WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric suspended particles

  1. Assessment of the Atmospheric Suspended Particles Pollution in the Madrid Air Quality Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suspended particles are a very complex type of atmospheric pollution because of their chemical composition and size. In fact, there are a quite high number of particles sources which are linked to different physicochemical processes that determine their size. At present particles smaller than 10 μm are considered the most dangerous, as has been recently pointed out by numerous epidemiologic studies. In this way, more restrictive concentration limit values have been approved in the EU countries, so an assessment of present airborne concentration values and the sources apportionment in their most representative areas is needed. In the Madrid Community a first approaching of these and other aims, has been carried out from an analysis of the Madrid Air Quality networks data. This will contribute to the establishment of concentration levels abatement strategies. (Author) 111 refs

  2. Health Impacts Estimation of Mineralogical and Chemical Characterization of Suspended Atmospheric Particles over the East Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. A. Rahoma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The small size fraction of aerosols, measured as PM10 and PM2.5, rather than the larger particles, is considered to be responsible for most of the health effects. Such particles have a relatively long residence time in the atmosphere and can therefore travel over long distances. Hence, a large portion of ambient concentrations of PM10 and in particular of particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5, can be attributed to long range trans boundary air pollution or to other remote sources. The estimates of exposure and of health effects are based on a number of uncertain assumptions and data sets, as described in previous article. Approach: In industrialized Middle East countries, the daily deposition of PM10 particles in the lungs is roughly 250 µg day-1, which represents a small dose in terms of traditional toxicology studies. Studies of PM10 have considered this total material but have not asked how much its chemical or physical characteristics contribute to its total toxicity. Results: This article focuses on the description of the present knowledge on PM10 concentration fields and predominant sources contributing to PM10 from long range transport of pollution. PM10 is a complex mixture of many known and unknown components; therefore, a short introduction on the composition of PM10 is given. The studies denote to the African dust from mean PM10 levels background levels are still 5-10 mg m3 higher in the Eastern Basin (EMB when compared with those in the Western (WMB, mainly due to the higher anthropogenic and sea spray loads. Conclusion: As regards for the seasonal trends, these are largely driven by the occurrence of African dust events, resulting in a spring-early summer maximum over the EMB and a clear summer maximum in the WMB, although in this later region the recirculation of aged air masses play an important role. Furthermore, a marked seasonal trend is still evident when subtracting the African

  3. Suspended particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study are to determine the factors influencing the extent of Pu deposition from airborne effluents onto foliage, the potential for the resuspension of Pu from the leaf surface and the extent of Pu uptake and translocation by the plant. Using a low-wind-speed aerosol plant-exposure chamber, polydispersed aerosols were generated, particles characterized with respect to AMAD and GSD, and parameters such as deposition rate and deposition velocity evaluated for the plant canopy. The fate of surface deposited Pu compounds with respect to chemical modification and leachability was evaluated by leaching with synthetic ''rainwater'' and 0.1 percent HNO3 solutions

  4. Particles matter: Transformation of suspended particles in constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Mulling, B.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that constructed wetlands transform suspended particles in (treated) municipal wastewater through selective precipitation in ponds, biological filtering by plankton communities and physical and biological retention in reed beds. These processes effectively remove faecal indicator bacteria and viruses, while in situ production generates suspended particles including bacterial consortia that closely resemble that of natural shallow water systems. This transformation is driven ...

  5. Characterization of suspended particles in Everglades wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Saiers, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    We report the concentration, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) content, and size and chemical fractionation of fine suspended particles (0.2-100 ??m) and colloids (3 kilodalton [kDa]-0.1 ??m) in the surface water of Everglades wetlands along regional and P-enrichment gradients. Total suspended sediment concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 2.7 mg L-1. Total particulate P concentrations increased from 0.05 ??mol L-1 to 0.31 ??mol L -1 along the P-enrichment gradient. Particles contained from 20% to 43% of total P but particles identified acid-hydrolyzable P as the most abundant species of particulate P, with little reactive or refractory organic P. Sequential chemical extraction revealed that about 65% of total particulate P was microbial, while about 25% was associated with humic and fulvic organic matter. The size and chemical fractionation information suggested that P-rich particles mostly consisted of suspended bacteria. Suspended particles in Everglades wetlands were small in size and had low concentrations, yet they stored a large proportion of surface-water P in intermediately reactive forms, but they held little N. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  6. Nucleation of atmospheric particles

    OpenAIRE

    Curtius J

    2009-01-01

    Two types of particles exist in the atmosphere, primary and secondary particles. While primary particles such as soot, mineral dust, sea salt particles or pollen are introduced directly as particles into the atmosphere, secondary particles are formed in the atmosphere by condensation of gases. The formation of such new aerosol particles takes place frequently and at a broad variety of atmospheric conditions and geographic locations. A considerable fraction of the atmospheric particles is form...

  7. Particles matter: Transformation of suspended particles in constructed wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.T.M. Mulling

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that constructed wetlands transform suspended particles in (treated) municipal wastewater through selective precipitation in ponds, biological filtering by plankton communities and physical and biological retention in reed beds. These processes effectively remove faecal indicator b

  8. Assessment of the Atmospheric Suspended Particles Pollution in the Madrid Air Quality Networks; Evaluacion de la Contaminacion Atmosferica producida por Particulas en Suspension en las Redes de Calidad del Aire de la Comunidad de Madrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, P.; Artinano, B.

    2000-07-01

    Suspended particles are a very complex type of atmospheric pollution because of their chemical composition and size. In fact, there are a quite high number of particles sources which are linked to different physico-chemical processes that determine their size. At present particles smaller than 10 {mu}m are considered the most dangerous, as has been recently pointed out by numerous epidemiologic studies. In this way, more restrictive concentration limit values have been approved in the EU countries, so an assessment of present airborne concentration values and the sources apportionment in their most representative areas is needed. In the Madrid Community a first approaching of these and other aims, has been carried out from an analysis of the Madrid Air Quality networks data. This will contribute to the stablishment of concentration levels abatement strategies. (Author) 111 refs.

  9. Environmental atmosphere suspended particulate matter analysis using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the environmental indicators of the atmosphere environment is suspended particulate matter (SPM). Recently, the concentration of particulate matter under 2.5 micro-meters (PM2.5) among SPM is regarded as important, and an environmental standard has been established for PM2.5 concentration. S.H.I. Examination and Inspection (SEI), Ltd. analyzes the components of PM2.5 by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) using a Van de Graaff accelerator. SEI's PIXE analysis system quantifies the components by an external standard method. As a method for validating the reliability, the certified values of standard matter SRM2783 were compared with SEI's analysis values, and it was confirmed that the uncertainty of the analysis values of PM2.5 with this analysis system was within 10%. (author)

  10. System for concentrating and analyzing particles suspended in a fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Bethesda, MD); Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Singh, Anup K. (Danville, CA)

    2011-04-26

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  11. IUTAM symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.H. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodynamic diffusion refers to the fluctuating motion of nonBrownian particles (or droplets or bubbles) which occurs in a dispersion due to multiparticle interactions. For example, in a concentrated sheared suspension, particles do not move along streamlines but instead exhibit fluctuating motions as they tumble around each other. This leads to a net migration of particles down gradients in particle concentration and in shear rate, due to the higher frequency of encounters of a test particle with other particles on the side of the test particle which has higher concentration or shear rate. As another example, suspended particles subject to sedimentation, centrifugation, or fluidization, do not generally move relative to the fluid with a constant velocity, but instead experience diffusion-like fluctuations in velocity due to interactions with neighboring particles and the resulting variation in the microstructure or configuration of the suspended particles. In flowing granular materials, the particles interact through direct collisions or contacts (rather than through the surrounding fluid); these collisions also cause the particles to undergo fluctuating motions characteristic of diffusion processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Suspended Particles: Their Role in Estuarine Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A.; Millward, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Suspended particles are instrumental in controlling the reactivity, transport and biological impacts of substances in aquatic environments, and provide a crucial link for chemical constituents between the water column, bed sediment and food chain. This article reviews the role of suspended particles in the chemical and biological cycling of trace constituents (trace metals, organo-metallic compounds and hydrophobic organic micropollutants; HOMs) in estuaries, with particular emphasis on the effects of and changes to particle reactivity and composition. The partitioning (or distribution coefficient, KD ) and bioavailability of chemical constituents, and assimilation efficiency (AE) of such by bivalve suspension feeders, are identified as key parameters requiring definition for accurate biogeochemical modelling, and the discussion centres around the determination of and controls on these parameters. Particle-water interactions encompass a variety of physical, biological, electrostatic and hydrophobic effects, and are largely dependent on the character and concentration of suspended particles and salinity. The salinity-dependence results from the competing and complexing effects of seawater ions for trace metals, and the compression of water in the presence of dissolved seawater ions and consequent salting out of neutral solute (HOMs, organo-metallic compounds and some trace metal complexes). The extent of biological solubilization of chemical constituents from suspended particles is dependent on the nature of chemical components of the gastro-intestinal environment and their interactions with ingested particles, and the physiological (e.g. gut passage time) and chemical (e.g. redox conditions and pH) constraints imposed on these interactions. Generally, chemicals that associate with fine, organic-rich particles (or, for some HOMs, fine inorganic particles), and desorb at pH 5-6 and/or complex with digestive enzymes or surfactants are most readily solubilized in the

  13. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  14. Deterministic separation of suspended particles in a reconfigurable obstacle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2015-11-01

    We use a macromodel of a flow-driven deterministic lateral displacement microfluidic system to investigate conditions leading to size-separation of suspended particles. This model system can be easily reconfigured to establish an arbitrary forcing angle, i.e. the orientation between the average flow field and the square array of cylindrical posts that constitutes the stationary phase. We also consider posts of different diameters, while maintaining a constant gap between them, to investigate the effect of obstacle size on particle separation. In all cases, we observe the presence of a locked mode at small forcing angles, in which particles move along a principal direction in the lattice. A locked-to-zigzag mode transition takes place when the orientation of the driving force reaches a critical angle. We show that the transition occurs at increasing angles for larger particles, thus enabling particle separation. Moreover, we observe a linear regression between the critical angle and the size of the particles, which allows us to estimate size-resolution in these systems. The presence of such a linear relation would guide the selection of the forcing angle in microfluidic systems, in which the direction of the flow field with respect to the array of obstacles is fixed. Finally, we present a simple model based on the presence of irreversible interactions between the suspended particles and the obstacles, which describes the observed dependence of the migration angle on the orientation of the average flow.

  15. Method for relating suspended-chemical concentrations to suspended-sediment particle-size classes in storm-water runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed to relate suspended-chemical concentrations (associated with suspended sediments) in storm-water runoff to suspended-sediment particle-size classes. These classes are based on settling velocities in quiescent native water. This method requires processing 20 liters of water having a suspended-sediment concentration greater than 500 milligrams per liter. However, samples with suspended-sediment concentrations as low as 250 milligrams per liter may be analyzed, if sample volumes are increased to 50 liters. The time required for one person to separate suspended sediments into particle-size classes ranges from 6 to 14 hours. This report outlines procedures for processing metal, nutrient, and organic samples.

  16. Structure formation by nanosilica particles suspended in levitated droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    Vaporization of liquid droplets containing particles has been studied extensively for its applications in combustion, thermal coating, ink-jet printing, spray cooling, drug delivery, and surface patterning. Droplets containing solid particles show a preferential solute-migration during drying process. Recently we carried out experiments with vaporizing droplet suspended in an acoustic levitator. In this work, we present detailed study of a laser irradiated droplet containing nanosilica particles. Infrared and High speed imaging of the heating process for different concentrations of nanosilica revealed an interesting solute migration pattern. Further investigation with Particle Image Velocimetry shows presence of strong recirculation within the levitated droplet. It also reveals that with increasing viscosity of the liquid the strength of this recirculation decreases. Due to the droplets rotation about the levitator axis, a centrifugal force also dominated the flow field within the droplet. High speed imaging ...

  17. Electrooptical behaviour and control of a suspended particle device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergaz, R.; Pena, J. M. S.; Barrios, D.; Pérez, I.; Torres, J. C.

    2007-09-01

    A suspended particle device is made by electrophoretic rod-shape particles suspended in an organic gel. These particles can twist and order with an applied voltage. The light crossing the material suffers more or less scattering according to that voltage. A commercial device is analyzed in this work. Several electrical models are tested, being the best one a series configuration including a shunt double layer capacitance and a Warburg element. Main parameter errors are below 2%, showing the quality of this new electrical model for this kind of devices. A quick method to improve the manufacturing process on-line is also proposed. Impedance measurements will be fitted to the selected electrical model, in order to check physical aspects such as charge diffusion lengths and response times. An electronic driver to obtain several levels of device transmission has been also developed, being its linearity demonstrated too. Colour changes are negligible for the main part of the bleaching process. All these features allow the use of this set in domotics application.

  18. Rheology of cubic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwalina, Colin D; Harrison, Kelsey J; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-05-18

    Many real-world industrial processes involve non-spherical particles suspended in a fluid medium. Knowledge of the flow behavior of these suspensions is essential for optimizing their transport properties and designing processing equipment. In the present work, we explore and report on the rheology of concentrated suspensions of cubic-shaped colloidal particles under steady and dynamic shear flow. These suspensions exhibit a rich non-Newtonian rheology that includes shear thickening and normal stress differences at high shear stresses. Scalings are proposed to connect the material properties of these suspensions of cubic particle to those measured for suspensions of spherical particles. Negative first normal stress differences indicate that lubrication hydrodynamic forces dominate the stress in the shear-thickened state. Accounting for the increased lubrication hydrodynamic interactions between the flat surfaces of the cubic particles allows for a quantitative comparison of the deviatoric stress in the shear-thickened state to that of spherical particles. New semi-empirical models for the viscosity and normal stress difference coefficients are presented for the shear-thickened state. The results of this study indicate that cubic particles offer new and unique opportunities to formulate colloidal dispersions for field-responsive materials. PMID:27112791

  19. Stochastic particle based models for suspended particle movement in surface flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina W.TSAI; Chuanjian MAN; Jungsun OH

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of suspended sediment particle movement in surface water can be achieved by stochastic particle tracking model approaches. In this paper, different mathematical forms of particle tracking models are introduced to describe particle movement under various flow conditions, i.e., the stochastic diffusion process, stochastic jump process, and stochastic jump diffusion process. While the stochastic diffusion process can be used to represent the stochastic movement of suspended particles in turbulent flows, the stochastic jump and the stochastic jump diffusion processes can be used to describe suspended particle movement in the occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows. An extreme flow herein is defined as a hydrologic flow event or a hydrodynamic flow phenomenon with a low probability of occurrence and a high impact on its ambient flow environment. In this paper, the suspended sediment particle is assumed to immediately follow the extreme flows in the jump process (i.e. the time lag between the flow particle and the sediment particle in extreme flows is considered negligible). In the proposed particle tracking models, a random term mainly caused by fluid eddy motions is modeled as a Wiener process, while the random occurrences of a sequence of extreme flows can be modeled as a Poisson process. The frequency of occurrence of the extreme flows in the proposed particle tracking model can be explicitly accounted for by the Poisson process when evaluating particle movement. The ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be obtained from the proposed stochastic models via simulations. The ensemble mean and variance of particle velocity are verified with available data. Applicability of the proposed stochastic particle tracking models for sediment transport modeling is also discussed.

  20. Interactions of radionuclides with sediments and suspended particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reviews fundamental principles of the rates and extents of radionuclide uptake by sedimentary and suspended particles, defines sediment-water partition coefficients, and shows how they can explain first order features of radionuclide partitioning in aquatic environments. It then explains how sediment accumulation and mixing rates can be calculated from profiles of radionuclide activity measured in sediment cores. Such rates can be combined with profiles of other chemicals to establish the extent of temporal changes in chemical composition of the overlying water body. Since sediment processing and counting in the laboratory take much longer than the time required to collect the sample, suggestions are made to ensure that the sediment samples are not ruined or comprised during collection and handling in the field, and so are worth all the subsequent time and effort to analyze. (author)

  1. Physical and biological changes of suspended particles in a free surface flow constructed wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.T.M. Mulling; R.M. van den Boomen; T.H.L. Claassen; H.G. van der Geest; J.W.N.M. Kappelhof; W. Admiraal

    2013-01-01

    Suspended particles are considered as contaminants in treated wastewater and can have profound effects on the biological, physical and chemical properties of receiving aquatic ecosystems, depending on the concentration, type and nature of the suspended particles. Constructed wetlands are known to su

  2. Chemical composition shape form and size of suspended solids in the atmosphere carried by rain water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest of this work is to know about shape form, size and chemical composition of the suspended solids in the atmosphere of Toluca city and which are carried by the rains. The harvest of the samples was carried out during january to november 1999. The separation of the particulate matter from the rain water was realized through centrifugation. The solids were analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy to know the shape form and size and the chemical composition was determined by X-ray dispersive energy in general form and of some particles individually analysed. The p H was measured to the solutions and the quantification of some dissolved ions by the Icp technique was realized. The results of the solids showed C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, P, K, Ca, Ti and Fe. Moreover they present sizes which varying from a ten of nanometers until some tens of microns. (Author)

  3. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  4. Dynamics of Single Chains of Suspended Ferrofluid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillas, S.; Liu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of isolated chains made of super-paramagnetic particles under the influence of a magnetic field. The motivation of this work is to understand if the chain fluctuations exist and, if it does, how does the fluctuation affect chain aggregation. We find that single chains strongly fluctuate and that the characteristic frequency of their fluctuations is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. The higher the field the lower the characteristic frequency of the chain fluctuations. In the high magnetic field limit, chains behave like rigid rods without any internal motions. In this work, we used ferrofluid particles suspended in water. These particles do not have any intrinsic magnetization. Once a magnetic field is applied, a dipole moment is induced in each particle, proportional to the magnetic field. A dipolar magnetic interaction then occurs between particles. If dipole-dipole magnetic energy is higher than the thermal energy, the result is a structure change inside the dipolar fluid. The ratio of these two energies is expressed by a coupling constant lambda as: lambda = (pi(a(exp 3))(chi(exp 2))(mu(sub 0))(H(sub 0))(exp 2))/18kT Where a is the particle radius, mu(sub 0) is the vacuum magnetic permeability, H(sub 0) the applied magnetic field, k the Boltzmann constant and T the absolute temperature. If lambda > 1, magnetic particles form chains along the field direction. The lateral coalescence of several chains may form bigger aggregates especially if the particle volume fraction is high. While many studies and applications deal with the rheological properties and the structural changes of these dipolar fluids, this work focuses on the understanding of the chain dynamics. In order to probe the chain dynamics, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) in self-beating mode as our experimental technique. The experimental geometry is such that the scattering plane is perpendicular to the magnetic field

  5. Chemical characterization of atmospheric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the characterisation of complex environmental materials such as atmospheric particulate matter, analytical specificity is required to account for the many dimensions of information present in the sample. These dimensions include size, morphology, elemental composition, inorganic and organic chemical speciation, all to be performed on either single particles or on the population (or bulk sample) basis. Various techniques were developed for such measurements, including a number of bulk analysis procedures, methodologies for microscopical analysis of individual particles, and a variety of procedures for organic/inorganic chemical speciation. (author)

  6. Monosaccharide composition of suspended particles from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Sankaran, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    Neutral carbohydrates were determined as alditol acetates by capillary gas chromatography in the hydrolysates of suspended particulate samples (40) collected from 8 depths (approx 1 to 1,000 m) at 5 stations of the Bay of Bengal. Eight individual...

  7. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  8. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'. PMID:26323505

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 50 - Reference Method for the Determination of Suspended Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere (High...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference Method for the Determination of Suspended Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere (High-Volume Method) B Appendix B to Part 50... Determination of Suspended Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere (High-Volume Method) 1.0 Applicability. 1.1...

  10. An experimental and theoretical study of the seepage migration of suspended particles with different sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing; Xu, Tao; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-08-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effect of particle size, particle concentration and flow velocity on the migration of suspended particles of size 1.02-47 μm in porous media. The results show that at the same flow velocity, the peak values of the breakthrough curves decrease and corresponding pore volumes increase slightly with increasing particles size. The migration velocity of smaller suspended particles is even greater than water flow velocity, which is attributed to the size exclusion effect. With increase of the injected particle concentration, the deposition coefficients of small single particles increase at first and then tend to a steady state or even decrease slightly, explained by the maximum retention concentration. The dispersivity of small particles decreases with increasing velocity. However, at a high flow velocity, the hydrodynamic dispersivity becomes increasingly dominant with the increase of particle size. The deposition coefficients for large-sized particles are higher than those for small-sized particles, which is attributed to considerable mass removal due to straining. An analytical solution, considering the release effect of sorbed particles, is developed to account for the one-dimensional flow and dispersive effect using a source function method, and then three transport parameters—dispersivity, deposition coefficient and release coefficient—are fitted using the experimental results. Finally, suspended-particle migration is predicted by the proposed model for short-time constant-concentration injection and repeated three-pulse injection. Overall, particle size has a significant effect on the seepage migration parameters of suspended particles in porous media such as the particle velocity, dispersivity and deposition coefficient.

  11. Apparatus and method for concentrating and filtering particles suspended in a fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Bethesda, MD); Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Singh, Anup K. (Danville, CA)

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  12. Suspended particle capture by synthetic vegetation in a laboratory flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauria, Kristen E.; Kerwin, Rachel E.; Nover, Daniel; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands trap particles, a process that is important for water quality and wetland function and morphology. The rates of particle removal by vegetation remain poorly characterized, especially for small particles and vegetation coated with biofilm. In this study, we measured capture rates of road dust by arrays of grass-like synthetic vegetation in a laboratory flume. We performed 40 experiments in which stem density, flow velocity, the presence of biofilm, and initial particle concentration varied, and used an in situ particle size analyzer to measure the concentration of a continuous particle size distribution (1.25-250 µm diameter). We fit first-order decay models to the particle concentration measurements to determine particle capture rates and found that capture rates increased with particle size, stem density, and the presence of biofilm. Capture rates decreased with increasing flow velocity, which suggests that fast flows may resuspend particles from stems. We also calculated percent particle capture efficiencies and fit a new empirical model for capture efficiency to our results. We found that particle capture efficiency was highest for low stem density treatments and propose that stem density affects capture by altering turbulent kinetic energy.

  13. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Anderson, Patrick D.

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem.

  14. Total suspended particles (TSP) and breathable particles (PM10) in Aburra Valley, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Aburra's valley, nor-western region of Colombia, inhabited by 3 million people, crossed by 400,000 vehicles; with the presence of establishments of industrial sectors: textile, foods and metal-mechanical; The concentrations of total suspended particles (PST) and breathable particles (PM10) were evaluated, during the period: December of 2000 to June of 2001. The determinations of PST and PM10 were performed in ten stations, distributed of north to the south, covering urban and rural zones with the municipalities of: Girardota, Bello, Medellin, Itagui, Sabaneta and Caldas. When analyzing relation PM10/PST, was that the best statistical correlations are located in the zones center and the south of the valley. In addition the increasing tendency in relation PM10/PST was observed, from 0.527 for the rural station Girardota (North), to 0.813 in the urban station Caldas (South). This gradient in relation PM10/PST apparently this related to the wind regime that predominates in the Valley of Aburra with direction the north-south, which causes that the fine particles migrate of north to the south, increasing relation PM10/PST in the same direction

  15. Study on Optical Properties of Unpigmented Suspended Particles, Yellow Substance and Phytoplankton Algae in Taihu Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞宏; 蔡启铭; 吴敬禄

    2004-01-01

    The optical properties of a waterbody are subjects of research on limnological hydrooptics. The optical properties of, and parameterization methods for, three impurities in Taihu Lake, namely unpigmented suspensions, yellow substance and phytoplankton algae, are analyzed in detail in this paper dealing with the optical types of Taihu Lake waters both in winter and in summer. The results showed that: 1) The optical parameters of suspended particles can be calculated by the application of Mie Theory; 2) The absorption of yellow substance decreases exponentially with increasing wavelength, with the mean value of decreasing rate being about 0.014 nm-1; 3) Taihu Lake waters appeared to be of type PY in winter, with suspended particles and yellow substance being the dominant light absorbers, and type CPY in summer, with suspended particles, yellow substance and phytoplankton algae being the dominant light absorbers; 4) In winter or summer, unpigmented suspension has the main effect on the scattering property of Taihu Lake waters.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Evaporation Induced Self-Assembly of Sub-Micron Particles Suspended in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Tayeb, Raihan; Mao, Yijin; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of sub-micron particles suspended in a water film is investigated numerically. The liquid medium is allowed to evaporate leaving only the sub-micron particles. A coupled CFD-DEM approach is used for the simulation of fluid-particle interaction. Momentum exchange and heat transfer between particles and fluid and among particles are considered. A history dependent contact model is used to compute the contact force among sub-micron particles. Simulation is done using the open sourc...

  17. Energetic particle influences in Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Rycroft, Michael; Briggs, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    Energetic particles from outer space, known as galactic cosmic rays, constantly ionise the entire atmosphere. During strong solar storms, solar energetic particles can also reach the troposphere and enhance ionisation. Atmospheric ionisation generates cluster ions. These facilitate current flow in the global electric circuit, which arises from charge separation in thunderstorms driven by meteorological processes. Energetic particles, whether solar or galactic in origin, may influence the troposphere and stratosphere through a range of different mechanisms, each probably contributing a small amount. Some of the suggested processes potentially acting over a wide spatial area in the troposphere include enhanced scavenging of charged aerosol particles, modification of droplet or droplet-droplet behavior by charging, and the direct absorption of infra-red radiation by the bending and stretching of hydrogen bonds inside atmospheric cluster-ions. As well as reviewing the proposed mechanisms by which energetic particles modulate atmospheric properties, we will also discuss new instrumentation for measurement of energetic particles in the atmosphere.

  18. Changing shapes and implied viscosities of suspended submicron particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    area. Numerical modeling was used to estimate the particle viscosity associated with this flow. Based on particle diameter and RH exposure time, the viscosity dropped from 10(8.7±2.0 to 10(7.0±2.0 Pa s (2σ for an increase in RH from < 5 to 58% at 293 K, corresponding to a solid to semisolid transition for the organic material. These results imply that the equilibration of the chemical composition of the particle phase with the gas phase can shift from hours at mid-range RH to weeks for low RH.

  19. Laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles as a source of excitation of dye luminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Zelensky, S

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of pulsed YAG-Nd sup 3 sup + laser radiation with submicron light-absorbing particles suspended in an aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G is investigated experimentally. The experiments demonstrate that the laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles excites the luminescence of the dissolved dye molecules. The mechanism of the luminescence excitation consists in the reabsorption of the thermal radiation within the volume of the sample cell. On the ground of this mechanism of excitation, a method of measurement of the luminescence quantum yield is proposed and realized. The method requires the knowledge of the geometrical parameters of the cell and does not require the use of reference samples.

  20. Dry deposition velocity of total suspended particles and meteorological influence in four locations in Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leifu Chen; Shaolin Peng; Jingang Liu; Qianqian Hou

    2012-01-01

    Dry deposition velocity of total suspended particles (TSP) is an effective parameter that describes the speed of atmospheric particulate matter deposit to the natural surface.It is also an important indicator to the capacity of atmosphere self-depuration.However,the spatial and temporal variations in dry deposition velocity of TSP at different urban landscapes and the relationship between dry deposition velocity and the meteorological parameters are subject to large uncertainties.We concurrently investigated this relationship at four different landscapes of Guangzhou,from October to December of 2009.The result of the average dry deposition velocity is (1.49 ±0.77),(1.44 ± 0.77),(1.13 ± 0.53) and (1.82 ± 0.82) cm/sec for urban commercial landscape,urban forest landscape,urban residential landscape and country landscape,respectively.This spatial variation can be explained by the difference of both particle size composition of TSP and meteorological parameters of sampling sites.Dry deposition velocity of TSP has a positive correlation with wind speed,and a negative correlation with temperature and relative humidity.Wind speed is the strongest factor that affects the magnitude of TSP dry deposition velocity,and the temperature is another considerable strong meteorological factor.We also find out that the relative humidity brings less impact,especially during the dry season.It is thus implied that the current global warming and urban heat island effect may lead to correlative changes in TSP dry deposition velocity,especially in the urban areas.

  1. Thermal performance of heat pipe with suspended nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, K.N. [Gurgaon College of Engineering, Gurgaon (India); Solomon, A.B.; Pillai, B.C.; Ruba Singh, B.J.; Saravana Kumar, S. [Karunya University, Centre for Research in Thermal Management, Coimbatore (India)

    2012-11-15

    Nanofluids are employed as the working medium for a conventional cylindrical heat pipe. A cylindrical copper heat pipe of 19.5 mm outer diameter and 400 mm length was fabricated and tested with two different working fluids. The working fluids used in this study are DI-water and Nano-particles suspension (mixture of copper nano particle and DI-water). The overall heat transfer coefficient of the heat pipe was calculated based on the lumped thermal resistance network and compared with the heat transfer coefficient of base fluid filled heat pipe. There is a quantitative improvement in the heat transfer coefficient using nano-particles suspension as the working medium. A heat transfer correlation was also developed based on multiple regression least square method and the results were compared with that obtained by the experiment. (orig.)

  2. Thermal performance of heat pipe with suspended nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, K. N.; Solomon, A. Brusly; Pillai, B. C.; Ruba Singh, B. Jacob; Saravana Kumar, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nanofluids are employed as the working medium for a conventional cylindrical heat pipe. A cylindrical copper heat pipe of 19.5 mm outer diameter and 400 mm length was fabricated and tested with two different working fluids. The working fluids used in this study are DI-water and Nano-particles suspension (mixture of copper nano particle and DI-water). The overall heat transfer coefficient of the heat pipe was calculated based on the lumped thermal resistance network and compared with the heat transfer coefficient of base fluid filled heat pipe. There is a quantitative improvement in the heat transfer coefficient using nano-particles suspension as the working medium. A heat transfer correlation was also developed based on multiple regression least square method and the results were compared with that obtained by the experiment.

  3. The Influence of Suspended Inert Solid Particles on Zinc Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers

    1996-01-01

    The rate of corrosion of electroplated zinc in near-neutral chloride solutions can be lowered by as much as 75% by adding fine, inert particles of substances such as MnO2, Fe3O4, SiC and TiN to the well-stirred solution. Spreading of local areas of etching is also stopped. Copyright (C) 1996...

  4. Quantitative relationship between flagellate abundance and suspended particle density in Huanghai Sea and East China Sea in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lingfeng; PAN Ke; GUO Feng

    2006-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in the Huanghai Sea and the East China Sea to study the quantitative relationship between the abundance of flagellates and the density of suspended particles in the summer of 2001. The results show that the abundance of flagellates varies from 44~12 600 cell/cm3, and flagellates sometimes constitutes a significant part of suspended particles. The size-spectra of suspended particles can be divided into four categories: flat spectrum, humped spectrum, plankton spectrum and mixed spectrum. In general, the abundance of flagellates varies in proportion to the density of suspended particles. However, their quantitative relations reveal different characteristics in the seawater samples of different types of particle-size spectrum. This is only a preliminary study of the quantitative relationship between flagellates and suspended particles, which might lead to a potential convenient approach to the estimation of flagellate abundance in the sea.

  5. Kaolinite Mobilisation in Sandstone:Pore Plugging vs. Suspended Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Kets, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature and salinity on sandstone permeability is critical to the feasibility of heat storage in geothermal aquifers. Permeability reduction has been observed in Berea sandstone when the salinity of the pore water is reduced as well as when the sample is heated. Several authors suggest that this effect is due to kaolinite clay mobilisation from the quartz grain surface; the mobilised particles subsequently plug the pore throats and reduce the permeability irreversibly. The e...

  6. Experimental study of the viscosity of suspensions: effect of solid fraction, particle size and suspending liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijn, B.J.; Sanderink, O.B.J.; Kruyt, N.P.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of nearly neutrally-buoyant suspensions has been studied experimentally, using a concentric-cylinder rheometer. The effect on the suspension viscosity of: (i) solid fraction, (ii) diameter of the solid, spherical particles, (iii) viscosity of the suspending liquid, and (iv) shear rate

  7. Atmospheric Gravity Perturbations Measured by Ground-Based Interferometer with Suspended Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Rudenko, V N; Tsubono, K

    2003-01-01

    A possibility of geophysical measurements using the large scale laser interferometrical gravitational wave antenna is discussed. An interferometer with suspended mirrors can be used as a gradiometer measuring variations of an angle between gravity force vectors acting on the spatially separated suspensions. We analyze restrictions imposed by the atmospheric noises on feasibility of such measurements. Two models of the atmosphere are invoked: a quiet atmosphere with a hydrostatic coupling of pressure and density and a dynamic model of moving region of the density anomaly (cyclone). Both models lead to similar conclusions up to numerical factors. Besides the hydrostatic approximation, we use a model of turbulent atmosphere with the pressure fluctuation spectrum f^{-7/3} to explore the Newtonian noise in a higher frequency domain (up to 10 Hz) predicting the gravitational noise background for modern gravitational wave detectors. Our estimates show that this could pose a serious problem for realization of such pr...

  8. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    OpenAIRE

    Pähtz, Thomas; Duran, Orancio; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions...

  9. PARTICLE MORPHOLOGY OF POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) RESIN PREPARED BY SUSPENDED EMULSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-zhong Bao; Zhen-li Wei; Zhi-xue Weng; Zhi-ming Huang

    2003-01-01

    Suspended emulsion polymerization was used to prepare poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) resin. Fine PVC particles were formed at low polymerization conversions. The amount of fine particles decreases as conversion increases and disappears at conversions greater than 30%. Scanning electron micrographs show that PVC grains are composed of loosely coalesced primary particles, especially for PVC resins prepared in the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) dispersant. The size of primary particles increases and porosity decreases with the increase of conversion. In view of the particle features of PVC resin, a particle formation mechanism including the formation of primary particles and grains is proposed. The formation process of primary particles includes the formation of particle nuclei, coalescence of particle nuclei to form primary particles,and growth of primary particles. PVC grains are formed by the coagulation of primary particles. The loose coalescence of primary particles is caused by the colloidal stability of primary particles and the low swelling degree of vinyl chloride in the primary particles.

  10. Ultrafine particles in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, L M; Harrison, R M; Maynard, A D; Maynard, R L

    2003-01-01

    Following the recognition that airborne particulate matter, even at quite modest concentrations, has an adverse effect on human health, there has been an intense research effort to understand the mechanisms and quantify the effects. One feature that has shone through is the important role of ultrafine particles as a contributor to the adverse effects of airborne particles. In this volume, many of the most distinguished researchers in the field provide a state-of-the-art overview of the scientific and medical research on ultrafine particles. Contents: Measurements of Number, Mass and Size Distr

  11. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF DIFFERENT PARTICLE SIZE OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN THE LIU RIVER CATCHMENTS,CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haoming FAN; Qiangguo CAI; Chengjiu GUO; Tieliang WANG

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents information on the particle size characteristics of suspended sediment transported by the Liu River, which has the most serious erosion and sedimentation problems in the northeast of China. The median (d50) particle size for the individual stations on the Liu River ranged from 0.0343 to 0.0588 mm. Particles <0.01 mm ranged from 15.4 to 33.3% and >0.05 mm of ranged from 24.3 to 53.7%. Spatial and temporal variations were noticeable in the particle size composition of suspended sediment within the study basins. At different locations the sediment particles size varies as a result of differences in catchment characteristics. The preferential deposition of the coarser size fractions has resulted in downstream fining of the suspended sediment load. In the flood season the suspended sediment particle size was finer than that in low flow season. The relations among water discharge, suspended sediment concentration, and sediment particle size are complicated. At small water discharge or suspended sediment concentration, with the increase of water discharge or sediment concentration the particle size of suspended sediment decreases to a minimum. However, when the water discharge or sediment concentration exceed certain threshold values (turning points) the particle size increases or remains constant with the increase of water discharge or sediment concentration. The tuning points are different in different rivers. Thus, their relations are double-valued. The negative relation between suspended sediment particle size and flow discharge reflects the importance of supply conditions and the positive relation reflects that the flow and hydraulics take a greater role in sediment transportation. On the whole, variation of the sediment particle size is subject to many factors such as the hydraulic conditions, the type and extent of erosion, human activities, vegetation coverage, hydraulic projects, and sediment supply. The findings reported in this paper

  12. Impact of Suspended Particles and Enhancement Techniques on Ultraviolet Disinfection of a Secondary Effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianling; WANG Lin; WANG Baozhen; ZHANG Jinsong; ZOU Qixian

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of suspended solids in the secondary effluent often varies widely, leading to frequent adjustment of the UV dosage to meet the disinfection criterion. In addition, a desired disinfection rate is difficult to achieve sometimes. The authors studied the particle size distribution, contributionof particle-associated Fecal Coliform (F. C. ), and their influences on UV disinfection. A combined disinfection process (chlorination with a subsequent UV disinfection) was tested to improve the disinfection effect. The results indicated that the content of suspended solids, especially that of large particles, has a strong impact on UV disinfection efficiency; D > 10 μm particles associated F.C. are difficult to be disinfected and are the main part of the tailings of F.C. inactivation curves. Pre-chlorination could decrease the number of particles in the secondary effluent and transform the large particles into small ones, reducing the influence of particles on UV disinfection and enhancing the resistance ability of the combined process to particle loading.

  13. Suspended particle effects on ClO2/ultraviolet light combined disinfection of effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ling; WANG Bao-zhen; WANG Lin; ZHANG Jin-song; HUANG Wen-zhang

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of suspended solids of effluent often varies in a wide range, therefore the dose of ultraviolet light (UV) in disinfection process needs to be adjusted to meet the disinfection criterion at a high frequency, and the desired disinfection effect is difficult to be ensured. The particles size and particle-associated fecal coliform (F.C.) contribution, and their influence on UV disinfection were investigated when ClO2 and UV combined disinfection process was used. The results showed that suspended solids content had a major impact on UV disinfection efficiency, especially the large particle size fraction. Particles (D>10 μm) associated F.C. were difficult to be disinfected and were the main part of the tailings of F.C. inactivation curve. Pre-ClO2 oxidation could reduce the number of particles in effluent, and make large particles decrease to small ones. Therefore, the influence of particles on UV disinfection could be reduced after pre-ClO2 oxidation, and the resistance ability to particle loadings of combined process was enhanced. Moreover, the combined process has a lot of advantages, such as low toxicity, low operational/maintenance costs; it is also convenient to be established in the existing wastewater plant or the new planned one.

  14. Laboratory and field evaluations of the LISST-100 instrument for suspended particle size determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J.W.; Cheng, R.T.; Wang, P.-F.; Richter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology have resulted in a new instrument that is designed for in-situ determination of particle size spectra. Such an instrument that can measure undisturbed particle size distributions is much needed for sediment transport studies. The LISST-100 (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry) uses the principle of laser diffraction to obtain the size distribution and volume concentration of suspended material in 32 size classes logarithmically spaced between 1.25 and 250 ??m. This paper describes a laboratory evaluation of the ability of LISST-100 to determine particle sizes using suspensions of single size, artificial particles. Findings show the instrument is able to determine particle size to within about 10% with increasing error as particle size increases. The instrument determines volume (or mass) concentration using a volume conversion factor Cv. This volume conversion factor is theoretically a constant. In the laboratory evaluation Cv is found to vary by a factor of about three over the particle size range between 5 and 200 ??m. Results from field studies in South San Francisco Bay show that values of mass concentration of suspended marine sediments estimated by LISST-100 agree favorably with estimates from optical backscatterance sensors if an appropriate value of Cv, according to mean size, is used and the assumed average particle (aggregate) density is carefully chosen. Analyses of size distribution of suspended materials in South San Francisco Bay over multiple tide cycles suggest the likelihood of different sources of sediment because of different size characteristics during flood and ebb cycles. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Propagation of nuclear particle fluxes in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo model of propagation of nuclear-active particle shower initiated in the atmosphere by cosmic rays or by any other radiation source is developed. The model permits to calculate spatial distributions and energy spectra of charged and neutral particle fluxes in the air and inside the blocks

  16. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Pähtz, Thomas; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F

    2015-01-01

    Here we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids ("saltation" and "bedload", respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts ("splash") in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an ...

  17. Studies of colloids and suspended particles, Cigar Lake uranium deposit, Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cigar Lake U deposit located in the eastern part of the Athabasca Sandstone Basin, consists of a high-grade ore body (up to 55% U) located at a depth of ∼ 430 m. As part of a study to evaluate the analog features of this deposit with respect to a disposal vault for waste nuclear fuel, colloids (1-450 nm) and suspended particles (> 450 nm) in groundwater have been investigated to evaluate their effect on element transport. The results show that particle compositions are similar to the composition of minerals in the sandstones and ore body, suggesting that particles in groundwater are generated by the erosion of fracture-lining minerals and concentrations are affected by the integrity of the host rock. The observed colloid and suspended particle concentrations in the deep groundwaters are too low to have a significant impact on radionuclide migration, provided that radionuclide sorption is reversible. If radionuclides are irreversibly sorbed to particles they cannot sorb to the host rock and their migration can only be evaluated with an understanding of particle mobility. The data for dissolved and particulate U, Th and Ra were used to calculate field-derived distribution ratios (Rd) between particles and groundwater. The wide range of observed Rd values indicates that these radionuclides in particulate form are not in equilibrium with groundwater. U-series isotope data indicated that most of the U and Ra on particles was derived from groundwater. Some particles could have retained their U for as long as 8000 a. The U and Ra contents of particles in the ore and surrounding clay zones are significantly higher than in particles from sandstone, suggesting that the clay has been an effective barrier to particle migration. (author)

  18. Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability of Viscous-Viscoelastic Superposed Fluids in Presence of Suspended Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pardeep; Singh, Mahinder

    2007-01-01

    The Rayleigh‐Taylor instability of a Newtonian viscous fluid overlying an Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid containing suspended particles is considered. As in both Newtonian viscous-viscous fluids, the system is stable in the potentially stable case and unstable in the potentially unstable case, this holds for the present problem also. The effect of a variable horizontal magnetic field is also considered. The presence of magnetic field stabilizes a certain wavenumber band, whereas the system is ...

  19. Transfer of suspended particles from liquid effluents of nuclear generating stations through the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the complexity of the environmental transfer of suspended particles in aquatic systems, the available literature usually deals with specific pathways and mechanisms of the transfer process. This paper attempts to give a brief overview of the entire transfer process. Potential routes of transfer in both the marine and freshwater environments are examined, and tentative conclusions presented. This work was performed while the author was employed by Atomic Energy Control Board under the McMaster University cooperative program

  20. Lateral Migration and Nonuniform Rotation of Biconcave Particle Suspended in Poiseuille Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bing-Hai, Wen; Ren-Liang, Zhang; Chao-Ying, Zhang; Hai-Ping, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A biconcave particle suspended in a Poiseuille flow is investigated by the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method with the Galilean-invariant momentum exchange method. The lateral migration and equilibrium of the particle are similar to the Segr\\'e-Silberberg effect in our numerical simulations. Surprisingly, two lateral equilibrium positions are observed corresponding to the releasing positions of the biconcave particle. The upper equilibrium positions significantly decrease with the growth of the Reynolds number, whereas the lower ones are almost insensitive to the Reynolds number. Interestingly, the regular wave accompanied by nonuniform rotation is exhibited in the lateral movement of the biconcave particle. It can be attributed to that the biconcave shape in various postures interacts with the parabolic velocity distribution of the Poiseuille flow. A set of contours illustrate the dynamic flow field when the biconcave particle has successive postures in a rotating period.

  1. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  2. Heavy metal toxicity and bioavailability of dissolved nutrients to a bacterivorous flagellate are linked to suspended particle physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many dissolved substances attach easily to sediment particles. In the presence of suspended sediments bioavailability of dissolved substances is therefore, usually reduced and clays are even applied to 'wash' natural waters upon pollution. In organisms which feed on food organisms in the size range of these suspended sediment particles, however, bioavailability of such substances may even increase. For microorganisms the interaction with dissolved substances and suspended sediment particles so far has hardly been investigated. We specifically tested: (1) the importance of suspended particles as an uptake route for dissolved substances; and (2) the significance of particle surface properties, i.e. surface load and mineralogy. As a model system we used an axenically cultured strain of a widespread and often abundant flagellate ('Spumella-like' flagellate strain JBM10). We tested the toxicity of cadmium (II) and mercury (II) as well as availability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the absence as well as in the presence of different natural clays, i.e. a kaolinite, a montmorillonite, and a mixed clay, and of artificial silicate particles of different surface charge. When applied separately the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury as well as of suspended particles negatively affected the investigated flagellate but nutritive organics supported growth of the investigated flagellate. Toxic stress response comprises behavioral changes including enhanced swimming activity and stress egestion of ingested particles and was generally similar for a variety of different flagellate species. In combination with suspended particles, the respective effect of trace metals and nutritive substances decreased. Regarding the particle quality, cadmium toxicity increased with increasingly negative surface charge, i.e. increasing surface density of silanol groups (Pearson's product moment, P = 0.005). For mercury particle mineralogy still had a significant effect (P < 0

  3. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern. PMID:26920521

  4. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  5. Trajectory and distribution of suspended non-Brownian particles moving past a fixed spherical or cylindrical obstacle

    CERN Document Server

    Risbud, Sumedh R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the motion of a suspended non-Brownian sphere past a fixed cylindrical or spherical obstacle in the limit of zero Reynolds number for arbitrary particle-obstacle aspect ratios. We consider both a suspended sphere moving in a quiescent fluid under the action of a uniform force as well as a uniform ambient velocity field driving a freely suspended particle. We determine the distribution of particles around a single obstacle and solve for the individual particle trajectories to comment on the transport of dilute suspensions past an array of fixed obstacles. First, we obtain an expression for the probability density function governing the distribution of a dilute suspension of particles around an isolated obstacle, and we show that it is isotropic. We then present an analytical expression -- derived using both Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches -- for the minimum particle-obstacle separation attained during the motion, as a function of the incoming impact parameter, i.e. the initial offset between ...

  6. Particle diffusion in atmospheres of CP stars

    OpenAIRE

    Aret, A.; Sapar, A.

    1998-01-01

    We give concisely the formulae governing diffusion of chemical elements and their isotopes in quiescent stellar atmospheres, due to electrostatic, gravitational and radiation fields and to impacts between particles. Isotope segregation of heavy elements due to light-induced drift is emphasized.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Evaporation Induced Self-Assembly of Sub-Micron Particles Suspended in Water

    CERN Document Server

    Tayeb, Raihan; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of sub-micron particles suspended in a water film is investigated numerically. The liquid medium is allowed to evaporate leaving only the sub-micron particles. A coupled CFD-DEM approach is used for the simulation of fluid-particle interaction. Momentum exchange and heat transfer between particles and fluid and among particles are considered. A history dependent contact model is used to compute the contact force among sub-micron particles. Simulation is done using the open source software package CFDEM which basically comprises of two other open source packages OpenFOAM and LIGGGHTS. OpenFOAM is a widely used solver for CFD related problems. LIGGGHTS, a modification of LAMMPS, is used for DEM simulation of granular materials. The final packing structure of the sub-micron particles is discussed in terms of distribution of coordination number and radial distribution function (RDF). The final packing structure shows that particles form clusters and exhibit a definite pattern as water evaporates awa...

  8. Particle pollution changes the atmospheric circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial emissions and combustion of fossil fuels create large amounts of sulfate- and carbon containing soot particles. These mix with natural particles to change the natural aerosols. Such anthropogenic changes in the aerosols may have a great impact on the climate of the earth. Altered properties of the aerosols may change the atmosphere's absorption and reflection of solar radiation and contribute to heating or cooling. This is the direct effect. Changes in the properties of aerosols may also affect the number and size of recently formed cloud droplets. This may change the ability of the clouds to reflect solar radiation and to produce precipitation. This is the indirect effect. Recent research at the University of Oslo shows that anthropogenic particles significantly change the atmospheric circulation, in particular in the tropics, but also at European latitudes

  9. A flowrate measurement method by counting of radioactive particles suspended in a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By external counting of fine #betta# emitting radioactive particles suspended in a liquid, the flowrate in a system of pipes can be measured. The study comprises three phases: 1. - The hydraulic validity of the method is demonstrated in laminar as well as in turbulent flow under certain conditions of particles size and density and of liquid viscosity. 2. - Radioactive labelling of microspheres of serumalbumin or ion exchange resins with indium 113m delivered by a generator Tin 113 → Indium 113m. 3. - Counting with a scintillation detector: a method of threshold overstepping is experimented with a mechanical or electronic simulator; the statistical study of particle superposition under the detector enables a correction for the resulting counting losses to be proposed. The method provides absolute measurements, but is particularly suitable to measure relative flowrates in a hydraulic network. It can be continuous and does not perturb the flow and the network. The accuracy of the method is analysed in details

  10. Evaluation of the surface roughness effect on suspended particle deposition near unpaved roads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dongzi; Gillies, J. A.; Etyemezian, V.; Nikolich, G.; Shaw, William J.

    2015-11-11

    The downwind transport and deposition of suspended dust raised by a vehicle driving on unpaved roads was studied for four differently vegetated surfaces in the USA states of Kansas and Washington, and one barren surface in Nevada. A 10 m high tower adjacent to the source (z10 m downwind) and an array of multi-channel optical particle counters at three positions downwind of the source measured the flux of particles and the particle size distribution in the advecting dust plumes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Aerodynamic parameters such as friction velocity (u*) and surface roughness length (z0) were calculated from wind speed measurements made on the tower. Particle number concentration, PM10 mass exhibited an exponential decay along the direction of transport. Coarse particles accounted for z95% of the PM10 mass, at least to a downwind distance of 200 m from the source. PM10 removed by deposition was found to increase with increasing particle size and increasing surface roughness under similar moderate wind speed conditions. The surface of dense, long grass (1.2 m high and complete surface cover) had the greatest reduction of PM10 among the five surfaces tested due to deposition induced by turbulence effects created by the rougher surface and by enhanced particle impaction/ interception effects to the grass blades.

  11. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pähtz, Thomas, E-mail: 0012136@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Physical Oceanography, Ocean College, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, 310012 Hangzhou (China); Durán, Orencio [MARUM-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR UR1-CNRS 6251, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Kok, Jasper F. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 90095-1565 Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  12. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small

  13. Suspended particles in the Canada Basin from optical and bottle data, 2003–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Jackson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that coastal erosion, upwelling and increased river runoff from Arctic warming will increase the concentration of suspended particles in the Arctic Ocean. Here we analyze in situ transmissometer and fluorometer data from the summers of 2003 through 2008 and bottle-derived particulate organic carbon (POC and total suspended solids (TSS measurements sampled in the summers of 2006 and 2007 from the Canada Basin and surrounding shelves. By coupling these data sets, we explored the correlation of POC with beam attenuation coefficients to assess the viability of estimating POC concentrations from archived transmissometer data. We divided our study area into five regions to account for the significant spatial variability and found that POC (but not TSS and attenuation were well-correlated over the Northwind Ridge, in the Canada Basin interior, and along the eastern shelf of the Canada Basin. We then estimated POC from attenuation for these regions and found that the average POC ranged from 16 to 37 μg C kg−1 within the upper 50 m and from 14 to 23 μg C kg−1 from 50–100 m. The strength of the chlorophyll maximum appeared to dominate the average POC values. In general, the eastern shelf was the least productive region in our study area. Neither TSS nor POC were well-correlated along the entire Beaufort shelf. Our interannual comparison from the summers of 2003 through 2008 found no evidence of increased particle concentrations over the Northwind Ridge, in the Canada Basin interior, or along the eastern shelf, however, this work provides a baseline of suspended POC concentrations.

  14. Chromium in water, suspended particles, sediments and biota in the Iraja River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W.C.; Fiszman, M.; de Lacerda, L.D.; van Weerfelt, M.; Carbonell, N.

    1982-11-01

    Analyses of chromium concentrations in waters, suspended particles, bottom sediments, fish (Poecilia reticulata), plants (Paspalum vaginatum, Sesuvium portulacastrum, Philoxeros vermicularis), soils and barnacles (Balanus sp.) were performed from August 1976 to September 1980 in samples collected from the Iraja River and inside its estuary in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Sediments and water from the Iraja River showed chromium concentrations of 17536 and 23.39 ppm--a thousand times higher than the published data for freshwater systems. Chromium removed from solution by bottom sediments reaches Guanabara Bay linked to particulate matter. Fish and emergent grass inside the river concentrate chromium from water and/or sediment, returning the metal to the system as detritus. Soil and plants inside the estuary concentrate chromium thirty and ten times higher than in the control area. The vegetal community exhibits a concentration factor smaller than that related to soil and prevents the return of chromium to the estuarine waters. Inside the Guanabara Bay, Balanus sp. appears to be an effective biological monitor as it concentrates chromium in soft tissues 10/sup 3/ times higher than values found in suspended particles (0.012 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/).

  15. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Mishra, Bhoopesh [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Lai, Barry [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Liang, Liyuan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobes to directly visualize and quantify the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 g/g Hg is found on suspended particles. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM), possibly as Hg-NOM-iron oxide ternary complexes. The diatom-bound Hg is mostly found on outer surfaces of the cells, suggesting passive sorption of inorganic Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, is an important sink for Hg in natural aquatic environments.

  16. Attenuation of an ultrasonic beam by suspended particles and range of acoustic flow meters in sewer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Larrarte, Frédérique; Francois, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic flow meters are commonly used in wastewater management. Under certain circumstances, a reduction in the flow meter range may occur and cause significant error in the flow rate measurement. Attenuation due to suspended particles is one of the phenomena capable of reducing the flow meter range. The present paper examines attenuation resulting from re-suspended pond sediment over a wide range of concentration values. It appears that a formula established for sand suspensions provides ...

  17. Suspended Particulates Concentration (PM10 under Unstable Atmospheric Conditions over Subtropical Urban Area (Qena, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Nouby Adam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the suspended particulates (PM10 in the atmosphere under unstable atmospheric conditions. The variation of PM10 was investigated and primary statistics were employed. The results show that, the PM10 concentrations values ranged from 6.00 to 646.74 μg m−3. The average value of PM10 is equal to 114.32 μg m−3. The high values were recorded in April and May (155.17 μg m−3 and 171.82 μg m−3, respectively and the low values were noted in February and December (73.86 μg m−3 and 74.05 μg m−3, respectively. The average value of PM10 of the hot season (125.35 × 10−6 g m−3 was higher than its value for the cold season (89.27 μg m−3. In addition, the effect of weather elements (air temperature, humidity and wind on the concentration of PM10 was determined. The multiple R between PM10 and these elements ranged from 0.05 to 0.47 and its value increased to reach 0.73 for the monthly average of the database used. Finally, the PM10 concentrations were grouped depending on their associated atmospheric stability class. These average values were equal to 122.80 ± 9 μg m−3 (highly unstable or convective, 109.37 ± 12 μg m−3 (moderately unstable and 104.42 ± 15 μg m−3 (slightly unstable.

