WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric sulfur budget

  1. The contribution of aircraft emissions to the atmospheric sulfur budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, E. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Feichter, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Sausen, R.; Hein, R. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model including the atmospheric sulfur cycle has been used to investigate the impact of aircraft sulfur emissions on the global sulfur budget of the atmosphere. The relative contribution from aircraft sulfur to the atmospheric sulfate burden is larger than the ratio between aircraft emissions and surface emissions due to the calculated long turn-over time of aircraft sulfate (about 12 days). However, in terms of the sulfate mass balance, aircraft emissions are small, contributing about 1% of the total sulfate mass north of 40 deg C where the aircraft emissions are largest. Despite this small contribution to sulfate mass, the aircraft emissions could potentially significantly enhance the background number concentration of aerosol particles. Based on the model calculations the increased stratospheric background aerosol mass observed during the last decades can not be explained by increased aircraft sulfur emissions 50 refs, 9 figs, 4 tabs

  2. Closing the Dimethyl Sulfide Budget in the Tropical Marine Boundary Layer during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Conley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen research flights were conducted with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C-130 near Christmas Island (2° N, 157° W during the summer of 2007 as part of the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE. In order to tightly constrain the scalar budget of DMS, fluxes were measured at various levels in the marine boundary layer (MBL from near the surface (30 m to the top of the mixed layer (500 m providing greater accuracy of the flux divergence calculation in the DMS budget. The observed mean mole fraction of DMS in the MBL exhibited the well known diurnal cycle, ranging from 50 pptv in the daytime to 110 pptv at night. Contributions from horizontal advection are included using a multivariate regression of all DMS flight data from within the MBL to estimate the mean gradients and trends. With this technique we consider the residual term in the DMS budget as an estimate of overall photochemical oxidation. Error analysis of the various terms in the DMS budget indicate that chemical losses acting on time scales of up to 110 h can be inferred with this technique. On average, photochemistry accounted for 7.3 ppt hr−1 loss rate for the seven daytime flights, with an estimated error of 0.6 ppt/hr. The loss rate due to expected OH oxidation is sufficient to explain the net DMS destruction without invoking the action of additional oxidants (e.g. reactive halogens. The observed ocean flux of DMS averaged 3.1 (±1.5μmol m−2 d−1, and generally decreased throughout the sunlit hours. The average entrainment flux at the top of the MBL was 2.5 μmol m−2 d−1; therefore the flux divergence term in the budget equation only contributed an average increase of 1.3 ppt hr−1 to the mean MBL mole fraction. Over the entire mission, the horizontal advection contribution to the overall budget was 0.2 ppt hr−1, indicating a mean atmospheric DMS gradient nearly

  3. The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James F.; Turco, Richard P.; Liu, May S.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere using a one-dimensional photochemical model is described and evaluated. Theoretical uncertainties concerning the operation of the marine sulfur cycle are examined, and measurements of sulfur gases in the marine atmosphere necessary for developing the model are derived. Previous modeling studies are reviewed, and the data from these studies are compared to the model simulations. Recommendations for improving the simulation of the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere are discussed.

  4. Atmospheric influence of Earth's earliest sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar; Bao; Thiemens

    2000-08-01

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures for delta(33)S, delta(34)S, and delta(36)S from sulfide and sulfate in Precambrian rocks indicate that a change occurred in the sulfur cycle between 2090 and 2450 million years ago (Ma). Before 2450 Ma, the cycle was influenced by gas-phase atmospheric reactions. These atmospheric reactions also played a role in determining the oxidation state of sulfur, implying that atmospheric oxygen partial pressures were low and that the roles of oxidative weathering and of microbial oxidation and reduction of sulfur were minimal. Atmospheric fractionation processes should be considered in the use of sulfur isotopes to study the onset and consequences of microbial fractionation processes in Earth's early history.

  5. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  6. Sulfur hexafluoride - A powerful new atmospheric tracer

    OpenAIRE

    Maiss, Manfred; Steele, Paul; Francey, Roger; Fraser, Paul; Langenfelds, Ray; Trivett, Neil; Levin, Ingeborg

    1996-01-01

    Long-term observations of the atmospheric trace gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) at four background monitoring stations, Neumayer, Antarctica (1986-1994), Cape Grim, Tasmania (1978-1994), Izana, Canary Islands (1991-1994) and Alert, Canada (1993-1994) are presented. These data sets are supplemented by two meridional profiles collected over the Atlantic Ocean (1990 and 1993) and occasional observations at the regional site Fraserdale, Canada (1994). The analytical system and the method of SF6 cal...

  7. Total Sulfur Deposition (wet+dry) from the Atmosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is emitted primarily as a by-product of coal combustion from power plants. Sulfur Dioxide reacts in the atmosphere to form other chemical such...

