package, the size of the swings induced by atmospheric turbulence can be measured. In test flights, strong turbulence has induced accelerations greater than 5g, where g = 9.81 m s-2. Calibration of the accelerometer data with a vertically orientated lidar has allowed eddy dissipation rate values of between 10-3 and 10-2 m2 s-3 to be derived from the accelerometer data. The novel use of a whole weather balloon and its adapted instrument package can be used as a new instrument to make standardized in situ measurements of turbulence.

  16. Turbulence strength estimation and super-resolution from an arbitrary set of atmospherically degraded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamek, Steve; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2006-08-01

    In remote sensing, atmospheric turbulence and aerosols limit the image quality. For many practical cases turbulence is shown to be dominant, especially for horizontal close-to-earth imaging in hot environments. In a horizontal long-range imaging it is usually impractical to measure path-averaged refractive index structure constant C n2 (which characterizes the turbulence strength) with conventional equipment. In this paper we propose a method for estimation of C n2 based just on the available recorded turbulence-degraded image sequence. The method exploits the turbulence-induced image "dancing". C n2 is extracted from the estimated image shifts variance. Experimental comparison with C n2 measurements using a scintillometer shows reliable estimation results. We also estimate image motion with sub-pixel accuracy for the purpose of obtaining a high-resolution image by applying a simple super-resolution procedure. Results of super-resolution for real imagery are presented.

  17. Wind Energy and the Turbulent Nature of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Wächter, Matthias; Hölling, Michael; Morales, Allan; Milan, Patrick; Mücke, Tanja; Peinke, Joachim; Reinke, Nico; Rinn, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of developing a sustainable and renewable energy supply within the next decades requires collaborative efforts as well as new concepts in the fields of science and engineering. Here we give an overview on the impact of small-scale properties of atmospheric turbulence on the wind energy conversion process. Special emphasis is given to the noisy and intermittent structure of turbulence and its outcome for wind energy conversion and utilization. Experimental, theoretical, analytical, and numerical concepts and methods are presented. In particular we report on new aspects resulting from the combination of basic research, especially in the field of turbulence and complex stochastic systems, with engineering applications.

  18. Numerical simulation research on sodium laser beacon imagings through the atmosphere turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyuan; Qian, Xianmei; Zhang, Suimeng; Zhao, Minfu; Cui, Chaolong; Huang, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relative intensity distributions of Sodium Laser Beacon (SLB) and analysis of the on-axis imaging of incoherent light, considering the effects of atmospheric turbulence and the changes of telescope receiving diameter on the short-exposure SLB imagings on the focal plane, imagings of an extended source SLB are simulated under the three atmospheric turbulence models. Results indicate that sharpness and peak strehl ratio of SLB imagings increase but sharpness radius decrease with the decrease of atmosphere turbulence strengths. Moreover, the changes of telescope diameter from 3.0m to 1.5m cause the decrease of sharpness and peak strehl ratio but the increase of sharpness radius.

  19. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob;

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling...... of the wind industry, four areas were identified as high prioritizations for further research: 1. the turbulence distribution in a single wake 2. multiple wake deficits and build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines 3. the effect of the atmospheric boundary layer on wake turbulence and wake deficit...... evolution 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented...

  20. Cross-frequency coherence and pulse propagation in a turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Wilson, D Keith; Collier, Sandra L; Cain, Jericho E; Cheinet, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Cross-frequency coherence of acoustic signals in a turbulent atmosphere is an important consideration for source localization with acoustic sensor arrays and for remote sensing of the atmosphere with sodars and tomography techniques. This paper takes as a starting point recently derived, closed-form equations for the spatial-temporal correlation function of a broadband acoustic signal propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with coupled spatial-temporal fluctuations in temperature and wind velocity. This theory is employed to calculate, based on the Rytov approximation, the two-point, two-time, two-frequency mutual coherence function of plane and spherical waves in the weak scattering regime. The cross-frequency coherence for these waveforms is then obtained and compared with that in the geometrical acoustics approximation. The coherence bandwidth is calculated and analyzed for typical meteorological regimes of the atmospheric surface layer and parameters of sound propagation. The results obtained are compared with available experimental data. The cross-frequency coherence is also used to study the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the mean intensity of an acoustic pulse propagating in a turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27475189

  1. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paugam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distribution of ice crystals. The atmospheric turbulence is synthesized using a methodology developed to force anisotropic turbulent fluctuations. The results show the feasibility of three-dimensional simulations of the early development of a contrail in supersaturated conditions before its transition into a contrail-cirrus. %(when radiative heating and sedimentation are no more negligible. It is shown that in case of strongly supersaturated and shear-free atmosphere the optical depth is maintained as the contrail spreads by turbulent diffusion in the late dissipation regime.

  2. Influence of Turbulent Atmosphere on Polarization Properties of Stochastic Electromagnetic Pulsed Beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Chao-Liang; ZHAO Zhi-Guo; LI Xiao-Feng; PAN Liu-Zhan; YUAN Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Using the coherence theory of non-stationary fields and the characterization of stochastic electromagnetic pulsed beams, the analytical expression for the spectral degree of polarization of stochastic electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model pulsed (GSMP) beams in turbulent atmosphere is derived and is used to study the polarization properties of stochastic electromagnetic GSMP beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere. The results of numerical calculation are given to illustrate the dependence of spectral degree of polarization on the pulse frequency, refraction index structure constant and spatial correlation length. It is shown that, compared with free-space case, in turbulent atmosphere propagation there are two positions at which the on-axis spectral degree of polarization P is equal to zero. The position change depends on the pulse frequency, refraction index structure constant and spatial correlation length.%@@ Using the coherence theory of non-stationary fields and the characterization of stochastic electromagnetic pulsed beams, the analytical expression for the spectral degree of polarization of stochastic electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model pulsed (GSMP) beams in turbulent atmosphere is derived and is used to study the polarization properties of stochastic electromagnetic GSMP beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere.The results of numerical calculation are given to illustrate the dependence of spectral degree of polarization on the pulse frequency, refraction index structure constant and spatial correlation length.It is shown that, compared with free-space case, in turbulent atmosphere propagation there are two positions at which the on-axis spectral degree of polarization P is equal to zero.The position change depends on the pulse frequency, refraction index structure constant and spatial correlation length.

  3. Performance analysis of coherent wireless optical communications with atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mingbo; Song, Xuegui; Cheng, Julian; Holzman, Jonathan F

    2012-03-12

    Coherent wireless optical communication systems with heterodyne detection are analyzed for binary phase-shift keying (BPSK), differential PSK (DPSK), and M-ary PSK over Gamma-Gamma turbulence channels. Closed-form error rate expressions are derived using a series expansion approach. It is shown that, in the special case of K-distributed turbulence channel, the DPSK incurs a 3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty compared to BPSK in the large SNR regime. The outage probability is also obtained, and a detailed outage truncation error analysis is presented and used to assess the accuracy in system performance estimation. It is shown that our series error rate expressions are simple to use and highly accurate for practical system performance estimation. PMID:22418534

  4. Simulating thick atmospheric turbulence in the lab with application to orbital angular momentum communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a procedure by which a long (≳1 km) optical path through atmospheric turbulence can be experimentally simulated in a controlled fashion and scaled down to distances easily accessible in a laboratory setting. This procedure is then used to simulate a 1 km long free-space communication link in which information is encoded in orbital angular momentum spatial modes. We also demonstrate that standard adaptive optics methods can be used to mitigate many of the effects of thick atmospheric turbulence. (paper)

  5. Using an incoherent target return to adaptively focus through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W; Palastro, J P; Wu, C; Davis, C C

    2016-03-15

    A laser beam propagating to a remote target through atmospheric turbulence acquires intensity fluctuations. If the target is cooperative and provides a coherent return beam, the phase measured near the beam transmitter and adaptive optics, in principle, can correct these fluctuations. Generally, however, the target is uncooperative. In this case, we show that an incoherent return from the target can be used instead. Using the principle of reciprocity, we derive a novel relation between the field at the target and the returned field at a detector. We simulate an adaptive optics system that utilizes this relation to focus a beam through atmospheric turbulence onto a rough surface. PMID:26977694

  6. Using an incoherent target-return to adaptively focus through atmospheric turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, William; Wu, Chensheng; Davis, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A laser beam propagating to a remote target through atmospheric turbulence acquires intensity fluctuations. If the target is cooperative and provides a coherent return beam, the phase measured near the beam transmitter and adaptive optics can, in principle, correct these fluctuations. Generally, however, the target is uncooperative. In this case, we show that an incoherent return from the target can be used instead. Using the principle of reciprocity, we derive a novel relation between the field at the target and the reflected field at a detector. We simulate an adaptive optics system that utilizes this relation to focus a beam through atmospheric turbulence onto the incoherent surface.

  7. Measurement of Spatial Coherence of Light Propagating in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barcik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A lot of issues have to be taken into account when designing a reliable free space optical communication link. Among these are e.g.,beam wander, fluctuation of optical intensity and loss of spatial coherence that are caused by atmospheric turbulence. This paper presents experimental measurements of spatial coherence of a laser beam. The experimental setup is based on Young's double pinhole experiment. Fringe patterns under atmospheric turbulence for four different pinhole separations are presented. From these fringe patterns, visibility is determined and the coherence radius is estimated.

  8. BER of subcarrier MPSK and MDPSK systems in atmospheric turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xuegui

    2015-01-01

    Bit-error rate (BER) performance of subcarrier $M$-ary phase-shift keying (MPSK) and $M$-ary differential PSK (MDPSK) is analyzed for optical wireless communications over Gamma-Gamma and lognormal turbulence channels. We study the relation between the exact BER and the approximate BER, which is obtained by dividing the symbol-error rate by the number of bits per symbol, for subcarrier MPSK and MDPSK modulations. The asymptotic BER performance gap between the exact and the approximate BERs is quantified analytically through our asymptotic analyses. The accuracy of the approximate BER of both MPSK and MDPSK depends on the channel conditions. Under weak turbulence conditions, the approximate BER expression can be used to predict the system performance with high accuracy, while under strong turbulence conditions the approximate BER becomes inaccurate and can only serve as a loose lower bound of the exact BER. The asymptotic BER performance loss of MDPSK with respect to MPSK is also quantified analytically.

  9. Effect of atmospheric turbulence on propagation properties of optical vortices formed by using coherent laser beam arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Li-Gang; Wang, Li-Qin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of optical vertex formed from the radial coherent laser beam array, with the initially well-defined phase distribution. The propagation formula of the radial coherent laser array passing through the turbulent atmosphere is analytically derived by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral. Based on the derived formula, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation properties of such laser arrays has been studied in great detail. Our main results show that the atmospheric turbulence may result in the prohibition of the formation of the optical vortex or the disappearance of the formed optical vortex, which are very different from that in the free space. The formed optical vortex with the higher topological charge may propagate over a much longer distance in the moderate or weak turbulent atmosphere. After the sufficient long-distance atmospheric propagation, all the output beams (even with initiall...

  10. Propagation of Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model beams through paraxial optical systems in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, Ji; Xiu, Peng; Liu, Xu

    2013-12-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral, the expressions for the average intensity and the effective size of Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model beams propagating through a paraxial ABCD optical system are obtained in the turbulent atmosphere. The influences of the source coherence and atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model beams in the turbulent atmosphere are investigated in detail. It is found that the beam profile will eventually evolve into a Gaussian-like distribution through turbulence in contrast to ring-shaped far-field pattern in free space. The effective size of Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model beams with lower source coherence is less affected by turbulence. The parameter β and index n of the sources have some effects on intensity distribution and beam spreading through atmospheric turbulence.

  11. Off-Axis Gaussian Beams with Random Displacement in Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Baykal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent work in which we study the propagation of the general Hermite-sinusoidal-Gaussian laser beams in wireless broadband access telecommunication systems is elaborated in this paper to cover the special case of an off-axis Gaussian beam. We mainly investigate the propagation characteristics in atmospheric turbulence of an off-axis Gaussian beam possessing Gaussian distributed random displacement parameters. Our interest is to search for different types of laser beams that will improve the performance of a wireless broadband access system when atmospheric turbulence is considered. Our formulation is based on the basic solution of the second order mutual coherence function evaluated at the receiver plane. For fixed turbulence strength, the coherence length calculated at the receiver plane is found to decrease as the variance of the random displacement is increased. It is shown that as the turbulence becomes stronger, coherence lengths due to off-axis Gaussian beams tend to approach the same value, irrespective of the variance of the random displacement. As expected, the beam spreading is found to be pronounced for larger variance of displacement parameter. Average intensity profiles when atmospheric turbulence is present are plotted for different values of the variance of the random displacement parameter of the off-axis Gaussian beam.

  12. Imaging through atmospheric turbulence for laser based C-RAM systems: an analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buske, Ivo; Riede, Wolfgang; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    High Energy Laser weapons (HEL) have unique attributes which distinguish them from limitations of kinetic energy weapons. HEL weapons engagement process typical starts with identifying the target and selecting the aim point on the target through a high magnification telescope. One scenario for such a HEL system is the countermeasure against rockets, artillery or mortar (RAM) objects to protect ships, camps or other infrastructure from terrorist attacks. For target identification and especially to resolve the aim point it is significant to ensure high resolution imaging of RAM objects. During the whole ballistic flight phase the knowledge about the expectable imaging quality is important to estimate and evaluate the countermeasure system performance. Hereby image quality is mainly influenced by unavoidable atmospheric turbulence. Analytical calculations have been taken to analyze and evaluate image quality parameters during an approaching RAM object. In general, Kolmogorov turbulence theory was implemented to determine atmospheric coherence length and isoplanatic angle. The image acquisition is distinguishing between long and short exposure times to characterize tip/tilt image shift and the impact of high order turbulence fluctuations. Two different observer positions are considered to show the influence of the selected sensor site. Furthermore two different turbulence strengths are investigated to point out the effect of climate or weather condition. It is well known that atmospheric turbulence degenerates image sharpness and creates blurred images. Investigations are done to estimate the effectiveness of simple tip/tilt systems or low order adaptive optics for laser based C-RAM systems.

  13. Propagation of phase-locked truncated Gaussian beam array in turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truncation manipulation is a simple but effective way to improve the intensity distribution properties of the phase-locked Gaussian beam array at the receiving plane. In this paper, the analytical expression for the propagation of the phase-locked truncated Gaussian beam array in a turbulent atmosphere is obtained based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle. Power in the diffraction-limited bucket is introduced as the beam quality factor to evaluate the influence of different truncation parameters. The dependence of optimal truncation ratio on the number of beamlets, the intensity of turbulence, propagation distance and laser wavelength is calculated and discussed. It is revealed that the optimal truncation ratio is larger for the laser array that contains more lasers, and the optimal truncation ratio will shift to a larger value with an increase in propagation distance and decrease in intensity of atmosphere turbulence. The optimal truncation ratio is independent of laser wavelength. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  14. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  15. Effect of Atmospheric Turbulence on Wireless Optical Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jabeena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In wireless optical communication system, communication is obtained between receiver and transmitter in free space. The major challenge for wireless optical communication system is the free space atmospheric attenuation and scattering caused by Scintillation and aerosol particles (Rain, fog, drizzle and haze. Analysis has been done for the statistical data and then compared with real time data to obtain the refractive index variation due to atmospheric attenuation which cause high impact on wireless optical link design.

  16. The effects of atmospheric turbulence on a quadrotor heavy lift airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. B.; Jex, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The response of a quadrotor heavy lift airship to atmospheric turbulence is evaluated using a four-point input model. Results show interaction between gust inputs and the characteristic modes of the vehicle's response. Example loop closures demonstrate tradeoffs between response regulation and structural loads. Vehicle responses to a tuned discrete wave front compare favorably with the linear results and illustrate characteristic HLA motion.

  17. Transport of Orbital-Angular-Momentum Entanglement through a Turbulent Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Pors, Bart-Jan; Monken, C. H.; Eliel, Eric R.; Woerdman, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally how orbital-angular-momentum entanglement of two photons evolves under influence of atmospheric turbulence. We find that the quantum channel capacity is surprisingly robust: Its typical horizontal decay distance is of the order of 2 kilometers, demonstrating the potential of photonic orbital angular momentum for free-space quantum communication in a metropolitan environment.

  18. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence compensation through piston-only phase control of a laser phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Jack E.; Van Zandt, Noah; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    Beam propagation from a laser phased array system through the turbulent atmosphere is simulated and the ability of such a system to compensate for the atmosphere via piston-only phase control of the sub-apertures is evaluated. Directed energy (DE) applications demand more power than most lasers can produce, consequently many schemes for high power involve combining the beams from many smaller lasers into one. When many smaller lasers are combined into a phased array, phase control of the individual sub-apertures will be necessary to create a high-quality beam. Phase control of these sub-apertures could then be used to do more, such as focus, steer, and compensate for atmospheric turbulence. Atmospheric turbulence is well known to degrade the performance of both imaging systems and laser systems. Adaptive optics can be used to mitigate this degradation. Adaptive optics ordinarily involves a deformable mirror, but with phase control on each sub-aperture the need for a deformable mirror is eliminated. The simulation conducted here evaluates performance gain for a 127 element phased array in a hexagonal pattern with piston-only phase control on each element over an uncompensated array for varying levels of atmospheric turbulence. While most simulations were carried out against a 10 km tactical scenario, the turbulence profile was adjusted so performance could be evaluated as a function of the Fried Parameter (r0) and the log-amplitude variance somewhat independently. This approach is demonstrated to be generally effective with the largest percentage improvement occurring when r0 is close to the sub-aperture diameter.

  19. Dynamics of the gas flow turbulent front in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, X.; Ghasemi, M.; Xu, H.; Hasnain, Q.; Wu, S.; Tu, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, dynamic characterizations of the turbulent flow field in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are investigated by focusing on the effect of different APPJ parameters, such as gas flow rate, applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and time duration of the pulse. We utilize Schlieren photography and photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as a signal triggering of an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) and also a high speed camera to examine the formation of the turbulent front and its dynamics. The results reveal that the turbulent front will appear earlier and closer to the tube nozzle by increasing the gas flow rate or the applied voltage amplitude. However, the pulse time duration and repetition frequency cannot change the dynamics and formation of the turbulent front. Further investigation shows that every pulse can excite one turbulent front which is created in a specific position in a laminar region and propagates downstream. It seems that the dominating mechanisms responsible for the formation of turbulent fronts in plasma jets might not be ion momentum transfer.

  20. Research on diversity receive technology for wireless optical communication using PPM in weak turbulence atmosphere channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2014-09-01

    In order to mitigate atmospheric turbulence, the free space optical (FSO) system model with spatial diversity is analyzed based on intensity detection pulse position modulation (PPM) in the weak turbulence atmosphere. The slot error rate (SER) calculating formula of the system without diversity is derived under pulse position modulation firstly. Then as a benchmark, independent of identical distribution, the average slot error rates of the three linear combining technologies, which are the maximal ratio combining (MRC), equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SelC), are compared. Simulation results show that the performance of system is the best improved by MRC, followed by EGC, and is poor by SelC, but SelC is simpler and more convenient. Spatial diversity is efficient to improve the performance and has strong ability on resistance to atmospheric channel decline. The above scheme is more suitable for optical wireless communication systems.

  1. Coupled mode theory for orbital angular momentum modes transmission in the presence of atmosphere turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junhe; Zong, Jinbang; Liu, Daoqiang

    2015-12-14

    In this paper, orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes transmission in the presence of atmosphere turbulence is studied via a coupled mode theory. The Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams with OAM topological charges are emitted into free space and undergo interactions due to the random index variations in the atmosphere. The coupling between the LG beams can be characterized by a set of coupled average power equation, which resembles the Marcuse' coupled power equation (CPE) originally proposed for the optical waveguides. The coupling coefficients and the modal radiation losses for the equation can be evaluated analytically. The accurate solution and the first order approximate solution to the CPE match the published data and the Mont-Carlos simulation results with good accuracy. The CPE and its approximate analytical solution can work as powerful tools for the analysis of the OAM beam evolution with the presence of the atmosphere turbulence. PMID:26698988

  2. Target-in-the-loop remote sensing of laser beam and atmospheric turbulence characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, Mikhail A; Lachinova, Svetlana L; Majumdar, Arun K

    2016-07-01

    A new target-in-the-loop (TIL) atmospheric sensing concept for in situ remote measurements of major laser beam characteristics and atmospheric turbulence parameters is proposed and analyzed numerically. The technique is based on utilization of an integral relationship between complex amplitudes of the counterpropagating optical waves known as overlapping integral or interference metric, whose value is preserved along the propagation path. It is shown that the interference metric can be directly measured using the proposed TIL sensing system composed of a single-mode fiber-based optical transceiver and a remotely located retro-target. The measured signal allows retrieval of key beam and atmospheric turbulence characteristics including scintillation index and the path-integrated refractive index structure parameter. PMID:27409206

  3. The Local Atmosphere and the Turbulent Heat Transfer in the Eastern Himalayas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Han; LI Peng; MA Shupo; ZHOU Libo; ZHU Jinhuan

    2012-01-01

    To understand the local atmosphere and heat transfer and to facilitate the boundary-layer parameterization of numerical simulation and prediction,an observational campaign was conducted in the Eastern Himalayas in June 2010.The local atmospheric properties and near-surface turbulent heat transfers were analyzed.The local atmosphere in this region is warmer,more humid and less windy,with weaker solar radiation and surface radiate heating than in the Middle Himalayas.The near-surface turbulent heat transfer in the Eastern Himalayas is weaker than that in the Middle Himalayas.The total heat transfer is mainly contributed by the latent heat transfer with a Bowen ratio of 0.36,which is essentially different from that in the Middle Himalayas and the other Tibetan regions.

  4. A study of key features of the RAE atmospheric turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, W. F.; Heffley, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complex atmospheric turbulence model for use in aircraft simulation is analyzed in terms of its temporal, spectral, and statistical characteristics. First, a direct comparison was made between cases of the RAE model and the more conventional Dryden turbulence model. Next the control parameters of the RAE model were systematically varied and the effects noted. The RAE model was found to possess a high degree of flexibility in its characteristics, but the individual control parameters are cross-coupled in terms of their effect on various measures of intensity, bandwidth, and probability distribution.

  5. Reciprocity-enhanced optical communication through atmospheric turbulence - part II: communication architectures and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryear, Andrew L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Parenti, Ronald R.

    2012-10-01

    Free-space optical communication provides rapidly deployable, dynamic communication links that are capable of very high data rates compared with those of radio-frequency systems. As such, free-space optical communication is ideal for mobile platforms, for platforms that require the additional security afforded by the narrow divergence of a laser beam, and for systems that must be deployed in a relatively short time frame. In clear-weather conditions the data rate and utility of free-space optical communication links are primarily limited by fading caused by micro-scale atmospheric temperature variations that create parts-per-million refractive-index fluctuations known as atmospheric turbulence. Typical communication techniques to overcome turbulence-induced fading, such as interleavers with sophisticated codes, lose viability as the data rate is driven higher or the delay requirement is driven lower. This paper, along with its companion [J. H. Shapiro and A. Puryear, "Reciprocity-Enhanced Optical Communication through Atmospheric Turbulence-Part I: Reciprocity Proofs and Far-Field Power Transfer"], present communication systems and techniques that exploit atmospheric reciprocity to overcome turbulence which are viable for high data rate and low delay requirement systems. Part I proves that reciprocity is exhibited under rather general conditions, and derives the optimal power-transfer phase compensation for far-field operation. The Part II paper presents capacity-achieving architectures that exploit reciprocity to overcome the complexity and delay issues that limit state-of-the art free-space optical communications. Further, this paper uses theoretical turbulence models to determine the performance—delay, throughput, and complexity—of the proposed architectures.

  6. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  7. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  8. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  9. SWIR sky glow imaging for detection of turbulence in the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David; Nolasco, Rudy; Allen, Jeff; Myers, Mike; Gonglewski, John; Fertig, Gregory; Burns, Dennis; Mons, Ishan

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band between 0.9 and 1.7 μm wave length. This has been demonstrated as an effective illumination source for night time imaging applications. It addition it has been shown that observation of the spatial and temporal variations of the illumination can be used to characterize atmospheric tidal wave actions in the sky glow region. These spatiotemporal variations manifest themselves as traveling wave patterns whose period and velocity are related to the wind velocity at 85 km as well as the turbulence induced by atmospheric vertical instabilities. Ground to space observation systems especially those employing adaptive optics are adversely affected by high altitude turbulence and winds. In this paper we propose the use of sky glow observations to predict and characterize image system degradation due to upper atmosphere turbulence.

  10. Recovery of image distorted by turbulent atmosphere using phase-conjugate image generated by difference frequency generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate dynamic recovery of blurred images caused by atmospheric turbulence. In particular, using a phase-conjugate wave generated by a second-order nonlinear crystal or composite, we restore the original quality of the image after the optical radiation forming the image propagates through the turbulent atmosphere. One of the key elements for our experiment is a rotating phase plate being placed in the beam path for simulating turbulent atmosphere. Using the nonlinear composite, we demonstrate that the image recovery is insensitive to the polarization of the optical radiation forming the image

  11. Turbulent Transport Mechanics at the Forest-Atmosphere Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel

    1999-11-01

    A new method is developed to estimate momentum and scalar sources and sinks from measured mean concentration profiles within forested canopies (termed as the "Inverse" problem). The method combines many of the practical advantages of a previously proposed Lagrangian Localized Near Field theory and higher order Eulerian closure principles. Particularly, this "hybrid" method successfully combines the essential physics of closure modeling and the robustness of the regression source inversion developed for the Localized Near Field theory. The method is tested using measured mean CO2 concentration and eddy-covariance fluxes collected in a 15 year-old pine forest for a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions and using temperature and sensible heat flux measurements collected in a wind tunnel for a planar heat source. It is demonstrated that the newly proposed method is well suited for routine source and flux distribution inferences within the canopy.

  12. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30″ FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1″ FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed. PMID:26906859

  13. Propagation of the off-axis superposition of partially coherent beams through atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang En-Tao; Ji Xiao-Ling; Lü Bai-Da

    2009-01-01

    The propagation properties of the off-axis superposition of partially coherent beams through atmospheric tur-bulence and their beam quality in terms of the mean-squared beam width w(z) and the power in the bucket (PIB)are studied in detail, where the effects of partial coherence, off-axis beam superposition and atmospheric turbulence are considered. The analytical expressions for the intensity, the beam width and the PIB are derived, and illustrative examples are given numerically. It is shown that the maximum intensity/max and the PIB decrease and ω(z) increases as the refraction index structure constant C2n increases. Therefore, the turbulence results in a degradation of the beam quality. However, the resulting partially coherent beam with a smaller value of spatial correlation parameter γ and larger values of separate distance Xd and beam number M is less affected by the turbulence than that with a larger value of γ and smaller values of xd and M. The main results obtained in this paper are explained physically.

  14. Performance Analysis of Free-Space Optical Communication Systems With Multiuser Diversity Over Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication has become a cost-effective method to provide high data rates. However, the turbulence-induced fading limits its application to short-range applications. To address this, we propose a multiuser diversity (MD) FSO scheme in which the Nth best user is selected and the channel fluctuations can be effectively exploited to produce a selection diversity gain. More specifically, we first present the statistics analysis for the considered system over both weak and strong atmospheric turbulence channels. Based on these statistics, the outage probability, bit-error rate performance, average capacity, diversity order, and coverage are analyzed. Results show that the diversity order for the gamma-gamma fading is N min{α, β}/2, where N is the number of users, and α and β are the channel fading parameters related to the effective atmospheric conditions of the link.

  15. Slant path average intensity of finite optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Zhang; Gaogang Wang

    2006-01-01

    The average intensity of finite laser beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere is calculated from the extended Huygens Fresnel principle. Formulas are presented for the slant path average intensity from an arbitrarily truncated Gaussian beam. The new expressions are derived from the modified von Karman spectrum for refractive-index fluctuations, quadratic approximation of the structure function,and Gaussian approximation for the product of Gaussian function and Bessel function. It is shown that the form of average intensity is not a Gaussian function but a polynomial of the power of the binomial function, Gaussian function, and the incomplete gamma function. The results also show that the mean irradiance of a finite optical beam propagating in slant path turbulent atmosphere not only depends on the effective beam radius at the transmitting aperture plane, propagation distance, and long-term lateral coherence length of spherical wave, but also on the radius of emit aperture.

  16. Applications of 2-D Moiré Deflectometry to Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifollah Rasouli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on applications of a moiré deflectometry to observations of anisotropy in the statistical properties of atmospheric turbulence. Specifically, combining the use of a telescope with moiré deflectometry allows enhanced sensitivity to fluctuations in the wave-front phase, which reflect fluctuations in the fluid density. Such phase fluctuations in the aperture of the telescope are imaged on the first grating of the moiré deflectometer, giving high spatial resolution. In particular, we have measured the covariance of the angle of arrival (AA between pairs of points displaced spatially on the telescope aperture which allows a quantitative measure of anisotropy in the atmospheric surface layer. Importantly, the telescope-based moiré deflectometry measures directly in the spatial domain and, besides being a non-intrusive method for studying turbulent flows, has the advantage of being relatively simple and inexpensive.

  17. Slant path average intensity of finite optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Gaogang

    2006-10-01

    The average intensity of finite laser beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere is calculated from the extended Huygens Fresnel principle. Formulas are presented for the slant path average intensity from an arbitrarily truncated Gaussian beam. The new expressions are derived from the modified von Karman spectrum for refractive-index fluctuations, quadratic approximation of the structure function, and Gaussian approximation for the product of Gaussian function and Bessel function. It is shown that the form of average intensity is not a Gaussian function but a polynomial of the power of the binomial function, Gaussian function, and the incomplete gamma function. The results also show that the mean irradiance of a finite optical beam propagating in slant path turbulent atmosphere not only depends on the effective beam radius at the transmitting aperture plane, propagation distance, and long-term lateral coherence length of spherical wave, but also on the radius of emit aperture.

  18. Propagation properties of partially coherent four-petal Gaussian vortex beams in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dajun; Wang, Yaochuan; Yin, Hongming

    2016-04-01

    The partially coherent four-petal Gaussian vortex beam is introduced and described by analytical expressions. The analytical propagation equation for partially coherent four-petal Gaussian vortex beam in turbulent atmosphere is derived by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral formula. The influences of refraction index structure, beam order n, topological charge M and the coherence length on the average intensity distributions of beam are investigated by numerical examples.

  19. The effect of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation properties of optical vortices formed by using coherent laser beam arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Gang; Zheng, Wei-Wei

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of an optical vortex, which may be formed from a radial coherent laser beam array with an initially well-defined phase distribution. The propagation formula of the radial coherent laser array passing through a turbulent atmosphere is analytically derived by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral. Based on the derived formula, the effect of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation properties has been studied in great detail. Our main results show that atmospheric turbulence may result in the prohibition of the formation of the optical vortex or the disappearance of the formed optical vortex, which are very different from the behaviour in free space. An optical vortex formed with higher topological charge may propagate over a much longer distance in a moderately or weakly turbulent atmosphere. After sufficient long-distance atmospheric propagation, the output beam (initially with different phase distributions) finally loses the vortex property and gradually becomes a Gaussian-shaped beam, and in this case the output beam actually becomes incoherent light fields due to the decoherence effect of the turbulent atmosphere.

  20. The efficiency of propagation of radiation from different lasers through the turbulent Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model of the propagation of intense laser beams in the turbulent Earth's atmosphere along horizontal and oblique paths is improved. The model takes into account the basic mechanisms of interaction of laser radiation with the Earth's atmosphere (molecular absorption, aerosol extinction, turbulence-induced beam spread and wander). The application of this model demonstrates a general approach to determining the optimal radiation wavelengths for attaining the maximum intensity of focused laser radiation at a stationary object depending on the path length, angle of the path inclination, weather conditions, and diameter of the laser output beam. A simple physical interpretation of the dependences obtained is presented. The efficiencies of propagation of various high-power laser beams through the turbulent Earth's atmosphere are compared. Specific features of the energy transfer from various lasers to moving objects are analysed. It is shown that, when weather conditions change over a wide range, it is expedient to use radiation from a cw chemical DF laser. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  1. Study of optimum methods of optical communication. [accounting for the effects of the turbulent atmosphere and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Abstracts are reported relating to the techniques used in the research concerning optical transmission of information. Communication through the turbulent atmosphere, quantum mechanics, and quantum communication theory are discussed along with the results.

  2. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  3. Using an atmospheric turbulence model for the stochastic model of geodetic VLBI data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsig, Sebastian; Artz, Thomas; Iddink, Andreas; Nothnagel, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Space-geodetic techniques at radio wavelength, such as global navigation satellite systems and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), suffer from refractivity of the Earth's atmosphere. These highly dynamic processes, particularly refractivity variations in the neutral atmosphere, contribute considerably to the error budget of these space-geodetic techniques. Here, microscale fluctuations in refractivity lead to elevation-dependent uncertainties and induce physical correlations between the observations. However, up to now such correlations are not considered routinely in the stochastic model of space-geodetic observations, which leads to very optimistic standard deviations of the derived target parameters, such as Earth orientation parameters and station positions. In this study, the standard stochastic model of VLBI observations, which only includes, almost exclusively, the uncertainties from the VLBI correlation process, is now augmented by a variance-covariance matrix derived from an atmospheric turbulence model. Thus, atmospheric refractivity fluctuations in space and time can be quantified. One of the main objectives is to realize a suitable stochastic model of VLBI observations in an operational way. In order to validate the new approach, the turbulence model is applied to several VLBI observation campaigns consisting of different network geometries leading the path for the next-generation VLBI campaigns. It is shown that the stochastic model of VLBI observations can be improved by using high-frequency atmospheric variations and, thus, refining the stochastic model leads to far more realistic standard deviations of the target parameters. The baseline length repeatabilities as a general measure of accuracy of baseline length determinations improve for the turbulence-based solution. Further, this method is well suited for routine VLBI data analysis with limited computational costs.