  18. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  19. Intergrating cavity absorption meter measurements of dissolved substances and suspended particles in ocean water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Robin M.; Weidemann, Alan D.; Fry, Edward S.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new device to measure the separate contributions to the spectral absorption coefficient due to a pure liquid, due to the particles suspended in it, and due to the substances dissolved in it. This device, the Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter (ICAM), is essentially independent of scattering effects in the sample. In April 1993, a prototype of the ICAM was field tested on board the research vessel USNS Bartlett. A major part of the cruise track included criss-crossing the area where the Mississippi flows into the Gulf of Mexico at various ranges from the mouth of the river; thus samples were collected from areas of blue, green, and brown/black water. We evaluated 35 seawater samples collected with 5-l Niskin bottles from 22 locations to determine absorption spectra (380-700 nm) of suspended particles and dissolved substances (gelbstoff). Results validate the ICAM as a viable tool for marine optical absorption research. Gelbstoff absorption at 432.5 nm ranged from 0.024 to 0.603 m -1. Over the spectral region 380→560 nm, gelbstoff absorption by each of the samples could be accurately fit to a decaying exponential. The particle absorption spectra are generally characteristic of those of phytoplankton and exhibit a local maximum at 430-440 nm. Absorption values at 432.5 nm ranged from ˜zero to ˜1.0 m -1. Some samples with moderate particulate absorption, however, did not show the characteristic local maximum of phytoplankton in the blue and instead resembled the characteristic decaying exponential of detritus with a shape similar to that observed in the gelbstoff. The ratio of gelbstoff to particulate absorption at 432.5 nm ranged from 0.46 to 152.

  20. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  1. Atmospheric particle formation in spatially and temporally varying conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lauros, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric particles affect the radiation balance of the Earth and thus the climate. New particle formation from nucleation has been observed in diverse atmospheric conditions but the actual formation path is still unknown. The prevailing conditions can be exploited to evaluate proposed formation mechanisms. This study aims to improve our understanding of new particle formation from the view of atmospheric conditions. The role of atmospheric conditions on particle formation was studied ...

  2. Gas-particle partitioning of pesticides in atmospheric samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, Astrid; Millet, Maurice; Mirabel, Philippe; Wortham, Henri

    A filter-XAD-2 resin plug high-volume air sampler was used to collect the particle (P) and vapour (V) phases of 11 pesticides. The atmospheric concentrations were measured simultaneously at three sites characterised as remote (Aubure in the Vosges mountains), rural (Colmar, in the upper Rhine Valley), and urban (Strasbourg, in the upper Rhine Valley). The measured concentrations, which agree with those of literature, were used to study the influence of the physico-chemical parameters on the V/P partitioning. The behaviour observed on two organochlorine pesticides ( α-HCH and HCB), carbaryl, and trifluraline corresponds to the one presented in literature for organochlorine and PAH. Therefore, the V/P partitioning is mainly controlled by temperature, total suspended particle (TSP), and vapour pressure. Nevertheless, the slope of the regression line of log( A.TSP/ F ) against log P° l (where A and F are, respectively, the gas and particulate concentrations and P° l is the subcooled liquid-vapour pressure) is less compared with that presented in literature (0.36 against approximately 0.85). This difference could possibly result from the low TSP concentrations measured in our study. For some pesticides (trifluraline, γ-HCH, mecoprop, carbofuran and atrazine) the description of the V/P partitioning is improved by using relative humidity in addition to the three previous environmental parameters (temperature, TSP and vapour pressure). There seems to exist a competition mechanism between water molecules in gas phase and pesticides to adsorb on the receiving sites of the particles. By this mechanism increase in the atmospheric relative humidity induces a simultaneous increase of pesticides in the gas phase.

  3. Coalescence phenomena of droplets with suspended particles in a tube flow at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Toshihiko; Wada, Takuma

    Coalescence phenomena of droplets in a tube flow at low Reynolds number are expected to be useful for fluid handling technique, controlling chemical reaction and so on. In the case of motion of droplets with suspended particles, Drug delivery system can be cited as one of applications. The coalescence phenomena are also underlying basis on analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media. Such phenomena can be seen, for instance, in enhanced oil recovery, breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers and so on. In this experiment, a glass tube of 2.0 mm in inner diameter, 7.0 mm in outer diameter, and 1500 mm in length is used as a test tube. Silicones oil is employed as the test fluid for the droplet. Mixture fluid of glycerol and pure water is used for a surrounding fluid in the tube flow. The density of the droplets is matched to that of the surrounding fluid by adding carbon tetrachloride. An over flow tank is used to keep the flow in the tube steady at a designated averaged velocity. The test tube is surrounded by a tank filled with a temperature-controlled water to keep the temperature of the system constant. Droplets are injected into the test tube using micro-syringes in front of inlet of the test tube. Behaviors of droplets and suspended particles are monitored by a digital video camera and high speed cameras placed on a sliding stage. The motion of the stage is electrically controlled to follow the travelling droplets in the test tube. Coalescence time of two droplets is measured. The coalescence time indicates a period between the instant when relative velocity of two droplets becomes zero after their apparent contact and the instant when the coalescence takes place. The coalescence time is compared with semi-theoretical formulas obtained using resistance exerted on liquid droplet in a tube creeping flow. When relative velocity of two droplets becomes zero after their apparent contact, clearance diameter of clearance area between droplets is

  4. The influence of antibiotics on the adsorption kinetics of 54-Mn and 59-Fe on suspended particles in river Elbe water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many pollutants in river water are mainly transported by suspended particles. It depends on many physical and chemical parameters how these pollutants are distributed between water and suspended particles. Much effort has been made for measuring this distribution. Our examination has dealt with the determination of influences on the adsorption kinetics of some metal ions from water to suspended particles. We used 54-MnCl2 and 59-FeCl3 as tracers. (orig.)

  5. Suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution, and their relationship with heavy metal content

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S H R Sadeghi; M Kiani Harchegani; H A Younesi

    2012-02-01

    This paper aims at assessing the feasibility of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) estimation by using predictor variables of heavy metal concentration (HMC, viz., iron, chromium, zinc and nickel) transported in solution and solid. The study was conducted in the Research and Educational Forest Watershed of the Tarbiat Modares University (Kojour) which comprises an area of ca. 50000 ha. For this study, suspended sediment samples were collected from the left bank of the Kojour River twice a week, as well as during runoff events from November 2007 to June 2008. The samples were then prepared through direct digestion and finally analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The relationship between SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) were correlated with HMC by using bivariate and multivariate regression models. Proposed models were then selected based on statistical criteria. The results showed high correlation between dissolved and particulate chromium content with efficiency coefficients beyond 77% ( > 0.001). However, a lower relationship was found between SSC and nickel content. From these results, it is clearly shown that the HMC can practically be estimated by SSC in watersheds with different accuracy and vice versa. It is also understood that heavy metal pollution can be easily managed by controlling SSC.

  6. Application of nuclear techniques to the measurement of rock density and transport of solid particles suspended in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to better understand hydron phenomens in semi-arid regions characterized by torrential rains, we measured solid particles suspended to dums and in rivers. We also determined the density profile of a drilling and density of saline solutions. We designed an automatic nuclear gauge used for measuring the concentration of particles suspended to rivers. The installation, calibration and operations of a LABEN gauge were done in BENI SLIMANE on the 27th and 28th of February, 1984. The first results we obtained were received on the 24th of April, 1984

  7. A radiotracer study of cerium and manganese uptake onto suspended particles in Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation kinetics of Ce(III) and Mn(II) were studied in Chesapeake Bay in March and July 1990 to establish the role of water column redox processes in contributing to Ce anomalies observed in this estuary (SHOLKOVITZ and ELDERFIELD, 1988; SHOLKOVITZ et al., 1992). Oxidation was measured by adding Mn(II) and Ce(III) to freshly collected water samples as radiotracers and measuring their uptake onto the ambient suspended particle assemblage. Mn(II) oxidation was measured by following the uptake of 54Mn(II) onto suspended particles and utilizing protocols established by other workers to distinguish oxidation from Mn(II) adsorption. The same protocols were applicable to Ce(III), using 139Ce(III), and were supported by the use of 152Eu(III) as a nonredox reactive control. Specific rates of Ce(III) and MN(II) oxidation measured at a station in the North Bay (depth = 4 m) in July were 2016% per day and 4032% per day, respectively. In March, at the same station, the specific rate of Mn(II) of oxidation was only 1-% per day, and Ce(III) oxidation was undetectable. Both Ce(III) and Mn(II) oxidation processes were inhibited by azide, indicating that they were microbially mediated. The seasonal differences probably reflect strong seasonal variation in the abundance of Mn oxidizing bacteria. No Ce(III) oxidation occured in samples collected below the oxic/anoxic interface in July. The specific rates of oxidation for both elements were over 1000 times higher than those measured in the Sargasso Sea. However, the specific rates for Ce(III) and Mn(II) were very similar to each other. This fact, coupled with similar spatial and temporal trends for specific oxidation rates, suggests a common mechanism of oxidation of both elements which may be significant in a wide range of marine environments

  8. Effect of particle size and composition of suspended sediment on denitrification in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhimei; Liu, Ting; Xia, Xinghui; Xia, Na

    2016-01-15

    Rivers with high suspended sediment (SPS) concentration are common worldwide, and previous studies reported the occurrence of denitrification on SPS. In this work, effect of particle size and composition of SPS on denitrification in river water was studied in laboratory. The (15)N isotope tracer technique was used to investigate the denitrification in water containing 8 g L(-1) SPS with different particle sizes, including denitrifying bacteria population in the system decreased with the increase of particle size, which was positively correlated with denitrification rate (pdenitrifying bacteria population (pdenitrifying bacteria. Different from the (15)N2 production, (15)N2O emission rate reached the highest of 1.02 μg-N/m(3) · d in the system containing SPS of 20-50 μm, which was 14.8 times that of 100-200 μm. This was due to the difference in denitrifying bacteria species in different systems due to different oxic/anoxic conditions around SPS. This study suggests that not only the SPS concentration but also the SPS size and composition should be considered in studying the nitrogen cycle in river systems, especially for the production of N2O. PMID:26461138

  9. Attenuation of an ultrasonic beam by suspended particles and range of acoustic flow meters in sewer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrarte, Frédérique; François, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic flow meters are commonly used in wastewater management. Under certain circumstances, a reduction in the flow meter range may occur and cause significant error in the flow rate measurement. Attenuation due to suspended particles is one of the phenomena capable of reducing the flow meter range. The present paper examines attenuation resulting from re-suspended pond sediment over a wide range of concentration values. It appears that a formula established for sand suspensions provides a good estimate of ultrasound attenuation for these types of particles as well. Experiments conducted for wastewater under particle concentrations commonly encountered in sewer networks demonstrate that the attenuation by particles only contributes to a negligible extent towards intensity decay, in accordance with theoretical predictions. We also theoretically determine herein the operating conditions under which the range of an ultrasonic flow meter would be significantly reduced due to particle attenuation. PMID:22258678

  10. THERMAL INSTABILITY OF COMPRESSIBLE WALTERS' (MODEL B' FLUID IN THE PRESENCE OF HALL CURRENTS AND SUSPENDED PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi GUPTA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Hall currents and suspended particles is considered on the hydromagnetic stability of a compressible, electrically conducting Walters' (Model B' elastico-viscous fluid. After linearizing the relevant hydromagnetic equations, the perturbation equations are analyzed in terms of normal modes. A dispersion relation governing the effects of visco-elasticity, magnetic field, Hall currents and suspended particles is derived. It has been found that for stationary convection, the Walters' (Model B' fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid due to the vanishing of the visco-elastic parameter. The compressibility and magnetic field have a stabilizing effect on the system, as such their effect is to postpone the onset of thermal instability whereas Hall currents and suspended particles are found to hasten the onset of thermal instability for permissible range of values of various parameters. Also, the dispersion relation is analyzed numerically and the results shown graphically. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wavenumbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection are obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers has been depicted graphically. The visco-elasticity, suspended particles and Hall currents (hence magnetic field introduce oscillatory modes in the system which were non-existent in their absence.

  11. Suspended particles in the Canada Basin from optical and bottle data, 2003–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. McLaughlin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that coastal erosion, upwelling, and increased river runoff from Arctic warming will increase the concentration of suspended particles in the Arctic Ocean. Here we analyze in situ transmissometer and fluorometer data from the summers of 2003 through 2008 and bottle-derived particulate organic carbon (POC and total suspended solids (TSS measurements sampled in the summers of 2006 and 2007 from the Canada Basin and surrounding shelves. We divided our study area into five regions to account for the significant spatial variability and found that the highest attenuation, POC and TSS values were observed along the Beaufort shelf and the lowest values were located along the eastern shelf of the Canada Basin. We then explored the correlation of POC and TSS with beam attenuation coefficients to assess the viability of estimating POC concentrations from archived transmissometer data. POC (but not TSS and attenuation were well-correlated over the Northwind Ridge, in the Canada Basin interior, and along the eastern shelf of the Canada Basin. Neither TSS nor POC were well-correlated with attenuation along the entire Beaufort shelf. An interannual comparison of the attenuation and fluorescence data was done. We found no evidence of increasing attenuation from the summers of 2003 through 2008 and, although not statistically significant, it even appeared that attenuation decreased over time in the upper 25 m of the Northwind Ridge and in the 25–100 m layer (that includes the chlorophyll maximum of the eastern Beaufort shelf and within the Canada Basin. In the Canada Basin interior, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum deepened at a rate of 3.2 m per year from an average of 45 m in 2003 to 61 m in 2008, an example of how changes to the Arctic climate are impacting its ecology.

  12. The acoustic radiation force on a small thermoviscous or thermoelastic particle suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Jonas; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    We present a theoretical analysis (arxiv.org/abs/1507.01043) of the acoustic radiation force on a single small particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid. Our analysis places no restrictions on the viscous and thermal boundary layer thicknesses relative to the particle radius, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from sub-micrometer particles. For particle sizes smaller than the boundary layer widths, our theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. For example, for liquid droplets and solid particles suspended in gasses we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory. Moreover, for certain relevant choices of materials, we find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to applications in acoustic levitation or separation of micro-particles in gases, as well as to handling of μm- and nm-sized particles such as bacteria and vira in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  13. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  14. Microanalysis of colloids and suspended particles from nuclear waste glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully radioactive and non-radioactive Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) borosilicate glasses were reacted with water under static conditions at glass surface area to leachant volume (S/V) ratios of 340 m-1, 2000 m-1, and 20,000m-1 for times varying from several days to several years at 90C. A radioactive SRL 200 glass was also reacted under intermittent flow conditions at 90C. Colloidal and suspended glass alteration particles present in the leachates of these tests were examined with analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM). The major colloidal phase identified in all tests was partially crystalline dioctahedral smectite clay. At 20andpuncsp; omitted000 m-1, the clay colloids flocculate and sediment, becoming attached to available surfaces when the ionic strength reached a value of about 0.3-0.5 mol·kg-1. Clay colloids remained stable in the solution for the duration of the experiment in tests conducted at S/V values of 2000 m-1 and 340 m-1. Calcite, dolomite, and transition metal oxide particles were more common in the intermittent flow tests but were also found in the static tests. Layered, Mn-bearing minerals, birnessite and asbolane, were found exclusively in the intermittent flow tests. Weeksite and a U-Ti phase were found exclusively in the static tests. Partially crystalline rare earth-bearing calcium phosphate colloids, structurally related to rhabdophane, were found in both types of tests. These particles exhibited a negative Ce anomaly. The affinity of phosphate for Pu was investigated through geochemical modeling. The results from this study and others were used to form a picture of colloidal development in the leachate from waste glass testing. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Biological particles capable of triggering ice nucleation in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Vogel, André; Häusler, Thomas; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) have a huge impact on atmospheric processes, since they can trigger ice cloud formation. In general, ice clouds interfere with the radiation balance of planet Earth effectively at high altitudes. Since ambient matter of biological origin tends to have rather large aerodynamic diameters, it exhibits a fast sinking velocity and can only reach limited altitudes. Therefore, research focused on materials found in higher quantities in the upper atmosphere. However, recent findings indicate that the role of biological INPs has been underestimated in the past. In 2012 Pummer and colleagues found that the INPs from birch pollen can be washed off and constitute of macromolecules in the size-range of a few nanometres. With such a small diameter, they show a much longer life span in the upper atmosphere than expected. Further, Huffman and colleagues showed in 2013 a burst of biological INPs over woodlands triggered by rain events, which matches the finding of Pummer et al. well. Plants originating from the northern timberline experience harsh conditions with night frost even during the warm seasons. To prevent frost damages, those plants developed coping mechanisms. Many plant species, which are domestic in cold weather zones, exhibit ice nucleation activity. Therefore, it is important to examine those plants to understand the scale at which biological INPs can be emitted. For the presented results we focus on two types of samples: Berries and tree pollen. Both belong to plants domestic at the northern timberline. With our results we are able to show that INPs are spread vastly throughout different species. Furthermore, all those INPs show certain similarities to each other, most importantly, all of the found INPs seem to be associated to macromolecules in the nano-particulate size range. We examined the INPs from birch pollen more closely. Results indicate that proteins play a major role. Pummer, B., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S

  16. Ignition of Deflagration and Detonation Ahead of the Flame due to Radiative Preheating of Suspended Micro Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M F; Liberman, M A

    2014-01-01

    We study a flame propagating in the gaseous combustible mixture with suspended inert solid micro particles. The gaseous mixture is assumed to be transparent for thermal radiation emitted by the hot combustion products, while particles absorb and reemit the radiation. Thermal radiation heats the particles, which in turn transfer the heat to the surrounding unburned gaseous mixture by means of thermal heat transfer. Different scenarios are possible depending on the spatial distribution of the particles, their size and the number density. In the case of uniform spatial distribution the radiation absorption ahead of the flame causes a modest increase of the combustion wave velocity. On the contrary, in the case of non-uniform distribution of the particles, such that the particles number density increases far ahead of the flame, the preheating caused by the thermal radiation may trigger additional source of ignition. Far enough ahead of the flame, where number density of particles is higher, the temperature due to...

  17. Atmospheric correction of CHRIS data: a first step towards suspended sediment quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Salama, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) sensor was launched on board of PROBA (PROject for on Board Anatomy) on October 22, 2001. The CHRIS sensor will acquire sets of images over an area of 18km by 18km within the Belgian coastal zone near Oostende. This area exhibits a permanent high load of suspended sediments. Values are of the order of 40mg/l off the coast and may increase (especially in the winter) to more than 100 mg/l. This high load of suspended sediment arises from ...

  18. Effects of atmospheric particles from Southern California on the optical properties of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Stramski, Dariusz; Cichocka, Marta; Cieplak, Agnieszka; Woźniak, SłAwomir B.

    2008-08-01

    The role of particles deposited from the atmosphere to the ocean is poorly understood in ocean optics. We examined the light absorption and scattering properties of atmospheric particulate matter, which was collected by dry deposition near the Pacific coastline in La Jolla, Southern California, and then suspended in particle-free seawater for subsequent laboratory measurements. Within these suspensions, we measured the spectral absorption and beam attenuation coefficients, particle size distribution, and particle mass concentration of atmospheric particles. We also determined the 4-week average aerosol deposition rates at the experimental site over a period of 9 months. The mass-specific particle absorption ap*(λ) and scattering bp*(λ) coefficients showed considerable variability among the samples because of the variations in particle size distribution and composition. For example, ap*(440) was on average 0.042 m2 g-1 but exhibited over fivefold range among the samples. At near-infrared wavelengths (750-800 nm), the magnitude of ap* was significant (>0.02 m2 g-1 for a number of samples) and is likely attributable to the presence of black carbon. The bp*(λ) values were virtually wavelength-independent because of the significant presence of relatively large particles (>10 μm) in our samples. The magnitude of bp*(λ) varied within a 3.5-fold range, with an average value of ˜0.27 m2 g-1. Our determinations of absorption and scattering by atmospheric particles coupled with radiative transfer simulations suggest that aerosol deposition may have sizable effect on ocean optical properties, including remote sensing reflectance under certain scenarios of deposition events, residence time of deposited particles within the water column, and particle properties.

  19. Progress in the Analysis of Complex Atmospheric Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K; Knopf, Daniel A; Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup

    2016-06-12

    This article presents an overview of recent advances in field and laboratory studies of atmospheric particles formed in processes of environmental air-surface interactions. The overarching goal of these studies is to advance predictive understanding of atmospheric particle composition, particle chemistry during aging, and their environmental impacts. The diversity between chemical constituents and lateral heterogeneity within individual particles adds to the chemical complexity of particles and their surfaces. Once emitted, particles undergo transformation via atmospheric aging processes that further modify their complex composition. We highlight a range of modern analytical approaches that enable multimodal chemical characterization of particles with both molecular and lateral specificity. When combined, these approaches provide a comprehensive arsenal of tools for understanding the nature of particles at air-surface interactions and their reactivity and transformations with atmospheric aging. We discuss applications of these novel approaches in recent studies and highlight additional research areas to explore the environmental effects of air-surface interactions. PMID:27306308

  20. Progress in the Analysis of Complex Atmospheric Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup

    2016-06-01

    This article presents an overview of recent advances in field and laboratory studies of atmospheric particles formed in processes of environmental air-surface interactions. The overarching goal of these studies is to advance predictive understanding of atmospheric particle composition, particle chemistry during aging, and their environmental impacts. The diversity between chemical constituents and lateral heterogeneity within individual particles adds to the chemical complexity of particles and their surfaces. Once emitted, particles undergo transformation via atmospheric aging processes that further modify their complex composition. We highlight a range of modern analytical approaches that enable multimodal chemical characterization of particles with both molecular and lateral specificity. When combined, these approaches provide a comprehensive arsenal of tools for understanding the nature of particles at air-surface interactions and their reactivity and transformations with atmospheric aging. We discuss applications of these novel approaches in recent studies and highlight additional research areas to explore the environmental effects of air-surface interactions.

  1. Radiative transfer model for the computation of radiance and polarization in an ocean-atmosphere system: polarization properties of suspended matter for remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, M; Santer, R; Dilligeard, E

    2001-05-20

    A radiative transfer code termed OSOA for the ocean-atmosphere system that is able to predict the total and the polarized signals has been developed. The successive-orders-of-scattering method is used. The air-water interface is modeled as a planar mirror. Four components grouped by their optical properties, pure seawater, phytoplankton, nonchlorophyllose matter, and yellow substances, are included in the water column. Models are validated through comparisons with standard models. The numerical accuracy of the method is better than 2%; high computational efficiency is maintained. The model is used to study the influence of polarization on the detection of suspended matter. Polarizing properties of hydrosols are discussed: phytoplankton cells exhibit weak polarization and small inorganic particles, which are strong backscatterers, contribute appreciably to the polarized signal. Therefore the use of the polarized signal to extract the sediment signature promises good results. Also, polarized radiance could improve characterization of aerosols when open ocean waters are treated. PMID:18357248

  2. Anthropogenic versus geogenic contribution to total suspended atmospheric particulate matter and its variations during a two-year sampling period in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Nina; Norra, Stefan; Chai, Fahe; Chen, Yizhen; Wang, Shulan; Stüben, Doris

    2010-02-01

    Weekly samples of total suspended particles in air (TSP) were taken in south-east Beijing for a two-year period continuously from August 2005 to August 2007. Mass concentrations varied between 76 and 1028 microg m(-3) with an average concentration of 370 microg m(-3) for the whole period. The chemical composition and the mass concentration of aerosols in combination with meteorological data are reflecting specific influences of distinct aerosol sources on the pollution of Beijing's atmosphere. Lead (Pb), titanium (Ti), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) concentrations were chosen as indicator elements for different sources. Their amounts considerably varied over the course of the year. Element ratios, such as Pb/Ti, supported the distinction between periods of predominant geogenic or anthropogenic caused pollution. However, the interactions between aerosols from different sources are numerous and aerosol pollution still is a big and complex challenge for the sustainable development of Beijing. PMID:20145883

  3. Evidence for a bimodal size distribution for the suspended aerosol particles on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, A. A.; Montmessin, F.; Rodin, A. V.; Korablev, O. I.; Määttänen, A.; Maltagliati, L.; Bertaux, J.-L.

    2014-03-01

    First simultaneous analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) atmospheric extinctions from SPICAM/Mars Express solar occultations in the beginning of the Northern summer (Ls = 56-97°) is presented. The two SPICAM channels allow sounding of the martian atmosphere in the spectral range from 0.118 to 1.7 μm at the altitudes from 10 to 80 km. Based on Mie scattering theory with adequate refraction indices for dust and H2O ice, a bimodal distribution of aerosol has been inferred from the SPICAM measurements. The coarser mode is represented by both dust and H2O particles with average radius of 0.7 and 1.2 μm, respectively, with number density from 0.01 to 10 particles in cm3. Clouds belonging to the aphelion cloud belt have been observed in midlatitudes in the Southern and the Northern hemispheres at altitudes of 20-30 km. The clouds are formed of large particles, and their opacity in the UV and the IR is below 0.03. The finer mode with a radius of 0.04-0.07 μm and a number density from 1 cm-3 at 60 km to 1000 cm-3 at 20 km has been detected in both hemispheres. In the Southern hemisphere the finer mode extends up to 70 km, whereas in the Northern hemisphere it is confined below 30-40 km. The lack of condensation nuclei is consistent, but could not fully explain the high water supersaturation observed between 30 and 50 km in the same Northern hemisphere dataset (Maltagliati L., Montmessin, F., Fedorova, A., Korablev, O., Forget, F., Bertaux, J.-L. [2011]. Science 333, 1868-1871). The average size of the fine mode (∼50 nm) and the large number density (up to 1000 cm-3) most likely corresponds to Aitken particles (r survival of the observed bimodal distribution.

  4. Suspended particles only marginally reduce pyrethroid toxicity to the freshwater invertebrate Gammarus pulex (L.) during pulse exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Cedergreen, Nina; Kronvang, Brian; Andersen, Maj-Britt Bjergager; Nørum, Ulrik; Kretschmann, Andreas; Strobel, Bjarne Westergaard; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2016-04-01

    Current ecotoxicological research on particle-associated pyrethroids in freshwater systems focuses almost exclusively on sediment-exposure scenarios and sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrates. We studied how suspended particles influence acute effects of lambda-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin on the epibenthic freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) using brief pulse exposures followed by a 144 h post exposure recovery phase. Humic acid (HA) and the clay mineral montmorillonite (MM) were used as model sorbents in environmentally realistic concentrations (5, 25 and 125 mg L(-1)). Mortality of G. pulex was recorded during the post exposure recovery phase and locomotor behavior was measured during exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin. We found that HA in concentrations ≥25 mg L(-1) adsorbed the majority of pyrethroids but only reduced mortality of G. pulex up to a factor of four compared to pyrethroid-only treatments. MM suspensions adsorbed a variable fraction of pyrethroids (10% for bifenthrin and 70% for lambda-cyhalothrin) but did not significantly change the concentration-response relationship compared to pure pyrethroid treatments. Behavioral responses and immobilisation rate of G. pulex were reduced in the presence of HA, whereas behavioral responses and immobilisation rate were increased in the presence of MM. This indicates that G. pulex was capable of sensing the bioavailable fraction of lambda-cyhalothrin. Our results imply that suspended particles reduce to only a limited extent the toxicity of pyrethroids to G. pulex and that passive uptake of pyrethroids can be significant even when pyrethroids are adsorbed to suspended particles. PMID:26831865

  5. Stability Of Superposed Fluids Through Magnetic Field With Suspended Particles Of Different Permeability Saturated Through Porous Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2015-12-01

    The instability of plane interface between two superposed Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluids saturated through a porous medium has been studied to include the suspended (dust) particles effect. Following the linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis the dispersion relation is obtained. For stationary convection, the Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid behaves like Newtonian fluids. It found that for a potentially stable arrangement the Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid of different permeabilities in the presence of suspended particles in a porous medium is stable, whereas in a potentially unstable case instability of the system occurs. In the presence of a magnetic field for a potentially stable arrangement the system is always stable and for the potentially unstable arrangement, the magnetic field succeeds in stabilizing certain wave-number band which was unstable in the absence of the magnetic field.

  6. Stability Of Superposed Fluids Through Magnetic Field With Suspended Particles Of Different Permeability Saturated Through Porous Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The instability of plane interface between two superposed Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluids saturated through a porous medium has been studied to include the suspended (dust particles effect. Following the linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis the dispersion relation is obtained. For stationary convection, the Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid behaves like Newtonian fluids. It found that for a potentially stable arrangement the Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid of different permeabilities in the presence of suspended particles in a porous medium is stable, whereas in a potentially unstable case instability of the system occurs. In the presence of a magnetic field for a potentially stable arrangement the system is always stable and for the potentially unstable arrangement, the magnetic field succeeds in stabilizing certain wave-number band which was unstable in the absence of the magnetic field.

  7. Spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles in the Daliao River Estuary, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yanwen; Han, Chaonan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Yingqun; Shi, Yao; Liu, Zhichao; Yang, Chenchen

    2016-08-01

    The transport and storage of phosphorus in estuary is a complex biogeochemical process as the result of the convergence of fresh and saline water. The objective of the current study is to investigate the spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles of Daliao River Estuary, China. Samples were collected in August (wet season) and November (dry season), 2013. The results showed that total particulate phosphorus (TPP) in water accounted for more than 50 % of the total phosphorus (TP). Meanwhile, in suspended particles, more than 62 % of particulate phosphorus was in the form of bioavailable phosphorus, including exchangeable phosphorus (Exc-P), extractable organic phosphorus (Exo-P), and iron-bound phosphorus (Fe-P), which meant that the potential impacts of bioavailable phosphorus in suspended particles on estuarine water environment cannot be ignored. There were significantly seasonal variations of phosphorus fractions in the Daliao River Estuary. The concentrations of phosphorus fractions in water in wet season were much lower than that in dry season because of the dilution effect of larger rainfall in wet season. In addition, spatial distribution characteristics of phosphorus fractions were also obvious. Due to terrigenous phosphorus input from the upstream of tidal reach and seawater dilution effect in coastal estuary, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentrations in water gradually decreased from tidal reach to coastal estuary. However, the concentrations of TPP and TP in water and Exo-P in suspended particles presented spatial fluctuation, and these were greatly attributed to sediment re-suspension in coastal estuary. PMID:27155833

  8. Inhibition of rainbow trout acetylcholinesterase by aqueous and suspended particle-associated organophosphorous insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Armin; Radau, Tanja S; Hahn, Torsten; Schulz, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Spraydrift and edge-of-field runoff are important routes of pesticide entry into streams. Pesticide contamination originating from spraydrift usually resides in the water phase, while pesticides in contaminated runoff are to a large extent associated with suspended particles (SPs). The effects of two organophosphorous insecticides (OPs), chloropyrifos (CPF) and azinphos-methyl (AZP), on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rainbow trout were compared between two exposure scenarios, simulating spraydrift- and runoff-borne contamination events in the Lourens River (LR), Western Cape, South Africa. NOECs of brain AChE inhibition, determined after 1h of exposure followed by 24h of recovery, were 0.33microgl(-1) for aqueous CPF, 200mgkg(-1) for SP-associated CPF and 20mgkg(-1) for SP-associated AZP (at 0.5gl(-1) SP). The highest aqueous AZP concentration tested (3.3microgl(-1)) was without significant effects. Previously reported peak levels of aqueous CPF in the LR ( approximately 0.2microgl(-1)) are close to its NOEC (this study), suggesting a significant toxicological risk to fish in the LR. By contrast, reported levels of SP-associated OPs in the LR are 20-200-fold lower than their NOECs (this study). In a comparative in situ study, trout were exposed for seven days at agricultural (LR2, LR3) and upstream reference (LR1) sites. No runoff occurred during the study. Brain AChE was significantly inhibited at LR3. However, OP levels at LR3 (CPF 0.01microgl(-1); AZP 0.14microgl(-1)) were minor compared to concentrations having effects in the laboratory (see above). Additionally, muscle AChE activity was significantly higher in caged trout from LR1 than in animals maintained in laboratory tanks. PMID:17418885

  9. Characterization and morphology of solids suspended in rain water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the results obtained from the analysis of rain water in Mexico. The study treats over the characterization and morphology of the solids suspended in form of particles in the atmosphere. The solids suspended were obtained of the pluvial precipitations after these have been centrifuged. Subsequently of the separation, the particulate matter was analysed by Sem and X-ray dispersive energy

  10. Parameterization of ionization induced in the atmosphere by precipitating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonov, Anton; Usoskin, Ilya; Kovaltsov, Gennady

    We present a physical model to calculate ionization induced in the atmosphere by precipitating particles. This model is based on the Bethe-Bloch equation applied for precipitating particles such as: electrons, alpha-particles and protons. The energy range of precipitating particles is up to 5MeV and 80MeV/nuc respectively. This model provides an easy implementation with a robust realization of model calculations for a wide range of incident energies of precipitating particles. This method is limited to the upper-middle atmosphere. An ionization yield function [see, Usoskin and Kovaltsov, 2006; Usoskin, Kovaltsov, Mironova, 2010] can be also used in this model, making it possible to calculate the atmospheric ionization effect of precipitating particles for the entire atmosphere, dawn to the ground.

  11. Probing of the Changing Shapes and Viscosity of Suspended Organic Particles as a Function of Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Sanchez, M. S.; Douet, C.; Wang, Y.; Bateman, A. P.; Gong, Z.; Kuwata, M.; Wolff, L. R.; Liu, P.; Sato, B. B.; Bertram, A. K.; Geiger, F.; Martin, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles of secondary organic material (SOM) were produced by α-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. The aerosol flow was passed into a chamber with a long residence time where coagulation of primary particles occurred. An experimental apparatus, consisting of a differential mobility analyzer coupled to a particle mass analyzer (DMA-APM), was used to classify coagulated particles by particle electric mobility diameter (52.4 to 190.0 nm) and then to measure associated particle mass. From these data, the dynamic shape factor was determined for particles of known material density. Experiments were conducted for variable relativity humidity (RH). The results showed that the dynamic shape factor depended on post-coagulation particle number concentration, particle diameter, and relative humidity. For some particle number concentrations, coagulation occurred between particles of similar diameters under dry conditions (< 5% RH), thereby forming non-spherical particles. The dynamic shape factors were observed to change from 1.24 to 1.02 between 5 and 35% RH, and 1.27 to 1.03 between 20% to 60% RH, implying a transformation from non-spherical to round shapes. The shape change arose from decreased viscosity at elevated RH, allowing the material to flow and thereby form a spherical shape (i.e., as favored by minimization of surface area). Numerical modeling was used to estimate the particle viscosity associated with this flow. Based on the particle size and exposure time to elevated RH, the viscosity was determined from 109 Pa s down to 107 Pa s from 3% RH to 65% RH. The experiments establish a method for estimating the viscosity of suspended submicron aerosol particles based on changes in particle shape.

  12. The active surface of suspended particles as a predictor of lung function and pulmonary symptoms in Austrian school children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Neuberger, Manfred

    At a central elementary school in the capital of Upper Austria children aged 7-10 years underwent repeated respiratory health checkups (questionnaires, diaries, spirometry). Between March and May 2001 the daily means of the signals of a diffusion charging sensor, measuring the "active surface" of suspended particles, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, measuring the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were related to spirometric results of the total 164 children examined and to the daily symptom scores of a susceptible subgroup. Significant reductions of forced vital capacity ( p=0.006) and forced expiratory volume in the first second ( p=0.001) and significant increases of wheezing ( p=0.001), shortness of breath ( p=0.041), cough in the evening ( p=0.031) and at night ( p=0.018) were found with increase of "active surface" of suspended particles measured at the adjacent outdoor monitoring station, but not with the increase of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Monitoring "active surface" of particles with diameters of about 10 nm-1 μm by means of a diffusion charging sensor might provide additional information in surveillance of particulate matter for prevention of acute effects on respiratory health.

  13. The role of colloids and suspended particles in radionuclide transport in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is developing a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in a deep engineered vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield and is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to document its case for the acceptability of the disposal concept. This report, one in a series of supporting documents for the EIS, addresses the role of particles in radionuclide transport. It summarizes our studies of natural particles in groundwater and presents the arguments used to justify the omission of particle-facilitated transport in the geosphere model that is based on the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) and used in the postclosure assessment study case. Because radiocolloids formed in the vault will not be able to migrate through the clay buffer, radiocolloid formation in the geosphere will be determined by the sorption of radionuclides onto particles in groundwater. These particles consist of typical fracture-lining minerals, such as clays, micas and quartz; precipitated particles, such as colloidal silica and Fe-Si oxyhydroxides; and organic particles. In groundwater from the WRA, the average concentrations of colloids and suspended particles are 0.34 and 1.4 mg/L respectively. Particle-facilitated transport is not included in the geosphere model because the concentrations of particles in groundwater from the WRA are too low to have a significant impact on radionuclide transport. (author). 92 refs., 11 tabs., 13 figs

  14. Oxidation - Membrane method for cleaning LRW with large contents of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general structural scheme for cleaning ?problematic? liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) containing large amount of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances has been proposed. The technological scheme includes two main stages: 1) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and the larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration, 2) purification of radioactive waters from radionuclides by membrane-sorption to the level of applied norms of radiation safety. The filtration stage has been considered as a three-step process of 'problematic' LRW treatment which includes: 1) LRW extraction from storage tanks with a robot intended for washing out the bottom sediment (slurry), 2) LRW purification from suspended particles, oil product emulsions and larger part of colloidal particles by filtration through porous or gauze diaphragms of 0.1 to 10 μm pores (cells) in size, 3) concentration of slurry up to 100-200 g/l of inorganic suspended particles and oil product emulsions. Two possible variants of porous or gauze diaphragms capacity and lifetime increase between their surface regenerations have been shown: 1) possibility of an oxidizer introduction into initial LRW, 2) possibility to rotate a filtering element (disk or cylinder type). Two main variants of the membrane-sorption technological schemes of LRW cleaning have been proposed. The first variant (AQUA-EXPRESS technology) applies purification of radioactive waters in a cascade of sorption filters charged with diverse selective to individual radionuclides sorbents and polishing by ultrafiltration. This variant allows purifying LRW which chemical composition is similar to surface and main water and 'simple' radionuclide composition (for example, 137Cs, 90Sr, 60Co). The second variant (RO-technology) applies the reverse osmosis with the following polishing of permeate (filtrate) by selective inorganic sorbents. The RO-technology as compared with the AQUA-EXPRESS technology gives the less

  15. Particle-area dependence of mineral dust in the immersion mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured by using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows to freely suspending single drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. Heterogeneous nucleation caused by several mineral dust particles (montmorillonite, two types of illite) was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 \\unit{mm} in radius were monitored by a video camera during cooling down to -28 °C to simulate the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was remotely determined with an infra-red thermometer so that the onset of freezing was indicated. For comparisons, measurements with one particle type were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 \\unit{{μ}m} radius freely suspended. The data were interpreted regarding the particle surfaces immersed in the drops. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C in dependence of particle type and surface area per drop. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model.

  16. Chemical characterization of particulate matter suspended in the atmosphere of two Brazilian cities using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective was to evaluate the chemical composition of suspended particulate matter in the atmospheres of Londrina (Parana State) and Piracicaba (Sao Paulo State) - two southern Brazilian cities. The sampling was carried- out in the winter/2002 and summer/2003, with a stacker filter holder, which allowed for the simultaneous collection of fine particles (with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm) and coarse particles (between 2.5 and 10 μm), using 47 mm diameter filters of 0.4 and 8 μm pore diameters, respectively. The sample analyses were carried out with the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique, using a Mo target X-ray tube and a Si(Li) detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer. The excitation and detection of the characteristic X-rays were done in vacuous (Fe filter, 10 kV, 40 mA) and air atmospheres (Zr filter, 25 kV, 10 mA), quantifying 16 chemical elements in the particulate matter in the range-from Al to Zr. The obtained X-ray spectra were interpreted using the AXIL software and- the chemical element quantification was carried out by the fundamental parameters methodology, employing thin standard films produced by MicroMatter. The accuracy of the analytical method was assessed using a thin glass film, Standard Reference Material produced by the National Bureau of Standards. The average element concentrations in the fine and coarse fractions were different, with S being the major element in the fine fraction in the winter and summer in both cities, and Si, Fe, Al and Ca-in the coarse fraction. The grouping analysis revealed that the elements in the aerosol particles came basically from two sources: soil re-suspension and industrial/anthropogenic activities.

  17. Numerical simulation of microstructure formation of suspended particles in magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure formation of magnetic particles and nonmagnetic particles in magnetorheological (MR) fluids is investigated using the particle method simulation based on simplified Stokesian dynamics. Spherical nonmagnetic particles are rearranged in the field direction due to the formation of magnetic particles in chain-like clusters. Cluster formation of spherocylindrical magnetic particles forces spherical nonmagnetic particles to arrange in the direction of the field. In contrast, the spherocylindrical nonmagnetic particles, with an aspect ratio of two or three, are not sufficiently rearranged in the field direction by cluster formation of spherical magnetic particles. Even after cluster formation in the presence of a magnetic field, the uniformity of distribution of particles on the plane perpendicular to the field direction shows very little change. However, the deviation of uniformity in particle distribution is reduced when the volume fraction of magnetic particles is the same as that of nonmagnetic particles.

  18. Removal of Atmospheric Particles in Poor Visibility Outdoor Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen Al-Zubaidy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The visibility of a scene is degraded by weather phenomena such as rain drizzle, fog and haze. The degradation of image scene is due the substantial presence of particles in the atmosphere that scatter and absorb light. As the light spreads from object to the observer, the color and intensity is changed by the atmospheric particles. In this research, we suggest new methods to precisely detect airlight and correctly estimate the atmospheric veil from image that captured in bad weather. The result of suggested methods will be used in scattering atmospheric model to remove atmospheric particles namely, rain drizzle, fog and haze from a single image. Therefore a higher visibility image will be produced.

  19. Fingerprinting upland sediment sources : particle size-specific magnetic linkages between soils, lake and suspended sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Hatfield; Maher, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated erosion of fine-grained sediment is an environmental problem of international dimensions. Erosion control strategies and targeting of mitigation measures require robust and quantitative identification of sediment sources. Here, we use magnetic ‘fingerprinting’ to characterize soils, and examine their affinity with and contribution to suspended sediments transported within two subcatchments feeding Bassenthwaite Lake, northwest England. A high-resolution soil magnetic susceptibilit...

  20. Fast numerical method for solving the three-dimensional Stokes' equations in the presence of suspended particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fast numerical method for solving the three-dimensional Stokes' equations in the presence of suspended particles is presented. The fluid dynamics equations are solved on a lattice. A particle is represented by a set of points each of which moves at the local fluid velocity and is not constrained to lie on the lattice. These points are coupled by forces which resist deformation of the particle. These forces contribute to the force density in the Stokes' equations. As a result, a single set of fluid dynamics equations holds at all points of the domain and there are no internal boundaries. Particles size, shape, and deformability may be prescribed. Computational work increases only linearly with the number of particles, so large numbers (500--1000) of particles may be studied efficiently. The numerical method involves implicit calculation of the particle forces by minimizing an energy function and solution of a finite-difference approximation to the Stokes' equations using the Fourier--Toeplitz method. The numerical method has been implemented to run on all CRAY computers: the implementation exploits the CRAY's vectorized arithmetic, and on machines with insufficient central memory, it performs efficient disk I/O while storing most of the data on disk. Applications of the method to sedimentation of one-, two-, and many-particle systems are described. Trajectories and settling speeds for two-particle sedimentation, and settling speed for multiparticle sedimentation from initial distributions on a cubic lattice or at random give good quantitative agreement with existing theories. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc

  1. Evaluation of correlating factors between 238U concentration measured in fine and course atmospheric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air quality is ever more important in function of the enormous proportion of human actions that have affected the environment over the last two centuries. Particulate material is one among many pollutants that can cause great risk to human health and the environment. It can be classified as: Total Suspended Particles (TSP), defined simply as particles with less than 50 μm aerodynamic diameter (one group of these particles can be inhaled and may cause health problems, while others may unfavorably affect the population's quality of life, interfering in environmental conditions and impairing normal community activities); and Inhalable Particles (PM10), defined as those particles with less than 10 μm aerodynamic diameter. These particles penetrate the respiratory system and can reach pulmonary alveoli due to their small size, causing serious health damage. The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has monitored air quality around its installations since 2000. CDTN's Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP) includes monitoring radioactivity levels contained in atmospheric TSP. In order to optimize its program, CDTN is carrying out a study to estimate the correlation between concentrations of particulate material measured in TSP and those measured in PM10, PI2.5 and PI1, as well as determination of activity concentration for each controlled radionuclide in all parts. The objective of this study is to present preliminary results and report 238U activity concentration results. (author)

  2. Evaluation of correlating factors between {sup 238}U concentration measured in fine and course atmospheric particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Claudia Marques; Jacomino, Vanusa Maria Feliciano; Barreto, Alberto Avelar; Dias, Vagner Silva, E-mail: cmp@cdtn.b, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b, E-mail: aab@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dias, Fabiana Ferrari, E-mail: fdias@cnen.gov.b [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN-/MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC)

    2009-07-01

    Air quality is ever more important in function of the enormous proportion of human actions that have affected the environment over the last two centuries. Particulate material is one among many pollutants that can cause great risk to human health and the environment. It can be classified as: Total Suspended Particles (TSP), defined simply as particles with less than 50 mum aerodynamic diameter (one group of these particles can be inhaled and may cause health problems, while others may unfavorably affect the population's quality of life, interfering in environmental conditions and impairing normal community activities); and Inhalable Particles (PM{sub 10}), defined as those particles with less than 10 mum aerodynamic diameter. These particles penetrate the respiratory system and can reach pulmonary alveoli due to their small size, causing serious health damage. The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has monitored air quality around its installations since 2000. CDTN's Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP) includes monitoring radioactivity levels contained in atmospheric TSP. In order to optimize its program, CDTN is carrying out a study to estimate the correlation between concentrations of particulate material measured in TSP and those measured in PM{sub 10}, PI{sub 2.5} and PI{sub 1}, as well as determination of activity concentration for each controlled radionuclide in all parts. The objective of this study is to present preliminary results and report {sup 238}U activity concentration results. (author)

  3. Lead isotopic compositions of atmospheric suspended particulate matter in Nagoya City as measured by HR-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead isotope ratios in atmospheric suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected in Nagoya City were measured by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Before analyzing SPM samples, the present method was evaluated by analyzing standard reference material (SRM 981) for common lead isotopic standard from NIST. The analytical results for 207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb for SRM 981 were 0.9160±0.0006 and 2.136±0.003, respectively, which were almost coincident with the certified values of 0.91464±0.00033 and 2.1681±0.0008, respectively. The lead isotope ratios in SPM samples collected daily in Nagoya University were analyzed in order to elucidate their origins, and the results were compared with various kinds of ores. It was found that most SPM samples showed some mixed compositions of lead isotope ratios of lead ores from USA and Australia, which suggested utilization of large amount of lead ores imported from these two countries. On the other hand, some samples showed mixed compositions of lead ores from Asian continent, which might be resulted from the long-range transportation of atmospheric SPM from Asian continent to Japan. (author)

  4. The radiation in the atmosphere during major solar particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Simon N.; Dyer, Clive S.; Lei, Fan

    Major solar particle events can give rise to greatly enhanced radiation throughout the entire atmosphere including at aircraft altitudes. These particle events are very hard to predict and their effect on aircraft is difficult to calculate. A comprehensive model of the energetic radiation in the atmosphere has been developed based on a response matrix of the atmosphere to energetic particle incidence. This model has previously been used to determine the spectral form of several ground level neutron events including February 1956 and September/October 1989. Significant validation of the model has been possible using CREAM data flying onboard Concorde during the September/October 1989 events. Further work has been carried out for the current solar maximum, including estimates of the solar particle spectra during the July 2000, April 2001, and October 2003 events and comparisons of predicted atmospheric measurements with limited flight data. Further CREAM data have been obtained onboard commercial airlines and high altitude business jets during quiet time periods. In addition, the atmospheric radiation model, along with solar particle spectra, have been used to calculate the neutron flux and dose rates along several commercial aircraft flight paths including London to Los Angeles. The influence of rigidity cut-off suppression by geomagnetic storms is examined and shows that the received flight dose during disturbed periods can be significantly enhanced compared with quiet periods.

  5. Estimate Total Number of the Earth Atmospheric Particle with Standard Atmosphere Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2001-01-01

    The total number of atmospheric particle (AP) is an important datum for planetary science and geoscience.Estimating entire AP number is also a familiar question in general physics.With standard atmosphere model,considering the number difference of AP caused by rough and uneven in the earth surface below,the sum of dry clean atmosphere particle is 1.06962 × 1044.So the whole number of AP including water vapor is 1.0740 × 1044.The rough estimation for the total number of AP on other planets (or satellites) in condensed state is also discussed on the base of it.

  6. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the atmosphere: Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haszpra, Tímea; Lagzi, István; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of dispersion and deposition of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is an essential issue, because they have an effect on the biosphere and atmosphere. Moreover, aerosol particles have different transport properties and chemical and physical transformations in the atmosphere compared to gas phase air pollutants. The motion of a particle is described by a set of ordinary differential equations. The large-scale dynamics in the horizontal direction can be described by the equations of passive scalar advection, but in the vertical direction a well-defined terminal velocity should be taken into account as a term added to the vertical wind component. In the planetary boundary layer turbulent diffusion has an important role in the particle dispersion, which is taken into account by adding stochastic terms to the deterministic equations above. Wet deposition is also an essential process in the lower levels of the atmosphere, however, its precise parameterization is a challenge. For the simulations the wind field and other necessary data were taken from the ECMWF ERA-Interim database. In the case of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (March-April 2011) radioactive aerosol particles were also released in the planetary boundary layer. Simulations (included the continuous and varying emission from the nuclear power plant) will be presented for the period of 14-23 March. Results show that wet deposition also has to be taken into consideration in the lower levels of the atmosphere. Furthermore, dynamical system characteristics are evaluated for the aerosol particle dynamics. The escape rate of particles was estimated both with and without turbulent diffusion, and in both cases when there was no wet deposition and also when wet deposition was taken into consideration.

  7. DNS with Discrete Element Modeling of Suspended Sediment Particles in an Open Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksereht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Interactions of glass particles in water in a turbulent open channel flow over a smooth bed with gravity perpendicular to the mean flow is examined using direct numerical simulation (DNS) together with Lagrangian Discrete-Element-Model (DEM) for particles. The turbulent Reynolds number (Reτ) is 710 corresponding to the experimental observations of Righetti & Romano (JFM, 2004). Particles of size 200 microns with volume loading on the order of 10-3 are simulated using four-way coupling with standard models for drag, added mass, lift, pressure, and inter-particle collision forces. The presence of particles affect the outer as well as inner region of the wall layer where particle inertia and concentration are higher. The DNS-DEM is able to capture the fluid-particle interactions in the outer layer accurately. However, in the inner layer, an increase in mean as well as rms fluid velocity, as observed in the experiments, is not predicted by the DNS-DEM model. It is conjectured that particles slide and roll on the bottom wall, creating slip-like condition. Predictions using different models for drag and lift forces, as well as strong torque coupling are explored and compared with experimental data. Funding: NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows.

  8. Suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment-laden rivers and streams pose substantial environmental and economic challenges. Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, and transports harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011 indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in the driftless region of southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. During the 2011 spring runoff, the single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis- St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been determined to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. Because of this, the MPCA was interested in quantifying the differences between SSC and TSS in different parts of the State. Comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. The largest percent difference between SSC and TSS was measured at the South Branch Buffalo River at Sabin, and the smallest difference was observed at the Des Moines

  9. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  10. Arsenic speciation in water, suspended particles, and coastal organisms from the Taehwa River Estuary of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Hye-Ok; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Jung-Suk; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-07-15

    Water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and biota samples were collected from the Taehwa River Estuary to determine the distributions, partitioning, and bioaccumulation of arsenicals. Six forms of As were quantitated by the use of HPLC-ICP/MS. As was found mainly near urban and industrial areas, and inorganic As(V) was the predominant As form in both water and SPM. Particulate arsenicals were found at the greatest concentrations in coarse particles (>180μm), followed by medium (30-180μm) and fine (0.45-30μm) particles, in freshwater. Arsenical concentrations were similar across the three particle fractions in saltwater. Field-based distribution coefficient (Kd) values for As depended strongly on SPM, with a less robust dependence on salinity. Concentrations of As were greater in macroalgae than in marine animals, such as fishes, bivalves, crabs, shrimps, and gastropods. Overall, the results of the present study provide useful information on the behaviors and fate of arsenicals in an estuarine environment. PMID:27114086

  11. Characterization of suspended solids and particle-bound heavy metals in a first flush of highway runoff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-hui NIE; Tian LI; Hai-feng YAO; Man FENG; Guang-kai ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the dynamic characteristics of total suspended solids(TSS)and their particle-bound heavy metals in a first flush,the runoffsampling together with its flow rate measuring was conducted for three rainfall events at outfalls of highway in Shanghai from June to September 2007.Field samples were analyzed to determine the concentrations of TSS and particle-bound heavy metals,such as Zn,Pb,and Cu.Results show that the wash off behavior of TSS under varying runoff rate condition can be explained by different antecedent dry weather period(ADWP).Contribution of fine fraction(45 μm).When the runoff flow increased obviously,a significant contribution of the coarse fraction was observed for a certain rainfall events with long antecedent dry weather condition.The changes of total metals concentration and particle-bound metal concentrations were strongly dependent on the TSS variation.TSS was generally well correlated with most particulate-bound heavy metals.Of the heavy metals,the concentration of Zn was found considerably high and that of Pb was significantly low at North Zhongshan 2 Road,in Shanghai,China,but they are still within the range reported in the literature.Fluctuation of heavy metal contents in the coarse fraction during a first flush period was more significant compared with that in the fine fraction.The results will assist in the development of effective control strategies to minimize heavy metals and solids in highway runoff.