  8. Atmospheric nitrogen budget in Sahelian dry savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric nitrogen budget depends on emission and deposition fluxes both as reduced and oxidized nitrogen compounds. In this study, a first attempt at estimating the Sahel nitrogen budget for the year 2006 is made, through measurements and simulations at three stations from the IDAF network situated in dry savanna ecosystems. Dry deposition fluxes are estimated from measurements of NO2, HNO3 and NH3 gaseous concentrations, and wet deposition fluxes are calculated from NH4+ and NO3 concentrations in samples of rain. Emission fluxes are estimated including biogenic emission of NO from soils (an Artificial Neural Network module has been inserted into the ISBA-SURFEX surface model, emission of NOx and NH3 from domestic fires and biomass burning, and volatilization of NH3 from animal excreta.

    This study uses original and unique data from remote and hardly-ever-explored regions. The monthly evolution of oxidized N compounds shows that deposition increases at the beginning of the rainy season because of large emissions of biogenic NO (pulse events. Emission of oxidized compounds is dominated by biogenic emission from soils (domestic fires and biomass burning account for 27% at the most, depending on the station, whereas emission of NH3 is dominated by the process of volatilization. Deposition fluxes are dominated by gaseous dry deposition processes (58% of the total, for both oxidized and reduced compounds. The average deposition flux in dry savanna ecosystems ranges from 8.6 to 10.9 kgN ha−1 yr−1, with 30% attributed to oxidized compounds, and the other 70% attributed to NHx. The average emission flux ranges from 7.8 to 9.7 kgN ha−1 yr−1, dominated by NH3 volatilization (67% and biogenic emission from soils (24%. The annual budget is then

  9. Atmospheric nitrogen budget in Sahelian dry savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric nitrogen budget depends on emission and deposition fluxes both as reduced and oxidized nitrogen compounds. In this study, a first attempt at estimating the Sahel nitrogen budget for the year 2006 is made, through measurements and simulations at three stations from the IDAF network situated in dry savanna ecosystems. Dry deposition fluxes are estimated from measurements of NO2, HNO3 and NH3 gaseous concentrations and from simulated dry deposition velocities, and wet deposition fluxes are calculated from NH4+ and NO3 concentrations in samples of rain. Emission fluxes are estimated including biogenic emission of NO from soils (an Artificial Neural Network module has been inserted into the ISBA-SURFEX surface model, emission of NOx and NH3 from domestic fires and biomass burning, and volatilization of NH3 from animal excreta. Uncertainties are calculated for each contribution of the budget.

    This study uses original and unique data from remote and hardly-ever-explored regions.The monthly evolution of oxidized N compounds shows that emission and deposition increase at the beginning of the rainy season because of large emissions of biogenic NO (pulse events. Emission of oxidized compounds is dominated by biogenic emission from soils (domestic fires and biomass burning of oxidized compounds account for 0 to 13% at the most at the annual scale, depending on the station, whereas emission of NH3 is dominated by the process of volatilization from soils. At the annual scale, the average gaseous dry deposition accounts for 47% of the total estimated deposition flux, for both oxidized and reduced compounds. The average estimated wet plus dry deposition flux in dry savanna ecosystems is 7.5±1.8 kgN ha−1 yr−1, with approximately 30% attributed to oxidized compounds, and the rest attributed

  10. Sulfur Chemistry in the Early and Present Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Summers, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric sulfur species resulting from volcanic emissions impact the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere, impact the climate, and hence, the habitability of Mars and impact the mineralogy and composition of the surface of Mars. The geochemical/ photochemical cycling of sulfur species between the interior (via volcanism), the atmosphere (atmospheric photochemical and chemical processes) and the deposition of sulfuric acid on the surface of Mars is an important, but as yet poorly understood geochemical/ photochemical cycle on Mars. There is no observational evidence to indicate that Mars is volcanically active at the present time, however, there is strong evidence that volcanism was an important and widespread process on early Mars. The chemistry and photochemistry of sulfur species in the early and present atmosphere of Mars will be assessed using a one-dimensional photochemical model. Since it is generally assumed that the atmosphere of early Mars was significantly denser than the present 6-millibar atmosphere, photochemical calculations were performed for the present atmosphere and for the atmosphere of early Mars with assumed surface pressures of 60 and 350-millibars, where higher surface pressure resulted from enhanced atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). The following sections include the results of earlier modeling studies, a summary of the one-dimensional photochemical model used in this study, a summary of the photochemistry and chemistry of sulfur species in the atmosphere of Mars and some of the results of the calculations.