  4. Quantum polarization fluctuations of an Airy beam in turbulent atmosphere in a slant path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xia; Zhang, Licheng

    2016-07-01

    Polarization of light has many applications in quantum information processing, including quantum teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate the polarization fluctuations of Airy beams propagating in a slant turbulent channel under the "few-photon" limit. Using the quantum Stokes parameters and the quantum degree of polarization, we demonstrate that the degree of polarization of Airy beams increases significantly with the large number of the detection photons, and a higher photon-number level can retain the stability of polarization. Numerical simulations show that the longer propagation distance and the stronger turbulence will lead to less oscillatory behaviors and a decrease in the polarization degree of Airy beams, but a bigger exponential truncation factor will cause an increase in the polarization degree of Airy beams. In contrast with Gaussian beams, the degree of polarization of Airy beams is less affected by atmospheric turbulence and propagation distance under the same conditions, which means that Airy beams possess a resilient ability against turbulence-induced perturbations. These results indicate that Airy beams have great potential for applications in long-distance free-space optical communications to improve the performance of a polarization-encoded free-space quantum communication system. PMID:27409692

  5. Strong intensity variations of laser feedback interferometer caused by atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyi Sun(孙毅义); Zhiping Li(李治平)

    2003-01-01

    The significant variation of the laser output can be caused by feedback of a small part of laser beam, whichis reflected or backscattered by a target at a long distance from laser source, into the laser cavity. Thispaper describes and analyzes theoretically and experimentally the influence of atmospheric turbulence oninterference caused by laser feedback. The influence depends upon both the energy of feedback into thelaser cavity and the strength of turbulence over a laser propagation path in the atmosphere. In the caseof stronger energy of feedback and weak turbulence variance of fluctuation of the laser output can beenhanced by hundreds to thousands times. From our measurements and theoretical analysis it shows thatthese significant enhancements can result from the change of laser-cavity-modes which can be stimulatedsimultaneously and from beat oscillations between a variety of frequencies of laser modes. This also canresult from optical chaos inside the laser resonator because a non-separable distorted external cavity canbecome a prerequisite for optical chaos.

  6. Implementation of a Phase Only Spatial Light Modulator as an Atmospheric Turbulence Simulator at 1550 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Font

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulating atmospheric turbulence in a controlled environment have been a focus of interest for scientists for decades. The development of new technologies allows scientists to perform this task in a more realistic and controlled environment and provides powerful tools for the study and better understanding of the propagation of light through a nonstatic medium such as the atmosphere. Free space laser communications (FSLC and studies in light propagation through the atmosphere are areas which constantly benefit from breakthroughs in technology and in the development of realistic atmospheric turbulence simulators, in particular (Santiago et al. 2011. In this paper, we present the results from the implementation of a phase only spatial light modulator (SLM as an atmospheric turbulence simulator for light propagation in the short-wave infrared (SWIR regime. Specifically, we demonstrate its efficacy for its use in an FSLC system, at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  7. The Analyses of Turbulence Characteristics in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Zhang, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulent characteristics in the atmospheric surface layer are investigated using a data-driven method, Hilbert spectral analysis. The results from empirical mode decomposition display a set of intrinsic mode functions whose characteristic scales suggest a dyadic filter-bank property. It can be concluded from the joint probability density function of the intrinsic mode functions that the turbulent properties are totally different under different stratifications: the amplitudes (or energies) are arranged according to the stability parameter [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] for stable conditions, but tend to cluster randomly for unstable cases. The intermittency analyses reveal that second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display a power-law behaviour in the inertial subrange, and that the scaling exponent functions deviate from the theoretical values due to the strong intermittency in the stable boundary layer.

  8. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  9. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat

  10. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-22

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow and pressure were investigated by a series of experiments conducted in an especially built wind tunnel in Lhasa, a city on the Tibetan plateau where the altitude is 3650 m and the atmospheric pressure condition is naturally low (64 kPa). These results were compared with results obtained from a wind tunnel at standard atmospheric pressure (100 kPa) in Hefei city (altitude 50 m). The size of the fuel nozzles used in the experiments ranged from 3 to 8 mm in diameter and propane was used as the fuel. It was found that the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow first increased (“cross flow dominant” regime) and then decreased (“fuel jet dominant” regime) as the fuel jet velocity increased in both pressures; however, the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow was much lower at sub-atmospheric pressure than that at standard atmospheric pressure whereas the domain of the blow-out limit curve (in a plot of the air speed of the cross flow versus the fuel jet velocity) shrank as the pressure decreased. A theoretical model was developed to characterize the blow-out limit of nonpremixed jet flames in a cross flow based on a Damköhler number, defined as the ratio between the mixing time and the characteristic reaction time. A satisfactory correlation was obtained at relative strong cross flow conditions (“cross flow dominant” regime) that included the effects of the air speed of the cross flow, fuel jet velocity, nozzle diameter and pressure.

  11. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  12. Theoretical comparison of subgrid turbulence in atmospheric and oceanic quasi-geostrophic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsios, Vassili; Frederiksen, Jorgen S.; Zidikheri, Meelis J.

    2016-04-01

    Due to the massive disparity between the largest and smallest eddies in the atmosphere and ocean, it is not possible to simulate these flows by explicitly resolving all scales on a computational grid. Instead the large scales are explicitly resolved, and the interactions between the unresolved subgrid turbulence and large resolved scales are parameterised. If these interactions are not properly represented then an increase in resolution will not necessarily improve the accuracy of the large scales. This has been a significant and long-standing problem since the earliest climate simulations. Historically subgrid models for the atmosphere and ocean have been developed in isolation, with the structure of each motivated by different physical phenomena. Here we solve the turbulence closure problem by determining the parameterisation coefficients (eddy viscosities) from the subgrid statistics of high-resolution quasi-geostrophic atmospheric and oceanic simulations. These subgrid coefficients are characterised into a set of simple unifying scaling laws, for truncations made within the enstrophy-cascading inertial range. The ocean additionally has an inverse energy cascading range, within which the subgrid model coefficients have different scaling properties. Simulations adopting these scaling laws are shown to reproduce the statistics of the reference benchmark simulations across resolved scales, with orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency. This reduction in both resolution dependence and computational effort will improve the efficiency and accuracy of geophysical research and operational activities that require data generated by general circulation models, including weather, seasonal, and climate prediction; transport studies; and understanding natural variability and extreme events.

  13. Low SNR Capacity of FSO Links over Gamma-Gamma Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Benkhelifa, Fatma

    2013-02-23

    In this paper, we study the ergodic capacity of free space optical communication systems over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence fading channels with perfect channel state information at both the transmitter and the receiver. In our framework, we mainly focus on the low signal-to-noise ratio range and show that the ergodic capacity scales proportionally to SNR log^4(1/SNR). We show also that one-bit CSI feedback at the transmitter is enough to achieve this capacity using an on-off power control scheme.

  14. Conditions for observation of the enhanced backscattering phenomenon in a turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, Janusz; Kirkiewicz, Jozef; Kravtsov, Yuri A.

    2003-11-01

    Influence of enhanced backscattering effect on laser measurements of dust and aerosols content in a turbulent atmosphere is discussed. It is shown that doubling of the backscattered light intensity, characteristic for enhanced backscattering, leads to overestimating dust content in the air. To avoid undesirable effect of overestimation, it is recommended to displace receiving aperture sidewise relatively to laser source. Other method to eliminate overestimation is to use wider laser beam and extended receiving aperture as compared to coherence radius of the scattered wave field.

  15. Random wandering of laser beams with orbital angular momentum during propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Valerii P; Kolosov, Valeriy V; Pogutsa, Cheslav E

    2014-06-10

    The propagation of laser beams having orbital angular momenta (OAM) in the turbulent atmosphere is studied numerically. The variance of random wandering of these beams is investigated with the use of the Monte Carlo technique. It is found that, among various types of vortex laser beams, such as the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam, modified Bessel-Gaussian beam, and hypergeometric Gaussian beam, having identical initial effective radii and OAM, the LG beam occupying the largest effective volume in space is the most stable one. PMID:24921122

  16. Low SNR Capacity of FSO Links over Gamma-Gamma Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Benkhelifa, Fatma

    2013-01-27

    In this paper, we study the ergodic capacity of free space optical communication systems over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence fading channels with perfect channel state information at both the transmitter and the receiver. In our framework, we mainly focus on the low signal-to-noise ratio range and show that the ergodic capacity scales proportionally to SNR log^4(1/SNR). We show also that one-bit CSI feedback at the transmitter is enough to achieve this capacity using an on-o ff power control scheme.

  17. Large- and small-scale turbulent spectra in MHD and atmospheric flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Chkhetiani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present review we discuss certain studies of large- and small-scale turbulent spectra in MHD and atmospheric flows performed by S. S. Moiseev and his co-authors during the last years of his life and continued by his co-authors after he passed away. It is shown that many ideas developed in these works have not lost their novelty and urgency until now, and can form the basis of future studies in this field.

  18. Scaling laws of turbulence intermittency in the atmospheric boundary layer: the role of stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Cesari, Rita; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Bursting and intermittent behavior is a fundamental feature of turbulence, especially in the vicinity of solid obstacles. This is associated with the dynamics of turbulent energy production and dissipation, which can be described in terms of coherent motion structures. These structures are generated at random times and remain stable for long times, after which they become suddenly unstable and undergo a rapid decay event. This intermittent behavior is described as a birth-death point process of self-organization, i.e., a sequence of critical events. The Inter-Event Time (IET) distribution, associated with intermittent self-organization, is typically a power-law decay, whose power exponent is known as complexity index and characterizes the complexity of the system, i.e., the ability to develop self-organized, metastable motion structures. We use a method, based on diffusion scaling, for the estimation of system's complexity. The method is applied to turbulence velocity data in the atmospheric boundary layer. A neutral condition is compared with a stable one, finding that the complexity index is lower in the neutral case with respect to the stable one. As a consequence, the crucial birth-death events are more rare in the stable case, and this could be associated with a less efficient transport dynamics.

  19. A low cost, low power, S-band radar for atmospheric turbulence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas C.

    2015-05-01

    We present a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar capable of measuring atmospheric turbulence profiles within the Earth's surface layer. Due to the low cost and easily automated design, a number of units may be built and deployed to sites of interest around the world. Each unit would be capable of collecting turbulence strength, as a function of altitude, with a range of about 50 meters above the antenna plane. Such data is valuable to developers of directed energy, laser communications, imaging, and other optical systems, where good engineering design is based on an understanding of the details of the turbulence in which those systems will have to operate. The radar is based on the MIT "coffee can" design1,2. It is FCC compliant, operating in the 2.4 GHz instrumentation, science, and medical (ISM) band with less than 1 watt effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP). It is expected to cost less than $1000 per unit and is built from commercial off the shelf parts, along with easily constructed horn antennas. Major modifications to the design in 1,2 are the inclusion of horn antennas for directivity, and a straight forward processing software change that increases integration times to the order of tens of seconds to a minute. Here, a prototype system is described and preliminary data is presented.

  20. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  1. Implementation of a Phase Only Spatial Light Modulator as an Atmospheric Turbulence Simulator at 1550 nm

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and simulating atmospheric turbulence in a controlled environment have been a focus of interest for scientists for decades. The development of new technologies allows scientists to perform this task in a more realistic and controlled environment and provides powerful tools for the study and better understanding of the propagation of light through a nonstatic medium such as the atmosphere. Free space laser communications (FSLC) and studies in light propagation through the atmosphere a...

  2. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  3. A simplified free-space adaptive optics system against atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2012-03-01

    Optical free-space communications have the distinct advantages over conventional radio frequency and microwave systems in terms of information capacity and increased security. However, optical carrier frequencies drastically suffer due to atmospheric turbulence. This effect is a random process and time-varying process; therefore, it is very difficult to overcome the effect. Adaptive optics is the technology used to mitigate chaotic optical wave-front distortions in real time by measuring the wave-front distortion with the help of a sensor and then adapting the wave-front corrector to lessen the phase distortions and ultimately to recover a closely approximated signal to its original counterpart. But these systems are too expensive and large. This study employs the various aspects of Adaptive Optics system, such as wave-front corrector, wave-front sensors and analytical analysis of open and closed-loop systems using loop equations, in order to make free-space optics communication links more vulnerable against atmospheric turbulence and wave-front phase distributions. The purpose of this study is to investigate a wave-front sensorless adaptive optics system, which would provide reduced complexity, size and cost.

  4. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  5. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core

  6. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  7. Infinitesimal-propagation equation for decoherence of an orbital-angular-momentum-entangled biphoton state in atmospheric turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive a first-order differential equation for the decoherence of an orbital angular momentum entangled biphoton state propagating through a turbulent atmosphere. The derivation is based on the distortion that orbital angular momentum states experience due to propagation through a thin sheet of turbulent atmosphere. This distortion is treated as an infinitesimal transformation leading to a first-order differential equation, which we call an infinitesimal propagation equation. The equation is applied to a simple qubit case to show how the entanglement decays.

  8. Using Dynamically Coupled Turbine/Wind Simulations to Investigate the Influence of Atmospheric Turbulence in Turbine Wake Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, R.; Koo, E.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B.; Lundquist, J. K.; Canfield, J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to increase our efficiency of energy capture in wind farms, optimize turbine arrangements, and adapt wind-turbine technology to optimal performance in common atmospheric conditions such as low level jets (LLJ), it is critical to understand the dynamic interactions between turbulence and multiple wind turbines. Ambient atmospheric turbulence interacts with spinning turbines producing the critical mechanism for the recovery of the wind field behind a wind turbine. This turbine-influenced turbulent wind field creates the environment surrounding downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus controlling the amount of wind energy available for harvesting as well as the nature of the wear and tear that downwind turbines endure. The strength of the turbulent structures and their length-scales evolve downstream. Thus, the conditions to which downstream turbines are exposed, their productivity, and potentially their lifespan is a function of their position within the turbulent wake of upstream turbines. A numerical technique, WindBlade, has been developed for characterizing the interaction of spinning wind turbines and unsteady/heterogeneous atmospheric boundary layers at length scales ranging from blade-chord-scale (meters) to turbine-array-scale (multiple kilometers). This implementation of this technique combines an R&D100 winning numerical tool, HIGRAD/FIRETEC, a fully-compressible atmospheric hydrodynamics model with novel techniques to capture forces exchanged between the atmosphere and turbine as it rotates. The blade-induced forces on the wind field over the along the span of spinning turbine blades interacts with any oncoming atmospheric turbulence or shear, thus producing turbine wakes which are functions of turbine blade geometry and pitch, rotation speed, topographic and vegetation influences, and of course ambient wind speed, direction, shear, and turbulence. TurbSim, which creates vertical planes of three-dimensional turbulent wind fields based on empirical

  9. MIMO Free Space Optical Communications in Turbid and Turbulent Atmosphere (Invited Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Kavehrad

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Free Space Optical (FSO communications is the only viable solution for creating a three-dimensional global communications grid of inter-connected ground and airborne nodes. The huge amount of data exchange between satellites and ground stations demands enormous capacity that cannot be provided by strictly regulated, scarce resources of the Radio Frequency (RF spectrum. Free Space Optical (FSO communications, on the other hand, has the potential of providing virtually unlimited bandwidth. Furthermore, due to the spatial confinement of laser beams, such links are very secure. In other words, security is guaranteed at the physical layer. However, the promised enormous data rates are only available under clear weather conditions, and atmospheric phenomena such as clouds, fog, and even turbulence can degrade the performance, dramatically. While turbid media such as clouds and aerosols cause pulse broadening in space and time, turbulence presents itself as scintillation and fading. Hence, to exploit the great potentials of FSO at its best under all weather conditions, prudent measures must be taken in the design of transmitter and receiver. More specifically, multiple transmitters and receivers can be used to combat the turbulence-induced fading and to compensate for pulse attenuation and broadening caused by scattering. In this paper, Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO transmitter and receiver designs for FSO communications are investigated and the achievable performance improvements are discussed.

  10. Dissipation of buoyancy waves and turbulence in the atmosphere of venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izakov, M. N.

    2010-12-01

    The turbulent energy dissipation rate and the coefficients of turbulent diffusion and viscosity caused by breaking buoyancy waves (BWs) have been calculated. From the comparison of these values with other data, the contribution of BWs to the generation of turbulence has been determined. The comparison confirms the validity of the turbulence characteristics of the Venusian troposphere previously calculated from experimental data.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of premixed turbulent hydrogen flame propagation in lean and wet atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of PhD work concern the characterisation of hydrogen flame propagation in air-steam mixture representative of reactor containment atmosphere in severe accident situations. Laminar and turbulent flame regimes were investigated with: (1) spherical bomb is used to perform laminar flame tests. Different parameters were identified: the laminar flame velocity, SL0, and flame thickness, d, the integral length scale, LT, and intensity of turbulence, the Lewis and Zeldovich numbers, Le, b, the expansion ratio, s, the product speed of sound Csp. (2) ENACCEF facility dedicated to flame acceleration. This facility is highly instrumented (16 optical windows with PMT, 9 pressure transducers) to follow the flame propagation. The lower part of ENACCEF has 6 gas sampling locations. The mixture is ignited by a spark discharge at the bottom-end using electrodes. Tests performed on ENACCEF show the effect of blockage ratio, obstacles shape and gas composition on flame velocity. Some tests performed on the previous facilities were numerically simulated with TONUS CFD code. (author)

  12. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  13. Turbulent mixing driven by mean-flow shear and internal gravity waves in oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01

    This study starts with balances deduced by Baumert and Peters (2004, 2005) from results of stratified-shear experiments made in channels and wind tunnels by Itsweire (1984) and Rohr and Van Atta (1987), and of free-decay experiments in a resting stratified tank by Dickey and Mellor (1980). Using a modification of Canuto's (2002) ideas on turbulence and waves, these balances are merged with an (internal) gravity-wave energy balance presented for the open ocean by Gregg (1989), without mean-flow shear. The latter was augmented by a linear (viscous) friction term. Gregg's wave-energy source is interpreted on its long-wave spectral end as internal tides, topography, large-scale wind, and atmospheric low-pressure actions. In addition, internal eigen waves, generated by mean-flow shear, and the aging of the wave field from a virginal (linear) into a saturated state are taken into account. Wave packets and turbulence are treated as particles (vortices, packets) by ensemble kinetics so that the loss terms in all thre...

  14. Propagation based on second-order moments for partially coherent Laguerre–Gaussian beams through atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggen; Li, Yude; Dan, Youquan; Du, Quan; Wang, Shijian

    2016-07-01

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) has been used to study the propagation properties of partially coherent Laguerre Gaussian (PCLG) beams through atmospheric turbulence. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, an analytical formula of the propagation matrixes in terms of the second-order moments of the WDF for PCLG Beams in the receiving plane is derived. And then the analytical formulae for the curvature radii of PCLG Beams propagating in turbulence are given by the second-order moments of the WDF. The numerical results indicate that the curvature radius of PCLG Beams changes more rapidly in turbulence than that in the free space. The influence of the transverse coherence width and the beam waist width on the curvature radius of PCLG Beams is obvious, while the laser wavelength and the inner scale of turbulence have a slight effect. The study results may be useful for remote sensing and free space optical communications.

  15. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  16. Propagation of second-order moments of general truncated beams in atmospheric turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the partial-coherence theory and the method of the window function being expanded into a finite sum of complex-valued Gaussian functions, the analytic expressions for second-order moments of general truncated beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence are derived, from which some important characteristic parameters, such as the mean-squared beam width, the angular spread, the beam propagation factor (i.e. M2-factor), the Rayleigh range and the effective radius of curvature are also derived. It is shown that general truncated beams may have the same directionality as a fully coherent Gaussian beam if a certain condition is satisfied. Taking a truncated sinh-Gaussian beam as an example of general truncated beams, some numerical calculations are performed to illustrate the general results obtained in this paper. The analytic results obtained in this paper are general and very useful in studying the propagation property and the beam quality of laser beams. (paper)

  17. Scintillation characteristics of annular beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence along a slanted path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintillation characteristics of annular beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence along a slanted path are studied by using the numerical simulation method and some new results are obtained, which are explained in physical terms. It is found that, when the zenith angle is not large enough, the saturation phenomenon of the scintillation index never appears even if the propagation distance is large enough, which is quite different from the behavior for the horizontal propagation case. However, under the same condition (i.e. the zenith angle is not large enough), the on-axis scintillation index still approaches an asymptotical value, which increases as the zenith angle increases, and depends on the obscure ratio of annular beams. Furthermore, the relation of the on-axis scintillation index between annular beams and flat-topped beams is also examined in this paper. It is shown that their relation will change as the zenith angle changes. (paper)

  18. Impact of atmospheric turbulence on Van Cittert-Zernike speckle cell area estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations of laser beam propagation at 3.5 microns wavelength through atmospheric turbulence are used to characterize on-target irradiance profiles and the Van Cittert-Zemike speckle cell areas associated therewith. Results for a 3 km horizontal path with CN2 values between 2.5 x 10-14 and 5 x 10-13 m-2/3 are compared with those for a 20 km near-vertical slant path for a CN2 versus altitude with a near-ground value of 5 x 10--13m-2/3 and a Huffnagel-Valley type shape. The irradiance fluctuations for the slant path are much smaller than for the shorter horizontal path. The speckle cell area for the slant path is approximately the vacuum-path value; for the 3 km horizontal path it is at most 3 times the vacuum-path value

  19. Fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of a laser beam, carrying an optical vortex, in the turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam interacting with turbulent inhomogeneities of the atmosphere is studied theoretically. The integral representations are obtained for the OAM in terms of the distributions of the random intensity and random field of the permittivity of the medium, and also for OAM statistical characteristics in terms of corresponding correlation functions. It is found that the average OAM value is preserved during the propagation of the laser beam in a random medium. The dependence of the dispersion of OAM fluctuations on the atmospheric turbulence and beam parameters is calculated. It is shown that the dependence of the OAM dispersion on the initial angular momentum of the laser beam disappears in the case of very strong turbulence. (laser beams)

  20. PIV Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence and Pollen Dispersal Above a Corn Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; van Hout, R.; Luznik, L.; Katz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Dispersal of pollen grains by wind and gravity (Anemophilous) is one of the oldest means of plant fertilization available in nature. Recently, the growth of genetically modified foods has raised questions on the range of pollen dispersal in order to limit cross-fertilization between organically grown and transgenic crops. The distance that a pollen grain can travel once released from the anther is determined, among others, by the aerodynamic parameters of the pollen and the characteristics of turbulence in the atmosphere in which it is released. Turbulence characteristics of the flow above a pollinating corn field were measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements were performed on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, in Maryland, during July 2003. Two PIV systems were used simultaneously, each with an overall sample area of 18x18 cm. The spacing between samples was about equal to the field of view. The PIV instrumentation, including CCD cameras, power supply and laser sheets forming optics were mounted on a measurement platform, consisting of a hydraulic telescopic arm that could be extended up to 10m. The whole system could be rotated in order to align it with the flow. The flow was seeded with smoke generated about 30m upstream of the sample areas. Measurements were carried out at several elevations, from just below canopy height up to 1m above canopy. The local meteorological conditions around the test site were monitored by other sensors including sonic anemometers, Rotorod pollen counters and temperature sensors. Each processed PIV image provides an instantaneous velocity distribution containing 64x64 vectors with a vector spacing of ~3mm. The pollen grains (~100mm) can be clearly distinguished from the smoke particles (~1mm) based on their size difference. The acquired PIV data enables calculation of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics including Reynolds stresses, spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. Data

  1. Effects of atmospheric turbulence on microwave and millimeter wave satellite communications systems. [attenuation statistics and antenna design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasirvatham, D. M. J.; Hodge, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the microwave and millimeter wave link in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is presented with emphasis on satellite communications systems. The analysis is based on standard methods of statistical theory. The results are directly usable by the design engineer.

  2. Solar seeing monitor MISOLFA: A new method for estimating atmospheric turbulence parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irbah, A.; Borgnino, J.; Djafer, D.; Damé, L.; Keckhut, P.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: Daily observation conditions are needed when observing the Sun at high angular resolution. MISOLFA is a daytime seeing monitor developed for this purpose that allows the estimation of the spatial and temporal parameters of atmospheric turbulence. This information is necessary, for instance, for astrometric measurements of the solar radius performed at Calern Observatory (France) with SODISM II, the ground-based version of the SODISM instrument of the PICARD mission. Methods: We present a new way to estimate the spatial parameters of atmospheric turbulence for daily observations. This method is less sensitive to vibrations and guiding defaults of the telescope since it uses short-exposure images. It is based on the comparison of the optical transfer function obtained from solar data and the theoretical values deduced from the Kolmogorov and Von Kàrmàn models. This method, previously tested on simulated solar images, is applied to real data recorded at Calern Observatory in July 2013 with the MISOLFA monitor. Results: First, we use data recorded in the pupil plane mode of MISOLFA and evaluate the turbulence characteristic times of angle-of-arrival fluctuations: between 5 and 16 ms. Second, we use the focal plane mode of MISOLFA to simultaneously record solar images to obtain isoplanatic angles: ranging from 1 to 5 arcsec (in agreement with previously published values). These images and our new method allow Fried's parameter to be measured; it ranges from 0.5 cm to 4.7 cm with a mean value of 1.5 cm when Kolmogorov's model is considered, and from less than 0.5 to 2.6 cm with a mean value of 1.3 cm for the Von Kàrmàn model. Measurements of the spatial coherence outer scale parameter are also obtained when using the Von Kàrmàn model; it ranges from 0.25 to 13 m with a mean value of 3.4 m for the four days of observation that we analyzed. We found that its value can undergo large variations in only a few hours and that more data analysis is needed to better

  3. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  4. Climate simulations with a new air-sea turbulent flux parameterization in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Junmei; Gao, Zhiqiu; Lenschow, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines climate simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (NCAR CAM3) using a new air-sea turbulent flux parameterization scheme. The current air-sea turbulent flux scheme in CAM3 consists of three basic bulk flux equations that are solved simultaneously by an iterative computational technique. We recently developed a new turbulent flux parameterization scheme where the Obukhov stability length is parameterized directly by using a bulk Richardson number, an aerodynamic roughness length, and a heat roughness length. Its advantages are that it (1) avoids the iterative process and thus increases the computational efficiency, (2) takes account of the difference between z0m and z0h and allows large z0m/z0h, and (3) preserves the accuracy of iteration. An offline test using Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) data shows that the original scheme overestimates the surface fluxes under very weak winds but the new scheme gives better results. Under identical initial and boundary conditions, the original CAM3 and CAM3 coupled with the new turbulent flux scheme are used to simulate the global distribution of air-sea surface turbulent fluxes, and precipitation. Comparisons of model outputs against the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), the Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux), and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) show that: (1) the new scheme produces more realistic surface wind stress in the North Pacific and North Atlantic trade wind belts and wintertime extratropical storm track regions; (2) the latent heat flux in the Northern Hemisphere trade wind zones shows modest improvement in the new scheme, and the latent heat flux bias in the western boundary current region of the Gulf Stream is reduced; and (3) the simulated precipitation in the new scheme is closer to observation in the Asian monsoon

  5. Characterization of wake turbulence in a wind turbine array submerged in atmospheric boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar

    Wind energy is becoming one of the most significant sources of renewable energy. With its growing use, and social and political awareness, efforts are being made to harness it in the most efficient manner. However, a number of challenges preclude efficient and optimum operation of wind farms. Wind resource forecasting over a long operation window of a wind farm, development of wind farms over a complex terrain on-shore, and air/wave interaction off-shore all pose difficulties in materializing the goal of the efficient harnessing of wind energy. These difficulties are further amplified when wind turbine wakes interact directly with turbines located downstream and in adjacent rows in a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In the present study, an ABL solver is used to simulate different atmospheric stability states over a diurnal cycle. The effect of the turbines is modeled by using actuator methods, in particular the state-of-the-art actuator line method (ALM) and an improved ALM are used for the simulation of the turbine arrays. The two ALM approaches are used either with uniform inflow or are coupled with the ABL solver. In the latter case, a precursor simulation is first obtained and data saved at the inflow planes for the duration the turbines are anticipated to be simulated. The coupled ABL-ALM solver is then used to simulate the turbine arrays operating in atmospheric turbulence. A detailed accuracy assessment of the state-of-the-art ALM is performed by applying it to different rotors. A discrepancy regarding over-prediction of tip loads and an artificial tip correction is identified. A new proposed ALM* is developed and validated for the NREL Phase VI rotor. This is also applied to the NREL 5-MW turbine, and guidelines to obtain consistent results with ALM* are developed. Both the ALM approaches are then applied to study a turbine-turbine interaction problem consisting of two NREL 5-MW turbines. The simulations are performed for two ABL stability

  6. A wavelet-based approach to detect climate change on the coherent and turbulent component of the atmospheric circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faranda, Davide; Defrance, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    The modifications of atmospheric circulation induced by anthropogenic effects are difficult to capture because wind fields feature a complex spectrum where the signal of large-scale coherent structures (planetary, baroclinic waves and other long-term oscillations) is mixed up with turbulence. Our purpose is to study the effects of climate changes on these two components separately by applying a wavelet analysis to the 700 hPa wind fields obtained in climate simulations for different forcing scenarios. We study the coherent component of the signal via a correlation analysis to detect the persistence of large-scale or long-lasting structures, whereas we use the theory of autoregressive moving-average stochastic processes to measure the spectral complexity of the turbulent component. Under strong anthropogenic forcing, we detect a significant climate change signal. The analysis suggests that coherent structures will play a dominant role in future climate, whereas turbulent spectra will approach a classical Kolmogorov behaviour.

  7. Statistical distribution of the OAM states of Bessel-Gaussian-Schell infrared beams in strong turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Donglin; Shan, Lei; Xia, Mingchao; Zhao, Yuanhang

    2016-05-01

    The effects of strong turbulence on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of infrared and non-diffraction beam propagation in a terrestrial atmosphere are investigated. A new probability density model for OAM states of Bessel-Gaussian-Schell beam in the paraxial and strong turbulent channel is modeled based on the modified Rytov approximation. We find that the normalization energy weight of signal OAM modes at each OAM level is approximate equivalence in strong turbulence regime, one can constitute multiple mode channels by choosing OAM modes with large energy level difference between modes to reduce mode interference, and one can utilize BGS beam with OAM modes increasing the channel capacity of optical communications.

  8. The role of atmospheric stability/turbulence on wakes at the Egmond aan Zee offshore wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmie, R. J.; Churchfield, M. J.; Moriarty, P. J.; Lundquist, J. K.; Oxley, G. S.; Hahn, S.; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results from the NREL SOWFA project that compares simulations from models of different fidelity to meteorological and turbine data from the Egmond aan Zee wind farm. Initial results illustrate that wake behavior and impacts are strongly impacted by turbulence intensity [1]. This includes both power losses from wakes and loading illustrated by the out of plane bending moment. Here we focus on understanding the relationship between turbulence and atmospheric stability and whether power losses due to wakes can effectively be characterized by measures of turbulence alone or whether atmospheric stability as a whole plays a fundamental role in wake behavior. The study defines atmospheric stability using the Monin-Obukhov length estimated based on the temperature difference between 116 and 70 m. The data subset selected using this method for the calculation of the Monin-Obukhov length indicate little diurnal or directional dependence of the stability classes but a dominance of stable classes in the spring/unstable classes in fall and of near-neutral classes at high wind speeds (Figure 2). The analysis is complicated by the need to define turbulence intensity. We can select the ratio of the standard deviation of wind speed to mean wind speed in each observation period using data from the meteorological mast, in which case a substantial amount of data must be excluded due to the presence of the wind farm. An alternative is to use data from the wind turbines which could provide a larger data set for analysis. These approaches are examined and compared to illustrate their robustness. Finally, power losses from wakes are categorized according to stability and/or turbulence in order to understand their relative importance in determining the behavior of wind turbine wakes.

  9. Quantifying non-stationarity effects on organization of atmospheric turbulent eddy motion by Benford's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinglei; Fu, Zuntao

    2016-04-01

    How to quantify the effects of non-stationarity on organization of atmospheric turbulent eddy motions has drawn less attention in recent literatures. Here Benford's law (BL), which states that the first digit (1 through 9) in many datasets follows a monotonically decreasing logarithmic distribution, is used to address this issue for the first time. A quantifier called multi-scale first digit entropy (MFDE) is adopted, which is based on the deviation of BL from the practical first digit distribution of multi-scaled vertical velocity increments, and marked differences are detected in stationary and non-stationary series. The MFDE values of stationary records do not change much with different scales while increase significantly for non-stationary ones as time scales increase. Due to the close relationship between MFDE and the multi-scale Shannon entropy (MSSE), the above results indicate that the non-stationary series are more organized than the stationary ones. Especially, the MFDE can also be used to quantify the different organization degrees of the multi-scaled structures existing in surface vertical velocity records.

  10. Outer scale and Monin-Obukhov flux relationships of atmospheric turbulence under dry convective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruin, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    In this study we will investigate the assumption that in the atmospheric surface layer the outer scale (L0) is proportional to the height above the surface, under dry convective conditions. For this purpose we analyzed raw sonic anemometers data collected at 3.5 m and at 9 m in a field campaign at the Santa Cruz Flats (32040.3190'N, 111032.641'W, 526 m of elevation) near Eloy, Arizona. For simplicity, we define the L0 as that separation distance at which the spatial correlation coefficient of air temperature at two points in the surface layer is 0.5. Then, according to the 2/3-Kolmogorov scaling law in the inertial sub-range, L0 is determined by the variance and the structure parameter of T . It is found that L0 does not scale with height. Possible reasons for this negative result will be discussed, by considering the methodology to determine structure parameters, Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, effects of intermittency and Monin-Obukhov flux relationships for variance and structure parameter for T . The question is asked whether the concept of surface constant flux layer still holds under strong convective condition.

  11. Double-distance propagation of Gaussian beams passing through a tilted cat-eye optical lens in a turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Zhong; Sun, Hua-Yan; Song, Feng-Hua

    2011-04-01

    By using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral and the method of expanding the aperture function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions, an approximate analytical formula of the double-distance propagation for Gaussian beam passing through a tilted cat-eye optical lens and going back along the entrance way in a turbulent atmosphere has been derived. Through numerical calculation, the effects of incidence angle, propagation distance, and structure constant on the propagation properties of a Gaussian beam in a turbulent atmosphere are studied. It is found that the incidence angle creates an unsymmetrical average intensity distribution pattern, while the propagation distance and the structure constant can each create a smooth and symmetrical average intensity distribution pattern. The average intensity peak gradually deviates from the centre, and the central average intensity value decreases quickly with the increase in incidence angle, while a larger structure constant can bring the average intensity peak back to the centre.