  12. Determination of physical and dynamic properties of suspended particles in water column with ultrasonic scanning in between the water surface and stable sediment layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Ozeren, Sinan; Cagatay, Namık; Sari, Erol; Vardar, Denizhan; Eris, Kadir

    2015-04-01

    The behavior of seafloor sediment with its water column should be known against any occurrences of anoxic or oxic conditions. The most important ones of these conditions are possible leakage of natural gas or escape of liquids from sediment. On the basis of combined solid/liquid flow dynamics in sedimentation, such kind of events can change, even in an effective manner, the dynamic movements of molecules and their cumulative mass of particules, i.e. the suspended materials. The deployment of suitable sediment traps or ultrasonic transducers somewhere in the water column are not easy attempts in order to obtain useful information about the state of suspended materials during sedimentation. These are usually bulky instruments; therefore they may behave like an anti-move suppresser on the particles moving in the float direction, in oxic and anoxic manner. These instruments, on the other hand, may cover the effects of diffusive flow or bubble formed gas and fluid escape from the sediment surface into the water column. Ultrasonic scanners, however, are able to make observations in a remote manner, without affecting such artificial events. Our field trials were successfully completed at the historical estuary called Halic of Marmara sea . The physical properties; such as the velocity of particles, their travel directions, their dimensions and the ability to observe anti-compositor crushes of shock waves of the bubbles are only a few of these observations in natural ambience. The most important problem solved about water pressure during 3 atmosphere . The sensor has been tested successfully few times. We used the ''High voltage electric isolator oil filling'' to the inside of the scanner for pressure equalization between outer side and inner body of probe at a depth of (20 meters) beneath the sea surface . The transmitted signals by the planar crystal of the transducer become weaker under the pressure of overlying water column in depths. Our efforts are now focused on the

  13. Comparison Study of Vibration Control Effects between Suspended Tuned Mass Damper and Particle Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration control performance and its influencing factors of a tuned mass damper and a particle damper are examined by a single degree of freedom structure with such devices. The vibration control effects between these two dampers are also investigated. Increasing the mass ratio of the damper can improve the damping effects; under the condition of tuning frequency, the damping effects are remarkable. However, the more the deviation from the tuned frequency, the less controlling effects can be obtained. The damping effect of a particle damper is generally better than that of a tuned mass damper. For this test model, the particle damper can improve primary structure’s equivalent damping ratio 19 times to the original one’s, while the tuned mass damper can be 13 times. The reason lies in the fact that the particle damper can dissipate input energy by tuning mass, collision, impact, and friction between particles and the container and the momentum exchange effects between the secondary damper mass and the primary structure.

  14. Unsteady Porous Channel Flow of a Conducting Fluid with Suspended Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagjit Pal Kaur

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of a viscous incompressible fluid embedded with a small spherical particle in the presence of a transverse magnetic field in a channel has been discussed. The cross-section of the channel is a porous regular hexagonal of side 4a and the walls are non-conducting. The analysis applied to the flows with pressure gradient which are arbitrary function of time. A few particular cases, flow for impulsive pressure gradient and for constant pressure gradient have been studied. The velocity of the fluid and particle decrease with increase in the intensity of the magnetic field.

  15. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate compounds have recently received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of nitrate-coated mineral particles in an individual particle scale in field study. The sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes occurred between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. The sizes, morphologies, and compositions of mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. 92% of the internally mixed mineral particles analyzed are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The major coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with less sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings strongly relate with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite within individual mineral particles. Calcium sulfate particles with the diameter from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO32 and Mg(NO32 coatings. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic coatings tend to be more spherical and larger. Such changes enhance their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  16. Solar energetic particle interactions with the Venusian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plainaki, Christina; Paschalis, Pavlos; Grassi, Davide; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the context of planetary space weather, we estimate the ion production rates in the Venusian atmosphere due to the interactions of solar energetic particles (SEPs) with gas. The assumed concept for our estimations is based on two cases of SEP events, previously observed in near-Earth space: the event in October 1989 and the event in May 2012. For both cases, we assume that the directional properties of the flux and the interplanetary magnetic field configuration would have allowed the SEPs' arrival at Venus and their penetration to the planet's atmosphere. For the event in May 2012, we consider the solar particle properties (integrated flux and rigidity spectrum) obtained by the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al., 2010, 2014) applied previously for the Earth case and scaled to the distance of Venus from the Sun. For the simulation of the actual cascade in the Venusian atmosphere initiated by the incoming particle fluxes, we apply the DYASTIMA code, a Monte Carlo (MC) application based on the Geant4 software (Paschalis et al., 2014). Our predictions are afterwards compared to other estimations derived from previous studies and discussed. Finally, we discuss the differences between the nominal ionization profile due to galactic cosmic-ray-atmosphere interactions and the profile during periods of intense solar activity, and we show the importance of understanding space weather conditions on Venus in the context of future mission preparation and data interpretation.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of optically levitated aerosol: a technique to quantitatively map the viscosity of suspended aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, C; Hosny, N A; Tong, H; Seville, P C; Gallimore, P J; Davidson, N M; Athanasiadis, A; Botchway, S W; Ward, A D; Kalberer, M; Kuimova, M K; Pope, F D

    2016-08-21

    We describe a technique to measure the viscosity of stably levitated single micron-sized aerosol particles. Particle levitation allows the aerosol phase to be probed in the absence of potentially artefact-causing surfaces. To achieve this feat, we combined two laser based techniques: optical trapping for aerosol particle levitation, using a counter-propagating laser beam configuration, and fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of molecular rotors for the measurement of viscosity within the particle. Unlike other techniques used to measure aerosol particle viscosity, this allows for the non-destructive probing of viscosity of aerosol particles without interference from surfaces. The well-described viscosity of sucrose aerosol, under a range of relative humidity conditions, is used to validate the technique. Furthermore we investigate a pharmaceutically-relevant mixture of sodium chloride and salbutamol sulphate under humidities representative of in vivo drug inhalation. Finally, we provide a methodology for incorporating molecular rotors into already levitated particles, thereby making the FLIM/optical trapping technique applicable to real world aerosol systems, such as atmospheric aerosols and those generated by pharmaceutical inhalers. PMID:27430158

  18. Thermoslutal Convection in Walters’ (Model B' Rotating Fluid Permeated with Suspended Particles and Variable Gravity Field in Porous Medium in Hydromagnetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Dr. Rana . G. C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermosolutal convection in Walters’ (Model B' elastico-viscous rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles (fine dust and variable gravity field in porous medium in hydromagnetics is considered. By applying normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved numerically. It is observed that the rotation, magnetic field, gravity field, suspended particles and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection, Walters’ (Model B' elastico-viscous fluid behave like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that rotation and stable solute gradient has stabilizing effects and suspended particles are found to have destabilizing effect on the system, whereas the medium permeability has stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the system under certain conditions. The magnetic field has destabilizing effect in the absence of rotation, whereas in the presence of rotation, magnetic field has stabilizing or destabilizing effect under certain conditions. The effect of rotation, suspended particles, magnetic field, stable solute gradient and medium permeability has also been shown graphically. AMS subject classifications are 76A10, 76E07, 76E25 and 76S05.

  19. A new approach in the prediction of the dissolution behavior of suspended particles by means of their particle size distribution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinke, A.P.; Houtte, K.J.A. van; Maesschalck, R. de; Verheyen, S.; Winter, H. de

    2005-01-01

    Though various attempts have been made in literature to model the particle size distribution of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in function of the required release profile of the pharmaceutical product, so far one has not succeeded to develop a universal approach in the correlation of part

  20. Mixing state of atmospheric particles over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. L.; Ma, N.; Kecorius, S.; Wang, P. C.; Hu, M.; Wang, Z. B.; Größ, J.; Wu, Z. J.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this unique processing study, the mixing state of ambient submicron aerosol particles in terms of hygroscopicity and volatility was investigated with a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer and a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer. The measurements were conducted at a regional atmospheric observational site in the North China Plain (NCP) from 8 July to 9 August, 2013. Multimodal patterns were observed in the probability density functions of the hygroscopicity parameter κ and the shrink factor, indicating that ambient particles are mostly an external mixture of particles with different hygroscopicity and volatility. Linear relationships were found between the number fraction of hydrophobic and non-volatile populations, reflecting the dominance of soot in hydrophobic and non-volatile particles. The number fraction of non-volatile particles is lower than that of hydrophobic particles in most cases, indicating that a certain fraction of hydrophobic particles is volatile. Distinct diurnal patterns were found for the number fraction of the hydrophobic and non-volatile particles, with a higher level at nighttime and a lower level during the daytime. The result of air mass classification shows that aerosol particles in air masses coming from north with high moving speed have a high number fraction of hydrophobic/non-volatile population, and are more externally mixed. Only minor differences can be found between the measured aerosol properties for the rest of the air masses. With abundant precursor in the NCP, no matter where the air mass originates, as far as it stays in the NCP for a certain time, aerosol particles may get aged and mixed with newly emitted particles in a short time.

  1. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  2. Determination of particle size and content of metals in the atmosphere of ZMCM (Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inside the breathable fraction of the atmosphere of Mexico City, the presence of metals in suspended particles, is determined and quantified. The detection was carry out simultaneously in three places of the city, using collectors of the type stacking filter unit (SFU) which allow the separation of particles according to its size. The SFU detectors allow the separation in two size: 'Gross' mass from 2.5 to 1.5 μm and 'fine' mass for particles smallest than 2.5 μm. The analysis of the samples was fulfilled by means of PIXE method. Samples were irradiated with a proton beam, and based in the X-ray spectra the elements were identified and quantified, which allow to establish the temporal behavior of the concentrations per element for gross mass and fine mass in each one of the places of sampling. (Author)

  3. Near-bottom suspended matter concentration on the Continental Shelf during storms: estimates based on in situ observations of light transmission and a particle size dependent transmissometer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Butman, B.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory calibration of Sea Tech and Montedoro-Whitney beam transmissometers shows a linear relation between light attenuation coefficient (cp) and suspended matter concentration (SMC) for natural sediments and for glass beads. However the proportionality constant between cp and SMC depends on the particle diameter and particle type. Thus, to measure SMC, observations of light attenuation must be used with a time-variable calibration when suspended particle characteristics change with time. Because of this variable calibration, time series of light attenuation alone may not directly reflect SMC and must be interpreted with care. The near-bottom concentration of suspended matter during winter storms on the U.S. East Coast Continental Shelf is estimated from light transmission measurements made 2 m above the bottom and from the size distribution of suspended material collected simultaneously in sediment traps 3 m above the bottom. The average concentrations during six storms between December 1979 and February 1980 in the Middle Atlantic Bight ranged from 2 to 4 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 7 mg l1) and 8 to 12 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 22 mg l1) on the south flank of Georges Bank. ?? 1987.

  4. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate compounds have received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of ambient nitrate-coated mineral particles on an individual particle scale. In this study, sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. Sizes, morphologies, and compositions of 332 mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX microanalyses. Structures of some mineral particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED. TEM observation indicates that approximately 90% of the collected mineral particles are covered by visible coatings in haze samples whereas only 5% are coated in the dust sample. 92% of the analyzed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The majority of coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with small amounts of sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings are strongly correlated with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite. CaSO4 particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected in the coatings including Ca(NO32 and Mg(NO32. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic nitrate coatings tend to be more spherical and larger, enhancing their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on

  5. Identifying primary stressors impacting macroinvertebrates in the Salinas River (California, USA): Relative effects of pesticides and suspended particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory dose-response experiments with organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, and dose-response experiments with increasing particle loads were used to determine which of these stressors were likely responsible for the toxicity and macroinvertebrate impacts previously observed in the Salinas River. Experiments were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the baetid mayfly Procloeon sp., and the midge Chironomus dilutus (Shobanov, formerly Chironomus tentans). The results indicate the primary stressor impacting H. azteca was pesticides, including chlorpyrifos and permethrin. The mayfly Procloeon sp. was sensitive to chlorpyrifos and permethrin within the range of concentrations of these pesticides measured in the river. Chironomus dilutus were sensitive to chlorpyrifos within the ranges of concentrations measured in the river. None of the species tested were affected by turbidity as high as 1000 NTUs. The current study shows that pesticides are more important acute stressors of macroinvertebrates than suspended sediments in the Salinas River. - Pesticides are the primary stressor impacting macroinvertebrates in sections of the lower Salinas River

  6. Identifying primary stressors impacting macroinvertebrates in the Salinas River (California, USA): Relative effects of pesticides and suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: anderson@ucdavis.edu; Phillips, B.M. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hunt, J.W. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Connor, V. [Division of Water Quality, State Water Resources Control Board, 1001 I. Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (United States); Richard, N. [Division of Water Quality, State Water Resources Control Board, 1001 I. Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (United States); Tjeerdema, R.S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Laboratory dose-response experiments with organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, and dose-response experiments with increasing particle loads were used to determine which of these stressors were likely responsible for the toxicity and macroinvertebrate impacts previously observed in the Salinas River. Experiments were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the baetid mayfly Procloeon sp., and the midge Chironomus dilutus (Shobanov, formerly Chironomus tentans). The results indicate the primary stressor impacting H. azteca was pesticides, including chlorpyrifos and permethrin. The mayfly Procloeon sp. was sensitive to chlorpyrifos and permethrin within the range of concentrations of these pesticides measured in the river. Chironomus dilutus were sensitive to chlorpyrifos within the ranges of concentrations measured in the river. None of the species tested were affected by turbidity as high as 1000 NTUs. The current study shows that pesticides are more important acute stressors of macroinvertebrates than suspended sediments in the Salinas River. - Pesticides are the primary stressor impacting macroinvertebrates in sections of the lower Salinas River.

  7. Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Simulation of Polarization Characteristics of Sea Water Which Contains Spherical and Non-Spherical Particles of Suspended Solid and Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulation method of sea water which contains spherical and non-spherical particles of suspended solid and phytoplankton based on Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT is proposed for identifying non-spherical species of phytoplankton. From the simulation results, it is found that the proposed MCRT model is validated. Also some possibility of identification of spherical and non-spherical shapes of particles which are contained in sea water is shown. Meanwhile, simulations with the different shape of particles, Prolate and Oblate show that Degree of Polarization: DP depends on shapes. Therefore, non-spherical shape of phytoplankton can be identified with polarization characteristics measurements of the ocean.

  8. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. PMID:23712117

  9. Hydroclimatic influence on particle size distribution of suspended sediments evacuated from debris-covered Chorabari Glacier, upper Mandakini catchment, central Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Gokhale, Anupam Anand; Shukla, Tanuj; Dobhal, Dwarika Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Sediments released from high altitude glaciers exhibit varying evacuation patterns and transport characteristics owing to the presence of thick debris cover over the glacier. Despite the recent needs for integrated hydrometeorological studies in the Himalaya, little is known about the impacts of suspended sediment on hydropower generation, reservoir sedimentation, and abrasion of turbine components. Present study involves analysis of particle size distribution of suspended sediments to understand sediment evacuation patterns and transport characteristics in variable energy conditions during the ablation season. Peak suspended sediments were evacuated during extreme rainfall events. The estimated seasonal modern sediment erosion rate varies from 0.6 to 2.3 mm y- 1 for the study period (2009-2012). The analysis shows dominance of medium silt-sized to fine sand-sized particles having sediment size of 0.0156-0.25 mm corresponding to 70-80% without any significant seasonal variation. These transported sediments show that they are poorly sorted, coarser in nature with a nearly symmetrical to coarse skewed texture and kurtosis analysis suggesting mesokurtic distribution of sediments. The particle size fraction ranges between 4.65 and 5.23 ϕ, which is dominantly medium to coarse silty in texture. Results indicate that suspended sediments are evacuated in highly variable energy conditions through subglacial transport pathways because of increase in availability of meltwater with the progressive ablation season. Bulk geochemical characterization has been carried out to differentiate the source of suspended sediments and intensity of weathering. Chemical Index of Alterations (CIA) values of sediment flux range from 54.68 to 55.18 compared to the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) ~ 50, indicating moderate intensity of weathering. Mean seasonal (2009-2012) elemental fluxes and their contribution to the suspended sediment flux reflect that Si and Al are responsible for about 85% of

  10. The effect of clay particles on the activity of suspended autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and on the performance of an air-lift reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, M. J.; Pacheco, A. P.; I. A. Pinho; Melo, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    Clay minerals have some properties, namely a high surface area and the ability of ion exchange that may exert some effects on microbial systems. It is often difficult to know the way the clay is exerting its influence and whether its presence improves a given metabolic process The present work concerns the study of the effect of the addition of Powdered kaolin to autotrophic nitrification systems, and includes the study of the effects of the particles on the activity of a suspended nitrifying...

  11. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  12. Effects of forest on precipitation chemistry and total suspended particles of stem-flow in Jiufeng National Forest Park, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dengzhi; NIE Lishui; LI Jiyue

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation chemistry was monitored in two different types of forests (mixed Pinus tabulaeformis and Quercus variabilis forest and pure Q.variabilis forest) in Jiufeng National Forest Park,in western Beijing.Results showed that the pH value of precipitation ranged between 6.13 and 6.97 and no acid rain appeared;the mean electrical conductivity (EC) was 0.18 mS/cm and mean total suspended particles (TSP) was 44.02 mg/L,but these values changed significantly with different amounts of stem-flow.Acidification occurred in the stem-flow to different extents:that of P.tabulaeformis>Q.variabilis.The mean EC value of stem-flow in P.tabulaeformis in the mixed forest was 1.00 mS/cm,which was 5.88 times as high as that of precipitation outside the forest.EC values of Q.variabilis in pure and mixed forests show little difference,0.34 and 0.30 mS/cm,respectively and were 2.00 and 1.76 times higher than that of precipitation.During the summer,EC values of stem-flow of P.tabulaeformis decreased over time and with an increase in the amount of precipitation.The mean TSP of stem-flow in mixed forest was 116,95 mg/L,but 87.14 mg/L in the pure forest,which were 72.93 and 43.12 mg/L higher than that of precipitation.

  13. The effect of clay particles on the activity of suspended autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and on the performance of an air-lift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, M J; Pacheco, A P; Pinho, I A; Melo, L F

    2001-02-01

    Clay minerals have some properties, namely a high surface area and the ability of ion exchange that may exert some effects on microbial systems. It is often difficult to know the way the clay is exerting its influence and whether its presence improves a given metabolic process. The present work concerns the study of the effect of the addition of powdered kaolin to autotrophic nitrification systems, and includes the study of the effects of the particles on the activity of a suspended nitrifying bacteria consortium and on the performance of an air-lift biofilm reactor used for tertiary nitrification. Concerning the suspended culture, kaolin particles produced stimulation on the specific endogenous and exogenous respiration rates of the bacteria, probably due to a nutritional effect supplied by the clay. This effect was more pronounced for the ammonia oxidation rates, although nitrite oxidation was also enhanced but to a lesser extent. In respect to the presence of kaolin particles in the air-lift reactor, the results obtained indicate that the clay particles become incorporated in the biofilm pellets, but do not change significantly their thickness or their shape. However, nitrate production decreased when the concentration of particles increased. The low adsorption of ammonia by the kaolin indicated that the clay particles embedded in the biofilm did not probably retain the ions. Although it was not proved, precipitation of salts may have occurred. PMID:11349371

  14. Characterization and morphology of solids suspended in rain water; Caracterizacion y morfologia de solidos suspendidos en agua de lluvia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Lopez M, B.E.; Torre O, J. De la [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    This work presents the results obtained from the analysis of rain water in Mexico. The study treats over the characterization and morphology of the solids suspended in form of particles in the atmosphere. The solids suspended were obtained of the pluvial precipitations after these have been centrifuged. Subsequently of the separation, the particulate matter was analysed by Sem and X-ray dispersive energy.

  15. Solar particle effects on minor components of the Polar atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Damiani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar activity can influence the Earth's environment, and in particular the ozone layer, by direct modulation of the e.m. radiation or through variability of the incoming cosmic ray flux (solar and galactic particles. In particular, solar energetic particles (SEPs provide additional external energy to the terrestrial environment; they are able to interact with the minor constituents of the atmospheric layer and produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations and excitations. This paper highlights the SEP effects on the chemistry of the upper atmosphere by analysing some SEP events recorded during 2005 in the descending phase of the current solar cycle. It is shown that these events can lead to short- (hours and medium- (days term ozone variations through catalytic cycles (e.g. HOx and NOx increases. We focus attention on the relationship between ozone and OH data (retrieved from MLS EOS AURA for four SEP events: 17 and 20 January, 15 May and 8 September. We confirm that SEP effects are different on the night and day hemispheres at high latitudes.

  16. Solar particle effects on minor components of the Polar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, A. [ICES - International Center for Earth Sciences c/o Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Acustica ' O.M. Corbino' ; INAF, Roma (Italy). Ist. di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario; Storini, M.; Laurenza, M. [INAF, Roma (Italy). Ist. di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario; Rafanelli, C. [ICES - International Center for Earth Sciences c/o Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Acustica ' O.M. Corbino'

    2008-07-01

    Solar activity can influence the Earth's environment, and in particular the ozone layer, by direct modulation of the e.m. radiation or through variability of the incoming cosmic ray flux (solar and galactic particles). In particular, solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide additional external energy to the terrestrial environment; they are able to interact with the minor constituents of the atmospheric layer and produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations and excitations. This paper highlights the SEP effects on the chemistry of the upper atmosphere by analysing some SEP events recorded during 2005 in the descending phase of the current solar cycle. It is shown that these events can lead to short- (hours) and medium- (days) term ozone variations through catalytic cycles (e.g. HO{sub x} and NO{sub x} increases). We focus attention on the relationship between ozone and OH data (retrieved from MLS EOS AURA) for four SEP events: 17 and 20 January, 15 May and 8 September. We confirm that SEP effects are different on the night and day hemispheres at high latitudes. (orig.)

  17. Particle hygroscopicity during atmospheric new particle formation events: implications for the chemical species contributing to particle growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the hygroscopicity of newly formed particles (diameters range 25–45 nm during two atmospheric new particle formation (NPF events in the German mid-level mountains during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 (HCCT-2010 field experiment. At the end of the NPF event involving clear particle growth, we measured an unusually high soluble particle fraction of 58.5% at 45 nm particle size. The particle growth rate contributed through sulfuric acid condensation only accounts for around 6.5% of the observed growth rate. Estimations showed that sulfuric acid condensation explained, however, only around 10% of that soluble particle fraction. Therefore, the formation of additional water-soluble matter appears imperative to explain the missing soluble fraction. Although direct evidence is missing, we consider water-soluble organics as candidates for this mechanism. For the case with clear growth process, the particle growth rate was determined by two alternative methods based on tracking the mode diameter of the nucleation mode. The mean particle growth rate obtained from the inter-site data comparison using Lagrangian consideration is 3.8 (± 2.6 nm h−1. During the same period, the growth rate calculated based on one site data is 5.0 nm h−1 using log-normal distribution function method. In light of the fact that considerable uncertainties could be involved in both methods, we consider both estimated growth rates consistent.

  18. Oxidation Products of Biogenic Emissions Contribute to Nucleation of Atmospheric Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Riccobono, F.; Schobesberger, S.; Scott, CE; Dommen, J; Ortega, IK; L. Rondo; Almeida, J; Amorim, A.; BIANCHI, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; David, A.(CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva, Switzerland); Downard, A.; Dunne, EM; J. Duplissy; S. Ehrhart

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric new-particle formation affects climate and is one of the least understood atmospheric aerosol processes. The complexity and variability of the atmosphere has hindered elucidation of the fundamental mechanism of new-particle formation from gaseous precursors. We show, in experiments performed with the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN, that sulfuric acid and oxidized organic vapors at atmospheric concentrations reproduce particle nucleation rates observed in ...

  19. Modelling the Role of Charge in Atmospheric Particle Formation Using Quantum Chemical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusuvuori, Kai

    2015-01-01

    New particle formation is an important process in the atmosphere. As ions are constantly produced in the atmosphere, the behaviour and role of charged particles in atmospheric processes needs to be understood. In order to gain insight on the role of charge in atmospheric new particle formation, the electron structure of the molecules taking part in this process needs to be taken into account using quantum chemical methods. Quantum chemical density functional theory was employed in an eff...

  20. Inverse problem for particle size distributions of atmospheric aerosols using stochastic particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of resolving optical properties in atmosphere radiative transfer calculations, this paper focuses on obtaining aerosol optical thicknesses (AOTs) in the visible and near infrared wave band through indirect method by gleaning the values of aerosol particle size distribution parameters. Although various inverse techniques have been applied to obtain values for these parameters, we choose a stochastic particle swarm optimization (SPSO) algorithm to perform an inverse calculation. Computational performances of different inverse methods are investigated and the influence of swarm size on the inverse problem of computation particles is examined. Next, computational efficiencies of various particle size distributions and the influences of the measured errors on computational accuracy are compared. Finally, we recover particle size distributions for atmospheric aerosols over Beijing using the measured AOT data (at wavelengths λ=0.400, 0.690, 0.870, and 1.020 μm) obtained from AERONET at different times and then calculate other AOT values for this band based on the inverse results. With calculations agreeing with measured data, the SPSO algorithm shows good practicability.

  1. Atmospheric aerosol particle analysis at the Debrecen Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Characterisation of atmospheric aerosol is in the focus of several national and international research programs due to their health impact and effects on the radiative balance of Earth. Bulk elemental analytical techniques, like macro-PIXE, are extensively used for analysing atmospheric aerosol. However more detailed and reliable data can be obtained if individual aerosol particles are analysed. Nuclear microscopy is a powerful tool which enables the quantitative determination of trace element distribution in complex samples with a sensitivity of μg/g on micrometer scale. In the frame of an OTKA and a Coordinated Research Project of the IAEA, an experimental setup based on the simultaneous use of different ion beam analytical techniques was developed at the Debrecen scanning nuclear microprobe facility, which enables the total quantitative analysis of microparticles. This measurement, data collection and evaluation setup was already applied successfully in various studies: (1) ion beam microanalysis of desert dust particles originating from Saharan dust intrusions, (2) characterization of urban aerosol sources by single particle analysis, (3) characterization of indoor aerosols. As an example, nuclear microprobe study of indoor aerosol particles containing toxic metals is presented. Aerosol samples were collected in the IBA Lab of ATOMKI in the frame of a laboratory practice for undergraduate students. At the same time mechanical repair work was carried out on the heating system in the corridor outside the Laboratory. In order to demonstrate the monitoring of air pollution for the students, aerosol samples were collected with a 2-stage filter unit on Nuclepore polycarbonate filters. The samples were analysed by bulk-PIXE. Concentration of Zn, Cd and Pb were found to be exceeding the national air quality limit. Therefore single particle analysis was carried out on the coarse mode samples to find out the origin of the toxic

  2. Nature and evolution of ultrafine aerosol particles in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V. V.

    2006-12-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of a poorly understood phenomenon, an intense emission of ultrafine (nanometer) aerosols (ENA), are reviewed. In the English-language literature, this phenomenon is commonly referred to as a nucleation burst. ENA events have been observed on all the continents and throughout the depth of the troposphere, with the number of corresponding publications growing steadily. Intense and long-lasting ENA events have been studied more or less comprehensively and in full detail for Northern Europe, with 60 to 70% of observations taken in a forest area in the presence of snow cover and 10 to 20% in coastal marine areas. Most often, ENA events occur during spring and fall, with 95% of cases in the daytime and under sunny calm conditions, typical of anticyclones. In ENA events, the concentration of nanoparticles initially grows rapidly to values of 103-105 cm-3. One or two hours later, the so-called nuclei fraction with diameters D = 3-15 nm is produced. The appearance of the Aitken fraction D = 20-80 nm and the enlargement of aerosol particles inside the accumulation fraction D = 80-200 nm may occur during the following 4-6 h. Thus, the cycle of formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles in the size range from a few to hundreds of nanometers is reproduced over 6-8 h. A specific synoptic feature of ENA events over land is that they occur when the polar air is transported to measuring sites and the temperature difference between day and light is large. During ENA periods, the formation rate of condensation nuclei with a diameter of 100 nm increases 10-to 100-fold. Important factors of ENA genesis are the “aerosol” and “electric” states of the atmosphere. More intense ENA events occur at low concentrations of background aerosols in the presence of atmospheric ions of medium mobility with D = 2-3 nm. The international experiments ACE 1 and 2, BIOFOR 1, 2, and 3, ESUP 2000, QUEST, etc., have not yet provided any

  3. The effects of solar particle events on the middle atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar particle events (SPEs) have been investigated since the late 1960's for possible effects on the middle atmosphere. Solar protons from SPEs produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations, and excitations in the middle atmosphere. The production of HO(x) and NO(x) and their subsequent effects on ozone can also be computed using energy deposition and photochemical models. The effects of SPE-produced HO(x) species on the odd nitrogen abundance of the middle atmosphere as well as the SPE-produced long term effects on ozone. Model computations indicate fairly good agreement with ozone data for the SPE-induced ozone depletion caused by NO(y) species connected with the August 1972 SPE. The model computations indicate that NO(y) will not be substantially changed over a solar cycle by SPEs. The changes are mainly at high latitudes and are on time scales of several months, after which the NO(y) drifts back to its ambient levels

  4. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid–liquid phase separations

    OpenAIRE

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah J.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney J.; Shilling, John E.; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric aerosol particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere and the water content of the particles correspondingly changes, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid–liquid phase separation. If liquid–liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of sola...

  5. Applicability of condensation particle counters to measure atmospheric clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sipilä

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambient and laboratory molecular and ion clusters were investigated. Here we present data on the ambient concentrations of both charged and uncharged molecular clusters as well as the performance of a pulse height condensation particle counter (PH-CPC and an expansion condensation particle counter (E-CPC. The ambient molecular cluster concentrations were measured using both instruments, and they were deployed in conjunction with ion spectrometers and other aerosol instruments in Hyytiälä, Finland at the SMEAR II station during 1 March to 30 June 2007. The observed cluster concentrations varied and were from ca. 1000 to 100 000 cm−3. Both instruments showed similar concentrations. The average size of detected clusters was approximately 1.8 nm. As the atmospheric measurements at sub 2-nm particles and molecular clusters are a challenging task, and we were most likely unable to detect the smallest clusters, the reported concentrations are our best estimates for minimum cluster concentrations in boreal forest environment.

  6. Energetic particle energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, J. H.; Smith, H. T.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mandt, K. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s upper atmosphere has been observed to be variable on a pass-by-pass basis. During the nominal mission where the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) only sampled the northern hemisphere this variability was initially believed to be tied to solar drivers manifest in latitudinal variations in the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere. However, when Cassini delved into the southern hemisphere the latitudinal dependence was not present in the data. Recently, Westlake et al. (2011) showed that the pass-by-pass variability is correlated with the deviations in the plasma environment as identified by Rymer et al. (2009) and Simon et al. (2010). Furthermore, the studies of Westlake et al. (2011) and Bell et al. (2011) showed that Titan’s upper atmosphere responds to changes in the ambient magnetospheric plasma on timescales of roughly one Titan day (16 Earth days). We report on recent studies of energy deposition in Titan’s upper atmosphere. Previous studies by Smith et al. (2009), Cravens et al. (2008), Tseng et al. (2008), and Shah et al. (2009) reported on energetic proton and oxygen ion precipitation. Back of the envelope calculations by Sittler et al. (2009) showed that magnetospheric energy inputs are expected to be of the order of or greater than the solar processes. We report on further analysis of the plasma environment around Titan during the flybys that the INMS has good data. We utilize data from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to determine how the magnetospheric particle population varies from pass to pass and how this influences the net magnetospheric energy input prior to the flyby. We also report on enhanced energetic neutral atom emissions during select highly energetic passes. References: Bell, J., et al.: “Simulating the time-dependent response of Titan's upper atmosphere to periods of magnetospheric forcing”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06202, 2011. Rymer, A. M., et al.: “Discrete classification and electron

  7. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawardena, Janaka, E-mail: j.gunawardena@qut.edu.au; Ziyath, Abdul M., E-mail: mohamed.ziyath@qut.edu.au; Bostrom, Thor E., E-mail: t.bostrom@qut.edu.au; Bekessy, Lambert K., E-mail: l.bekessy@qut.edu.au; Ayoko, Godwin A., E-mail: g.ayoko@qut.edu.au; Egodawatta, Prasanna, E-mail: p.egodawatta@qut.edu.au; Goonetilleke, Ashantha, E-mail: a.goonetilleke@qut.edu.au

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. - Highlights: • The dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to pollutant build-up. • The dust storm increased TSS, Al, Fe and Mn loads in build-up on ground surfaces. • Dust storm did not significantly increase TOC, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd loads in build-up. • Cr and Zn in dust storm deposition were contributed by local anthropogenic sources.

  8. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. - Highlights: • The dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to pollutant build-up. • The dust storm increased TSS, Al, Fe and Mn loads in build-up on ground surfaces. • Dust storm did not significantly increase TOC, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd loads in build-up. • Cr and Zn in dust storm deposition were contributed by local anthropogenic sources

  9. 校园空气微生物和悬浮物污染评价及相关性分析%Air Micro-organisms and Suspended Particles Pollution Evaluation and Correlation Analysis on Campus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杏辉; 罗燕群; 周振明

    2011-01-01

    Based on the monitoring of atmospheric total suspended particles and micro-organisms of teaching areas, living quarters, sports fields and traffic areas of campus Yucai of Cuangxi Normal University, this article evaluated and analysis of its situation of air pollution. According to the standards of air microbiological evaluation which is recommended by the Ecological Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences, the atmospheric microbial contamination is not so serious, although the traffic areas and sports fields content more micro-organisms than other areas, but they still can achieve to clean air standards; atmospheric pollution of the total suspended paniculate matter is more serious in the afternoon and most over the grade two standard limits of The Peoples Republic of China ambient air quality standards, but all of The measured value was lower in the moming for these four functional areas, the atmospheric total suspended particles of the traffic zone is more than sports fields,the teaching zone of it is in the third and the living quarters is the least, the atmospheric total suspended particles have significant correlation with the total number of bacteria but not with the mold in the morning ;in the afternoon,it have no significant correlation with the number of bacteria as well as the mold. But the number of bacteria and the mold of campus have a very significant relation.%在对广西师范大学育才校区教学区、宿舍区、运动场和交通区大气微生物和总悬浮颗粒物(TSP)进行监测的基础上,评价与分析了育才校区大气污染状况.依照中国科学院生态中心推荐使用的空气微生物评价标准,育才校区大气微生物污染轻微,其中交通区和运动场大气微生物含量相对较高,但都能达到清洁空气的标准;大气总悬浮颗粒物污染下午较严重,多数测定值超过了国家环境空气质量标准中的二级标准限值,而上午的测定值相对较低;四个功能区中TSP浓度

  10. Effect of atmospheric electricity on dry deposition of airborne particles from atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, H.; Kimmel, V.; Israelsson, S.

    The electric mechanism of dry deposition is well known in the case of unattached radon daughter clusters that are unipolar charged and of high mobility. The problematic role of the electric forces in deposition of aerosol particles is theoretically examined by comparing the fluxes of particles carried by different deposition mechanisms in a model situation. The electric mechanism of deposition appears essential for particles of diameter 10-200 nm in conditions of low wind speed. The electric flux of fine particles can be dominant on the tips of leaves and needles even in a moderate atmospheric electric field of a few hundred V m -1 measured over the plane ground surface. The electric deposition is enhanced under thunderclouds and high voltage power lines. Strong wind suppresses the relative role of the electric deposition when compared with aerodynamic deposition. When compared with diffusion deposition the electric deposition appears less uniform: the precipitation particulate matter on the tips of leaves and especially on needles of top branches of conifer trees is much more intensive than on the ground surface and electrically shielded surfaces of plants. The knowledge of deposition geometry could improve our understanding of air pollution damage to plants.

  11. Aliphatic and aromatic amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: comparison of three ionization techniques in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jiménez, José; Hautala, Sanna; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Laitinen, Totti; Hartonen, Kari; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2012-08-15

    A complete methodology was developed for the determination of ten aliphatic and nine aromatic amines in atmospheric aerosol particles. Before the liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometric separation and determination, the derivatization reaction of the analytes using dansyl chloride was accelerated by ultrasounds. From three different ionization techniques studied electrospray ionization was superior in terms of sensitivity, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility over atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and photoionization for the target analytes. The method developed was validated for the gas phase, 30 nm and total suspended atmospheric aerosol particles. The method quantification limits ranged between 1.8 and 71.7 pg. The accuracy and the potential matrix effects were evaluated using a standard addition methodology. Recoveries from 92.1% to 109.1%, the repeatability from 0.6% to 8.4% and the reproducibility from 2.3% to 9.8% were obtained. The reliability of the methodology was proved by the statistical evaluation. Finally, the developed methodology was applied to the determination of the target analytes in eight size separated ultrafine particulate (Dp=30±4 nm) samples and in eight total suspended particulate samples collected at the SMEAR II station. The mean concentrations for aliphatic amines were between 0.01 and 42.67 ng m(-3) and for aromatic amines between 0.02 and 1.70 ng m(-3). Thirteen amines were quantified for the first time in 30 nm aerosol particles. PMID:22841047

  12. Particle surface area dependence of mineral dust in immersion freezing mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator and a vertical wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows one to freely suspend single drops in the air without any wall contact. Heterogeneous nucleation by two types of illite (illite IMt1 and illite NX) and a montmorillonite sample was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 mm in radius were monitored by a video camera while cooled down to -28 °C to simulate freezing within the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was contact-free, determined with an infrared thermometer; the onset of freezing was indicated by a sudden increase of the drop surface temperature. For comparison, measurements with one particle type (illite NX) were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 μm radius freely suspended. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C as a function of particle type and particle surface area immersed in the drops. Isothermal experiments in the wind tunnel indicated that after the cooling stage freezing still proceeds, at least during the investigated time period of 30 s. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model. Although the wind tunnel results do not support the time-independence of the freezing process both models are applicable for comparing the results from the two experimental techniques.

  13. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8-415 µm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 datasets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-12 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38 – 69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC / volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/ml (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/ml) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over 2 orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/ml (range: 2.56-2.87 g/ml, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  14. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-03-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  15. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  16. Role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation and settling of suspended particles in the Mississippi River Delta plain, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, D.P.; Ji, S.; Dong, H.; Blake, R.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Kim, J.

    2008-01-01

    River-dominated delta areas are primary sites of active biogeochemical cycling, with productivity enhanced by terrestrial inputs of nutrients. Particle aggregation in these areas primarily controls the deposition of suspended particles, yet factors that control particle aggregation and resulting sedimentation in these environments are poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation of suspended particles in the Mississippi Delta. Three representative sites along the salinity gradient were selected and sediments were collected from the sediment-water interface. Based on quantitative mineralogical analyses 88-89 wt.% of all minerals in the sediments are clays, mainly smectite and illite. Consumption of SO421 and the formation of H2S and pyrite during microbial Fe(III) reduction of the non-sterile sediments by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in artificial pore water (APW) media suggest simultaneous sulfate and Fe(III) reduction activity. The pHPZNPC of the sediments was ??? 3.5 and their zeta potentials at the sediment-water interface pH (6.9-7.3) varied from -35 to -45 mV, suggesting that both edges and faces of clay particles have negative surface charge. Therefore, high concentrations of cations in pore water are expected to be a predominant factor in particle aggregation consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Experiments on aggregation of different types of sediments in the same APW composition revealed that the sediment with low zeta potential had a high rate of aggregation. Similarly, addition of external Fe(II) (i.e. not derived from sediments) was normally found to enhance particle aggregation and deposition in all sediments, probably resulting from a decrease in surface potential of particles due to specific Fe(II) sorption. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images showed predominant face-to-face clay aggregation in native

  17. The effect of compressibility, rotation and magnetic field on thermal instability of Walters’ fluid permeated with suspended particles in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Kumar Amrish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of compressibility, rotation, magnetic field and suspended particles on thermal stability of a layer of visco-elastic Walters’ (model fluid in porous medium. Using linearized theory and normal mode analysis, dispersion relation has been obtained. In case of stationary convection, it is found that the rotation has stabilizing effect on the system. The magnetic field may have destabilizing effect on the system in the presence of rotation while in the absence of rotation it always has stabilizing effect. The medium permeability has destabilizing effect on the system in the absence of rotation while in the presence of rotation it may have stabilizing effect. The suspended particles and compressibility always have destabilizing effect. Due to vanishing of visco-elastic parameter, the compressible visco-elastic fluid behaves like Newtonian fluid. Graphs have also been plotted to depict the stability characteristics. The viscoelasticity, magnetic field and rotation are found to introduce oscillatory modes into the system which were non-existent in their absence.

  18. Concentration of lead, cadmium, and iron in sediment dust and total suspended particles before and after initialisation of integral production in iron and steel work plant Zenica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prcanović, Halim; Duraković, Mirnes; Beganović, Sanela

    2012-06-01

    Poor air quality is a common fact for all areas with base industry. The city of Zenica was once the metallurgical centre of Ex-Yugoslavia and is therefore highly polluted at present. Air pollution peaked in 1987 when average concentration of pollutants was extremely high (daily average concentration of SO(2) was 1800 μg m(-3)). With the beginning of the war in 1992, integral production in the steel work plant was shut down, to be re-launched in 2008. Limit values for iron do not exist, but iron has been monitored in Zenica for the past 28 years because of the presence of steel works. Concentrations of cadmium and lead have also been measured because they are very much present in polluted areas with steel works. The concentration of mentioned elements in air deposit and total suspended particles before and after integral production in the steel work plant was re-launched is the subject of this paper. Total suspended particles were measured in two locations using German standard VDI 2463 Blatt 4. Sediment dust was measured in nine locations using Bergerhoff method. The concentration of iron, lead, and cadmium was performed in the chemical laboratory of the Metallurgical Institute "Kemal Kapetanović" Zenica using standard methods. Higher concentrations of these parameters during the period of integral production clearly point to the impact of steel works on Zenica valley. PMID:22728800

  19. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  20. Influence of microorganism content in suspended particles on the particle–water partitioning of mercury in semi-enclosed coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jiyi [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Global Bioresources Research Center, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST), Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyunji [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seunghee, E-mail: shan@gist.ac.kr [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    It is known that particle scavenging of mercury (Hg) can be affected by the abundance of particulate organic matter in coastal waters. However, the role of living organic particles in Hg scavenging is not yet completely understood. In this study, we hypothesized that an abundance of living organic particles (i.e., phytoplankton and bacteria) would influence the particle–water partitioning of Hg in coastal waters. Surface seawater samples were collected from eight stations in Gwangyang Bay, Korea, in three seasons (November 2009, April 2010, and October 2010) for the determination of concentrations of suspended particulate matter (including chlorophyll-a and bacteria), and Hg in unfiltered and filtered waters. We found that more Hg partitioned toward particulate matter when phytoplankton biomass, indicated from the chlorophyll-a concentration in a particle, was higher. In the low algal season, when [chlorophyll-a] < 0.6 μg L{sup −1}, the bacterial number, instead of chlorophyll-a concentration in particle, showed a positive correlation with the particle–water partition coefficient of Hg. Overall, microbial abundance seems to play a critical role in particle scavenging of Hg in coastal water. Taking this result in light of Hg in pristine coastal zones, we predict that increases in algal biomass amplify the potential for algae to transfer Hg to marine food chains. - Highlights: • Abundance of phytoplankton and bacteria influenced particle–water partitioning of Hg. • More Hg partitioned toward particles when microorganism biomass in particle is large. • Increases of algal biomass may enhance Hg bioaccumulation in coastal ecosystem.

  1. Atmospheric Dust in the Upper Colorado River Basin: Integrated Analysis of Digital Imagery, Total Suspended Particulate, and Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, F. E.; Reynolds, R. L.; Neff, J. C.; Fernandez, D. P.; Reheis, M. C.; Goldstein, H.; Grote, E.; Landry, C.

    2012-12-01

    Improved measurement and observation of dust emission and deposition in the American west would advance understanding of (1) landscape conditions that promote or suppress dust emission, (2) dynamics of dryland and montane ecosystems, (3) premature melting of snow cover that provides critical water supplies, and (4) possible effects of dust on human health. Such understanding can be applied to issues of land management, water-resource management, as well as the safety and well-being of urban and rural inhabitants. We have recently expanded the scope of particulate measurement in the Upper Colorado River basin through the establishment of total-suspended-particulate (TSP) measurement stations located in Utah and Colorado with bi-weekly data (filter) collection, along with protocols for characterizing dust-on-snow (DOS) layers in Colorado mountains. A sub-network of high-resolution digital cameras has been co-located with several of the TSP stations, as well as at other strategic locations. These real-time regional dust-event detection cameras are internet-based and collect digital imagery every 6-15 minutes. Measurements of meteorological conditions to support these collections and observations are provided partly by CLIM-MET stations, four of which were deployed in 1998 in the Canyonlands (Utah) region. These stations provide continuous, near real-time records of the complex interaction of wind, precipitation, vegetation, as well as dust emission and deposition, in different land-use settings. The complementary datasets of dust measurement and observation enable tracking of individual regional dust events. As an example, the first DOS event of water year 2012 (Nov 5, 2011), as documented at Senator Beck Basin, near Silverton, Colorado, was also recorded by the camera at Island-in-the-Sky (200 km to the northwest), as well as in aeolian activity and wind data from the Dugout Ranch CLIM-MET station (170 km to the west-northwest). At these sites, strong winds and the

  2. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 40 nm and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and a radioactive plume. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  3. Oxidation Products of Biogenic Emissions Contribute to Nucleation of Atmospheric Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Riccobono, Francesco; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Wimmer, Daniela; Wex, Heike; Weingartner, Ernest; Wagner, Paul E; Vrtala, Aron; Viisanen, Yrjö; Vaattovaara, Petri; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, Antonio; Stratmann, Frank; Stozhkov, Yuri; Spracklen, Dominick V; Sipilä, Mikko; Praplan, Arnaud P; Petäjä, Tuukka; Onnela, Antti; Nieminen, Tuomo; Mathot, Serge; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Laaksonen, Ari; Kvashin, Alexander N.; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Keskinen, Helmi; Kajos, Maija; Junninen, Heikki; Hansel, Armin; Franchin, Alessandro; Flagan, Richard C; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Duplissy, Jonathan; Dunne, Eimear M; Downard, Andrew; David, André; Breitenlechner, Martin; Bianchi, Federico; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, João; Rondo, Linda; Ortega, Ismael K; Dommen, Josef; Scott, Catherine E; Vrtala, Aron; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Seinfeld, John H; Sipila, Mikko; Donahue, Neil M; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric new-particle formation affects climate and is one of the least understood atmospheric aerosol processes. The complexity and variability of the atmosphere has hindered elucidation of the fundamental mechanism of new-particle formation from gaseous precursors. We show, in experiments performed with the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN, that sulfuric acid and oxidized organic vapors at atmospheric concentrations reproduce particle nucleation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. The experiments reveal a nucleation mechanism involving the formation of clusters containing sulfuric acid and oxidized organic molecules from the very first step. Inclusion of this mechanism in a global aerosol model yields a photochemically and biologically driven seasonal cycle of particle concentrations in the continental boundary layer, in good agreement with observations.

  4. Effect of surface potential of small particles suspended in solution on separation characteristics in a HGMS (High Gradient Magnetic Separator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of surface potential of particles on removal characteristics in the HGMS were studied by using three kinds of small particles with individually different magnetic susceptibility: molybdenum, chrominum and hematite. It was shown that the effect of surface potential of particles such as molybdenum with low magnetic susceptibility value less than 1.7 x 104 appeared at a low linear velocity of liquid less than 150 m/h, and the removal performance increased by controlling the pH range in which the product of ζ-potential of the particle and matrix was negative. The relation between the particles volume captured with matrix and the rest potential of the matrix was determined. (author)

  5. A study on mesoscale atmospheric dispersion of radioactive particles released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three dimensional sea-land breeze model and lagrangian particle dispersion model have been employed for the study on the mesoscale atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials released from Wolsung NPPs. In this study, atmospheric dispersion simulations are carried out under two synoptic weather conditions: the geostrophic flow is a weak northerly wind (CASE 1) and a strong northerly wind (CASE 2) on a clear day in spring. The results show that atmospheric dispersion is affected by sea-land breeze and the recirculation of particles by the change of wind direction between sea breeze and land breeze plays an important role in atmospheric concentration distribution of radioactive materials

  6. Sublimation of ice particles from rocket exhausts in the upper atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Platov, Y. V.; Kosch, Mike J.

    2003-01-01

    The process of sublimation of ice particles from a rocket exhaust in the upper atmosphere is examined. Heating by solar radiation and losses of energy by means thermal radiation and sublimation are taken into account in the thermal balance of the ice particles. The time dependences of size and temperature of the ice particles are obtained. An estimation of water vapor concentration around the rocket trajectory is made. The process of sublimation of the rocket exhaust ice particles may be impo...

  7. Atmospheric gas-particle partitioning versus gaseous/particle-bound deposition of SVOCs: Why they are not equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glüge, Juliane; Bogdal, Christian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2015-08-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be particle-bound or in the gas phase in the atmosphere, depending on the (temperature dependent) gas-particle partitioning of the chemicals and the fraction of particles in air. Several studies linked gas-particle partitioning of SVOCs in the atmosphere directly to the gaseous/particle-bound deposition of these chemicals, i.e. in cases of compounds occurring mainly in the gas phase, the deposition was also assumed to be mainly in gaseous form. In this study, we apply a multi-media fate model to point out that gas-particle partitioning of SVOCs in air and gaseous/particle-bound deposition of SVOCs are driven by different mechanism and, thus, cannot be deduced from each other. We apply our calculations to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as model SVOCs. We show that the fraction of particle-bound deposition to deciduous forest is 1.5-190 times higher in winter and between 5 and 1000 times higher in summer than the particle-bound fraction of these chemicals in air. The fraction of particle-bound deposition to coniferous forest is 1.5-172 times higher in winter and between 5 and 1000 times higher in summer than the particle-bound fraction of PCBs in air. In addition to the fractions of particle-bound SVOCs in air and particle-bound deposition, we recalculated particle-bound and gaseous deposition velocities to coniferous and deciduous forest for PCBs. The deposition velocities obtained for dry gaseous deposition (PCBs occurring predominantly in the gas phase, interception was also completely due to dry gaseous deposition.

  8. Behavior of alumina particles in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of Al2O3 particle size, velocity and temperature was mapped over the flow field of a 31.5 kW plasma torch. The effects of varying the powder loading were studied. The powder feed rate was varied between .45 and 2.05 kg/hr independent of the carrier gas flow rate. The particle flow field was non-symmetric due to the method of particle injection. The data indicate that powder feed rate does not significantly affect either the temperature or velocity of the particles, for typical plasma spray conditions, and that the assumption of a dilute particle flow field is valid. 1 ref., 7 figs

  9. Radioactive contamination in the upper part of the Techa river: stirring-up of bottom sediments and precipitation of suspended particles. Analysis of the data obtained in 1949-1951.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrov, Yury G

    2004-02-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the upper part of the Techa river was developed on the basis of the river valley geometry as well as data of hydrological conditions and of the granulometric composition of bottom sediments. The model describes the transport of radioactivity by suspended sediments with different granulometric compositions (clay, silt) in the early 1950s. It includes the stirring-up of bottom sediments and the precipitation of suspended sediments as a function of water discharge rate and water level in the investigated part of the river. The results allow to specify the development of the river system contamination as a result of inflow of suspended sediments contaminated with radionuclides. In the period of liquid radioactive waste (LRW) discharges, the water of the Techa river contained a large fraction of finely dispersed particles of less than 5 micro m diameter. At the site of LRW discharge 80% of the discharged activity was adsorbed to these particles. Depending on the water flow, 40-80% of the suspensions precipitated at the bottom of subsequent sedimentation reservoirs. A total of about 1.6 MCi adsorbed to the suspended particles entered the open hydrographic system of the Techa river. The conclusion that the largest part of the activity was adsorbed on the suspended particles contradicts the assumption in the Techa river dosimetry system, TRDS-2000, that most of the released activity entered the Techa river in soluble form. For a correct reconstruction of the doses received by the Techa river population it is, therefore, essential to consider hydrodynamic models that take into account the transport of radionuclides adsorbed on the suspended particles. PMID:14714191

  10. Concentrations of PAHs in atmospheric particles (PM-10) and roadside soil particles collected in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Nasr Yousef M. J.; Abas, M. Radzi Bin; Ketuly, Kamal Aziz; Tahir, Norhayati Mohd

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric particles and roadside soil particles were measured at eight locations in the city center and the suburb of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Atmospheric particles were collected using high-volume PM-10 sampler on glass fiber filters over 24 h average sampling period. Both types of samples were extracted with dichloromethane by ultrasonic agitation. The extracts were then fractionated on an alumina-silica column and the aromatic fraction was subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. Total PAH concentrations in the atmospheric particles and roadside soil particles were found to be 6.28±4.35 ng m -3 and 0.22±0.11 μg g -1, respectively. Benzo[ g, h, i]perylene and coronene were found to be the most abundant PAHs in airborne particles at all locations. The most abundant PAHs in the roadside soil particles were fluoranthene, pyrene and phenanthrene.

  11. [Atmospheric particle formation events in Nanjing during summer 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Lei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Li-Juan; Kang, Han-Qing; Diao, Yi-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Feature of aerosol particle number concentration, condition and impact factor of new particle formation (NPF) were investigated in Nanjing during summer. In this study, aerosol particle number concentration and gaseous pollutants (O3, SO2 and NO2) measurements were carried out by Wide-Range Particle Spectrometer (WPS) and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in July 2010. Combining with observations from Automatic Weather Station and Backward Trajectory Simulation, the condition and impact factor of NPF were discussed. Results showed that the averaged 10-500 nm particle number concentration was 1.7 x 10(4) cm(-3), similar to some typical observation values in North American and Europe; the 10-25 nm particle number concentration accounted for 25% of the total number concentration. Six NPF events occurred during observation. We analyzed that stable wind speed and direction, strong solar radiation promoted the NPF. The humidity during NPF event varied from 50% to 70%. Results indicated that clean ocean air mass brought from easterly and southerly wind promoted the NPF by Backward Trajectory Model Simulation. During the NPF event, the 10 - 25 nm particle number concentration positively correlated with the concentration of SO2, and negatively correlated with O3, whereas poorly correlated with NO2. PMID:22624358

  12. The interaction between air ions and aerosol particles in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, KL

    2012-01-01

    Charged particles are continually generated in atmospheric air, and the interaction between natural ionisation and atmospheric particles is complicated. It is of some climatic importance to establish if ions are implicated in particle formation. Atmospheric ion concentrations have been investigated here at high temporal resolution, using Gerdien ion analysers at a site where synchronous meteorological measurements were also made. The background ionisation rate was also monitored with a Geiger counter, enabling ion production from natural radioactivity to be distinguished from other effects. Measurements at 1Hz offer some promise in establishing the atmospheric electrical influences in ionic nucleation bursts, although combinations of other meteorological factors are also known to be significant. High time resolution meteorological and ion measurements are therefore clearly necessary in advancing basic understanding in the behaviour of atmospheric aerosol.