  11. Sulfur dioxide contributions to the atmosphere by volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, R E; Jepsen, A

    1973-11-01

    The first extensive measurements by remote-sensing correlation spectrometry of the sulfur dioxide emitted by volcanic plumes indicate that on the order of 10(3) metric tons of sulfur dioxide gas enter the atmosphere daily from Central American volcanoes. Extrapolation gives a minimum estimate of the annual amount of sulfur dioxide emitted from the world's volcanoes of about 10(7) metric tons.

  12. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K J; Richardson, S J; Miles, N L

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2-3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute

  13. The global atmospheric budget of ethanol revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. V. Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is an important biogenic volatile organic compound, which is increasingly used as a fuel for motor vehicles; therefore, an improved understanding of its atmospheric cycle is important. In this paper we use three sets of observational data, measured emissions of ethanol from living plants, measured concentrations of ethanol in the atmosphere and measured hydroxyl concentrations in the atmosphere (by methyl chloroform titration, to make two independent estimates related to the rate of cycling of ethanol through the atmosphere. In the first estimate, simple calculations give the emission rate of ethanol from living plants as 26 (range, 10–38 Tg yr−1. This contributes significantly to the total global ethanol source of 42 (range, 25–56 Tg yr−1. In the second estimate, the total losses of ethanol from the global atmosphere are 70 (range, 50–90 Tg yr−1, with about three-quarters of the ethanol removed by reaction with hydroxyl radicals in the gaseous and aqueous phases of the atmosphere, and the remainder lost through wet and dry deposition to land. These values of both the source of ethanol from living plants and the removal of atmospheric ethanol via oxidation by hydroxyl radicals (derived entirely from observations are significantly larger than those in recent literature. We suggest that a revision of the estimate of global ethanol emissions from plants to the atmosphere to a value comparable with this analysis is warranted.

  14. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Guo, H.

    2015-12-01

    Wet deposition and dry deposition reduce their concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen contained air pollutants in atmosphere, but lead to increase of sulfur and nitrogen fluxes to the surface. Atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen can lead to acidification of surface water bodies (lakes, rivers, and coasts) and subsequent damage to aquatic ecosystems as well as damage to forests and vegetation. Louisiana has abundant water resources with approximately 11% of the total surface area composed of water bodies. It is important to protect water resources from excessive atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen. However, the information obtained from the observation systems for understanding the deposition of sulfur and nitrogen and the adverse effects in Louisiana is limited. This study uses a source-oriented CMAQ model to simulate emission, formation, transport, and deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species in Louisiana. WRF is used to generate the meteorological inputs and SMOKE is used to generate the emissions based on national emission inventory (NEI). The forms and quantities of sulfur and nitrogen deposition from wet and dry processes in Louisiana will be discovered. The spatial and temporal variations of sulfur and nitrogen fluxes will be quantified and contributions of major source sectors or source regions will be quantified.

  15. Seasonal variation of the atmospheric energy budget on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Montabone, L.; Ruan, T.; Valeanu, A.; Wang, Y.; Young, R. M. B.

    2014-04-01

    We compute a detailed Lorenz energy budget [1] to improve our understanding of the dynamical circulation of the martian atmosphere. Results suggest that the circulation of the martian atmosphere is is governed mostly by baroclinic instability, except during a 2 to 3 month long period around the northern hemisphere winter solstice when barotropic and baroclinic instabilites coincide. The difference between diurnally averaged quantities and the full energy budget also indicate a major role for diurnal tides in enabling a direct transfer of energy from diurnal heating to eddy potential and kinetic energy.

  16. Entropy budget of the earth,atmosphere and ocean system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Zijun; YAN Youfangand; QI Yiquan

    2004-01-01

    The energy budget in the system of the earth, atmosphere and ocean conforms to the first law of thermodynamics, namely the law of conservation of energy, and it is balanced when the system is in a steady-state condition. However, the entropy budget following the second law of thermodynamics is unbalanced. In this paper, we deduce the expressions of entropy flux and re-estimate the earth, atmosphere and ocean annual mean entropy budget with the updated climatologically global mean energy budget and the climatologically air-sea flux data. The calculated results show that the earth system obtains a net influx of negative entropy (-1179.3 mWm-2K-1) from its surroundings, and the atmosphere and the ocean systems obtain a net input of negative entropy at about -537.4 mWm-2K-1 and -555.6 mWm-2K-1, respectively. Calculations of the entropy budget can provide some guidance for further understanding the spatial-temporal change of the local entropy flux, and the entropy production resulting from all kinds of irreversible processes inside these systems.