  12. Influence of enhanced backscattering phenomenon on laser measurements of dust and aerosols content in a turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, J.; Kirkiewicz, J.; Kravtsov, Yu. A.

    2002-07-01

    Influence of enhanced backscattering effect on laser measurements of dust and aerosols content in a turbulent atmosphere is discussed. It is shown that doubling of the backscattered light intensity, characteristic for enhanced backscattering leads to overestimating dust content in the air. To avoid undesirable effect of overestimation of dust and aerosols it is recommended to displace receiving aperture sidewise relatively to source and to use wider laser beam and extended receiving aperture as compared to coherence radius of the scattered wave field.

  13. An experimental study of high Reynolds number turbulence in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhruva, Brindesh R.

    2000-11-01

    High Reynolds number turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer has been investigated using constant temperature hot-wire anemometry. The Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers (Rλ) were typically between 5 × 103 at 2 meters in the salt flats of Western Utah and 2 × 104 at 35 meters on the meterological tower of Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island. The measurements were used to study the statistical properties of inertial range quantities, Reynolds stress and wind direction. The identification of possible self- similar behavior in the inertial range is a primary goal in turbulence research. To motivate the need for high Reynolds number measurements we demonstrate the Reynolds number effect on the existence and extent of the inertial range. We find that the inertial range is non-existent at typical laboratory Reynolds numbers. We thus turn to high Reynolds numbers and analyze the asymmetry in the probability distribution function (pdf) of the longitudinal velocity increment. We compute the scaling exponents of the positive and negative structure functions and find that the negative exponents are more anomalous than the positive ones. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution to the asymmetry-or the skewness-from different regions of the pdf. We find that the core region of the pdf is more or less symmetric and the skewness comes primarily from the rare large amplitude events contained in the tails of the pdf. We discuss this result in the context of the down-scale cascade of energy. Next it is shown that even at Rλ ~ 20,000 the structure functions do not scale unambiguously-although the situation is far better than that at low Reynolds numbers. By applying various filtering techniques and conditional sampling it is shown that this lack of strict scaling even at very high Reynolds numbers is due to large scale ``corrupting effects'' on the inertial range. We propose a plausible scheme to remove the large scale effects. Next, we characterize the

  14. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  15. Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

    2013-01-01

    The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

  16. Non-steady dynamics of atmospheric turbulence interaction with wind turbine loadings through blade-boundary-layer-resolved CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh

    Modern commercial megawatt-scale wind turbines occupy the lower 15-20% of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). The current trend of increasing wind turbine diameter and hub height increases the interaction of the wind turbines with the upper ASL which contains spatio-temporal velocity variations over a wide range of length and time scales. Our interest is the interaction of the wind turbine with the energetic integral-scale eddies, since these cause the largest temporal variations in blade loadings. The rotation of a wind turbine blade through the ABL causes fluctuations in the local velocity magnitude and angle of attack at different sections along the blade. The blade boundary layer responds to these fluctuations and in turn causes temporal transients in local sectional loads and integrated blade and shaft bending moments. While the integral scales of the atmospheric boundary layer are ˜ O(10--100m) in the horizontal with advection time scales of order tens of seconds, the viscous surface layer of the blade boundary layer is ˜ O(10 -- 100 mum) with time scales of order milliseconds. Thus, the response of wind turbine blade loadings to atmospheric turbulence is the result of the interaction between two turbulence dynamical systems at extremely disparate ranges of length and time scales. A deeper understanding of this interaction can impact future approaches to improve the reliability of wind turbines in wind farms, and can underlie future improvements. My thesis centers on the development of a computational framework to simulate the interaction between the atmospheric and wind turbine blade turbulence dynamical systems using a two step one-way coupled approach. Pseudo-spectral large eddy simulation (LES) is used to generate a true (equilibrium) atmospheric boundary layer over a flat land with specified surface roughness and heating consistent with the stability state of the daytime lower troposphere. Using the data from the

  17. Performance analysis of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangning; Ma, Jing; Belmonte, Aniceto; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2015-12-01

    The performances of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications over Gamma-Gamma distributed turbulence are studied for a multiple-aperture receiver system. Equal gain-combining (EGC) and selection-combining (SC) techniques are considered as practical schemes to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence under thermal-noise-limited conditions. Bit-error rate (BER) performances for on-off keying-modulated direct detection and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for SC diversity receptions using analytical results and for EGC diversity receptions through an approximation method. To show the net diversity gain of a multiple-aperture receiver system, BER performances and outage probabilities of EGC and SC receiver systems are compared with a single monolithic-aperture receiver system with the same total aperture area (same average total incident optical power) for satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications. All the numerical results are also verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  18. Polarization of quantization Gaussian Schell-beams through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence of marine-atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanhang; Zhang, Yixin; Hu, Zhengda; Li, Ye; Wang, Donglin

    2016-07-01

    Polarization and spatial coherence of quantization Gaussian Schell-beams propagating through the anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence of marine-atmosphere channel are studied based on the quantized Huygens-Fresnel principle and the degree of quantum polarization. The spatial coherence length and the polarization degree of linearly polarization quantization Gaussian Schell-beams are developed. The effects of outer scale on the lateral coherence length are not obvious as same as the effects of wavelength on the degree of polarization. The degree of polarization decreases as the source transverse coherent width, anisotropic factor, the number of received photons, spectral index, the inner scale of turbulent eddies and source transverse radius decrease or generalized refractive-index structure parameter increases. The refractive-index structure parameter, spectral index and inner scale have also effect on the changes of lateral coherence length. Those results can be used to improve the performance of a polarization-encoded quantum communication system.

  19. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  20. Transmission analysis of CPolM-based OFDM FSO system in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuwei; Bai, Fan; Sato, Takuro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose to implement a consecutive polarization modulation (CPolM) scheme to transmit orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal over the turbulent free-space optical (FSO) links. We analyze the fluctuation of polarization states of an optical wave while propagating through the turbulence channel of which the refractive-index property is described by Kolmogorov spectrum. The transmission performance in terms of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), symbol-error-ratio (SER) and outage probability of the proposed system are evaluated. The proposed system provides a more efficient way to compensate scintillation effects in a comparison with the intensity modulation (IM) based OFDM FSO system under a varying degrees of turbulence strength regimes.

  1. Comment on `Simulating thick atmospheric turbulence in the lab with application to orbital angular momentum communication'

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Rodenburg et al (2014 New J. Phys. 16 033020) presented an approach for simulating propagation over a long path of uniformly distributed Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence by means of a compact laboratory arrangement that used two carefully placed and controlled spatial light modulators. We show that their simulation approach mimics the behavior of plane-wave propagation, rather than general beam-wave propagation. Thus, the regime in which their orbital angular momentum (OAM) cross-talk results accurately represent the behavior to be expected in horizontal-path propagation through turbulence may be limited to collimated-beam OAM modes whose diameters are sufficient that turbulence-induced beam spread is negligible.

  2. Acceleration of raindrops formation due to tangling-clustering instability in turbulent stratified atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; Krasovitov, B; Kulmala, M; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2013-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50-100 micron-size droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 minutes. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth, is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain, and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation". We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence (Phys. Fluids 25, 085104, 2013) results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities and strong five-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mechanism of tangling clustering instability in the temperature-stratified turbulence is much more effective than the previously considered pure inertial clustering caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. Our a...

  3. Dispersion of the impurity released from an instantaneous source in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Yuri S.; Ershov, Arkadii D.; Bril, Andrey I.; Kabashnikov, Vitaliy P.; Popov, V. M.; Chaikovsky, Anatoly P.

    2002-02-01

    The results of comprehensive field experiment are presented. The objective of the experiment is lidar technique development for control of pollutant dispersion from pulse source. Experiment was carried out in steppe region, underlying surface was covered with sparse vegetation. Charge exploded at the altitude of 10 m stand for source of pollutant. Lidar was used to trace the cloud of explosion products. The ratio of backscatter signal from the cloud to aerosol background signal was recorded along with the time and coordinates of sounded points. Ultrasonic meteorological station and sodar 25 - 30 meters distant from explosion location were used to measure air temperature, vertical and horizontal components of wind velocity and its direction, total energy of turbulent motions, tangential turbulent friction stress and vertical turbulent heat flow. Experimental data were compared with the results of numerical modeling of pollutant spatial distribution performed on the basis of Gaussian statistical model. Numerical results were primarily in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  4. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  5. Experimental evaluation of a model for the influence of coherent wind lidars on their remote measurements of atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Kapp, Stefan; Kristensen, Leif; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2011-11-01

    Affordable coherent wind lidars based on modern telecom components have recently emerged on the wind energy market spurred by high demand of the industry for compact and accurate remote sensing wind and turbulence profilers. Today, hundreds of ground based wind lidars that achieve the range resolution by either focusing a continuous-wave laser beam or by gating a pulsed laser beam are used for measuring mean wind and turbulence profiles in the lower atmospheric boundary-layer. However, detailed understanding of the influence of the spatial filtering of the lidars on their precise assessment of turbulence is still a challenge. For assessment of the fine structure turbulence, and in particular for the easy and fast assessment of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy from measurements in the Kolmogorov inertial subrange, we havemodeled the atmospheric velocity structure functions and spectra obtainable from fixed-orientation along-beam wind measurements by these lidars. The dissipation rate retrieval model is experimentally evaluated with data obtained with a pulsed lidar pointing horizontally into horizontally homogeneous turbulence encountered at the top level of a 125 m tall meteorological tower, equipped with an in-situ turbulence measurement device (a three-dimensional sonic anemometer) for intercomparison. Our experimental study has revealed that the easily manageable analytical model accounts well for the observed fine structure turbulent spectra and their dependence on the pointing direction of the lidar beam relative to the mean wind direction. The results demonstrate that turbulence dissipation rates, and hence boundary-layer turbulence, can easily be obtained from wind lidar-based fine structure measurements.

  6. Retrieving atmospheric turbulence information from regular commercial aircraft using Mode-S and ADS-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Jacek M.; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; de Haan, Siebren; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2016-05-01

    Navigational information broadcast by commercial aircraft in the form of Mode-S EHS (Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance) and ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast) messages can be considered a new source of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric turbulence estimates. A set of three processing methods is proposed and analysed using a quality record of turbulence encounters made by a research aircraft.The proposed methods are based on processing the vertical acceleration or the background wind into the eddy dissipation rate. Turbulence intensity can be estimated using the standard content of the Mode-S EHS/ADS-B.The results are based on a Mode-S EHS/ADS-B data set generated synthetically based on the transmissions from the research aircraft. This data set was validated using the overlapping record of the Mode-S EHS/ADS-B received from the same research aircraft. The turbulence intensity, meaning the eddy dissipation rate, obtained from the proposed methods based on the Mode-S EHS/ADS-B is compared with the value obtained using on-board accelerometer. The results of the comparison indicate the potential of the methods. The advantages and limitation of the presented approaches are discussed.

  7. Double-distance propagation of Gaussian beams passing through a tilted cat-eye optical lens in a turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral and the method of expanding the aperture function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions, an approximate analytical formula of the double-distance propagation for Gaussian beam passing through a tilted cat-eye optical lens and going back along the entrance way in a turbulent atmosphere has been derived. Through numerical calculation, the effects of incidence angle, propagation distance, and structure constant on the propagation properties of a Gaussian beam in a turbulent atmosphere are studied. It is found that the incidence angle creates an unsymmetrical average intensity distribution pattern, while the propagation distance and the structure constant can each create a smooth and symmetrical average intensity distribution pattern. The average intensity peak gradually deviates from the centre, and the central average intensity value decreases quickly with the increase in incidence angle, while a larger structure constant can bring the average intensity peak back to the centre. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. Measurement and statistical analysis of the wavefront distortions induced by atmospheric turbulence using two-channel moiré deflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, an adjustable, high-sensitivity, wide dynamic range, two-channel wavefront sensor based on moiré deflectometry was proposed by Rasouli et al (2010 Opt. Express 18 23906). In this work we have used this sensor on a telescope for measuring turbulence-induced wavefront distortions. A slightly divergent laser beam passes through turbulent ground level atmosphere and enters the telescope’s aperture. The laser beam is collimated behind the telescope’s focal point by means of a collimator and the beam enters the wavefront sensor. First, from deviations in the moiré fringes we calculate the two orthogonal components of the angle of arrival at each location across the wavefront. The deviations have been deduced in successive frames which allows evolution of the wavefront shape and Fried’s seeing parameter r0 to be determined. Mainly, statistical analysis of the reconstructed wavefront distortions are presented. The achieved accuracy in the measurements and comparison between the measurements and the theoretical models are presented. Owing to the use of the sensor on a telescope, and using sub-pixel accuracy for the measurement of the moiré fringe displacements, the sensitivity of the measurements is improved by more than one order of magnitude. In this work we have achieved a minimum measurable angle of arrival fluctuations equal to 3.7 × 10−7 rad or 0.07 arc s. Besides, because of the large area of the telescope’s aperture, a high spatial resolution is achieved in detecting the spatial perturbations of the atmospheric turbulence. (paper)

  9. Average intensity and polarization properties of a cylindrical vector Laguerre-Gaussian beam passing through a paraxial ABCD optical system in a turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2013-06-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral, the analytical expressions for the average intensity, the degree of the polarization, and the effective size of a cylindrical vector Laguerre-Gaussian beam passing through a paraxial ABCD optical system are derived in a turbulent atmosphere, respectively. The influences of the beam parameters and the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a cylindrical vector Laguerre-Gaussian beam in a turbulent atmosphere are examined in detail. It is found that the beam profile will finally tend to a Gaussian-like distribution, and the polarization distribution always has a dip in the cross section. This research is beneficial to the practical applications in free-space optical communications and the remote sensing of the cylindrical vector Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

  10. Mean-square angle-of-arrival difference between two counter-propagating spherical waves in the presence of atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Tong, Shoufeng; Lou, Yan

    2015-09-21

    The mean-square angle-of-arrival (AOA) difference between two counter-propagating spherical waves in atmospheric turbulence is theoretically formulated. Closed-form expressions for the path weighting functions are obtained. It is found that the diffraction and refraction effects of turbulent cells make negative and positive contributions to the mean-square AOA difference, respectively, and the turbulent cells located at the midpoint of the propagation path have no contributions to the mean-square AOA difference. If the mean-square AOA difference is separated into the refraction and diffraction parts, the refraction part always dominates the diffraction one, and the ratio of the diffraction part to the refraction one is never larger than 0.5 for any turbulence spectrum. Based on the expressions for the mean-square AOA difference, formulae for the correlation coefficient between the angles of arrival of two counter-propagating spherical waves in atmospheric turbulence are derived. Numerical calculations are carried out by considering that the turbulence spectrum has no path dependence. It is shown that the mean-square AOA difference always approximates to the variance of AOA fluctuations. It is found that the correlation coefficient between the angles of arrival in the x or y direction of two counter-propagating spherical waves ranges from 0.46 to 0.5, implying that the instantaneous angles of arrival of two counter-propagating spherical waves in atmospheric turbulence are far from being perfectly correlated even when the turbulence spectrum does not vary along the path. PMID:26406667

  11. The Turbopause experiment: atmospheric stability and turbulent structure spanning the turbopause altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Lehmacher

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Very few sequences of high resolution wind and temperature measurements in the lower thermosphere are available in the literature, which makes it difficult to verify the simulation results of models that would provide better understanding of the complex dynamics of the region. To address this problem the Turbopause experiment used four rockets launched over a period of approximately two hours from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska (64° N, 147° W on the night of 17–18 February 2009. All four rocket payloads released trimethyl aluminum trails for neutral wind and turbulence measurements, and two of the rockets carried ionization gauges and fixed-bias Langmuir probes measuring neutral and electron densities, small-scale fluctuations and neutral temperatures. Two lidars monitored temperature structure and sodium densities. The observations were made under quiet geomagnetic conditions and show persistence in the wind magnitudes and shears throughout the observing period while being modulated by inertia-gravity waves. High resolution temperature profiles show the winter polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere in a state of relatively low stability with several quasi-adiabatic layers between 74 and 103 km. Temperature and wind data were combined to calculate Richardson number profiles. Evidence for turbulence comes from simultaneous observations of density fluctuations and downward transport of sodium in a mixed layer near 75 km; the observation of turbulent fluctuations and energy dissipation from 87–90 km; and fast and irregular trail expansion at 90–93 km, and especially between 95 to 103 km. The regions of turbulent trails agree well with regions of quasi-adiabatic temperature gradients. Above 103 km, trail diffusion was mainly laminar; however, unusual features and vortices in the trail diffusion were observed up to 118 km that have not been as prevalent or as clearly evident in earlier trail releases.

  12. MOSE: optical turbulence and atmospherical parameters operational forecast at ESO ground-based sites. II: atmospherical parameters in the surface layer [0-30] m

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, Franck; Fini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This article is the second of a series of articles aiming at proving the feasibility of the forecast of all the most relevant classical atmospherical parameters for astronomical applications (wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity) and the optical turbulence (Cn2 and the derived astro-climatic parameters like seeing, isoplanatic angle, wavefront coherence time...). This study is done in the framework of the MOSE project, and focused above the two ESO ground-bases sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones. In this paper we present the results related to the Meso-Nh model ability in reconstructing the surface layer atmospherical parameters (wind speed intensity, wind direction and absolute temperature, [0-30] m a.g.l.). The model reconstruction of all the atmospherical parameters in the surface layer is very satisfactory. For the temperature, at all levels, the RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) is inferior to 1{\\deg}C. For the wind speed, it is ~2 m/s, and for the wind direction, it is in the ran...

  13. A Dropsonde UAV for Atmospheric Sensing in a Turbulent Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dropsondes are one of the primary atmospheric measurement tools available to researchers. Current dropsondes are deployed with a free fall parachute trajectory,...

  14. MIMO free-space optical communication employing coherent BPOLSK modulation in atmospheric optical turbulence channel with pointing errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, K.; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2015-05-01

    An optical wireless communication system is an alternative to radio frequency communication, but atmospheric turbulence induced fading and misalignment fading are the main impairments affecting an optical signal when propagating through the turbulence channel. The resultant of misalignment fading is the pointing errors, it degrades the bit error rate (BER) performance of the free space optics (FSO) system. In this paper, we study the BER performance of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FSO system employing coherent binary polarization shift keying (BPOLSK) in gamma-gamma (G-G) channel with pointing errors. The BER performance of the BPOLSK based MIMO FSO system is compared with the single-input single-output (SISO) system. Also, the average BER performance of the systems is analyzed and compared with and without pointing errors. A novel closed form expressions of BER are derived for MIMO FSO system with maximal ratio combining (MRC) and equal gain combining (EGC) diversity techniques. The analytical results show that the pointing errors can severely degrade the performance of the system.

  15. Stokes parameters of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammady, Sh; Ghafary, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, generalized Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle and the unified theory of coherence and polarization have been reported. Analytical formulas for 2  ×  2 cross-spectral density matrix elements, and consequently Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere have been formulated. Effects of many physical attributes such as wavelength, turbulence strength, flatness order and other source parameters on the Stokes parameters, and therefore spectral degree of polarization upon propagation have been studied thoroughly. The behaviour of the spectral degree of coherence of a delineated beam for different source conditions has been investigated. It can be shown that four generalized Stokes parameters increase by raising the flatness order at the same propagation distance. Increasing the number of beams leads to a decrease in the Stokes parameters to zero slowly. The results are of utmost importance for optical communications.

  16. Atmospheric lateral and longitudinal turbulent length scales (measured at 600 to 800 meters above grade level)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Airborne Doppler Lidar System has been used to obtain a detailed 'instantaneous' mapping of horizontal spatial wind fields at 600-800 m elevations on the east side of the San Gorgonio Pass in California, in the form of checkerboard-fashion horizontal wind vectors spaced at 300 m intervals along and normal to the flight path. Spatial autocorrelations for the lateral and longitudinal components are ensemble-averaged, and integral turbulent length scales are computed for the wind fields' longitudinal and lateral directions. The flow in the region studied does not appear to be isotropic.

  17. Performance analysis of relay-assisted all-optical FSO networks over strong atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Liang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we consider a relay-assisted free-space optical communication scheme over strong atmospheric turbulence channels with misalignment-induced pointing errors. The links from the source to the destination are assumed to be all-optical links. Assuming a variable gain relay with amplify-and-forward protocol, the electrical signal at the source is forwarded to the destination with the help of this relay through all-optical links. More specifically, we first present a cumulative density function (CDF) analysis for the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio. Based on this CDF, the outage probability, bit-error rate, and average capacity of our proposed system are derived. Results show that the system diversity order is related to the minimum value of the channel parameters.

  18. Optimization of structures undergoing harmonic or stochastic excitation. Ph.D. Thesis; [atmospheric turbulence and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal design was investigated of simple structures subjected to dynamic loads, with constraints on the structures' responses. Optimal designs were examined for one dimensional structures excited by harmonically oscillating loads, similar structures excited by white noise, and a wing in the presence of continuous atmospheric turbulence. The first has constraints on the maximum allowable stress while the last two place bounds on the probability of failure of the structure. Approximations were made to replace the time parameter with a frequency parameter. For the first problem, this involved the steady state response, and in the remaining cases, power spectral techniques were employed to find the root mean square values of the responses. Optimal solutions were found by using computer algorithms which combined finite elements methods with optimization techniques based on mathematical programming. It was found that the inertial loads for these dynamic problems result in optimal structures that are radically different from those obtained for structures loaded statically by forces of comparable magnitude.

  19. Scintillation of partially coherent Gaussian—Schell model beam propagation in slant atmospheric turbulence considering inner- and outer-scale effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the modified Rytov theory and the international telecommunication union-radio (ITU-R) slant atmospheric structure constant model, the uniform scintillation index of partially coherent Gaussian—Schell model (GSM) beam propagation in the slant path is derived from weak- to strong-turbulence regions considering inner- and outer-scale effects. The effects of wavelength of beams and inner- and outer-scale of turbulence on scintillation are analyzed numerically. Comparison between the scintillation of GSM beams under the von Karman spectrum and that of beams under the modified Hill spectrum is made. The results obtained show that the scintillation index obtained under the von Karman spectrum is smaller than that under the modified Hill spectrum. This study can find theory bases for the experiments of the partially coherent GSM beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. An adaptation method to improve secret key rates of time-frequency QKD in atmospheric turbulence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaole; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) channels can be characterized by random power fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, which is known as scintillation. Weak coherent source based FSO quantum key distribution (QKD) systems suffer from the scintillation effect because during the deep channel fading the expected detection rate drops, which then gives an eavesdropper opportunity to get additional information about protocol by performing photon number splitting (PNS) attack and blocking single-photon pulses without changing QBER. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we study a large-alphabet QKD protocol, which is achieved by using pulse-position modulation (PPM)-like approach that utilizes the time-frequency uncertainty relation of the weak coherent photon state, called here TF-PPM-QKD protocol. We first complete finite size analysis for TF-PPM-QKD protocol to give practical bounds against non-negligible statistical fluctuation due to finite resources in practical implementations. The impact of scintillation under strong atmospheric turbulence regime is studied then. To overcome the secure key rate performance degradation of TF-PPM-QKD caused by scintillation, we propose an adaptation method for compensating the scintillation impact. By changing source intensity according to the channel state information (CSI), obtained by classical channel, the adaptation method improves the performance of QKD system with respect to the secret key rate. The CSI of a time-varying channel can be predicted using stochastic models, such as autoregressive (AR) models. Based on the channel state predictions, we change the source intensity to the optimal value to achieve a higher secret key rate. We demonstrate that the improvement of the adaptation method is dependent on the prediction accuracy.

  1. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  2. MOSE: optical turbulence and atmospherical parameters operational forecast at ESO ground-based sites. I: Overview and atmospherical parameters vertical stratification on [0-20] km

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E; Fini, L

    2013-01-01

    We present the overview of the MOSE project (MOdeling ESO Sites) aiming at proving the feasibility of the forecast of the classical atmospherical parameters (wind speed intensity and direction, temperature, relative humidity) and the optical turbulence OT (CN2 profiles and the most relevant integrated astro-climatic parameters derived from the CN2: the seeing, the isoplanatic angle, the wavefront coherence time) above the two ESO ground-based sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones. The final outcome of the study is to investigate the opportunity to implement an automatic system for the forecast of these parameters at these sites. In this paper we present results related to the Meso-Nh model ability in reconstructing the vertical stratification of the atmospherical parameters along the 20 km above the ground. The very satisfactory performances shown by the model in reconstructing most of these parameters (and in particular the wind speed) put this tool of investigation as the most suitable to be used in as...

  3. Impact of storm-induced cooling of sea surface temperature on large turbulent eddies and vertical turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer of Hurricane Isaac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuting; Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan; Gao, Cen

    2016-01-01

    Roll vortices in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are important to oil operation and oil spill transport. This study investigates the impact of storm-induced sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on the roll vortices generated by the convective and dynamic instability in the ABL of Hurricane Isaac (2012) and the roll induced transport using hindcasting large eddy simulations (LESs) configured from the multiply nested Weather Research & Forecasting model. Two experiments are performed: one forced by the Unified Wave INterface - Coupled Model and the other with the SST replaced by the NCEP FNL analysis that does not include the storm-induced SST cooling. The simulations show that the roll vortices are the prevalent eddy circulations in the ABL of Isaac. The storm-induced SST cooling causes the ABL stability falls in a range that satisfies the empirical criterion of roll generation by dynamic instability, whereas the ABL stability without considering the storm-induced SST cooling meets the criterion of roll generation by convective instability. The ABL roll is skewed and the increase of convective instability enhances the skewness. Large convective instability leads to large vertical transport of heat and moisture; whereas the dominant dynamic instability results in large turbulent kinetic energy but relatively weak heat and moisture transport. This study suggests that failure to consider roll vortices or incorrect initiation of dynamic and convective instability of rolls in simulations may substantially affect the transport of momentum, energy, and pollutants in the ABL and the dispersion/advection of oil spill fume at the ocean surface.

  4. Scaling Of Turbulence In The Atmospheric Surface-Layer: Which Anisotropy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to provide an insight into the fundamental relationships between large and small scale wind velocity fluctuations within the boundary layer through careful analysis of measuring mast wind velocities. The measuring mast was in a wind farm on top of a mountain (with steep inclines of about 30°) on an island surrounded by the sea which meant the horizontal mean flow fluctuations were dominated by buoyancy forces and vertical shears at large scales (above 500m). Thus using a variety of methods including spectral, integrated spectral, integrated cospectral and multifractal analysis we were able to clearly dispel the relevance of 2D turbulence and give on the contrary some credence to the multifractal anisotropic model.

  5. Influence of leads widths distribution on turbulent heat transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marcq

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Leads are linear-like structures of open water within the sea ice cover that develop as the result of fracturing due to divergence or shear. Through leads, air and water come into contact and directly exchange latent and sensible heat through convective processes driven by the large temperature and moisture differences between them. In the central Arctic, leads only cover 1 to 2% of the ocean during winter, but account for more than 80% of the heat fluxes. Furthermore, narrow leads (several meters are more than twice as efficient at transmitting turbulent heat than larger ones (several hundreds of meters. We show that lead widths are power law distributed, P(X~X−a with a>1, down to very small spatial scales (20 m or below. This implies that the open water fraction is by far dominated by very small leads. Using two classical formulations, which provide first order turbulence closure for the fetch-dependence of heat fluxes, we find that the mean heat fluxes (sensible and latent over open water are up to 55 % larger when considering the lead width distribution obtained from a SPOT satellite image of the ice cover, compared to the situation where the open water fraction constitutes one unique large lead and the rest of the area is covered by ice, as it is usually considered in climate models at the grid scale. This difference may be even larger if we assume that the power law scaling of lead widths extents down to smaller (~1 m scales. Such estimations may be a first step towards a subgrid scale parameterization of the spatial distribution of open water for heat fluxes calculations in ocean/sea ice coupled models.

  6. Atmospheric Turbulence Measurements With the Automatic Mini UAV 'M2AV Carolo'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bange, J.; van den Kroonenberg, A. C.; Spieß, T.; Buschmann, M.; Krüger, L.; Heindorf, A.; Vörsmann, P.

    2007-05-01

    The limitations of manned airborne meteorological measurements led to the development of an autonomously operating mini aircraft, the Meteorological Mini-UAV (M2AV), at the Institute of Aerospace Systems, Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. The task was to develop, test and verify a meteorological sensor package as payload for an already available automatic carrier aircraft, the UAV 'Carolo T200', which operates autonomously i.e. without remote control. The M2AV is a self constructed model aircraft with two electrically powered engines and a wingspan of two meters. The maximum take-off weight is 4.5~kg (the M2AV is therefore classified as an model plane which simplifies authority issues), including 1.5~kg of payload. It is hand-launched which makes operation of the aircraft easy. With an endurance of approximately 50 minutes, the range accounts for 60 km at a cruising speed of 20~m/s. The M2AV is capable of performing turbulence measurements (wind vector, temperature and humidity) within the troposphere and offers an economic component during meteorological campaigns. The meteorological sensors are mounted on a noseboom to minimise the aircraft's influence on the measurements and to position the sensors closely to each other. Wind is measured via a small five-hole probe, an inertia measurement unit and GPS. The flight mission (waypoints, altitudes, airspeed) is planned and assigned to the aircraft before the semi- automatic launch. The flight is only controlled by the on-board autopilot system which only communicates with a ground station (laptop PC) for the exchange of measured data and command updates like new waypoints etc. The talk gives details on the technical items, calibration and first missions. Results from first field experiments like the LAUNCH-2005 campaign near Berlin are used for data quality assessment by comparison with simultaneous lidar and sodar measurements. An in situ comparison with the highly accurate helicopter-borne turbulence

  7. Chemistry-turbulence interactions and mesoscale variability influence the cleansing efficiency of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Yuan, B.; Mauldin, R. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Patton, E. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knote, C.; Orlando, J.; Emmons, L.; Apel, E.; Hornbrook, R.; Shertz, S.; Ullmann, K.; Hall, S.; Graus, M.; Gouw, J.; Zhou, X.; Ye, C.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere and the primary sink for isoprene, the dominant volatile organic compound emitted by vegetation. Recent research on the atmospheric oxidation capacity in isoprene-dominated environments has suggested missing radical sources leading to significant overestimation of the lifetime of isoprene. Here we report, for the first time, a comprehensive experimental budget of isoprene in the planetary boundary layer based on airborne flux measurements along with in situ OH observations in the Southeast and Central U.S. Our findings show that surface heterogeneity of isoprene emissions lead to a physical separation of isoprene and OH resulting in an effective slowdown in the chemistry. Depending on surface heterogeneity, the intensity of segregation (Is) could locally slow down isoprene chemistry up to 30%. The effect of segregated reactants in the planetary boundary layer on average has an influence on modeled OH radicals that is comparable to that of recently proposed radical recycling mechanisms.

  8. Effects of precipitation on sonic anemometer measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongwang; Huang, Jian; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jun A.; Huang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Effects caused by precipitation on the measurements of three-dimensional sonic anemometer are analyzed based on a field observational experiment conducted in Maoming, Guangdong Province, China. Obvious fluctuations induced by precipitation are observed for the outputs of sonic anemometer-derived temperature and wind velocity components. A technique of turbulence spectra and cospectra normalized in the framework of similarity theory is utilized to validate the measured variables and calculated fluxes. It is found that the sensitivity of sonic anemometer-derived temperature to precipitation is significant, compared with that of the wind velocity components. The spectra of wind velocity and cospectra of momentum flux resemble the standard universal shape with the slopes of the spectra and cospectra at the inertial subrange, following the -2/3 and -4/3 power law, respectively, even under the condition of heavy rain. Contaminated by precipitation, however, the spectra of temperature and cospectra of sensible heat flux do not exhibit a universal shape and have obvious frequency loss at the inertial subrange. From the physical structure and working principle of sonic anemometer, a possible explanation is proposed to describe this difference, which is found to be related to the variations of precipitation particles. Corrections for errors of sonic anemometer-derived temperature under precipitation is needed, which is still under exploration.

  9. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved

  10. The impact of turbulence intensity and atmospheric stability on power deficits due to wind turbine wakes at Horns Rev wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Jensen, Leo E.;

    2012-01-01

    the flow inside the wind farm, and the power deficits along rows of wind turbines have been determined for different inflow directions and wind speed intervals. A method to classify the atmospheric stability based on the Bulk-Ri number has been implemented. Long-term stability conditions have been...... unstable conditions, whereas northerly winds have fewer observations in the stable classes. Stable conditions also tend to be associated with lower levels of turbulence intensity, and this relationship persists as wind speeds increase. Power deficit is a function of ambient turbulence intensity. The level...... of power deficit is strongly dependent on the wind turbine spacing; as turbulence intensity increases, the power deficit decreases. The power deficit is determined for four different wind turbine spacing distances and for stability classified as very stable, stable and others (near neutral to very...

  11. The influence of vegetation and relief heterogeneity on turbulent exchange of CO2 between land surface and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhartova, Juliya; Levashova, Natalia; Volkova, Elena; Olchev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    vegetation and land-use types are situated far enough from the domain boundaries. It enabled us to assume that near these boundaries the values of vertical and horizontal wind components are independent on x coordinate. To quantify the possible effects of relief and vegetation heterogeneity on CO2 fluxes the three transects crossing the study area were chosen. For each transect the 2D patterns of wind speed components, turbulent exchange coefficients, CO2 concentrations and fluxes were calculated. The modeled vertical CO2 fluxes were compared with the fluxes calculated without allowing for turbulent disturbances due to relief and vegetation heterogeneity. All modeling experiments were provided for different weather conditions. The results of modeling experiments for different transects under various meteorological conditions showed that relief and vegetation heterogeneity have a significant impact on CO2 fluxes within the atmospheric surface layer and their ignoring can results in uncertainties in flux estimations. This study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (Grant 14-14-00956).

  12. Statistical correlations of the wave-induced atmospheric turbulence over the sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SethuRamam, S.