  13. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, João; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Vehkamaki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates ...

  14. Atmosphere turbulence effect on the hot particle charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charging of hot beta-active aerosol articles of the micron size range in the turbulent current has been studied experimentally . For this purpose hot particles, obtained by the neutron activation of gold placed on the surface of glass microspheres by the cathode spraying method, were introduced into the turbulent current with the Reynolds number of 104 - 105. Results of the determination of particle charges within the current velocity range from 0.5 to 3 m/s confirm the reliability of the previously obtained model of the charging of hot particles in the turbulent current of the near - ground atmospere layer which is described by the function directly proportional to the radius of particles and the half-cube of the wind velocity, and inversely proportional to the square root of the height. The scheme is suggested and specific features are described of experimental installations used in the process of studies

  15. Applicability of condensation particle counters to measure atmospheric clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; M. Kulmala; T. Petäjä; Junninen, H.; Aalto, P.P.; Manninen, H. E.; E.-M. Kyrö; Asmi, E.; Riipinen, I; J. Curtius; A. Kürten; S. Borrmann; C. D. O'Dowd

    2008-01-01

    The ambient and laboratory molecular and ion clusters were investigated. Here we present data on the ambient concentrations of both charged and uncharged molecular clusters as well as the performance of a pulse height condensation particle counter (PH-CPC) and an expansion condensation particle counter (E-CPC). The ambient molecular cluster concentrations were measured using both instruments, and they were deployed in conjunction with ion spectrometers and other aerosol instruments in Hyytiäl...

  16. Measurements of hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles during ultrafine particle formation events at urban, industrial, and coastal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kihong; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Seung Ho

    2009-09-01

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique was applied to determine the hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles in three sites of urban Gwangju, industrial Yeosu, and coastal Taean in South Korea. A database for the hygroscopicity and volatility of the known compositions and sizes of the laboratory-generated particles wasfirst constructed for comparison with the measured properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles. Distinct differences in hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles werefound between a "photochemical event" and a "combustion event" as well as among different sites. At the Gwangju site, ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" were determined to be more hygroscopic (growth factor (GF) = 1.05-1.33) than those in the "combustion event" (GF = 1.02-1.12), but their hygroscopicity was not as high as pure ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the laboratory-generated database, suggesting they were internally mixed with less soluble species. Ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" at the Yeosu site, having a variety of SO2, CO, and VOC emission sources, were more hygroscopic (GF = 1.34-1.60) and had a higher amount of volatile species (47-75%)than those observed at the Gwangju site. Ultrafine particle concentration at the Taean site increased during daylight hours with low tide, having a higher GF (1.34-1.80) than the Gwangju site and a lower amount of volatile species (17-34%) than the Yeosu site. Occasionally ultrafine particles were externally mixed according to their hygroscopicity and volatility, and TEM/EDS data showed that each type of particle had a distinct morphology and elemental composition. PMID:19764239

  17. Environmental atmospheric impact assessment by the emission of particles in an industrial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of metals present in suspended particulate matter was evaluated using analytical related nuclear techniques, in order to discriminate the contribution of different emission sources to the atmospheric concentration in the area of Campana, located in the Province of Buenos Aires. The levels of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ag, Cd y Pb were quantified by Wave Dispersion X-Ray Florescence spectrometry (WDXRF), Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometry (TRXRF) and Inducted Coupled Plasma Absorption Emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). (author)

  18. Particle-size distribution and gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers in urban areas of Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis; Besis, Athanasios [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece); Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece)], E-mail: stephanou@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2009-04-15

    Ambient concentrations, gas/particle partitioning and particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were investigated in two urban areas (Athens and Heraklion) of Greece. Atmospheric (gas + particle) concentrations of {sigma}PBDE varied from 21 to 30 pg m{sup -3} in the center of Athens and from 4 to 44 pg m{sup -3} in the suburbs of Heraklion. A predominance of particulate PBDEs was observed in Athens (71-76% in particles), whereas the opposite was evident in Heraklion (69-92% in gas phase). In both urban areas, PBDE particle-size distribution featured a distinct enrichment in smaller particles. A similar trend was also observed in aerosols of a background marine site. For all sampling sites, more than 46% of {sigma}PBDE was associated with particles of <0.57 {mu}m in diameter. Our results imply that particulate PBDEs may have long atmospheric residence time and they may be capable of reaching the deeper parts of the human respiratory system. - Analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples indicates a predominance of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the small particle-size fraction.

  19. The role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin B.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Bondo, T.;

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol nucleation has been studied experimentally in purified, atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of water vapor, ozone, and sulfur dioxide. The results are compared with model calculations. It is found that an increase in ionization by a factor of 10 increases the production rate of stable...

  20. Fine particles measurement techniques. Application to some atmospheric phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continous flow condensation nuclei counter (CNC) was first studied, this device being used for counting submicronic aerosol particles. A model describing heat and mass transfers inside a cooled pipe and the simultaneous condensational growth was developed; a comparison with experimental results showed excellent agreement. This model accounts for the defaults already observed with this type of apparatus. A new method for measuring the size distribution of aerosols with diameter ranging from 0.008 to 0.3 micron m is described. This technique is based upon particles bipolar charging, by contact with ions emitted from a beta source, and a subsequent differential electrical mobility analysis. The selected particles are detected by means of the CNC. A numerical inversion procedure is needed to recover the original aerosol size distribution. This method was compared with those currently in use: Electrical Mobility Analyser and Diffusion Battery

  1. Optical Characterisation of Suspended Particles in the Mackenzie River Plume (Canadian Arctic Ocean) and Implications for Ocean Colour Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxaran, D.; Ehn, J.; Belanger, S.; Matsuoka, A.; Hooker, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change significantly impacts Arctic shelf regions in terms of air temperature, ultraviolet radiation, melting of sea ice, precipitation, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Direct consequences have been observed on the increasing Arctic river flow and a large amount of organic carbon sequestered in soils at high latitudes since the last glacial maximum can be expected to be delivered to the Arctic Ocean during the coming decade. Monitoring the fluxes and fate of this terrigenous organic carbon is problematic in such sparsely populated regions unless remote sensing techniques can be developed and proved to be operational. The main objective of this study is to develop an ocean colour algorithm to operationally monitor dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on the Mackenzie River continental shelf (Canadian Arctic Ocean) using satellite imagery. The water optical properties are documented across the study area and related to concentrations of SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC). Robust SPM and POC : SPM proxies are identified, such as the light backscattering and attenuation coefficients, and relationships are established between these optical and biogeochemical parameters. Following a semi-analytical approach, a regional SPM quantification relationship is obtained for the inversion of the water reflectance signal into SPM concentration. This relationship is reproduced based on independent field optical measurements. It is successfully applied to a selection of MODIS satellite data which allow estimating fluxes at the river mouth and monitoring the extension and dynamics of the Mackenzie River surface plume in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Good agreement is obtained with field observations representative of the whole water column in the river delta zone where terrigenous SPM is mainly constrained (out of short periods of maximum river outflow). Most of the seaward export of SPM is observed to occur within the west side of the river mouth. Future

  2. Effects of suspended particles on the rate of mass transfer to a rotating disk electrode. [Ferric cyanide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roha, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Limiting currents for the reduction of ferric cyanide at a rotating disk were determined in the presence of 0 to 40 percent by volume of spherical glass beads. Experiments were conducted with six different particle diameters, and with rotation speeds in the range of 387 to 270 rpm, usong both a 0.56 cm and a 1.41 cm radius disk electrode. It was established that at a given rpm upon addition of glass beads in the limiting current, i/sub L/, may increase to more than three times its value without solids. This increase in limiting current density is greater at high rotation speeds and with the larger disk electrode. i/sub L/ as a function of particle diameter yields at maximum at approx. 10 ..mu..m. Two mass transfer models are offered to explain this behavior, both of which assume that the beads are in contact with the disk electrode and moving parallel to its surface. In the surface renewal model it is assumed that complete mixing takes place with the passage of each bead and the boundary layer is replaced with fresh bulk solution. While with the particle film model it is assumed the bead and a clinging film of fluid rotate together. The film promotes mass transfer by alternately absorbing and desorbing the diffusing species. The particle film model best explains the observed behavior of the limiting current density. Calculations of stirring power required verses i/sub L/ observed, show that adding beads to increase i/sub L/ consumes less additional power than simply increasing the rotation speed alone and even permits a decrease in the amount of stirring energy required per unit reactant consumed, at limiting current conditions.

  3. Bronchiolitis caused by occupational and ambient atmospheric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L

    2003-10-01

    Occupationally encountered mineral dusts such as asbestos, silica, silicates (talc, mica), and metals can produce a distinctive pattern of fibrosis and distortion of the small airways, particularly the distal membranous bronchioles (MB) and the respiratory bronchioles (RB). Recent reports show that the same types of changes, accompanied by considerable muscle hyperplasia, are found in individuals living in regions with high levels of particulate air pollutants (PM). Models and actual measurements suggest that these changes occur because the small airways are sites of high particle deposition, and inhaled and deposited particulates, including PM, enter the airway walls. Studies from our laboratory using a tracheal explant model have shown that, for many types of particles, entry into the airway wall causes expression of mediators that lead to airway wall fibrosis and airway wall smooth muscle hyperplasia, probably through oxidant mechanisms. These reactions are intrinsic properties of the particles and do not require exogenous inflammatory cells. There is considerable evidence that individuals with occupational exposure to a wide variety of mineral dusts, as well as individuals with chronic exposure to high levels of PM, develop chronic airflow obstruction. The type of small airway remodeling seen in particle-induced bronchiolitis appears to be one cause of chronic airflow obstruction in this setting. PMID:16088574

  4. Strong atmospheric disturbances as a possible origin of inner zone particle diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pokhotelov

    Full Text Available A new mechanism of the atmosphere-magnetosphere interaction, which might be called "acoustic-magnetospheric cyclotron accelerator", is proposed. The idea of this mechanism stems from the fact that strong acoustical perturbations in the ionosphere (e.g., due to earthquakes, thunderstorms, etc. may generate magnetic disturbances in the magnetosphere. Then, the latter will induce local resonant acceleration and subsequent inward diffusion of trapped particles. This idea may be fruitful in the interpretation of some occasional increases in inner zone particle fluxes which do not correlate with the solar or magnetospheric activities.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; particle acceleration

  5. Microcomputer-controlled system for measuring atmospheric particle fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, R.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A Hiac/Royco Model 4102 optical airborne particle counter equipped with the Model 1200 sensor was interfaced to an existing data acquisition system. Due to the location of the instruments and data transmission problems, special interfaces and software solutions were required to achieve data transmission and instrument control integrity. System design, instrument operation, and the software and hardware solutions required for operation are described.

  6. Decreasing particle number concentrations in a warming atmosphere and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation contributes significantly to the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN as well as cloud CN (CCN, a key factor determining aerosol indirect radiative forcing of the climate system. Using a physics-based nucleation mechanism that is consistent with a range of field observations of aerosol formation, it is shown that projected increases in global temperatures could significantly inhibit new particle, and CCN, formation rates worldwide. An analysis of CN concentrations observed at four NOAA ESRL/GMD baseline stations since the 1970s and two other sites since 1990s reveals long-term decreasing trends consistent with these predictions. The analysis also suggests, owing to larger observed CN reductions at remote sites than can be explained by the basic nucleation mechanism, that dimethylsulphide (DMS emissions may be decreasing worldwide with increasing global temperatures, implying a positive DMS-based cloud feedback forcing of the climate ("CLAW". The combined effects of rising temperatures on aerosol nucleation rates, and possibly on DMS emissions, may imply substantial decreases in future tropospheric particle abundances associated with global warming, delineating a potentially significant feedback mechanism that increases Earth's climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. Further research is needed to quantify the magnitude of such a feedback process.

  7. Decreasing particle number concentrations in a warming atmosphere and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation contributes significantly to the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN as well as cloud CN (CCN, a key factor determining aerosol indirect radiative forcing of the climate system. Using a physics-based nucleation mechanism that is consistent with a range of field observations of aerosol formation, it is shown that projected increases in global temperatures could significantly inhibit new particle, and CCN, formation rates worldwide. An analysis of CN concentrations observed at four NOAA ESRL/GMD baseline stations since the 1970s and two other sites since 1990s reveals long-term decreasing trends that are consistent in sign with, but are larger in magnitude than, the predicted temperature effects. The possible reasons for larger observed long-term CN reductions at remote sites are discussed. The combined effects of rising temperatures on aerosol nucleation rates and other chemical and microphysical processes may imply substantial decreases in future tropospheric particle abundances associated with global warming, delineating a potentially significant feedback mechanism that increases Earth's climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. Further research is needed to quantify the magnitude of such a feedback process.

  8. Occurrence and photostability of 3-nitrobenzanthrone associated with atmospheric particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, A.; Ohura, T.; Nielsen, T.; Poulsen, M.W.B.; Amagai, T.

    2002-01-01

    nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and other air pollution components, it is suggested that 3-nitrobenzanthrone is a directly emitted primary pollutant and that it is not formed in the atmosphere to a significant degree. The photodegradation of 3-nitrobenzanthrone was studied in order...... to understand the low levels of this compound in ambient air. In the presence of a radical sensitizer, anthraquinone, the degradation rate of 3-nitrobenzanthrone is comparable to that of 1-nitropyrene (NP), a directly emitted nitro-PAH present in ambient air in significantly higher levels than 3...

  9. The role of low-volatility organic compounds in initial particle growth in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Gordon, Hamish; Heinritzi, Martin; Yan, Chao; Molteni, Ugo; Ahlm, Lars; Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Wagner, Robert; Simon, Mario; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Williamson, Christina; Craven, Jill S; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, Joao; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Dias, Antònio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Gysel, Martin; Hansel, Armin; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Möhler, Ottmar; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Piel, Felix M; Miettinen, Pasi; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomè, Antònio; Virtanen, Annele; Wagner, Andrea C; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Riipinen, Ilona; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    About half of present-day cloud condensation nuclei originate from atmospheric nucleation, frequently appearing as a burst of new particles near midday. Atmospheric observations show that the growth rate of new particles often accelerates when the diameter of the particles is between one and ten nanometres. In this critical size range, new particles are most likely to be lost by coagulation with pre-existing particles, thereby failing to form new cloud condensation nuclei that are typically 50 to 100 nanometres across. Sulfuric acid vapour is often involved in nucleation but is too scarce to explain most subsequent growth, leaving organic vapours as the most plausible alternative, at least in the planetary boundary layer. Although recent studies predict that low-volatility organic vapours contribute during initial growth, direct evidence has been lacking. The accelerating growth may result from increased photolytic production of condensable organic species in the afternoon, and the presence of a possible Kelv...

  10. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, L. M.; Zhang, G. L.; Lei, Q. T.; Li, Y.; Li, X. L.; Hwu, Y. K.; Yi, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained.

  11. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained

  12. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, L.M., E-mail: baoliangman@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, G.L., E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Lei, Q.T.; Li, Y.; Li, X.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Hwu, Y.K. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yi, J.M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained.

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  14. Reversible electrically-driven magnetic domain wall rotation in multiferroic heterostructures to manipulate suspended on-chip magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Mark; Sohn, Hyunmin; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Hockel, Joshua; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; McLellan, Brenda; Marcus, Matthew; Doran, Andrew; Young, Anthony; Kläui, Mathias; Carman, Gregory; Bokor, Jeffrey; Candler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate reversible electrically-driven, strain-mediated domain wall (DW) rotation in Ni rings fabricated on piezoelectric [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrates. An electric field applied across the PMN-PT substrate induces a strain in the Ni rings producing DW rotation around the ring toward the dominant PMN-PT strain axis by inverse magnetostriction. We observe DWs reversibly cycled between their initial and rotated state as a function of the applied electric field with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photo-emission electron microscopy. The DW rotation is analytically predicted using a fully coupled micromagnetic/elastodyanmic multi-physics simulation to verify that the experimental behavior is caused by the electrically-generated strain in this multiferroic system. Finally, this DW rotation is used to capture and manipulate magnetic particles in a fluidic environment to demonstrate a proof-of-concept energy-efficient pathway for multiferroic-based lab-on-a-chip applications. Supported by TANMS (NSF 11-537), E3S, US Dept of Energy (DE-AC02-05CH11231), EU, and DFG.

  15. A new method for assessing the contribution of Primary Biological Atmospheric Particles to the mass concentration of the atmospheric aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, Cinzia; Marcovecchio, Francesca

    2016-02-01

    Primary Biologic Atmospheric Particles (PBAPs) constitute an interesting and poorly investigated component of the atmospheric aerosol. We have developed and validated a method for evaluating the contribution of overall PBAPs to the mass concentration of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). The method is based on PM sampling on polycarbonate filters, staining of the collected particles with propidium iodide, observation at epifluorescence microscope and calculation of the bioaerosol mass using a digital image analysis software. The method has been also adapted to the observation and quantification of size-segregated aerosol samples collected by multi-stage impactors. Each step of the procedure has been individually validated. The relative repeatability of the method, calculated on 10 pairs of atmospheric PM samples collected side-by-side, was 16%. The method has been applied to real atmospheric samples collected in the vicinity of Rome, Italy. Size distribution measurements revealed that PBAPs was mainly in the coarse fraction of PM, with maxima in the range 5.6-10 μm. 24-h samples collected during different period of the year have shown that the concentration of bioaerosol was in the range 0.18-5.3 μg m(-3) (N=20), with a contribution to the organic matter in PM10 in the range 0.5-31% and to the total mass concentration of PM10 in the range 0.3-18%. The possibility to determine the concentration of total PBAPs in PM opens up interesting perspectives in terms of studying the health effects of these components and of increasing our knowledge about the composition of the organic fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. PMID:26680730

  16. Non-volatile residuals of newly formed atmospheric particles in the boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehn

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The volatility of sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles was studied in a rural background environment in Finland using a combination of a heating tube and a scanning mobility particle sizer. The analysis focused on nanoparticles formed through nucleation which were subsequently observed during their growth in the diameter range between 5 and 60 nm. During the 6 days of new particle formation shown in detail, the concentrations of newly formed particles increased up to 10 000 cm−3. The number of nucleation mode particles measured after volatilization in the heating tube at 280°C was up to 90% of the total number under ambient conditions. Taking into account the absolute accuracy of the size distribution measurements, all ambient particles found in the rural atmosphere could have a non-volatile core after volatilization at 280°C. As the regional new particle formation events developed over time as a result of further vapor condensation, the newly formed particles grew at an average growth rate of 2.4±0.3 nm h−1. Importantly, the non-volatile cores of nucleation mode particles were also observed to grow over time, however, at a lower average growth rate of 0.6±0.3 nm h−1. One implication of the volatility analysis is that the newly formed particles, which have reached ambient diameters of 15 nm, are unlikely to consist of sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, and water alone. A relatively constant ratio between the growth rate of the ambient particles as well as their non-volatile cores indicates that non-volatile matter is formed only gradually in the growing particles. The non-volatile fraction of the particles showed some correlation with the ambient temperature. The composition and formation mechanism of this non-volatile material in nucleation mode particles are, to date, not known.

  17. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water. PMID:27348257

  18. Removal of trace nonylphenol from water in the coexistence of suspended inorganic particles and NOMs by using a cellulose-based flocculant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Guibal, Eric; Jia, Shuying; Shen, Jiachun; Zhang, Xuntong; Yang, Weiben

    2016-10-01

    A flocculation method was used for the removal of trace nonylphenol (NP) from synthetic surface water containing natural organic matters (humic acid, HA) and suspended inorganic particles (kaolin). A polymeric flocculant (CMCND), with enhanced cationic property and unique switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristic, was specially designed for this application. CMCND showed a high efficiency for trace NP removal, turbidity and UV254 abatements: under optimized conditions (pH: 4; T: 35 °C; dosage: 40 mg/L), the removal of NP reached up to 79%. By using dosage-pH flocculation diagrams and correlation analyses as tools, kaolin and HA were found to exert synergistic effects on NP removal, with the aid of CMCND; the synergistic effect of HA is higher due to π-π stacking. Zeta potential-dosage profiles clearly demonstrated charge neutralization predominated at pH 4, due to the strong cationic groups in the flocculant. Floc size monitoring displayed that the delayed phase transformation process (from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity) of CMCND at 35 °C enhanced NP removal. In addition, spectral analyses clarified the interactions among CMCND, NP, kaolin and HA: charge attraction and hydrophobic interaction between CMCND and NP played the key roles. The findings are of significance for removing endocrine-disrupting chemicals in environmental remediation. PMID:27459160

  19. Assessment of the relationship between total suspended particles and the response of two biological indicators transplanted to an urban area in central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, H. A.; Rodriguez, J. H.; González, C. M.; Wannaz, E. D.; Garcia Ferreyra, F.; Perez, C. A.; Pignata, M. L.

    Samples of the vascular plant Tradescantia pallida and the lichen Usnea amblyoclada were exposed from October 2004 to April 2005 in three sites with different local sources of air pollution in Córdoba city, Argentina. Simultaneous determinations of the ambient levels of total suspended particles were made for each site. Young inflorescenses of T. pallida were collected in November, February and April and the frequency of micronuclei was determined on early tetrads of pollen mother cells. Physiological parameters and the elemental composition of lichen thalli were measured from samples exposed and replaced every month. Significant differences among sampling sites were observed in the frequency of micronuclei measured in T. pallida as well as in many physiological parameters and elements accumulated in lichen thalli. The mass of particulate material as well as the concentration of Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn and Sr was significantly different in different sampling sites, too. These results suggest that in situ biomonitoring using both higher plants and lichens may be of use to characterize air pollution in areas devoid of instrumental monitoring techniques or where it is necessary to explore the distribution of air contaminants at a microscale.

  20. A review of solar wind and high energy particle influence on the middle atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the middle atmosphere there are several external sources of energy connected with solar wind and high energy particles. Some of them affect the basic state of the middle atmosphere, e.g. galactic cosmic rays are responsible for the ionization in the stratosphere. However, they are responsible mainly for various disturbances in the middle atmosphere. One can identify effects caused by geomagnetic storms (and substorms in high latitudes), solar cosmic ray and relativistic electron precipitation events, Forbush decreases of galactic cosmic rays, interplanetary magnetic field and its sector boundary, high speed streams, interaction regions and other phenomena in the solar wind. Their mechanisms often partly overlap and are usually associated with high-energy particle penetration. Most of the effects are reasonably well understood in the lower ionosphere, but our knowledge concerning the neutral middle atmosphere is still rather poor

  1. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Schobesberger, S.; Junninen, H.; BIANCHI, F.; Lonn, G.; M. Ehn; Lehtipalo, K.; Dommen, J; S. Ehrhart; Ortega, I.K.; A. Franchin; Nieminen, T.; Riccobono, F.; Hutterli, M.; J. Duplissy; Almeida, J

    2013-01-01

    The formation of nanoparticles by condensable vapors in the atmosphere influences radiative forcing and therefore climate. We explored the detailed mechanism of particle formation, in particular the role of oxidized organic molecules that arise from the oxidation of monoterpenes, a class of volatile organic compounds emitted from plants. We mimicked atmospheric conditions in a well-controlled laboratory setup and found that these oxidized organics form initial clusters directly with single su...

  2. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Mateev Lachezar; Lastovicka Jan; Kudela Karel; Asenovski Simeon; Velinov Peter I.Y.; Mishev Alexander; Tonev Peter

    2013-01-01

    A brief review of the study during COST Action ES0803 of effects due to cosmic rays (CR) and solar energetic particles (SEP) in the ionosphere and atmosphere is presented. Models CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere) and application of CORSIKA (COsmic Ray SImulations for KAscade) code are considered. They are capable to compute the cosmic ray ionization profiles at a given location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Intercomparison of the models, as well as c...

  3. Simultaneous determination of radiocesium ((135)Cs, (137)Cs) and plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu) isotopes in river suspended particles by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liguo; Zheng, Jian; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Due to radioisotope releases in the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, long-term monitoring of radiocesium ((135)Cs and (137)Cs) and Pu isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) in river suspended particles is necessary to study the transport and fate of these long-lived radioisotopes in the land-ocean system. However, it is expensive and technically difficult to collect samples of suspended particles from river and ocean. Thus, simultaneous determination of multi-radionuclides remains as a challenging topic. In this study, for the first time, we report an analytical method for simultaneous determination of radiocesium and Pu isotopes in suspended particles with small sample size (1-2g). Radiocesium and Pu were sequentially pre-concentrated using ammonium molybdophosphate and ferric hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively. After the two-stage ion-exchange chromatography separation from the matrix elements, radiocesium and Pu isotopes were finally determined by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS, respectively. The interfering elements of U ((238)U(1)H(+) and (238)U(2)H(+) for (239)Pu and (240)Pu, respectively) and Ba ((135)Ba(+) and (137)Ba(+) for (135)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively) were sufficiently removed with the decontamination factors of 1-8×10(6) and 1×10(4), respectively, with the developed method. Soil reference materials were utilized for method validation, and the obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios, and (239+240)Pu activities showed a good agreement with the certified/information values. In addition, the developed method was applied to analyze radiocesium and Pu in the suspended particles of land water samples collected from Fukushima Prefecture after the FDNPP accident. The (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratios (0.329-0.391) and (137)Cs activities (23.4-152Bq/g) suggested radiocesium contamination of the suspended particles mainly originated from the accident-released radioactive contaminates, while similar Pu contamination of suspended

  4. Characterizing Biological Particles in the Atmosphere at two Sites in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E.; Prenni, A. J.; Prenni, J.; Rivest, J.; Demott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    The composition and distribution of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) in the atmosphere is constantly changing due to both natural and anthropogenic activities. In this presentation, we will describe measurements aimed at better characterizing this population at Manitou Experimental Forest, in Pike National Forest in Colorado and in Fort Collins, CO. This work is part of the larger Biosphere-atmosphere Exchange of Aerosols within Cloud, Carbon and Hydrologic cycles, including Organics and Nitrogen (BEACHON) field study program, which is aimed at studying the connections between the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and water in semi-arid regions of the Western U.S. To this end, we are collecting PBAP with SKC impingers into water, which are subsequently analyzed by flow cytometery to determine the atmospheric biological particle concentration. Further, we are generating a gene library of the small subunit RNA genes to speciate the PBAPs in our collected samples using Sanger sequencing. These experiments are performed throughout the year to better understand seasonal variability of atmospheric microbial communities at the selected sites. A small handful of PBAPs have been found to be some of the best ice nucleators in the atmosphere, inducing ice nucleation as high as -2oC; these particles may play pivotal roles in influencing ice formation in cold clouds and, thereby, climate. Preliminary data will be presented aimed at better characterizing this important subset of biological particles.

  5. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The runaway breakdown-extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB-EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles (εp>1017-1019 eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB-EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  6. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful new type discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gurevich, A V

    2004-01-01

    The runaway breakdown -- extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB - EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles ($\\epsilon_p>10^{17} - 10^{19}$ eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB - EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  7. Studying Close Approaches for a Cloud of Particles Considering Atmospheric Drag

    OpenAIRE

    Vivian Martins Gomes; Jorge Formiga; Rodolpho Vilhena de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    The present paper has the goal of studying close approaches between a planet and a group of particles. The mathematical model includes the presence of the atmosphere of the planet. This cloud is assumed to be created by the passage of the spacecraft in the atmosphere of the planet, which can cause the explosion of the spacecraft. The system is assumed to be formed by the Sun, the planet, and the spacecraft that explodes and becomes a cloud of particles. The Sun and the planet are assumed to b...

  8. Size distribution of radon daughter particles in uranium mine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of the particle size distribution and other properties of radon daughters in uranium mines was reported earlier but only summaries of the data were presented. This report consists mainly of tables of detailed measurements that were omitted in the original article. The tabulated data include the size distributions, uncombined fractions and ratios of radon daughters as well as the working levels, radon concentrations, condensation nuclei concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. The measurements were made in 27 locations in four large underground mines in New Mexico during typical mining operations. The size distributions of the radon daughters were log normal. The activity median diameters ranged from 0.09 μm to 0.3 μm with a mean of 0.17 μm. Geometric standard deviations were from 1.3 to 4 with a mean of 2.7. Uncombined fractions expressed in accordance with the ICRP definition ranged from 0.004 to 0.16 with a mean of 0.04

  9. The link between atmospheric radicals and newly formed particles at a spruce forest site in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, B.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Sun, T. S.; Bingemer, H.; Rondo, L.; Javed, U.; Li, J.; Axinte, R.; Li, X.; Brauers, T.; Sonderfeld, H.; Koppmann, R.; Sogachev, Andrey; Jacobi, S.; Spracklen, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    controlled by HO2 and NO we conclude that peroxy radicals and NO seem to play an important role for ambient radical chemistry not only with respect to oxidation capacity but also for the activation process of new particle formation. This is supposed to have significant impact of atmospheric radical species......It has been claimed for more than a century that atmospheric new particle formation is primarily influenced by the presence of sulphuric acid. However, the activation process of sulphuric acid related clusters into detectable particles is still an unresolved topic. In this study we focus on the...... theories, evaluating their ability to simulate measured particle formation rates at 3 nm in diameter (J3) for a variety of different conditions. Nucleation mechanisms involving only sulphuric acid tentatively captured the observed noon-time daily maximum in J3, but displayed an increasing difference to J3...

  10. Source apportionment of single aerosol particles in the atmosphere of Shanghai city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear microprobe with high spatial resolution and high analytical sensitivity was applied to analyze atmospheric aerosol at five monitoring sites in Shanghai city. Meantime, a new pattern recognition technique, which used the micro-PIXE spectrum of a single aerosol particle as its fingerprint, was developed to identify the origin of the particle. The results showed that the major contributors to the atmosphere pollution were soil dust (31.6%), building dust (30.8%), and the next were vehicle exhaust (13.7%), metallurgic industry excrements (5.6%), oil combustion (5%) and coal combustion (2.3%). Besides these, about 10% of the particles could not be identified. Based on the cluster analysis of these particles, they could be divided into soil dust, building dust and metallurgic industry excrements. Moreover, some new pollution sources from tyres and chemical plants were also revealed

  11. Suspended-slurry reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-22

    An apparatus for generating a large volume of gas from a liquid stream is disclosed. The apparatus includes a first channel through which the liquid stream passes. The apparatus also includes a layer of catalyst particles suspended in a solid slurry for generating gas from the liquid stream. The apparatus further includes a second channel through which a mixture of converted liquid and generated gas passes. A heat exchange channel heats the liquid stream. A wicking structure located in the second channel separates the gas generated from the converted liquid.

  12. Evaluation of the accuracy of analysis tools for atmospheric new particle formation

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, H.; S.-L. Sihto; V.-M. Kerminen; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Several mathematical tools have been developed in recent years to analyze new particle formation rates and to estimate nucleation rates and mechanisms at sub-3nm sizes from atmospheric aerosol data. Here we evaluate these analysis tools using 1239 numerical nucleation events for which the nucleation mechanism and formation rates were known exactly. The accuracy of the estimates of particle formation rate at 3 nm (J3) showed significant sensitivity to ...

  13. Evaluation of the accuracy of analysis tools for atmospheric new particle formation

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, H.; Sihto, S.-L.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Several mathematical tools have been developed in recent years to analyze new particle formation rates and to estimate nucleation rates and mechanisms at sub-3 nm sizes from atmospheric aerosol data. Here we evaluate these analysis tools using 1239 numerical nucleation events for which the nucleation mechanism and formation rates were known exactly. The accuracy of the estimates of particle formation rate at 3 nm (J3) showed significant sensitivity to...

  14. Analyses on the formation of atmospheric particles and stabilized sulphuric acid clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasonen, P.

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol particles have various effects on our life. They affect the visibility and have diverse health effects, but are also applied in various applications, from drug inhalators to pesticides. Additionally, aerosol particles have manifold effects on the Earths' radiation budget and thus on the climate. The strength of the aerosol climate effect is one of the factors causing major uncertainties in the global climate models predicting the future climate change. Aerosol particles are emitted to atmosphere from various anthropogenic and biogenic sources, but they are also formed from precursor vapours in many parts of the world in a process called atmospheric new particle formation (NPF). The uncertainties in aerosol climate effect are partly due to the current lack of knowledge of the mechanisms governing the atmospheric NPF. It is known that gas phase sulphuric acid most certainly plays an important role in atmospheric NPF. However, also other vapours are needed in NPF, but the exact roles or even identities of these vapours are currently not exactly known. In this thesis I present some of the recent advancements in understanding of the atmospheric NPF in terms of the roles of the participating vapours and the meteorological conditions. Since direct measurements of new particle formation rate in the initial size scale of the formed particles (below 2 nm) are so far infrequent in both spatial and temporal scales, indirect methods are needed. The work presented on the following pages approaches the NPF from two directions: by analysing the observed formation rates of particles after they have grown to sizes measurable with widely applied instruments (2 nm or larger), and by measuring and modelling the initial sulphuric acid cluster formation. The obtained results can be summarized as follows. (1) The observed atmospheric new particle formation rates are typically connected with sulphuric acid concentration to the power close to two. (2) Also other compounds, most

  15. Nuclear microprobe analysis and source apportionment of individual atmospheric aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In atmospheric aerosol reserach, one key issue is to determine the sources of the airborne particles. Bulk PIXE analysis coupled with receptor modeling provides a useful, but limited view of the aerosol sources influencing one particular site or sample. The scanning nuclear microprobe (SNM) technique is a microanalytical technique that gives unique information on individual aerosol particles. In the SNM analyses a 1.0 μm size 2.4 MeV proton beam from the Oxford SNM was used. The trace elements with Z>11 were measured by the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method with detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range. Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are measured simultaneously using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at the Brazilian Antarctic Station and at biomass burning sites in the Amazon basin tropical rain forest in Brazil. In the Antarctic samples, the sea-salt aerosol particles were clearly predominating, with NaCl and CaSO4 as major compounds with several trace elements as Al, Si, P, K, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb. Factor analysis of the elemental data showed the presence of four components: 1) Soil dust particles; 2) NaCl particles; 3) CaSO4 with Sr; and 4) Br and Mg. Strontium, observed at 20-100 ppm levels, was always present in the CaSO4 particles. The hierarchical cluster procedure gave results similar to the ones obtained through factor analysis. For the tropical rain forest biomass burning aerosol emissions, biogenic particles with a high organic content dominate the particle population, while K, P, Ca, Mg, Zn, and Si are the dominant elements. Zinc at 10-200 ppm is present in biogenic particles rich in P and K. The quantitative aspects and excellent detection limits make SNM analysis of individual aerosol particles a very powerful analytical tool. (orig.)

  16. Inhibition effects of suspended and accumulated particles on adhesion and development of Undaria pinnatifida zoospores; Kaisuichu kendaku ryushi no chinko taiseki ga wakame yusoshi no chakusei to sono seicho ni oyobosu sogai sayo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Takami, T. [Miyazaki University, Miyazaki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Miura, A. [Aomori University, Aomori (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-10-10

    In order to reveal effects of suspended and accumulated particles in sea water on the adhesion and development of Undaria pinnatifida zoospores on the substratum, adhesion Inhibition tests were conducted using kaolinite as model particles under the following three cases of natural conditions; Case 1: suspended particles together with zoospores, Case 2: zoospores released after accumulation of particles on the substratum, and Case 3: accumulated particles on zoospores adhered on the substratum. Case 2 provided the most effective inhibition for the adhesion of zoospores, and 50% of effective concentration of particles was 29{mu}g/cm{sup 2}. Zoospores adhered on the substratum were developed to gametophytes even when covered and deposited by kaolinite particles. It was difficult for these gametophytes to develop to sporophytes. Remarkable inhibition was observed in the development process via gametophytes and sporophytes to young sporophytes. The inhibition was observed for crust spores at lower concentration. Higher adhesion performance on the substratum was found for zoospores. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Phase transitions of aqueous atmospheric particles: Crystallization of ammonium salts promoted by oxide mineral constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong-Ho

    2001-09-01

    Knowledge of the hygroscopic response of aerosols is a fundamental factor necessary for the accurate quantitative modeling of visibility degradation, global warming, PM-10 health issues, cloud microphysics, and the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. At the present time, however, our current understanding of phase transitions is insufficient to develop accurate quantitative models. The discrepancy between current atmospheric models and field measurements originates mainly from a lack of understanding of the efflorescence of real atmospheric particles. While there have been many studies on the homogeneous nucleation of the soluble organic, inorganic, or multi-component materials, many recent in situ field measurements with single-particle mass spectrometry reveal that the individual particles in the troposphere are primarily composed of more than one component. One of the common mixed component particle types contains both water- soluble and insoluble components. Through atmospheric processes, the soluble component can be expected to form a coating around the insoluble constituents. This type of atmospheric particles is very important because the insoluble constituent can play a role as a template for the crystallization of the soluble components by heterogeneous nucleation. In the atmosphere, the most prevalent insoluble constituents are mineral dusts, which have their origin from Saharan and Gobbi deserts. The existence of these coated particles has been supported by several field measurements as well as model studies. Therefore, it becomes imperative to simulate more realistic atmospheric particles for more exact (or realistic) understanding the phase transition of the ambient aerosol particles in the real world. In this context, a series of studies has been completed to solve the aforementioned problems in the phase transition study and to better understand the heterogeneous nucleation of these internally mixed particles. An in-line tube furnace has been

  18. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  19. Microgravity particle research on the Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squyres, S.W.; Mckay, C.P.; Schwartz, D.E.

    1987-12-01

    Science questions that could be addressed by a Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility for studying small suspended particles were discussed. Characteristics of such a facility were determined. Disciplines covered include astrophysics and the solar nebula, planetary science, atmospheric science, exobiology and life science, and physics and chemistry.

  20. The effect of acid–base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at su...

  1. Internal composition of atmospheric dust particles from focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conny, Joseph M

    2013-08-01

    Use of focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal composition of atmospheric particles is demonstrated for assessing particle optical properties. In the FIB-SEM instrument equipped with an X-ray detector, a gallium-ion beam mills the particle, while the electron beam images the slice faces and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy provides element maps of the particle. Differences in assessments of optical behavior based on FIB-SEM and conventional SEM were shown for five selected urban dust particles. The benefit of FIB-SEM for accurately determining the depth and size of optically important phases within particles was shown. FIB-SEM revealed that iron oxide grains left undetected by conventional SEM could potentially shift the single-scattering albedo of the particle from negative to positive radiative forcing. Analysis of a coke-like particle showed that 73% of the light-scattering inclusion went undetected with conventional SEM, causing the bulk absorption coefficient to vary by as much as 25%. Optical property calculations for particles as volume-equivalent spheres and as spheroids that approximated actual particle shapes revealed that the largest effect between conventional SEM and FIB-SEM analyses was on backscattering efficiency, in some cases varying several-fold. PMID:23763344

  2. Nuclear fuel particles in the environment - characteristics, atmospheric transport and skin doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R

    2002-05-01

    In the present thesis, nuclear fuel particles are studied from the perspective of their characteristics, atmospheric transport and possible skin doses. These particles, often referred to as 'hot' particles, can be released into the environment, as has happened in past years, through human activities, incidents and accidents, such as the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. Nuclear fuel particles with a diameter of tens of micrometers, referred to here as large particles, may be hundreds of kilobecquerels in activity and even an individual particle may present a quantifiable health hazard. The detection of individual nuclear fuel particles in the environment, their isolation for subsequent analysis and their characterisation are complicated and require well-designed sampling and tailored analytical methods. In the present study, the need to develop particle analysis methods is highlighted. It is shown that complementary analytical techniques are necessary for proper characterisation of the particles. Methods routinely used for homogeneous samples may produce erroneous results if they are carelessly applied to radioactive particles. Large nuclear fuel particles are transported differently in the atmosphere compared with small particles or gaseous species. Thus, the trajectories of gaseous species are not necessarily appropriate for calculating the areas that may receive large particle fallout. A simplified model and a more advanced model based on the data on real weather conditions were applied in the case of the Chernobyl accident to calculate the transport of the particles of different sizes. The models were appropriate in characterising general transport properties but were not able to properly predict the transport of the particles with an aerodynamic diameter of tens of micrometers, detected at distances of hundreds of kilometres from the source, using only the current knowledge of the source term. Either the effective release height has

  3. Nuclear fuel particles in the environment - characteristics, atmospheric transport and skin doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis, nuclear fuel particles are studied from the perspective of their characteristics, atmospheric transport and possible skin doses. These particles, often referred to as 'hot' particles, can be released into the environment, as has happened in past years, through human activities, incidents and accidents, such as the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. Nuclear fuel particles with a diameter of tens of micrometers, referred to here as large particles, may be hundreds of kilobecquerels in activity and even an individual particle may present a quantifiable health hazard. The detection of individual nuclear fuel particles in the environment, their isolation for subsequent analysis and their characterisation are complicated and require well-designed sampling and tailored analytical methods. In the present study, the need to develop particle analysis methods is highlighted. It is shown that complementary analytical techniques are necessary for proper characterisation of the particles. Methods routinely used for homogeneous samples may produce erroneous results if they are carelessly applied to radioactive particles. Large nuclear fuel particles are transported differently in the atmosphere compared with small particles or gaseous species. Thus, the trajectories of gaseous species are not necessarily appropriate for calculating the areas that may receive large particle fallout. A simplified model and a more advanced model based on the data on real weather conditions were applied in the case of the Chernobyl accident to calculate the transport of the particles of different sizes. The models were appropriate in characterising general transport properties but were not able to properly predict the transport of the particles with an aerodynamic diameter of tens of micrometers, detected at distances of hundreds of kilometres from the source, using only the current knowledge of the source term. Either the effective release height has been higher

  4. Experimental evidence for the role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Marsh, N.D.;

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of aerosol nucleation in air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide and water vapour at concentrations relevant for the Earth's atmosphere, are reported. The production of new aerosol particles is found to be proportional to the negative ion density and yields nu...

  5. Atmospheric data over a solar cycle: no connection between galactic cosmic rays and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, through their activation into cloud droplets. Both effects are known with considerable uncertainty only, and translate into even bigger uncertainties in future climate predictions. More than a decade ago, variations in galactic cosmic rays were suggested to closely correlate with variations in atmospheric cloud cover and therefore constitute a driving force behind aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Later, the enhancement of atmospheric aerosol particle formation by ions generated from cosmic rays was proposed as a physical mechanism explaining this correlation. Here, we report unique observations on atmospheric aerosol formation based on measurements at the SMEAR II station, Finland, over a solar cycle (years 1996–2008 that shed new light on these presumed relationships. Our analysis shows that none of the quantities related to aerosol formation correlates with the cosmic ray-induced ionisation intensity (CRII. We also examined the contribution of ions to new particle formation on the basis of novel ground-based and airborne observations. A consistent result is that ion-induced formation contributes typically less than 10% to the number of new particles, which would explain the missing correlation between CRII and aerosol formation. Our main conclusion is that galactic cosmic rays appear to play a minor role for atmospheric aerosol formation, and so for the connected aerosol-climate effects as well.

  6. Atmospheric data over a solar cycle: no connection between galactic cosmic rays and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, through their activation into cloud droplets. Both effects are known with considerable uncertainty only, and translate into even bigger uncertainties in future climate predictions. More than a decade ago, variations in galactic cosmic rays were suggested to closely correlate with variations in atmospheric cloud cover and therefore constitute a driving force behind aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Later, the enhancement of atmospheric aerosol particle formation by ions generated from cosmic rays was proposed as a physical mechanism explaining this correlation. Here, we report unique observations on atmospheric aerosol formation based on measurements at the SMEAR II station, Finland, over a solar cycle (years 1996–2008 that shed new light on these presumed relationships. Our analysis shows that none of the quantities related to aerosol formation correlates with the cosmic ray-induced ionisation intensity (CRII. We also examined the contribution of ions to new particle formation on the basis of novel ground-based and airborne observations. A consistent result is that ion-induced formation contributes typically significantly less than 10% to the number of new particles, which would explain the missing correlation between CRII and aerosol formation. Our main conclusion is that galactic cosmic rays appear to play a minor role for atmospheric aerosol formation events, and so for the connected aerosol-climate effects as well.

  7. Flocculation Potential of Estuarine Particles: The Importance of Environmental Factors and of the Spatial and Seasonal Variability of Suspended Particulate Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Verney, Romaric; Lafite, Robert; Brun-cottan, Jean-claude

    2009-01-01

    Estuarine systems are complex environments where seasonal and spatial variations occur in concentrations of suspended particulate matter, in primary constituents, and in organic matter content. This study investigated in the laboratory the flocculation potential of estuarine-suspended particulate matter throughout the year in order to better identify the controlling factors and their hierarchy. Kinetic experiments were performed in the lab with a "video in lab" device, based on a jar test tec...

  8. Depletion of total ozone content of the atmosphere due to solar particle events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depletion of total ozone in the atmosphere due to major solar particle events during the past decade and a half is investigated. The daily data for a number of stations situated above 40deg N for several days before and after each particle event, are analyzed and superimposed. The seasonal variation is taken into consideration and corrected for. The percentage variation curves for a number of particle events are superimposed to obtain a consolidated curve which shows a detectable depletion of ozone after such occurrences. The depletion of ground ozone due to extra-terrestrial energetic particles has not been definitely identified before. The percentage reduction of O3 so obtained agrees well with observed Nimbus-4 satellite data of 3.3% after 8 days of 4 Aug. 1972 event. Different mechanisms of ozone depletion due to particle flux are discussed. (auth.)

  9. Pollution characteristics of atmospheric fine particles and their secondary components in the atmosphere of Shenzhen in summer and in winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Yuwen; HE Lingyan; HU Min; ZHANG Jing; ZHAO Yunliang

    2006-01-01

    Two field measurements for atmospheric fine particles were conducted in Baoan district of Shenzhen during the summer and winter in 2004. Totally 30 sets of 24 h samples were collected, and then the mass concentrations and chemical compositions were determined. The seasonal variations and secondary pollution characteristics of fine particles during the sampling periods were discussed with meteorological factors. The results show that seasonal variations of atmospheric particles are significant in Shenzhen. The average mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 in summer were 35 μg·m-3 and 57 μg·m-3, respectively, and those in winter were 99 μg·m-3 and 135 μg·m-3, respectively. The concentrations of both PM2.5 and PM10 in winter increased 184% and 137%, respectively, compared to those in summer. PM2.5 accounted for 61% and 75% of PM10 in summer and in winter, respectively, indicating severe fine particle pollution in Shenzhen. During the summer and winter sampling periods, the mean OC/EC ratios were 3.4 and 1.6, respectively. The estimated secondary organic carbon (SOC) averagely accounted for 56% and 6% of the total OC in summer and in winter, respectively, which implies a major contribution of SOC to OC in summer. During the continuous high temperature period in summer, both the concentrations and fractions of secondary aerosol components in PM2.5 were highly elevated, suggesting severe secondary pollution again. The prevailing wind was from South China Sea in summer, and the air quality was good. The prevailing wind in winter was from Mainland China to the north, and the polluted air mass led to poor air quality.

  10. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  11. Catalytic oxidation of CS2 over atmospheric particles and oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic oxidization of CS2 over atmospheric particles and some oxide catalysts was explored through FT-IR, MS and a fixed-bed stainless steel reactor. The results show that at mospheric particles and some oxide catalysts exhibited considerable oxidizing activities for CS2 at ambient temperature. The reaction products are mainly COS and elemental sulfur, even CO2 on some catalysts. Among the catalysts, CaO has the strongest catalytic activity for oxidizing CS2. Fe2O3 is weaker than CaO. The catalytic activity for AI2O3 reduces considerably compared with the former two catalysts, and SiO2 the weakest. Atmospheric particle samples' catalytic activity is be tween Fe2O3's and AI2O3's. The atmospheric particle sample collected mainly consists of Ca(AI2Si2O8)· 4H2O, which is also the main component of cement. COS, the main product, is formed by the catalytic oxidization of CS2 with adsorbed “molecular” oxygen over the catalysts' surfaces. The concentration of adsorbed oxygen over catalysts' surfaces may be the key factor contributed to the oxidizing activity. It is indicated that CS2 could be catalytically oxidized over at mospheric particles, which induced that this reaction may be another important source of atmos pheric COS from CS2.

  12. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  13. Utilitarian Opacity Model for Aggregate Particles in Protoplanetary Nebulae and Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Davis, Sanford S

    2013-01-01

    As small solid grains grow into larger ones in protoplanetary nebulae, or in the cloudy atmospheres of exoplanets, they generally form porous aggregates rather than solid spheres. A number of previous studies have used highly sophisticated schemes to calculate opacity models for irregular, porous particles with size much smaller than a wavelength. However, mere growth itself can affect the opacity of the medium in far more significant ways than the detailed compositional and/or structural differences between grain constituents once aggregate particle sizes exceed the relevant wavelengths. This physics is not new; our goal here is to provide a model that provides physical insight and is simple to use in the increasing number of protoplanetary nebula evolution, and exoplanet atmosphere, models appearing in recent years, yet quantitatively captures the main radiative properties of mixtures of particles of arbitrary size, porosity, and composition. The model is a simple combination of effective medium theory with...

  14. Field and laboratory studies of atmospheric reactive mercury: Gas-particle partitioning and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Andrew Philip

    Certain aspects of atmospheric reactive mercury (RM) source-receptor relationships are not well understood. The objective of this dissertation was to improve the understanding of these relationships in the following areas: (i) gas-particle partitioning, and; (ii) the local impacts of RM source emissions. A novel aerosol reactor was developed to study gas-particle partitioning of RM using synthetic atmospheric aerosol containing picogram concentrations of RM. The RM in the aerosol was collected in an offline mode with filters and sorbent, and analyzed with Thermal Desorption Analysis (TDA). The offline-TDA collection and analysis method was compared with a commercial real time ambient mercury analyzer and two wet analysis methods using ambient measurements. The offline-TDA method performed well in comparison to the established techniques. The dependencies of gas-particle partitioning coefficients upon temperature and particle composition were determined and parameterized from field studies and laboratory experiments. The volatility of RM increased with ambient temperature in urban aerosol and laboratory aerosol of ammonium sulfate and adipic acid. The dependence of RM gas-particle partitioning on particle composition were determined using synthetic atmospheric aerosol generated in the laboratory. RM partitioned predominantly to the particle phase in particles of sodium nitrate, sodium chloride and potassium chloride, but was much more volatile in particles made of ammonium sulfate, levoglucosan and adipic acid. The impacts of RM sources on local receptors were studied in southern Wisconsin and Mexico City. RM measurements were made over a year in Milwaukee, WI (urban) and Devil's Lake State Park, WI (rural). An urban excess of all three mercury species was detected in Milwaukee, WI. The urban excess was attributed to a higher density of mercury emissions in the Milwaukee, WI-Chicago, IL area. The impact of local sources of RM on both sites was found to dominate the

  15. The role of low-volatility organic compounds in initial particle growth in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Chuang, Wayne K; Gordon, Hamish; Heinritzi, Martin; Yan, Chao; Molteni, Ugo; Ahlm, Lars; Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Wagner, Robert; Simon, Mario; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Williamson, Christina; Craven, Jill S; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, Joao; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Dias, Antònio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Gysel, Martin; Hansel, Armin; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Möhler, Ottmar; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Piel, Felix M; Miettinen, Pasi; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomè, Antònio; Virtanen, Annele; Wagner, Andrea C; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Riipinen, Ilona; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-05-26

    About half of present-day cloud condensation nuclei originate from atmospheric nucleation, frequently appearing as a burst of new particles near midday. Atmospheric observations show that the growth rate of new particles often accelerates when the diameter of the particles is between one and ten nanometres. In this critical size range, new particles are most likely to be lost by coagulation with pre-existing particles, thereby failing to form new cloud condensation nuclei that are typically 50 to 100 nanometres across. Sulfuric acid vapour is often involved in nucleation but is too scarce to explain most subsequent growth, leaving organic vapours as the most plausible alternative, at least in the planetary boundary layer. Although recent studies predict that low-volatility organic vapours contribute during initial growth, direct evidence has been lacking. The accelerating growth may result from increased photolytic production of condensable organic species in the afternoon, and the presence of a possible Kelvin (curvature) effect, which inhibits organic vapour condensation on the smallest particles (the nano-Köhler theory), has so far remained ambiguous. Here we present experiments performed in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions that investigate the role of organic vapours in the initial growth of nucleated organic particles in the absence of inorganic acids and bases such as sulfuric acid or ammonia and amines, respectively. Using data from the same set of experiments, it has been shown that organic vapours alone can drive nucleation. We focus on the growth of nucleated particles and find that the organic vapours that drive initial growth have extremely low volatilities (saturation concentration less than 10(-4.5) micrograms per cubic metre). As the particles increase in size and the Kelvin barrier falls, subsequent growth is primarily due to more abundant organic vapours of slightly higher volatility (saturation concentrations of 10(-4.5) to 10

  16. UTILITARIAN OPACITY MODEL FOR AGGREGATE PARTICLES IN PROTOPLANETARY NEBULAE AND EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As small solid grains grow into larger ones in protoplanetary nebulae, or in the cloudy atmospheres of exoplanets, they generally form porous aggregates rather than solid spheres. A number of previous studies have used highly sophisticated schemes to calculate opacity models for irregular, porous particles with sizes much smaller than a wavelength. However, mere growth itself can affect the opacity of the medium in far more significant ways than the detailed compositional and/or structural differences between grain constituents once aggregate particle sizes exceed the relevant wavelengths. This physics is not new; our goal here is to provide a model that provides physical insight and is simple to use in the increasing number of protoplanetary nebula evolution and exoplanet atmosphere models appearing in recent years, yet quantitatively captures the main radiative properties of mixtures of particles of arbitrary size, porosity, and composition. The model is a simple combination of effective medium theory with small-particle closed-form expressions, combined with suitably chosen transitions to geometric optics behavior. Calculations of wavelength-dependent emission and Rosseland mean opacity are shown and compared with Mie theory. The model's fidelity is very good in all comparisons we have made except in cases involving pure metal particles or monochromatic opacities for solid particles with sizes comparable to the wavelength

  17. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  18. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  19. Processing of atmospheric particles caught in the act via STXM/NEXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimer, S.; Lampimäki, M.; Grzinic, G.; Coz, E.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are an important focus of environmental research due to their effect on climate and human health. Among their main constituents are mineral dust and organic particles. Both types of particles directly and indirectly affect our climate through scattering and absorption of radiation and through acting as cloud condensation nuclei respectively. Organic particles are also of significant concern with respect to their health effects. Mineral dust particles in addition serve as a primary external iron source to the open ocean and the bioavailability of iron from these particles is highly dependent on the oxidation state of the metal. The environmental impact of atmospheric particles depends on their physical and chemical properties, which might change upon chemical ageing. In this study we therefore investigated the changes in chemical composition and morphology of mineral dust and organic particle proxies (Arizona test dust and shikimic acid, respectively) upon in situ exposure to ozone or nitrogen oxides in presence of humidity. This was achieved by monitoring changes at the C and O K-edges as well as the metal L-edges via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Measurements were conducted at the PolLux beamline at Swiss Light Source. All experiments were conducted in an environmental micro reactor, designed specifically for the end station, to enable the investigation in situ. We observed oxidation of shikimic acid particles in situ during exposure to ozone at different humidities, whereby humidity was found to be a critical factor controlling the rate of the reaction. We also obtained well resolved iron distribution maps from the individual submicrometer size mineral dust particles before and after exposure to nitrogen oxides.