  17. Quantifying the global atmospheric power budget

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, Anastassia M; Nefiodov, Andrei V; Sheil, Douglas; Nobre, Antonio Donato; Li, Bai-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the definition of mechanical work for an ideal gas, we present a novel derivation linking global wind power to measurable atmospheric parameters. The resulting expression distinguishes three components: the kinetic power associated with horizontal motion, the kinetic power associated with vertical motion and the gravitational power of precipitation. We discuss the caveats associated with integration of material derivatives in the presence of phase transitions and how these affect published analyses of global atmospheric power. Using the MERRA database for the years 2009-2015 (three hourly data on the 1.25$^{\\rm o} \\times$ 1.25$^{\\rm o}$ grid at 42 pressure levels) we estimate total atmospheric power at 3.1 W m$^{-2}$ and kinetic power at 2.6 W m$^{-2}$. The difference between the two (0.5 W m$^{-2}$) is about half the independently estimated gravitational power of precipitation (1 W m$^{-2}$). We explain how this discrepancy arises from the limited spatial and temporal resolution of the database...

  18. Effects of Irrigation in India on the Atmospheric Water Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, O.A.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Stacke, T.; Wiltshire, A.; Lucas-Picher, P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of large-scale irrigation in India on the moisture budget of the atmosphere was investigated using three regional climate models and one global climate model, all of which performed an irrigated run and a natural run without irrigation. Using a common irrigation map, year-round irrigation

  19. Atmospheric Sulfur Deposition on Farmland in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ti-Jian; YANG Hao-Ming; GAO Li-Jie; ZHANG Yan; HU Zheng-Yi; XU Cheng-Kai

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric sulfur deposition onto typical farmland in East China was investigated using both field measurements and numerical modeling. The field measurements were conducted at the Experiment Station of Red Soil Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 10 km from Yingtan, Jiangxi Province, East China, between November 1998 and October 1999, and at the Changshu Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in a rapidly developing region of Jiangsu Province, East China, between April 2001 and March 2002. The regional acid deposition model system (RegADMS), in which the dry deposition velocities of SO2 and sulfate aerosols (SO42-) were estimated using a big-leaf resistance analogy model, was applied to simulate air sulfur deposition over East China and sulfur deposition onto lands of different use types in East China. The wet scavenging coefficients were parameterized in terms of precipitation rate, and the effect of sub-grid processes due to inhomogeneous land use on dry deposition velocity was also included. Results of the field measurements showed that over 83% of the total sulfur deposition at the Yingtan site was dry deposition, while at the Changshu site42% was dry deposition. The total sulfur deposition was much larger at the Yingtan site than at the Changshu site, which suggested contrasting air pollution and meteorological situations. The modeling results revealed that the total annual sulfur deposition over East China was 1.88 Mt, of which 72.8% was deposited onto farmland, and dry deposition accounted for 43% of the total sulfur deposited. The modeling results were generally in agreement with those from the observations.Overall, this study suggested that atmospheric sulfur deposition played an important role in the soil sulfur balance, which could have a significant effect on agricultural ecosystems in the study region.

  20. Atmospheric degradation mechanism of organic sulfur compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Arsene, C.

    2002-02-01

    In the present work a detailed product study has been performed on the OH radical initiated oxidation of dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl sulphoxide, under different conditions of temperature, partial pressure of oxygen and NO{sub x} concentration, in order to better define the degradation mechanism of the above compounds under conditions which prevail in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  1. Atmospheric hydrological budget with its effects over Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAIJingyu; XUXiangde

    2004-01-01

    Based on 1961-2000 NCEP/NCAR monthly mean reanalysis datasets, vapor transfer and hydrological budget over the Tibetan Plateau are investigated. The Plateau is a vapor sink all the year round. In summer, vapor is convergent in lower levels (from surface to 500 hPa) and divergent in upper levels (from 400 to 300 hPa), with 450 hPa referred to as level of non-divergence. Two levels have different hydrologic budget signatures: the budget is negative at the upper levels from February to November, i.e., vapor transfers from the upper levels over the plateau; as to the lower, the negative (positive) budget occurs during the winter (summer) half year. Evidence also indicates that Tibetan Plateau is a "vapor transition belt", vapor from the south and the west is transferred from lower to upper levels there in summer, which will affect surrounding regions, including eastern China, especially, the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze. Vapor transfer exerts significant influence on precipitation in summertime months. Vapor transferred from the upper layers helps humidify eastern China, with coefficient -0.3 of the upper budget to the precipitation over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze (MLRY); also, vapor transferred from east side (27.5°-32.5°N) of the upper level has remarkable relationship with precipitation, the coefficient being 0.41. The convergence of the lower level vapor has great effects on the local precipitation over the plateau, with coefficient reaching 0.44, and the vapor passage affects the advance and retreat of the rainbelt. In general, atmospheric hydrologic budget and vapor transfer over the plateau have noticeable effects on precipitation of the target region as well as the ambient areas.