    1977-01-01

    The micro-meteorological processes that take place in the atmospheric surface layer over oceans can be broadly classified into two categories; transfer of momentum and energy from the wind to the water and, the perturbance of the wind field due to the propagation of waves. The purpose of this paper is to consider the latter process. When waves progress in water they induce an airflow in the initially still air close to the waves with the mean component in the direction of the waves. Over an open ocean, such a situation commonly occurs when waves with swell frequencies propagate in a locally calm meteorological condition. The influence of the swells will be felt even when there is a moderate wind locally. Another characteristic of the above process is the perturbations in the wind velocity fluctuations due to the presence of the waves. Data are reviewed from several theoretical and field studies on disturbances.

  13. Optical Spatial Filter to Suppress Beam Wander and Spatial Noise Induced by Atmospheric Turbulence in Free-Space Optical Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucuk Darusalam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optical spatial filter (OSF method to suppress beam wander and spatial noise effects. Signal from random displacements of the focus spot around the optical axis within the constricted area is collected. This method advantageously suppresses fluctuations in signal intensity. The OSF consists of a pinhole and cone reflector. The pinhole produces Fresnel diffraction on the focus spot. The cone reflector provides directed reflectance onto the pinhole for random focus spot displacements due to beam wander. The calculations of signal power are based on fluctuations of signal intensity that are minimized by the circular aperture function of the pinhole and the cosine of the reflectance angle from the cone reflector. The method is applied to free-space optical communications at a wavelength of 1.55 μm with an atmospheric chamber to provide optical propagation media. Based on calculations, the beam wander angles that can be received by the OSF are from 14.0° to 28.0°. Moreover, based on experiment, the OSF with a pinhole diameter of 20.0 μm and cone reflector diameter of 1.5 mm produces signal power of −15.3 dBm. Both calculations and experiment show that the OSF enhances the received signal power in the presence of turbulence.

  14. Fluid-structure interaction simulation of floating structures interacting with complex, large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Calderer, Antoni; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-01-01

    We develop a numerical method for simulating coupled interactions of complex floating structures with large-scale ocean waves and atmospheric turbulence. We employ an efficient large-scale model to develop offshore wind and wave environmental conditions, which are then incorporated into a high resolution two-phase flow solver with fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The large-scale wind-wave interaction model is based on the two-fluid dynamically-coupled approach of Yang and Shen (2011), which employs a high-order spectral method for simulating the water motion and a viscous solver with undulatory boundaries for the air motion. The two-phase flow FSI solver, developed by Calderer, Kang, and Sotiropoulos (2014), is based on the level set method and is capable of simulating the coupled dynamic interaction of arbitrarily complex bodies with airflow and waves. The large-scale wave field solver is coupled with the near-field FSI solver by feeding into the latter waves via the pressure-forcing method of Guo and Shen...

  15. Parallel implementation of high-speed, phase diverse atmospheric turbulence compensation method on a neural network-based architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrasmith, William W.; Sullivan, Sean F.

    2008-04-01

    Phase diversity imaging methods work well in removing atmospheric turbulence and some system effects from predominantly near-field imaging systems. However, phase diversity approaches can be computationally intensive and slow. We present a recently adapted, high-speed phase diversity method using a conventional, software-based neural network paradigm. This phase-diversity method has the advantage of eliminating many time consuming, computationally heavy calculations and directly estimates the optical transfer function from the entrance pupil phases or phase differences. Additionally, this method is more accurate than conventional Zernike-based, phase diversity approaches and lends itself to implementation on parallel software or hardware architectures. We use computer simulation to demonstrate how this high-speed, phase diverse imaging method can be implemented on a parallel, highspeed, neural network-based architecture-specifically the Cellular Neural Network (CNN). The CNN architecture was chosen as a representative, neural network-based processing environment because 1) the CNN can be implemented in 2-D or 3-D processing schemes, 2) it can be implemented in hardware or software, 3) recent 2-D implementations of CNN technology have shown a 3 orders of magnitude superiority in speed, area, or power over equivalent digital representations, and 4) a complete development environment exists. We also provide a short discussion on processing speed.

  16. A unified parameterization of clouds and turbulence using CLUBB and subcolumns in the Community Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thayer-Calder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most global climate models parameterize separate cloud types using separate parameterizations. This approach has several disadvantages, including obscure interactions between parameterizations and inaccurate triggering of cumulus parameterizations. Alternatively, a unified cloud parameterization uses one equation set to represent all cloud types. Such cloud types include stratiform liquid and ice cloud, shallow convective cloud, and deep convective cloud. Vital to the success of a unified parameterization is a general interface between clouds and microphysics. One such interface involves drawing Monte Carlo samples of subgrid variability of temperature, water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice, and feeding the sample points into a microphysics scheme. This study evaluates a unified cloud parameterization and a Monte Carlo microphysics interface that has been implemented in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM version 5.3. Results describing the mean climate and tropical variability from global simulations are presented. The new model shows a degradation in precipitation skill but improvements in short-wave cloud forcing, liquid water path, long-wave cloud forcing, precipitable water, and tropical wave simulation. Also presented are estimations of computational expense and investigation of sensitivity to number of subcolumns.

  17. A unified parameterization of clouds and turbulence using CLUBB and subcolumns in the Community Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer-Calder, K.; Gettelman, A.; Craig, C.; Goldhaber, S.; Bogenschutz, P. A.; Chen, C.-C.; Morrison, H.; Höft, J.; Raut, E.; Griffin, B. M.; Weber, J. K.; Larson, V. E.; Wyant, M. C.; Wang, M.; Guo, Z.; Ghan, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Most global climate models parameterize separate cloud types using separate parameterizations. This approach has several disadvantages, including obscure interactions between parameterizations and inaccurate triggering of cumulus parameterizations. Alternatively, a unified cloud parameterization uses one equation set to represent all cloud types. Such cloud types include stratiform liquid and ice cloud, shallow convective cloud, and deep convective cloud. Vital to the success of a unified parameterization is a general interface between clouds and microphysics. One such interface involves drawing Monte Carlo samples of subgrid variability of temperature, water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice, and feeding the sample points into a microphysics scheme. This study evaluates a unified cloud parameterization and a Monte Carlo microphysics interface that has been implemented in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5.3. Model computational expense is estimated, and sensitivity to the number of subcolumns is investigated. Results describing the mean climate and tropical variability from global simulations are presented. The new model shows a degradation in precipitation skill but improvements in shortwave cloud forcing, liquid water path, long-wave cloud forcing, precipitable water, and tropical wave simulation.

  18. Preliminary evaluation and comparison of atmospheric turbulence rejection performance for infinite and receding horizon control in adaptive optics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnik, Mikhail V.; De Dona, Jose

    2014-07-01

    disturbance rejection performance in the unconstrained case is the same for LQG and RHC, while RHC clearly outperforms the saturated LQG control in terms of atmospheric turbulence rejection. More importantly, RHC can be used in high-gain mode, unlike LQG, providing better atmospheric disturbance rejection in the constrained case.

  19. A comparison between energy transfer and atmospheric turbulent exchanges over alpine meadow and banana plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhangwei; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Zhiping; Ma, Weiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Banana plantation and alpine meadow ecosystems in southern China and the Tibetan Plateau are unique in the underlying surfaces they exhibit. In this study, we used eddy covariance and a micrometeorological tower to examine the characteristics of land surface energy exchanges over a banana plantation in southern China and an alpine meadow in the Tibetan Plateau from May 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that the diurnal and seasonal variations in upward shortwave radiation flux and surface soil heat flux were larger over the alpine meadow than over the banana plantation surface. Dominant energy partitioning varied with season. Latent heat flux was the main consumer of net radiation flux in the growing season, whereas sensible heat flux was the main consumer during other periods. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory was employed for comparative purposes, using sonic anemometer observations of flow over the surfaces of banana plantations in the humid southern China monsoon region and the semi-arid areas of the TP, and was found to be applicable. Over banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, the average surface albedo and surface aerodynamic roughness lengths under neutral atmospheric conditions were ~0.128 and 0.47m, and ~0.223 and 0.01m, respectively. During the measuring period, the mean annual bulk transfer coefficients for momentum and sensible heat were 1.47×10-2 and 7.13×10-3, and 2.91×10-3 and 1.96×10-3, for banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, respectively. This is the first time in Asia that long-term open field measurements have been taken with the specific aim of making comparisons between banana plantation and alpine meadow surfaces.

  20. Soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  1. Development of local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. Part 3. Turbulent flow and plume dispersion in building arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a LOcal-scale High-resolution atmospheric DIspersion Model using Large-Eddy Simulation (LOHDIM-LES) to assess the safety at nuclear facilities and to respond to emergencies against accidental or intentional release of radioactive materials (e.g., a terrorist attack in an urban area). In Part 1, the unsteady behavior of a plume over a flat terrain was successfully simulated. In Part 2, a new scheme to generate a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer flow was proposed. Then, the large-eddy simulation (LES) model for turbulent flow and plume dispersion around an isolated building was validated. In this study, we extend the LES model to turbulent flows and plume dispersion in various building arrays that represent typical urban surface geometries. Concerning the characteristics of flow and dispersion in building arrays, the flow patterns associated with obstacle densities and the distribution patterns of mean and root-mean-square (r.m.s.) concentrations agree well with those of the wind tunnel experiments. It is shown that the LES model successfully simulates the unsteady behaviors of turbulent flows and plume dispersion in urban-type surface geometries. (author)

  2. Development of local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. Part 4. Turbulent flows and plume dispersion in an actual urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation (LOHDIM-LES) to assess the safety at nuclear facilities and to respond to emergency situations resulting from accidental or deliberate releases of radioactive materials (e.g., a terrorist attack in an urban area). In Part 1, the unsteady behavior of a plume dispersing over a flat terrain was successfully simulated. In Parts 2 and 3, LESs of turbulent flows and plume dispersion around an isolated building and in building arrays with different obstacle densities were performed, which showed the basic performance comparable to wind tunnel experimental technique. In this study, we apply the LES model to turbulent flows and plume dispersion in an actual urban area. Although some of the turbulence and dispersion characteristics are quantitatively different from the wind tunnel experimental data, the distribution patterns are generally similar to those of the experiments. It is concluded that our LES model simulates reasonably the unsteady behavior of turbulent flows and plume dispersion even for complex heterogeneous urban areas. (author)

  3. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on the transmission of orbital angular momentum for Whittaker-Gaussian laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixin; Cheng, Mingjian; Zhu, Yun; Gao, Jie; Dan, Weiyi; Hu, Zhengda; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the effects of turbulence on the detection probability spectrum and the mode weight of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) for Whittaker-Gaussian (WG) laser beams in weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence channels. Our numerical results show that WG beam is a better light source for mitigating the effects of turbulence with several adjustable parameters. The real parameters of WG beams γ and W0, which have significant effects on the mode weight, have no influence on the detection probability spectrum. Larger signal OAM quantum number, shorter wavelength, smaller beamwidth and coherence length will lead to the lower detection probability of the signal OAM mode. PMID:25321585

  4. Simulating real-world turbulence in the lab: orbital angular momentum communication through 1 km of atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Rodenburg, Brandon; Malik, Mehul; Yanakas, Michael; Maher, Laura; Steinhoff, Nicholas K; Tyler, Glenn A; Boyd, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    We describe an experimental implementation of a free-space communication link encoding information in orbital angular momentum (OAM) spatial modes. The free-space path was constructed to represent propagation through an equivalent 1\\,km horizontal turbulent path with C_n^2=1.8e-14 m^(-2/3). Turbulence induces a spreading in the OAM spectrum leading to cross-talk in the communication channel. Methods of dealing with this loss in channel capacity of the communication channel are demonstrated using both adaptive correction of the turbulence as well as optimization of the channel encoding.

  5. Influence of Atmospheric Turbulence on a High-Dimensional Quantum Key Distribution System using Orbital Angular Momentum for Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, Mehul; Rodenburg, Brandon; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Leach, Jonathan; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Boyd, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    We describe an experimental implementation of a free-space 11-dimensional quantum key distribution (QKD) system using orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes. This QKD system has a maximum theoretical channel capacity of log2(11) = 3.46 bits/photon. The effects of Kolmogorov thin-phase turbulence on the OAM channel capacity of this QKD system are quantified. We find that increasing the turbulence leads to a degradation of the channel capacity of the OAM channel. We are able to mitigate the effects of turbulence by increasing the spacing between detected modes.

  6. Performance of Wireless Optical Communication over Atmospheric Turbulence Channel%大气湍流下无线光通信信道性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄根全

    2011-01-01

    Based on different scintillation distribution channel model over atmospheric turbulence, the statistic model of outage probability and average channel capacity was founded,and the method on Gauss -Lager was applied to calculate outage probability and average channel capacity under weak to moderate and moderate to strong turbulence. The simulation results showed that outage probability increases with the increasing intensity of turbulence and normalized average electrical SNR, and average channel capacity also increases with the increasing of receiver average electrical SNR The increasing rate is faster and channel capacity is biger under weak turbulence than strong turbulence. The knowledge of the theory was provided for wireless optical access communication system.%无线光通信中大气湍流导致光信号在传输中产生光强起伏等现象,其影响成为无线光通信普及的一大障碍.基于大气湍流不同光强起伏信道模型,分别建立了弱、中及强湍流信道的中断概率与平均信道容量数学统计模型,研究了大气折射率结构常数和传输距离对湍流信道可靠性的影响.仿真结果表明,归一化阈值信噪比和通信距离的增加导致通信系统性能劣化.平均信道容量随着湍流强度的增大而降低,且随着接收机平均电信噪比增大,弱湍流下的信道容量增长速度明显大于强湍流.

  7. Fast simulation of atmospheric turbulence phase screen based on non-uniform sampling%非均匀采样的功率谱反演大气湍流相位屏的快速模拟∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡冬梅; 遆培培; 贾鹏; 王东; 刘建霞

    2015-01-01

    The generation of atmosphere turbulence wave-front is important for studying the light propagation and imaging through the atmosphere, and correcting the atmosphere turbulence, such as the adaptive optics system. The power spectral density method generates phase screens quickly for using the fast Fourier transform (FFT). The main drawback to this approach is that lower order aberrations such as tilt are often under represented. The reason is that the low frequency is sampled inadequately. Since the low order aberrations include a major percentage of the atmospheric energy spectrum, the error of simulated phase screens makes this method less desirable to use. To overcome this shortcoming, a non-uniform sampling method is proposed to generate phase screens accurately. Unfortunately, when the sampling is nonuniform, the FFT does not apply directly. Generating such a phase screen is computation intensive which greatly reduces simulation speed. In this paper, we develop a fast, more accurate method to generate atmospheric turbulence phase screens, according to non-uniforming sampling. The nonequispaced fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) arises in a variety of application areas, ranging from medical imaging to radio astronomy to the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Speeding up the simulation of atmospheric turbulence phase screens is possible by using the non-uniform fast Fourier transform. In this paper, the atmospheric turbulence phase screen is decomposed into a series of harmonics. Then the non-uniform distributed har-monics are projected onto over-sampled uniform grid by using the Gaussian kernel function. Atmospheric turbulence phase screen will be generated using the standard fast Fourier transform on the over-sampled uniform grid. The at-mospheric turbulence phase screens can be generated quickly. Using Kolmogorov spectrum model in this paper, the phase screens can be generated quickly. The performances of generated phase screens are analyzed

  8. A case study of effects of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence, wind speed, and stability on wind farm induced temperature changes using observations from a field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Geng; Zhou, Liming; Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Roy, Somnath Baidya; Harris, Ronald A.; Cervarich, Matthew Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that operational wind farms in west-central Texas increase local nighttime land surface temperature (LST) by 0.31-0.70 °C, but no noticeable impact is detected during daytime, and that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the magnitude of this warming are likely determined by those in the magnitude of wind speed. This paper further explores these findings by using the data from a year-long field campaign and nearby radiosonde observations to investigate how thermodynamic profiles and surface-atmosphere exchange processes work in tandem with the presence of wind farms to affect the local climate. Combined with satellite data analyses, we find that wind farm impacts on LST are predominantly determined by the relative ratio of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) induced by the wind turbines compared to the background TKE. This ratio explains not only the day-night contrast of the wind farm impact and the warming magnitude of nighttime LST over the wind farms, but also most of the seasonal variations in the nighttime LST changes. These results indicate that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the turbine-induced turbulence relative to the background TKE play an essential role in determining those in the magnitude of LST changes over the wind farms. In addition, atmospheric stability determines the sign and strength of the net downward heat transport as well as the magnitude of the background TKE. The study highlights the need for better understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and wind farm interactions, and for better parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

  9. On the Performance of Free-Space Optical Systems over Generalized Atmospheric Turbulence Channels with Pointing Errors

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Imran Shafique

    2015-03-01

    Generalized fading has been an imminent part and parcel of wireless communications. It not only characterizes the wireless channel appropriately but also allows its utilization for further performance analysis of various types of wireless communication systems. Under the umbrella of generalized fading channels, a unified performance analysis of a free-space optical (FSO) link over the Malaga (M) atmospheric turbulence channel that accounts for pointing errors and both types of detection techniques (i.e. indirect modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) as well as heterodyne detection) is presented. Specifically, unified exact closed-form expressions for the probability density function (PDF), the cumulative distribution function (CDF), the moment generating function (MGF), and the moments of the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a single link FSO transmission system are presented, all in terms of the Meijer\\'s G function except for the moments that is in terms of simple elementary functions. Then capitalizing on these unified results, unified exact closed-form expressions for various performance metrics of FSO link transmission systems are offered, such as, the outage probability (OP), the higher-order amount of fading (AF), the average error rate for binary and M-ary modulation schemes, and the ergodic capacity (except for IM/DD technique, where closed-form lower bound results are presented), all in terms of Meijer\\'s G functions except for the higher-order AF that is in terms of simple elementary functions. Additionally, the asymptotic results are derived for all the expressions derived earlier in terms of the Meijer\\'s G function in the high SNR regime in terms of simple elementary functions via an asymptotic expansion of the Meijer\\'s G function. Furthermore, new asymptotic expressions for the ergodic capacity in the low as well as high SNR regimes are derived in terms of simple elementary functions via utilizing moments. All the presented results are

  10. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  11. Momentum and buoyancy transfer in atmospheric turbulent boundary layer over wavy water surface – Part 1: Harmonic wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Troitskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface-drag and mass-transfer coefficients are determined within a self-consistent problem of wave-induced perturbations and mean fields of velocity and density in the air, using a quasi-linear model based on the Reynolds equations with down-gradient turbulence closure. Investigation of a harmonic wave propagating along the wind has disclosed that the surface drag is generally larger for shorter waves. This effect is more pronounced in the unstable and neutral stratification. The stable stratification suppresses turbulence, which leads to weakening of the momentum and mass transfer.

  12. Real time mitigation of atmospheric turbulence in long distance imaging using the lucky region fusion algorithm with FPGA and GPU hardware acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher Robert

    "Lucky-region" fusion (LRF) is a synthetic imaging technique that has proven successful in enhancing the quality of images distorted by atmospheric turbulence. The LRF algorithm selects sharp regions of an image obtained from a series of short exposure frames, and fuses the sharp regions into a final, improved image. In previous research, the LRF algorithm had been implemented on a PC using the C programming language. However, the PC did not have sufficient sequential processing power to handle real-time extraction, processing and reduction required when the LRF algorithm was applied to real-time video from fast, high-resolution image sensors. This thesis describes two hardware implementations of the LRF algorithm to achieve real-time image processing. The first was created with a VIRTEX-7 field programmable gate array (FPGA). The other developed using the graphics processing unit (GPU) of a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 690 video card. The novelty in the FPGA approach is the creation of a "black box" LRF video processing system with a general camera link input, a user controller interface, and a camera link video output. We also describe a custom hardware simulation environment we have built to test the FPGA LRF implementation. The advantage of the GPU approach is significantly improved development time, integration of image stabilization into the system, and comparable atmospheric turbulence mitigation.

  13. Turbulent Transfer Coefficients and Calculation of Air Temperature inside Tall Grass Canopies in Land Atmosphere Schemes for Environmental Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, D. T.; Alapaty, K.; Lalic, B.; Arsenic, I.; Rajkovic, B.; Malinovic, S.

    2004-10-01

    A method for estimating profiles of turbulent transfer coefficients inside a vegetation canopy and their use in calculating the air temperature inside tall grass canopies in land surface schemes for environmental modeling is presented. The proposed method, based on K theory, is assessed using data measured in a maize canopy. The air temperature inside the canopy is determined diagnostically by a method based on detailed consideration of 1) calculations of turbulent fluxes, 2) the shape of the wind and turbulent transfer coefficient profiles, and 3) calculation of the aerodynamic resistances inside tall grass canopies. An expression for calculating the turbulent transfer coefficient inside sparse tall grass canopies is also suggested, including modification of the corresponding equation for the wind profile inside the canopy. The proposed calculations of K-theory parameters are tested using the Land Air Parameterization Scheme (LAPS). Model outputs of air temperature inside the canopy for 8 17 July 2002 are compared with micrometeorological measurements inside a sunflower field at the Rimski Sancevi experimental site (Serbia). To demonstrate how changes in the specification of canopy density affect the simulation of air temperature inside tall grass canopies and, thus, alter the growth of PBL height, numerical experiments are performed with LAPS coupled with a one-dimensional PBL model over a sunflower field. To examine how the turbulent transfer coefficient inside tall grass canopies over a large domain represents the influence of the underlying surface on the air layer above, sensitivity tests are performed using a coupled system consisting of the NCEP Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model and LAPS.

  14. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect of...

  15. Exact error rate analysis of free-space optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Li, Kangning; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Cao, Yubin

    2016-02-01

    The error rate performances and outage probabilities of free-space optical (FSO) communications with spatial diversity are studied for Gamma-Gamma turbulent environments. Equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SC) diversity are considered as practical schemes to mitigate turbulence. The exact bit-error rate (BER) expression and outage probability are derived for direct detection EGC multiple aperture receiver system. BER performances and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for different number of sub-apertures each having aperture area A with EGC and SC techniques. BER performances and outage probabilities of a single monolithic aperture and multiple aperture receiver system with the same total aperture area are compared under thermal-noise-limited and background-noise-limited conditions. It is shown that multiple aperture receiver system can greatly improve the system communication performances. And these analytical tools are useful in providing highly accurate error rate estimation for FSO communication systems.

  16. Momentum and buoyancy transfer in atmospheric turbulent boundary layer over wavy water surface - Part 1: Harmonic wave

    OpenAIRE

    Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Ezhova, E. V.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The surface-drag and mass-transfer coefficients are determined within a self-consistent problem of wave-induced perturbations and mean fields of velocity and density in the air, using a quasi-linear model based on the Reynolds equations with down-gradient turbulence closure. Investigation of a harmonic wave propagating along the wind has disclosed that the surface drag is generally larger for shorter waves. This effect is more pronounced in the unstable and neutral stratification. The stable ...

  17. An overview of turbulence compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, K.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Iersel, M. van; Doelman, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification

  18. Turbulence in magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics describes dynamics in electrically conductive fluids. These occur in our environment as well as in our atmosphere and magnetosphere, and play a role in the sun's interaction with our planet. This work gives the basic information on turbulence in nature, comprising the needed equations, notions and numerical simulations. The current state of our knowledge and future implications of MHD turbulence are outlined systematically. It is indispensable for all scientists engaged in research of our atmosphere and in space science.

  19. The aurora as a source of planetary-scale waves in the middle atmosphere. [atmospheric turbulence caused by auroral energy absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Straus, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photographs of global scale auroral forms taken by scanning radiometers onboard weather satellites in 1972 show that auroral bands exhibit well organized wave motion with typical zonal wave number of 5 or so. The scale size of these waves is in agreement with that of well organized neutral wind fields in the 150- to 200-km region during the geomagnetic storm of May 27, 1967. Further, the horizontal scale size revealed by these observations are in agreement with that of high altitude traveling ionospheric disturbances. It is conjectured that the geomagnetic storm is a source of planetary and synoptic scale neutral atmospheric waves in the middle atmosphere. Although there is, at present, no observation of substorm related waves of this scale size at mesospheric and stratospheric altitudes, the possible existence of a new source of waves of the proper scale size to trigger instabilities in middle atmospheric circulation systems may be significant in the study of lower atmospheric response to geomagnetic activity.

  20. Finite-difference large-eddy simulations of atmospheric turbulence using a Lagrangian scale-dependent sub-grid scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, C. L.; Xie, S.; Ghaisas, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) have been successfully utilized in many atmospheric turbulence studies. In LES, grid spacing acts like a low-pass filter such that flow features larger than the grid spacing can be resolved, whereas the effects of smaller, sub-grid scale (SGS) eddies are modeled. Therefore, a well-designed SGS model plays a vital role in a successful LES. One of the most sophisticated SGS models is the Lagrangian scale-dependent (LASD) model, in which the scale-dependence of the Smagorinsky coefficient CS is taken into account by performing two explicit filtering processes with different filter widths. Then Lagrangian averaging in time along flow trajectories is used to eliminate the numerical instability caused by backscattering. The LASD model has been successfully implemented in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) studies using the spectral/pseudo-spectral methods. However, it has not been coupled with finite-difference methods. In this study, the finite-difference method is used for the first time in LES of the ABL using an LASD subgrid scale model. First, a-posteriori tests with a fully conservative 4th-order scheme are performed by simulating turbulent channel flows with . Vertical profiles of mean wind velocity, turbulence intensity, and momentum fluxes, and 1-D spectra of streamwise velocity are compared to those from an existing direct numerical simulation (DNS) database. Several different SGS models are compared and a sensitivity test of spatial resolution is also performed. Second, LES of a neutral ABL with (i.e., molecular viscosity is negligible) are performed using the same numerical methods. The classic logarithmic profile of the streamwise velocity in the inertial subrange is examined in particular. Third, the numerical methods are extended to LES of a stable ABL where the buoyancy effect is considered by using the Boussinesq approximation. The SGS heat flux is calculated via an LASD model similar to that for the SGS stress. The results are

  1. Results of Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Atmospheric Turbulence, Internal Gravity Waves and Sporadic-E Layers by Resonant Scattering of Radio Waves on Artificial Periodic Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev; Tolmacheva, Ariadna V.

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) formed by the powerful standing radio waves in the ionospheric plasma give the good chance for the lower ionosphere comprehensive studies. In this paper we present some applications of the API technique for experimental studies of sporadic E-layers (E _{s}), internal gravity waves and turbulent events in the lower ionosphere. API are formed in the field of the standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one from the ionosphere (in more details about the API technique one can see in the book Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength Lambda or one-half the powerful wavelength lambda/2. API diagnostics are carried out at the API relaxation or decay stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. Based on the measurement of an amplitude and a phase of the API scattered signal their relaxation time and regular vertical plasma velocity are measured. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the non-uniformly heated plasma. The relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The diffusion time is tau=(K (2) D _{a}) (-1) where K=2pi/Lambda and D _{a} is the ambipolar diffusion rate. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the API relaxation time in comparison the diffusion time. Determination of the turbulent velocity is based on this fact. The vertical plasma velocity is determined by measuring the phase of the scattered signal. Atmospheric waves having the periods from 5-10 minutes to 5-6 hours give the contribution to temporal variations of the velocity. Parameters and effects of atmospheric waves and the turbulence on the API relaxation process are presented. Determination of the masses of the

  2. Interdisciplinary aspects of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kupka, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    What do combustion engines, fusion reactors, weather forecast, ocean flows, our sun, and stellar explosions in outer space have in common? Of course, the physics and the length and time scales are vastly different in all cases, but it is also well known that in all of them, on some relevant length scales, the material flows that govern the dynamical and/or secular evolution of the systems are chaotic and often unpredictable: they are said to be turbulent. The interdisciplinary aspects of turbulence are brought together in this volume containing chapters written by experts from very different fields, including geophysics, astrophysics, and engineering. It covers several subjects on which considerable progress was made during the last decades, from questions concerning the very nature of turbulence to some practical applications. These subjects include: a basic introduction into turbulence, statistical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics, turbulent convection in stars, atmospheric turbulence in the context of nume...

  3. An atmospheric turbulence model for spatiotemporal variability of geographically-diverse, aggregated wind-generated electricity to accelerate wide-scale wind energy deployment (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Handschy, M.

    2013-12-01

    During the year 2012, the cumulative wind power capacity installed in the United States could provide roughly 4.4% of electricity demand. Although the wind resource can provide many times over the entire US electrical needs, and costs for onshore wind deployment are continually dropping, the variability of the wind represents one of the greatest remaining barriers to wide-scale wind deployment. This study focuses on the nature of this variability. We quantify the axiom 'geographic diversity reduces variability' (of wind generation) by relating resource variability characteristics to the well-understood physical phenomena of turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere. Many existing studies focus on datasets of a few years' duration in a particular geographic area; such results are difficult to generalize. Our approach builds on the fundamental nonlinear characteristics of turbulence in the atmosphere to characterize wind speed and power generation correlations between wind plants from local to continental scales. The resulting general principles enable estimation of the benefits of geographic aggregation absent detailed site-specific historical data, thereby enabling more efficient transmission grid models, expediting transmission plans, and providing a framework for evaluating the requirements and benefits of electric storage at higher wind penetrations. To validate these general principles, we compare them to observed inter-station correlations in a number of wind-speed data sets, including a 40-year Canadian dataset that spans the continent of North America, as well as shorter-duration datasets in smaller regions within the United States. This presentation will present general rules for the dependence of correlation between wind turbines on separation and time scale. We suggest these general rules could help shift renewable integration planning from simulation towards optimization.

  4. Two improvements to the dynamic wake meandering model: including the effects of atmospheric shear on wake turbulence and incorporating turbulence build-up in a row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Lee, Sang; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2015-01-01

    shear on the wake deficit evolution by including a strain-rate contribution in the wake turbulence calculation. The method to account for the increased turbulence at a wake-affected turbine by basing the wake-added turbulence directly on the Reynolds stresses of the oncoming wake. This also allows the...

  5. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  6. 222Rn as indicator of atmospheric turbulence: measurements at Lake Maggiore and on the pre-Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentration measurements in atmosphere were taken in years from 1997 to 1999 in Milan and at pre-alpine sites located north of Lombardy. In this paper the results of measuring campaigns and a comparison of radon levels observed in the hilly area north of the town and on the pre-Alps are reported. The general criteria of the measurements and the interpretative models of radon concentration are presented. The Lake Maggiore area shows evidence of a great nocturnal stability and frequent formation of Nocturnal Stable Layer. The peculiar findings in the high altitude stations confirm the use of radon as an indicator of atmospheric dispersion of pollutants in an area with complex orography. The afternoon minimum values are concordant for the different stations: this implies a remixing in afternoon hours over the whole area investigated

  7. New trends in turbulence; Turbulence: nouveaux aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieur, M. [Institut National Polytechnique, LEGI/INPG, Institut de Mecanique, UMR 101, 38 - Grenoble (France); Yaglom, A. [Institut of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[MIT, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Cambridge, MA (United States); David, F. [CEA Saclay, SPhT, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    According to a Russian scientist, the flow of fluids actually met both in nature and engineering practice are turbulent in the overwhelmingly majority of cases. This document that reviews all the progress made recently in the understanding of turbulence, is made up of 10 courses. Course 1 ''a century of turbulence'' deals with the linear and non-linear points of views. In course 2 ''measures of anisotropy and the universal properties of turbulence'' the author gives a very complete account of fully developed turbulence experimental data both in the laboratory and in the atmosphere. Course 3 ''large-eddy simulations of turbulence (LES)'', LES are powerful tools to simulate the coherent vortices formation and evolution in a deterministic way. In Course 4 ''statistical turbulence modelling for the computation of physically complex flows'' the author describes methods used for predicting statistical industrial flows, where the geometry is right now too complex to allow the use of LES. In course 5 ''computational aero-acoustics'' an informative review of computational aero-acoustics with many applications to aircraft noise, is made. In course 6 ''the topology of turbulence'' the author presents the basis of topological fluid dynamics and stresses the importance of helicity in neutral and in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows. In course 7 ''burgulence'' the authors deal with finite-time singularities, but mostly on the basis of Burger equations in one or several dimensions with the formation of multiple shocks. In course 8 ''2-dimensional turbulence'' the author presents numerous examples of 2D turbulence in the laboratory (rotating or MHD flows, plasmas), in the ocean and in the planetary atmosphere. Course 9 ''analysing and computing turbulent flows using wavelets'' is a useful presentation of

  8. Orbital angular momentum entanglement in turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Alpha Hamadou; Roux, Filippus S.; McLaren, Melanie; Konrad, Thomas; Forbes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The turbulence induced decay of orbital angular momentum (OAM) entanglement between two photons is investigated numerically and experimentally. To compare our results with previous work, we simulate the turbulent atmosphere with a single phase screen based on the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence. We consider two different scenarios: in the first only one of the two photons propagates through turbulence, and in the second both photons propagate through uncorrelated turbulence. Comparing the ent...