  20. Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles from a Mining City in Southwest China Using Electron Probe microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X.; Huang, Y.; Lu, H., III; Liu, Z., IV; Wang, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    Xin Cheng1, Yi Huang1*, Huilin Lu2, Zaidong Liu2, Ningming Wang21 Key Laboratory of Geological Nuclear Technology of Sichuan Province, College of Earth Science, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China. ; E-mail:chengxin_cdut@163.com 2 College of Earth Science, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China. ; *Corresponding author: E-mail: huangyi@cdut.cn Panzhihua is a mining city located at Pan-Xi Rift valley, southwest China. It has a long industrial history of vanadium-titanium magnetite mining, iron and steel smelting, and coal-fired power plants. Atomospheric environment has been seriously contaminated with airborne paticles, which is threatening human health.The harmful effects of aerosols are dependent on certain characteristics such as microphysical properties. However, few studsies have been carried out on morphological information contained on single atmospheric particles in this area. In this study, we provide a detailed morphologically and chemically characterization of airborne particles collected at Panzhihua city in October, 2014, using a quantitative single particle analysis based on EPXMA. The results indicate that based on their chemical composition, five major types of particles were identified. Among these, aluminosilicate particles have typical spherical shapes and are produced during the high-temperature combustion; Fe-containing particles contains high level of Mn, and more likely originated from mineralogical and steel industry; Si-containing particles can originate from mineralogical source; V-Ti-Mn-containing particles are also produced by steel industry; Ca-containing particles,these particles are CaCO3, mainly from the mining of limestone mine. The results help us on tracing and partitioning different sources of atomospheric particles in the industrial area. Fig.1 Fe-rich shperical particles

  1. Effects of sintering atmosphere and initial particle size on sintering of gadolinia-doped ceria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the sintering atmosphere and initial particle size on the sintering of ceria containing 10 mol% gadolinia (GdO1.5) were systematically investigated. The main physical parameter was the specific surface area of the initial powders. Nanometric powders with three different specific surface areas were utilized, 210 m2/g, 36,2 m2/g e 7,4 m2/g. The influence on the densification, and micro structural evolution were evaluated. The starting sintering temperature was verified to decrease with increasing on the specific surface area of raw powders. The densification was accelerated for the materials with smaller particle size. Sintering paths for crystallite growth were obtained. Master sintering curves for gadolinium-doped ceria were constructed for all initial powders. A computational program was developed for this purpose. The results for apparent activation energy showed noticeable dependence with specific surface area. In this work, the apparent activation energy for densification increased with the initial particle size of powders. The evolution of the particle size distributions on non isothermal sintering was investigated by WPPM method. It was verified that the grain growth controlling mechanism on gadolinia doped ceria is the pore drag for initial stage and beginning of intermediate stage. The effects of the sintering atmosphere on the stoichiometry deviation of ceria, densification, microstructure evolution, and electrical conductivity were analyzed. Inert, oxidizing, and reducing atmospheres were utilized on this work. Deviations on ceria stoichiometry were verified on the bulk materials. The deviation verified was dependent of the specific surface area and sintering atmosphere. Higher reduction potential atmospheres increase Ce3+ bulk concentration after sintering. Accelerated grain growth and lower electrical conductivities were verified when reduction reactions are significantly present on sintering. (author)

  2. A computer programmed model for calculation of fall and dispersion of particles in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric model has been designed and developed to provide estimates of air concentrations or ground deposit densities of particles released in the atmosphere up to 90-km altitude. Particle density and diameter may range from 1 to 10 g/cm3 and about 3 to 300μ, respectively, for given instantaneous point or line sources. The particle cloud is allowed to move horizontally in accordance with analytically simulated winds and to fall at terminal velocity plus vertical air velocity. Small-scale cloud growth rate is specified empirically at values based on past instantaneous tracer experiments while large-scale growth results from trajectory subdivision and divergence of new particle trajectories. Some specific computer runs at Sandia were done to assess hazards resulting from possible rocket abort situations and atmospheric re-entry from improper orbits of isotopic or reactor power supplies. The results have been compared with other modes of estimation derived from simpler models of world-wide contaminant spread. While existing data are insufficient for full verification, it is felt that the present model is one of the most comprehensive and realistic available. (author)

  3. Effect of typhoon on atmospheric aerosol particle pollutants accumulation over Xiamen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinpei; Chen, Liqi; Lin, Qi; Zhao, Shuhui; Zhang, Miming

    2016-09-01

    Great influence of typhoon on air quality has been confirmed, however, rare data especially high time resolved aerosol particle data could be used to establish the behavior of typhoon on air pollution. A single particle aerosol spectrometer (SPAMS) was employed to characterize the particles with particle number count in high time resolution for two typhoons of Soulik (2013) and Soudelor (2015) with similar tracks. Three periods with five events were classified during the whole observation time, including pre - typhoon (event 1 and event 2), typhoon (event 3 and event 4) and post - typhoon (event 5) based on the meteorological parameters and particle pollutant properties. First pollutant group appeared during pre-typhoon (event 2) with high relative contributions of V - Ni rich particles. Pollution from the ship emissions and accumulated by local processes with stagnant meteorological atmosphere dominated the formation of the pollutant group before typhoon. The second pollutant group was present during typhoon (event 3), while typhoon began to change the local wind direction and increase wind speed. Particle number count reached up to the maximum value. High relative contributions of V - Ni rich and dust particles with low value of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) was observed during this period, indicating that the pollutant group was governed by the combined effect of local pollutant emissions and long-term transports. The analysis of this study sheds a deep insight into understand the relationship between the air pollution and typhoon. PMID:27295441

  4. Source apportionment of single aerosol particles in the atmosphere of Shanghai city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A nuclear microprobe with high spatial resolution and high analyti cal sensitivity was applied to analyze atmospheric aerosol at five monitoring sites in Shanghai city. Meantime, a new pattern recognition technique, which used the micro PIXE spectrum of a single aerosol particle as its fingerprint, was developed to identify the origin of the particle. The results showed that the major contributors to the at mosphere pollution were soil dust (31.6%), building dust (30.8%), and the next were vehicle exhaust (13.7%), metallurgic industry excrements (5.6%), oil combustion (5%) and coal combustion (2.3%). Besides these, about 10% of the particles could not be identified. Based on the cluster analysis of these particles, they could be divided into eight groups. By inference, they might belong to some sub-pollution sources from soil dust, building dust and metallurgic industry excrements. Moreover, some new pollution sources from tyres and chemical plants were also revealed.

  5. Kinetic study of the thermal decomposition process of calcite particles in air and CO2 atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Escardino Benlloch, Agustín; García Ten, Francisco Javier; Feliu Mingarro, Carlos; Saburit Llaudis, Alejandro; Cantavella Soler, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition process of calcite particles (0.45–3.60 mm average diameter), made up of porous agglomerates of very small CaCO3 microcrystals, was studied in the 975–1216 K temperature range. The experiments were carried out under isothermal conditions in air atmosphere, in CO2 atmosphere, as well as in a gas stream comprising different concentrations of air and CO2. An equation is proposed that relates the calcite conversion degree to both reaction time and operating condition...

  6. Treatment of airborne asbestos and asbestos-like microfiber particles using atmospheric microwave air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We use atmospheric microwave air plasma to treat ceramic fiber and stainless fiber as asbestos alike micro fiber particle. → Spheroidization of certain type of ceramic fiber and stainless fiber particle. → The evaluation of the treated particles by the fiber vanishing rate. → Good fiber vanishing rate is observed for fiber particle with diameter below 10 μm. → The treatment of pure asbestos and a suggestion of the use of this method for the treatment airborne asbestos. - Abstract: Atmospheric microwave air plasma was used to treat asbestos-like microfiber particles that had two types of ceramic fiber and one type of stainless fiber. The treated particles were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experiment results showed that one type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 1:1) and the stainless fiber were spheroidized, but the other type of ceramic fiber (Alumina:Silica = 7:3) was not. The conversion of the fibers was investigated by calculating the equivalent diameter, the aspect ratio, and the fiber content ratio. The fiber content ratio in various conditions showed values near zero. The relationship between the normalized fiber vanishing rate and the energy needed to melt the particles completely per unit surface area of projected particles, which is defined as η, was examined and seen to indicate that the normalized fiber vanishing rate decreased rapidly with the increase in η. Finally, some preliminary experiments for pure asbestos were conducted, and the analysis via XRD and phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) showed the availability of the plasma treatment.

  7. Arsenic speciation in total contents and bioaccessible fractions in atmospheric particles related to human intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speciation of inorganic trivalent arsenicals (iAsIII), inorganic pentavalent arsenicals (iAsV), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in total arsenic (As) content and its bioaccessible fractions contained in road dust, household air-conditioning (AC) filter dust and PM2.5 was investigated. Inorganic As, especially iAsV, was observed as the dominant species. Physiologically based extraction test (PBET), an in-vitro gastrointestinal method, was used to estimate the oral As bioaccessibility in coarse particles and the species present in the oral bioaccessible fraction. A composite lung simulating serum was used to mimic the pulmonary condition to extract the respiratory bioaccessible As and its species in PM2.5. Reduction of iAsV to iAsIII occurred in both in-vitro gastrointestinal and lung simulating extraction models. The inorganic As species was the exclusive species for absorption through ingestion and inhalation of atmospheric particles, which was an important exposure route to inorganic As, in addition to drinking water and food consumption. - Highlights: • Inorganic As species was the predominant species in dust and airborne particles. • Existence of iAsIII in dust and airborne particles increases human health risks. • Reduction from iAsV to iAsIII occurred through in-vitro gastrointestinal model. • Reduction from iAsV to iAsIII occurred in the simulating pulmonary region. • Atmospheric particles were important exposure sources of inorganic As. - Atmospheric particles are important exposure sources of inorganic As, of which the bioaccessibility is dependent on the extraction phases and models used

  8. Particle densities of the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Li

    2015-02-01

    Pulsed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) have become a promising solution to generate atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasmas. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is carried out to research particle densities of the pulsed nitrogen DBDs at atmospheric pressure. Averaged particle densities, time evolutions of axial distributions of particle densities and influences of discharge gap distance dg on the particle densities are systematically illustrated and discussed. The calculation results show that averaged electron densities are lower than averaged N2+ densities, but higher than other averaged ion densities. Time evolutions of axial distributions of electron, N+ and N2+ densities show two peaks during rising and falling phases of applied voltage when dg is 0.2 cm but present gradual increases during pulse width when dg is 0.6 cm, which are similar to those of N2(a‧) and N2(B). Maximums of N3+ densities are close to the momentary cathode under dg of 0.2 cm but locate near the grounded electrode under dg of 0.6 cm, which are alike to those of N2(A) and N2(C). Besides, N4+ densities nearby the momentary anode are higher than those nearby the momentary cathode when dg is 0.2 cm. N(2D) has low averaged particle densities and complex time evolutions compared to N.

  9. Vertical concentration profiles of dust particles in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Freire Grion, Livia; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2013-11-01

    The study of the emission of dust particles from soil surfaces into the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) has important applications to different environmental problems, from local air quality to large-scale aerosol transport and its interaction with climate. Due to the difficulty of measuring surface dust flux, a model relating it to the vertical profile of mean concentration is needed. In this study, we use Large-Eddy Simulation of the ABL to evaluate the effects of particle size and turbulence on the relationship between dust flux and concentration profiles. Results show that for very small particles (less than 5 micrometers) the settling velocity is usually negligible and the mean concentration displays a logarithmic profile. For large particles (more than 30 micrometers), there is an approximate balance between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling, so that Prandtl's power-law solution holds. However, a more general solution including non-zero net fluxes and gravitational settling exists, and it is in agreement with LES results for all particle sizes. Effects of atmospheric stability are also investigated. Funding from the Science Without Borders program (CNPq, Brazil) is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Particle densities of the pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) have become a promising solution to generate atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasmas. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is carried out to research particle densities of the pulsed nitrogen DBDs at atmospheric pressure. Averaged particle densities, time evolutions of axial distributions of particle densities and influences of discharge gap distance dg on the particle densities are systematically illustrated and discussed. The calculation results show that averaged electron densities are lower than averaged N2+ densities, but higher than other averaged ion densities. Time evolutions of axial distributions of electron, N+ and N2+ densities show two peaks during rising and falling phases of applied voltage when dg is 0.2 cm but present gradual increases during pulse width when dg is 0.6 cm, which are similar to those of N2(a′) and N2(B). Maximums of N3+ densities are close to the momentary cathode under dg of 0.2 cm but locate near the grounded electrode under dg of 0.6 cm, which are alike to those of N2(A) and N2(C). Besides, N4+ densities nearby the momentary anode are higher than those nearby the momentary cathode when dg is 0.2 cm. N(2D) has low averaged particle densities and complex time evolutions compared to N. (paper)

  11. Escape probability of Martian atmospheric particles: controlling effects of the electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Liemohn, M. W.; Nagy, A. F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.

    2009-12-01

    This study quantifies several factors controlling the probability of a pickup oxygen ion to escape from the Mars upper atmosphere. Our Monte Carlo model releases billions of test particles through the electromagnetic fields of a magnetohydrodynamic model solution, monitoring their motion due to gravity and the Lorentz force throughout the simulation domain, which extends from the 200 km exobase altitude to 5 Martian radii from the center. We focus on the escape chances of the ions created at low altitudes on the dayside, where most ion production is located. The simulation results show that the electromagnetic fields are the dominant factor, surpassing the deceleration of gravity, in controlling ion transport and thus determine whether particles ultimately escape Mars or return to the planet. In a simulation case in which the strongest crustal fields face the Sun at nominal solar minimum conditions, on average only 45% of isotropically distributed new-born particles at ~400 km altitude are able to escape, even with a relatively high initial energy of ~10 eV. The percentage value slightly increases to 47%, if the velocity distribution is assumed to be half-isotropic without downward moving particles. The particle kinetic energy and the local time of the crustal fields are also important factors greatly influencing the escape probability. Furthermore, there is a distinct hemispheric asymmetry in the escape probability distribution, as defined by the upstream convection electric field direction. These findings imply that electromagnetic field effects are crucial in estimating Martian atmospheric loss for comparison with photochemical escape rates

  12. Flux induced growth of atmospheric nano-particles by organic vapors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play critical roles in air quality, public health, and visibility. In addition, they strongly influence climate by scattering solar radiation and by changing the reflectivity and lifetime of clouds. One major but still poorly understood source of atmospheric aerosol is new particle formation, which consists of the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters from trace gas molecules (homogeneous nucleation followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size (~3 nm. Because freshly nucleated clusters are most susceptible to loss due to high rate of coagulation with pre-existing aerosol population, the initial growth rate strongly influences the rate of new particle formation and ambient aerosol population. Whereas many field observations and modeling studies indicate that organics enhance the initial growth of the clusters and therefore new particle formation, thermodynamic considerations would suggest that the strong increase of equilibrium vapor concentration due to cluster surface curvature (Kelvin effect may prevent ambient organics from condensing on these small clusters. Here the initial condensational growth of freshly nucleated clusters is described as heterogeneous nucleation of organic molecules onto these clusters. We find that the strong gradient in cluster population with respect to its size lead to positive cluster number flux, and therefore driving the growth of clusters substantially smaller than the Kelvin diameter, conventionally considered as the minimum particle size that can be grown through condensation. The conventional approach neglects this contribution from the cluster concentration gradient, and underestimates the rate of new particle formation by a factor of up to 60.

  13. Approximation for the absorption coefficient of airborne atmospheric aerosol particles in terms of measurable bulk properties

    OpenAIRE

    HÄNEL, GOTTFRIED; Dlugi, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The absorption coefficient of airborne atmospheric aerosol particles can be approximated by where λ is the wavelength of radiation, n — ik is the mean complex refractive index, ρ the mean bulk density, and M/Vk the mass of the particles per unit volume of air. This approximation gives good results at relative humidities between 0 and 0.95 for the wavelengths of radiation between 0.55 μm and 2.0 μm and between 9.25 μm and 12.0 μm. Basing on this approximation it is possible to determine the s...

  14. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  15. Laboratory Studies of Hydrocarbon Nucleation on Tholin Particles and Thin Organic Films: Application to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Daniel B.; Glandorf, David L.; Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; McKay, Christopher P.; Khare, Bishun N.

    2001-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has a thick nitrogen/methane atmosphere. In Titan's lower atmosphere, methane is saturated or supersaturated with respect to nucleation and may form clouds. To better characterize the properties of Titan's methane clouds we have measured the saturation ratio required to obtain butane nucleation, S (sub crit), on Titan tholin material and organic films. We find a critical saturation ratio for butane on tholin particles of S (sub crit) = 1.40, suggesting high supersaturations are required for nucleation. If methane is similar to butane, we expect high supersaturations of methane as well. This could favor the formation of a small number of large particles, consistent with recent measurements of methane rain on Titan.

  16. Optical propagation in linear media atmospheric gases and particles, solid-state components, and water

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    PART I: Background Theory and Measurement. 1. Optical Electromagnetics I. 2. Optical Electromagnetics II. 3. Spectroscopy of Matter. 4. Electrodynamics I: Macroscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 5. Electrodynamics II: Microscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 6. Experimental Techniques. PART II: Practical Models for Various Media. 7. Optical Propagation in Gases and the Atmosphere of the Earth. 8. Optical Propagation in Solids. 9. Optical Propagation in Liquids. 10. Particle Absorption and Scatter. 11. Propagation Background and Noise

  17. In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Brent J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the gas/particle-phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds is critical in determining atmospheric aerosol formation processes and growth rates, which in turn affect global climate and human health. The Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside 2005 campaign was performed to gain a better understanding of the factors responsible for aerosol formation and growth in Riverside, CA, a region with high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol formed through the phase transfer ...

  18. Atmospheric data over a solar cycle: no connection between galactic cosmic rays and new particle formation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kulmala; Riipinen, I; Nieminen, T.; Hulkkonen, M.; Sogacheva, L.; Manninen, H. E.; Paasonen, P.; T. Petäjä; Dal Maso, M.; Aalto, P.P.; Viljanen, A.; Usoskin, I.; Vainio, R.; Mirme, S.; Mirme, A.

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, through their activation into cloud droplets. Both effects are known with considerable uncertainty only, and translate into even bigger uncertainties in future climate predictions. More than a decade ago, variations in galactic cosmic rays were suggested to closely correlate with variations in atmospheric cloud cover and therefore constitute a driving force behind aeros...

  19. Pesticides in the atmosphere: a comparison of gas-particle partitioning and particle size distribution of legacy and current-use pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrendele, C.; Okonski, K.; Melymuk, L.; Landlová, L.; Kukučka, P.; Audy, O.; Kohoutek, J.; Čupr, P.; Klánová, J.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a comparison of seasonal variation, gas-particle partitioning, and particle-phase size distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in air. Two years (2012/2013) of weekly air samples were collected at a background site in the Czech Republic using a high-volume air sampler. To study the particle-phase size distribution, air samples were also collected at an urban and rural site in the area of Brno, Czech Republic, using a cascade impactor separating atmospheric particulates according to six size fractions. Major differences were found in the atmospheric distribution of OCPs and CUPs. The atmospheric concentrations of CUPs were driven by agricultural activities while secondary sources such as volatilization from surfaces governed the atmospheric concentrations of OCPs. Moreover, clear differences were observed in gas-particle partitioning; CUP partitioning was influenced by adsorption onto mineral surfaces while OCPs were mainly partitioning to aerosols through absorption. A predictive method for estimating the gas-particle partitioning has been derived and is proposed for polar and non-polar pesticides. Finally, while OCPs and the majority of CUPs were largely found on fine particles, four CUPs (carbendazim, isoproturon, prochloraz, and terbuthylazine) had higher concentrations on coarse particles ( > 3.0 µm), which may be related to the pesticide application technique. This finding is particularly important and should be further investigated given that large particles result in lower risks from inhalation (regardless the toxicity of the pesticide) and lower potential for long-range atmospheric transport.

  20. Atmospheric Effects of Solar Energetic Particle Events In Magnetized and Non-Magnetized Regions of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, R.; Dong, C.; Lillis, R. J.; Curry, S.; Brain, D. A.; Larson, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Solar and shock-accelerated heliospheric energetic charged particles represent an important if irregular source of energy to the Martian upper atmosphere. A Monte Carlo code has been developed to track a population of protons in an atmosphere and account for energy loss to collisional processes including heating, ionization, excitation, and charge transfer. The model framework is open to multiple planetary-specific inputs (e.g. three-dimensional neutral densities, electric and magnetic fields) and uses an adaptive trace algorithm to accurately model collisions in dense and sparse atmospheric regions. Applying 3-D models of electric and magnetic fields from the Michigan Mars MHD code and 1-D neutral densities from the Mars Global Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (M-GITM), we use this model to calculate volume rates of relevant proton-mediated energy loss processes in the Martian upper atmosphere. The model will be improved to generate ionization and heating rates in areas of strong and weak crustal magnetic fields for solar energetic particle events observed by the SEP instrument on MAVEN. Ultimately this will form part of a comprehensive model of solar wind interactions with Mars.

  1. Elemental composition of aerosol particles from two atmospheric monitoring stations in the Amazon Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One key region for the study of processes that are changing the composition of the global atmosphere is the Amazon Basin tropical rain forest. The high rate of deforestation and biomass burning is emitting large amounts of gases and fine-mode aerosol particles to the global atmosphere. Two background monitoring stations are operating continuously measuring aerosol composition, at Cuiaba, and Serra do Navio. Fine- and coarse-mode aerosol particles are being collected using stacked filter units. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure concentrations of up to 21 elements: Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb. The elemental composition was measured at the new PIXE facility from the University of Sao Paulo, using a dedicated 5SDH tandem Pelletron nuclear accelerator. Absolute principal factor analysis (APFA) has derived absolute elemental source profiles. At the Serra do Navio sampling site a very clean background aerosol is being observed. Biogenic aerosol dominates the fine-mode mass concentration, with the presence of K, P, S, Cl, Zn, Br, and FPM. Three components dominate the aerosol composition: Soil dust particles, the natural biogenic release by the forest, and a marine aerosol component. At the Cuiaba site, during the dry season, a strong component of biomass burning is observed. An aerosol mass concentration up to 120 μg/m3 was measured. APFA showed three components: Soil dust (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), biomass burning (soot, FPM, K, Cl) and natural biogenic particles (K, S, Ca, Mn, Zn). The fine-mode biogenic component of both sites shows remarkable similarities, although the two sampling sites are 3000 km apart. Several essential plant nutrients like P, K, S, Ca, Ni and others are transported in the atmosphere as a result of biomass burning processes. (orig.)

  2. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  3. Heterogeneous nucleation as a potential sulphate-coating mechanism of atmospheric mineral dust particles and implications of coated dust on new particle formation

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, H.; Napari, I.; Timmreck, C.; Vehkamaki, H.; Pirjola, L.; Lehtinen, K.; Lauri, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2003-01-01

    The plausibility of heterogeneous conucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia as a pathway leading to soluble coating of atmospheric mineral dust is investigated. In addition, the effect of such sulphate-coated dust on the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles is addressed. The simulated new particle formation mechanism is ternary nucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia vapors, while in the condensational growth process the effect of condensable organic vapor i...

  4. Morphological and chemical composition characteristics of summertime atmospheric particles collected at Tokchok Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hong; Jung, Hae-Jin; Park, YooMyung; Hwang, HeeJin; Kim, HyeKyeong; Kim, Yoo Jung; Sunwoo, Young; Ro, Chul-Un

    Determination of the chemical compositions of atmospheric single particles in the Yellow Sea region is critical for evaluating the environmental impact caused by air pollutants emitted from mainland China and the Korean peninsula. After ambient aerosol particles were collected by the Dekati PM10 cascade impactor on July 17-23, 2007 at Tokchok Island (approximately 50 km west of the Korean coast nearby Seoul), Korea, overall 2000 particles (on stage 2 and 3 with cut-off diameters of 2.5-10 μm and 1.0-2.5 μm, respectively) in 10 samples were determined by using low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis. X-ray spectral and secondary electron image (SEI) data showed that soil-derived and sea-salt particles which had reacted or were mixed with SO 2 and NO x (or their acidic products) outnumbered the primary and "genuine" ones (59.2% vs. 19.2% in the stage 2 fraction and 41.3% vs. 9.9% in the stage 3 fraction). Moreover, particles containing nitrate in the secondary soil-derived species greatly outnumbered those containing sulfate. Organic particles, mainly consisting of marine biogenic species, were more abundant in the stage 2 fraction than in the stage 3 fraction (11.6% vs. 5.1%). Their relative abundance was greater than the sum of carbon-rich, K-containing, Fe-containing, and fly ash particles, which exhibited low frequencies in all the samples. In addition, many droplets rich in C, N, O, and S were observed. They tended to be small, exhibiting a dark round shape on SEI, and generally included 8-20 at.% C, 0-12 at.% N, 60-80 at.% O, and 4-10 at.% S (sometimes with secondary aerosol particles.

  5. Size-dependent atmospheric deposition and inhalation exposure of particle-bound organophosphate flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pei; Bao, Lian-Jun; Guo, Ying; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric size-fractionated particles were collected at different heights in an e-waste recycling zone (QY) and urban Guangzhou (GZ), China and analyzed for organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). The total air concentrations of eight OPFRs were 130±130 and 138±127 ng m(-3) in QY and GZ, respectively. Compositional profiles of chlorinated OPFRs were different between QY and GZ, but the size distribution patterns of all OPFRs were not significantly different at different heights. Estimated atmospheric deposition fluxes of OPFRs were 51±67 and 55±13 μg m(-2) d(-1) in QY and GZ, respectively, and the coarse particles (Dp>1.8 μm) dominated both the dry and wet deposition fluxes. Moreover, not all particle-bound OPFRs were inhalable and deposited in the human respiratory tract. The calculated inhalation doses of OPFRs were much lower than the reference doses, suggesting that potential health risk due to inhalation exposure to particle-bound OPFRs in the e-waste recycling zone and urban site was low. PMID:26414926

  6. Probing new physics with long-lived charged particles produced by atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As suggested by some extensions of the standard model of particle physics, dark matter may be a super-weakly-interacting lightest stable particle, while the next-to-lightest particle (NLP) is charged and metastable. One could test such a possibility with neutrino telescopes, by detecting the charged NLPs produced in high-energy neutrino collisions with Earth matter. We study the production of charged NLPs by both atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos; only the latter, which is largely uncertain and has not been detected yet, was the focus of previous studies. We compute the resulting fluxes of the charged NLPs, compare those of different origins and analyze the dependence on the underlying particle physics set-up. We point out that, even if the astrophysical neutrino flux is very small, atmospheric neutrinos, especially those from the prompt decay of charmed mesons, may provide a detectable flux of NLP pairs at neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. We also comment on the flux of charged NLPs expected from proton–nucleon collisions and show that, for theoretically motivated and phenomenologically viable models, it is typically subdominant and below detectable rates

  7. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Virid, Sparisoma

    2015-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of alti...

  8. Quantifying the kinetic limitations of atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, A.; Murphy, B.; Riipinen, I.; Percival, C.; Topping, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, from anthropogenic and biogenic sources, remain a major uncertainty in the Earth system: they impact the climate by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation, as well as regulating the properties of clouds. On regional scales, aerosols are among the main pollutants deteriorating air quality, their impacts on both poorly quantified. Reducing these uncertainties requires accurate knowledge on the composition, concentrations and size distributions of these particles as they reside in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, there are currently huge uncertainties in many fundamental parameters that are required to predict their environmental impacts. This is largely down to the fact that a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles are comprised of organic material (20-90% of particle mass), containing potentially thousands of compounds with largely uncertain properties It is becoming increasingly evident that aerosols exist as metastable amorphous states, rather than simple liquid/solid mixtures. Empirical evidence suggests that particles can form glass like substances. As the glass transition temperature is approached, an increase in viscosity leads to a reduced rate of molecular diffusion and an arrested non-equilibrium structure. Partitioning between the gas and condensed phase is kinetically limited in such amorphous states. Traditional organic aerosol models do not account for this, they assume that 1) the aerosol phase is a well-mixed non-viscous liquid; 2) the aerosol phase instantaneously equilibrates with the gas phase constituents. This adds significant uncertainty to predictions of gas/particle mass transfer as mixing timescales are ultimately governed by the diffusion coefficients of the aerosol constituents in the aerosol, which, on the other hand, are connected to the viscosity of the particulate matter. For typical aerosol sizes, the characteristic time for mixing could increase from a few milliseconds to hours or

  9. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateev Lachezar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the study during COST Action ES0803 of effects due to cosmic rays (CR and solar energetic particles (SEP in the ionosphere and atmosphere is presented. Models CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere and application of CORSIKA (COsmic Ray SImulations for KAscade code are considered. They are capable to compute the cosmic ray ionization profiles at a given location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Intercomparison of the models, as well as comparison with direct measurements of the atmospheric ionization, validates their applicability for the entire atmosphere and for the different levels of the solar activity. The effects of CR and SEP can be very strong locally in the polar cap regions, affecting the physical-chemical and electrical properties of the ionosphere and atmosphere. Contributions here were also made by the anomalous CR, whose ionization is significant at high geomagnetic latitudes (above 65°–70°. Several recent achievements and application of CR ionization models are briefly presented. This work is the output from the SG 1.1 of the COST ES0803 action (2008–2012 and the emphasis is given on the progress achieved by European scientists involved in this collaboration.

  10. Composition, size distribution, optical properties and radiative effects of re-suspended local mineral dust of Rome area by individual-particle microanalysis and radiative transfer modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pietrodangelo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available New information on the PM10 mineral dust from site-specific (Rome area, Latium outcropped rocks, and on the microphysics, optical properties and radiative effects of mineral dust at local level were gained in this work. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on individual-particle scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of dust, size distribution of mineral particles, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM.The mineral composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals and one exclusively composed of calcite. The first is obtained from volcanic lithotypes, the second from travertine or limestones; lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones of Rome area. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are evidenced by the diversity of volume distributions, within either dust types, or mineral species. Further differences are observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source and from road dust (anthropic source, specifically on the width, shape and enrichment of the fine fraction (unimodal at 5 μm a.d. for travertine, bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d. for road dust. Log-normal probability density functions of volcanics and travertine dusts affect differently the single scattering albedo (SSA and the asymmetry parameter (g in the VISible and Near Infrared (NIR regions, depending also on the absorbing/non-absorbing character of volcanics and travertine, respectively. The downward component of the BOA solar irradiance simulated by RTM for a volcanics-rich or travertine-rich atmosphere shows that volcanics contribution to the

  11. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  12. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  13. Synthesis and tissue distribution studies of two novel esters of haloperidol and the application of radiolabelling techniques using short-lived radionuclides in the study of the deposition characteristics of suspended aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the Schotten-Baumann reaction conditions were modified to esterify the tertiary hydroxyl group of haloperidol. The rapid synthesis (less than 20 min) makes this procedure applicable to the preparation of esters of haloperidol containing fluorine-18 (t/sup (1/2)/ 110 min), a γ-emitting radioisotope useful in external scintigraphy. In vivo distribution studies of the synthesized tritiated esters and haloperidol in the rat demonstrated that neither ester prodrug achieved overall higher brain concentration levels than haloperidol. In this study, radiotracer techniques were developed to examine parameters that characterize pressurized aerosols designed to utilize insoluble particles suspended in the aerosol formulation. The suspended micro-aggregated bovine albumin microspheres were labelled with iodine-131 (t/sup (1/2)/ 8 days). The techniques developed illustrate the use of short-lived radionuclides for: 1) quantitation of each metered dose; 2) characterization of particle size distribution by the aerosol; and 3) determination of the extent of deposition of the particles in the aerosol and all of its components

  14. LABORATORY REPORT ON IODINE ({sup 129}I AND {sup 127}I) SPECIATION, TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILITY IN HANFORD GROUNDWATER, SUSPENDED PARTICLES AND SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Santschi, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.

    2012-09-30

    than iodide K{sub d} values, and the K{sub d} values for both species tended to increase with the amount of organic carbon (OC) present in the sediment. It is especially noteworthy that this trend existed at the very low OC concentrations that naturally exist in the Hanford sediments. Iodine and OC can form essentially irreversible covalent bonds, thereby providing a yet unstudied {sup 129}I retardation reaction at the Hanford Site. In addition to the transformation of iodine species, the sediment collected from the vadose zone also released stable iodide into the aqueous phase. It was found that the three sediments all took up the ambient iodate from the groundwater and slowly transformed it into iodide under the laboratory conditions, likely dependent on the abundance of reducing agents such as organic matter and Fe{sup 2+}. Therefore two competitive iodine processes were identified, the tendency for the sediment to reduce iodate to iodide, and the groundwater chemistry to maintain the iodine as iodate, presumably it is largely the result of natural pH and dissolved O{sub 2}/Eh levels. Suspended carbonate (and silica) particles collected from Hanford groundwater contained elevated amounts of iodine (142 ± 8 μg/g iodine), consisting mainly of iodate (>99%). Iodate was likely incorporated into the carbonate structure during calcite precipitation upon degasing of CO{sub 2} as the groundwater samples were removed from the subsurface. This concentration of groundwater iodate in precipitated carbonate has implication to long-term fate and transport of 129I and on active in-situ {sup 129}I groundwater remediation. This study provides some of the first groundwater radioiodine speciation studies conducted in arid environments and provides much needed mechanistic descriptions to permit making informed decisions about low-cost/high intellectual input remediation options, such as monitored natural attenuation, or long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal sites.

  15. On the formation of sulphuric acid – amine clusters in varying atmospheric conditions and its influence on atmospheric new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulphuric acid is a key component in atmospheric new particle formation. However, sulphuric acid alone does not form stable enough clusters to initiate particle formation in atmospheric conditions. Strong bases, such as amines, have been suggested to stabilize sulphuric acid clusters and thus participate in particle formation. We modelled the formation rate of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules (JA2B2 at varying atmospherically relevant conditions with respect to concentrations of sulphuric acid ([H2SO4], dimethylamine ([DMA] and trimethylamine ([TMA], temperature and relative humidity (RH. We also tested how the model results change if we assume that the clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules would act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of organic vapours (other than amines with higher atmospheric concentrations than sulphuric acid. The modelled formation rates JA2B2 were functions of sulphuric acid concentration with close to quadratic dependence, which is in good agreement with atmospheric observations of the connection between the particle formation rate and sulphuric acid concentration. The coefficients KA2B2 connecting the cluster formation rate and sulphuric acid concentrations as JA2B2=KA2B2[H2SO4]2 turned out to depend also on amine concentrations, temperature and relative humidity. We compared the modelled coefficients KA2B2 with the corresponding coefficients calculated from the atmospheric observations (Kobs from environments with varying temperatures and levels of anthropogenic influence. By taking into account the modelled behaviour of JA2B2 as a function of [H2SO4], temperature and RH, the atmospheric particle formation rate was reproduced more closely than with the traditional semi-empirical formulae based on sulphuric acid concentration only. The formation rates of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules with different amine compositions (DMA or TMA or one of both had

  16. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  17. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the free atmosphere using ensemble forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Haszpra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of aerosol particle pollutants is studied using 50 members of an ensemble forecast in the example of a hypothetical free atmospheric emission above Fukushima over a period of 2.5 days. Considerable differences are found among the dispersion predictions of the different ensemble members, as well as between the ensemble mean and the deterministic result at the end of the observation period. The variance is found to decrease with the particle size. The geographical area where a threshold concentration is exceeded in at least one ensemble member expands to a 5–10 times larger region than the area from the deterministic forecast, both for air column "concentration" and in the "deposition" field. We demonstrate that the root-mean-square distance of any particle from its own clones in the ensemble members can reach values on the order of one thousand kilometers. Even the centers of mass of the particle cloud of the ensemble members deviate considerably from that obtained by the deterministic forecast. All these indicate that an investigation of the dispersion of aerosol particles in the spirit of ensemble forecast contains useful hints for the improvement of risk assessment.

  18. Influence of complex component and particle polydispersity on radiative properties of soot aggregate in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of morphological structure, water coating, dust mixing and primary particle size distribution on the radiative properties of soot fractal aggregates in atmosphere are investigated using T-matrix method. These fractal aggregates are numerically generated using a combination of the particle-cluster and cluster-cluster aggregation algorithms with fractal parameters representing soot aggregate in atmosphere. The radiative properties of compact aggregate notably deviate from that of the branched one, and the effect of morphology changes on the radiative properties in wet air cannot be neglected. However it is reasonable to use realization-averaged radiative properties to represent that of the aggregates with certain morphology. In wet air, the scattering, absorption and extinction cross-section and symmetry parameter of soot aggregates coated with water notably increase with water shell thickness. The mixing structures of dust have little effect on radiative properties of aggregates, but the volume fraction of dust has an obvious effect on extinction, scattering and absorption cross-section of aggregates when the size parameters are above the Rayleigh limit. Although the primary particle size distribution of soot aggregate has mild effect on the scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter, the deviations of the extinction, scattering, absorption cross-section among the three size distributions are significant in this study. The size distribution has a significant effect on forward scattering of phase function, while the effect can be neglected as the size parameter approaches to the Rayleigh limit.

  19. Atmospheric particle characterization, distribution, and deposition in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, Central China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical characterization and chemical analysis of settled dusts collected in Xi'an from November 2007 to December 2008 show that (1) dust deposition rates ranged from 14.6 to 350.4 g m-2 yr-1. The average deposition rate (76.7 g m-2 yr-1) ranks the 11th out of 56 dust deposition rates observed throughout the world. The coal-burning power was the major particle source; (2) on average (except site 4), ∼10% of the settled dusts having size 70% having size <30 μm; (3) the concentrations for 20 out of 27 elements analyzed were upto 18 times higher than their soil background values in China. With such high deposition rates of dusts that contain elevated levels of toxic elements, actions should be taken to reduce emission and studies are needed to assess the potential impacts of settled particles on surface ecosystem, water resource, and human health in the area. - Research highlights: → High atmospheric dust deposition rate in Xi'an, Shaanxi, China. → Coal-burning power plan being a major source of particulate matter in Xi'an area. → High levels of toxic elements in the settled dusts. → Enrichment of heavy metals (e.g., Pb, Ni, Cu) in fine particles. - Atmospheric dust deposition rate is high and the levels of toxic elements associated with the settled dusts are elevated in Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.

  20. Impact of dust storm on chemical species of S, Cl and Ca in Shanghai atmosphere particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Dust storm originated from the northwest region of China brought dust particles for Shanghai every spring, which resulted in serious particulate pollution. However, the studies of the impact of dust storm on the Shanghai atmospheric aerosols were limited to the concentrations of ions and elements. It is considered that the chemical species of atmospheric aerosols were much more necessary for the evaluation of the impact of dust storm on the particulate pollution in Shanghai. Purpose: Based on the elements concentration variations, backward trajectories of air masses and chlorine, calcium, sulfur species in aerosols during the dust event, the impact of dust storm on the chemical species of aerosols in Shanghai was studied. Methods: Elements concentrations of the samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) based on synchrotron radiation. To identify the potential importance of different source regions on aerosol composition during dust events, the air mass trajectories were calculated by using the model HYSPLIT version 4 developed by NOAA/ARL. Chemical species of S, Cl, Ca were analyzed by synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Sulfur K-edge XANES is capable of distinguishing various sulfate species in a non-destructive way and we used linear combination fitting procedure to quantify the concentrations of sulfate species in PM. Results: Elements concentration variations during the dust storm period showed that crust elements (Si, Al, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Ti) in particles increased substantially during dust storm. However, pollution elements (S, Zn, Pb, Cu, V, Cr, As) from local region decreased by the clean effect of dust storm. Combined XANES of S, Cl, Ca in particulate samples with backward trajectories, the possible sources and reasons of their chemical species were studied. During dust storm, sulfur mainly existed as CaSO4·2H2O, Cl existed as organic chloride and Cl-, Ca existed as CaCO3. In the samples of other days

  1. Production, growth and properties of ultrafine atmospheric aerosol particles in an urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Number concentrations of atmospheric aerosol particles were measured by a flow-switching type differential mobility particle sizer in an electrical mobility diameter range of 6–1000 nm in 30 channels near central Budapest with a time resolution of 10 min continuously from 3 November 2008 to 2 November 2009. Daily median number concentrations of particles varied from 3.8 × 103 to 29 ×103 cm−3 with a yearly median of 11.8 × 103 cm−3. Contribution of ultrafine particles to the total particle number ranged from 58 to 92% with a mean ratio and standard deviation of (79 ± 6%. Typical diurnal variation of the particle number concentration was related to the major emission patterns in cities, new particle formation, sinks of particles and meteorology. Shapes of the monthly mean number size distributions were similar to each other. Overall mean for the number median mobility diameter of the Aitken and accumulation modes were 26 and 93 nm, respectively, which are substantially smaller than for rural or background environments. The Aitken and accumulation modes contributed similarly to the total particle number concentrations at the actual measurement location. New particle formation and growth unambiguously occurred on 83 days, which represent 27% of all relevant days. Hence, new particle formation and growth are not rare phenomena in Budapest. Their frequency showed an apparent seasonal variation with a minimum of 7.3% in winter and a maximum of 44% in spring. New particle formation events were linked to increased gas-phase H2SO4 concentrations. In the studied area, new particle formation is mainly affected by condensation sink and solar radiation. The formation process seems to be not sensitive to SO2, which was present in a yearly median concentration of 6.7 μg m−3. This suggests that the precursor gas was always available in excess

  2. Numerical study of the auroral particle transport in the polar upper atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation and with some reasonable assumptions, a one-dimensional transport equation of charged energetic particles is derived by taking account of major interactions with neutral species in the upper atmosphere, including the processes of elastic scattering, the excitation, the ionization and the secondary electron production. The transport equation is numerically solved, for a simplified atmosphere consisting only of nitrogen molecules (N2), to obtain the variations of incident electron fluxes as a function of altitude, energy and pitch angle. The model results can describe fairly the transport characteristics of pre-cipitating auroral electron spectra in the polar upper atmosphere; meanwhile the N2 ionization rates calculated from the modeled differential flux spectra also exhibit good agreements with existing empirical models in terms of several key parameters. Taking the energy flux spectra of precipitating electrons observed by FAST satellite flying over EISCAT site on May 15, 1997 as model inputs, the model-calculated ionization rate profile of neutral atmosphere consists reasonably with that recon-structed from electron density measurements by the radar.

  3. Particle size distribution of halogenated flame retardants and implications for atmospheric deposition and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonski, Krzysztof; Degrendele, Céline; Melymuk, Lisa; Landlová, Linda; Kukučka, Petr; Vojta, Šimon; Kohoutek, Jiří; Čupr, Pavel; Klánová, Jana

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates the distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and a group of novel flame retardants (NFRs) on atmospheric aerosols. Two high volume cascade impactors were used to collect particulate fractions of ambient air over a one year period at urban and rural sites. The majority of FRs were found on the finest aerosols (<0.95 μm). Concentrations of HBCD were higher than those of ΣPBDEs. Moreover, we noted seasonality and spatial differences in particle size distributions, yet a large portion of the observed differences were due to differences in particulate matter (PM) itself. When normalized by PM, the size distributions of the FRs exhibited much greater heterogeneity. Differences existed between the FR distributions by molecular weight, with the higher molecular weight FRs (e.g., BDE-209, Dechlorane Plus) distributed more uniformly across all particulate size fractions. The seasonal, spatial, and compound-specific differences are of crucial importance when estimating dry and wet deposition of FRs as smaller aerosols have longer atmospheric residence times. Estimated wet and dry deposition of four representative FRs (BDE-47, BDE-209, HBCD, and Dechlorane Plus) using size-segregated aerosol data resulted in lower deposition estimates than when bulk aerosol data were used. This has implications for estimates of long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric residence times, as it suggests that without size-specific distributions, these parameters could be underestimated for FRs. PMID:25380095

  4. Lung cancer mortality and exposure to atmospheric aerosol particles in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Wu, Dui; Brasseur, Guy

    In recent years, China and other emerging countries have been experiencing severe air pollution problems with high concentrations of atmospheric aerosol particles. Satellite measurements indicate that the aerosol loading of the atmosphere in highly populated regions of China is about 10 times higher than, for example, in Europe and in the Eastern United States. The exposure to extremely high aerosol concentrations might lead to important human health effects, including respiratory and cardiovascular diseases as well as lung cancers. Here, we analyze 52-year historical surface measurements of haze data in the Chinese city of Guangzhou, and show that the dramatic increase in the occurrence of air pollution events between 1954 and 2006 has been followed by a large enhancement in the incidence of lung cancer.

  5. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hritz, A. D.; Raymond, T. M.; Dutcher, D. D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect sufficiently large volumes of atmospheric aerosol for use in typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A...

  6. The link between atmospheric radicals and newly formed particles at a spruce forest site in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bonn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been claimed for more than a century that atmospheric new particle formation is primarily influenced by the presence of sulphuric acid. However, the activation process of sulphuric acid related clusters into detectable particles is still an unresolved topic. In this study we focus on the PARADE campaign measurements conducted during August/September 2011 at Mt. Kleiner Feldberg in central Germany. During this campaign a set of radicals, organic and inorganic compounds and oxidants and aerosol properties were measured or calculated. We compared a range of organic and inorganic nucleation theories, evaluating their ability to simulate measured particle formation rates at 3 nm in diameter (J3 for a variety of different conditions. Nucleation mechanisms involving only sulphuric acid tentatively captured the observed noon-time daily maximum in J3, but displayed an increasing difference to J3 measurements during the rest of the diurnal cycle. Including large organic radicals, i.e. organic peroxy radicals (RO2 deriving from monoterpenes and their oxidation products in the nucleation mechanism improved the correlation between observed and simulated J3. This supports a recently proposed empirical relationship for new particle formation that has been used in global models. However, the best match between theory and measurements for the site of interest was found for an activation process based on large organic peroxy radicals and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI. This novel laboratory derived algorithm simulated the daily pattern and intensity of J3 observed in the ambient data. In this algorithm organic derived radicals are involved in activation and growth and link the formation rate of smallest aerosol particles with OH during daytime and NO3 during nighttime. Because of the RO2s lifetime is controlled by HO2 and NO we conclude that peroxy radicals and NO seem to play an important role for ambient radical chemistry not only with respect to

  7. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using portable Simulation chamber Study techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes, such as particle formation online, and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically, with a residence time xT (COMPASS1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min, at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a gas leak rate of (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Particle loss rates were found to be larger (due to the particles' stickiness to the chamber walls), with an extrapolated maximum of 1.8 × 10-3 s-1 at 1 nm, i.e. a hundredfold of the gas leak rate. This latter value is associated with sticky non-volatile gaseous compounds, too. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system, a set of experiments was conducted under different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhanced ozone and terpenes as well as reduced sunlight. In order to do so, an ozone lamp was applied to enhance ozone in one of two chambers; the measurement chamber was protected from radiation by a first-aid cover and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were added using a small additional flow and a temperature-controlled oven. During the elevated ozone period, ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions, but by a different intensity. Protection of solar radiation displayed a clear negative effect on particle number, while terpene addition did cause a distinct daily pattern. E.g. adding β pinene particle number concentration rose by 13% maximum at noontime, while no significant effect was observable during darkness. Therefore

  8. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  9. An improved criterion for new particle formation in diverse atmospheric environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kuang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A dimensionless theory for new particle formation (NPF was developed, using an aerosol population balance model incorporating recent developments in nucleation rates and measured particle growth rates. Based on this theoretical analysis, it was shown that a dimensionless parameter LΓ, characterizing the ratio of the particle scavenging loss rate to the particle growth rate, exclusively determined whether or not NPF would occur on a particular day. This parameter determines the probability that a nucleated particle will grow to a detectable size before being lost by coagulation with the pre-existing aerosol. Cluster-cluster coagulation was shown to contribute negligibly to this survival probability under conditions pertinent to the atmosphere. Data acquired during intensive measurement campaigns in Tecamac (MILAGRO, Atlanta (ANARChE, Boulder, and Hyytiälä (QUEST II, QUEST IV, and EUCAARI were used to test the validity of LΓ as an NPF criterion. Measurements included aerosol size distributions down to 3 nm and gas-phase sulfuric acid concentrations. The model was applied to seventy-seven NPF events and nineteen non-events (characterized by growth of pre-existing aerosol without NPF measured in diverse environments with broad ranges in sulfuric acid concentrations, ultrafine number concentrations, aerosol surface areas, and particle growth rates (nearly two orders of magnitude. Across this diverse data set, a nominal value of LΓ=0.7 was found to determine the boundary for the occurrence of NPF, with NPF occurring when LΓ<0.7 and being suppressed when LΓ>0.7. Moreover, nearly 45% of measured LΓ values associated with NPF fell in the relatively narrow range of 0.1<LΓ<0.3.

  10. Requirements for low density riming and two stage growth on atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Laura; Castellano, Nesvit E.; Nasello, Olga B.; Prodi, Franco

    A theoretical study is carried out of the conditions that can be expected to determine low density riming on atmospheric ice particles. Using a growth simulation model, critical liquid water contents Lwc and air temperatures Ta are calculated, which correspond to a density ρ=0.5 g/cm 3 for rime deposit on ice particles with radii varying from 1 to 10 mm. Their dependence on the used laws for the ice density as a function of Macklin's parameter and for the drag coefficient as a function of Reynolds number, is discussed. The evolution of the density and related parameters for free falling particles growing by accretion from initial values of the radius R and density ρ is studied in different environmental conditions. It is shown that the temperature of the deposit Ts increases with R, up to the transition to wet growth, represented by Ts=0°C. Only for Lwc≥2 g/m 3 the transition from low density ice to wet growth is found to occur rapidly, at a distance from the center R≤1 cm. This distance is considered to represent the maximum radius of regions where two-stage growth, due to water penetration and freezing into pores of low-density layers, can be responsible for rapid variations of the particle density and consequently of its free-fall speed, which would characterize the effect of hail growth via microphysical recycling.

  11. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  12. Chemical characteristics and source of size-fractionated atmospheric particle in haze episode in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun; Zhen, Naijia; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    The abundance, behavior, and source of chemical species in size-fractionated atmospheric particle were studied with a 13-stage low pressure impactor (ELPI) during high polluted winter episode in Beijing. Thirty three elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) and eight water soluble ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2 +, and Mg2 +) were determined by ICP/MS and IC, respectively. The size distribution of TC (OC + EC) was reconstructed. Averagely, 51.5 ± 5.3% and 74.1 ± 3.7% of the total aerosol mass was distributed in the sub-micron (PM1) and fine particle (PM2.5), respectively. A significant shift to larger fractions during heavy pollution episode was observed for aerosol mass, NH4+, SO42 -, NO3-, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. The mass size distributions of NH4+, SO42 -, NO3-, and K were dominated by accumulation mode. Size distributions of elements were classified into four main types: (I) elements were enriched within the accumulation mode (water soluble ions. Dust, vehicle, aged coal combustion, and sea salt were identified, and the size resolved source apportionments were discussed. Aged coal combustion was the important source of fine particles and dust contributed most to coarse particle.