  2. Atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen in West Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet-only rainwater composition on a weekly basis was determined at four sites in West Java, Indonesia, from June 1991 to June 1992. Three sites were near the extreme western end of Java, surrounding a coal-fired power station at Suralaya. The fourth site was ∼ 100 km to the east in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. Over the 12 months study period wet deposition of sulfate at the three western sites varied between 32-46 meq m-2 while nitrate varied between 10-14 meq m-2. Wet deposition at the Jakarta site was systematically higher, at 56 meq m-2 for sulfate and 20 meq m-2 for nitrate. Since sulfate and nitrate wet deposition fluxes in the nearby and relatively unpopulated regions of typical Australia are both only ∼ 5 meq m-2 anthropogenic emissions of S and N apparently cause significant atmospheric acidification in Java. It is possible that total acid deposition fluxes (of S and N) in parts of Java are comparable with those responsible for environmental degradation in acid-sensitive parts of Europe and North America. 19 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Processes linking the hydrological cycle and the atmospheric radiative budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueglistaler, Stephan; Dinh, Tra

    2016-04-01

    We study the response of the strength of the global hydrological cycle to changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) using the HiRAM General Circulation Model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), with the objective to better connect the well-known energetic constraints to physical processes. We find that idealized model setups using a global slab ocean and annual mean insolation give similar scalings as coupled atmosphere-ocean models with realistic land and topography. Using the surface temperatures from the slab ocean runs, we analyse the response in the atmospheric state and hydrological cycle separately for a change in CO2 (but fixed surface temperature), and for a change in surface temperature (but fixed CO2). The former perturbation is also referred to as the "fast" response, whereas the latter is commonly used to diagnose a model's climate sensitivity. As expected from the perspective of the atmospheric radiative budget, an increase in CO2 at fixed surface temperature decreases the strength of the hydrological cycle, and an increase in surface temperature increases the strength of the hydrological cycle. However, the physical processes that connect the atmospheric radiative energy budget to the sensible and latent heat fluxes at the surface remain not well understood. The responses to the two perturbations are linearly additive, and we find that the experiment with fixed surface temperature and changes in CO2 is of great relevance to understanding the total response. This result points to the importance of local radiative heating rate changes rather than just the net atmospheric radiative loss of energy. Although larger in magnitude, the response to changes in surface temperature is dominated by the temperature dependence of the water vapor pressure, but in both cases changes in near-surface relative humidity are very important.

  4. Regional atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen over the British isles assessed using a multi-layer atmospheric transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, N.; Tang, Y.S.; Dragosits, U.; Kluizenaar, Y.de; Sutton, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen for the major political regions of the British Isles are investigated with a multi-layer atmospheric transport model. The model is validated against measurements of NH3 concentration and is developed to provide atmospheric budgets for defined subdomains of the

  5. Sulfur speciation and bioaccumulation in camphor tree leaves as atmospheric sulfur indicator analyzed by synchrotron radiation XRF and XANES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianrong; Zhang, Guilin; Bao, Liangman; Long, Shilei; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan; Ma, Chenyan; Zhao, Yidong

    2013-03-01

    Analyzing and understanding the effects of ambient pollution on plants is getting more and more attention as a topic of environmental biology. A method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy was established to analyze the sulfur concentration and speciation in mature camphor tree leaves (CTLs), which were sampled from 5 local fields in Shanghai, China. Annual SO2 concentration, SO4(2-) concentration in atmospheric particulate, SO4(2-) and sulfur concentration in soil were also analyzed to explore the relationship between ambient sulfur sources and the sulfur nutrient cycling in CTLs. Total sulfur concentration in mature camphor tree leaves was 766-1704 mg/kg. The mainly detected sulfur states and their corresponding compounds were +6 (sulfate, include inorganic sulfate and organic sulfate), +5.2 (sulfonate), +2.2 (suloxides), +0.6 (thiols and thiothers), +0.2 (organic sulfides). Total sulfur concentration was strongly correlated with sulfate proportion with a linear correlation coefficient up to 0.977, which suggested that sulfur accumulated in CTLs as sulfate form. Reduced sulfur compounds (organic sulfides, thiols, thioethers, sulfoxide and sulfonate) assimilation was sufficed to meet the nutrient requirement for growth at a balanced level around 526 mg/kg. The sulfate accumulation mainly caused by atmospheric sulfur pollution such as SO2 and airborne sulfate particulate instead of soil contamination. From urban to suburb place, sulfate in mature CTLs decreased as the atmospheric sulfur pollution reduced, but a dramatic increase presented near the seashore, where the marine sulfate emission and maritime activity pollution were significant. The sulfur concentration and speciation in mature CTLs effectively represented the long-term biological accumulation of atmospheric sulfur pollution in local environment. PMID:23923435