  9. Non-gaussian turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J. [NEG Micon Project Development A/S, Randers (Denmark); Hansen, K.S. [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, B.J. [VESTAS Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Nielsen, M. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The pdf`s of atmospheric turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour is being investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity. Models for non-Gaussian turbulence have been developed, by which artificial turbulence can be generated with specified distributions, spectra and cross-correlations. The artificial time series will then be used in load models and the resulting loads in the Gaussian and the non-Gaussian cases will be compared. (au)

  10. Turbulence compensation: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Schutte, Klamer; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-06-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  11. Passive imaging through the turbulent atmosphere - Fundamental limits on the spatial frequency resolution of a rotational shearing interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. J.; Breckinridge, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio to be expected when a 180 deg rotationally shearing interferometer is used for image recovery at the diffraction limit of a large telescope is computed. The variance and covariance of the irradiance fluctuations at the detector array are shown to yield measures of the high-frequency spatial spectrum of the source. Four fundamental sources of noise are considered: temporal fluctuations of the source, space-time fluctuations of the atmosphere, shot noise in the detected photocurrents, and the effects of finite sampling. S/N is found to be directly proportional to the angular resolution of the telescope, the single-frame integration time, the square root of the number of frames, the cube of the operating wavelength, the quantum efficiency of the detector, and the average spectral irradiance from the source on the pupil. It is inversely proportional to the cube of the field angle subtended by the source (or part thereof) under study.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to, and modern account of, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, an active field both in general turbulence theory and in various areas of astrophysics. The book starts by introducing the MHD equations, certain useful approximations and the transition to turbulence. The second part of the book covers incompressible MHD turbulence, the macroscopic aspects connected with the different self-organization processes, the phenomenology of the turbulence spectra, two-point closure theory, and intermittency. The third considers two-dimensional turbulence and compressi

  13. Bending and turbulent enhancement phenomena of neutral gas flow containing an atmospheric pressure plasma by applying external electric fields measured by schlieren optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Sakakita, Hajime; Tsunoda, Syuichiro; Kasahara, Jiro; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kato, Susumu; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of turbulent enhancement phenomena of a neutral gas flow containing plasma ejected from the nozzle of plasma equipment, the schlieren optical method was performed to visualize the neutral gas behavior. It was confirmed that the turbulent starting point became closer to the nozzle exit, as the amplitude of discharge voltage (electric field) increased. To study the effect of electric field on turbulent enhancement, two sets of external electrodes were arranged in parallel, and the gas from the nozzle was allowed to flow between the upper and lower electrodes. It was found that the neutral gas flow was bent, and the bending angle increased as the amplitude of the external electric field increased. The results obtained using a simple model analysis roughly coincide with experimental data. These results indicate that momentum transport from drifted ions induced by the electric field to neutral particles is an important factor that enhances turbulence.

  14. Large Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  15. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  16. Turbulent mixing and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, S I; Sreenivasan, K R

    2010-04-13

    Turbulence is a supermixer. Turbulent mixing has immense consequences for physical phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales under both high- and low-energy-density conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic confinement systems; governs dynamics of supernovae, accretion disks and explosions; dominates stellar convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics; affects premixed and non-premixed combustion; controls standard turbulent flows (wall-bounded and free-subsonic, supersonic as well as hypersonic); as well as atmospheric and oceanic phenomena (which themselves have important effects on climate). In most of these circumstances, the mixing phenomena are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics. While each article in this collection dwells on a specific problem, the purpose here is to seek a few unified themes amongst diverse phenomena. PMID:20211872

  17. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  18. Development of local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. Part 3: turbulent flow and plume dispersion in building arrays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakayama, H.; Jurčáková, Klára; Nagai, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 5 (2013), s. 503-519. ISSN 0022-3131 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : local -scale high-resolution dispersion model * nuclear emergency response system * large-eddy simulation * spatially developing turbulent boundary layer flow Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.452, year: 2013

  19. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  20. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of NOX over complex terrain region of Ranchi with FLEXPART-WRF by incorporation of improved turbulence intensity relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Srinivas, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate representation of air pollutant dispersion is essential for environmental management and planning purposes. In this study, semi-empirical relationships of turbulence intensity (σu/u*, σv/u* and σw/u*) as a function of surface layer scaling and local stability are developed following boundary layer similarity concepts at Ranchi, a complex terrain in Jharkhand, Eastern India for various seasons. The impact of the new turbulence parameterization for air pollution dispersion simulation is studied by incorporating the same in the Hanna scheme of FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian Particle dispersion model over study region. The model is used to estimate the ground level concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) due to industrial and vehicular sources in study region. The meteorological parameters needed in air-quality simulation are simulated using the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) mesoscale model at high resolution (3 km). Three turbulence schemes (YSU, MYNN2 and ACM2) in ARW are alternatively tested in dispersion simulation and comparisons are made with available air quality data for eight days in different seasons (winter, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon). Simulations with FLEXPART revealed distinct seasonal variation of dispersion patterns. It has been found that the new turbulence intensity relationships in FLEXPART improved the NOx concentration estimates by reducing the negative bias seen with default Hanna scheme. Further, the ARW simulated meteorological parameters using ACM2 and MYNN2 significantly reduced the bias in modeled pollutant concentrations. The study demonstrates the utility of high quality seasonal turbulence measurements in pollution dispersion model for better diffusion parameterization needed in air quality modeling.

  1. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  2. Theorem of turbulent intensity and macroscopic mechanism of the turbulence development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most common nature phenomena in everyday experience, but that is not adequately understood yet. This article reviews the history and present state of development of the turbulence theory and indicates the necessity to probe into the turbulent features and mechanism with the different methods at different levels. Therefore this article proves a theorem of turbulent transpor- tation and a theorem of turbulent intensity by using the theory of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics, and that the Reynolds turbulence and the Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence are united in the theorems of the turbulent intensity and the turbulent transportation. The macroscopic cause of the development of fluid turbulence is a result from shearing effect of the velocity together with the temperature, which is also the macroscopic cause of the stretch and fold of trajectory in the phase space of turbulent field. And it is proved by the observed data of atmosphere that the phenomenological coefficient of turbulent in- tensity is not only a function of the velocity shear but also a function of temperature shear, viz the sta- bility of temperature stratification, in the atmosphere. Accordingly, authenticity of the theorem, which is proved by the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, of turbulent intensity is testified by the facts of observational experiment.

  3. An overview of turbulence compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Klamer; van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-09-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which type of scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  4. Spatial correlation exp erimental analysis of atmospheric optical turbulence in the near ground layer%近地面大气光学湍流空间相关特性的实验研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩; 梅海平; 钱仙妹; 饶瑞中

    2015-01-01

    本文提出了基于光纤湍流传感器阵列的大气光学湍流空间相关函数测量原理,并确定了具体的测量方案和数据统计方法.利用光纤湍流传感器阵列在近地面开展了大气光学湍流空间相关特性的实验测量研究,尽可能全面地展示光学湍流空间相关函数的各种形式.结果表明,大气光学湍流的一维空间相关函数主要表现为两种结构形态,其一,58.7%基本符合各向同性湍流空间相关函数模型,其相关函数在一定尺度范围内呈现随尺度的增大而减小的趋势,当超过该尺度时,相关系数接近于0;其二,另有37.9%表现为与尺度无关,相关系数维持在0附近小幅度随机振荡.不难发现:光学湍流的空间相关特性主要取决于湍流的强弱和湍流是否得以充分发展,同时,湍流的相干结构将引起空间相关函数的小幅度振荡.以空间布点探测直接获取光学湍流空间相关函数的方法,不仅为分析湍流空间结构奠定了实验基础,同时,也为进一步建立非K湍流模型提供了理论开端.%Atmospheric optical turbulence means refractive index random fluctuation of atmosphere. In this article, according to the concept of correlation function, the measurement principle, measurement schemes, and data processing method of spatial correlation function are given based on a high-quality fiber optical turbulence sensing array. Determining the statistical time and the calculation principle of the spatial correlation is the main point of current research. Emphasis is put on demonstrating the kinds of structural forms and analyzing the impact elements of spatial correlation function in turbulence as clear as possible. Using the sensing array, experimental measurement is promoted in the near ground layer and many forms of correlation functions are revealed. Results show that there are two main structural forms of the spatial correlation function: the first one shows an isotropy

  5. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  6. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  7. Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  8. 大气斜程传输中高阶贝塞尔高斯光束轨道角动量的研究%Orbital angular momentum research of high order Bessel Gaussian beam in a slant atmosphere turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯熙政; 郭新龙

    2015-01-01

    大气湍流引起大气折射率随机变化, 导致空间不均匀性.高阶贝塞尔光束在大气湍流中传输时, 空间不均匀性会使光子波函数改变,形成不同的光子态引起轨道角动量的弥散.在Rytov近似下,计算了高阶贝塞尔光束在大气斜程传输中各分量所占光束总能量的权重. 讨论并对比折射率结构常数,光束波长,天顶角,轨道角动量数,接收孔径和光斑大小等参数对螺旋谱的影响,并给予相应的物理解释. 结果表明:随着折射率结构常数,天顶角和传输距离的增加以及光束波长的减小,螺旋谐波主分量对应的谱减小,轨道角动量弥散越大,而且望远镜接收孔径和光斑大小对轨道角动量弥散的影响非常小.%Atmospheric turbulence can cause random variations of the refractive index, resulting in a spatial inhomogeneity. When a high order Bessel Gaussian beam is propagating through the atmospheric turbulence, spatial inhomogeneity can bring about the change of photon wave function that causes the disperse of the orbital angular momentum to form different photon states. Under the Rytov approximation, when the high order Bessel beam was propagating in a slant-path atmospheric turbulence, the weight of the spiral harmonic component of the beam energy was calculated. And then, the impact on the spiral spectrum of the beam propagating in the slant ways, caused by refractive index structure constant, the wavelength of the beam, the zenith, orbital angular momentum, the receiver aperture, spot size were discussed and compared and a series of concrete explanations were given. The research results show that with increasing refractive index structure constant and the zenith and with decreasing wavelength of the beam, the spectrum of the spiral harmonic main component reduces and the orbital angular momentum disperses more serious. The receiver aperture and spot size have little effect on the orbital angular momentum disperse .

  9. Turbulent mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Dimotakis, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of turbulent flows to effectively mix entrained fluids to a molecular scale is a vital part of the dynamics of such flows, with wide-ranging consequences in nature and engineering. It is a considerable experimental, theoretical, modeling, and computational challenge to capture and represent turbulent mixing which, for high Reynolds number (Re) flows, occurs across a spectrum of scales of considerable span. This consideration alone places high-Re mixing phenomena beyond the reach o...

  10. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have investigated the solutions of Maxwell's equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the Schrödinger associated with the solutions of Einstein's equations for empty space. It is shown that in some cases the geometric instability leading to turbulence on the mechanism of alternating viscosity, which offered by N.N. Yanenko. The mechanism of generation of matter from dark energy due to the geometric turbulence in the Big Bang has been discussed

  11. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the progress made in understanding plasma turbulence. It has relied heavily on numerical simulations to gain some intuition on the physical processes underlying nonlinear interaction and as a cross check for quantitative estimates derived from weak turbulence theory or DIA-based strong turbulence theory. The mathematical description of plasmas, especially those confined in a magnetic bottle, is far more complex than the Navier-Stokes fluid. Yet because of the dispersion of the plasma eigenmodes, the DIA perhaps has greater validity in a plasma than in a Navier-Stokes fluid. Recent developments in dynamical-systems theory have not yet been implemented in plasma turbulence at the level discussed in other studies for boundary-layer turbulence. This technique has promise for evaluating the behavior of large eddies, which may dominate plasma transport as a low-order system. In the collisionless, kinetic regime, where turbulence in x, v phase space has to be addressed, the new methods involving noneigenmode entities called clumps and holes, need further evolution to gain complete acceptability. For the future, a combination of analytical tools and numerical methods may afford the optimum route. Some examples of this are revireviewed

  12. Detector of Optical Vortices as the Main Element of the System of Data Transfer: Principles of Operation, Numerical Model, and Influence of Noise and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Aksenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed of optical vortex topological charge detection along with a design of a corresponding detector. The developed technique is based on measurements of light field intensity. Mathematical model simulating performance of the detector is described in the paper, and results of numerical experiments are presented which illustrate recognition of a vortex in a turbulent medium and in the presence of amplitude and phase noise in the registered radiation. Influence of shifts of the system optical axis on precision of registration is also considered in the paper.

  13. High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory conducted the High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project in the mid 1960s with the intention of better understanding air...

  14. Theorem of turbulent intensity and macroscopic mechanism of the turbulence development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YinQiao; CHEN JinBei; ZUO HongChao

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most common nature phenomena in everyday experience, but that is not adequately understood yet. This article reviews the history and present state of development of the turbulence theory and indicates the necessity to probe into the turbulent features and mechanism with the different methods at different levels. Therefore this article proves a theorem of turbulent transportation and a theorem of turbulent intensity by using the theory of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics,turbulent intensity and the turbulent transportation. The macroscopic cause of the development of fluid turbulence is a result from shearing effect of the velocity together with the temperature, which is also the macroscopic cause of the stretch and fold of trajectory in the phase space of turbulent field. And it is proved by the observed data of atmosphere that the phenomenological coefficient of turbulent intensity is not only a function of the velocity shear but also a function of temperature shear, viz the stability of temperature stratification, in the atmosphere. Accordingly, authenticity of the theorem, which is proved by the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, of turbulent intensity is testified by the facts of observational experiment.

  15. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (Rij-ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  16. Cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generalization of a transformation due to Kurskov and Ozernoi is used to rewrite the usual equations governing subsonic turbulence in Robertson-Walker cosmological models as Navier-Stokes equations with a time-dependent viscosity. This paper first rederives some well-known results in a very simple way by means of this transformation. The main result however is that the establishment of a Kolmogorov spectrum at recombination appears to be incompatible with subsonic turbulence. The conditions after recombination are also discussed briefly. (author)

  17. Burgers turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers model to statistical physics, cosmology, and fluid dynamics. Also Burgers turbulence appeared as one of the simplest instances of a nonlinear system out of equilibrium. The study of random Lagrangian systems, of stochastic partial differential equations and their invariant measures, the theory of dynamical systems, the applications of field theory to the understanding of dissipative anomalies and of multiscaling in hydrodynamic turbulence have benefited significantly from progress in Burgers turbulence. The aim of this review is to give a unified view of selected work stemming from these rather diverse disciplines

  18. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  19. De-trending of turbulence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a comparison between long term raw and de-trended turbulence intensity values recorded at offshore and coastal sites under different weather systems. Within the traditional framework of turbulence interpretation, where turbulence is considered as a stationary...... process imposed on a given constant mean wind speed, measured raw turbulence intensities consist of contributions from the atmospheric turbulence as well as from the change in mean wind speed levels. The change in mean wind speed will appear as a trend in the wind speed time series. Wind resource...... depends primarily on site characteristics and local mean wind speed variations. Reduced turbulence intensity will result in lower design fatigue loads. This aspect of de-trending is discussed by use of a simple heuristic load model. Finally an empirical model for de-trending wind resource data is...

  20. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H; Bondur, Valery G; Leung, Pak T; Prandke, H; Vithanage, D

    2007-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km^2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2x10^4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence ma...

  1. Orbital angular momentum entanglement in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Alpha Hamadou; McLaren, Melanie; Konrad, Thomas; Forbes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The turbulence induced decay of orbital angular momentum (OAM) entanglement between two photons is investigated numerically and experimentally. To compare our results with previous work, we simulate the turbulent atmosphere with a single phase screen based on the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence. We consider two different scenarios: in the first only one of the two photons propagates through turbulence, and in the second both photons propagate through uncorrelated turbulence. Comparing the entanglement evolution for different OAM values, we found the entanglement to be more robust in turbulence for higher OAM values. We derive an empirical formula for the distance scale at which entanglement decays in term of the scale parameters and the OAM value.

  2. Large eddy simulation of stably stratified turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Stable stratification turbulence, as a common phenomenon in atmospheric and oceanic flows, is an important mechanism for numerical prediction of such flows. In this paper the large eddy simulation is utilized for investigating stable stratification turbulence numerically. The paper is expected to provide correct statistical results in agreement with those measured in the atmosphere or ocean. The fully developed turbulence is obtained in the stable stratification fluid by large eddy simulation with different initial velocity field and characteristic parameters, i.e. Reynolds number Re and Froude number Fr. The evolution of turbulent kinetic energy, characteristic length scales and parameters is analyzed for investigating the development of turbulence in stable stratification fluid. The three-dimensional energy spectra, horizontal and vertical energy spectrum, are compared between numerical simulation and real observation in the atmosphere and ocean in order to test the reliability of the numerical simulation. The results of numerical cases show that the large eddy simulation is capable of predicting the properties of stable stratification turbulence in consistence with real measurements at less computational cost. It has been found in this paper that the turbulence can be developed under different initial velocity conditions and the internal wave energy is dominant in the developed stable stratification turbulence. It is also found that the characteristic parameters must satisfy certain conditions in order to have correct statistical property of stable stratification turbulence in the atmosphere and ocean. The Reynolds number and Froude number are unnecessarily equal to those in atmosphere or ocean, but the Reynolds number must be large enough, say, greater than 10 2 , and Froude number must be less than 0.1. The most important parameter is ReFr 2 which must be greater than 10.

  3. Spectral characteristics of chirped pulsed Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere%啁啾脉冲高斯光束在大气湍流中的传输特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾祥梅; 段作梁; 常凌颖; 张美志

    2013-01-01

    基于广义惠更斯-菲涅耳原理,推导出啁啾脉冲高斯光束在湍流大气中传输的光谱解析表达式,并对解析表达式进行了数值仿真.结果表明:啁啾参数越大,光源谱宽越宽;当光源相对谱宽大于0.336时,轴上点光谱产生蓝移;湍流使得轴上点光谱的相对频移量减小,相对频移量随源光谱宽的增大而非线性增大;增大光束束腰半径可减小湍流对光谱频移、光束展宽的影响.%Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle,analytical expressions are derived for the cross-spectral density matrix of chirped pulsed Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere,which are then numerically simulated.It is shown that there are blue shifts in the spectra of axis point when the spectral width of chirped pulsed Gaussian beams is more than a certain value of 0.336.The turbulence induces the decrease of relative frequency shift of on-axis spectra; the relative frequency shift of on-axis spectra increases nonlinearly with the increasing light source spectral width.Increasing the beam waist radius can inhibit the relative frequency shift and the beam broadening.

  4. Turbulent heat fluxes by profile and inertial dissipation methods: analysis of the atmospheric surface layer from shipboard measurements during the SOFIA/ASTEX and SEMAPHORE experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dupuis

    Full Text Available Heat flux estimates obtained using the inertial dissipation method, and the profile method applied to radiosonde soundings, are assessed with emphasis on the parameterization of the roughness lengths for temperature and specific humidity. Results from the inertial dissipation method show a decrease of the temperature and humidity roughness lengths for increasing neutral wind speed, in agreement with previous studies. The sensible heat flux estimates were obtained using the temperature estimated from the speed of sound determined by a sonic anemometer. This method seems very attractive for estimating heat fluxes over the ocean. However allowance must be made in the inertial dissipation method for non-neutral stratification. The SOFIA/ASTEX and SEMAPHORE results show that, in unstable stratification, a term due to the transport terms in the turbulent kinetic energy budget, has to be included in order to determine the friction velocity with better accuracy. Using the profile method with radiosonde data, the roughness length values showed large scatter. A reliable estimate of the temperature roughness length could not be obtained. The humidity roughness length values were compatible with those found using the inertial dissipation method.

  5. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  6. Burgers Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Bec, Jeremie; Khanin, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers mod...

  7. Controlling turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  8. Learning to soar in turbulent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gautam; Celani, Antonio; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Vergassola, Massimo

    2016-08-16

    Birds and gliders exploit warm, rising atmospheric currents (thermals) to reach heights comparable to low-lying clouds with a reduced expenditure of energy. This strategy of flight (thermal soaring) is frequently used by migratory birds. Soaring provides a remarkable instance of complex decision making in biology and requires a long-term strategy to effectively use the ascending thermals. Furthermore, the problem is technologically relevant to extend the flying range of autonomous gliders. Thermal soaring is commonly observed in the atmospheric convective boundary layer on warm, sunny days. The formation of thermals unavoidably generates strong turbulent fluctuations, which constitute an essential element of soaring. Here, we approach soaring flight as a problem of learning to navigate complex, highly fluctuating turbulent environments. We simulate the atmospheric boundary layer by numerical models of turbulent convective flow and combine them with model-free, experience-based, reinforcement learning algorithms to train the gliders. For the learned policies in the regimes of moderate and strong turbulence levels, the glider adopts an increasingly conservative policy as turbulence levels increase, quantifying the degree of risk affordable in turbulent environments. Reinforcement learning uncovers those sensorimotor cues that permit effective control over soaring in turbulent environments. PMID:27482099

  9. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  10. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  11. Study on orbital angular momentum of Laguerre-Gaussian b eam in a slant-path atmospheric turbulence%在大气湍流斜程传输中拉盖高斯光束的轨道角动量的研究*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯熙政; 谌娟; 杨一明

    2014-01-01

    大气湍流引起大气折射率随机变化,导致空间不均匀性。拉盖高斯光束在大气湍流中传输时,空间不均匀性会使光子波函数改变,引起轨道角动量的变化。本文讨论了拉盖尔高斯光束在大气斜程传输时,湍流介质改变光子轨道角动量而形成不同的光子态。计算了螺旋谐波各分量所占光束总能量的权重,分析了拉盖高斯光束的轨道角动量的变化规律。%Atmospheric turbulence can cause random variations of the refractive index, resulting in a spatial inhomogeneity. When a Laguerre-Gaussian beam is propagating through the atmospheric turbulence, spatial inhomogeneity can bring about the change of photon wave function that causes variations in the orbital angular momentum. This article discusses how turbulence media change the orbital angular momentum of photons as to form different photon states, when the Laguerre-Gaussian beam is propagating in a slant-path atmospheric turbulence, by calculating the weight of the spiral harmonic component of the beam energy. Analysis of the variations of orbital angular momentum of Laguerre-Gaussian beam in the turbulent medium has been carried out.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  13. Ribbon Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Vallis, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel forced by an imposed unstable zonal mean flow, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization on the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these result by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the imposed mean flow appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the...

  14. Turbulent Transport in Complex, Alpine Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Oldroyd, Holly Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent exchanges between the atmosphere and the underlying surface transport heat, moisture, momentum and pollutants, and thus understanding them is crucial to water resource management, meteorological predictions, climate modeling, wind energy production and pollution transport modeling and mitigation. The majority of established theories and techniques used to model, predict and observe turbulent exchange assume the underlying surface is flat, uniform and homogeneous. Consequently, in mo...

  15. Signal modeling of turbulence-distorted imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. Susan; Driggers, Ronald G.; Krapels, Keith; Espinola, Richard L.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Cha, Jae

    2009-05-01

    Understanding turbulence effects on wave propagation and imaging systems has been an active research area for more than 50 years. Conventional atmospheric optics methods use statistical models to analyze image degradation effects that are caused by turbulence. In this paper, we intend to understand atmospheric turbulence effects using a deterministic signal processing and imaging theory point of view and modeling. The model simulates the formed imagery by a lens by tracing the optical rays from the target through a band of turbulence. We examine the nature of the turbulence-degraded image, and identify its characteristics as the parameters of the band of turbulence, e.g., its width, angle, and index of refraction, are varied. Image degradation effects due to turbulence, such as image blurring and image dancing, are revealed by this signal modeling. We show that in fact these phenomena can be related not only to phase errors in the frequency domain of the image but also a 2D modulation effect in the image spectrum. Results with simulated and realistic data are provided.

  16. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    In order to study atmospheric pollution and the dispersion of industrial stack emissions, a large eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky-Germano sub-grid-scale model is coupled with Lagrangian tracking of fluid particles containing scalar, solid particles and droplets. The movement of fluid particles at a sub-grid level is given by a three-dimensional Langevin model. The stochastic model is written in terms of sub-grid-scale statistics at a mesh level. By introducing a diffusion model, the coupling between the large-eddy simulation and the modified three-dimensional Langevin model is applied to passive scalar dispersion. The results are validated by comparison with the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (1982). The equation of motion of a small rigid sphere in a turbulent flow is introduced. Solid particles and droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The velocity of solid particles and droplets is considered to have a large scale component (directly computed by the large-eddy simulation) and a sub-grid scale part. Because of inertia and gravity effects, solid particles and droplets, deviate from the trajectories of the surrounding fluid particles. Therefore, a modified Lagrangian correlation timescale is introduced into the Langevin model previously developed for the sub-grid velocity of fluid particles. Two-way coupling and collisions are taken into account. The results of the large-eddy simulation with solid particles are compared with the wind-tunnel experiments of Nalpanis et al. (1993) and of Taniere et al. (1997) on sand particles in saltation and in modified saltation, respectively. A model for droplet coalescence and breakup is implemented which allows to predict droplet interactions under turbulent flow conditions in the frame of the Euler/Lagrange approach. Coalescence and breakup are considered as a stochastic process with simple scaling symmetry assumption for the droplet radius, initially proposed by Kolmogorov (1941). At high

  17. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  18. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our ai...

  19. Water in Protoplanetary Disks: Deuteration and Turbulent Mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-01-01

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of w...

  20. Optical turbulence in confined media: part I, the indoor turbulence sensor instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabé, Julien; Blary, Flavien; Ziad, Aziz; Borgnino, Julien; Fanteï-Caujolle, Yan; Liotard, Arnaud; Falzon, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Optical system performances can be affected by local optical turbulence created by its surrounding environment (telescope dome, clean room, atmospheric surface layer). We present our new instrument INdoor TurbulENce SEnsor (INTENSE) dedicated to this local optical turbulence characterization. INTENSE consists of using several parallel laser beams separated by non-redundant baselines between 0.05 and 2.5 m and measuring the angle of arrival fluctuations from spot displacements on a CCD. After introducing the theoretical background, we give a description of the instrument including a detailed characterization of instrumental noise and, finally, give the first results for the characterization of the turbulence inside clean rooms for optical systems studies. PMID:27607283

  1. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  2. Idealised Simulations of Turbulence Near Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovko Rajak, D.; Lane, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is a significant hazard to the aviation industry because it can cause injuries, damage to aircraft as well as financial losses. A number of recent studies have been conducted in order to explain the mechanisms that are responsible for convectively induced turbulence (CIT), which can occur within the cloud as well as in the clear air regions surrounding the cloud. The majority of these studies were focused on above cloud turbulence, however, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that generate turbulence around thunderstorms. This type of turbulence, also known as near-cloud turbulence, is of particular interest because it is much more difficult to avoid than turbulence within clouds since it is invisible and undetectable using standard hazard methods (e.g. on-board and ground-based radars). This study examines turbulence generation by organised convection (viz. supercells) using three-dimensional (3D) simulations conducted with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Results from several high-resolution idealised simulations will be shown, with a focus on the role of 3D cloud-induced flow perturbations on turbulence generation and their sensitivity to different background flow conditions like wind shear. High resolution numerical modeling is necessary for more realistic treatment of deep convection and turbulence processes on a scale that affect aircraft (these are on the order of 100 m). Since conducting 3D simulations with cloud-resolving scales is very computationally expensive it is necessary to use nesting in order to resolve these small scale processes. The simulation results show regions of turbulence that extend more than 100 km away from the active deep convection (i.e. regions with high radar reflectivity). These turbulent regions are related to strong upper-level storm outflow and the associated enhanced vertical shear. Simulations also show localised modulation of the outflow jet by small-scale gravity waves (~ 4 km

  3. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    Wind turbine wakes can cause 10-20% annual energy losses in wind farms, and wake turbulence can decrease the lifetime of wind turbine blades. One way of estimating these effects is the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate wind turbines wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Since...... wind farm, the simulated results cannot be compared directly with wind farm measurements that have a high uncertainty in the measured reference wind direction. When this uncertainty is used to post-process the CFD results, a fairer comparison with measurements is achieved....... this flow is in the high Reynolds number regime, it is mainly dictated by turbulence. As a result, the turbulence modeling in CFD dominates the wake characteristics, especially in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The present work is dedicated to study and develop RANS-based turbulence models...

  4. Pair separation in high Reynolds number turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgoin, M O; Xu, H; Joergensen, J B; Bodenschatz, E; Bourgoin, Mickael; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Xu, Haitao; Joergensen, Jacob B.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The separation of two nearby particles in a turbulent flow is fundamental in our everyday lives. Turbulent mixing is important everywhere from mundane applications like stirring milk into a cup of tea to technological processes such as the mixing of chemicals in reactors, combustion engines, or jet turbines. Environmental problems such as the spread of pollutants or bioagents in the atmosphere and oceans are fundamentally turbulent mixing processes. Even biological organisms use it to survive in marine ecosystems. Despite intense scientific inquiry, however, no convincing agreement has been found with the Richardson and Batchelor two-particle dispersion predictions over a wide range of timescales. Here we report measurements in a laboratory water flow at very high turbulence intensities (Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers of R_lambda = 690 and 815) that show excellent agreement with a refinement of Batchelor's prediction. We find that even for large initial spatial separations Batchelor scaling is fulfilled. ...

  5. Atmospheric Turbulence Estimates from a Pulsed Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruis, Matthew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nash'at N.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of the eddy dissipation rate (EDR) were obtained from measurements made by a coherent pulsed lidar and compared with estimates from mesoscale model simulations and measurements from an in situ sonic anemometer at the Denver International Airport and with EDR estimates from the last observation time of the trailing vortex pair. The estimates of EDR from the lidar were obtained using two different methodologies. The two methodologies show consistent estimates of the vertical profiles. Comparison of EDR derived from the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model with the in situ lidar estimates show good agreement during the daytime convective boundary layer, but the WRF simulations tend to overestimate EDR during the nighttime. The EDR estimates from a sonic anemometer located at 7.3 meters above ground level are approximately one order of magnitude greater than both the WRF and lidar estimates - which are from greater heights - during the daytime convective boundary layer and substantially greater during the nighttime stable boundary layer. The consistency of the EDR estimates from different methods suggests a reasonable ability to predict the temporal evolution of a spatially averaged vertical profile of EDR in an airport terminal area using a mesoscale model during the daytime convective boundary layer. In the stable nighttime boundary layer, there may be added value to EDR estimates provided by in situ lidar measurements.

  6. Long-distance Bessel beam propagation through Kolmogorov turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Philip; Ituen, Iniabasi; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Free-space optical communication has the potential to transmit information with both high speed and security. However, since it is unguided it suffers from losses due to atmospheric turbulence and diffraction. To overcome the diffraction limits the long-distance propagation of Bessel beams is considered and compared against Gaussian beam properties. Bessel beams are shown to have a number of benefits over Gaussian beams when propagating through atmospheric turbulence. PMID:26560921

  7. Anomalous diffusion in geophysical and laboratory turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tsinober

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview and some new results on anomalous diffusion of passive scalar in turbulent flows (including those used by Richardson in his famous paper in 1926. The obtained results are based on the analysis of the properties of invariant quantities (energy, enstrophy, dissipation, enstrophy generation, helicity density, etc. - i.e. independent of the choice of the system of reference as the most appropriate to describe physical processes - in three different turbulent laboratory flows (grid-flow, jet and boundary layer, see Tsinober et al. (1992 and Kit et al. (1993. The emphasis is made on the relations between the asymptotic properties of the intermittency exponents of higher order moments of different turbulent fields (energy, dissipation, helicity, spontaneous breaking of isotropy and reflexional symmetry and the variability of turbulent diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer, in the troposphere and in the stratosphere. It is argued that local spontaneous breaking of isotropy of turbulent flow results in anomalous scaling laws for turbulent diffusion (as compared to the scaling law of Richardson which are observed, as a rule, in different atmospheric layers from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL to the stratosphere. Breaking of rotational symmetry is important in the ABL, whereas reflexional symmetry breaking is dominating in the troposphere locally and in the stratosphere globally. The results are of speculative nature and further analysis is necessary to validate or disprove the claims made, since the correspondence with the experimental results may occur for the wrong reasons as happens from time to time in the field of turbulence.

  8. Lessons from hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulent flows, with their irregular behavior, confound any single attempts to understand them. But physicists have succeeded in identifying some universal properties of turbulence and relating them to broken symmetries. (author)

  9. Distinguishing ichthyogenic turbulence from geophysical turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiana, Kandaga; Moum, James N.; Smyth, William D.; Warner, Sally J.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of currents and turbulence beneath a geostationary ship in the equatorial Indian Ocean during a period of weak surface forcing revealed unexpectedly strong turbulence beneath the surface mixed layer. Coincident with the turbulence was a marked reduction of the current speeds registered by shipboard Doppler current profilers, and an increase in their variability. At a mooring 1 km away, measurements of turbulence and currents showed no such anomalies. Correlation with the shipboard echo sounder measurements indicate that these nighttime anomalies were associated with fish aggregations beneath the ship. The fish created turbulence by swimming against the strong zonal current in order to remain beneath the ship, and their presence affected the Doppler speed measurements. The principal characteristics of the resultant ichthyogenic turbulence are (i) low wave number roll-off of shear spectra in the inertial subrange relative to geophysical turbulence, (ii) Thorpe overturning scales that are small compared with the Ozmidov scale, and (iii) low mixing efficiency. These factors extend previous findings by Gregg and Horne (2009) to a very different biophysical regime and support the general conclusion that the biological contribution to mixing the ocean via turbulence is negligible.

  10. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  11. Turbulent flow in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Kumar S.; Sen, Siddhartha

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  12. Nonuniqueness and Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, M A

    1997-01-01

    The possibility is considered that turbulence is described by differential equations for which uniqueness fails maximally, at least in some limit. The inviscid Burgers equation, in the context of Onsager's suggestion that turbulence should be described by a negative absolute temperature, is such a limit. In this picture, the onset of turbulence coincides with the proliferation of singularities which characterizes the failure of uniqueness.

  13. Large-Scale Spectral Structure with a Gap in the Stably Stratified Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, T M; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Pécseli, Hans;

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of the large-scale structure of turbulence in a stratified atmosphere is important for the prediction and modelling of turbulence. The Monin-Obukhov similarity consideration is well suited for the modelling of small-scale turbulence. But the large-scale turbulence possesses new...

  14. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric d...

  15. Turbulent Soret Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We show, by direct numerical simulations, that heavy inertial particles (with Stokes number ${\\rm St}$) in inhomogeneously forced statistically stationary turbulent flows cluster at the minima of turbulent kinetic energy. We further show that two turbulent transport processes, turbophoresis and turbulent diffusion together determine the spatial distribution of the particles. The ratio of the corresponding transport coefficient -- the turbulent Soret coefficient -- increases with ${\\rm St}$ for small ${\\rm St}$, reaches a maxima for ${\\rm St}\\approx 10$ and decreases as $\\sim {\\rm St}^{-0.33}$ for large ${\\rm St}$.