  13. Mass size distribution of particles emitted by diesel engines and determination of the contribution of diesel particles to the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna by using a tracer suitable for activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Vienna a large fraction of light absorbing aerosols has been found. The traffic could be a source for the high absorption coefficients, since the time dependent absorption coefficients varise similar to the traffic densities. Diesel vehicles have high soot emissions, so they may contribute considerably to light absorption during the summer. The emission factors of the vehicles were estimated by measurements at different motor and driving conditions by the Constant-Volume-Sampling-Method. To determine the size distributions a 10-stage-low pressure impactor with a lower cut size of 0.015 μm aerodynamic particle diameter was used. In order to estimate the contribution of diesel vehicles to the total mass concentrations all diesel fuel sold in Vienna and its vincinity was marked with an organic Dysprosium compound. This rare earth tracer was emitted by vehicles together with the soot particles and collected at eleven stations in Vienna. The filter samples were extracted with diluted HNO3 and the extraction was analysed for Dy by neutron activation analysis. The mass size distributions of the particles and the soot emitted from diesel engines are only slightly influenced by motor and driving parameters. The total mass emissions showed considerable variations, but the mean emission factor obtained from the tests was 2.43 g per litre fuel; knowing also the concentration of the tracer in the fuel, the contribution of diesel particles to the mass of the suspended particulates could be estimated. During the measuring period the contribution was c. 25% to the total mass and c. 40% to the absorbing matter in the atmosphere. (Author)

  14. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis for single-particle analysis and its application for characterizing atmospheric aerosol particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shila Maskey; Chul-Un Ro

    2011-02-01

    An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such as C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements that can be analysed by conventional ED-EPMA. The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric particles, e.g. sulphates, nitrates, ammonium and carbonaceous particles, contain low-Z elements. To demonstrate its practical applicability, the application of the low-Z particle EPMA for the characterization of Asian Dust, urban and subway aerosol particles is shown herein. In addition, it is demonstrated that the Monte Carlo calculation can also be applied in a quantitative single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), showing that the technique is useful and reliable for the characterization of submicron aerosol particles

  15. Source tracing of fluvial suspended sediments by magnetic and geochemical particle characterization: example of the Canche watershed (Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patault, Edouard; Alary, Claire; Franke, Christine; Gauthier, Arnaud; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2016-04-01

    In France, erosion by water run-off is estimated to 1.5 t ha‑1yr‑1 and can exceed 10 t ha‑1yr‑1 in large growing areas, such as the North of France (Nord-Pas-de-Calais). In this region, the Canche watershed (1294 km2) sustains heavy loss of fertile soils. The land use is mainly dominated by arable lands (80%) and in 2013, 104 kt of suspended sediment transited to the estuary. As demonstrated in literature, agricultural soil erosion leads to the gradual disappearance and depletion of fertile soil, which constitute a non-renewable resource at human time scale. Additionally, water erosion can significantly damage the aquatic habitat and can be responsible for the input of nutrients, bacteria, pesticides, heavy metals and radionuclides into surface waters. Conscious of these effects, many programs have emerged in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais to reduce erosion. This study presents a combination of environmental magnetic proxy parameters and geochemical analyses on sediments and suspended particulate matter. The aim is to develop effective tools to trace erosion by water run-off and quantify this process. In order to identify the respective sediment sources in the Canche watershed, sediment trap samples of suspended particulate matter were recovered at key positions along the Canche watershed. The preliminary results show that magnetic concentration (Mrs) shows typical values for the agricultural soils in the region, but these variations in magnetic concentrations and total irons concentrations are not always correlated, which may be explained by the iron speciation. In calculating the so-called S-ratio for each sample we can distinguish changes in magneto-mineralogy (and thus iron speciation) from magnetite-dominated assemblages in the mainstream Canche (naturel background signal) to high-coercivity-dominated assemblages in the tributaries, typical for soil erosion material rich in hematite/goethite. In combination with the element concentrations from ICP analyses

  16. Sources and chemical composition of atmospheric fine and coarse particles in the Helsinki area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakkanen, T.A.; Loukkola, K.; Korhonen, C.H. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (FI)] (and others)

    2001-07-01

    During April 1996 - June 1997 size-segregated atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at an urban and a rural site in the Helsinki area by utilising virtual impactors (VI) and Berner low-pressure impactors (BLPI). In addition, VI samples were collected at a semi-urban site during October 1996 - May 1997. The average PM{sub 2.3} (fine particle) concentrations at the urban and rural sites were 11.8 and 8.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, and the PM{sub 2.3}-{sub 15} (coarse particle) concentrations were 12.8 and about 5{mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. The difference in fine particle mass concentrations suggests that on average, more than one third of the fine mass at the urban site is of local origin. Evaporation of fine particle nitrate from the VI Teflon filters during sampling varied similarly at the three sites, the average evaporation being about 50-60 per cent. The average fine particle concentrations of the chemical components (25 elements and 13 ions) appeared to be fairly similar at the three sites for most components, which suggests that despite the long-range transport, the local emissions of these components were relatively evenly distributed in the Helsinki area. Exceptions were the average fine particles Ba, Fe, Sb and V concentrations that were clearly highest at the urban site pointing to traffic (Ba, Fe, Sb) and to combustion of heavy fuel oil (V) as the likely sources. The average coarse particle concentrations for most components were highest at the urban site and lowest at the rural site. Average chemical composition of fine particles was fairly similar at the urban and rural sites: non-analysed fraction (mainly carbonaceous material and water) 43 per cent and 37 per cent, sulphate 21 per cent and 25 per cent, crustal matter 12 per cent and 13 per cent, nitrate 12 per cent and 11 per cent, ammonium 9 per cent and 10 per cent and sea-salt 2.5 per cent and 3.2 per cent, respectively. At the semi-urban site also, the average fine particle composition was similar

  17. Sub-micron atmospheric aerosols in the surroundings of Marseille and Athens: physical characterization and new particle formation

    OpenAIRE

    Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V. -M.; Maso, M; Junninen, H.; I. K. Koponen; Hussein, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Andronopoulos, S.; Robin, D.; Hämeri, K.; Bartzis, J. G.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-01-01

    The properties of atmospheric aerosol particles in Marseille and Athens were investigated. The studies were performed in Marseille, France, during July 2002 and in Athens, Greece, during June 2003. The aerosol size distribution and the formation and growth rates of newly formed particles were characterized using Differential Mobility Particle Sizers. Hygroscopic properties were observed using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. During both campaigns, t...

  18. Mass and elemental distributions of atmospheric particles nearby blast furnace and electric arc furnace operated industrial areas in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohiuddin, Kazi, E-mail: kazi.mohiuddin@students.mq.edu.au [Graduate School of the Environment, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia); Strezov, Vladimir; Nelson, Peter F. [Graduate School of the Environment, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia); Stelcer, Eduard [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Evans, Tim [Graduate School of the Environment, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    The improved understanding of mass and elemental distributions of industrial air particles is important due to their heterogeneous atmospheric behaviour and impact on human health and the environment. In this study, particles of different size ranges were collected from three sites in Australia located in the vicinity of iron and steelmaking industries and one urban background site with very little industrial influence. In order to determine the importance of the type of industrial activity on the urban atmospheric quality, the industrial sites selected in this study were in the close proximity to two blast furnace operated and one electric arc furnace based steelmaking sites. The chemical compositions of the collected air particles were analysed using the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. This study revealed significantly higher metal concentrations in the atmospheric particles collected in the industrial sites, comparing to the background urban site, demonstrating local influence of the industrial activities to the air quality. The modality types of the particles were found to be variable between the mass and elements, and among elements in the urban and industrial areas indicating that the elemental modal distribution is as important as particle mass for particle pollution modelling. The highest elemental number distribution at all studied sites occurred with particle size of 0.1 μm. Iron was found as the main dominant metal at the industrial atmosphere in each particle size range. The industrial Fe fraction in the submicron and ultrafine size particles was estimated at up to 95% which may be released from high temperature industrial activities with the iron and steelmaking industries being one of the major contributors. Hence, these industrial elemental loadings can highly influence the atmospheric pollution at local urban and regional levels and are required to consider in the atmospheric modelling settings. - Highlights: • Urban and

  19. Mass and elemental distributions of atmospheric particles nearby blast furnace and electric arc furnace operated industrial areas in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improved understanding of mass and elemental distributions of industrial air particles is important due to their heterogeneous atmospheric behaviour and impact on human health and the environment. In this study, particles of different size ranges were collected from three sites in Australia located in the vicinity of iron and steelmaking industries and one urban background site with very little industrial influence. In order to determine the importance of the type of industrial activity on the urban atmospheric quality, the industrial sites selected in this study were in the close proximity to two blast furnace operated and one electric arc furnace based steelmaking sites. The chemical compositions of the collected air particles were analysed using the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. This study revealed significantly higher metal concentrations in the atmospheric particles collected in the industrial sites, comparing to the background urban site, demonstrating local influence of the industrial activities to the air quality. The modality types of the particles were found to be variable between the mass and elements, and among elements in the urban and industrial areas indicating that the elemental modal distribution is as important as particle mass for particle pollution modelling. The highest elemental number distribution at all studied sites occurred with particle size of 0.1 μm. Iron was found as the main dominant metal at the industrial atmosphere in each particle size range. The industrial Fe fraction in the submicron and ultrafine size particles was estimated at up to 95% which may be released from high temperature industrial activities with the iron and steelmaking industries being one of the major contributors. Hence, these industrial elemental loadings can highly influence the atmospheric pollution at local urban and regional levels and are required to consider in the atmospheric modelling settings. - Highlights: • Urban and

  20. Effect of reaction atmosphere on particle morphology of TiO{sub 2} produced by thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Gil; Park, Kyun Young [Kongju National University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kypark@kongju.ac.kr

    2006-04-15

    Thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was carried out in varying reaction atmospheres: nitrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen plus water vapor. The effect of reaction atmosphere on the morphology, size, and crystalline structure of produced TiO{sub 2} particles was studied. The reactor used was similar to the microreactor proposed earlier by Park et al. (2001, J. Nanopart. Res., 3, 309-319), but for a modification in the precursor evaporator. The reactor temperature was varied from 300 to 700 deg. C and the TTIP concentration in the evaporator from 1.0 to 7.0 mol%, holding the reactor residence time at 0.7 s. The primary-particle size was in the range 25-250 nm, varying with operating condition. The crystalline structure was amorphous in nitrogen, a mixture of rutile and anatase in nitrogen plus water vapor, and anatase in oxygen atmospheres. In nitrogen, agglomerates composed of very small particles whose individual boundaries are not clearly distinguished were produced. In oxygen, the particles composing an agglomerate became larger and were clearly spherical. As the atmosphere was varied to the nitrogen plus water vapor, the particle size increased further. The variation of primary particle size with reaction atmosphere was discussed in comparison with previous experimental data.

  1. Comparison of isolation and quantification methods to measure humic-like substances (HULIS) in atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingjun; Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an

    2012-12-01

    Humic-like Substances (HULIS) comprise a significant fraction of the water-soluble organic aerosol mass and influence the cloud microphysical properties and climate effects of aerosols in the atmosphere. In this work, the most frequently used HULIS isolation and quantification methods including ENVI-18, HLB, XAD-8 and DEAE were comparatively characterized with two model standards, ten interfering compounds, and five ambient aerosol samples. Quantification of HULIS is performed with a TOC analyzer, complemented by an investigation of the chemical structure of the extracted fractions by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results show that the four isolation methods were all characterized by high reliability, high reproducibility, and low limit of detection (LOD), indicating that each method can be used to efficiently recover Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and be applied to the quantification of the lower amount of HULIS in atmospheric particles. The analytical results of the UV-Vis spectra of HULIS fractions isolated also indicate that they are all favorable for extraction of compounds of high UV absorbance, high MW, and high aromaticity and that the DEAE protocol is the most significant one. Compared with the DEAE method that favors extraction of highly UV-absorbing and more aromatic compounds, SRFA isolated by the ENVI-18, HLB, and XAD-8 protocols were more representative of the global matrix. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages and is suitable for a particular application. No single method is ideal for both isolation and quantification of HULIS in atmospheric samples.

  2. Particle/vapor concentrations and distributions of PAHs in the atmosphere of southern Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric PAH concentrations were measured at four sites characterized as rural (Haven Beach), semiurban (York River), urban (Hampton), and industrialized (Elizabeth River) areas as part of a study to quantify gaseous exchange fluxes across the air-water interface of southern Chesapeake Bay. Aerosol particle-associated PAH concentrations were similar at all sites; however, PAH vapor concentrations in the urban areas were as much as a factor of 50 greater than those at the rural site. Mean total PAH concentrations ranged from 7.87 ng/m3 at the rural site to 92.8 ng/m3 at the urban site. Daily total PAH concentrations ranged from 1.60 to 198 ng/m3. Exponential increases in PAH vapor concentrations with temperature were observed at the non-rural sites, suggesting volatilization from contaminated surfaces during warmer weather; whereas PAH vapor concentrations at the rural Haven Beach site exhibited little seasonal variability. Aerosol particle-associated PAH levels were similar at all sites and increased in winter due to the temperature dependence of vapor-particle partitioning, increased sources from combustion of fossil fuel and wood for home heating, and cold condensation of source vapors to background aerosols as air masses are dispersed to remote regions. Plots of log Kd vs. log Psat,SC1 indicate PAH partitioning is not at equilibrium in rural areas of Southern Chesapeake Bay. In addition, plots of log Kd vs. 1/T for individual PAHs indicate difference particle characteristics or partitioning processes influence particle/vapor distributions at the urban and rural sites

  3. Indoor Particle Contamination in Airlaid Papermaking Workshop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junjie; WANG Meng; PEI Jingjing

    2006-01-01

    An onsite testing based on eight-site air sampling was carried out in an airlaid papermaking workshop in Tianjin, China. By theoretical calculation, super absorbent polymer (SAP) size and its existent state in indoor static airflow were obtained. SAP content in the sampled air was test ed through chemical analysis method and found to be 3.0-7.2 times that of the human health limit in production areas. The concentrations of total suspending particles (TSP) and respirable particles were achieved by weighing. Particles of the most concern differ for varied function areas. Particles smaller than 10 μm are mostly produced in the main production process, and 73%-90% particles generated in packing areas are larger than 10 μm. SAP raw material particles can easily changed to suspending form by inevitable extrusion and frication. Correlation between respirable particles andTSP agrees well with that in atmospheric environment.

  4. Production, growth and properties of ultrafine atmospheric aerosol particles in an urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Number concentrations of atmospheric aerosol particles were measured by a flow-switching type differential mobility particle sizer in an electrical mobility diameter range of 6–1000 nm in 30 channels near central Budapest with a time resolution of 10 min continuously from 3 November 2008 to 2 November 2009. Daily median number concentrations of particles varied from 3.8×103 to 29×103 cm−3 with a yearly median of 11.8×103 cm−3. Contribution of ultrafine particles to the total particle number ranged from 58 to 92% with a mean ratio and standard deviation of (79±6%. Daily average number concentrations in various size fractions and contribution of ultrafine particles to the total particle number showed no seasonal dependency. Monthly mean number size distributions were similar to each other. Overall mean for the number median mobility diameter of the Aitken and accumulation modes were 26 and 93 nm, respectively, which are substantially smaller than for rural or background environments. The Aitken and accumulation modes contributed similarly to the total particle number concentrations at the actual measurement location. Median diameters of the Aitken and accumulation modes were shifted to larger values before nucleation started and over the growth process, which can be related to the presence of aged aerosol under the conditions that favour nucleation and growth. Particle concentrations were usually increased substantially after nucleations. Overall mean and standard deviation of the nucleation mode number concentrations were (10.4±2.8×103 cm−3. Mean ratio and standard deviation of the nucleation mode number concentration to the total particle number concentration that was averaged for two hours just before the formation was detected was 2.3±1.1. Nucleation unambiguously occurred on 83 days, which represent 27% of all relevant days. Its frequency showed a

  5. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  6. Characterization of individual atmospheric aerosol particles with SIMS and laser-SNMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. E.; Nair, A.; Dambach, S.; Arlinghaus, H. F.; Tyler, B. J.

    2006-07-01

    The surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles is important in determining how these particles will effect human health, visibility, climate and precipitation chemistry. In previous work, it has been shown that ToF-SIMS can provide significant valuable information on both organic and inorganic constituents of the aerosol. It has been found, however, that ToF-SIMS with a Ga + primary ion beam offers very low sensitivity to poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals, two important classes of pollutants. In this work the utility of laser-SNMS for detection of these pollutants has been explored. Two laser systems, a 193 nm excimer laser and a 157 nm excimer laser have been utilized. Each approach has advantages. ToF-SIMS has the highest sensitivity to alkali metals and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The 193 nm laser provides very high sensitivity to lead and other metals. The 157 nm laser greatly enhances sensitivity to PAHs which has enabled detection of PAHs on the surface of individual particles.

  7. Characterization of individual atmospheric aerosol particles with SIMS and laser-SNMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, R.E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 50 S Central Campus Dr. Rm. 3290, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9203 (United States); Nair, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 50 S Central Campus Dr. Rm. 3290, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9203 (United States); Dambach, S. [Physikalisches Institute der Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Arlinghaus, H.F. [Physikalisches Institute der Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Tyler, B.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 50 S Central Campus Dr. Rm. 3290, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9203 (United States)]. E-mail: bonniet@eng.utah.edu

    2006-07-30

    The surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles is important in determining how these particles will effect human health, visibility, climate and precipitation chemistry. In previous work, it has been shown that ToF-SIMS can provide significant valuable information on both organic and inorganic constituents of the aerosol. It has been found, however, that ToF-SIMS with a Ga{sup +} primary ion beam offers very low sensitivity to poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals, two important classes of pollutants. In this work the utility of laser-SNMS for detection of these pollutants has been explored. Two laser systems, a 193 nm excimer laser and a 157 nm excimer laser have been utilized. Each approach has advantages. ToF-SIMS has the highest sensitivity to alkali metals and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The 193 nm laser provides very high sensitivity to lead and other metals. The 157 nm laser greatly enhances sensitivity to PAHs which has enabled detection of PAHs on the surface of individual particles.

  8. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m−3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m−3 in 2009, 113 µg m−3 in 2010, and 134 µg m−3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5–10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m−3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m−3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  9. Modelling the contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds to new particle formation in the Jülich plant atmosphere chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldin, P.; Liao, L.; Mogensen, D.; Dal Maso, M.; Rusanen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Mentel, T. F.; Wildt, J.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2015-09-01

    We used the Aerosol Dynamics gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM) to simulate the contribution of BVOC plant emissions to the observed new particle formation during photooxidation experiments performed in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Chamber and to evaluate how well smog chamber experiments can mimic the atmospheric conditions during new particle formation events. ADCHAM couples the detailed gas-phase chemistry from Master Chemical Mechanism with a novel aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module. Our model simulations reveal that the observed particle growth may have either been controlled by the formation rate of semi- and low-volatility organic compounds in the gas phase or by acid catalysed heterogeneous reactions between semi-volatility organic compounds in the particle surface layer (e.g. peroxyhemiacetal dimer formation). The contribution of extremely low-volatility organic gas-phase compounds to the particle formation and growth was suppressed because of their rapid and irreversible wall losses, which decreased their contribution to the nano-CN formation and growth compared to the atmospheric situation. The best agreement between the modelled and measured total particle number concentration (R2 > 0.95) was achieved if the nano-CN was formed by kinetic nucleation involving both sulphuric acid and organic compounds formed from OH oxidation of BVOCs.

  10. Atmospheric new particle formation and the potential role of organic peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trawny, Katrin; Bonn, Boris; Jacobi, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere belongs to the currently most discussed aspects of atmospheric aerosols with significant implications for cloud formation and microphysics, once these particles have grown beyond about 50 nm in particle diameter. If these particles act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei they can affect the radiation budget at the Earths surface and cause climate couplings important to understand when aiming to predict climate change scenarios. One aspect widely discussed is the potential contribution of organic trace gases from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this study we analysed datasets from a Central European measurement station in Germany in a spruce forest approximately 800 m above sea level and a distance of about 20 km to Frankfurt (southeast). Continuous particle size distribution measurements were classified in nucleation-event or not and unidentified and intercompared to meteorological and basic trace gas observations. Additionally meteorological backtrajektories calculated by the German Weather Service for the station every 12 hours have been considered. These led to the following conclusions: Nucleation was most likely if (A) the air has not get significantly into touch with the surface within the last days, or if (B) at least human impact was minor and the air faced forest surfaces mainly (northwest). As observed already in Hyytiälä (Finland) nucleation appeared, when the relative humidity and ambient water vapour mixing ratio were low, ozone was high and the condensation sink was small. A further important point was the amount of global radiation measured at the Taunus Observatory (Mt. Kleiner Feldberg). The higher the radiation, the more likely a nucleation event and the more intense. Temperature impacted on the intensity of nucleation, i.e. the higher the temperature the more intense the event, but did not directly affect the occurrence of an event or not, if a threshold value of ca. -6 °C was exceeded. This

  11. Chemical characteristics and source of size-fractionated atmospheric particle in haze episode in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun; Zhen, Naijia; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    The abundance, behavior, and source of chemical species in size-fractionated atmospheric particle were studied with a 13-stage low pressure impactor (ELPI) during high polluted winter episode in Beijing. Thirty three elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) and eight water soluble ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2 +, and Mg2 +) were determined by ICP/MS and IC, respectively. The size distribution of TC (OC + EC) was reconstructed. Averagely, 51.5 ± 5.3% and 74.1 ± 3.7% of the total aerosol mass was distributed in the sub-micron (PM1) and fine particle (PM2.5), respectively. A significant shift to larger fractions during heavy pollution episode was observed for aerosol mass, NH4+, SO42 -, NO3-, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. The mass size distributions of NH4+, SO42 -, NO3-, and K were dominated by accumulation mode. Size distributions of elements were classified into four main types: (I) elements were enriched within the accumulation mode (fine, intermediate, and coarse modes; and (IV) those which were mainly found within particles larger than 2.7 μm (Al, Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Tl, Fe, Sr, Zr, and Ba). [H+]cor showed an accumulation mode at 600-700 nm and the role of Ca2 + should be fully considered in the estimation of acidity. The acidity in accumulation mode particles suggested that generally gaseous NH3 was not enough to neutralize sulfate completely. PMF method was applied for source apportionment of elements combined with water soluble ions. Dust, vehicle, aged coal combustion, and sea salt were identified, and the size resolved source apportionments were discussed. Aged coal combustion was the important source of fine particles and dust contributed most to coarse particle.

  12. Atmospheric particles retrieval using satellite remote sensing: Applications for sandstorms and volcanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingxin

    This thesis is concerned with atmospheric particles produced by sandstorms and volcanic eruptions. Three studies were conducted in order to examine particle retrieval methodology, and apply these towards an improved understanding of large-scale sandstorms. A thermal infrared remote sensing retrieval method developed by Wen and Rose [1994], which retrieves particle sizes, optical depth, and total masses of silicate particles in the volcanic cloud, was applied to an April 07, 2001 sandstorm over northern China, using MODIS. Results indicate that the area of the dust cloud observed was 1.34 million km2, the mean particle radius of the dust was 1.44 mum, and the mean optical depth at 11 mum was 0.79. The mean burden of dust was approximately 4.8 tons/km2 and the main portion of the dust storm on April 07, 2001 contained 6.5 million tons of dust. The results are supported by both independent remote sensing data (TOMS) and in-situ data for a similar event in 1998, therefore suggesting that the technique is appropriate for quantitative analysis of silicate dust clouds. This is the first quantitative evaluation of annual and seasonal dust loading in 2003 produced by Saharan dust storms by satellite remote sensing analysis. The retrieved mean particle effective radii of 2003 dust events are between 1.7--2.6 mum which is small enough to be inhaled and is hazardous to human health. The retrieved yearly dust mass load is 658--690 Tg, which is ˜45% of the annual global mineral dust production. Winter is the heaviest dust loading season in the year 2003, which is more than 5 times larger than that in the summer season in 2003.The mean optical depths at 11 mum in the winter season (around 0.7) are higher than those in the summer season (around 0.5). The results could help both meteorologists and environmental scientists to evaluate and predict the hazard degree caused by Saharan dust storms. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. Origin of nitrocatechols and alkylated-nitrocatechols in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Sylvestre, Alexandre; Ravier, Sylvain; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Slowik, Jay; El Haddad, Imad; Prevot, Andre

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning constitutes one of the major sources of aerosol particles in most of the environments during winter. If a lot of information is available in the literature on the primary fraction of biomass burning aerosol particles, almost nothing is known regarding the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) from the chemical mixture emitted by this source. Recently methylated nitrocatechol have been identified in atmospheric particles collected in winter. These compounds are strongly associated with biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan and are suspected to be of secondary origin since they can be formed through the oxidation of cresol significantly emitted by biomass burning. However, nitrocatechols are particularly difficult to analyze using classical techniques like HPLC-MS or GC-MS. In the present study, we adopt a new analytical approach. Direct analysis in real time (DART), introduced by Cody et al. (2005), allows direct analysis of gases, liquids, solids and materials on surfaces. Thus, for particles collected onto filters, the sample preparation step is simplified as much as possible, avoiding losses and reducing to the minimum the analytical procedure time. Two analytic modes can be used. In positive mode, [MH]+ ions are formed by proton transfer reaction ; whereas in negative ionization mode, [MH]-, M- and [MO2]- ions are formed. DART source enables soft ionization and produces simple mass spectra suitable for analysis of complex matrices, like organic aerosol, in only a few seconds. For this study, the DART source was coupled to a Q-ToF mass spectrometer (Synapt G2 HDMS, Waters), with a mass resolution up to 40 000. The analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples, collected in Marseille during winter 2011 (APICE project), with the DART/Q-ToF approach highlighted the abundance of nitrocatechols and alkylated nitrocatechols. Their temporal trends were also very similar to those of levoglucosan or dihydroabietic acid well known tracers of biomass

  14. Application of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Ferrite Layers for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F; Federmann, S; Taborelli, M; Schulz, C; Bobzin, K; Wu, J

    2013-01-01

    A common problem in all kinds of cavity-like structures in particle accelerators is the occurrence of RF-resonances. Typically, ferrite plates attached to the walls of such structures as diagnostic devices, kickers or collimators, are used to dampen those undesired modes. However, the heat transfer rate from these plates to the walls is rather limited. Brazing ferrite plates to the walls is not possible in most cases due to the different thermal expansion coefficients. To overcome those limitations, atmospheric plasma spraying techniques have been investigated. Ferrite layers with a thickness from 50 μm to about 300 μm can be deposited on metallic surfaces like stainless steel exhibiting good thermal contact and still reasonable absorption properties. In this paper the technological aspects of plasma deposition are discussed and results of specifically developed RF loss measurement procedures for such thin magnetically lossy layers on metal are presented.

  15. Future monitoring of charged particle energy deposition into the upper atmosphere and comments on possible relationships between atmospheric phenomena and solar and/or geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. J.; Grubb, R. N.; Evans, D. S.; Sauer, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Monitoring of earth's atmosphere was conducted for several years utilizing the ITOS series of low-altitude, polar-orbiting weather satellites. A space environment monitoring package was included in these satellites to perform measurements of a portion of earth's charged particle environment. The charged particle observations proposed for the low-altitude weather satellite TIROS N, are described which will provide the capability of routine monitoring of the instantaneous total energy deposition into the upper atmosphere by the precipitation of charged particles from higher altitudes. Such observations may be of use in future studies of the relationships between geomagnetic activity and atmospheric weather pattern developments. Estimates are given to assess the potential importance of this type of energy deposition. Discussion and examples are presented illustrating the importance of distinguishing between solar and geomagnetic activity as possible causative sources. Such differentiation is necessary because of the widely different spatial and time scales involved in the atmospheric energy input resulting from these various sources of activity.

  16. Health risk assessment for residents exposed to atmospheric diesel exhaust particles in southern region of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chia-Pin; Liao, Chung-Min; Tsai, Ying-I.; Cheng, Man-Ting; Chou, Wei-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Evidence shows a strong association among air pollution, oxidative stress (OS), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, and diseases. Recent studies indicated that the aging, human neurodegenerative diseases and cancers resulted from mitochondrial dysfunction and OS. The purpose of this study is to provide a probabilistic risk assessment model to quantify the atmospheric diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced pre-cancer biomarker response and cancer incidence risk for residents in south Taiwan. We conducted entirely monthly particulate matter sampling data at five sites in Kaohsiung of south Taiwan in the period 2002-2003. Three findings were found: (i) the DEP dose estimates and cancer risk quantification had heterogeneously spatiotemporal difference in south Taiwan, (ii) the pre-cancer DNA damage biomarker and cancer incidence estimates had a positive yet insignificant association, and (iii) all the estimates of cancer incidence in south Taiwan populations fell within and slight lower than the values from previous cancer epidemiological investigations. In this study, we successfully assessed the tumor incidence for residents posed by DEP exposure in south Taiwan compared with the epidemiological approach. Our approach provides a unique way for assessing human health risk for residences exposed to atmospheric DEP depending on specific combinations of local and regional conditions. Our work implicates the importance of incorporating both environmental and health risk impacts into models of air pollution exposure to guide adaptive mitigation strategies.

  17. Effect of atmospheric aging on volatility and reactive oxygen species of biodiesel exhaust nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourkhesalian, A. M.; Stevanovic, S.; Rahman, M. M.; Faghihi, E. M.; Bottle, S. E.; Masri, A. R.; Brown, R. J.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2015-08-01

    In the prospect of limited energy resources and climate change, effects of alternative biofuels on primary emissions are being extensively studied. Our two recent studies have shown that biodiesel fuel composition has a significant impact on primary particulate matter emissions. It was also shown that particulate matter caused by biodiesels was substantially different from the emissions due to petroleum diesel. Emissions appeared to have higher oxidative potential with the increase in oxygen content and decrease of carbon chain length and unsaturation levels of fuel molecules. Overall, both studies concluded that chemical composition of biodiesel is more important than its physical properties in controlling exhaust particle emissions. This suggests that the atmospheric aging processes, including secondary organic aerosol formation, of emissions from different fuels will be different as well. In this study, measurements were conducted on a modern common-rail diesel engine. To get more information on realistic properties of tested biodiesel particulate matter once they are released into the atmosphere, particulate matter was exposed to atmospheric oxidants, ozone and ultra-violet light; and the change in their properties was monitored for different biodiesel blends. Upon the exposure to oxidative agents, the chemical composition of the exhaust changes. It triggers the cascade of photochemical reactions resulting in the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particulate phase. In most of the cases, aging lead to the increase in volatility and oxidative potential, and the increment of change was mainly dependent on the chemical composition of fuels as the leading cause for the amount and the type of semi-volatile compounds present in the exhaust.

  18. The stable isotope compositions of mercury in atmospheric particles (PM10) from Paris (France) and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widory, D.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Johnson, T.; Quétel, C.; Snell, J.; van Bocxstaele, M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    Solid mercury (Hg) in atmospheric particles in the environment can be derived from a variety of primary sources and cycled through numerous secondary processes, complicating identification of its origin. Using the PM10 fraction of aerosols from Paris and vicinity, we investigated the possibility that Hg stable isotope compositions could help identify the origins of atmospheric Hg and processes affecting the atmospheric Hg budget. Characterization of Hg isotope compositions of emissions from the different potential sources (e.g. waste incinerators, coal-fired power plants, metal refining plants, road traffic, heating sources and volcanic gases) shows that those containing Hg are clearly discriminated by specific Hg isotope signatures. PM10 were sampled in three different locations: A) downtown Paris, characterized by diffuse pollution, B) nearby suburb of the city, close to suspected Hg emitters, and C) in distant suburb of the city, having only a few industrial activities in the area. Results indicate that Hg in most of the PM10 samples is explained by binary mixings. The mixing end-members include at least two distinct sources at low Hg concentrations in the aerosols, compatible with industrial activity. At high Hg concentration in the aerosols, the isotopes may likewise indicate two distinct sources with δ202Hg compositions of -4.1 and -11.4 ‰. This range is significantly less than that measured on the potential sources of Hg pollution, and may indicate secondary processes, such as gas to solid phase transfers. The occurrence of post-emission processes is reinforced by the strong correlations existing between these low δ202Hg and MIF Δ201Hg values.

  19. Influence of Ionization Degrees on the Evolutions of Charged Particles in Atmospheric Plasma at Low Altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A zero-dimensional model which includes 56 species of reactants and 427 reactions is used to study the behavior of charged particles in atmospheric plasmas with different ionization degrees at low altitude (near 0 km). The constant coefficient nonlinear equations are solved by using the Quasi-steady-state approximation method. The electron lifetimes are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values, and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented, which are dominant in reaction processes. The results show that the electron number density decays quickly. The lifetimes of electrons are shortened by about two orders with increasing ionization degree. Electrons then attach to neutral particles and produce negative ions. When the initial electron densities are in the range of 1010 ∼ 1014 cm−3, the negative ions have sufficiently high densities and long lifetimes for air purification, disinfection and sterilization. Electrons, O2−, O4−, CO4− and CO3− are the dominant negative species when the initial electron density ne0 ≤ 1013 cm−3, and only electrons and CO3− are left when ne0 ≥ 1015 cm−3 · N+2, N+4 and O+2 are dominant in the positive charges for any ionization degree. Other positive species, such as O+4, N+3, NO+, NO+2, Ar+2 and H3O+·H2O, are dominant only for a certain ionization degree and in a certain period. (low temperature plasma)

  20. An Overview of Energetic Particle Precipitation Effects on the Earth's Atmosphere and (Potentially) Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Energetic precipitating particles (EPPs) can cause significant constituent changes in the polar mesosphere and stratosphere (middle atmosphere) during certain periods. Both protons and electrons can influence the polar middle atmosphere through ionization and dissociation processes. EPPs can enhance HOx (H, OH, HO2) through the formation of positive ions followed by complex ion chemistry and NOx (N, NO, NO2) through the dissociation of molecular nitrogen. The solar EPP-created HOx increases can lead to ozone destruction in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere via several catalytic loss cycles. Such middle atmospheric HOx-caused ozone loss is rather short-lived due to the relatively short lifetime (hours) of the HOx constituents. The HOx-caused ozone depletion of greater than 30% has been observed during several large solar proton events (SPEs) in the past 50 years. HOx enhancements due to SPEs were confirmed by observations in solar cycle 23. A number of modeling studies have been undertaken over this time period that show predictions of enhanced HOx accompanied by decreased ozone due to energetic particles. The solar EPP-created NOx family has a longer lifetime than the HOx family and can also lead to catalytic ozone destruction. EPP-caused enhancements of the NOx family can affect ozone promptly, if produced in the stratosphere, or subsequently, if produced in the lower thermosphere or mesosphere and transported to the stratosphere. NOx enhancements due to auroral electrons, medium and high energy electrons, relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events, and SPEs have been measured and/or modeled for decades. Model predictions and measurements show that certain years have significant winter-time meteorological events, which result in the transport of EPP-caused NOx enhancements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere to lower altitudes. The NOx-caused ozone depletion has also been observed during several solar proton events (SPEs) in the past 50 years

  1. Investigation of particle sizes in Pluto's atmosphere from the 29 June 2015 occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Bosh, A. S.; Person, M. J.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Levine, S. E.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Dunham, E. W.; McLean, I.; Wolf, J.; Abe, F.; Bida, T. A.; Bright, L. P.; Brothers, T.; Christie, G.; Collins, P. L.; Durst, R. F.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hamilton, R.; Harris, H. C.; Johnson, C.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kosiarek, M. R.; Leppik, K.; Logsdon, S.; Lucas, R.; Mathers, S.; Morley, C. J. K.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, P.; Ngan, H.; Pfüller, E.; de, H.-P.; Sallum, S.; Savage, M.; Seeger, C. H.; Siu, H.; Stockdale, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thanathibodee, T.; Tilleman, T.; Tristam, P. J.; Van Cleve, J.; Varughese, C.; Weisenbach, L. W.; Widen, E.; Wiedemann, M.

    2015-11-01

    The 29 June 2015 observations of a stellar occultation by Pluto, from SOFIA and ground-based sites in New Zealand, indicate that haze was present in the lower atmosphere (Bosh et al., this conference). Previously, slope changes in the occultation light curve profile of Pluto’s lower atmosphere have been attributed to haze, a steep thermal gradient, and/or a combination of the two. The most useful diagnostic for differentiating between these effects has been observing occultations over a range of wavelengths: haze scattering and absorption are functions of particle size and are wavelength dependent, whereas effects due to a temperature gradient should be largely independent of observational wavelength. The SOFIA and Mt. John data from this event exhibit obvious central flashes, from multiple telescopes observing over a range of wavelengths at each site (Person et al. and Pasachoff et al., this conference). SOFIA data include Red and Blue observations from the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO, at ~ 500 and 850 nm), First Light Infrared Test Camera (FLITECAM, at ~1800 nm), and the Focal Plan Imager (FPI+, at ~ 600 nm). Mt. John data include open filter, g', r', i', and near infrared. Here, we analyze the flux at the bottom of the light curves versus observed wavelength. We find that there is a distinct trend in flux versus wavelength, and we discuss applicable Mie scattering models for different particle size distributions and compositions (as were used to characterize haze in Pluto's lower atmosphere in Gulbis et al. 2015).SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart. Support for this work was provided by the National Research Foundation of South Africa, NASA SSO grants NNX15AJ82G (Lowell Observatory), PA NNX10AB27G (MIT), and PA NNX12AJ29G (Williams College), and the NASA

  2. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiedensohler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer.

    We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data.

    Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the

  3. Highly time-resolved chemical characterization of atmospheric fine particles during 2010 Shanghai World Expo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-F. Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shanghai, with a population of over 20 million, is the largest mega-city in China. Rapidly increasing industrial and metropolitan emissions have deteriorated its air quality in the past decades, with fine particle pollution as one of the major issues. However, systematic characterization of atmospheric fine particles with advanced measurement techniques has been very scarce in Shanghai. During 2010 Shanghai World Expo, we deployed a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and a single particle soot photometer (SP2 in urban Shanghai between 15 May and 10 June 2010 to measure fine particles with a high time resolution. The 4-min resolution PM1 mass concentration ranged from 5.5 to 155 μg m−3, with an average of 29.2 μg m−3. On average, sulfate and organic matter (OM were the most abundant PM1 components, accounting for 33.3 and 28.7% of the total mass, respectively, while the fraction of nitrate showed an increasing trend with the increasing PM1 loading, indicating the photochemical nature of high fine particle pollution in Shanghai. Taking advantage of HR-ToF-AMS and SP2, OM was found to have an average OM/OC ratio (organic matter mass/organic carbon mass of 1.55 and black carbon (BC had an average number fraction of internally mixed BC of 41.2%. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis on the high resolution organic mass spectral dataset identified a hydrocarbon-like (HOA, a semi-volatile oxygenated (SV-OOA, and a low-volatility oxygenated (LV-OOA organic aerosol component, which on average accounted for 24.0, 46.8, and 29.2% of the total organic mass, respectively. The diurnal patterns of them with interesting time delay possibly implied a photochemical oxidizing process from HOA (and/or its concurrently emitted gaseous organic pollutants to SV-OOA to LV-OOA. Back trajectory analysis indicated that the northwesterly continental air mass represented the

  4. Atmospheric heteroseneous reaction of acetone: Adsorption and desorption kinetics and mechanisms on SiO2 particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE ChongYu; CHEN ZhongMing; WANG HongLi; HUA Wei; WANG CaiXia; LI Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Acetone plays an important role in photooxidation processes in the atmosphere. Up to date, little is known regarding the heterogeneous fate of acetone. In this study, the adsorption and desorption processes of acetone on SiO2 particles, which are the major constituent of mineral dust in the atmos-phere, have been investigated for the first time under the simulated atmospheric conditions, using in situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is found that acetone molecules are ad-sorbed on the surfaces of SiO2 particles by van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding forces in a nonreactive and reversible state. The rates of initial adsorption and initial desorption, initial uptake coefficients and adsorption concentrations at equilibrium have been determined at different relative humidity. The presence of water vapor cannot result in the formation of new substances, but can de-crease the adsorption ability by consuming or overlapping the isolated OH groups on the surfaces of SiO2 particles. In the desorption process, a considerable amount of acetone molecules will remain on SiO2 particles in dry air, whereas acetone molecules are almost completely desorbed at a high relative humidity. In order to evaluate the role of heterogeneous reactions of acetone and other carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere, a new model fitting the atmospheric conditions is needed.

  5. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  6. The effect of acid–base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  7. Aerosol and Cloud-Nucleating Particle Observations during an Atmospheric River Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, P. J.; McCluskey, C. S.; Petters, M.; Suski, K. J.; Levin, E. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Atwood, S. A.; Schill, G. P.; Rocci, K.; Boose, Y.; Martin, A.; Cornwell, G.; Al-Mashat, H.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Rothfuss, N.; Taylor, H.; Leung, L. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; Creamean, J.; White, A. B.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The multi-agency CalWater 2015 project occurred over North Central CA and the Eastern Pacific during January to March 2015 (Spackman et al., this session). The goals of the campaign were to document the structure of atmospheric rivers (ARs) that deliver much of the water vapor associated with major winter storms along the U.S. West Coast and to investigate the modulating effect of aerosols on precipitation. Aerosol sources that may influence orographic cloud properties for air lifted over the mountains in California in winter include pollution, biomass burning, soil dusts and marine aerosols, but their roles will also be influenced by transport, vertical stratification, and scavenging processes. We present results from a comprehensive study of aerosol distributions, compositions, and cloud nucleating properties during an intense winter storm during February 2015, including data from an NSF-supported measurement site at Bodega Bay, from the DOE-ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment that included sampling on the NOAA RV Ron Brown offshore and the G-1 aircraft over ocean and land, and with context provided by other NOAA aircraft and remote sensing facilities. With a special focus on the coastal site, we discuss changes in aerosol distributions, aerosol hygroscopicity, and number concentrations of fluorescent particles, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and ice nucleating particles (INPs) during the AR event. We compare with periods preceding and following the event. For example, total aerosol number and surface area concentrations at below 0.5 μm diameter decreased from typical values of a few thousand cm-3 and 100 μm2 cm-3, respectively, to a few hundred cm-3 and 10 μm2cm-3 at Bodega Bay during the AR event. CCN concentrations were similarly lower, but hygroscopicity parameter (kappa) increased from typical values of 0.2 to values > 0.5 during the AR.INP and fluorescent particle number concentrations were generally lower during the AR event than at any other

  8. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - fluorescent biomolecules, biological standard particles and potential interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, C.; Huffmann, J. A.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-04-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, bacteria, biogenic polymers and debris from larger organisms are known to influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere and public health. PBAP account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in urban, rural and pristine environment and are released with estimated emission rates of up to ~1000 Tg/a [1]. Continuous measurements of the abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP have been difficult until recently, however. The application of on-line instruments able to detect autofluorescence from biological particles in real-time has been a promising development for the measurement of PBAP concentrations and fluxes in different environments [2,3]. The detected fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) can be regarded as a subset of PBAP, although the exact relationship between PBAP and FBAP is still being investigated. Autofluorescence of FBAP is usually a superposition of fluorescence from a mixture of individual fluorescent molecules (fluorophores). Numerous biogenic fluorophores such as amino acids (e.g., tryptophan, tyrosine), coenzymes (e.g., NAD(P)H, riboflavin) and biopolymers (e.g., cellulose) emit fluorescent light due to heterocyclic aromatic rings or conjugated double bonds within their molecular structures. The tryptophan emission peak is a common feature of most bioparticles because the amino acid is a constituent of many proteins and peptides. The influence of the coenzymes NAD(P)H and riboflavin on the autofluorescence of bacteria can be regarded as an indicator for bacterial metabolism and has been utilized to discriminate between viable and non-viable organisms [4]. However, very little information is available about other essential biofluorophores in fungal spores and pollen. In order to better understand the autofluorescence behavior of FBAP, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to analyze standard

  9. Size distribution of natural aerosols and radioactive particles issued from radon, in marine and hardly polluted urban atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a view to studying the natural radioactive particles produced by atttachment of 222Rn daughters on environmental aerosol particles, the behaviours of CASELLA MK2 and ANDERSEN cascade impactors were first investigated. Their characteristic stage diameters were determined and size distributions of airborne particles were obtained in various situations. Moreover, an experimental and automatic equipment for measuring radon was devised and a method was developed in order to evaluate RaA, RaB, RaC concentrations in the free atmosphere. A degree of radioactive desequilibrium between 222Rn and its daughters, more important than that in other locations was thus demonstrated. Furthermore, by means of various aerosol collection systems (ion tubes, diffusion batteries, cascade impactors, filters), the cumulative size distribution of natural radioactivity was established in the air, at ground level. Finally, from a theory of attachment of small radioactive ions on atmospheric particles, a tentative explanation of experimental results was made

  10. Macromodel for assessing residential concentrations of combustion-generated pollutants: Model development and preliminary predictions for CO, NO/sub 2/, and respirable suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynor, G.W.; Aceti, J.C.; Apte, M.G.; Smith, B.V.; Green, L.L.; Smith-Reiser, A.; Novak, K.M.; Moses, D.O.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation model (also called a ''macromodel'') has been developed to predict residential air pollutant concentration distributions for specified populations. The model inputs include the market penetration of pollution sources, pollution source characteristics (e.g., emission rates, source usage rates), building characteristics (e.g., house volume, air exchange rates), and meteorological parameters (e.g., outside temperature). Four geographically distinct regions of the US have been modeled using Monte Carlo and deterministic simulation techniques. Single-source simulations were also conducted. The highest predicted CO and NO/sub 2/ residential concentrations were associated with the winter-time use of unvented gas and kerosene space heaters. The highest predicted respirable suspended particulate concentrations were associated with indoor cigarette smoking and the winter-time use of non-airtight wood stoves, radiant kerosene heaters, convective unvented gas space heaters, and oil forced-air furnaces. Future field studies in this area should (1) fill information gaps identified in this report, and (2) collect information on the macromodel input parameters to properly interpret the results. It is almost more important to measure the parameters that affect indoor concentration than it is to measure the concentrations themselves.

  11. Particle hygroscopicity and its link to chemical composition in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, China, during summertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. J.; Zheng, J.; Shang, D. J.; Du, Z. F.; Wu, Y. S.; Zeng, L. M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Hu, M.

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous measurements of particle number size distribution, particle hygroscopic properties, and size-resolved chemical composition were made during the summer of 2014 in Beijing, China. During the measurement period, the mean hygroscopicity parameters (κs) of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 nm particles were respectively 0.16 ± 0.07, 0.19 ± 0.06, 0.22 ± 0.06, 0.26 ± 0.07, and 0.28 ± 0.10, showing an increasing trend with increasing particle size. Such size dependency of particle hygroscopicity was similar to that of the inorganic mass fraction in PM1. The hydrophilic mode (hygroscopic growth factor, HGF > 1.2) was more prominent in growth factor probability density distributions and its dominance of hydrophilic mode became more pronounced with increasing particle size. When PM2.5 mass concentration was greater than 50 μg m-3, the fractions of the hydrophilic mode for 150, 250, and 350 nm particles increased towards 1 as PM2.5 mass concentration increased. This indicates that aged particles dominated during severe pollution periods in the atmosphere of Beijing. Particle hygroscopic growth can be well predicted using high-time-resolution size-resolved chemical composition derived from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule. The organic hygroscopicity parameter (κorg) showed a positive correlation with the oxygen to carbon ratio. During the new particle formation event associated with strongly active photochemistry, the hygroscopic growth factor or κ of newly formed particles is greater than for particles with the same sizes not during new particle formation (NPF) periods. A quick transformation from external mixture to internal mixture for pre-existing particles (for example, 250 nm particles) was observed. Such transformations may modify the state of the mixture of pre-existing particles and thus modify properties such as the light absorption coefficient and cloud condensation nuclei activation.

  12. Characteristics of atmospheric particulate mercury in size-fractionated particles during haze days in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojia; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Zhu, Qiongyu; Behera, Sailesh N.; Bo, Dandan; Huang, Xian; Xie, Haiyun; Cheng, Jinping

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate mercury (PHg) is recognized as a global pollutant that requires regulation because of its significant impacts on both human health and wildlife. The haze episodes that occur frequently in China could influence the transport and fate of PHg. To examine the characteristics of PHg during haze and non-haze days, size-fractioned particles were collected using thirteen-stage Nano-MOUDI samplers (10 nm-18 μm) during a severe haze episode (from December 2013 to January 2014) in Shanghai. The PHg concentration on haze days (4.11 ± 0.53 ng m-3) was three times higher than on non-haze days (1.34 ± 0.15 ng m-3). The ratio of the PHg concentration to total gaseous mercury (TGM) ranged from 0.42 during haze days to 0.21 during non-haze days, which was possibly due to the elevated concentration of particles for gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) adsorption, elevated sulfate and nitrate contributing to GEM oxidation, and the catalytic effect of elevated water-soluble inorganic metal ions. PHg/PM10 during haze days (0.019 ± 0.004 ng/μg) was lower than during non-haze days (0.024 ± 0.002 ng/μg), and PHg/PM10 was significantly reduced with an increasing concentration of PM10, which implied a relatively lower growth velocity of mercury than other compositions on particles during haze days, especially in the diameter range of 0.018-0.032 μm. During haze days, each size-fractioned PHg concentration was higher than the corresponding fraction on non-haze days, and the dominant particle size was in the accumulation mode, with constant accumulation to a particle size of 0.56-1.0 μm. The mass size distribution of PHg was bimodal with peaks at 0.32-0.56 μm and 3.1-6.2 μm on non-haze days, and 0.56-1.0 μm and 3.1-6.2 μm on haze days. There was a clear trend that the dominant size for PHg in the fine modes shifted from 0.32-0.56 μm during non-haze days to 0.56-1.0 μm on haze days, which revealed the higher growth velocity of PHg on haze days due to the

  13. Real time analysis of lead-containing atmospheric particles in Beijing during springtime by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Lei; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Zou, Lilin; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), the chemical composition and size distributions of lead (Pb)-containing particles with diameter from 0.1 μm to 2.0 μm in Beijing were analyzed in the spring of 2011 during clear, hazy, and dusty days. Based on mass spectral features of particles, cluster analysis was applied to Pb-containing particles, and six major classes were acquired consisting of K-rich, carboneous, Fe-rich, dust, Pb-rich, and Cl-rich particles. Pb-containing particles accounted for 4.2-5.3%, 21.8-22.7%, and 3.2% of total particle number during clear, hazy and dusty days, respectively. K-rich particles are a major contribution to Pb-containing particles, varying from 30.8% to 82.1% of total number of Pb-containing particles, lowest during dusty days and highest during hazy days. The results reflect that the chemical composition and amount of Pb-containing particles has been affected by meteorological conditions as well as the emissions of natural and anthropogenic sources. K-rich particles and carbonaceous particles could be mainly assigned to the emissions of coal combustion. Other classes of Pb-containing particles may be associated with metallurgical processes, coal combustion, dust, and waste incineration etc. In addition, Pb-containing particles during dusty days were first time studied by SPAMS. This method could provide a powerful tool for monitoring and controlling of Pb pollution in real time. PMID:27085059

  14. Hourly atmospheric concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs-137 at monitoring stations for suspended particulate matter in and south of Fukushima after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2013-04-01

    No data has been found of continuous monitoring of radioactive materials in the atmosphere in Fukushima area after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident on March 11, 2011, although it greatly contributes to accurate evaluation of the internal exposure dose, to reconstruction of emission time series of released radionuclides, and to validation of numerical simulations by atmospheric transport models. Then, we have challenged to retrieve the radioactivity in atmospheric aerosols collected every hour on a filter tape of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitoring system with beta ray attenuation method used at air pollution monitoring stations in east Japan. A test measurement for hourly atmospheric concentrations of Cs-134 and Cs-137 was successfully performed with a Ge detector for the used filter tapes during March 15-23, 2011, at three stations in Fukushima City 60 km northwest of the FD1NPP and four stations in southwest Ibaraki prefecture more than 150 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The data in Fukushima City revealed high Cs-137 concentrations of 10-30 Bq m-3 from the evening of March 15 to the early morning of March 16, when a large amount of radioactive materials was simultaneously deposited on the land surface by precipitation according to the measurement of radiation dose rate. Higher Cs-137 concentrations of 10-50 Bq m-3 were also found from the afternoon of March 20 to the morning of March 21, and which could not be detected by the radiation dose rate due to no precipitation. In contrast, much higher concentrations with the maximum of 320 Bq m-3 in southwest Ibaraki than in Fukushima City were found on the morning of March 15 and 21 under strong temperature inversion near the surface. The polluted air masses with high radioactive materials were passed away within a few hours as a plume in southwest Ibaraki, while the high Cs-137 concentrations lasted for 10-16 hours in Fukushima City where the polluted air masses after their transport

  15. Circular motion of particles suspended in a Gaussian beam with circular polarization validates the spin part of the internal energy flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Maksimyak, P. P.;

    2012-01-01

    switching to the right (left) circular polarization, the particles performed spinning motion in agreement with the angular momentum imparted by the field, but they were involved in an orbital rotation around the beam axis as well, which in previous works [Y. Zhao et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 073901 (2007......)] was treated as evidence for the spin-to orbital angular momentum conversion. Since in our realization the moderate focusing of the beam excluded the possibility for such a conversion, we consider the observed particle behavior as a demonstration of the macroscopic “spin energy flow” predicted by the...

  16. Source reconciliation of atmospheric gas-phase and particle-phase pollutants during a severe photochemical smog episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, James J; Fraser, Matthew P; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-09-01

    A comprehensive organic compound-based receptor model is developed that can simultaneously apportion the source contributions to atmospheric gas-phase organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, fine particle organic compounds, and fine particle mass. The model is applied to ambient data collected at four sites in the south coast region of California during a severe summertime photochemical smog episode, where the model determines the direct primary contributions to atmospheric pollutants from 11 distinct air pollution source types. The 11 sources included in the model are gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, whole gasoline vapors, gasoline headspace vapors, organic solvent vapors, whole diesel fuel, paved road dust, tire wear debris, meat cooking exhaust, natural gas leakage, and vegetative detritus. Gasoline engine exhaust plus whole gasoline vapors are the predominant sources of volatile organic gases, while gasoline and diesel engine exhaust plus diesel fuel vapors dominate the emissions of semivolatile organic compounds from these sources during the episode studied at all four air monitoring sites. The atmospheric fine particle organic compound mass was composed of noticeable contributions from gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, meat cooking, and paved road dust with smaller but quantifiable contributions from vegetative detritus and tire wear debris. In addition, secondary organic aerosol, which is formed from the low-vapor pressure products of gas-phase chemical reactions, is found to be a major source of fine particle organic compound mass under the severe photochemical smog conditions studied here. The concentrations of secondary organic aerosol calculated in the present study are compared with previous fine particle source apportionment results for less intense photochemical smog conditions. It is shown that estimated secondary organic aerosol concentrations correlate fairly well with the

  17. Caracterización de Partículas Suspendidas (PST y Partículas Respirables (PM 10 producidas en Áreas de Explotación Carbonífera a Cielo Abierto Characterization of Total Suspended Particles (TSP and Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM 10 generated in Open Pit Coal Mining Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C Angulo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión de la literatura sobre la cuantificación y caracterización de partículas suspendidas (PST y partículas respirables (PM10 producidas en áreas de explotación carbonífera a cielo abierto. El material particulado es un contaminante complejo por sus características físicas (distribución de tamaño de partícula, morfología y densidad y por sus características químicas (compuestos orgánicos e inorgánicos, metales y contaminantes primarios y secundarios. Estas características son críticas para determinar el tipo y magnitud de los efectos sobre la salud humana. Se encontró que los trabajos realizados, han empleado experimentos de laboratorio y de campo, así como estudios de modelación. Esta revisión bibliográfica contribuye a una mejor comprensión y evaluación de las tecnologías que se deben usar para encontrar soluciones a este problema de contaminación.This article presents a literature review about the quantification and characterization of total suspended particles (TSP and inhalable particulate matter (PM 10 generated in open pit coal mining areas. Particle matter is a complex pollutant due to its physical characteristics (particle size distribution, morphology and density and its chemical characteristics (organic and inorganic components, metals, and primary and secondary pollutants. These characteristics are critical to determine the type and the magnitude of their effects on human health. It was found that the different works published in the literature have used lab and field experiments, and also modeling studies. This literature review contributes to improve the understanding and evaluation of technologies that must be used to find solutions to this atmospheric pollution problem.