  6. Global atmospheric budget of simple monocyclic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Sander, Rolf; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The global atmospheric budget and distribution of monocyclic aromatic compounds is estimated, using an atmospheric chemistry general circulation model. Simulation results are evaluated with an ensemble of surface and aircraft observations with the goal of understanding emission, production and removal of these compounds.Anthropogenic emissions provided by the RCP database represent the largest source of aromatics in the model (≃ 23 TgC year-1) and biomass burning from the GFAS inventory the second largest (≃ 5 TgC year-1). The simulated chemical production of aromatics accounts for ≃ 5 TgC year-1. The atmospheric burden of aromatics sums up to 0.3 TgC. The main removal process of aromatics is photochemical decomposition (≃ 27 TgC year-1), while wet and dry deposition are responsible for a removal of ≃ 4 TgC year-1.Simulated mixing ratios at the surface and elsewhere in the troposphere show good spatial and temporal agreement with the observations for benzene, although the model generally underestimates mixing ratios. Toluene is generally well reproduced by the model at the surface, but mixing ratios in the free troposphere are underestimated. Finally, larger discrepancies are found for xylenes: surface mixing ratios are not only overestimated but also a low temporal correlation is found with respect to in situ observations.

  7. Sulfur speciation and bioaccumulation in camphor tree leaves as atmospheric sulfur indicator analyzed by synchrotron radiation XRF and XANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianrong Zeng; Guilin Zhang; Liangman Bao; Shilei Long; Mingguang Tan; Yan Li; Chenyan Ma

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing and understanding the effects of ambient pollution on plants is getting more and more attention as a topic of environmentalbiology.A method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy wasestablished to analyze the sulfur concentration and speciation in mature camphor tree leaves (CTLs),which were sampled from 5 localfields in Shanghai,China.Annual SO2 concentration,SO42-concentration in atmospheric particulate,SO42-and sulfur concentrationin soil were also analyzed to explore the relationship between ambient sulfur sources and the sulfur nutrient cycling in CTLs.Totalsulfur concentration in mature camphor tree leaves was 766-1704 mg/kg.The mainly detected sulfur states and their correspondingcompounds were +6 (sulfate,include inorganic sulfate and organic sulfate),+5.2 (sulfonate),+2.2 (suloxides),+0.6 (thiols andthiothers),+0.2 (organic sulfides).Total sulfur concentration was strongly correlated with sulfate proportion with a linear correlationcoefficient up to 0.977,which suggested that sulfur accumulated in CTLs as sulfate form.Reduced sulfur compounds (organic sulfides,thiols,thioethers,sulfoxide and sulfonate) assimilation was sufficed to meet the nutrient requirement for growth at a balanced levelaround 526 mg/kg.The sulfate accumulation mainly caused by atmospheric sulfur pollution such as SO2 and airborne sulfate particulateinstead of soil contamination.From urban to suburb place,sulfate in mature CTLs decreased as the atmospheric sulfur pollution reduced,but a dramatic increase presented near the seashore,where the marine sulfate emission and maritime activity pollution were significant.The sulfur concentration and speciation in mature CTLs effectively represented the long-term biological accumulation of atmosphericsulfur pollution in local environment.

  8. Atmospheric Sulfur Hexafluoride: Measurements and Emission Estimates from 1970 - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Miller, B. R.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Krummel, P. B.; Steele, L. P.; Fraser, P. J.; Leist, M.; Weiss, R. F.; Harth, C. M.; O'Doherty, S. J.; Greally, B. R.; Simmonds, P. G.; Derek, N.; Vollmer, M. K.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Porter, L. W.

    2009-12-01

    We present an air history of atmospheric sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) from the early 1970s through 2008. During this period, concentrations of this extremely potent and long-lived greenhouse gas have increased by more than an order of magnitude, and its growth has accelerated in recent years. In this study, historical concentrations are determined from archived air samples measured on the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) ‘Medusa’ gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system. These data are combined with modern high-frequency measurements from the AGAGE and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in situ networks and ˜weekly samples from the NOAA flask network, to produce a unique time series with increasing global coverage spanning almost four decades. Using the three-dimensional chemical transport Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5) and a discrete Kalman filter, we derive estimates of the annual emission strength of SF6 on hemispheric scales from 1970 - 2004 and on continental scales from 2004 - 2008. Our emission estimates are compared to the recently compiled Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v4), and emissions reported under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The cause of the recent growth rate increase is also investigated, indicating that the origin of the required emissions rise is likely to be South-East Asia.