  16. Introduction to quantum turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenghi, Carlo F; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2014-03-25

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  17. Building blocks of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, Marc; Roland, Nicolas; Hof, Bjoern

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature and although the equations governing fluid flow are well known, there are no analytical expressions that describe the complexity of turbulent motion. The nonlinear nature and the large number of spatial and temporal degrees of freedom turn this into one of the most challenging problems in mathematics and the physical sciences alike. We here report the discovery of unstable localised solutions for pipe flow that share key spatial characteristics of turbulence in the intermittent regime. While their temporal dynamics are very simple, much of the spatial complexity found in low Reynolds number turbulence is already encoded in them. We furthermore demonstrate how turbulent transients arise from one such solution branch. Our observations shed light on the origin of turbulence and link the localised structures commonly observed in turbulent flows to invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  18. Optimal beam focusing through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Beam spread and beam wandering are the most perceptible effects of atmospheric turbulence on propagating laser beams. The width of the mean irradiance profile is typically used to characterize the beam spread. This so-called long-term (LT) statistic allows for a relatively simple theoretical description. However, the LT beam size is not a very practical measure of the beam spread because its measurements are sensitive to the movements of the source and detector, and to the large-scale variations of the refractive index that are not associated with turbulence. The short-term (ST) beam spread is measured relative to the instantaneous position of the beam center and is free of these drawbacks, but has not been studied as thoroughly as the LT spread. We present a theoretical model for the ST beam irradiance that is based on the parabolic equation for the beam wave propagation in random media, and the Markov approximation for calculation of the statistics of the optical field, and discuss an approximation that allows introduction of the isoplanatic ST point spread function (PSF). Unlike the LT PSF, the ST PSF depends on the overall beam geometry. This allows optimization of the initial beam field in terms of minimizing the ST beam size at the observation plane. Calculations supporting this conjecture are presented for the simple case of the coherent Gaussian beam, and Kolmogorov turbulence. PMID:26560908

  19. Adapting unmanned aerial vehicles for turbulence measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Brandon; Helvey, Jacob; Mullen, Jon; Thamann, Michael; Bailey, Sean

    2015-11-01

    We describe the approach of using highly instrumented and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to spatially interrogate the atmospheric boundary layer's turbulent flow structure. This approach introduces new capabilities not available in contemporary micro-meteorological measurement techniques such as instrumented towers, balloons, and manned aircraft. A key advantage in utilizing UAVs as an atmospheric turbulence research tool is that it reduces the reliance on assumptions regarding temporal evolution of the turbulence inherent within Taylor's frozen flow hypothesis by facilitating the ability to spatially sample the flow field over a wide range of spatial scales. In addition, UAVs offer the ability to measure in a wide range of boundary conditions and distance from the earth's surface, the ability to gather many boundary layer thicknesses of data during brief periods of statistical quasi-stationarity, and the ability to acquire data where and when it is needed. We describe recent progress made in manufacturing purpose-built airframes and adapting pre-fabricated airframes for these measurements by integrating sensors into those airframes and developing data analysis techniques to isolate the atmospheric turbulence from the measured velocity signal. This research is supported by NSF Award CBET-1351411.

  20. Turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy parameters over a heterogeneous terrain of Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Runyuan; Li, Yaohui; Wang, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    A deep understanding of turbulence structure is important for investigating the characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer, especially over heterogeneous terrain. In the present study, turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) parameters are analyzed for different conditions with respect to stability, wind direction and wind speed over a valley region of the Loess Plateau of China during December 2003 and January 2004. The purpose of the study is to examine whether the observed turbulence intensity and TKE parameters satisfy Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST), and analyze the wind shear effect on, and thermal buoyancy function of, the TKE, despite the terrain heterogeneity. The results demonstrate that the normalized intensity of turbulence follows MOST for all stability in the horizontal and vertical directions, as well as the normalized TKE in the horizontal direction. The shear effect of the wind speed in the Loess Plateau region is strong in winter and could enhance turbulence for all stability conditions. During daytime, the buoyancy and shear effect together constitute the generation of TKE under unstable conditions. At night, the contribution of buoyancy to TKE is relatively small, and mechanical shearing is the main production form of turbulence.

  1. One-dimensional turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A.R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  2. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  3. On atmospheric stability in the dynamic wake meandering model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Lee, Sang; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2014-01-01

    parameters. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, simulations of neutral and unstable atmospheric boundary layers using large-eddy simulation are performed at the same streamwise turbulence intensity level. The turbulence intensity is kept constant by calibrating the surface roughness in......The present study investigates a new approach for capturing the effects of atmospheric stability on wind turbine wake evolution and wake meandering by using the dynamic wake meandering model. The most notable impact of atmospheric stability on the wind is the changes in length and velocity scales...... turbulence spectra and applied to the dynamic wake meandering model to capture the correct wake meandering behaviour. The ambient turbulence in all stability classes is generated using the Mann turbulence model, where the effects of non-neutral atmospheric stability are approximated by the selection of input...

  4. String Theory and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  5. String Theory and Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje(Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA); Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  6. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  7. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbu...

  8. Buoyancy driven turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, laboratory experiments and atmospheric measurements, that buoyancy driven turbulence exhibits a broad diversity of the types of distributed chaos with its stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$. The distributed chaos with $\\beta = 1/3$ (determined by the helicity correlation integral) is the most common feature of the stably stratified turbulence (due to the strong helical waves presence). These waves mostly dominate spectral properties of the vertical component of velocity field, while the horizontal component is dominated by the diffusive processes both for the weak and strong stable stratification ($\\beta =2/3$). For the last case influence of the low boundary can overcome the wave effects and result in $\\beta =1/2$ for the vertical component of the velocity field (the spontaneous breaking of the space translational symmetry - homogeneity). For the unstably stratified turbulence in the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone the di...

  9. Inhomogeneous turbulence in magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is expected to play an essential role in enhancing magnetic reconnection. Turbulence associated with magnetic reconnection is highly inhomogeneous: it is generated by inhomogeneities of the field configuration such as the velocity shear, temperature gradient, density stratification, magnetic shear, etc. This self-generated turbulence affects the reconnection through the turbulent transport. In this reconnection--turbulence interaction, localization of turbulent transport due to dynamic balance between several turbulence effects plays an essential role. For investigating inhomogeneous turbulence in a strongly nonlinear regime, closure or turbulence modeling approaches provide a powerful tool. A turbulence modeling approach for the magnetic reconnection is introduced. In the model, the mean-field equations with turbulence effects incorporated are solved simultaneously with the equations of turbulent statistical quantities that represent spatiotemporal properties of turbulence under the effect of large-scale field inhomogeneities. Numerical simulations of this Reynolds-averaged turbulence model showed that self-generated turbulence enhances magnetic reconnection. It was pointed out that reconnection states may be divided into three category depending on the turbulence level: (i) laminar reconnection; (ii) turbulent reconnection, and (iii) turbulent diffusion. Recent developments in this direction are also briefly introduced, which includes the magnetic Prandtl number dependence, spectral evolution, and guide-field effects. Also relationship of this fully nonlinear turbulence approach with other important approaches such as plasmoid instability reconnection will be discussed.

  10. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3  MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications

  11. Observations of upper-ocean turbulence during the VOCALS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, C. J.; Farrar, J.; Weller, R. A.; Straneo, F.; Moffat, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS) Regional Experiment, properties of upper-ocean turbulence were measured with a microstructure profiler during ship-based surveys, and a longer time series of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation at 9-m depth was collected from a surface mooring. The ship-based surveys allow examination of vertical mixing and its horizontal and vertical variation. The turbulence data from the mooring allows an assessment of the temporal variability of upper-ocean turbulence in the region and its relation to the surface forcing (wind, waves, and surface heat flux) and to oceanic variability, such as near-inertial waves. These data will be used to characterize upper-ocean turbulence beneath the Southeast Pacific stratus deck, its variability, and its role in setting upper-ocean mean properties.

  12. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  13. Seesaw mechanism in turbulence and turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Theory of nonlocal transport has been developed, based upon the statistical theory of plasma turbulence. Essence is that fluctuations (with long radial correlation length) can be excited by nonlinear processes, although they are linearly stable. Experiments have reported the non-diffusive mechanisms in rapid response of transport between distant radii. Simulations have demonstrated that transport barrier can be established while increasing linear growth rate of local instabilities. These await application of theory of nonlocal transport. Example of such nonlinearly-driven, meso-scale fluctuations is the zonal flow (ZF). ZFs grow extracting energy from microscopic fluctuations so as to reduce the turbulence and turbulent transport. Because the radial correlation length of ZF is longer than those for microscopic fluctuations, which are inducing turbulent transport, ZF, which is driven fluctuations at one radius, can suppress fluctuations at distant radii. Thus, the fluctuations exchange energy over the distance that is much longer than autocorrelation length of microscopic fluctuations. This mechanism induces new nonlocal interactions in turbulent transport. That is, strong fluctuations at particular radius can suppress fluctuations at different radius, via induction of ZFs. Stronger fluctuations suppress weaker fluctuations. This is called the seesaw mechanism via ZFs. Owing to this mechanism, the turbulence transport is not determined by local parameters alone, but by parameters at far distance. The transient response is much faster than the process governed by diffusive processes. [This work is partly supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Specially-Promoted Research (16002005), the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (19360418) and collaboration programme of NIFS.] (author)

  14. Elasto-inertial turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-06-25

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called "maximum drag reduction" asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  15. Sound generation by turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, A.P.; Hynes, T.P. [Cambridge Univ., Dept. of Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    Sound is a weak by-product of a subsonic turbulent flow. The main convective elements of the turbulence are silent and it is only spectral components with supersonic phase speeds that couple to the far-field sound. This paper reviews recent work on sound generation by turbulence. Just as there is a hierarchy of numerical models for turbulence (scaling, RANS, LES and DNS), there are different approaches for relating the near-field turbulence to the far-field sound. Kirchhoff approaches give the far-field sound in a straightforward way, but provide little insight into the sources of sound. Acoustic analogies can be used with different base flows to describe the propagation effects and to highlight the major noise producing regions. (authors)

  16. Turbulent Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Lehner, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We show that rapidly-spinning black holes can display turbulent gravitational behavior which is mediated by a new type of parametric instability. This instability transfers energy from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies--- a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse energy cascade displayed by 2+1-dimensional turbulent fluids. Our finding reveals a path towards gravitational turbulence for perturbations of rapidly-spinning black holes, and provides the first evidence for gravitational turbulence in an asymptotically flat spacetime. Interestingly, this finding predicts observable gravitational wave signatures from such phenomena in black hole binaries with high spins and gives a gravitational description of turbulence relevant to the fluid-gravity duality.

  17. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    stochastic turbulence model based on ambit processes is proposed. It is shown how a prescribed isotropic covariance structure can be reproduced. Non-Gaussian turbulence models are obtained through non-Gaussian Lévy bases or through volatility modulation of Lévy bases. As opposed to spectral models operating......This thesis addresses stochastic modelling of turbulence with applications to wind energy in mind. The primary tool is ambit processes, a recently developed class of computationally tractable stochastic processes based on integration with respect to Lévy bases. The subject of ambit processes is...... still undergoing rapid development. Turbulence and wind energy are vast and complicated subjects. Turbulence has structures across a wide range of length and time scales, structures which cannot be captured by a Gaussian process that relies on only second order properties. Concerning wind energy, a wind...

  18. Finite-Dimensional Turbulence of Planetary Waves

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Finite-dimensional wave turbulence refers to the chaotic dynamics of interacting wave `clusters' consisting of finite number of connected wave triads with exact three-wave resonances. We examine this phenomenon using the example of atmospheric planetary (Rossby) waves. It is shown that the dynamics of the clusters is determined by the types of connections between neighboring triads within a cluster; these correspond to substantially different scenarios of energy flux between different triads....

  19. Atmospheric Scintillation in Astronomical Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, J; Dhillon, V S; Wilson, R W

    2015-01-01

    Scintillation noise due to the Earth's turbulent atmosphere can be a dominant noise source in high-precision astronomical photometry when observing bright targets from the ground. Here we describe the phenomenon of scintillation from its physical origins to its effect on photometry. We show that Young's (1967) scintillation-noise approximation used by many astronomers tends to underestimate the median scintillation noise at several major observatories around the world. We show that using median atmospheric optical turbulence profiles, which are now available for most sites, provides a better estimate of the expected scintillation noise and that real-time turbulence profiles can be used to precisely characterise the scintillation noise component of contemporaneous photometric measurements. This will enable a better understanding and calibration of photometric noise sources and the effectiveness of scintillation correction techniques. We also provide new equations for calculating scintillation noise, including ...

  20. Atmospheric effects on CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrin, R.R.; Nelson, D.H.; Schmitt, M.J. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The ambient atmosphere between the laser transmitter and the target can affect CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement sensitivity through a number of different processes. In this work, we will address two of the sources of atmospheric interference with CO{sub 2} DIAL measurements: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and extinction due to absorption by atmospheric gases. Measurements of atmospheric extinction under different atmospheric conditions are presented and compared to a standard atmospheric transmission model (FASCODE). We have also investigated the effects of atmospheric turbulence on system performance. Measurements of the effective beam size after propagation are compared to model predictions using simultaneous measurements of atmospheric turbulence as input to the model. These results are also discussed in the context of the overall effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on the sensitivity of DIAL measurements.

  1. Turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulence: theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, G; Eidelman, A; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent thermal diffusion is a combined effect of the temperature stratified turbulence and inertia of small particles. It causes the appearance of a non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles in the direction of the turbulent heat flux. This non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles is proportional to the product of the mean particle number density and the effective velocity of inertial particles. The theory of this effect has been previously developed only for small temperature gradients and small Stokes numbers (Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 76}, 224, 1996). In this study a generalized theory of turbulent thermal diffusion for arbitrary temperature gradients and Stokes numbers has been developed. The laboratory experiments in the oscillating grid turbulence and in the multi-fan produced turbulence have been performed to validate the theory of turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulent flows. It has been shown that the ratio of the effective velocity of inertial particles to the characteristic ve...

  2. Atmosphere: An International and Interdisciplinary Scientific Open Access Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The new online, Open Access journal Atmosphere has been launched to present reviews, regular research papers, communications and short notes on atmospheric topics. These topics include experimental and theoretical work related to the physical atmosphere, such as turbulence, atmospheric flow, dynamic and physical processes and mechanisms, atmospheric chemistry, such as changes in atmospheric composition, including aerosols, ozone, air pollution, chemical weather, meteorology and scale interact...

  3. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Jiang; Nordsiek, Hansen; Shaw, Raymond A, E-mail: rashaw@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  4. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  5. Periodically kicked turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  6. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  7. One-dimensional turbulence model simulations of autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuel mixtures in a turbulent jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Kamlesh G.; Echekki, Tarek [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide in a turbulent jet with preheated co-flow air is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. The simulations are performed at atmospheric pressure based on varying the jet Reynolds number and the oxidizer preheat temperature for two compositions corresponding to varying the ratios of H{sub 2} and CO in the fuel stream. Moreover, simulations for homogeneous autoignition are implemented for similar mixture conditions for comparison with the turbulent jet results. The results identify the key effects of differential diffusion and turbulence on the onset and eventual progress of autoignition in the turbulent jets. The differential diffusion of hydrogen fuels results in a reduction of the ignition delay relative to similar conditions of homogeneous autoignition. Turbulence may play an important role in delaying ignition at high-turbulence conditions, a process countered by the differential diffusion of hydrogen relative to carbon monoxide; however, when ignition is established, turbulence enhances the overall rates of combustion of the non-premixed flame downstream of the ignition point. (author)

  8. Microgravity Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A gas-jet diffusion flame is similar to the flame on a Bunsen burner, where a gaseous fuel (e.g., propane) flows from a nozzle into an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., air). The difference is that a Bunsen burner allows for (partial) premixing of the fuel and the air, whereas a diffusion flame is not premixed and gets its oxygen (principally) by diffusion from the atmosphere around the flame. Simple gas-jet diffusion flames are often used for combustion studies because they embody the mechanisms operating in accidental fires and in practical combustion systems. However, most practical combustion is turbulent (i.e., with random flow vortices), which enhances the fuel/air mixing. These turbulent flames are not well understood because their random and transient nature complicates analysis. Normal gravity studies of turbulence in gas-jet diffusion flames can be impeded by buoyancy-induced instabilities. These gravitycaused instabilities, which are evident in the flickering of a candle flame in normal gravity, interfere with the study of turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. By conducting experiments in microgravity, where buoyant instabilities are avoided, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center hope to improve our understanding of turbulent combustion. Ultimately, this could lead to improvements in combustor design, yielding higher efficiency and lower pollutant emissions. Gas-jet diffusion flames are often researched as model flames, because they embody mechanisms operating in both accidental fires and practical combustion systems (see the first figure). In normal gravity laboratory research, buoyant air flows, which are often negligible in practical situations, dominate the heat and mass transfer processes. Microgravity research studies, however, are not constrained by buoyant air flows, and new, unique information on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames has been obtained.

  9. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  10. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Devranjan; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance however are more complicated (e.g. blood, polymer melts or paints), they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We here demonstrate for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but it is suppressed and replaced by a new type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT). EIT is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence and the dynamical properties differ significantly. In particular the drag is strongly reduced and the observed friction scaling resolves a longstanding puzzle in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics regarding the nature of the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote. Theoretical considerations imply that EIT will arise in complex fluid...

  11. Scrambled and Unscrambled Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramaprabhu, P; Lawrie, A G W

    2013-01-01

    The linked fluid dynamics videos depict Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence when driven by a complex acceleration profile involving two stages of acceleration interspersed with a stage of stabilizing deceleration. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs at the interface separating two fluids of different densities, when the lighter fluid is accelerated in to the heavier fluid. The turbulent mixing arising from the development of the miscible RT instability is of key importance in the design of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules, and to the understanding of astrophysical events, such as Type Ia supernovae. By driving this flow with an accel-decel-accel profile, we have investigated how structures in RT turbulence are affected by a sudden change in the direction of the acceleration first from destabilizing acceleration to deceleration, and followed by a restoration of the unstable acceleration. By studying turbulence under such highly non-equilibrium conditions, we hope to develop an understanding of the response and ...

  12. Color of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zare, Armin; Georgiou, Tryphon T

    2016-01-01

    Second-order statistics of turbulent flows can be obtained either experimentally or via direct numerical simulations. Statistics reflect fundamentals of flow physics and can be used to develop low-complexity turbulence models. Due to experimental or numerical limitations it is often the case that only partial flow statistics can be reliably known, i.e., only certain correlations between a limited number of flow field components are available. Thus, it is of interest to complete the statistical signature of the flow field in a way that is consistent with the known dynamics. This is an inverse problem and our approach utilizes stochastically-forced linearization around turbulent mean velocity profile. In general, white-in-time stochastic forcing is not sufficient to explain turbulent flow statistics. In contrast, colored-in-time forcing of the linearized equations allows for exact matching of available correlations. To accomplish this, we develop dynamical models that generate the required stochastic excitation...

  13. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  14. Turbulent Flames in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1994-05-01

    First results of three-dimensional simulations of a thermonuclear flame in Type Ia supernovae are obtained using a new flame-capturing algorithm, and a PPM hydrodynamical code. In the absence of gravity, the flame is stabilized with respect to the Landau (1944) instability due to the difference in the behaviour of convex and concave portions of the perturbed flame front. The transition to turbulence in supernovae occurs on scales =~ 0.1 - 10 km in agreement with the non-linear estimate lambda =~ 2pi D(2_l/geff) based on the Zeldovich (1966) model for a perturbed flame when the gravity acceleration increases; D_l is the normal speed of the laminar flame, and geff is the effective acceleration. The turbulent flame is mainly spread by large scale motions driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Small scale turbulence facilitates rapid incineration of the fuel left behind the front. The turbulent flame speed D_t approaches D_t =~ U', where U' is the root mean square velocity of turbulent motions, when the turbulent flame forgets initial conditions and reaches a steady state. The results indicate that in a steady state the turbulent flame speed should be independent of the normal laminar flame speed D_l. The three-dimensional results are in sharp contrast with the results of previous two-dimensional simulations which underestimate flame speed due to the lack of turbulent cascade directed in three dimensions from big to small spatial scales. The work was supported by the NSF grants AST 92-18035 and AST 93-005P.

  15. On Turbulent Reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Diamond, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of turbulent reconnection in 2D and 3D reduced MHD by calculating the effective dissipation due to coupling between small-scale fluctuations and large-scale magnetic fields. Sweet-Parker type balance relations are then used to calculate the global reconnection rate. Two approaches are employed -- quasi-linear closure and an eddy-damped fluid model. Results indicate that despite the presence of turbulence, the reconnection rate remains inversely proportional to $\\sqrt{R...

  16. Turbulent current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density

  17. Turbulent Plasmoid Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, Fabien; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    The plasmoid instability may lead to fast magnetic reconnection through long current sheets(CS). It is well known that large-Reynolds-number plasmas easily become turbulent. We address the question whether turbulence enhances the energy conversion rate of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. We carry out appropriate numerical MHD simulations, but resolving simultaneously the relevant large-scale (mean-) fields and the corresponding small-scale, turbulent, quantities by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) is not possible. Hence we investigate the influence of small scale turbulence on large scale MHD processes by utilizing a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model. We verify the applicability of our SGS model and then use it to investigate the influence of turbulence on the plasmoid instability. We start the simulations with Harris-type and force-free CS equilibria in the presence of a finite guide field in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. We use the DNS results to investigate the growt...

  18. Influence of asymmetry turbulence cells on the angle of arrival fluctuations of optical waves in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. Very recent analyses of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations of an optical wave in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence have adopted the assumption that the propagation path was in the z-direction with circular symmetry of turbulence cells maintained in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path, and one single anisotropy factor was adopted in the orthogonal xy-plane to parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence cells or eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions. In this work, the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence cells or eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane is no longer required, and two anisotropy parameters are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane to investigate the AOA fluctuations. In addition, deviations from the classic 11/3 spectral power law behavior for Kolmogorov turbulence are allowed by assuming spectral power law value variations between 3 and 4. With the Rytov approximation theory, new theoretical models for the variance of AOA fluctuations are developed for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. When the two anisotropic parameters are equal to each other, they reduce correctly to the recently published results (the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence cells or eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane was adopted). Furthermore, when these two anisotropic parameters equal one, they reduce correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of optical wave propagation through weak isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. PMID:26367438

  19. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    CERN Document Server

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  20. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pak-Tao Leung; Carl H. Gibson

    2004-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-turbulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  1. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Schneider, Tapio; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J. B.

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric flows are governed by the equations of fluid dynamics. These equations are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifest itself only weakly through interactions of nontrivial mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. Here we show how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. However, it does not capture important turbulent transport terms in the turbulence kinetic energy budget. Second, we study the evolution of two-dimensional large-scale waves, which are representative of waves seen in Earth's upper atmosphere. We demonstrate that a cumulant expansion truncated at second order (CE2) can capture the evolution of such waves and their nonlinear interaction with the mean flow in some circumstances, for example, when the wave amplitude is small enough or the planetary rotation rate is large enough. However, CE2 fails to capture the flow evolution when strongly nonlinear eddy-eddy interactions that generate small-scale filaments in surf zones around critical layers become important. Higher-order closures can capture these missing interactions. The results point to new ways in which the dynamics of turbulent boundary layers may be represented in climate models, and they illustrate different classes

  2. Thirty Meter Telescope Site Testing VI: Turbulence Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Els, S G; Schoeck, M; Riddle, R; Skidmore, W; Seguel, J; Bustos, E; Walker, D

    2009-01-01

    The results on the vertical distribution of optical turbulence above the five mountains which were investigated by the site testing for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) are reported. On San Pedro Martir in Mexico, the 13 North site on Mauna Kea and three mountains in northern Chile Cerro Tolar, Cerro Armazones and Cerro Tolonchar, MASS-DIMM turbulence profilers have been operated over at least two years. Acoustic turbulence profilers - SODARs - were also operated at these sites. The obtained turbulence profiles indicate that at all sites the lowest 200m are the main source of the total seeing observed, with the Chilean sites showing a weaker ground layer than the other two sites. The two northern hemisphere sites have weaker turbulence at altitudes above 500m, with 13N showing the weakest 16km turbulence, being responsible for the large isoplanatic angle at this site. The influence of the jetstream and wind speeds close to the ground on the clear sky turbulence strength throughout the atmosphere are discussed...

  3. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere. PMID:26125388

  4. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering

    CERN Document Server

    Zunino, Luciano; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  5. On the influence of neutral turbulence on ambipolar diffusivities deduced from meteor trail expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    Full Text Available By measuring fading times of radar echoes from underdense meteor trails, it is possible to deduce the ambipolar diffusivities of the ions responsible for these radar echoes. It could be anticipated that these diffusivities increase monotonically with height akin to neutral viscosity. In practice, this is not always the case. Here, we investigate the capability of neutral turbulence to affect the meteor trail diffusion rate.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence

  6. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  7. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsiste...

  8. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  9. Application of an acoustic noise removal method to aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Eaton, Frank D.; McCrae, Kim A.

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic noise removal method is used to reject engine acoustical disturbances from aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements. Removal of engine noise from atmospheric temperature measurements allows a larger wave number range to be fit while quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric temperature turbulence. The larger wave number range was found to result in a more statistically certain spectral slope estimate, with up to a 50% reduction in the standard deviation of measured spectral slopes. The noise removal technique was found to break down under conditions of weak atmospheric temperature turbulence where the engine acoustical disturbance can be several orders of magnitude larger than atmospheric temperature turbulence.

  10. Turbulent large-scale structure effects on wake meandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Y.-A.; Masson, C.; Aubrun, S.

    2015-06-01

    This work studies effects of large-scale turbulent structures on wake meandering using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) over an actuator disk. Other potential source of wake meandering such as the instablility mechanisms associated with tip vortices are not treated in this study. A crucial element of the efficient, pragmatic and successful simulations of large-scale turbulent structures in Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is the generation of the stochastic turbulent atmospheric flow. This is an essential capability since one source of wake meandering is these large - larger than the turbine diameter - turbulent structures. The unsteady wind turbine wake in ABL is simulated using a combination of LES and actuator disk approaches. In order to dedicate the large majority of the available computing power in the wake, the ABL ground region of the flow is not part of the computational domain. Instead, mixed Dirichlet/Neumann boundary conditions are applied at all the computational surfaces except at the outlet. Prescribed values for Dirichlet contribution of these boundary conditions are provided by a stochastic turbulent wind generator. This allows to simulate large-scale turbulent structures - larger than the computational domain - leading to an efficient simulation technique of wake meandering. Since the stochastic wind generator includes shear, the turbulence production is included in the analysis without the necessity of resolving the flow near the ground. The classical Smagorinsky sub-grid model is used. The resulting numerical methodology has been implemented in OpenFOAM. Comparisons with experimental measurements in porous-disk wakes have been undertaken, and the agreements are good. While temporal resolution in experimental measurements is high, the spatial resolution is often too low. LES numerical results provide a more complete spatial description of the flow. They tend to demonstrate that inflow low frequency content - or large- scale turbulent structures - is

  11. Laminated wave turbulence: Generic algorithms iii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashova, Elena; Kartashov, Alexey

    2007-07-01

    Model of laminated wave turbulence allows to study statistical and discrete layers of turbulence in the frame of the same model. Statistical layer is described by Zakharov-Kolmogorov energy spectra in the case of irrational enough dispersion function. Discrete layer is covered by some system(s) of Diophantine equations while their form is determined by wave dispersion function. This presents a very special computational challenge to solve Diophantine equations in many variables, usually 6 to 8, in high degrees, say 16, in integers of order 1016 and more. Generic algorithms for solving this problem in the case of irrational dispersion function have been presented in our previous papers (corresponds to many types of water waves). In this paper, we present a new algorithm for the case of rational dispersion functions (atmospheric planetary waves, drift waves, etc.)

  12. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, P T; Leung, Pak Tao; Gibson, Carl H.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified flu...

  13. Chaotic Free-Space Laser Communication over Turbulent Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Rulkov, N. F.; Vorontsov, M. A.; Illing, L.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of errors caused by atmospheric turbulence in a self-synchronizing chaos based communication system that stably transmits information over a $\\sim$5 km free-space laser link is studied experimentally. Binary information is transmitted using a chaotic sequence of short-term pulses as carrier. The information signal slightly shifts the chaotic time position of each pulse depending on the information bit. We report the results of an experimental analysis of the atmospheric turbulenc...

  14. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  15. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  16. Turbulent Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability—which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold—akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies—a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2 +1 )-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  17. Strong Imbalanced Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, A

    2007-01-01

    We consider imbalanced, or cross-helical MHD Alfvenic turbulence where the waves traveling in one direction have higher amplitudes than the opposite waves. This paper is dedicated to so-called strong turbulence, which cannot be treated perturbatively. Our main result is that the anisotropy of the weak waves is stronger than the anisotropy of a strong waves. This seemingly contradicts the conventional interpretation of so-called critical balance (Goldreich, Sridhar 1995). We propose that critical balance, that was originally conceived as a causality argument, has to be amended by what we call a propagation argument. This revised formulation is consistent with the old one in the balanced case, and is able to include the imbalanced case. We also provide phenomenological model of energy cascading and discuss possibility of self-similar solutions in a realistic setup of driven turbulence.

  18. Turbulence and galactic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2004-01-01

    Interstellar turbulence is driven over a wide range of scales by processes including spiral arm instabilities and supernovae, and it affects the rate and morphology of star formation, energy dissipation, and angular momentum transfer in galaxy disks. Star formation is initiated on large scales by gravitational instabilities which control the overall rate through the long dynamical time corresponding to the average ISM density. Stars form at much higher densities than average, however, and at much faster rates locally, so the slow average rate arises because the fraction of the gas mass that forms stars at any one time is low, ~10^{-4}. This low fraction is determined by turbulence compression, and is apparently independent of specific cloud formation processes which all operate at lower densities. Turbulence compression also accounts for the formation of most stars in clusters, along with the cluster mass spectrum, and it gives a hierarchical distribution to the positions of these clusters and to star-forming...

  19. Magnetic turbulence in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a discussion of the disruption process, it is concluded that this process plausibly consists of the onset of a fine grain turbulence. This turbulence must be able to produce the large values of the inductive electric field which are associated with the reorganization of the poloidal flux and the current density on the magnetic surfaces. It is then plausible that the turbulence belongs to a class of 'rippling' modes, that may explain the experimental values for the magnetic perturbations corresponding to a substantial radial ergodicity of the flux lines. The stability of the modes in the presence of such an ergodicity is accordingly considered. It is found that the modes may be unstable even in collisionless regime, the ergodicity playing a role similar to the resistivity to partially remove the M.H.D. constraint

  20. Propagation properties of partially coherent Hermite-Gaussian beams through non-Kolmogorov turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Xue-Mei; L(u) Bai-Da

    2011-01-01

    The propagation properties of partially coherent Hermite-Gaussian beams through non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence are studied. The effects of non-Kolmogorov turbulence and beam nonparaxiality on the average intensity evolution and the beam-width spreading are stressed. It is found that the evolution of the average intensity distribution and the beam-width spreading depends on the generalized exponent factor,namely,on the non-Kolmogorov turbulence strength for the paraxial case. For the non-paraxial case the effect of the turbulence is negligible,while the beamwidth spreading becomes very large. The analytical results are illustrated numerically and interpreted physically.

  1. Weak turbulence of gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Korotkevich, A. O.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2003-01-01

    For the first time weak turbulent theory was demonstrated for the surface gravity waves. Direct numerical simulation of the dynamical equations shows Kolmogorov turbulent spectra as predicted by analytical analysis from kinetic equation.

  2. Protostellar outflow-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, C D

    2007-01-01

    Protostellar outflows crisscross the regions of star cluster formation, stirring turbulence and altering the evolution of the forming cluster. We model the stirring of turbulent motions by protostellar outflows, building on an observation that the scaling law of supersonic turbulence implies a momentum cascade analogous to the energy cascade in Kolmogorov turbulence. We then generalize this model to account for a diversity of outflow strengths, and for outflow collimation, both of which enhance turbulence. For a single value of its coupling coefficient the model is consistent with turbulence simulations by Li & Nakamura and, plausibly, with observations of the NGC 1333 cluster-forming region. Outflow-driven turbulence is strong enough to stall collapse in cluster-forming regions for several crossing times, relieving the mismatch between star formation and turbulent decay rates. The predicted line-width-size scaling implies radial density indices between -1 and -2 for regions supported by outflow-driven tu...

  3. Direct simulation and regularization modeling of turbulent thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, M.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on turbulent thermal convection, which occurs in a wide range of geophysical and engineering situations, such as the atmosphere, the sun, the earth's mantle, indoor climates etc. The first part of the thesis comprises a fundamental study of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

  4. TOURIST BUSINESS IN TURBULENCE

    OpenAIRE

    KLIMOVA T.B.; VISHNEVSKAYA E.V.

    2015-01-01

    Russian tourist business works in an extreme mode, and the basic tone is set by turbulence, risk and uncertainty. The article deals with the factors of turbulence which engulfed the tourism industry with a «whirling flood». The main causes of the impact on the tourist market are: devaluation of the rouble, the bankruptcy of the largest tour operators and Transaero Airlines, the sanctions of the West, the introduction of fingerprinting for Russian tourists, as well as the causes of non-economi...