  18. New Directions: Questions surrounding suspended particle mass used as a surrogate for air quality and for regulatory control of ambient urban air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, John L.

    2014-07-01

    The original choice of particulate matter mass (PM) as a realistic surrogate for gross air pollution has gradually evolved into routine use nowadays of epidemiologically-based estimates of the monetary and other benefits expected from regulating urban air quality. Unfortunately, the statistical associations facilitating such calculations usually are based on single indices of air pollution whereas the health effects themselves are more broadly based causally. For this and other reasons the economic benefits of control tend to be exaggerated. Primarily because of their assumed inherently inferior respirability, particles ≥10 μm are generally excluded from such considerations. Where the particles themselves are chemically heterogeneous, as in an urban context, this may be inappropriate. Clearly all air-borne particles, whether coarse or fine, are susceptible to inhalation. Hence, the possibility exists for any adhering potentially harmful semi-volatile substances to be subsequently de-sorbed in vivo thereby facilitating their transport deeper into the lungs. Consequently, this alone may be a sufficient reason for including rather than rejecting during air quality monitoring the relatively coarse 10-100 μm particle fraction, ideally in conjunction with routine estimation of the gaseous co-pollutants thereby facilitating a multi-pollutant approach apropos regulation.

  19. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - Biological standard particles and the influence of environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Huffman, J. Alex; Förster, Jan-David; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, bacteria, biogenic polymers and debris from larger organisms are known to influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere and public health. PBAP can account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in urban, rural and pristine environment and are released with estimated emission rates of up to ~1000 Tg/a [1]. Continuous measurements of the abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP have been difficult until recently, however. The application of on-line instruments able to detect autofluorescence from biological particles in real-time has been a promising development for the measurement of PBAP concentrations and fluxes in different environments [2,3]. The detected fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) can be regarded as a subset of PBAP, although the exact relationship between PBAP and FBAP is still being investigated. Autofluorescence of FBAP is usually a superposition of fluorescence from a mixture of individual fluorescent molecules (fluorophores). Numerous biogenic fluorophores such as amino acids (e.g., tryptophan, tyrosine), coenzymes (e.g., NAD(P)H, riboflavin) and biopolymers (e.g., cellulose) emit fluorescent light due to heterocyclic aromatic rings or conjugated double bonds within their molecular structures. The tryptophan emission peak is a common feature of most bioparticles because the amino acid is a constituent of many proteins and peptides. The influence of the coenzymes NAD(P)H and riboflavin on the autofluorescence of bacteria can be regarded as an indicator for bacterial metabolism and has been utilized to discriminate between viable and non-viable organisms [4]. However, very little information is available about other essential biofluorophores in fungal spores and pollen. In order to better understand the autofluorescence behavior of FBAP, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to analyze

  20. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent J.; Zhang, Yaping; Zuo, Xiaochen; Martinez, Raul E.; Walker, Michael J.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition is often analyzed using thermal desorption techniques to evaporate samples and deliver organic or inorganic molecules to various designs of detectors for identification and quantification. The organic aerosol (OA) fraction is composed of thousands of individual compounds, some with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing functionality and, often contains oligomeric material, much of which may be susceptible to decomposition upon heating. Here we analyze thermal decomposition products as measured by a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) capable of separating thermal decomposition products from thermally stable molecules. The TAG impacts particles onto a collection and thermal desorption (CTD) cell, and upon completion of sample collection, heats and transfers the sample in a helium flow up to 310 °C. Desorbed molecules are refocused at the head of a gas chromatography column that is held at 45 °C and any volatile decomposition products pass directly through the column and into an electron impact quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of the sample introduction (thermal decomposition) period reveals contributions of NO+ (m/z 30), NO2+ (m/z 46), SO+ (m/z 48), and SO2+ (m/z 64), derived from either inorganic or organic particle-phase nitrate and sulfate. CO2+ (m/z 44) makes up a major component of the decomposition signal, along with smaller contributions from other organic components that vary with the type of aerosol contributing to the signal (e.g., m/z 53, 82 observed here for isoprene-derived secondary OA). All of these ions are important for ambient aerosol analyzed with the aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), suggesting similarity of the thermal desorption processes in both instruments. Ambient observations of these decomposition products compared to organic, nitrate, and sulfate mass concentrations measured by an AMS reveal good correlation, with improved correlations for OA when compared to the AMS oxygenated OA (OOA

  1. A critical evaluation of proxy methods used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Hennigan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Given significant challenges with available measurements of aerosol acidity, proxy methods are frequently used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles. In this study, four of the most common aerosol acidity proxies are evaluated and compared: (1 the ion balance method, (2 the molar ratio method, (3 thermodynamic equilibrium models, and (4 the phase partitioning of ammonia. All methods are evaluated against predictions of thermodynamic models and against direct observations of aerosol-gas equilibrium partitioning acquired in Mexico City during the MILAGRO study. The ion balance and molar ratio methods assume that any deficit in inorganic cations relative to anions is due to the presence of H+; and that a higher H+ loading and lower cation/anion ratio both correspond to increasingly acidic particles (i.e., lower pH. Based on the MILAGRO measurements, no correlation is observed between H+ levels inferred with the ion balance and aerosol pH predicted by the thermodynamic models and ammonia–ammonium (NH3–NH4+ partitioning. Similarly, no relationship is observed between the cation / anion molar ratio and predicted aerosol pH. Using only measured aerosol chemical composition as inputs without any constraint for the gas phase, the Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM and ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium models tend to predict aerosol pH levels that are inconsistent with the observed NH3–NH4+ partitioning. The modeled pH values from both models run with gas + aerosol inputs agreed well with the aerosol pH predicted by the phase partitioning of ammonia. It appears that (1 thermodynamic models constrained by gas + aerosol measurements, and (2 the phase partitioning of ammonia provide the best available predictions of aerosol pH. Furthermore, neither the ion balance nor the molar ratio can be used as surrogates for aerosol pH, and published studies to date with conclusions based on such acidity proxies may need to be reevaluated

  2. Insitu measurements of laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of single atmospheric organic carbon aerosol particles for their partial classification. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Pan, Y.; Hill, S.; Rosen, J. M.; Chang, R. K.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. Within the last two decades, the importance of organic carbon aerosols (OCAs) has been widely recognized. OCAs have both natural and anthropogenic sources and have effects ranging from atmospheric radiative forcing to human health. Improved methods for measuring and classifying OCAs are needed for better understanding their sources, transformation, and fate. In this talk we focus on the use of a relatively new technique for characterization of single OCA particles in atmospheric aerosol: ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF). UV-LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosols measured at multiple sites with different regional climate (Adelphi, MD, New Haven, CT, and Las Cruces, NM) are reported. A hierarchical clustering method was used to cluster (approximately 90%) of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra into 8-10 groups (clusters). Some of these clusters have spectra that are similar to spectra of some important classes of atmospheric aerosol, such as humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances, bacteria, cellulose, marine aerosol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The most highly populated clusters, and some of the less populated ones, appear at all sites. On average, spectra characteristic of humic/fulvic acids and humic-like-substances (HULIS) comprise 28-43% of fluorescent particles at all three sites; whereas cellulose-like spectra contribute only 1-3%.

  3. Evaluation of the accuracy of analysis tools for atmospheric new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Several mathematical tools have been developed in recent years to analyze new particle formation rates and to estimate nucleation rates and mechanisms at sub-3 nm sizes from atmospheric aerosol data. Here we evaluate these analysis tools using 1239 numerical nucleation events for which the nucleation mechanism and formation rates were known exactly. The accuracy of the estimates of particle formation rate at 3 nm (J3 showed significant sensitivity to the details of the analysis, i.e. form of equations used and assumptions made about the initial size of nucleating clusters, with the fraction of events within a factor-of-two accuracy ranging from 43–97%. In general, the estimates of the actual nucleation rate at 1.5 nm (J1.5 were less accurate, and even the most accurate analysis set-up estimated only 59% of the events within a factor of two of the simulated mean nucleation rate. The J1.5 estimates were deteriorated mainly by the size dependence of the cluster growth rate below 3 nm, which the analysis tools do not take into account, but also by possible erroneous assumptions about the initial cluster size. The poor estimates of J1.5 can lead to large uncertainties in the nucleation prefactors (i.e. constant P in nucleation equation J1.5 = P × [H2SO4]k. Large uncertainties were found also in the procedures that are used to determine the nucleation mechanism. When applied to individual events, the analysis tools clearly overestimated the number of H2SO4 molecules in a critical cluster for most events, and thus associated them with a wrong nucleation mechanism. However, in some conditions the number of H2SO4 molecules in a critical cluster was underestimated. This indicates that analysis of field data that implies a maximum of 2 H2SO4 molecules in

  4. Chemical characterization of atmospheric particles and source apportionment in the vicinity of a steelmaking industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, S.M., E-mail: smarta@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 139.7 km, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Lage, J. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 139.7 km, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Fernández, B. [Global R& D, ArcelorMittal, Avilés (Spain); Garcia, S. [Instituto de Soldadura e Qualidade, Av. Prof. Dr. Cavaco Silva, 33, 2740-120 Porto Salvo (Portugal); Reis, M.A.; Chaves, P.C. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 139.7 km, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    The objective of this work was to provide a chemical characterization of atmospheric particles collected in the vicinity of a steelmaking industry and to identify the sources that affect PM{sub 10} levels. A total of 94 PM samples were collected in two sampling campaigns that occurred in February and June/July of 2011. PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 2.5–10} were analyzed for a total of 22 elements by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Particle Induced X-ray Emission. The concentrations of water soluble ions in PM{sub 10} were measured by Ion Chromatography and Indophenol-Blue Spectrophotometry. Positive Matrix Factorization receptor model was used to identify sources of particulate matter and to determine their mass contribution to PM{sub 10}. Seven main groups of sources were identified: marine aerosol identified by Na and Cl (22%), steelmaking and sinter plant represented by As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mn, Pb, Sb and Zn (11%), sinter plant stack identified by NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K and Pb (12%), an unidentified Br source (1.8%), secondary aerosol from coke making and blast furnace (19%), fugitive emissions from the handling of raw material, sinter plant and vehicles dust resuspension identified by Al, Ca, La, Si, Ti and V (14%) and sinter plant and blast furnace associated essentially with Fe and Mn (21%). - Highlights: • Emissions from steelworks are very complex. • The larger steelworks contribution to PM{sub 10} was from blast furnace and sinter plant. • Sinter plant stack emissions contributed for 12% of the PM{sub 10} mass. • Secondary aerosol from coke making and blast furnace contributed for 19% of the PM{sub 10}. • Fugitive dust emissions highly contribute to PM{sub 10} mass.

  5. Chemical characterization of atmospheric particles and source apportionment in the vicinity of a steelmaking industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to provide a chemical characterization of atmospheric particles collected in the vicinity of a steelmaking industry and to identify the sources that affect PM10 levels. A total of 94 PM samples were collected in two sampling campaigns that occurred in February and June/July of 2011. PM2.5 and PM2.5–10 were analyzed for a total of 22 elements by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Particle Induced X-ray Emission. The concentrations of water soluble ions in PM10 were measured by Ion Chromatography and Indophenol-Blue Spectrophotometry. Positive Matrix Factorization receptor model was used to identify sources of particulate matter and to determine their mass contribution to PM10. Seven main groups of sources were identified: marine aerosol identified by Na and Cl (22%), steelmaking and sinter plant represented by As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mn, Pb, Sb and Zn (11%), sinter plant stack identified by NH4+, K and Pb (12%), an unidentified Br source (1.8%), secondary aerosol from coke making and blast furnace (19%), fugitive emissions from the handling of raw material, sinter plant and vehicles dust resuspension identified by Al, Ca, La, Si, Ti and V (14%) and sinter plant and blast furnace associated essentially with Fe and Mn (21%). - Highlights: • Emissions from steelworks are very complex. • The larger steelworks contribution to PM10 was from blast furnace and sinter plant. • Sinter plant stack emissions contributed for 12% of the PM10 mass. • Secondary aerosol from coke making and blast furnace contributed for 19% of the PM10. • Fugitive dust emissions highly contribute to PM10 mass

  6. Influence of Ionization Degrees on the Evolutions of Charged Particles in Atmospheric Plasma at Low Altitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xuexia; DENG Zechao; JIA Pengying; LIANG Weihua; LI Xia

    2012-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model which includes 56 species of reactants and 427 reactions is used to study the behavior of charged particles in atmospheric plasmas with different ionization degrees at low altitude (near 0 km). The constant coefficient nonlinear equations are solved by using the Quasi-steady-state approximation method. The electron lifetimes are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values, and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented, which are dominant in reaction processes. The results show that the electron number density decays quickly. The lifetimes of electrons are shortened by about two orders with increasing ionization degree. Electrons then attach to neutral particles and produce negative ions. When the initial electron densities are in the range of 10l~ ~ 1014 cm-3, the negative ions have sufficiently high densities and long lifetimes for air purification, disinfection and sterilization. Electrons, O(2,-), O(4,-) CO(4,-) and CO(3,-) are the dominant negative species when the initial electron density neo ≤ 1013 cm^(-3), and only electrons and CO3 are left when neo 〉 1015 cm^(-3). N(+,2), N+ and O(+,2) are dominant in the positive charges for any ionization degree. Other positive species, such as 0(+,4), N(+,3), NO(+,2), NO(+,2), Ar(+,2) and H3O+. H2O, are dominant only for a certain ionization degree and in a certain period.

  7. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  8. Carbon sources in suspended particles and surface sediments from the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids and compound-specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the organic matter (OM of this area. Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and 80%, with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60–75%, whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40% and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%. Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the sediments accounted for 30–40% of the total carbon in the inner shelf sediments, 17% in the outer shelf and Amundsen Gulf and up to 25% in the slope sediments. These estimates are low

  9. Evaluation of the air quality regarding total suspended particles and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) in the Hermosillo city, Sonora, Mexico, during a yearly period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the air quality of the city of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico was assessed considering total suspended particulates (tsp) and heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr) from June 2001 through May 2002 in three monitoring sites Centro (Mazon), Nor este (CESUES) and Noroeste (CBTIS). The filter-samples used for that purpose were provided by the Air Quality Evaluation and Improvement Program (PEMCA) of the municipality of Hermosillo. The sampling method was based on high volume sampling frequency set every 6 days with non-simultaneous sampling among the three sampling sites. Filters were dissolved for metal determination by acidic-extraction, and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results indicate that tsp concentrations at Centro and Noroeste sites were frequently higher than the maximum daily permissible level (260 μg/m3), while in the three sites the annual average was higher than the maximum annual permissible level (75 μg/m3) both established in the standard NOM-024-Ssa-1993 (Ssa 1994a). According to the Air Quality Standard Index (US EPA 1992a), used in Mexico by Air Quality Metropolitan Index (IMECA) the results indicate that the air quality in the city of Hermosillo regarding tsp was placed between no satisfactory and poor. In regard to heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Cr), concentrations detected were below the maximum permissible levels and/or criteria taking into account the standard NOM-026-Ssa-1993 (Ssa 1994b), the Who criterion (2000), the European Union criterion (Cec 2003), and the European Environmental Agency criteria (EEA 2004). Such findings would mean that airborne metals are of no concern; however, air quality is still classified as no satisfactory due to high particulate matter concentrations. Keeping air quality parameters monitoring is recommended in order to get extensive data for use in risk studies of air quality and health (morbidity/mortality), as well as topographic conditions, meteorological and urban

  10. Levoglucosan, a tracer for cellulose in biomass burning and atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, B. R. T.; Schauer, J. J.; Nolte, C. G.; Oros, D. R.; Elias, V. O.; Fraser, M. P.; Rogge, W. F.; Cass, G. R.

    The major organic components of smoke particles from biomass burning are monosaccharide derivatives from the breakdown of cellulose, accompanied by generally lesser amounts of straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and terpenoids from vegetation waxes, resins/gums, and other biopolymers. Levoglucosan and the related degradation products from cellulose can be utilized as specific and general indicator compounds for the presence of emissions from biomass burning in samples of atmospheric fine particulate matter. This enables the potential tracking of such emissions on a global basis. There are other compounds (e.g. amyrones, friedelin, dehydroabietic acid, and thermal derivatives from terpenoids and from lignin—syringaldehyde, vanillin, syringic acid, vanillic acid), which are additional key indicators in smoke from burning of biomass specific to the type of biomass fuel. The monosaccharide derivatives (e.g. levoglucosan) are proposed as specific indicators for cellulose in biomass burning emissions. Levoglucosan is emitted at such high concentrations that it can be detected at considerable distances from the original combustion source.

  11. "Sizing" Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Conversion of Gaseous Dimethyl Sulfide to Atmospheric Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Hara, Keiichiro; Osada, Kazuo; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2016-02-16

    The oxidation of biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions is a global source of cloud condensation nuclei. The amounts of the nucleating H2SO4(g) species produced in such process, however, remain uncertain. Hydrophobic DMS is mostly oxidized in the gas phase into H2SO4(g) + DMSO(g) (dimethyl sulfoxide), whereas water-soluble DMSO is oxidized into H2SO4(g) in the gas phase and into SO4(2-) + MeSO3(-) (methanesulfonate) on water surfaces. R = MeSO3(-)/(non-sea-salt SO4(2-)) ratios would therefore gauge both the strength of DMS sources and the extent of DMSO heterogeneous oxidation if Rhet = MeSO3(-)/SO4(2-) for DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) were known. Here, we report that Rhet = 2.7, a value obtained from online electrospray mass spectra of DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) reaction products that quantifies the MeSO3(-) produced in DMSO heterogeneous oxidation on aqueous aerosols for the first time. On this basis, the inverse R dependence on particle radius in size-segregated aerosol collected over Syowa station and Southern oceans is shown to be consistent with the competition between DMSO gas-phase oxidation and its mass accommodation followed by oxidation on aqueous droplets. Geographical R variations are thus associated with variable contributions of the heterogeneous pathway to DMSO atmospheric oxidation, which increase with the specific surface area of local aerosols. PMID:26761399

  12. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikanto, Joonas; Duplissy, Jonathan; Määttänen, Anni; Henschel, Henning; Donahue, Neil M.; Brus, David; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We derive a version of Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by quantum chemical results on sulfuric acid-water hydration to describe neutral and ion-induced particle formation in the binary sulfuric acid-water system. The theory is extended to treat the kinetic regime where the nucleation free energy barrier vanishes at high sulfuric acid concentrations or low temperatures. In the kinetic regime particle formation rates become proportional to sulfuric acid concentration to second power in the neutral system or first power in the ion-induced system. We derive simple general expressions for the prefactors in kinetic-type and activation-type particle formation calculations applicable also to more complex systems stabilized by other species. The theory predicts that the binary water-sulfuric acid system can produce strong new particle formation in the free troposphere both through barrier crossing and through kinetic pathways. At cold stratospheric and upper free tropospheric temperatures neutral formation dominates the binary particle formation rates. At midtropospheric temperatures the ion-induced pathway becomes the dominant mechanism. However, even the ion-induced binary mechanism does not produce significant particle formation in warm boundary layer conditions, as it requires temperatures below 0°C to take place at atmospheric concentrations. The theory successfully reproduces the characteristics of measured charged and neutral binary particle formation in CERN CLOUD3 and CLOUD5 experiments, as discussed in a companion paper.

  13. Modelling the light absorption properties of particulate matter forming organic particles suspended in seawater.Part 1. Model description, classification of organic particles, and example spectra of the light absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index of particulate matter for phytoplankton cells and phytoplankton-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on organic substances in the sea are applied to distinguish hypothetical chemical classes and physical types of suspended particulate organic matter (POM in seawater. Spectra of the light absorption coefficients of particulate matter apm(λ and the imaginary refractive index n'p(λ, are assessed for some of these classes and types of POM in seawater, that is, for live phytoplankton cells and phytoplankton-like particles. The spectral characteristics of these coefficients are established and the probable ranges of variability of their absolute magnitudes defined on the basis of the mass-specific coefficients of light absorption by the various organic substances forming the particles. Also presented are mathematical relationships linking the coefficients apm(λ and n'p(λ for the various chemical classes of POM with their physical parameters, such as the relative contents of organic matter, water, air or some other gas. This article is part of a bio-optical study undertaken by the authors, the objective of which is to implement remote sensing techniques in the investigation of Baltic ecosystems (Woźniak et al. 2004.

  14. The behaviour of cesium 137, chromium 51, cobalt 60, Manganese 54, sodium 22 and zinc 65 in simulated estuarine environments. Effects of suspended mineral particles and dissolved organic matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This laboratory investigation studied the retention of 6 radionuclides (cesium 137, chrome 51, cobalt 60, manganese 54, sodium 22 and zinc 65) on three types of clay particles (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite) and on sediments, suspended in media with salinities ranging between 0 and 34 per mill, with or without organic matters. Measurement of the radioactivity retained by the particles after 5 days' contact with the radionuclide made it possible to calculate the percentages retained and the distribution coefficients, and to follow their evolution versus salinity. Parallel experiments studied the behaviours of the 6 radionuclides as a function of experimental factors (wall effect, contact time..). An exhaustive bibliographic review gives the state-of-the-art of the knowledge. The following conclusions were derived: - the retention of all the radionuclides but chromium 51 decreased as soon as a low salinity appeared. Chromium (available as Cr3+) precipitated quickly and strongly during fixation whatever the surfaces or the conditions: - as for the role of the clay type, illite showed a strong affinity for cesium 137; manganese 54 had a particular behaviour with montmorillonite that enhanced its precipitation into MnO2; with cobalt, sodium and zinc, the percentages retained were always <= 20% and the type of clay had little effect; - dissolved organic matters had little effect on the behaviour of cesium or chromium; for sodium and zinc, strong complexation occured with the organic matter which was retained on the particles; cobalt and manganese gave intermediate results; - attempts to modeling emphasized the specific feature of the various reactions (adsorption by exchange with some compensating cations, absorption in the crystal lattice, surface retention of particular compounds)

  15. Toxic assessment of urban atmospheric particle-bound PAHs: Relevance of composition and particle size in Barcelona (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebrafish embryotoxicity and dioxin-like activity levels were tested for particulate air samples from an urban background site in Barcelona (Spain). Samples were collected during 14 months, and maximal values for both biological activities corresponded to samples collected during late autumn months, correlating with elevated PAH levels. Vehicle and combustion emissions appeared as the potentially most toxic sources, whereas total PM mass and mineral content appeared to be poor predictors of the biological activity of the samples. Samples simultaneously collected at different particle size cut-offs (10, 2.5, and 1 μm) did not differ significantly in dioxin-like PAH levels and biological activity, indicating that the sub-micron particle fraction (PM1) concentrated essentially all observed toxicity. Our results support the need for a tighter control on sub-micron particle emissions and show that total PM mass and, particularly, PM10, may not fully characterize the toxic potential of air samples. Highlights: • Dioxin-like activity was found in all air particle samples collected in Barcelona. • 50% of the samples showed different levels of fish embryotoxicity. • Toxic effects associated to PAHs and linked to vehicle and combustion emissions. • The toxicity was not correlated to PM mass or mineral content. • The sub-micron particle fraction PM1 concentrated essentially all observed toxicity. -- In vivo toxic effects associated to sub-micron urban air particles from combustion and vehicle emissions

  16. Particle characterization at the Cape Verde atmospheric observatory during the 2007 RHaMBLe intensive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Müller

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical characterization of filter high volume (HV and Berner impactor (BI samples PM during RHaMBLe 2007 shows that the Cape Verde aerosol particles are mainly composed of sea salt, mineral dust and associated water. The influence from the African continent on the aerosol constitution was generally small but air masses which came from south-western Europe crossing the Canary Islands transported dust to the sampling site together with other loadings. The mean mass concentration was determined for PM10 as 17 μg/m3 from the impactor samples and as 24.2 μg/m3 from HV filter samples. Non sea salt (nss components of PM were found in the submicron fractions including nitrate in the coarse mode fraction. Bromide was found in all samples with much depleted concentrations in the range 1–8 ng/m3 compared to fresh sea salt aerosol indicating intense atmospheric halogen chemistry. A chloride deficit of 31% and 38% for the coarse mode particles (3.5–10 μm; 1.2–3.5 μm, of 67% (0.42–1.2 μm and 83% (0.14–0.42 μm for the submicron fractions was determined.

    During 14 May with high mineral dust loads also the maximum of OC (1.71 μg/m3 and EC (1.25 μg/m3 was measured. The minimum of TC (0.25 μg/m3 was detected during the period 25 to 27 May when pure marine air masses arrived. The concentrations of carbonaceous material decrease with increasing particles size from 60% for the ultra fine particles to 2.5% in coarse mode PM.

    Total iron (dust vs. non-dust: 0.53 vs. 0.06 μg m−3, calcium (0.22 vs. 0.03 μg m−3 and potassium (0.33 vs. 0.02 μg m−3 were found as good indicators for dust periods because of their heavily increased concentration in the 1.2 to 3.5 μm fraction as compared to their concentration during the non-dust periods. For the organic constituents, oxalate (78–151 ng/m3 and

  17. Particle characterization at the Cape Verde atmospheric observatory during the 2007 RHaMBLe intensive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Müller

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical characterization of filter high volume (HV and Berner impactor (BI samples PM during RHaMBLe (Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer 2007 shows that the Cape Verde aerosol particles are mainly composed of sea salt, mineral dust and associated water. Minor components are nss-salts, OC and EC. The influence from the African continent on the aerosol constitution was generally small but air masses which came from south-western Europe crossing the Canary Islands transported dust to the sampling site together with other loadings. The mean mass concentration was determined for PM10 to 17 μg/m3 from impactor samples and to 24.2 μg/m3 from HV filter samples. Non sea salt (nss components of PM were found in the submicron fractions and nitrate in the coarse mode fraction. Bromide was found in all samples with much depleted concentrations in the range 1–8 ng/m3 compared to fresh sea salt aerosol indicating intense atmospheric halogen chemistry. Loss of bromide by ozone reaction during long sampling time is supposed and resulted totally in 82±12% in coarse mode impactor samples and in filter samples in 88±6% bromide deficits. A chloride deficit was determined to 8% and 1% for the coarse mode particles (3.5–10 μm; 1.2–3.5 μm and to 21% for filter samples.

    During 14 May with high mineral dust loads also the maximum of OC (1.71μg/m3 and EC (1.25 μg/m3 was measured. The minimum of TC (0.25 μg/m3 was detected during the period 25 to 27 May when pure marine air masses arrived. The concentrations of carbonaceous material decrease with increasing particle size from 60% for the ultra fine particles to 2.5% in coarse mode PM.

    Total iron (dust vs. non-dust: 0.53 vs. 0.06 μg m3, calcium (0.22 vs. 0.03 μg m3 and potassium (0.33 vs. 0.02 μg m3 were found as good indicators for dust periods because of their

  18. Illicit utilization of arsenic compounds in pyrotechnics? An analysis of the suspended particle emission during Vienna’s New Year fireworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of an investigation of an electrostatic precipitation technique as a sampling method for airborne dust particles, elevated concentrations of As were found in the data collected during New Years Eve celebrations in Vienna. The original study confirmed the applicability of the new sampling device as a useful sampling method, showing elevated values for the elements Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Cu, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Sb, Te and Ba, all associated with the use of pyrotechnics. The measured values for As could not be explained as a impurity in some other substances used. Thus, several unburned pyrotechnic products were investigated to find the source of As in the dust collected. The results showed only one product with higher than expected As contents (1.4 μg g-1), leading to the assumption of intentional - but illicit - use of arsenic compounds in pyrotechnics as a colouring agent for the production of blue light. (author)

  19. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of Ni-Al particle size, velocity, and temperature in atmospheric thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for simultaneously measuring particle size, velocity, and temperature has been applied to the in-flight characterization of a Ni--Al particles sprayed in a 28 kW plasma torch. The radial distribution of particle size, velocity, temperature and particle concentration were obtained at stand off distances between 63.5 and 88.9 mm. These measurements and their relationship to the characteristics of the resulting coating are discussed. Injection geometry dependent particle sizing and an apparant fracturing of the original particles into smaller particles was observed. A significant fraction of the largest particles observed did not appear to the molten. Particle behavior was found to be relatively insensitive to gas mixture and flow rate. 1 ref., 8 figs

  1. Seasonal Variations of Number Size Distributions and Mass Concentrations of Atmospheric Particles in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jianhua; Benjamin GUINOT; YU Tong; WANG Xin; LIU Wenqing

    2005-01-01

    Particle number and mass concentrations were measured in Beijing during the winter and summer periods in 2003, together with some other parameters including black carbon (BC) and meteorological conditions. Particle mass concentrations exhibited low seasonality, and the ratio of PM2.5/PM10 in winter was higher than that in summer. Particle number size distribution (PSD) was characterized by four modes and exhibited low seasonality. BC was well correlated with the number and mass concentrations of accumulation and coarse particles, indicating these size particles are related to anthropogenic activities.Particle mass and number concentrations (except ultra-fine and nucleation particles) followed well the trends of BC concentration for the majority of the day, indicating that most particles were associated with primary emissions. The diurnal number distributions of accumulation and coarse mode particles were characterized by two peaks.

  2. Correlations between urban atmospheric light extinction coefficients and fine particle mass concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trier, A.; Cabrini, N.; Ferrer, J. [Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Santiago 2 (Chile); Olaeta, I. [SESMA, Santiago 1 (Chile)

    1997-07-01

    Total horizontal atmospheric light extinction coefficients as well as particle mass concentrations have been measured in downtown areas of Santiago de Chile, a heavily polluted city. Measurement campaigns were carried out in 1994 in 1995. Extinction measurements were made by a telephotometric technique in four wavelength bands; oscillating mass balance type instruments were used to measure PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations. The latter type instrument had not been available heretofore. The extensive continuous PM2.5 measurements are the first for this city. Strong and highly significant statistical correlations were found between extinction coefficients and mass concentrations, especially with the fine respirable or PM2.5 mass concentrations. Angstrom exponents and, in one case, mass extinction coefficients have been estimated. [Spanish] Se ha medido coeficientes atmosfericos totales horizontales de extincion de luz asi como concentraciones de masa de particulas atmosfericas en zonas centricas de Santiago de Chile, una ciudad altamente contaminada. Las campanas de medicion se han hecho en 1994 y en 1995. Las mediciones de extincion se han hecho por un metodo telefotometrico en cuatro bandas espectrales; las concentraciones de masa PM2.5 y PM10 se han medido con instrumentos del tipo de balanzas de masa oscilantes. Tales instrumentos no han estado disponibles durante trabajos anteriores. Las extensas mediciones continuas de concentraciones de masa PM2.5 son las primeras para Santiago de Chile. Se han encontrado fuertes correlaciones estadisticas, altamente significativas, entre coeficientes de extincion y concentraciones de masa, especialmente las concentraciones de particulas finas respirables PM2.5. Se han estimado tambien exponentes de Angstrom y, en un caso, coeficientes masicos de extincion.

  3. Long-term trends in suspended chlorophyll a and vertical particle flux with respect to changing physical conditions in eastern Fram Strait, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöthig, Eva-Maria; Bauerfeind, Eduard; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Kraft, Angelina; Bracher, Astrid; Cherkasheva, Alexandra; Fahl, Kirsten; Hardge, Kristin; Kaleschke, Lars; Lalande, Catherine; Metfies, Katja; Peeken, Ilka; Klages, Michael; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Fram Strait is the main gateway for water, heat, sea ice and plankton exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic. The abundance and composition of phyto- and zooplankton communities is governed to a large extent by key physical factors such as water temperature, salinity, currents, stratification of the water column and the presence or absence of sea ice. With our study we aim at tracing effects of environmental changes in pelagic system structure and impacts on the fate of organic matter produced in the upper water column in a region that is anticipated to react rapidly to climate change. Chlorophyll a, an indicator of biomass standing stock of phytoplankton, has been measured in the upper 100 m of the water column since 1991 during several summer cruises (with RV 'Polarstern') across Fram Strait. Chlorophyll a measurements are used to validate productivity estimates by remote sensing from space. The quantity and composition of export fluxes of organic matter including biomarker have been measured since 2000 by annually moored sediment traps deployed at 200-300m at the AWI long-term observatory HAUSGARTEN in eastern Fram Strait (79°/4°E). Along with sinking particles, zooplankton (so-called 'swimmers') was also caught in the traps. Analyses of the material collected by the sediment traps allowed us to track seasonal and inter-annual changes in the surface waters at HAUSGARTEN. We present temporal trends in the chlorophyll a distribution (1991-2012), in swimmer composition in the traps (2000-2009), and in the export of biomarker (2000-2008), particulate organic carbon, particulate biogenic silica, calcium carbonate, and the protist composition (2000-2012), in relation to the changing sea ice cover and water temperature. Whereas chlorophyll a (integrated values 0-100m) showed only a slight increase, the swimmer composition and the composition of the annual particle flux changed after a warm water event occurring from 2005-2007. The warm anomaly

  4. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  5. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: II. Concentrations and surface exchange fluxes of atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Size-dependent particle number fluxes measured by eddy-covariance (EC and continuous fluxes of ammonium (NH4+ measured with the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM are reported for a Dutch heathland. Daytime deposition velocities (Vd by EC with peak values of 5 to 10 mm s-1 increased with particle diameter (dp over the range 0.1–0.5 µm, and are faster than predicted by current models. With a mean Vd of 2.0 mm s-1 (daytime: 2.7; night-time 0.8 mm s-1 NH4+ fluxes by AGM are overall in agreement with former measurements and NH4+-N dry deposition amounts to 20% of the dry input of NH3-N over the measurement period. These surface exchange fluxes are analyzed together with simultaneous gas-phase flux measurements for indications of gas-particle interactions. On warm afternoons the apparent fluxes of acids and aerosol above the heathland showed several coinciding anomalies, all of which are consistent with NH4+ evaporation during deposition: (i canopy resistances for HNO3 and HCl of up to 100 s m-1, (ii simultaneous particle emission of small particles (DpDp>0.18 µm, (iii NH4+ deposition faster than derived from size-distributions and size-segregated EC particle fluxes. These observations coincide with the observations of (i surface concentration products of NH3 and HNO3 well below the thermodynamic equilibrium value and (ii Damköhler numbers that indicate chemical conversion to be sufficiently fast to modify exchange fluxes. The measurements imply a removal rate of volatile NH4+ of 3−30×10-6 s-1 averaged over the 1 km boundary-layer, while NH3 deposition is underestimated by typically 20 ng m-2 s-1 (28% and flux reversal may occur.

  6. The role of particles on initial atmospheric corrosion of copper and zinc : lateral distribution, secondary spreading and CO2-/SO2-influence

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhuo Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The role of sodium chloride (NaCl) particles and ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) particles on the initial atmospheric corrosion of copper and zinc was investigated under in situ and ex situ conditions using microgravimetry, FTIR spectroscopy, ion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray microanalysis and the scanning Kelvin probe. For the first time, in situ infrared spectra were collected on a micron level during particle induced atmospheric corrosion using a recently developed e...

  7. Hydrodynamics of Inclusions in Freely Suspended Liquid Crystal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhiyuan

    Hydrodynamic interaction of pairs of circular inclusions in two-dimensional (2D), fluid smectic membranes suspended in air has been studied systematically. By analyzing their Brownian motion, it is found that the radial mutual mobilities of identical inclusions are independent of their size but that the angular coupling becomes strongly size-dependent when their radius exceeds a characteristic hydrodynamic length. These observations are described well for arbitrary inclusion separations by a model that generalizes the Levine/MacKintosh theory of point-force response functions and uses a boundary-element approach to calculate the mobility matrix for inclusions of finite extent. Beyond that, 2D flow fields generated by a rigid, oscillating post inserted in the film have been measured by analyzing the motion of tracer particles and provide a detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior in the film/gas system. The Brownian diffusion of micron-scale inclusions in freely suspended smectic A liquid crystal films a few nanometers thick and several millimeters in diameter depends strongly on the air surrounding the film. Near atmospheric pressure, the three-dimensionally coupled film/gas system is well described by Hughes/Pailthorpe/White hydrodynamic theory but at lower pressure, the diffusion coefficient increases substantially, tending in high vacuum toward the two-dimensional limit where it is determined by film size. In the absence of air, the films are found to be a nearly ideal physical realization of a two-dimensional, incompressible Newtonian fluid.

  8. Evaluation of the accuracy of analysis tools for atmospheric new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Several mathematical tools have been developed in recent years to analyze new particle formation rates and to estimate nucleation rates and mechanisms at sub-3nm sizes from atmospheric aerosol data. Here we evaluate these analysis tools using 1239 numerical nucleation events for which the nucleation mechanism and formation rates were known exactly. The accuracy of the estimates of particle formation rate at 3 nm (J3 showed significant sensitivity to the details of the analysis, i.e. form of equations used and assumptions made about the initial size of nucleating clusters, with the fraction of events within a factor-of-two accuracy ranging from 43–97%. In general, the estimates of the actual nucleation rate at 1.5 nm (J1.5 were less accurate, and even the most accurate analysis set-up estimated only 59% of the events within a factor of two of the simulated mean nucleation rate. The J1.5 estimates were deteriorated mainly by the size dependence of the cluster growth rate below 3 nm, which the analysis tools do not take into account, but also by possible erroneous assumptions about the initial cluster size. The poor estimates of J1.5 can lead to large uncertainties in the nucleation prefactors (i.e. constant P in nucleation equation J1.5 = P × [H2SO4]k. Large uncertainties were found also in the procedures that are used to determine the nucleation mechanism. When applied to individual events, the analysis tools clearly overestimated the number of H2SO4 molecules in a critical cluster for most events, and thus associated them with a wrong nucleation mechanism. However, in some conditions the number of H2SO4 molecules in a critical cluster was underestimated. This indicates that analysis of field data that implies a maximum of 2 H2SO4 molecules in

  9. Seasonal Control of Surface-Water Dissolved Iron Concentrations by Suspended Particle Concentrations on the Northern Gulf of Alaska Continental Shelf and Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusius, J.; Schroth, A. W.; Campbell, R.; Cullen, J. T.; Dillman, D.; Resing, J.

    2012-12-01

    The continental shelf region of the northern Gulf of Alaska (GoA) supports a productive ecosystem including an important commercial fishery. Downwelling winds during most of the year imply that some mechanism other than upwelling must be supplying the essential nutrients iron and nitrate. Although it is well known that iron limits productivity offshore in the GoA, we have a poor understanding of the controls on Fe supply. Data from cruises from 2010 provide some new insight into the mechanisms of Fe supply. Cruises were carried out along a transect extending from the mouth of the Copper River to ~40 km beyond the shelf break three times per year including early April, early May, and late July. High-resolution surface-water sampling was carried out, as well as bottle casts at 5 stations. High, fairly uniform concentrations of "total dissolvable iron" (TDFe; unfiltered sample acidified to pH=1.7) as well as "dissolved" Fe (dFe) were observed spanning the shelf in April, suggesting sediment resuspension is an important source of dFe to surface waters at that time. By contrast, high dFe and TDFe concentrations in late July coincide with low-salinity surface water, which in this location indicates a glacial meltwater source. Throughout spring and summer high particle concentrations across much of the shelf appear to "buffer" dFe concentrations to ~3 nmol/kg, which are close to those observed by Lippiatt et al (2010) in the region. This is consistent with dFe concentrations being determined by the organic ligand concentrations that, in turn, are fairly constant. In late July, surface water dFe concentrations are ~0.5 nmol/kg on the outer shelf and up to ~50 km further offshore. These dFe concentrations on the outer shelf are much lower in July than earlier in the year, owing to Fe removal by phytoplankton uptake and by scavenging, as well as by the lack of particulate Fe sources to surface waters in July. However, the high surface-water dFe observed ~50 km beyond the

  10. Ice nucleation by surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust and mineral dust/sulfate particles at cirrus temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Archuleta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the potential role of some types of mineral dust and mineral dust with sulfuric acid coatings as heterogeneous ice nuclei at cirrus temperatures. Commercially-available nanoscale powder samples of aluminum oxide, alumina-silicate and iron oxide were used as surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust particles, with and without multilayer coverage of sulfuric acid. A sample of Asian dust aerosol particles was also studied. Measurements of ice nucleation were made using a continuous-flow ice-thermal diffusion chamber (CFDC operated to expose size-selected aerosol particles to temperatures between -45 and -60°C and a range of relative humidity above ice-saturated conditions. Pure metal oxide particles supported heterogeneous ice nucleation at lower relative humidities than those required to homogeneously freeze sulfuric acid solution particles at sizes larger than about 50 nm. The ice nucleation behavior of the same metal oxides coated with sulfuric acid indicate heterogeneous freezing at lower relative humidities than those calculated for homogeneous freezing of the diluted particle coatings. The effect of soluble coatings on the ice activation relative humidity varied with the respective uncoated core particle types, but for all types the heterogeneous freezing rates increased with particle size for the same thermodynamic conditions. For a selected size of 200 nm, the natural mineral dust particles were the most effective ice nuclei tested, supporting heterogeneous ice formation at an ice relative humidity of approximately 135%, irrespective of temperature. Modified homogeneous freezing parameterizations and theoretical formulations are shown to have application to the description of heterogeneous freezing of mineral dust-like particles with soluble coatings.

  11. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2008-01-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transform...

  12. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B{&}W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transfo...

  13. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aer...

  14. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, Andreas; Hasselbach, Jan; Lauer, Peter; Baumann, Robert; Franke, Klaus; Gurk, Christian; Schlager, Hans; Weingartner, Ernest

    2008-01-01

    International audience Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airb...

  15. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B{&}W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by ai...

  16. A preliminary analysis of the surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles in a typical urban area of Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzheng; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongyan; Ni, Runxiang; Li, Jinjuan; Deng, Liqun; Lu, Defeng; Cheng, Xueli; Duan, Pengli; Li, Wenjun

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle samples were collected using an Ambient Eight Stage (Non-Viable) Cascade Impactor Sampler in a typical urban area of Beijing from 27th Sep. to 5th Oct., 2009. The surface chemistry of these aerosol particles was analyzed using Static Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (Static TOF-SIMS). The factors influencing surface compositions were evaluated in conjunction with the air pollution levels, meteorological factors, and air mass transport for the sampling period. The results show that a variety of organic ion groups and inorganic ions/ion groups were accumulated on the surfaces of aerosol particles in urban areas of Beijing; and hydrophobic organic compounds with short- or middle-chain alkyl as well as hydrophilic secondary inorganic compounds were observed. All these compounds have the potential to affect the atmospheric behavior of urban aerosol particles. PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7 had similar elements on their surfaces, but some molecules and ionic groups demonstrated differences in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry spectra. This suggests that the quantities of elements varied between PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7. In particular, more intense research efforts into fluoride pollution are required, because the fluorides on aerosol surfaces have the potential to harm human health. The levels of air pollution had the most significant influence on the surface compositions of aerosol particles in our study. Hence, heavier air pollution was associated with more complex surface compositions on aerosol particles. In addition, wind, rainfall, and air masses from the south also greatly influenced the surface compositions of these urban aerosol particles. PMID:27593274

  17. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; Lauer, P.; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; Schlager, H.; Weingartner, E.

    2008-05-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel)-1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel)-1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC). Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dpemissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  18. 腈纶皂化制备电流变液悬浮粒子的研究%Studies on Saponification of Acrylonitrile Terpolymer for Suspending Particles of Electrorheological Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴孟强; 陈艾

    2001-01-01

    In order to prepare suspending particles for electrorheological fluids, hetergeneous hydrolysis of acrylonitrile terpolymer is conducted in presence of saponifying agent(sodium hydroxide) in this paper. The effects of the saponification conditions such as the amount of added sodium hydroxide, time duration and temperature on the degree of saponification are studied in detail. Meanwhile, the conversion of nitrile groups is discussed with the result that the saponification of nitrile groups of the terpolymer initially yields amide groups, then slows down to carboxylic groups. The research sets a way for the preparation of dispersing particles of water-free electrorheological fluids tentatively used for controlling light transmittance.%为了制备无水电流变液用悬浮粒子,研究了腈纶在碱性条件下的多相水解。详细考察了皂化试剂氢氧化钾的用量,皂化时间和温度等皂化条件对皂化程度的影响; 讨论了氰基转化过程。研究结果表明,在皂化初期,腈纶分子链上的氰基转化为酰胺基,然后缓慢转化为羧基。给出了一条制备无水电流变液用悬浮粒子的方法,并初步考察了该类电流变液的控光特性。

  19. The adsorption of fungal ice-nucleating proteins on mineral dusts: a terrestrial reservoir of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel; Murray, Benjamin J.; Ross, James F.; Webb, Michael E.

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of ice-nucleating particles (INPs) in our atmosphere has a profound impact on the properties and lifetime of supercooled clouds. To date, the identities, sources and abundances of particles capable of nucleating ice at relatively low supercoolings (T > -15 °C) remain enigmatic. While biomolecules such as proteins and carbohydrates have been implicated as important high-temperature INPs, the lack of knowledge on the environmental fates of these species makes it difficult to assess their potential atmospheric impacts. Here we show that such nanoscale ice-nucleating proteins from a common soil-borne fungus (Fusarium avenaceum) preferentially bind to and confer their ice-nucleating properties to kaolinite. The ice-nucleating activity of the proteinaceous INPs is unaffected by adsorption to the clay, and once bound the proteins do not readily desorb, retaining much of the activity even after multiple washings with pure water. The atmospheric implications of the finding that biological residues can confer their ice-nucleating ability to dust particles are discussed.

  20. Real-Time, Online Automated System for Measurement of Water-Soluble Reactive Phosphate Ions in Atmospheric Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violaki, Kalliopi; Fang, Ting; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Weber, Rodney; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-07-19

    We present a novel automated system for real-time measurements of water-soluble reactive phosphate (SRP) ions in atmospheric particles. Detection of SRP is based on molybdenum blue chemistry with Sn(II) chloride dihydrate reduction. The instrumentation consists of one particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) coupled with a 250 cm path length liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) and miniature fiber optic spectrometer, with detection wavelength set at 690 nm. The detection limit was 0.4 nM P, equivalent to 0.03 nmol P m(-3) in atmospheric particles. Comparison of SRP in collocate PM2.5 aerosol filter sampling with the PILS-LWCC on line system were in good agreement (n = 49, slope = 0.84, R(2) = 0.78). This novel technique offers at least an order of magnitude enhancement in sensitivity over existing approaches allowing for SRP measurements of unprecedented frequency (8 min), which will lead to greater understanding of the sources and impacts of SRP in atmospheric chemistry. PMID:27301315

  1. Brominated flame retardants in the urban atmosphere of Northeast China: Concentrations, temperature dependence and gas-particle partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    57 pairs of air samples (gas and particle phases) were collected using a high volume air sampler in a typical city of Northeast China. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including 13 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, including BDEs 17, 28, 47, 49, 66, 85, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, 183, and 209) and 9 alternative BFRs (p-TBX, PBBZ, PBT, PBEB, DPTE, HBBZ, γ-HBCD, BTBPE, and DBDPE) were analyzed. The annual average total concentrations of the 13 PBDEs and the 9 alternative BFRs were 69 pg/m3 and 180 pg/m3, respectively. BDE 209 and γ-HBCD were the dominant congeners, according to the one-year study. The partial pressure of BFRs in the gas phase was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature, except for BDE 85, γ-HBCD and DBDPE, indicating the important influence of ambient temperature on the behavior of BFRs in the atmosphere. It was found that the gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logKp) for most low molecular weight BFRs were highly temperature dependent as well. Gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logKp) also correlated with the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (logPLo). Our results indicated that absorption into organic matter is the main control mechanism for the gas–particle partitioning of atmospheric PBDEs. - Highlights: • Both PBDEs and alternative BFRs were analyzed in the atmosphere of Northeast China. • Partial pressure of BFRs was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature. • A strong temperature dependence of gas-particle partitioning was found. • Absorption into organic matter was the control mechanism for G-P partitioning

  2. Atmospheric Aerosols in Suburb of Prague: The Dynamics of Particle Size Distributions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řimnáčová, Daniela; Ždímal, Vladimír; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Smolík, Jiří; Řimnáč, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 3 (2011), s. 539-552. ISSN 0169-8095 Grant ostatní: MF NF(CZ) CZ0049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * atmospheric nucleation * part size distribution Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.911, year: 2011

  3. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (ΔN). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the

  4. Control of TTIP Solution for Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet and Deposition of TiO2 Micro-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masahiro; Parajulee, Shankar; Ikezawa, Shunjiro

    TiO2 deposition-methods are versatile and are expected to be more simple and easy, however, in recent years the industrial photocatalytic products have been developed enormously. In this work, photocatalytic TiO2 micro-particles are deposited using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet device. Here, deposition-method is carried out in two steps, at first, the hydrolysis reaction time has been able to control which will resolve the TTIP coagulating trouble during the transportation, by acidifying the solution with AA (Acetic acid) and DEA (Diethanolamine). An experiment was performed to measure the hydrolysis reaction time of TTIP (Titanium tetraisopropoxide) solution by He-Ne laser. Secondly, the deposition of TiO2 micro-particles was carried out using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet with the controlled TTIP solution in reaction time. Based on SEM and water contact angle measurement, it is found that the smaller the mixing ratios of TTIP and DEA the smaller the TiO2 particle size. Also, the smaller the TiO2 particles the smaller the contact angle under the UV irradiation which suffices the photocatalytic behavior.

  5. Direct observation of aerosol particles in aged agricultural biomass burning plumes impacting urban atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Li

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Emissions from agricultural biomass burning (ABB in northern China have a significant impact on the regional and the global climate. According to the Giovanni's Aerosol optical depth (AOD map, the monthly average AOD at 550 nm in northern China in 2007 shows a maximum value of 0.7 in June, suggesting that episodes of severe aerosol pollution occurred in this region. Aerosol particles were collected in urban Beijing during regional brown hazes from 12 to 30 June, 2007. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry characterized the morphology, composition, and mixing state of aerosol particles. Potassium salts (K2SO4 and KNO3, ammonium sulfate, soot, and organic particles predominated in fine particles (diameter <1 μm collected from 12 to 20 June, 2007. In contrast, from 21 to 30 June, 2007, ammonium sulfate, soot, and organic particles were dominant. Potassium-dominant particles as a tracer of biomass burning, together with wildfire maps, show that intensive regional ABB in northern China from 10 to 20 June, 2007 contributed significantly to the regional haze. After long-range transport, ABB particles exhibited marked changes in their morphology, elemental composition, and mixing state. Heterogeneous reactions completely converted KCl particles from ABB into K2SO4 and KNO3. Soot particles were generally mixed with potassium salts, ammonium salts, and organic particles. In addition, the abundant aged organic particles and soluble salts emitted by ABB become more hygroscopic and increase their size during long-range transport, becoming in effect additional cloud condensation nuclei. The high AOD (average value at 2.2 during 12 to 20 June, 2007, in Beijing is partly explained by the hygroscopic growth of aged fine aerosol particles and by the strong absorption of internally mixed soot particles, both coming from regional ABB emissions.

  6. Classification of Multiple Types of Organic Carbon Composition in Atmospheric Particles by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcoyne, Arthur L; Takahama, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Russell, L.M.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.

    2007-05-16

    A scanning transmission X-ray microscope at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to measure organic functional group abundance and morphology of atmospheric aerosols. We present a summary of spectra, sizes, and shapes observed in 595 particles that were collected and analyzed between 2000 and 2006. These particles ranged between 0.1 and 12 mm and represent aerosols found in a large range of geographical areas, altitudes, and times. They include samples from seven different field campaigns: PELTI, ACE-ASIA, DYCOMS II, Princeton, MILAGRO (urban), MILAGRO (C-130), and INTEX-B. At least 14 different classes of organic particles show different types of spectroscopic signatures. Different particle types are found within the same region while the same particle types are also found in different geographical domains. Particles chemically resembling black carbon, humic-like aerosols, pine ultisol, and secondary or processed aerosol have been identified from functional group abundance and comparison of spectra with those published in the literature.

  7. Suspended graphene variable capacitor

    OpenAIRE

    AbdelGhany, M.; Mahvash, F.; Mukhopadhyay, M.; Favron, A.; Martel, R; Siaj, M.; Szkopek, T.

    2016-01-01

    The tuning of electrical circuit resonance with a variable capacitor, or varactor, finds wide application with the most important being wireless telecommunication. We demonstrate an electromechanical graphene varactor, a variable capacitor wherein the capacitance is tuned by voltage controlled deflection of a dense array of suspended graphene membranes. The low flexural rigidity of graphene monolayers is exploited to achieve low actuation voltage in an ultra-thin structure. Large arrays compr...

  8. Nucleation and growth of sub-3 nm particles in the polluted urban atmosphere of a megacity in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan; Zhou, Luyu; Dai, Liang; Shen, Wenchao; Dai, Wei; Zheng, Jun; Ma, Yan; Chen, Mindong

    2016-03-01

    Particle size distribution down to 1.4 nm was measured in the urban atmosphere of Nanjing, China, in spring, summer, and winter during 2014-2015. Sub-3 nm particle event, which is equivalent to nucleation event, occurred on 42 out of total 90 observation days, but new particles could grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)-active sizes on only 9 days. In summer, infrequent nucleation was limited by both unfavorable meteorological conditions (high temperature and relative humidity - RH) and reduced anthropogenic precursor availability due to strict emission control measures during the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing. The limiting factors for nucleation in winter and spring were meteorological conditions (radiation, temperature, and RH) and condensation sink, but for the further growth of sub-3 nm particles to CCN-active sizes, anthropogenic precursors again became limiting factors. Nucleation events were strong in the polluted urban atmosphere. Initial J1.4 at the onset and peak J1.4 at the noontime could be up to 2.1 × 102 and 2.5 × 103 cm-3 s-1, respectively, during the eight nucleation events selected from different seasons. Time-dependent J1.4 usually showed good linear correlations with a sulfuric acid proxy for every single event (R2 = 0.56-0.86, excluding a day with significant nocturnal nucleation), but the correlation among all eight events deteriorated (R2 = 0.17) due to temperature or season change. We observed that new particle growth rate (GR) did not increase monotonically with particle size, but had a local maximum up to 25 nm h-1 between 1 and 3 nm. The existence of local maxima GR in sub-3 nm size range, though sensitive to measurement uncertainties, gives new insight into cluster dynamics in polluted environments. In this study such growth rate behavior was interpreted as the solvation effect of organic activating vapor in newly formed inorganic nuclei.