  9. Atmospheric sulfur and climate changes: a modelling study at mid and high-southern latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mid and high-southern latitudes are still marginally affected by anthropogenic sulfur emissions. They are the only regions in the world where the natural cycle of the atmospheric sulfur may still be observed. Sulfur aerosols are well-known for their radiative impact, and thus interact with climate. Climate can in turn affect atmospheric sulfur sources, distribution and chemistry. Antarctic ice cores provide information on the evolution of climate and sulfur deposition at the surface of the ice sheet at glacial-interglacial time scales. The aim of this thesis is to develop and use modeling towards a better understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle in antarctic and sub-antarctic regions. Ice core data are used to validate model results under glacial climate conditions. An Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) coupled to a sulfur chemistry module is used: the LMD-ZTSulfur model, version 4. An update of both the physical and chemical parts of the model. The model was first performed. The impact of there changes on modelled sulfur cycle are evaluated for modern climate. Further, boundary conditions are adapted to simulate the atmospheric circulation and sulfur cycle at the Last Glacial Maximum, approximately 20,000 years ago. In the model, sulfur is found to be highly sensitive to antarctic sea-ice coverage, which is still poorly known during the ice age. An original dataset of ice-age sea-ice coverage was developed. Its impact on the oceanic emissions of dimethyl sulfide, main precursor of sulfur aerosols at high-southern latitudes, is discussed. Using the same oceanic sulfur reservoirs as for present day climate, the model broadly reproduces the glacial deposits of sulfur aerosols on the Antarctic plateau, suggesting little impact of climate on oceanic sulfur production in the Antarctic region. Sensitivity tests were carried out to draw an up-to-date status of major uncertainties and difficulties facing future progress in understanding atmospheric

  10. Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle Simulated in The Global Model GOCART: Model Description and Global Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian; Rood, Richard B.; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Mueller, Jean-Francois; Thompson, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    The Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The model uses the simulated meteorological data from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). Global sulfur budgets from a 6-year simulation for SO2, sulfate, dimethylsulfide (DMS), and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) are presented in this paper. In a normal year without major volcanic perturbations, about 20% of the sulfate precursor emission is from natural sources (biogenic and volcanic) and 80% is anthropogenic: the same sources contribute 339% and 67% respectively to the total sulfate burden. A sulfate production efficiency of 0.41 - 0.42 is estimated in the model, an efficiency which is defined as a ratio of the amount oi sulfate produced to the total amount of SO2 emitted and produced in the atmosphere. This value indicates that less than half of the SO2 entering the atmosphere contributes to the sulfate production, the rest being removed by dry and wet depositions. In a simulation for 1990, we estimate a total sulfate production of 39 Tg S /yr with 36% and 64% respectively from in-air and in-cloud oxidation of SO2. We also demonstrate that major volcanic eruptions, such as the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991, can significantly change the sulfate formation pathways, distributions, abundance, and lifetime. Comparison with other models shows that the parameterizations for wet removal or wet production of sulfate are the most critical factors in determining the burdens of SO2 and sulfate. Therefore, a priority for future research should be to reduce the large uncertainties associated with the wet physical and chemical processes.

  11. Atmospheric Sulfur Hexafluoride: Sources, Sinks and Greenhouse Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Nien Dak; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Shia, George; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, Frank J.; Murcray, David G.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1993-01-01

    Model calculations using estimated reaction rates of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) with OH and 0('D) indicate that the atmospheric lifetime due to these processes may be very long (25,000 years). An upper limit for the UV cross section would suggest a photolysis lifetime much longer than 1000 years. The possibility of other removal mechanisms are discussed. The estimated lifetimes are consistent with other estimated values based on recent laboratory measurements. There appears to be no known natural source of SF6. An estimate of the current production rate of SF6 is about 5 kt/yr. Based on historical emission rates, we calculated a present-day atmospheric concentrations for SF6 of about 2.5 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) and compared the results with available atmospheric measurements. It is difficult to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of SF6 based on mass balance of the emission rate and observed abundance. There are large uncertainties concerning what portion of the SF6 is released to the atmosphere. Even if the emission rate were precisely known, it would be difficult to distinguish among lifetimes longer than 100 years since the current abundance of SF6 is due to emission in the past three decades. More information on the measured trends over the past decade and observed vertical and latitudinal distributions of SF6 in the lower stratosphere will help to narrow the uncertainty in the lifetime. Based on laboratory-measured IR absorption cross section for SF6, we showed that SF6 is about 3 times more effective as a greenhouse gas compared to CFC 11 on a per molecule basis. However, its effect on atmospheric warming will be minimal because of its very small concentration. We estimated the future concentration of SF6 at 2010 to be 8 and 10 pptv based on two projected emission scenarios. The corresponding equilibrium warming of 0.0035 C and 0.0043 C is to be compared with the estimated warming due to CO2 increase of about 0.8 C in the same period.

  12. Experimental Observation of Strongly Bound Dimers of Sulfuric Acid: Application to Nucleation in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petaja, Tuukka; Sipila, Mikko; Paasonen, Pauli;

    2011-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is a key compound in atmospheric nucleation. Here we report on the observation of a close-to-collision-limited sulfuric acid dimer formation in atmospherically relevant laboratory conditions in the absence of measurable quantities of ammonia or organics. The observed dimer formation...... compound(s) with (a) concentration(s) high enough to prevent the dimer evaporation. Such a stabilizing compound should be abundant enough in any natural environment and would therefore not limit the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the atmosphere....