  5. Artificial ionospheric turbulence (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is an analysis of artificial ionospheric turbulence (AIT) arising near the level at which a powerful wave is reflected with ordinary polarization. AIT is an inhomogeneous structure in the ionosphere with a size on the order of centimeters or tens of kilometers and with characteristic frequencies from a fraction of a hertz (aperiodic inhomogeneity) to several megahertz (plasma waves). The authors are primarily concerned with small-scale artificial ionospheric turbulence (SAIT), i.e., with inhomogeneities that are greatly extended along the geomagnetic field with transverse dimensions that are less than the wavelengths of the perturbing waves - the pumping waves (PW) - in a vacuum

  6. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, H

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo $\\alpha$-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is electrostatic or due to the electron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity except for resistive effects and a small battery effect. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  7. Observing the decay of orbital angular momentum entanglement, through experimentally simulated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Alpha Hamadou; Goyal, Sandeep; McLaren, Melanie; Konrad, Thomas; Forbes, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the evolution of an orbital angular momentum (OAM) entangled bipartite photonic state for the case where one of the photons propagates through Kolmogorov turbulence, using the concurrence as a measure of entanglement. Quantum state tomography was performed to reconstruct the two qubit density matrices for a range of scintillation strengths. Our results give the first direct experimental confirmation of the existing theories for decay of entanglement due to atmospheric turbulence. We also show how the modal scattering increases with increasing scintillation and we discuss the impact of the scale at which entanglement dissipates due to atmospheric turbulence on free-space quantum communication.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent aerosol coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reade, Walter Caswell

    There are numerous systems-including both industrial applications and natural occurring phenomena-in which the collision/coagulation rates of aerosols are of significant interest. Two examples are the production of fine powders (such as titanium dioxide) and the formation of rain drops in the atmosphere. During the last decade, it has become apparent that dense aerosol particles behave much differently in a turbulent fluid than has been previously assumed. Particles with a response time on the order of the small-scale fluid time scale tend to collect in regions of low vorticity. The result is a particle concentration field that can be highly non-uniform. Sundaram and Collins (1997) recently demonstrated the effect that turbulence can have on the particle collision rate of a monodisperse system. The collision rates of finite-inertia particles can be as much as two orders of magnitude greater than particles that precisely follow the fluid streamlines. Sundaram and Collins derived a general collision expression that explicitly accounted for the two phenomena that affect the collision rate-changes in the particle concentration field and changes in the particle relative velocities. The result of Sundaram and Collins has generated further interest in the turbulent-aerosol problem. This thesis shows that, in addition to changing the rate that an aerosol size distribution might form, turbulence has the potential of dramatically changing the shape of the distribution. This result is demonstrated using direct numerical simulation of a turbulent-aerosol system over a wide range of particle parameters, and a moderate range of turbulence levels. Results show that particles with a small (but finite) initial inertia have the greatest potential of forming broad size distributions. The shape of the resulting size distribution is also affected by the initial size of the particles. Observations are explained using the statistics identified by Sundaram and Collins (1997). A major

  9. Generation and characterization of quantum turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kyle J.

    Turbulence is a specific type of fluid flow. We all know what it is but it is difficult to define. Turbulence is the rule, rather than the exception and is ubiquitous in nature. It is prevalent in the interstellar dust clouds reaching between the stars and crucial to the plasma dynamics inside them. It can't be ignored in the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, oceans, or cores. It is ubiquitous, from the observable environment down to the internal structure of the human body and every living organism known and unknown. We are composed of and encompassed in an ever changing mess of fluid motion. Nearly the entire universe is in a fluid state, and the majority of fluids are turbulent. Yet there exists no analytic solution to the equations that govern the chaos. This is incredible when pondered; almost everything that can be experienced is governed by the same rules, independent of size, shape or constituents. However, to describe our surroundings we are confined to brute force calculation and experiments. The theories of fluid dynamics are truly theories of everything, and yet, so many properties are still not understood. Presented in this thesis are: an experimental implementation of an existing linear motor to create the first studies of quantum turbulence created by this means in the low temperature limit; identification of the possible shortfalls of this preliminary motor system; the development of a new, more sophisticated, drive apparatus, and the creation, exploration, and development of new and existing sensors for measuring the properties of quantum turbulence. Each of the above parts in this thesis are different prongs of a multifaceted approach underway at the University of Florida to understand quantum turbulence across its entire temperature range. The work here builds on the previous projects in the group, to develop millikelvin turbulence machinery and techniques, but also goes forward in a new direction to explore the higher temperature regime with

  10. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In wave turbulence, which is made by nonlinear interactions among waves, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, where separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from weak nonlinearity is assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived in wave turbulence without assuming the weak nonlinearity according to Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successful in Navier–Stokes turbulence. The DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence. -- Highlights: ► Direct-Interaction Approximation is applied to wave turbulence. ► The DIA equations describe non-weak wave turbulent statistics. ► They can be applied to spatio-temporal intermittent structures. ► The conventional kinetic equation is recoverable in the weak nonlinear limit.

  11. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tziperman, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  12. The Theories of Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, J; Agostini, L

    1955-01-01

    The theory of turbulence reached its full growth at the end of the 19th century as a result of the work by Boussinesq and Reynolds. It then underwent a long period of stagnation which ended under the impulse given to it by the development of wind tunnels caused by the needs of aviation. Numerous researchers, attempted to put Reynolds' elementary statistical theory into a more precise form. During the war, some isolated scientists - von Weizsacker and Heisenberg in Germany, Kolmogoroff in Russia, Onsager in the U.S.A. - started a program of research. By a system of assumptions which make it possible to approach the structure of turbulence in well-defined limiting conditions quantitatively, they obtained a certain number of laws on the correlations and the spectrum. Since the late reports have improved the mathematical language of turbulence, it was deemed advisable to start with a detailed account of the mathematical methods applicable to turbulence, inspired at first by the work of the French school, above all for the basic principles, then the work of the foreigners, above all for the theory of the spectrum.

  13. VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines) stochastic loads using a 3-D turbulence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homicz, Gregory F.

    The stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence are thought to be a primary cause of premature blade fatigue in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). This paper describes a computer program for the prediction of these stochastic loads, based on a full 3-D simulation of the turbulence field. Computed results using this model are compared with the deterministic (periodic) loads which occur in the absence of turbulence, and with the predictions of an earlier model which employed a 1-D simulation of the turbulence. The results show that not only are instantaneous loads significantly influenced by turbulence, but that load distributions averaged over numerous revolutions are affected as well. A particularly interesting finding is that, for the same mean wind speed, the average output power is altered by turbulence.

  14. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  15. Remarks on turbulent constitutive relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that the concept of turbulent constitutive relations can be used to construct general models for various turbulent correlations. Some of the Generalized Cayley-Hamilton formulas for relating tensor products of higher extension to tensor products of lower extension are introduced. The combination of dimensional analysis and invariant theory can lead to 'turbulent constitutive relations' (or general turbulence models) for, in principle, any turbulent correlations. As examples, the constitutive relations for Reynolds stresses and scalar fluxes are derived. The results are consistent with ones from Renormalization Group (RNG) theory and two-scale Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA) method, but with a more general form.

  16. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechmann, A.

    2006-11-15

    The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - epsilon model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). The k - epsilon model is traditionally used for RANS computations, but is here developed to also enable LES. LES is able to provide detailed descriptions of a wide range of engineering flows at low Reynolds numbers. For atmospheric flows, however, the high Reynolds numbers and the rough surface of the earth provide difficulties normally not compatible with LES. Since these issues are most severe near the surface they are addressed by handling the near surface region with RANS and only use LES above this region. Using this method, the developed turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented where the turbulent wind field from a separate LES simulation can be used as inflow. To avoid numerical dissipation of turbulence special care is paid to the numerical method, e.g. the turbulence model is calibrated with the specific numerical scheme used. This is done by simulating decaying isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. Three atmospheric test cases are investigated in order to validate the behavior of the presented turbulence model. Simulation of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer, illustrates the turbulence model ability to generate and maintain the turbulent structures responsible for boundary layer transport processes. Velocity and turbulence profiles are in good agreement with measurements. Simulation of the flow over the Askervein hill is also

  17. Turbulence and heat exchange under ice

    OpenAIRE

    Sirevaag, Anders

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and salt were measured under sea ice at four different locations around Spitsbergen. In Kongsfjorden on West Spitsbergen additional measurements of heat fluxes in the ice and in the atmosphere were done and compared in an air/sea/ice heat budget. Ocean heat flux in Kongsfjorden is about 13 W/m2 and comparison with the other heat fluxes at the ice/ocean interface shows a good agreement. From the heat budget at the ice/ocean interface, the ice growth during three subseq...

  18. Laboratory Experiments on Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Falcon, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This review paper is devoted to a presentation of recent progress in wave turbulence. I first present the context and state of the art of this field of research both experimentally and theoretically. I then focus on the case of wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid, and I discuss the main results obtained by our group: caracterization of the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes, the first observation of intermittency in wave turbulence, the occurrence of strong fluctuations of injected power in the fluid, the observation of a pure capillary wave turbulence in low gravity environment and the observation of magnetic wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid. Finally, open questions in wave turbulence are discussed.

  19. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  20. An Examination of Aviation Accidents Associated with Turbulence, Wind Shear and Thunderstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2013-01-01

    The focal point of the study reported here was the definition and examination of turbulence, wind shear and thunderstorm in relation to aviation accidents. NASA project management desired this information regarding distinct subgroups of atmospheric hazards, in order to better focus their research portfolio. A seven category expansion of Kaplan's turbulence categories was developed, which included wake turbulence, mountain wave turbulence, clear air turbulence, cloud turbulence, convective turbulence, thunderstorm without mention of turbulence, and low altitude wind shear, microburst or turbulence (with no mention of thunderstorms).More than 800 accidents from flights based in the United States during 1987-2008 were selected from a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database. Accidents were selected for inclusion in this study if turbulence, thunderstorm, wind shear or microburst was considered either a cause or a factor in the accident report, and each accident was assigned to only one hazard category. This report summarizes the differences between the categories in terms of factors such as flight operations category, aircraft engine type, the accident's geographic location and time of year, degree of injury to aircraft occupants, aircraft damage, age and certification of the pilot and the phase of flight at the time of the accident.

  1. 部分空间和部分时间相干衍射高斯-谢尔模型脉冲光束在大气湍流中的光谱移动和光谱开关%Spectral shifts and spectral switches of diffracted spatially and temporally partially coherent Gaussian-Schell model pulsed beams through atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正武; 付文羽

    2011-01-01

    基于非稳光场的相干光理论,研究了部分空间和部分时间相干高斯-谢尔模型脉冲光束在大气湍流中的光谱变化规律.给出了两者在大气湍流中的光谱传输公式.数值计算结果表明,由于光阑衍射效应的影响,光谱沿轴向、径向均出现蓝移或红移,随着相对传输距离z/z0、空间相干参数β和折射率结构常数C2n的增大,脉冲时间相干长度Tc的减小,轴向光谱蓝移量(或红移量)逐渐增大,由明显的起伏逐渐趋于稳定并且沿径向出现了光谱开关.其数目随着截断参数δ的增大,光阑的衍射效应减弱而逐渐增多,光谱跃迁量△逐渐减小;随着脉冲时间相干长度的增大,光谱跃迁量逐渐减小,开关位置逐渐靠近z轴;而随着折射率结构常数的增大,光谱跃迁量逐渐减小,开关位置逐渐远离z轴.随着相对传输距离的增大,大气湍流对光谱的影响逐渐增大而光阑衍射效应逐渐减小,因此,光阑衍射在近场区对光谱影响较大,而大气湍流在远场区对光谱影响较大.%Based on the coherent theory of non-stationary light wave fields, the characteristic of spectral change of diffracted spatially and temporally partially coherent Gaussian-Schell model pulsed beams through atmospheric turbulence was studied and the analytical expression was derived. Analytical results show that as a result of the influence of diffractive aperture, both on-axis spectrum and radial spectrum appear blue-shifted (or red-shifted). Blue-shifted value (or red-shifted value) of on-axis spectrum increases gradually with the increase of the relative distance z/z0, spatial coherence parameter β and refractive index constant, and the decrease of the temporal coherence length To and goes to stabilization from clearly undulation and shows spectral switches on radical direction at last. The numbers of spectral switches increase and the spectral transition height Δ decrease with the increase of truncation

  2. Turbulence within variable-size wind turbine arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wind tunnel experiment was performed to study turbulence processes within a model wind turbine array of 3 by 8 model wind turbines of alternating sizes placed aligned with the mean flow. The model wind farm was placed in a boundary layer developed over both smooth and rough surfaces under neutrally stratified conditions. Turbulence statistics, TKE budget terms, and the spectral structure of the turbulence generated within and above the wind farm reveal relevant information about the processes modulating the turbulent energy transfer from the boundary layer to the turbines. The results of the experiment suggest that heterogeneity in turbine size within a wind farm introduce complex flow interactions not seen in a homogeneous farm, and may have positive effects on turbulent loading on the turbines and turbulent exchange with the atmosphere. In general, large scale motions are heavily dampened behind the first row of turbines but a portion of such structures are generated far inside the wind farm, and the scale of the most energetic eddy motions was relatively consistent at different elevations. Overall, the experiment revealed the possibility that heterogeneity of wind turbine size within wind farms have the potential to change the overall potential to harvest energy from the wind, and alter the economics of a project

  3. Satellite sensing of submerged fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2004-11-01

    Surface brightness anomalies from a submerged municipal wastewater outfall trapped by buoyancy in an area 0.1 km^2 are surprisingly detected from space satellites in areas > 200 km^2. How is this possible? Microstructure measurements near the outfall diffuser reveal enhanced turbulence and temperature dissipation rates above the 50 m trapping depth. Near-vertical radiation of internal waves by fossil and zombie turbulence microstructure patches produce wind ripple smoothing with 30-50 m internal wave patterns in surface Fourier brightness anomalies near the outfall. Detections at 10-14 km distances are at 100-220 m bottom boundary layer (BBL) fossil turbulence scales. Advected outfall fossils form zombie turbulence patches in internal wave patterns as they extract energy, vorticity, turbulence and ambient vertical internal wavelength information as their density gradients are tilted by the waves. As the zombies fossilize, patterned energy radiates near-vertically to produce the detected Fourier anomalies. Zombie turbulence patches beam extracted energy in a preferred direction with a special frequency, like energized metastable molecules in a chemical maser. Thus, kilowatts to produce the submerged field of advected fossil outfall turbulence patches are amplified by beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) into megawatts of turbulence dissipation to affect sea surface brightness on wide surface areas using gigawatts of BBL fossil turbulence wave energy available.

  4. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  5. Mechanics of inhomogeneous turbulence and interfacial layers

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, J.C.R; Eames, I; Westerweel, J.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanics of inhomogeneous turbulence in and adjacent to interfacial layers bounding turbulent and non-turbulent regions are analysed. Different mechanisms are identified according to the straining by the turbulent eddies in relation to the strength of the mean shear adjacent to, or across, the interfacial layer. How the turbulence is initiated and the topology of the region of turbulence are also significant factors. Specifically the cases of a layer of turbulence bounded on one, or two,...

  6. Quantification of statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Matthew; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of turbulent dispersions is of great importance for environmental and industrial applications. This includes developing a greater understanding of particle movement in atmospheric flows, and providing data that can be used to validate CFD models aimed at producing more accurate simulations of dispersed turbulent flows, aiding design of many industrial components. Statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. Experiments were carried out in a two dimensional channel over a Reynolds number range of 10000-30000, using water and 500 micron hydrogel particles. Particles were injected at the channel entrance, and dispersion properties were characterised at different distances downstream from the injection point. Probability density functions were compiled for the velocity components of the hydrogels for differing flow conditions. Higher order PDFs were constructed to investigate the behaviour of particle pairs. Dispersed phase data was also used to investigate the mechanics of collisions between hydrogel particles, allowing for calculation of the co-efficient of restitution. PIV algorithms were used to create velocity maps for the continuous phase for varying dispersed phase fractions. Thanks to support of Chevron grant as part of TMF consortium.

  7. Orbital angular momentum of a laser beam in a turbulent medium: preservation of the average value and variance of fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of the propagation of vortex laser beams in a turbulent atmosphere with recording of the total orbital angular momentum (OAM) and determination of the beam’s statistical characteristics, such as the average over realizations of the turbulent medium and the variance of fluctuations, has been simulated numerically. The dependences of OAM fluctuations on the turbulence intensity and the initial topological charge of the beam have been obtained. Numerical results are compared with the earlier asymptotic estimates. (paper)

  8. Orbital angular momentum of a laser beam in a turbulent medium: preservation of the average value and variance of fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Kolosov, V. V.; Filimonov, G. A.; Pogutsa, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of the propagation of vortex laser beams in a turbulent atmosphere with recording of the total orbital angular momentum (OAM) and determination of the beam’s statistical characteristics, such as the average over realizations of the turbulent medium and the variance of fluctuations, has been simulated numerically. The dependences of OAM fluctuations on the turbulence intensity and the initial topological charge of the beam have been obtained. Numerical results are compared with the earlier asymptotic estimates.

  9. A hierarchy of energy- and flux-budget (EFB) turbulence closure models for stably stratified geophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zilitinkevich, S S; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Esau, I

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we advance physical background of the EFB turbulence closure and present its comprehensive description. It is based on four budget equations for the second moments: turbulent kinetic and potential energies (TKE and TPE) and vertical turbulent fluxes of momentum and buoyancy; a new relaxation equation for the turbulent dissipation time-scale; and advanced concept of the inter-component exchange of TKE. The EFB closure is designed for stratified, rotating geophysical flows from neutral to very stable. In accordance to modern experimental evidence, it grants maintaining turbulence by the velocity shear at any gradient Richardson number Ri, and distinguishes between the two principally different regimes: "strong turbulence" at Ri 1 typical of the free atmosphere or deep ocean, where Pr_T asymptotically linearly increases with increasing Ri that implies strong suppressing of the heat transfer compared to momentum transfer. For use in different applications, the EFB turbulence closure is formulated a...

  10. Turbulence parameter inside and above a tall spruce site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, T.; Staudt, K.; Serafimovich, A.; Foken, T.

    2009-04-01

    In the EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project, different physical, chemical and biological processes in the soil-vegetation-boundary-layer system were investigated. Field experiments were performed at the BayCEER research site Waldstein/Weidenbrunnen, a spruce site located in the Fichtelgebirge Mountains in North-Eastern Bavaria, which are challenging for their heterogeneity and orographically structured terrain. Turbulence structure, advection, flux gradients of meteorological and chemical quantities were observed within the first intensive observation period (IOP 1) in September and October 2007. Observations of turbulence structure were obtained by a vertical profile of sonic anemometers covering all parts of the forest up to the lower part of the roughness sub layer. Field observations are complemented by simulations of ACASA model (Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm). Integral turbulence characteristics, the normalized standard deviation of a turbulent quantity, can be used to describe the structure of turbulence. A comparison between measured and predicted values shows whether turbulence is fully developed or not and is therefore used in quality assessment. For this quality control and as an input for models, when measurements are not available, parameterizations for profiles are needed. Since there is no uniform theory for those parameterizations inside a forest available, different approaches were tested with data collected during the EGER IOP1. In order to parameterize the integral turbulence characteristics of the wind components inside the roughness sub layer a dimensionless height ζ = hc L-1 should be used instead of ζ = z L-1, which is used above short vegetation. Profiles of integral turbulence characteristics from different ecosystems show that the decrease inside the roughness sub layer is similar but that parameterizations of profiles can not be generalized due to different stand structures. Selecting the profiles of the

  11. Oscillating grids turbulence generator for turbulent transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Eidelman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating grids turbulence generator was constructed for studies of two new effects associated with turbulent transport of particles, turbulent thermal diffusion and clustering instability. These effects result in formation of large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of particles. The advantage of this experimental set-up is the feasibility to study turbulent transport in mixtures with controllable composition and unlimited observation time. For flow measurements we used Particle Image Velocimetry with the adaptive multi-pass algorithm to determine a turbulent velocity field and its statistical characteristics. Instantaneous velocity vector maps, flow streamlines and probability density function of velocity field demonstrate properties of turbulence generated in the device.

  12. Area of turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.   The last day of data collection, tired but satisfied after seven intense days of measurements. Around the cryostat, from left to right: Philippe-E. Roche, Éléonore Rusaouen (CNRS),
Olivier Pirotte, Jean-Marc Quetsch (CERN), Nicolas Friedlin (CERN),
Vladislav Benda (CERN). Not in the photo: Laurent Le Mao (CERN), Jean-Marc Debernard (CERN), 
Jean-Paul Lamboy (CERN), Nicolas Guillotin (CERN), Benoit Chabaud (Grenoble Uni), and Gregory Garde (CNRS). CERN has a unique cryogenic facility in hall SM18, consisting of 21 liquid-helium-cooled test stations. While this equipment was, of course, designed for testing parts of CERN's acce...

  13. Turbulent multiphase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  14. Atmospheric Circulation of Brown Dwarfs: Jets, Vortices, and Time Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    A variety of observational evidence demonstrates that brown dwarfs exhibit active atmospheric circulations. In this study we use a shallow-water model to investigate the global atmospheric dynamics in the stratified layer overlying the convective zone on these rapidly rotating objects. We show that the existence and properties of the atmospheric circulation crucially depend on key parameters including the energy injection rate and radiative timescale. Under conditions of strong internal heat flux and weak radiative dissipation, a banded flow pattern comprising east-west jet streams spontaneously emerges from the interaction of atmospheric turbulence with the planetary rotation. In contrast, when the internal heat flux is weak and/or radiative dissipation is strong, turbulence injected into the atmosphere damps before it can self-organize into jets, leading to a flow dominated by isotropic turbulence and vortices instead. Based on the location of the transition, we suggest that many brown dwarfs may exhibit at...

  15. The turbulent ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Nihoul, J.C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The variability of the ocean over a wide range of scales, from the megameter to the millimeter, is examined in the light of turbulence theory.The geophysical constraints which arise from the Earth's rotation and curvature and from the stratification are discussed with emphasis on the role they can play at different scales in inducing instabilities and a transfer of energy to other scales of motion.

  16. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian-Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  17. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    In wave turbulence, which is made by nonlinear interactions among waves, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, where separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from weak nonlinearity is assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived in wave turbulence without assuming the weak nonlinearity according to Direct-Interaction Approximation ...

  18. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma flows with an MHD-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of General Magnetic Reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip-velocity source vector, which gives the rate of development of slip velocity per unit arc length of field line. The slip source vector is the ratio of the curl of the non ideal electric field in the Generalized Ohm's Law and the magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with magnetic null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of the quasi potential (integral of parallel electric field along field lines). In a turbulent inertial range the curl becomes extremely large while the parallel component is tiny, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution of this paradox is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial-range only in a weak sense which does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution i...

  19. Zooplankton intermittency and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, François G.

    2010-05-01

    Planktonic organisms usually live in a turbulent world. Since marine turbulence is characterized by very high Reynolds numbers, it possesses very intermittent fluctuations which in turn affect marine life. We consider here such influence on zooplankton on 2 aspects. First we consider zooplankton motion in the lab. Many copepods display swimming abilities. More and more species have been recently recorded using normal or high speed cameras, and many trajectories have been extracted from these movies and are now available for analysis. These trajectories can be complex, stochastic, with random switching from low velocity to high velocity events and even jumps. These complex trajectories show that an adequate modeling is necessary to understand and characterize them. Here we review the results published in the literature on copepod trajectories. We discuss the random walk, Levy walk modeling and introduce also multifractal random walks. We discuss the way to discriminate between these different walks using experimental data. Stochastic simulations will be performed to illustrate the different families. Second, we consider zooplankton contact rates in the framework of intermittent turbulence. Intermittency may have influence on plankton contact rates. We consider the Particle Stokes number of copepods, in a intermediate dissipation range affected by intermittent fluctuations. We show that they may display preferential concentration effects, and we consider the influence on contact rates of this effect in the intermediate dissipation range.

  20. Wind and Temperature Oscillations Generated by Wave-Turbulence Interactions in the Stably Stratified Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Mahrt, Larry; Nappo, Carmen; Lenschow, Donald

    2015-04-01

    We investigate atmospheric internal gravity waves (IGWs): their generation and induction of global intermittent turbulence in the nocturnal stable atmospheric boundary layer based on the new concept of turbulence generation discussed in Sun et al. (2012). The IGWs are generated by air lifted by convergence forced by the colliding background flow and cold currents near the ground. The buoyancy-forced IGWs enhance wind speed at the wind-speed wave crests such that the bulk shear instability generates large coherent eddies, which augment local turbulent mixing and vertically redistribute momentum and heat. The periodically enhanced turbulent mixing, in turn, modifies the air temperature and flow oscillations of the original IGWs. These turbulence-forced oscillations (TFOs) resemble waves and coherently transport momentum and sensible heat. The observed momentum and sensible heat fluxes at the IGW frequency, which are either due to the buoyancy-forced IGWs themselves or by the TFOs, are larger than turbulent fluxes near the surface. The IGWs enhance not only the bulk shear at the wave crests, but also local shear over the wind speed troughs of the surface IGWs. Temporal and spatial variations of turbulent mixing as a result of this wave-induced turbulent mixing change the mean air flow and the shape of the IGWs.

  1. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  2. Turbulence and fossil turbulence lead to life in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than all the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Fossil turbulence is a perturbation produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid ceases to be turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Because vorticity is produced at small scales, turbulence must cascade from small scales to large, providing a consistent physical basis for Kolmogorovian universal similarity laws. Oceanic and astrophysical mixing and diffusion are dominated by fossil turbulence and fossil turbulent waves. Observations from space telescopes show turbulence and vorticity existed in the beginning of the universe and that their fossils persist. Fossils of big bang turbulence include spin and the dark matter of galaxies: clumps of ∼1012 frozen hydrogen planets that make globular star clusters as seen by infrared and microwave space telescopes. When the planets were hot gas, they hosted the formation of life in a cosmic soup of hot-water oceans as they merged to form the first stars and chemicals. Because spontaneous life formation according to the standard cosmological model is virtually impossible, the existence of life falsifies the standard cosmological model. (paper)

  3. Turbulence characterization and image processing data sets from a NATO RTO SET 165 trial in Dayton, Ohio, USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velluet, M.-T.; Vorontsov, M.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Marchi, G.; Nicolas, S.; Riker, J.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of optical systems is degraded by atmospheric turbulence. Over propagation distances that exceed several kilometers, it is difficult to evaluate its impact because of terrain variability - a factor that should be taken into account. However, to optimize performance, the turbulence ch

  4. Shell Model for Buoyancy-driven Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we construct shell models for convective turbulence, e.g., Rayleigh B\\'{e}nard convection, and stably-stratified turbulence. We simulate these models in the turbulent regime and show that the convective turbulence exhibits Kolmogorov spectrum for the kinetic energy, while the stably-stratified turbulence show Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling.

  5. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit; Prasad Perlekar; Samriddhi Sankar Ray

    2009-07-01

    We present an introductory overview of several challenging problems in the statistical characterization of turbulence. We provide examples from fluid turbulence in three and two dimensions, from the turbulent advection of passive scalars, turbulence in the one-dimensional Burgers equation, and fluid turbulence in the presence of polymer additives.

  6. Orbital angular momentum of laser beam in the turbulent medium: asymptotic estimates and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Kolosov, V. V.; Pogutsa, Ch. E.; Filimonov, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulation and analytical calculations of the variance of fluctuations of the total orbital angular momentum (OAM) of Laguerre—Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams propagating in the randomly inhomogeneous atmosphere have been carried out. It is shown that as such beams propagate in the weakly turbulent atmosphere, the relative variance of OAM fluctuations remains much smaller than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations.

  7. Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garai, A.; Pardyjak, E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous laboratory and atmospheric experiments have shown that turbulence influences the surface temperature in a convective boundary layer. The main objective of this study is to examine land-atmosphere coupled heat transport mechanism for different stability conditions. High frequency infrared im

  8. Tackling turbulent flows in engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Anupam [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Applied Mechanics

    2011-07-01

    The emphasis of this book is on engineering aspects of fluid turbulence. The book explains for example how to tackle turbulence in industrial applications. It is useful to several disciplines, such as, mechanical, civil, chemical, aerospace engineers and also to professors, researchers, beginners, under graduates and post graduates. The following issues are emphasized in the book: - Modeling and computations of engineering flows: The author discusses in detail the quantities of interest for engineering turbulent flows and how to select an appropriate turbulence model; Also, a treatment of the selection of appropriate boundary conditions for the CFD simulations is given. - Modeling of turbulent convective heat transfer: This is encountered in several practical situations. It basically needs discussion on issues of treatment of walls and turbulent heat fluxes. - Modeling of buoyancy driven flows, for example, smoke issuing from chimney, pollutant discharge into water bodies, etc. (orig.)

  9. Transition to turbulence in ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed bifurcation analysis and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A striking finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, the onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence can be greatly facilitated by using ferrofluids, opening up...

  10. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitzman, Jerry [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lieuwen, Timothy [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These

  11. Gravity Waves characteristics and their impact on turbulent transport above an Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Daniela; Giostra, Umberto; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence within the stable boundary layer (SBL) remains a ubiquitous feature of many geophysical flows, especially over glaciers and ice-sheets. Although numerous studies have investigated various aspects of the boundary layer motion during stable atmospheric conditions, a unified picture of turbulent transport within the SBL remains elusive. In a strongly stratified SBL, turbulence generation is frequently associated with interactions with sub-meso scale motions that are often a combination of gravity waves (GWs) and horizontal modes. While some progress has been made in the inclusion of GW parameterisation within global models, description and parameterisation of the turbulence-wave interaction remain an open question. The discrimination between waves and turbulence is a focal point needed to make progress as these two motions have different properties with regards to heat, moisture and pollutant transport. In fact, the occurrence of GWs can cause significant differences and ambiguities in the interpretation of turbulence statistics and fluxes if not a priori filtered from the analysis. In this work, the characteristics of GW and their impact on turbulent statistics were investigated using wind velocity components and scalars collected above an Antarctic Ice sheet during an Austral Summer. Antarctica is an ideal location for exploring the characteristics of GW because of persistent conditions of strongly stable atmospheric stability in the lower troposphere. Periods dominated by wavy motions have been identified by analysing time series measured by fast response instrumentation. The GWs nature and features have been investigated using Fourier cross-spectral indicators. The detected waves were frequently characterised by variable amplitude and period; moreover, they often produced non-stationarity and large intermittency in turbulent fluctuations that can significantly alter the estimation of turbulence statistics in general and fluxes in particular. A multi

  12. Invariants of free turbulent decay

    OpenAIRE

    Llor, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    In practically all turbulent flows, turbulent energy decay is present and competes with numerous other phenomena. In Kolmogorov's theory, decay proceeds by transfer from large energy-containing scales towards small viscous scales through the "inertial cascade." Yet, this description cannot predict an actual decay rate, even in the simplest case of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). As empirically observed over 50 years, the steepness of the "infrared" spectrum - at scales larger than ene...

  13. Galactic turbulence and paleoclimate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet regression detrended fluctuations of the reconstructed temperature for the past three ice ages: approximately 340000 years (Antarctic ice cores isotopic data), exhibit clear evidences of the galactic turbulence modulation up to 2500 years time-scales. The observed strictly Kolmogorov turbulence features indicates the Kolmogorov nature of galactic turbulence, and provide explanation to random-like fluctuations of the global temperature on the millennial time scales.

  14. The turbulent decay of trailing vortex pairs in stably stratified environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Baumann, R.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of trailing vortex pairs in thermally stably stratified environments is investigated by means of large eddy simulations. Results of in-situ measurements in the wakes of different aircraft are used to find appropriate intitializations for the simulation of wake turbulence in the quiescent atmosphere. Furthermore, cases with weak atmospheric turbulence are investigated. It is shown that the early development of the vortices is not affected by turbulence and develops almost identically as in 2D simulations. In a quiescent atmosphere the subsequent vortex decay is controlled by the interaction of short-wave disturbances, owing to the aircraft induced turbulence, and baroclinic vorticity, owing to stable stratification. As a consequence, vertical vorticity streaks between the vortices are induced which are substantially intensified by vortex stretching and finally lead to rapid turbulent wake-vortex decay. When in addition also atmospheric turbulence is present, the long-wave instability is dominantly promoted. For very strong stratification (Fr < 1) it is observed that wake vortices may rebound but lose most of their strength before reaching the flight level. Finally, the simulation results are compared to the predictive capabilities of Greene's approximate model. (orig.)

  15. Front dynamics in turbulent media

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sancho, J M

    1997-01-01

    A study of a stable front propagating in a turbulent medium is presented. The front is generated through a reaction-diffusion equation, and the turbulent medium is statistically modeled using a Langevin equation. Numerical simulations indicate the presence of two different dynamical regimes. These regimes appear when the turbulent flow either wrinkles a still rather sharp propagating interfase or broadens it. Specific dependences of the propagating velocities on stirring intensities appropriate to each case are found and fitted when possible according to theoretically predicted laws. Different turbulent spectra are considered.

  16. Wave turbulence in magnetized plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galtier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent progress on wave turbulence for magnetized plasmas (MHD, Hall MHD and electron MHD in the incompressible and compressible cases. The emphasis is made on homogeneous and anisotropic turbulence which usually provides the best theoretical framework to investigate space and laboratory plasmas. The solar wind and the coronal heating problems are presented as two examples of application of anisotropic wave turbulence. The most important results of wave turbulence are reported and discussed in the context of natural and simulated magnetized plasmas. Important issues and possible spurious interpretations are also discussed.

  17. Hierarchical order in wall-bounded shear turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since turbulence at realistic Reynolds numbers, such as those occurring in the atmosphere or in the ocean, involve a high number of modes that cannot be resolved computationally in the foreseeable future, there is a strong motivation for finding techniques which drastically decrease the number of such required modes, particularly under inhomogeneous conditions. The significance of this work is to show that wall-bounded shear turbulence, in its strongly inhomogeneous direction (normal to the wall), can be decomposed into one (or a few) space endash time mother mode(s), with each mother generating a whole family of modes by stretching symmetry. In other words, the generated modes are similar, dilated copies of their mother. In addition, we show that the nature of all previous modes strongly depends on the symmetry itself. These findings constitute the first scaling theory of inhomogeneous turbulence. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Metallicity dependence of turbulent pressure and macroturbulence in stellar envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Grassitelli, Luca; Langer, Norbert; Simon-Diaz, Sergio; Castro, Norberto; Sanyal, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Macroturbulence, introduced as a fudge to reproduce the width and shape of stellar absorption lines, reflects gas motions in stellar atmospheres. While in cool stars, it is thought to be caused by convection zones immediately beneath the stellar surface, the origin of macroturbulence in hot stars is still under discussion. Recent works established a correlation between the turbulent-to-total pressure ratio inside the envelope of stellar models and the macroturbulent velocities observed in corresponding Galactic stars. To probe this connection further, we evaluated the turbulent pressure that arises in the envelope convective zones of stellar models in the mass range 1-125 Msun based on the mixing-length theory and computed for metallicities of the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud. We find that the turbulent pressure contributions in models with these metallicities located in the hot high-luminosity part of the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram is lower than in similar models with solar metallicity, whereas the ...