  9. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in centr...

  10. Composition and properties of atmospheric particles in the eastern Atlantic and impacts on gas phase uptake rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFiggans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol composition continues to represent a large source of uncertainty in the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry. In addition to their physical size and chemical composition, hygroscopicity plays a significant role, increasing the particles' surface areas and scattering potential. Simultaneous aerosol measurements were performed on board the RRS Discovery and at the Cape Verde atmospheric observatory during the Aerosol Composition and Modelling in the Marine Environment (ACMME and Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHAMBLE experiments. These included online measurements of number and dry size and bulk collection for offline analysis of aqueous ions. In addition, the measurements on board the Discovery included online measurements of composition using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, optical absorption using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer, ambient humidity size distribution measurements using a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS and optical particle counter (OPC and hygroscopicity measurements with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA.

    Good agreement between platforms in terms of the sea salt (ss and non sea salt (nss modes was found during the period when the Discovery was in close proximity to Cape Verde and showed a composition consistent with remote marine air. As the Discovery approached the African coast, the aerosol showed signs of continental influence such as an increase in particle number, optical absorption, enhancement of the nss mode and dust particles. The Cape Verde site was free of this influence during this period. Chloride and bromide showed concentrations with significant deviations from seawater relative to sodium, indicating that atmospheric halogen processing (and/or acid displacement for chloride had taken place. The time dependent ambient size distribution was synthesised using humidified DMPS and OPC data, corrected to ambient

  11. Modelling Contribution of Biogenic VOCs to New Particle Formation in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Boy, M.; Mogensen, D.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillman, R.; Kulmala, M. T.; Dal Maso, M.

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are substantially emitted from vegetation to atmosphere. The oxidation of BVOCs by OH, O3, and NO3 in air generating less volatile compounds may lead to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosol, and thus presents a link to the vegetation, aerosol, and climate interaction system (Kulmala et al, 2004). Studies including field observations, laboratory experiments and modelling have improved our understanding on the connection between BVOCs and new particle formation mechanism in some extent (see e.g. Tunved et al., 2006; Mentel et al., 2009). Nevertheless, the exact formation process still remains uncertain, especially from the perspective of BVOC contributions. The purpose of this work is using the MALTE aerosol dynamics and air chemistry box model to investigate aerosol formation from reactions of direct tree emitted VOCs in the presence of ozone, UV light and artificial solar light in an atmospheric simulation chamber. This model employs up to date air chemical reactions, especially the VOC chemistry, which may potentially allow us to estimate the contribution of BVOCs to secondary aerosol formation, and further to quantify the influence of terpenes to the formation rate of new particles. Experiments were conducted in the plant chamber facility at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany (Jülich Plant Aerosol Atmosphere Chamber, JPAC). The detail regarding to the chamber facility has been written elsewhere (Mentel et al., 2009). During the experiments, sulphuric acid was measured by CIMS. VOC mixing ratios were measured by two GC-MS systems and PTR-MS. An Airmodus Particle size magnifier coupled with a TSI CPC and a PH-CPC were used to count the total particle number concentrations with a detection limit close to the expected size of formation of fresh nanoCN. A SMPS measured the particle size distribution. Several other parameters including ozone, CO2, NO, Temperature, RH, and flow rates were also measured. MALTE is a modular model to predict

  12. Composition and properties of atmospheric particles in the eastern Atlantic and impacts on gas phase uptake rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Allan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol composition continues to represent a large source of uncertainty in the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry. In addition to their physical size and chemical composition, hygroscopicity plays a significant role, increasing the particles' surface areas and scattering potential. Simultaneous aerosol measurements were performed on board the RRS Discovery and at the Cape Verde atmospheric observatory during the Aerosol Composition and Modelling in the Marine Environment (ACMME and Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHAMBLE experiments. These included online measurements of number and dry size and bulk collection for offline analysis of aqueous ions. In addition, the measurements on board the Discovery included online measurements of composition using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, optical absorption using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer, ambient humidity size distribution measurements using a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS and optical particle counter (OPC and hygroscopicity measurements with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA.

    Good agreement between platforms in terms of the sea salt (ss and non sea salt (nss modes was found during the period when the Discovery was in close proximity to Cape Verde and showed a composition consistent with remote marine air. As the Discovery approached the African coast, the aerosol showed signs of continental influence such as an increase in particle number, optical absorption, enhancement of the nss mode and dust particles. The Cape Verde site was free of this influence during this period. Chloride and bromide showed concentrations with significant deviations from seawater relative to sodium, indicating that atmospheric halogen processing (and/or acid displacement for chloride had taken place. The time dependent ambient size distribution was synthesised using humidified DMPS and OPC data, corrected to ambient

  13. Estimating bacteria emissions from inversion of atmospheric transport: sensitivity to modelled particle characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Burrows; Rayner, P. J.; Butler, T; M. G. Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissio...

  14. Heat and momentum transfer from an atmospheric argon hydrogen plasma jet to spherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the author describes the energy and momentum transfer from the plasma jet to the spray particles. This is done both experimentally and theoretically. Also the internal energy process of the recombining plasma is discussed. All elastic and inelastic collisional and radiative processes, as well as transport effects within the plasma are considered. In the next section, the so called passive spectroscopy is treated. It describes the diagnostics of electron density and temperature measurement, as well as the investigation on heat content of the particles. Spatially resolved electron density and temperature profiles are presented. Next, the active spectroscopy, i.e. the laser Doppler anemometer is dealt with. With this diagnostic, axial spray-particle velocities inside the plasma jet were determined. The author also presents heat and momentum transfer modelling of the plasma, related to the plasma particle interaction. Finally, a one dimensional model verification is made, using the experimentally determined particle velocity and plasma temperature profiles. (Auth.)

  15. Nucleation and growth of sub-3 nm particles in the polluted urban atmosphere of a megacity in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distribution down to 1.38 nm was measured in the urban atmosphere of Nanjing, China in spring, summer and winter during 2014–2015. Nucleation event occurred on 42 out of total 90 observation days, but new particles could grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN-active sizes on only 9 days. In summer, infrequent nucleation was limited by both unfavorable meteorological conditions (high temperature and RH and reduced anthropogenic precursor availability due to strict emission control measures during the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing. The limiting factors for nucleation in winter and spring were meteorological conditions (radiation, temperature, and RH and condensation sink, but for the further growth of sub-3 nm particles to CCN-active sizes, anthropogenic precursors again became limiting factors. Nucleation events were strong in the polluted urban atmosphere. Initial J1.38 at the onset and peak J1.38 at the noontime could be up to 2.1 × 102 and 2.5 × 103 cm−3 s−1, respectively, during the 8 nucleation events selected from different seasons. Time-dependent J1.38 usually showed good linear correlations with a sulfuric acid proxy for every single event (R2 = 0.56–0.86, excluding a day with significant nocturnal nucleation, but the correlation among all the 8 events deteriorated (R2 = 0.17 due to temperature or season change. We observed that new particle growth rate did not increase monotonically with particle size, but had a local maximum up to 25 nm h−1 between 1–3 nm. The growth rate behavior was interpreted in this study as the solvation effect of organic activating vapor in newly formed inorganic nuclei using nano-Köhler theory.

  16. Hygroscopicity of internally mixed multi-component aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qifan; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2016-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of two water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) relevant to urban haze pollution (phthalic acid and levoglucosan) and their internally mixtures with inorganic salts (ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate) are investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) system. The multi-component particles uptake water gradually in the range 5-90% relative humidity (RH). The experimental results are compared with the thermodynamic model predictions. For most mixtures, Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) predictions agree well with the measured growth factors. The hygroscopic growth of mixed particles can be well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation as long as the mixed particles are completely liquid. ZSR calculations underestimate the water uptake of mixed particles at moderate RH due to the partial dissolution of ammonium sulfate in the organic and ammonium nitrate solution in this RH region. The phase of ammonium nitrate in the initial dry particles changes dramatically with the composition of mixtures. The presence of organics in the mixed particles can inhibit the crystallization of ammonium nitrate during the drying process and results in water uptake at low RH (RH water uptake of particles.

  17. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel−1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel−1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC. Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  18. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B{&}W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel−1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel−1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC. Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  19. Individual particle analysis in suburban Osaka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo

    2012-11-01

    Higashi-Osaka is urban area located on the east of Osaka city in Japan. We equip various ground measurement devices in Higashi-Osaka campus of Kinki University. The data supplied by the Cimel instrument are analyzed with a standard AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) processing system. We set up an SPM sampler attached to our AERONET site. It is found from the simultaneous measurements and analyses that clear atmosphere with few small particles is not too often, usually polluted particles from diesel vehicles and industries are suspended at Higashi-Osaka and the characterization of atmospheric particles varies especially in dust phenomenon. Then we performed detailed analysis of atmospheric particles in dust days. We analyzed atmospheric particles with scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. This instrument can detect contain elements of sample by X-ray emanated from the surface of the sample. In order to investigate change of particle properties before and after dust event, we select three cases as before dust reaches to Higashi-Osaka, peak of dust event and after dust event and after dust passes. The results of analyses for each case indicate that nonspherical particles with large particle size are dominant and the main component becomes silicon derived from soil particles at the peak of dust event and soil particles remain after dust event. It is found that sometimes anthropogenic pollutant is transported to Higashi-Osaka before dust comes and components from anthropogenic source increase before dust event.

  20. Oxidative stress on plasmid DNA induced by inhalable particles in the urban atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zongbo; SHAO Longyi; T. P. Jones; A. G. Whittaker; R. J. Richards; ZHANG Pengfei

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid DNA assay is a newly-developed in vitro method to investigate bioreactivity of particles. In this paper, this method was used to study the bioreactivity of PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10цm) and PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 цm). Samples and dust storm particles were collected in 2001 in an urban area, a satellite city and a clean air area in Beijing. A big difference was found for oxidative DNA stress induced by different particulate matter (PM) samples, with the TM50 (particle mass causing 50% damage to DNA) values varying by a factor over 10. This was closely dependent on the sizes of particles as well as the variation in relative proportion of mineral matter. PM2.5 samples generally impose larger oxidative stress on plasmid DNA than PM10 samples. Airborne particles collected during dust storm episodes, usually with a higher proportion of mineral matter, have a much lower oxidative capacity than those collected during non-dust storm episodes. PM samples and their water-soluble fractions usually have similar bioreactivities, demonstrating that oxidative capacity of Beijing airborne particles is mainly sourced from their water-soluble fractions.

  1. Evaluation of a global aerosol microphysics model against size-resolved particle statistics in the marine atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP. We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed sub-micrometre size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10–30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the marine boundary layer (MBL. Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic MBL aerosol, with typically 60–90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles (at the emission size and quantity assumed here do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the

  2. Characterization of Semi-volatility of Atmospheric Submicron Particles at a Regional Background Site in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L. Y.

    2015-12-01

    HE Lingyan1, HUANG Congni1, HUANG Xiaofeng11. Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, China Abstract:The coupling of a Thermal Denuder (TD) with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used in Xianghe, which is a regional background site in North China, during June - July, 2013 to on-line measure the mass concentrations and semi-volatilities of atmospheric submicron particles, including organic matter (OM), SO42- , NO3-, NH4+, and Cl-. The total PM1 mass concentration measured was averagely (47.9±47.3) mg/m3 during the campaign, with OM accounting for 38.2% of the total PM1 mass, followed by SO42- (33.7%), NH4+ (13.8%), NO3- (12.3%), and Cl- (2.0%). It was found that NO3- and Cl- had the highest semi-volatility, with about 60% of them evaporating into the gas phase by increasing the temperature to 50 °C, while SO42- showed the lowest semi-volatility, with almost 90% of its mass remaining in the particle phase at 50 °C. The semi-volatility of OM and NH4+ was at the middle level. The semi-volatility of NO3- was affected by the pollution level of the atmospheric submicron particles since it showed an increasing trend with the increasing of PM1 at 50 °C. The oxygen-to-carbon ration of organic aerosol was 0.47 to 0.60 by increasing the temperature from 50 ℃ to 200 °C. In addition, the semi-volatility of the PM1 species with vacuum aerodynamic diameters of 60-2000 nm was little size dependent. The calculation based on the high-resolution mass spectra of OM showed that CO2+-containing organic species had lower semi-volatility, while C4H9+-containing organic species had higher semi-volatility. The semi-volatility of OM was found to be negatively related to its oxidation state. The quantitative result of atmospheric submicron particles' semi-volatility is essential to the research of the physicochemical

  3. Magnetic particles in atmospheric particulate matter collected at sites with different level of air pollution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovský, Eduard; Zbořil, R.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Kotlík, B.; Novák, J.; Kapička, Aleš; Grison, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2013), s. 755-770. ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/0554 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : magnetite * atmospheric dust * pollution * rock magnetism Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2013

  4. Sub-micron atmospheric aerosols in the surroundings of Marseille and Athens: physical characterization and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Petäjä

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of atmospheric aerosol particles in Marseille and Athens were investigated. The studies were performed in Marseille, France, during July 2002 and in Athens, Greece, during June 2003. The aerosol size distribution and the formation and growth rates of newly formed particles were characterized using Differential Mobility Particle Sizers. Hygroscopic properties were observed using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. During both campaigns, the observations were performed at suburban, almost rural sites, and the sites can be considered to show general regional background behavior depending on the wind direction. At both sites there were clear pattern for both aerosol number concentration and hygroscopic properties. Nucleation mode number concentration increased during the morning hours indicating new particle formation, which was observed during more than 30% of the days. The observed formation rate was typically more than 1 cm−3 s−1, and the growth rate was between 1.2–9.9 nm h−1. Based on hygroscopicity measurements in Athens, the nucleation mode size increase was due to condensation of both water insoluble and water soluble material. However, during a period of less anthropogenic influence, the growth was to a larger extent due to water insoluble components. When urban pollution was more pronounced, growth due to condensation of water soluble material dominated.

  5. μ-Scale Variations Of Elemental Composition In Individual Atmospheric Particles By Means Of Synchrotron Radiation Based μ-XRF Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pollution poses a huge challenge especially for densely populated urban areas. Although a tremendous knowledge already exists on atmospheric particulate pollution, only very limited knowledge is available on mineral and chemical composition of single atmospheric particles because most studies on air pollution focus on total mass concentrations or bulk elemental analysis. However, it is of particular importance to investigate the properties of single particles since according to their individually composition they differ in their specific impact on climate change, negative environment and health effects, as well as accelerating the weathering of stone buildings in urban areas. Particles with sulfate and nitrate coatings together with sufficient moisture increase metal solubility and possibly catalyze further surface reactions on stone facades of buildings. From the viewpoint of health effects of aerosols it is important to consider agglomerations processes of fine anthropogenic and highly toxic particles with coarse geogenic and less toxic particles. With respect to fundamental research in mineralogy, processes forming composed coarse particles consisting of geogenic and anthropogenic substances are valuable to study since a new type of particle is produced. In this context, the important and still in detail unknown role of geogenic particles as catchers for anthropogenic aerosols can be investigated more closely. Coarse particles can provide a possible sink for fine particles. Moreover, the intermixture of particles from geogenic and anthropogenic sources and the spatial and temporal variations of contributions from different sources, which plays a decisive role in the study area of Beijing, can be clarified with this approach. For this study, particles were collected with the passive sampling device Sigma-2 and analyzed for particles from 3 to 96 μm. The analyzed particles showed a very inhomogeneous distribution in their elemental composition. For

  6. On source identification and alteration of single diesel and wood smoke soot particles in the atmosphere; an X-ray microspectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernooij, M G C; Mohr, M; Tzvetkov, G; Zelenay, V; Huthwelker, T; Kaegi, R; Gehrig, R; Grobéty, B

    2009-07-15

    Diesel and wood combustion are major sources of carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere. It is very hard to distinguish between the two sources by looking at soot particle morphology, but clear differences in the chemical structure of single particles are revealed by C(1s) NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) microspectroscopy. Soot from diesel combustion has a dominant spectral signature at approximately 285 eV from aromatic pi-bonds, whereas soot from wood combustion has the strongest signature at approximately 287 eV from phenolic carbon bonds. To investigate if it is possible to use these signatures for source apportionment purposes, we collected atmospheric samples with either diesel or wood combustion as a dominant particle source. No spectra obtained from the atmospheric particles completely matched the emission spectra. Especially particles from the wood dominated location underwent large modifications; the phenolic spectral signature at approximately 287 eV is greatly suppressed and surpassed by the peak attributed to the aromatic carbon groups at approximately 285 eV. Comparison with spectra from diesel soot samples experimentally aged with ozone show that very fast modification of the carbon structure of soot particles occurs as soon as they enter the atmosphere. Source attribution of single soot particles with microspectroscopy is thus hardly possible, but NEXAFS remains a powerful tool to study aging effects. PMID:19708363

  7. Atmospheric concentration characteristics and gas-particle partitioning of PCBs in a rural area of eastern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)]. E-mail: mandalakis@chemistry.uoc.gr; Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece)

    2007-05-15

    Atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in 14 successive daytime and nighttime air samples collected from Melpitz, a rural site in eastern Germany. The average total concentration of PCBs was 110+/-80pgm{sup -3} and they were predominately present in the gas phase ({approx}95%). Composition of individual congeners closely resembled those of Clophen A30 and Aroclor 1232. Partial vapor pressures of PCBs were well correlated with temperature and the steep slopes obtained from Clausius-Clapeyron plots (-4500 to -8000) indicated that evaporation from adjacent land surfaces still controls the atmospheric levels of these pollutants. Particle-gas partitioning coefficients (K{sub P}) of PCBs were well correlated with the respective sub-cooled vapor pressures (P{sub L}{sup o}), but the slopes obtained from logK{sub P} versus logP{sub L}{sup o} plots (-0.16 to -0.59) deviated significantly from the expected value of -1. Overall, gas-particle partitioning of PCBs was better simulated by Junge-Pankow than octanol/air partition coefficient-based model.

  8. Particle-in-cell and global simulations of α to γ transition in atmospheric pressure Penning-dominated capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (rf) capacitive micro-discharges are of interest due to emerging applications, especially in the bio-medical field. A previous global model did not consider high-power phenomena such as sheath multiplication, thus limiting its applicability to the lower power range. To overcome this, we use one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of atmospheric He/0.1% N2 capacitive discharges over a wide range of currents and frequencies to guide the development of a more general global model which is also valid at higher powers. The new model includes sheath multiplication and two classes of electrons: the higher temperature ‘hot’ electrons associated with the sheaths, and the cooler ‘warm’ electrons associated with the bulk. The electric field and the electron power balance are solved analytically to determine the time-varying hot and warm temperatures and the effective rate coefficients. The particle balance equations are integrated numerically to determine the species densities. The model and PIC results are compared, showing reasonable agreement over the range of currents and frequencies studied. They indicate a transition from an α mode at low power characterized by relatively high electron temperature Te with a near uniform profile to a γ mode at high power with a Te profile strongly depressed in the bulk plasma. The transition is accompanied by an increase in density and a decrease in sheath widths. The current and frequency scalings of the model are confirmed by the PIC simulations. (paper)

  9. Exploratory study for estimating atmospheric low level particle pollution based on vertical integrated optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahi, Houda; Santer, Richard; Weill, Alain; Crepon, Michel; Thiria, Sylvie

    2011-07-01

    We present a method for retrieving atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) from sun-sky photometer measurements (AOT). As PM10 is a "surface parameter" and AOT is an "integrated parameters", we first determined whether a "functional relationship" linking these two quantities exists. Since these two parameters strongly depend on atmospheric structures and meteorological variables, we classified the meteorological situations in terms of weather types by using a neuronal classifier (Self organizing Map). For each weather type, we found that a relationship between AOT and PM10 can be established. We applied this approach to the Lille region (France) for the summer 2007 and then extended to a five summer period (summers of the years 2003-2007) in order to increase the statistical confidence of the PM10 retrieval from AOT measurements. The good performances of the method led us to envisage the possibility of deriving the PM10 from satellite observations.

  10. The influence of humidity on the daytime decay of PAH on atmospheric soot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously shown that particle bound PAH on airborne soot particles generated from the combustion of wood, gasoline, diesel oil and soft coal degrade in the presence of sunlight. In the authors' preliminary work we reported that the PAH rate of decay on wood soot particles was more rapid under moderate temperatures (∼20 degrees C) and midday sun than under cool temperatures and similar sunlight. In this paper, the authors have attempted to quantify the loss of PAH effects of humidity, solar radiation, and temperature. Dilute residential wood smoke and internal gasoline combustion emissions were individually aged in the presence of natural sunlight in 25 m3 outdoor Teflon film chambers. Soot particles were collected on filters and analyzed for PAH. In each experiment first order rate constants were computed for the disappearance of individual PAH. Rate expressions as a function of humidity, light, and temperature were then generated for nine different PAH from the wood smoke experiments. Analysis of rate constant data suggests that humidity and sunlight most strongly influence the rate of PAH decay and that absolute humidity is much more important that temperature

  11. Measurement and Analysis of Near Real Time Data on Particle Size Distribution in Atmospheric Aerosol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Zdeněk; Fridrich, Miroslav; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Ždímal, Vladimír; Váňa, M.

    Catalogue : Zagreb Inventors Association, 2011, s. 130. [International Invention Show (silver medal awarded) /36./. Zagreb (HR), 09.11.2011-12.11.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol * near real time data * particle distribution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  12. The link between atmospheric radicals and newly formed particles at a spruce forest site in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, B.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Sun, T. S.; Bingemer, H.; Rondo, L.; Javed, U.; Li, J.; Axinte, R.; Li, X.; Brauers, T.; Sonderfeld, H.; Koppmann, R.; Sogachev, Andrey; Jacobi, S.; Spracklen, D. V.

    , evaluating their ability to simulate measured particle formation rates at 3 nm in diameter (J3) for a variety of different conditions. Nucleation mechanisms involving only sulfuric acid tentatively captured the observed noon-time daily maximum in J3, but displayed an increasing difference to J3 measurements...

  13. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    OpenAIRE

    B. J. Williams; Zhang, Y.; Zuo, X.; R. E. Martinez; Walker, M J; N. M. Kreisberg; Goldstein, A. H.; K. S. Docherty; Jimenez, J. L

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition is often analyzed using thermal desorption techniques to evaporate samples and deliver organic or inorganic molecules to various designs of detectors for identification and quantification. The organic aerosol (OA) fraction is composed of thousands of individual compounds, some with nitrogen- and sulfur-containing functionality, and often contains oligomeric material, much of which may be susceptible to decomposition upon heating. Here we analy...

  14. Middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification by particle precipitation at the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for a localized middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification at low latitudes (southern Brazilian coast) of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA), in association with enhanced geomagnetic activity, are presented in a unified way combining recent observational efforts and related numerical studies. They involve a distortion effect in the fair weather electric field at balloon altitudes. This effect is attributed to a local intensification of energetic electron precipitation through a related middle atmospheric ionization enhancement and is elucidated by numeric simulation. From the electric field measurements and the numeric simulation, the intensification of precipitation is considered to occur in fairly narrow regions at the observed low L values (around L = 1.13) of the SAMA, with horizontal extensions of the order of a few hundred kilometers. A physical mechanism that could be responsible for this sort of intensification is suggested. Furthermore, a comparison of the phenomenon of middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification at the SAMA with a similar one at auroral latitudes, in response to enhanced solar and geomagnetic activity, is also given.

  15. [Pollution characteristics and source of the atmospheric fine particles and secondary inorganic compounds at Mount Dinghu in autumn season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-Rui; Wang, Yue-Si; Liu, Quan; Liu, Lu-Ning; Zhang, De-Qiang

    2011-11-01

    Real-time measurements of PM2.5, secondary inorganic compounds in PM2.5 (SO4(2-), NH4(+), and NO3(-)) and related gaseous pollutants were conducted at Mount Dinghu, a regional background station of the Pearl River Delta (PRD), in October and November 2008 by using a conventional R&P TEOM and a system of rapid collection of fine particles and ion chromatography (RCFP-IC). Sources and transportation of atmospheric particles during the experiment were discussed with principal component analysis and backward trajectories calculated using HYSPLIT model. The average daily mass concentrations of PM2.5 were 76.9 microg x m(-3) during sampling period, and average daily mass concentrations of SO4(2-), NH4(+), and NO3(-) were 20.0 microg x m(-3), 6.8 microg x m(-3) and 2.6 microg x m(-3), respectively. The sum of these three secondary inorganic compounds accounted for more than one third of the PM2.5 mass concentration, which had become the major source of atmospheric fine particles at Mount Dinghu. The diurnal variation of PM2.5, SO4(2-), and NH4(+) all showed a "bimodal" distribution with two peaks appeared at 10:00 am and at 16:00 pm, respectively, whereas NO3(-s) howed "single peak" distribution peaked at 10:00 am. The mass concentrations of SO4(2-) in PM2.5 had the similar diurnal variation with that of SO2, SO4(2-) in PM2.5 was mainly transformed from SO2, whereas NO3(-) showed difference diurnal variation with that of NO2, and the second conversion rate of NO2 was far lower than that of SO2. NH4(+) in PM2.5 existed mainly in the form of sulfate, nitrate and chloride. Both of principal component analysis and back trajectory analysis showed that the variations of PM2.5 and secondary inorganic compounds at Mount Dinghu were mainly affected by the long-range transport air mass passed over Guangzhou, Huizhou and other highly industrialized areas which carried air pollutants to the observation site, at the same time local sulfate originated from secondary formation also

  16. Parameter estimation of atmospheric refractivity from radar clutter using the particle swarm optimization via Lévy flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Estimating refractivity profiles from radar sea clutter is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. To deal with the ill-posed difficulties, an inversion algorithm, particle swarm optimization with a Lévy flight (LPSO), was proposed to be applied in the refractivity from clutter (RFC) technique to retrieve atmospheric duct in this paper. PSO has many advantages in solving continuous optimization problems, while in its late period it has slow convergence speed and low precision. Therefore, we integrate the Lévy flights into the standard PSO algorithm to improve the precision and enhance the capability of jumping out of the local optima. To verify the feasibility and validation of the LPSO for estimating atmospheric duct parameters based on the RFC method, the synthetic and Wallops98 experimental data are implemented. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the optimal solutions obtained from the hybrid algorithm are more precise and efficient. Additionally, to test the algorithm inversion performance, the antinoise ability of LPSO is analyzed. The results indicate that the LPSO algorithm has a certain antinoise ability. Finally, according to the experiment results, it can be concluded that the LPSO algorithm can provide a more precise and efficient method for near-real-time inversion of atmospheric refractivity from radar clutter.

  17. Ultrahigh conductivity of large area suspended few layer graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, Nima; Wang, Yung Yu; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-12-01

    Room-temperature (atmospheric-pressure) electrical conductivity measurements of wafer-scale, large-area suspended (few layer) graphene membranes with areas up to 1000 μm2 (30 μm × 30 μm) are presented. Multiple devices on one wafer can be fabricated with high yield from the same chemical vapor deposition grown graphene sheet, transferred from a nickel growth substrate to large opening in a suspended silicon nitride support membrane. This represents areas two to orders of magnitude larger than prior transport studies on any suspended graphene device (single or few layer). We find a sheet conductivity of ˜2500 e2/h (or about 10 Ω/sq) of the suspended graphene, which is an order of magnitude higher than any previously reported sheet conductance of few layer graphene.

  18. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-J. Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and ion chromatography (IC, for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3–99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8–3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1–2% (v/v of acetone (or 2–4% (v/v of acetonitrile was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1–15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1–103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  19. Optical properties of atmospheric fine particles near Beijing during the HOPE-J3A campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xuezhe; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Qilei; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Bo; Chen, Weidong; Venables, Dean S.; Wang, Xinfeng; Pu, Wei; wang, xin; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties and chemical composition of PM1.0 particles in a suburban environment (Huairou) near the megacity of Beijing were measured during the HOPE-J3A (Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing–Jin–Ji Area) field campaign. The campaign covered the period November 2014 to January 2015 during the winter coal heating season. The average values and standard deviations of the extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and the aerosol single scattering albe...

  20. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  1. Analysis of PM2.5 particles in atmospheric dust of the MZVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives and scopes of this report are: to determine the places more representative for the installation of four stations of monitoring of small particles to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5 ) guided to protect the population's health in the regions indicated by the General Address of Environmental Administration of the Air (DGGM) of the Government of the Federal District (GDF). To select the places to collect PM2.5 in each one of the regions under study placing each place inside a contiguous cell of 2 x 2 km. To determine the concentration of PM2.5 in the selected places. To determine the temporary and space behavior of the fine particles in each one of the regions designated in this study. To determine the elementary concentration of some samples of PM2.5 in the four regions. The execution of this project will contribute to that the installation of the net of monitoring of particles of PM2.5 is carried out with scientific foundation. (Author)

  2. Target preparation by means of the vibrational motion of particles at one atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sugai, I

    1999-01-01

    The new target preparation method, which is based on the vibrational motion of microparticles in the electric field between parallel electrodes, has been applied to prepare Pd and Si self-supporting foils at one atmosphere in air. We successfully prepared targets of 0.10-0.50 mg/cm sup 2 thick with an electrode separation of 10 mm and an applied voltage of 10 kV. The impurities in the prepared targets were examined by using the Rutherford scattering of a 65 MeV alpha-beam. It was found that the impurity amounts depend on the prepared element.

  3. Tracing dust sources in different atmosphere levels of Tehran using hybrid single-particle lagrangian integrated trajectory (HYSPLIT model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Mohammadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thepresent study aims to tracing dust sources of Tehran (capital city of Iranusing HYSPLIT model and atmospheric circulationsystems atdifferent levels. The statistical analyses within the period 1981-2005 indicatethat one of the most significant dust events in Tehran province occurred in May2000 and continued for more than 4 days in Abali, Chitgar, Firuzkuh, Karaj andNorth Tehran stations. For this purpose, in order to identify the sources of dustparticles and their directions, firstly, high-level atmospheric data includingzonal and meridional wind, geopotential height at pressure levelof 700 and 850 hPa and atmospheric circulation patterns werestudied from two days before the storm, the first of May until the end of thesecond, fourth and fifth day. By using atmospheric circulation maps, the synoptic systems effective in causing dust events, flowsdirections and their speeds were determined. In this modeling approach, a backwardparticle tracking method was applied to determine the direction of dustparticles, 48 hours before dust storm in Tehran, at three elevations of 100,500 and 1000 meter. With regard to the fact that the pressure systems ofnorthern latitudes are active over Iran in transition period of spring, itshould be noted that the results of the present study were affected by thesesystems. Results indicate that the high-pressure system hovering above theSaudi Arabia and the low-pressure tongue at higher latitudes play an importantrole in forming particle motion patterns and flow speeds of mentioned levels.Using HYSPLIT Lagrangian model shows the effects of arid regions of SaudiArabia, Iraq and some parts of Syria on producing greatest amount of dustparticles transferred to Tehran.

  4. Suspended particulate studies over the Madeira Abyssal Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects relating to suspended matter over the Madeira Abyssal Plain are discussed. Special attention is paid to the nepheloid layer including resuspension and transport processes; time variabilities in particle concentrations and fluxes; particle morphology, microbiology and chemical composition; phase association of metals. Also, tentative predictions of the behaviour of some radionuclides are made based on theory and data on rare earth elements. Instrumentation developed for the project is detailed - the deep water particle sampler. (author)

  5. A review of measurement and modelling results of particle atmosphere-surface exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, Sara; Gallagher, M.; Sievering, H.;

    2008-01-01

    predictions. Closer agreement between models and observations is found over less-rough surfaces though those data also imply substantially higher surface collection efficiencies than were originally proposed and are manifest in current models. We review theorized dependencies for particle fluxes, describe and...... critique model approaches and innovations in experimental approaches, and synthesize common conclusions of experimental and modelling studies. We end by proposing a number of research avenues that should be pursued in to facilitate further insights and development of improved numerical models of...

  6. Biological aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their impact on clouds (BIOCLOUDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Pierre; Attard, Eleonore; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie; Flossmann, Andrea; Good, Nicholas; Joly, Muriel; Koop, Thomas; Möhler, Ottmar; Monier, Marie; Morris, Cindy; Oehm, Caroline; Pöschl, Ulrich; Sancelme, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The project BIOCLOUDS aimed at investigating and quantifying the role of bioaerosols in tropospheric clouds. We focused on the studies on microorganisms, mainly bacteria. To reach our objective we (1) isolated and identified INA bacterial strains in cloud waters, (2) studied in more details IN properties of bacteria isolated from cloud waters in laboratories and cloud chamber, (3) used new data as input to cloud models. 1. Isolation and Identification of INA bacterial strains in cloud waters Cloud water samples were collected at the puy de Dôme station under sterile conditions, microorganisms were cultured on agar plates and further identified by DNA sequencing coding for16SrRNA. 257 bacterial strains isolated from 25 cloud events were screened and 44 isolates were selected as they belonged to Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas and Erwinia genera which are potential INA candidates. Using the classical "Droplet Freezing method" as ice nucleation test, 7 strains were shown INA+. Their cumulative IN frequency profiles were established and showed that some of them are very efficient, for example the strain Pseudomonas syringae 13b74 started to nucleate a t-3°C and 4% of the cells were active at- 5°C. 2. Further laboratory investigations of IN properties of cloud bacterial strains All the experiments presented in this section were carried out with 3 Pseudomonas syringae strains. We tested the influence of O3, NO, UV and pH, which are atmospheric markers of anthropogenic activity, on the IN activity of the Pseudomonas strains. It was clearly shown that pH had a main influence, acidic pHs decreased the IN activity of the strains. This suggests a negative impact of human emissions on the natural capacity of bacteria to precipitate with rain. The 3 Pseudomas strains were sprayed in the AIDA cloud chamber. The survival of these strains with time before cloud formation was measured and will be used in the future to parameterize models for bacterial transport. After cloud formation

  7. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003, an extended aerosol layer at 13 km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal which we interpret as laser induced fluorescence from aerosol particles. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering in a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates the inelastic backscatter signal that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  8. Characteristics of Nano Particles in the Atmosphere of Gyeongju National Park Area Using a Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Hur, H. J.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, H. S. [Gyeongju Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The physico-chemical characteristics of the categorized aerosol with soil-related mineral species, anthropogenic-related heavy metal species, and aerosol-acidity-related element were analyzed based on the air-mass pathways. The lowest value of 0.6 {+-} 0.1 g m-3 was observed during the intensive fall period of 2005. The mass concentration of sulfur (S) was the highest in the intensive spring period and the lowest in the intensive summer period. The frequencies of the EM, the WC, the SC, and the NC events were 6, 17, 3, and 7, respectively. The continental air-mass-pathway categories were calculated consisting of 85% of the total 40 events whereas the marine air-mass-pathway categories were of 15%. The nanoparticles observed at the national park area of Gyeongju were estimated to be affected by soil-related elements when the air mass came from the western area of the Asian continent and to be predominantly affected by anthropogenic-related elements when air mass came from the northern area of the Asian continent through Korean peninsula. Soil-related elements were mainly observed in particles with sizes greater than 560 nm. The average mass fraction of anthropogenic-related elements was relatively much higher in the particle size range less than 320 nm.

  9. The reactive oxidant potential of different types of aged atmospheric particles: An outdoor chamber study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Rosen, Eli; Zhang, Haofei; Li, Qianfeng; Pantong, Karun; Kamens, Richard M.

    2011-07-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) potential of aged diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM) and other aged aerosol systems in the presence and absence of an urban hydrocarbon environment was assessed. Experiments were performed in a 274 m 3 dual outdoor Teflon film chamber. Filter samples were taken to assess the oxidant generation associated with PM by an optimized dithiothreitol (DTT) method. Diesel exhaust PM had a higher ROS response when it was in the presence of an urban hydrocarbon mixture and was associated with significant O 3 production. For all the aged dilute diesel systems, ROS expression increased by a factor of 2-4 over fresh diesel particles. Other particle systems were also investigated. A low ROS was observed in most of the nighttime experiments, including the nighttime aerosols from SO 2 with O 3 and SO 2 aged by itself. However, when all the systems were compared, aged diesel exhaust tended to express very high ROS potentials, with secondary organic aerosols from an α-pinene + toluene + an urban HC mixture giving the highest ROS response.

  10. Trace elements in aero transported solid particles in urban and rural atmosphere using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the present study, multi schedule collectors (type Streaker) were located, in four places selected by their relative location, to possible fountains of identifiable s particles. The cooperation among the Nuclear Laboratory PIXE of the State University of Florida, U.S.A. Permitted the irradiation of the collected samples, using the facilities of the Accelerator Van der Graaff of 4 MeV. The x-rays spectra emission,were valued in the Laboratory LAFNA and the Laboratory PIXE, using the Hex computational code. They were determined among 12 and 15 chemical elements to level of plans, quantity that depends on the place of recollection. The statistical analysis of the data recollected, was carried out applying analysis of factors. This statistical program of analysis, permits the regroup of the elements, depending on the systematic variation of the concentrations. A graphic analysis of distribution was carried out, besides, schedule of the hours of I continuous monitoring. This permits to observe its own singularities. Giving the opportunity to determine, possible fountains of origin of the collected particles. (author)

  11. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003 an extended aerosol layer at 13km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal that we detected with a water vapour Raman channel, but that was not produced by Raman scattering. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering from a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. We interpret the unexpected properties of these aerosols as fluorescence induced by the laser beam at organic components of the aerosol particles. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar systems. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates, inelastic backscatter signals that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  12. Nature of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Desert Areas in the Asian Continent: Chemical State and Number Concentration of Particles Measured at Dunhuang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of aerosol were made in August and October 2001, and January 2002, at Dunhuang, China (40o00'N, 94o30'E), to understand the nature of atmospheric particles over the desert areas in the Asian continent. Balloon-borne measurements with an optical particle counter suggested that particle size and concentration had a noticeable peak in size range of super micron in not only the boundary mixing layer but also the free troposphere. Thickness of the boundary mixing layer, from distributions of particle concentration, was about 4 km in summer (17 August 2001), about2.5 km in fall (17 October 2001), and about 3 km in winter (11 January 2002), which suggest active mixing of particles near the boundary in summer. Number-size distribution of particle showed a noticeable peak in the super micron particles size range in the mixing boundary layer: 0.4-2 particles cm-3 at diameter>1.2 μm in summer, 0.05-4 particles cm-3 at diameter >1.2 μm in fall, and 0.1-5 particles cm-3 at diameter>1.2 μm in winter. In winter strong inversion of atmospheric temperature was found in the height range from the boundary to about 3 km and vertical distribution of particle concentration well corresponded with the temperature distribution. Chemical elements of individual aerosols, which were collected in the boundary layer atmosphere at Dunhuang (18 October 2001) were analyzed with an electron microscope equipped with EDX. Those single particle analysis suggested that most of the particles with supermicron size were soil particles, and those particles had little sulfate on its surface. This is a very important different point,comparing with the chemical state of soil particles, which were transported from the desert area of China to Japan, and showed frequently the existence of sulfate on the particle surface. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that dust particles can be chemically modified during their long-range transport from desert areas to Japan

  13. The influence of gas-particle partitioning and surface-atmosphere exchange on ammonia during BAQS-Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ellis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Border Air Quality and Meteorology study (BAQS-Met was an intensive field campaign conducted in Southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2007. The focus of BAQS-Met was determining the causes of the formation of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5, and of the regional significance of trans-boundary transport and lake breeze circulations on that formation. Fast (1 Hz measurements of ammonia were acquired using a Quantum Cascade Laser Tunable Infrared Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS at the Harrow supersite. Measurements of PM2.5 ammonium, sulfate and nitrate were made using an Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC with hourly time resolution.The median mixing ratio of ammonia was 2.5 ppb, with occasional high spikes at night resulting from local emissions. Measurements were used to assess major local emissions of NH3, diurnal profiles and gas-particle partitioning. The measurements were compared with results from A Unified Regional Air-quality Modelling System (AURAMS. While the fraction of total ammonia (NHx≡NH3 + NH4+ observed in the gas phase peaks between 0.1 and 0.8, AURAMS tended to predict fractions of either less than 0.05 or greater than 0.8. The model frequently predicted acidic aerosol, in contrast withobservations whereinNHx always exceeded the observed equivalents of sulfate. One explanation for our observations is that the net flux of ammonia from the land surface to the atmosphere increases when aerosol sulfate is present, effectively buffering the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, a process not included in the model. We explore the impact of a bi-directional flux parameterization on the predicted gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric ammonia.

  14. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particles in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallarosa, Juliana Braga; Mônego, Josiane Garcia; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Stefens, Josemar Luis; Wiegand, Flávio

    The aim of the present study is to identify and quantify the main sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with aerosols (PM 10) collected at three different sampling stations: 8° Distrito, CEASA and Charqueadas. The samples were collected between November 2001 and November 2002, and the concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. The filters containing particulate matter were extracted with dichloromethane in Soxhlet and the extracts were later analysed in a gaseous chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GS/MS). The average concentrations of PAHs ranged between 0.04 and 2.30 ng m -3. The analysis of principal components was applied to the chemical and meteorological variables in order to facilitate the identification of sources of PAHs emission into the atmospheric particulate. The study identified the following sources of PAHs: vehicular emissions, such as diesel oil, petrol, alcohol, and kerosene; industrial emissions, like lubricating oils; emissions from hospital waste burning, and coal burning at power plants.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particles in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallarosa, J.B.; Monego, J.G.; Teixeira, E.C.; Stefens, J.L.; Wiegand, F. [Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify and quantify the main sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with aerosols (PM10) collected at three different sampling stations: 8 degrees Distrito, CEASA and Charqueadas. The samples were collected between November 2001 and November 2002, and the concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. The filters containing particulate matter were extracted with dichloromethane in Soxhlet and the extracts were later analysed in a gaseous chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GS/MS). The average concentrations of PAHs ranged between 0.04 and 2.30ng m{sup -3}. The analysis of principal components was applied to the chemical and meteorological variables in order to facilitate the identification of sources of PAHs emission into the atmospheric particulate. The study identified the following sources of PAHs: vehicular emissions, such as diesel oil, petrol, alcohol, and kerosene; industrial emissions, like lubricating oils; emissions from hospital waste burning, and coal burning at power plants.

  17. Sensitivity studies on the photolysis rates calculation in Amazonian atmospheric chemistry ? Part I: The impact of the direct radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, L. M. M.; Longo, K. M.; S. R. Freitas; Tarasova, T.; Plana Fattori, A.; Nobre, C.; Gatti, L. V.

    2005-01-01

    International audience The impact of the direct radiative effect of the aerosol particles on the calculation of the photolysis rates and consequently on the atmospheric chemistry in regional smoke clouds due to biomass burning over the Amazon basin is addressed in this work. It explores a case study for 19 September 2002 at LBA-RACCI-SMOCC (The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia ? Radiation, Cloud, and Climate Interactions ? Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climat...

  18. Lead and cadmium phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility for vegetables exposed to soil or atmospheric pollution by process ultrafine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tiantian; Leveque, Thibault; Shahid, Muhammad; Foucault, Yann; Mombo, Stéphane; Dumat, Camille

    2014-09-01

    When plants are exposed to airborne particles, they can accumulate metals in their edible portions through root or foliar transfer. There is a lack of knowledge on the influence of plant exposure conditions on human bioaccessibility of metals, which is of particular concern with the increase in urban gardening activities. Lettuce, radish, and parsley were exposed to metal-rich ultrafine particles from a recycling factory via field atmospheric fallouts or polluted soil. Total lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in of the edible plant parts and their human bioaccessibility were measured, and Pb translocation through the plants was studied using Pb isotopic analysis. The Pb and Cd bioaccessibility measured for consumed parts of the different polluted plants was significantly higher for root exposure (70% for Pb and 89% for Cd in lettuce) in comparison to foliar exposure (40% for Pb and 69% for Cd in lettuce). The difference in metal bioaccessibility could be linked to the metal compartmentalization and speciation changes in relation to exposure conditions. Metal nature strongly influences the measured bioaccessibility: Cd presents higher bioaccessibility in comparison to Pb. In the case of foliar exposure, a significant translocation of Pb from leaves toward the roots was observed. To conclude, the type of pollutant and the method of exposure significantly influences the phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility of metals, especially in relation to the contrasting phenomena involved in the rhizosphere and phyllosphere. The conditions of plant exposure must therefore be taken into account for environmental and health risk assessment. PMID:25603245

  19. Optical properties of atmospheric fine particles near Beijing during the HOPE-J3A campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuezhe; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Qilei; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Bo; Chen, Weidong; Venables, Dean S.; Wang, Xinfeng; Pu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties and chemical composition of PM1.0 particles in a suburban environment (Huairou) near the megacity of Beijing were measured during the HOPE-J3A (Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing-Jin-Ji Area) field campaign. The campaign covered the period November 2014 to January 2015 during the winter coal heating season. The average values and standard deviations of the extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at λ = 470 nm during the measurement period were 201 ± 240, 164 ± 202, 37 ± 43 Mm-1, and 0.80 ± 0.08, respectively. The average values for the real and imaginary components of the effective complex refractive index (CRI) over the campaign were 1.40 ± 0.06 and 0.03 ± 0.02, while the average mass scattering and absorption efficiencies (MSEs and MAEs) of PM1.0 were 3.6 and 0.7 m2 g-1, respectively. Highly time-resolved air pollution episodes clearly show the dramatic evolution of the PM1.0 size distribution, extensive optical properties (extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients), and intensive optical properties (SSA and CRI) during haze formation, development, and decline. Time periods were classified into three different pollution levels (clear, slightly polluted, and polluted) for further analysis. It was found that (1) the relative contributions of organic and inorganic species to observed aerosol composition changed significantly from clear to polluted days: the organic mass fraction decreased from 50 to 43 % while the proportion of sulfates, nitrates, and ammonium increased strongly from 34 to 44 %. (2) Chemical apportionment of extinction, calculated using the IMPROVE algorithm, tended to underestimate the extinction compared to measurements. Agreement with measurements was improved by modifying the parameters to account for enhanced absorption by elemental carbon (EC). Organic mass was the largest contributor (52 %) to the total extinction of PM1.0, while EC

  20. Measuring and modeling the hygroscopic growth of two humic substances in mixed aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Zamora

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric particles affects atmospheric chemistry and Earth's climate. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC constitutes a significant fraction of the dry submicron mass of atmospheric aerosols, thus affecting their water uptake properties. Although the WSOC fraction is comprised of many compounds, a set of model substances can be used to describe its behavior. For this study, mixtures of Nordic aquatic fulvic acid reference (NAFA and Fluka humic acid (HA, with various combinations of inorganic salts (sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate and other representative organic compounds (levoglucosan and succinic acid, were studied. We measured the equilibrium water vapor pressure over bulk solutions of these mixtures as a function of temperature and solute concentration. New water activity (aw parameterizations and hygroscopic growth curves at 25 °C were calculated from these data for particles of equivalent composition. We examined the effect of temperature on the water activity and found a maximum variation of 9% in the 0–30 °C range, and 2% in the 20–30 °C range. Five two-component mixtures were studied to understand the effect of adding a humic substance (HS, such as NAFA and HA, to an inorganic salt or a saccharide. The deliquescence point at 25 °C for HS-inorganic mixtures did not change significantly from that of the pure inorganic species. However, the hygroscopic growth of HA / inorganic mixtures was lower than that exhibited by the pure salt, in proportion to the added mass of HA. The addition of NAFA to a highly soluble solute (ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride or levoglucosan in water had the same effect as the addition of HA to the inorganic species for most of the water activity range studied. Yet, the water uptake of these NAFA mixtures transitioned to match the growth of the pure salt or saccharide at high aw values. The remaining four mixtures were based on chemical composition data for different

  1. Evaluating turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration relations from the North Fork Toutle River basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington; annual, seasonal, event, and particle size variations - a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam; Christianson, Tami

    2015-01-01

    Regression of in-stream turbidity with concurrent sample-based suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) has become an accepted method for producing unit-value time series of inferred SSC (Rasmussen et al., 2009). Turbidity-SSC regression models are increasingly used to generate suspended-sediment records for Pacific Northwest rivers (e.g., Curran et al., 2014; Schenk and Bragg, 2014; Uhrich and Bragg, 2003). Recent work developing turbidity-SSC models for the North Fork Toutle River in Southwest Washington (Uhrich et al., 2014), as well as other studies (Landers and Sturm, 2013, Merten et al., 2014), suggests that models derived from annual or greater datasets may not adequately reflect shorter term changes in turbidity-SSC relations, warranting closer inspection of such relations. In-stream turbidity measurements and suspended-sediment samples have been collected from the North Fork Toutle River since 2010. The study site, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage 14240525 near Kid Valley, Washington, is 13 river km downstream of the debris avalanche emplaced by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981), and 2 river km downstream of the large sediment retention structure (SRS) built from 1987–1989 to mitigate the associated sediment hazard. The debris avalanche extends roughly 25 km down valley from the edifice of the volcano and is the primary source of suspended sediment moving past the streamgage (NF Toutle-SRS). Other significant sources are debris flow events and sand deposits upstream of the SRS, which are periodically remobilized and transported downstream. Also, finer material often is derived from the clay-rich original debris avalanche deposit, while coarser material can derive from areas such as fluvially reworked terraces.

  2. Atmosphere pollutants-their health and environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conducted studies, continuous monitoring and measuring of the atmosphere pollution surrounding the world cities for a decade in the last century demonstrated increased rates of some pollutants, often exceeded the levels which are considered to be safe for health. Most of the dangerous pollutants in the atmosphere are suspended particles, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, ozone troposphere and lead, these are the main responsible pollutant in contaminating the atmosphere leading to increase of death percentage in the major cities. For a duration of nearly a century, atmosphere pollution accidents in cities like London approved that inhaling contaminated air is dangerous and deadly sometimes. In 1880 2200 person from London inhabitants have died when coal smoke with heating and industrial gases have been accumulated to form a toxic smog of sulfur oxide gas and suspended particles in the atmosphere of the city. In this paper we discuss type of atmosphere pollutants and their health and environmental effects on human being, creatures and earth and ways of eliminating that.(Author)

  3. PIXE study on effects of coal burning in a coal-fired power station on atmospheric environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight-stage cascade impactors and high-volume samplers were used to collect air particulate matter (APM) at the vicinity of the coal-fired power station in Beijing. Average concentrations for 19 elements in the particles and the TSP (total suspended particles) mass were determined by PIXE analysis and weighing respectively. The effects of coal burning in the power station on the atmospheric environmental pollution are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Toward Quantifying the Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Individual Submicron Atmospheric Aerosol Particles with STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey Piens, D.; Kelly, S. T.; OBrien, R. E.; Wang, B.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols influences their optical and cloud-nucleation properties, and therefore affects climate. Although changes in particle size as a function of relative humidity have often been used to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles, it has been noted that calculations of hygroscopicity based on size contain error due to particle porosity, non-ideal volume additivity and changes in surface tension. We will present a method to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles based on changes in mass, rather than size, as a function of relative humidity. This method results from a novel experimental approach combining scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near-edge x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), as well as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) on the same individual particles. First, using STXM/NEXAFS, our methods are applied to aerosol particles of known composition ‒ for instance ammonium sulfate, sodium bromide and levoglucosan ‒ and validated by theory. Then, using STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX, these methods are extended to mixed atmospheric aerosol particles collected in the field at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Planes sampling site in Oklahoma, USA. We have observed and quantified a range of hygroscopic behaviors which are correlated to the composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles. These methods will have implications for parameterizing aerosol mixing state and cloud-nucleation activity in atmospheric models.

  5. Observations of the UARS Particle Environment Monitor and computation of ionization rates in the middle and upper atmosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharber, J. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.; Biard, J. C.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Chenette, D. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Nightingale, R. W.; Imhof, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present observations made by the Particle Environment Monitor (PEM) instruments during the geomagnetic storm of 8-9 November, 1991. Ionization and energy deposition rates as functions of altitude in the middle and upper atmosphere by incident electrons and positive ions in the storm interval are computed. The suite of PEM instruments provides a systematic measurement of energetic particles and their associated X-rays over an energy range not fully covered by previous satellite missions.

  6. A study of inter-particle bonds in dry bauxite waste resulting in atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Thompson, Bentley

    1988-02-01

    Bauxite and Alumina production are one of the main activities of several third world countries such as Jamaica, Brazil, India, Guinea, eastern European countries such as Hungary and Rumania and advanced countries such as Australia, West Germany, Japan and the United States. The mining operations lead to dust pollution, but the refining of bauxite to alumina yield large amounts of highly caustic sludge waste, called "Red Mud". Millions of tons of the waste produced in every country are stored in containment dams or natural valleys. This leads to ground water pollution, destruction of plant and bird life and is hazardous to human settlement in earthquake prone regions like Jamaica. As a result several companies have been looking into dry mud stacking which involves thickening the mud in the refining plants and sprying it on the slopes to sun dry it. Typically it involves a drying field of about two hundred acres, which could act as a potential source of caustic dust. In Jamaica one company has started disposing of the mud in this way. The aerosol formation from such areas depends mainly on the integrity of the top dry layers. Presently this is done by studying the approximate parameters such as the friability of the mud. However, following the recent advances in powder technology it has been possible for us to develop an instrument to study the average interparticle forces between the red mud particles. The instrument is based on the principle of a tensometer and a split cell is used to load specimens. A load cell is used to measure the force and a chart recorder is used for plotting separation and the force. The present study reports elemental composition of the dust and its health hazards. It also reports the physical measurement of the average interparticle force as a function of their separation in the Jamaican mud. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the strength of the material is studied to see the effect of sun-drying of the waste. The five-fold increase

  7. Optical properties of atmospheric fine particles near Beijing during the HOPE-J3A Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Zhao, W.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, S.; Fang, B.; Chen, W.; Venables, D. S.; Wang, X.; Pu, W.; Wang, X.;