  19. Wind tunnel investigation of sound attenuation in turbulent flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Tatiana A; Durgin, William W

    2015-08-01

    Wind tunnel investigation of the sound wave attenuation by grid-generated turbulence is performed. The most influential parameters, such as the propagation distance, intensity of turbulent fluctuations and integral scale of the fluctuations are studied using an ultrasonic technique. The results are compared to the theoretical predictions available on the wave statistics. Theoretical predictions are well confirmed and partly extended. It is demonstrated that the ultrasonic technique provides the possibility of reproducing the main effects of atmospheric turbulence on sound propagation while benefiting from isolating the role of various parameters therefore sets of experimental data can be generated under laboratory conditions to benchmark further extensions of theoretical models and numerical simulations. PMID:25917257

  20. Unraveling the Mysteries of Turbulence Transport in a Wind Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj K. Jha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A true physical understanding of the mysteries involved in the recovery process of the wake momentum deficit, downstream of utility-scale wind turbines in the atmosphere, has not been obtained to date. Field data are not acquired at sufficient spatial and temporal resolutions to dissect some of the mysteries of wake turbulence. It is here that the actuator line method has evolved to become the technology standard in the wind energy community. This work presents the actuator line method embedded into an Open source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM large-eddy simulation solver and applies it to two small wind farms, the first one consisting of an array of two National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 Megawatt (NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in neutral and unstable atmospheric boundary-layer flow and the second one consisting of five NREL 5-MW wind turbines in unstable atmospheric conditions arranged in two staggered arrays of two and three turbines, respectively. Detailed statistics involving power spectral density (PSD of turbine power along with standard deviations reveal the effects of atmospheric turbulence and its space and time scales. High-resolution surface data extracts provide new insight into the complex recovery process of the wake momentum deficit governed by turbulence transport phenomena.

  1. Laser beam propagation through turbulence and adaptive optics for beam delivery improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. In particular, we study the statistical variations of the fractional beam energy hitting inside an optical aperture placed at several kilometer distance. The simulations are performed for different turbulence conditions and engagement ranges, with and without the use of turbulence mitigation. Turbulence mitigation is simulated with phase conjugation. The energy fluctuations are deduced from time sequence realizations. It is shown that turbulence mitigation leads to an increase of the mean energy inside the aperture and decrease of the fluctuations even in strong turbulence conditions and long distance engagement. As an example, the results are applied to a high energy laser countermeasure system, where we determine the probability that a single laser pulse, or one of the pulses in a sequence, will provide a lethal energy inside the target aperture. Again, turbulence mitigation contributes to increase the performance of the system at long-distance and for strong turbulence conditions in terms of kill probability. We also discuss a specific case where turbulence contributes to increase the pulse energy within the target aperture. The present analysis can be used to evaluate the performance of a variety of systems, such as directed countermeasures, laser communication, and laser weapons.

  2. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Papers included address the following topics: (1) Turbulent premixed flame propagation in microgravity; (2) The effect of gravity on turbulent premixed flame propagation - a preliminary cold flow study; and (3) Characteristics of a subgrid model for turbulent premixed combustion.

  3. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  4. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and

  5. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence II: turbulent energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence draws its energy from gravity and ultimately releases it via dissipation. However, the quantitative details of this energy flow have not been assessed for global disk models. In this work we examine the energetics of a well-resolved, three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulation by evaluating statistically-averaged mean-field equations for magnetic, kinetic, and internal energy using simulation data. The results reveal that turbulent magnetic (kinetic) energy is primarily injected by the correlation between Maxwell (Reynolds) stresses and shear in the (almost Keplerian) mean flow, and removed by dissipation. This finding differs from previous work using local (shearing-box) models, which indicated that turbulent kinetic energy was primarily sourced from the magnetic energy reservoir. Lorentz forces provide the bridge between the magnetic and kinetic energy reservoirs, converting ~ 1/5 of the total turbulent magnetic power input into turbulent kinetic ener...

  6. Effects of Turbulent Aberrations on Probability Distribution of Orbital Angular Momentum for Optical Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-Xin; CANG Ji

    2009-01-01

    Effects of atmospheric turbulence tilt, defocus, astigmatism and coma aberrations on the orbital angular mo-mentum measurement probability of photons propagating in weak turbulent regime are modeled with Rytov approximation. By considering the resulting wave as a superposition of angular momentum eigenstates, the or-bital angular momentum measurement probabilities of the transmitted digit axe presented. Our results show that the effect of turbulent tilt aberration on the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of photons is the maximum among these four kinds of aberrations. As the aberration order increases, the effects of turbulence aberrations on the measurement probabilities of orbital angular momentum generally decrease, whereas the effect of turbulence defoens can be ignored. For tilt aberration, as the difference between the measured orbital angular momentum and the original orbital angular momentum increases, the orbital angular momentum measurement probabifity decreases.

  7. Coronal heating in coupled photosphere-chromosphere-coronal systems: turbulence and leakage

    CERN Document Server

    Verdini, Andrea; Velli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Coronal loops act as resonant cavities for low frequency fluctuations that are transmitted from the deeper layers of the solar atmosphere and are amplified in the corona, triggering nonlinear interactions. However trapping is not perfect, some energy leaks down to the chromosphere, thus limiting the turbulence development and the associated heating. We consider the combined effects of turbulence and leakage in determining the energy level and associated heating rate in models of coronal loops which include the chromosphere and transition region. We use a piece-wise constant model for the Alfven speed and a Reduced MHD - Shell model to describe the interplay between turbulent dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the mean field and propagation along the field. Turbulence is sustained by incoming fluctuations which are equivalent, in the line-tied case, to forcing by the photospheric shear flows. While varying the turbulence strength, we compare systematically the average coronal energy level (E) and dissi...

  8. Effects of Turbulent Aberrations on Probability Distribution of Orbital Angular Momentum for Optical Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of atmospheric turbulence tilt, defocus, astigmatism and coma aberrations on the orbital angular momentum measurement probability of photons propagating in weak turbulent regime are modeled with Rytov approximation. By considering the resulting wave as a superposition of angular momentum eigenstates, the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of the transmitted digit are presented. Our results show that the effect of turbulent tilt aberration on the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of photons is the maximum among these four kinds of aberrations. As the aberration order increases, the effects of turbulence aberrations on the measurement probabilities of orbital angular momentum generally decrease, whereas the effect of turbulence defocus can be ignored. For tilt aberration, as the difference between the measured orbital angular momentum and the original orbital angular momentum increases, the orbital angular momentum measurement probability decreases. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  9. Microbubbles and Microparticles are Not Faithful Tracers of Turbulent Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Varghese; Calzavarini, Enrico; Brons, Jon; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    We report on the Lagrangian statistics of acceleration of small (sub-Kolmogorov) bubbles and tracer particles with Stokes number St ≪1 in turbulent flow. At a decreasing Reynolds number, the bubble accelerations show deviations from that of tracer particles; i.e., they deviate from the Heisenberg-Yaglom prediction and show a quicker decorrelation despite their small size and minute St. Using direct numerical simulations, we show that these effects arise due the drift of these particles through the turbulent flow. We theoretically predict this gravity-driven effect for developed isotropic turbulence, with the ratio of Stokes to Froude number or equivalently the particle drift velocity governing the enhancement of acceleration variance and the reductions in correlation time and intermittency. Our predictions are in good agreement with experimental and numerical results. The present findings are relevant to a range of scenarios encompassing tiny bubbles and droplets that drift through the turbulent oceans and the atmosphere. They also question the common usage of microbubbles and microdroplets as tracers in turbulence research.

  10. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  11. Stochastic Subspace Modelling of Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Pedersen, B. J.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    Turbulence of the incoming wind field is of paramount importance to the dynamic response of civil engineering structures. Hence reliable stochastic models of the turbulence should be available from which time series can be generated for dynamic response and structural safety analysis. In the paper...

  12. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  13. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

    2002-01-28

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

  14. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached

  15. MHD turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, that spectral properties of distributed chaos in MHD turbulence with zero mean magnetic field are similar to those of hydrodynamic turbulence. An exception is MHD spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry, when the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ has $\\beta=4/7$.

  16. Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1938-01-01

    Manometer for the Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel was originally called the Refrigeration or 'Ice' tunnel because it was intended to support research on aircraft icing. The tunnel was built of wood, lined with sheet steel, and heavily insulated on the outside. Refrigeration equipment was installed to generate icing conditions inside the test section. The NACA sent out a questionnaire to airline operators, asking them to detail the specific kinds of icing problems they encountered in flight. The replies became the basis for a comprehensive research program begun in 1938 when the tunnel commenced operation. Research quickly focused on the concept of using exhaust heat to prevent ice from forming on the wing's leading edge. This project was led by Lewis Rodert, who later would win the Collier Trophy for his work on deicing. By 1940, aircraft icing research had shifted to the new Ames Research Laboratory, and the Ice tunnel was refitted with screens and honeycomb. Researchers were trying to eliminate all turbulence in the test section. From TN 1283: 'The Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel is a single-return closed-throat tunnel.... The tunnel is constructed of heavy steel plate so that the pressure of the air may be varied from approximately full vacuum to 10 atmospheres absolute, thereby giving a wide range of air densities. Reciprocating compressors with a capacity of 1200 cubic feet of free air per minute provide compressed air. Since the tunnel shell has a volume of about 83,000 cubic feet, a compression rate of approximately one atmosphere per hour is obtained. ... The test section is rectangular in shape, 3 feet wide, 7 1/2 feet high, and 7 1/2 feet long. ... The over-all size of the wind-tunnel shell is about 146 feet long and 58 feet wide with a maximum diameter of 26 feet. The test section and entrance and exit cones are surrounded by a 22-foot diameter section of the shell to provide a space

  17. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A new two-equation, closure-like turbulence model for stably stratified flows is introduced which uses the turbulent kinetic energy (K and the turbulent enstrophy (Ω as primary variables. It accounts for mean shear – and internal wave-driven mixing in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively. The traditional TKE balance is augmented by an explicit energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. A modification of the Ω-equation accounts for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. The latter is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean-flow shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the swift tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  18. Wave Turbulence on Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey; Lukaschuk, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We overview the wave turbulence approach by example of one physical system: gravity waves on the surface of an infinitely deep fluid. In the theoretical part of our review, we derive the nonlinear Hamiltonian equations governing the water-wave system and describe the premises of the weak wave turbulence theory. We outline derivation of the wave-kinetic equation and the equation for the probability density function, and most important solutions to these equations, including the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra corresponding to a direct and an inverse turbulent cascades, as well as solutions for non-Gaussian wave fields corresponding to intermittency. We also discuss strong wave turbulence as well as coherent structures and their interaction with random waves. We describe numerical and laboratory experiments, and field observations of gravity wave turbulence, and compare their results with theoretical predictions.

  19. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  20. Observations and Analysis of Turbulent Wake of Wind Turbine by Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Li, Rongzhong; Wang, Xitao; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Turbulent wake of wind turbine will reduce the power output of wind farm. The access to real turbulent wake of wind turbine blades with different spatial and temporal scales is provided by the pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) which operates by transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. In this paper, the authors discuss the possibility of using lidar measurements to characterize the complicated wind field, specifically wind velocity deficit by the turbine wake.

  1. Turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in geophysics and in laboratory experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Eidelman, A; Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Krein, A.; Rogachevskii, I.; J. Buchholz; G. Grünefeld

    2004-01-01

    International audience We discuss a new phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion associated with turbulent transport of aerosols in the atmosphere and in laboratory experiments. The essence of this phenomenon is the appearance of a nondiffusive mean flux of particles in the direction of the mean heat flux, which results in the formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of aerosols that accumulate in regions of minimum mean temperature of the surrounding fluid. Th...

  2. Simulation of a 5MW wind turbine in an atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents detached eddy simulation (DES) results of a 5MW wind turbine in an unsteady atmospheric boundary layer. The evaluation performed in this article focuses on turbine blade loads as well as on the influence of atmospheric turbulence and tower on blade loads. Therefore, the turbulence transport of the atmospheric boundary layer to the turbine position is analyzed. To determine the influence of atmospheric turbulence on wind turbines the blade load spectrum is evaluated and compared to wind turbine simulation results with uniform inflow. Moreover, the influences of different frequency regimes and the tower on the blade loads are discussed. Finally, the normal force coefficient spectrum is analyzed at three different radial positions and the influence of tower and atmospheric turbulence is shown

  3. Implementation of a long range, distributed-volume, continuously variable turbulence generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiComo, Gregory; Helle, Michael; Peñano, Joe; Ting, Antonio; Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Elle, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    We have constructed a 180-m-long distributed, continuously variable atmospheric turbulence generator to study high-power laser beam propagation. This turbulence generator operates on the principle of free convection from a heated surface placed below the entire propagation path of the beam, similar to the situation in long-distance horizontal propagation for laser communications, power beaming, or directed energy applications. The turbulence produced by this generator has been characterized through constant-temperature anemometry, as well as by the scintillation of a low-power laser beam. PMID:27409209

  4. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area. (paper)

  5. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulopoulos, N; Kerl, J; Sponfeldner, T; Beyrau, F; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P [Mechanical Engineering Department, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vassilicos, J C, E-mail: ns6@ic.ac.uk [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area. (paper)

  6. Experimental orbital angular momentum based quantum key distribution through turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Goyal, Sandeep; Roux, Filippus S; Konrad, Thomas; Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Using an experimental setup that simulates a turbulent atmosphere, we study the secret key rate for quantum key distribution protocols in orbital angular momentum based free space quantum communication. The quantum key distribution protocols under consideration include the Ekert 91 protocol for different choices of mutually unbiased bases and the six-state protocol. We find that the secret key rate of these protocols decay to zero roughly at the same scale where the entanglement of formation decays to zero.

  7. Toy models of ice formation in turbulent overcooled water

    CERN Document Server

    De Santi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A study of ice formation in stationary turbulent conditions is carried out in various limit regimes with regard to crystal growth rate, overcooling and ice entrainment at the water surface. Analytical expressions of the temperature, salinity and ice concentration mean profiles are provided, and the role of fluctuations in ice production is numerically quantified. A lower bound on the ratio of sensible heat flux to latent heat flux to the atmosphere is derived.

  8. Experimental orbital angular momentum based quantum key distribution through turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Sandeep; Ibrahim, Alpha Hamadou; Roux, Filippus S.; Konrad, Thomas; Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Using an experimental setup that simulates a turbulent atmosphere, we study the secret key rate for quantum key distribution protocols in orbital angular momentum based free space quantum communication. The quantum key distribution protocols under consideration include the Ekert 91 protocol for different choices of mutually unbiased bases and the six-state protocol. We find that the secret key rate of these protocols decay to zero roughly at the same scale where the entanglement of formation ...

  9. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  10. Performance of different detrending methods in turbulent flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donateo, Antonio; Cava, Daniela; Contini, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance is the most direct, efficient and reliable method to measure the turbulent flux of a scalar (Baldocchi, 2003). Required conditions for high-quality eddy covariance measurements are amongst others stationarity of the measured data and a fully developed turbulence. The simplest method for obtaining the fluctuating components for covariance calculation according to Reynolds averaging rules under ideal stationary conditions is the so called mean removal method. However steady state conditions rarely exist in the atmosphere, because of the diurnal cycle, changes in meteorological conditions, or sensor drift. All these phenomena produce trends or low-frequency changes superimposed to the turbulent signal. Different methods for trend removal have been proposed in literature; however a general agreement on how separate low frequency perturbations from turbulence has not yet been reached. The most commonly applied methods are the linear detrending (Gash and Culf, 1996) and the high-pass filter, namely the moving average (Moncrieff et al., 2004). Moreover Vickers and Mahrt (2003) proposed a multi resolution decomposition method in order to select an appropriate time scale for mean removal as a function of atmospheric stability conditions. The present work investigates the performance of these different detrending methods in removing the low frequency contribution to the turbulent fluxes calculation, including also a spectral filter by a Fourier decomposition of the time series. The different methods have been applied to the calculation of the turbulent fluxes for different scalars (temperature, ultrafine particles number concentration, carbon dioxide and water vapour concentration). A comparison of the detrending methods will be performed also for different measurement site, namely a urban site, a suburban area, and a remote area in Antarctica. Moreover the performance of the moving average in detrending time series has been analyzed as a function of the

  11. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  12. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  13. Atmospheric stability affects wind turbine power collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power generated by a wind turbine largely depends on the wind speed. During time periods with identical hub-height wind speeds but different shapes to the wind profile, a turbine will produce different amounts of power. This variability may be induced by atmospheric stability, which affects profiles of mean wind speed, direction and turbulence across the rotor disk. Our letter examines turbine power generation data, segregated by atmospheric stability, in order to investigate power performance dependences at a West Coast North American wind farm. The dependence of power on stability is clear, regardless of whether time periods are segregated by three-dimensional turbulence, turbulence intensity or wind shear. The power generated at a given wind speed is higher under stable conditions and lower under strongly convective conditions: average power output differences approach 15%. Wind energy resource assessment and day ahead power forecasting could benefit from increased accuracy if atmospheric stability impacts were measured and appropriately incorporated in power forecasts, e.g., through the generation of power curves based on a range of turbulence regimes. (letter)

  14. Turbulent deflagrations, autoignitions, and detonations

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of turbulent burning velocities in fan-stirred explosion bombs show an initial linear increase with the fan speed and RMS turbulent velocity. The line then bends over to form a plateau of high values around the maximum attainable burning velocity. A further increase in fan speed leads to the eventual complete quenching of the flame due to increasing localised extinctions because of the flame stretch rate. The greater the Markstein number, the more readily does flame quenching occur. Flame propagation along a duct closed at one end, with and without baffles to increase the turbulence, is subjected to a one-dimensional analysis. The flame, initiated at the closed end of the long duct, accelerates by the turbulent feedback mechanism, creating a shock wave ahead of it, until the maximum turbulent burning velocity for the mixture is attained. With the confining walls, the mixture is compressed between the flame and the shock plane up to the point where it might autoignite. This can be followed by a deflagration to detonation transition. The maximum shock intensity occurs with the maximum attainable turbulent burning velocity, and this defines the limit for autoignition of the mixture. For more reactive mixtures, autoignition can occur at turbulent burning velocities that are less than the maximum attainable one. Autoignition can be followed by quasi-detonation or fully developed detonation. The stability of ensuing detonations is discussed, along with the conditions that may lead to their extinction. © 2012 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence: An astronomical perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sridhar

    2011-07-01

    Early work on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the 1960s due, independently, to Iroshnikov and Kraichnan (IK) considered isotropic inertial-range spectra. Whereas laboratory experiments were not in a position to measure the spectral index, they showed that the turbulence was strongly anisotropic. Theoretical horizons correspondingly expanded in the 1980s, to accommodate both the isotropy of the IK theory and the anisotropy suggested by the experiments. Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, many years of work on interstellar scintillation suggested that small-scale interstellar turbulence must have a hydromagnetic origin; but the IK spectrum was too flat and the ideas on anisotropic spectra too qualitative to explain the observations. In response, new theories of balanced MHD turbulence were proposed in the 1990s, which argued that the IK theory was incorrect, and made quantitative predictions of anisotropic inertial-range spectra; these theories have since found applications in many areas of astrophysics. Spacecraft measurements of solar-wind turbulence show that there is more power in Alfvén waves that travel away from the Sun than towards it. Theories of imbalanced MHD turbulence have now been proposed to address interplanetary turbulence. This very active area of research continues to be driven by astronomy.

  16. Turbulence, Spontaneous Stochasticity and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory

    Turbulence is well-recognized as important in the physics of climate. Turbulent mixing plays a crucial role in the global ocean circulation. Turbulence also provides a natural source of variability, which bedevils our ability to predict climate. I shall review here a recently discovered turbulence phenomenon, called ``spontaneous stochasticity'', which makes classical dynamical systems as intrinsically random as quantum mechanics. Turbulent dissipation and mixing of scalars (passive or active) is now understood to require Lagrangian spontaneous stochasticity, which can be expressed by an exact ``fluctuation-dissipation relation'' for scalar turbulence (joint work with Theo Drivas). Path-integral methods such as developed for quantum mechanics become necessary to the description. There can also be Eulerian spontaneous stochasticity of the flow fields themselves, which is intimately related to the work of Kraichnan and Leith on unpredictability of turbulent flows. This leads to problems similar to those encountered in quantum field theory. To quantify uncertainty in forecasts (or hindcasts), we can borrow from quantum field-theory the concept of ``effective actions'', which characterize climate averages by a variational principle and variances by functional derivatives. I discuss some work with Tom Haine (JHU) and Santha Akella (NASA-Goddard) to make this a practical predictive tool. More ambitious application of the effective action is possible using Rayleigh-Ritz schemes.

  17. Mixing in manipulated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczaj, A K; Geurts, Bernard J.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.

    2006-01-01

    A new computational framework for the simulation of turbulent flow through complex objects and along irregular boundaries is presented. This is motivated by the application of metal foams in compact heat-transfer devices, or as catalyst substrates in process-engineering. The flow-consequences of such complicated objects are incorporated by adding explicit multiscale forcing to the Navier-Stokes equations. The forcing represents the simultaneous agitation of a wide spectrum of length-scales when flow passes through the complex object. It is found that a considerable modulation of the traditional energy cascading can be introduced with a specific forcing strategy. In spectral space, forcing yields strongly localized deviations from the common Kolmogorov scaling law, directly associated with the explicitly forced scales. In addition, the accumulated effect of forcing induces a significant non-local alteration of the kinetic energy including the spectrum for the large scales. Consequently, a manipulation of turbu...

  18. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  19. Helically Decomposed Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    A decomposition of the energy and helicity fluxes in a turbulent hydrodynamic flow is proposed. The decomposition is based on the projection of the flow to a helical basis that allows to investigate separately the role of interactions among modes of different helicity. The proposed formalism is then applied in large scale numerical simulations of a non-helical and a helical flow, where the decomposed fluxes are explicitly calculated. It is shown that the total energy flux can be split in to three fluxes that independently remain constant in the inertial range. One of these fluxes that corresponds to the interactions of fields with the same helicity is negative implying the presence of an inverse cascade that is `hidden' inside the forward cascade. Similar to the energy flux the helicity flux is also shown that it can be decomposed to two fluxes that remain constant in the inertial range. Implications of these results as well possible new directions for investigations are discussed.

  20. A study on turbulence modulation via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; MANHART

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the turbulence modulation by particles in a turbulent two-phase channel flow via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants. The fluid turbulence is calculated by a large eddy simulation with a point-force two-way coupling model and particles are tracked by the Lagrangian trajectory method. The channel turbulence follows the two-component turbulence state within the viscous sub-layer region and outside the region the turbulence tends to follow the right curve of the anisotropy-invariant. The channel turbulence, interacting with heavy particles, is modulated to the two-component turbulence limit state near the wall and is separate from the axisymmetric turbulence state in the turbulence anisotropy-invariants map. The fluctuations of streamwise component are transferred to the other two components and hence the anisotropy decreases due to particle modulation. The study has deepened the understanding of the turbulence modulation mechanism in two-phase turbulent flows.

  1. Characteristics of turbulence in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Indian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunilkumar, S. V.; Muhsin, M.; Parameswaran, K.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Ramkumar, Geetha; Rajeev, K.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Sambhu Namboodiri, K. V.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Kishore Kumar, K.; Shankar Das, Siddarth

    2015-10-01

    Characteristics of turbulence in the troposphere and lower stratosphere at Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.9°E) and Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), two tropical stations located in the Indian Peninsula, are studied using GPS-radiosonde observations during the period of December 2010 to March 2014 as part of the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics (TTD) Experiment under the CAWSES-India program. This study relies on the detection of turbulence applying Thorpe analysis to the temperature profile, taking into account the impact of atmospheric moisture and instrumental noise on static stability. In general, the tropospheric turbulence is largely intermittent in space and time. The altitude region very close to the convective tropopause (COT), 10-15 km, is relatively more turbulent than the lower troposphere from 3 to 8 km. Though the occurrence of turbulence decreases significantly above the COT, occasionally a rather thin layer of turbulence (thickness 2 km, are the persisting features that can be observed in the 5-15 km altitude region in multiple observations at both the sites at least during Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) season, prominent multiple thin layers of stratified turbulence in the lower troposphere lasting for a day or less are observed only at Trivandrum in all seasons. In general, the turbulence strength in the 5-15 km altitude region at Gadanki is generally larger than that at Trivandrum. Below 15 km, while the turbulence is mainly governed by the convective instability at Gadanki, wind-shear driven (dynamic) instability also contributes considerably for the generation of turbulence at Trivandrum. While the generation of turbulence above 15 km is dominated by dynamic instability, in the lower stratosphere (LS) it is mainly due to strong wind shears.

  2. Strong Turbulence in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Pécseli, Hans

    1980-01-01

    Experimental investigations of strong turbulence in partially ionized, low-β plasmas are reported. The observed spectra are interpreted by applying Taylor's hypothesis and related to turbulent fluctuations in the ionosphere.......Experimental investigations of strong turbulence in partially ionized, low-β plasmas are reported. The observed spectra are interpreted by applying Taylor's hypothesis and related to turbulent fluctuations in the ionosphere....

  3. Impurity transport in plasma edge turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Naulin, Volker; Priego Wood, Martin; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The turbulent transport of minority species/impurities is investigated in 2D drift-wave turbulence as well as in 3D toroidal drift-Alfven edge turbulence. The full effects of perpendicular and -- in 3D -- parallel advection are kept for the impurity species. Anomalous pinch effects are recovered and explained in terms of Turbulent EquiPartition (TEP)

  4. Clumps in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    , two-dimensional random flow serves as a particularly simple illustration. For this case particles can be trapped for all times in a local vortex (macro-clump). A small test-cloud of particles (micro-clump) chosen arbitrarily in a realization will on the other hand expand on average. A formulation is...... proposed in terms of conditional eddies, in order to discriminate turbulent flows where macro-clumps may be observed. The analysis is illustrated by results from experimental investigations of strongly turbulent, resistive drift-wave fluctuations. The related problem for electrostatic turbulence in...

  5. Potential turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microscopic potential turbulence in tokamak plasmas are investigated by a multi-sample-volume heavy ion beam probe. The wavenumber/frequency spectra S(k,ω) of the plasmas potential fluctuation as well as density fluctuation are obtained for the first time. The instantaneous turbulence-driven particle flux, calculated from potential and density turbulence has oscillations of which amplitude is about 100 times larger than the steady-state outwards flux, showing sporadic behaviours. We also observed large-scale coherent potential oscillations with the frequency around 10-40 kHz. (author)

  6. On Lean Turbulent Combustion Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin LEVENTIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a lean methane-air flame with different chemical reaction mechanisms, for laminar and turbulent combustion, approached as one and bi-dimensional problem. The numerical results obtained with Cantera and Ansys Fluent software are compared with experimental data obtained at CORIA Institute, France. First, for laminar combustion, the burn temperature is very well approximated for all chemical mechanisms, however major differences appear in the evaluation of the flame front thickness. Next, the analysis of turbulence-combustion interaction shows that the numerical predictions are suficiently accurate for small and moderate turbulence intensity.

  7. Wind energy impact of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hölling, Michae; Ivanell, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the results of the seminar ""Wind Energy and the Impact of Turbulence on the Conversion Process"" which was supported from three societies, namely the EUROMech, EAWE and ERCOFATC and took place in Oldenburg, Germany in spring 2012.The seminar was one of the first scientific meetings devoted to the common topic of wind energy and basic turbulence. The established community of researchers working on the challenging puzzle of turbulence for decades met the quite young community of researchers, who face the upcoming challenges in the fast growing field of wind energy application

  8. Fragmentation in turbulent primordial gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O; Klessen, R S; Bromm, V

    2010-01-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of star formation in the early universe that focus on the role of subsonic turbulence, and investigate whether it can induce fragmentation of the gas. We find that dense primordial gas is highly susceptible to fragmentation, even for rms turbulent velocity dispersions as low as 20% of the initial sound speed. The resulting fragments cover over two orders of magnitude in mass, ranging from 0.1 to 40 solar masses. However, our results suggest that the details of the fragmentation depend on the local properties of the turbulent velocity field and hence we expect considerable variations in the resulting stellar mass spectrum in different halos.

  9. Subcritical excitation of plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory of current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in plasmas is developed in the presence of collisional transport. Double-valued amplitude of stationary fluctuations is expressed in terms of the pressure gradient. The backward bifurcation is shown to appear near the linear stability boundary. The subcritical nature of the turbulence is explicitly illustrated. Critical pressure gradient at which the transition from collisional transport to the turbulent one is to occur is predicted. This provides a prototype of the transport theory for nonlinear-non-equilibrium systems. (author)

  10. Bumblebee flight in heavy turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, T; Schneider, K; Lehmann, F -O; Sesterhenn, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of a tethered model bumblebee in forward flight are performed superimposing homogeneous isotropic turbulent fluctuations to the uniform inflow. Despite tremendous variation in turbulence intensity, between 17% and 99% with respect to the mean flow, we do not find significant changes in cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces, moments or flight power when averaged over realizations, compared to laminar inflow conditions. The variance of aerodynamic measures, however, significantly increases with increasing turbulence intensity, which may explain flight instabilities observed in freely flying bees.

  11. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  12. Anisotropic spectra of acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We found universal anizopropic spectra of acoustic turbulence with the linear dispersion law ω(k)=ck within the framework of generalized kinetic equation which takes into account the finite time of three-wave interactions. This anisotropic spectra can assume both scale-invariant and non-scale-invariant form. The implications for the evolution of the acoustic turbulence with nonisotropic pumping are discussed. The main result of the article is that the spectra of acoustic turbulence tend to become more isotropic. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  13. Turbulence evolution in MHD plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, M; Spanier, F

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium has been an active field of research in the last decade. Numerical simulations are the tool of choice in most cases. But while there are a number of simulations on the market some questions have not been answered finally. In this paper we are going to examine the influence of compressible and incompressible driving on the evolution of turbulent spectra in a number of possible interstellar medium scenarios. We conclude that the driving not only has an influence on the ratio of compressible to incompressible component but also on the anisotropy of turbulence.

  14. Fundamentals of premixed turbulent combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatnikov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Lean burning of premixed gases is considered to be a promising combustion technology for future clean and highly efficient gas turbine engines. This book highlights the phenomenology of premixed turbulent flames. The text provides experimental data on the general appearance of premixed turbulent flames, physical mechanisms that could affect flame behavior, and physical and numerical models aimed at predicting the key features of premixed turbulent combustion. The author aims to provide a simple introduction to the field for advanced graduate and postgraduate students. Topics covered include La

  15. Two-dimensional elastic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, S; Boffetta, G; Celani, A; Musacchio, S; 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.055306

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of polymer additives on a two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow at very low Reynolds numbers by direct numerical simulations of the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic model. We find that above the elastic instability threshold the flow develops the elastic turbulence regime recently observed in experiments. We observe that both the turbulent drag and the Lyapunov exponent increase with Weissenberg, indicating the presence of a disordered, turbulent-like mixing flow. The energy spectrum develops a power-law scaling range with an exponent close to the experimental and theoretical expectations.

  16. Axisymmetric Vortex Simulations with Various Turbulence Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Howard Fiedler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CFD code FLUENTTM has been applied to a vortex within an updraft above a frictional lower boundary. The sensitivity of vortex intensity and structure to the choice of turbulent model is explored. A high Reynolds number of 108 is employed to make the investigation relevant to the atmospheric vortex known as a tornado. The simulations are axisymmetric and are integrated forward in time to equilibrium.  In a variety of turbulence models tested, the Reynolds Stress Model allows for the greatest intensification of the vortex, with the azimuthal wind speed near the surface being 2.4 times the speed of the updraft, consistent with the destructive nature of tornadoes.  The Standard k-e Model, which is simpler than the Reynolds Stress Model but still more detailed than what is commonly available in numerical weather prediction models, produces an azimuthal wind speed near the surface of at most 0.6 times the updraft speed.        

  17. Turbulence Modeling Verification and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been in routine use for more than a quarter of a century. It is currently employed not only for basic research in fluid dynamics, but also for the analysis and design processes in many industries worldwide, including aerospace, automotive, power generation, chemical manufacturing, polymer processing, and petroleum exploration. A key feature of RANS CFD is the turbulence model. Because the RANS equations are unclosed, a model is necessary to describe the effects of the turbulence on the mean flow, through the Reynolds stress terms. The turbulence model is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in RANS CFD, and most models are known to be flawed in one way or another. Alternative methods such as direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) rely less on modeling and hence include more physics than RANS. In DNS all turbulent scales are resolved, and in LES the large scales are resolved and the effects of the smallest turbulence scales are modeled. However, both DNS and LES are too expensive for most routine industrial usage on today's computers. Hybrid RANS-LES, which blends RANS near walls with LES away from walls, helps to moderate the cost while still retaining some of the scale-resolving capability of LES, but for some applications it can still be too expensive. Even considering its associated uncertainties, RANS turbulence modeling has proved to be very useful for a wide variety of applications. For example, in the aerospace field, many RANS models are considered to be reliable for computing attached flows. However, existing turbulence models are known to be inaccurate for many flows involving separation. Research has been ongoing for decades in an attempt to improve turbulence models for separated and other nonequilibrium flows. When developing or improving turbulence models, both verification and validation are important

  18. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  19. Atmospheric Turbulence Compensation with Laser Phase Shifting Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rabien, S; Genzel, R; Davies, R I; Ott, T

    2006-01-01

    Laser guide stars with adaptive optics allow astronomical image correction in the absence of a natural guide star. Single guide star systems with a star created in the earth's sodium layer can be used to correct the wavefront in the near infrared spectral regime for 8-m class telescopes. For possible future telescopes of larger sizes, or for correction at shorter wavelengths, the use of a single guide star is ultimately limited by focal anisoplanatism that arises from the finite height of the guide star. To overcome this limitation we propose to overlap coherently pulsed laser beams that are expanded over the full aperture of the telescope, traveling upwards along the same path which light from the astronomical object travels downwards. Imaging the scattered light from the resultant interference pattern with a camera gated to a certain height above the telescope, and using phase shifting interferometry we have found a method to retrieve the local wavefront gradients. By sensing the backscattered light from tw...

  20. Adaptive beaming and imaging in the turbulent atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lukin, Vladimir P

    2002-01-01

    Due to the wide application of adaptive optical systems, an understanding of optical wave propagation in randomly inhomogeneous media has become essential, and several numerical models of individual AOS components and of efficient correction algorithms have been developed. This monograph contains detailed descriptions of the mathematical experiments that were designed and carried out during more than a decade's worth of research.