  13. Kinetics of Thermochemical Reactions Important in the Venus Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the rates of several thermochemical gas-solid reactions between sulfur gases in the Venus atmosphere and reactive minerals on the hot Venus surface. Despite the great importance of these reactions for the maintenance of significant amounts of sulfur gases (and thus for the maintenance of the global cloud cover) in the atmosphere of Venus, essentially no kinetic data are currently available for them.

  14. Assessment of atmospheric sulfur with the epilithic moss Haplocladium microphyllum: Evidences from tissue sulfur and delta{sup 34}S analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xueyan, E-mail: liuxueyan@vip.skleg.c [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guanshui Road 46, Guiyang 550002, Guizhou Province (China); Xiao Huayun, E-mail: xiaohuayun@vip.skleg.c [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guanshui Road 46, Guiyang 550002, Guizhou Province (China); Liu Congqiang, E-mail: liucongqiang@vip.skleg.c [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guanshui Road 46, Guiyang 550002, Guizhou Province (China); Xiao Hongwei; Wang Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guanshui Road 46, Guiyang 550002, Guizhou Province (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-07-15

    The application of geochemical signals in mosses is more and more popular to investigate the deposition of atmospheric pollutants, but it is unclear whether records of atmospheric sulfur in mosses differ between their diverse habitats. This study aimed to investigate the influence of growing condition on tissue sulfur and delta{sup 34}S of Haplocladium microphyllum. Epilithic and terricolous mosses in open fields, mosses under different canopy conditions were considered. We found that tissue sulfur and delta{sup 34}S of mosses under different habitats were not consistent and could not be compared for atmospheric sulfur research with each other even collected at the same site, moss sulfur and delta{sup 34}S records would be distorted by subsoil and upper canopies in different degrees, which possibly mislead the interpretation of atmospheric sulfur level and sources. Consequently, mosses on open rocks can be used reliably to assess atmospheric-derived sulfur in view of their identical sulfur and delta{sup 34}S evidences. - Mosses on open rocky surfaces are reliable bioindicators of atmospheric sulfur deposition.

  15. Identifying the change in atmospheric sulfur sources in China using isotopic ratios in mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Tang, Cong-Guo; Xiao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xue-Yan; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    A considerable number of studies on rainwater sulfur isotopic ratios (δ34Srain) have been conducted to trace sulfur sources at a large number of sites in the past. If longitudinal studies on the isotope composition of precipitation sulfate were conducted, it is possible to relate that to changes in sulfur emissions. But direct measurement needs considerable labor and time. So, in this study, sulfur isotopic ratios in rainwater and mosses were analyzed at Guiyang and Nanchang to evaluate the possibility of using mosses as a substitute for rainwater. We found that present moss sulfur isotopic ratios were comparable to those of present rainwater. Additionally, we investigated the changes of atmospheric sulfur sources and sulfur concentrations using an isotopic graphic analysis at five industrial cities, two forested areas, and two remote areas in China. Mosses in industrial cities show a wide range of δ34S values, with the highest occurring at Chongqing (+3.9‰) and the lowest at Guiyang (-3.1‰). But as compared to those in forested and remote areas, δ34S values of mosses in all the five industrial cities are lower. On the basis of isotopic comparisons between past rainwater (reported in the literature) and present mosses, in the plot of δ34Smoss versus δ34Srain, six zones indicating different atmospheric sulfur change are separated by the 1:1 line and δ34S values of potential sulfur sources. Our results indicate that atmospheric sulfur pollution in most of the industrial cities decreased, while at the two forested areas, no significant changes were observed, and a new anxiousness coming from new energy sources (e.g., oil) appeared in some cities. Studies on the change of ambient SO2 concentrations support these results.

  16. Biogeochemical context impacts seawater pH changes resulting from atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, M.; Hunter, K.A.; Liss, P.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater acidification can be induced both by absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and by atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Their relative significance, interplay, and dependency on water column biogeochemistry are not well understood. Using a simple biogeoc

  17. Atmospheric Sulfur Deposition for a Red Soil Broadleaf Forest in Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Cheng-Kai; HU Zheng-Yi; CAI Zu-Cong; WANG Ti-Jian; HE Yuan-Qiu; CAO Zhi-Hong

    2004-01-01

    A two-year study in a typical red soil region of Southern China was conducted to determine 1) the dry deposition velocity (Vd) for SO2 and particulate SO2 4- above a broadleaf forest, and 2) atmospheric sulfur fluxes so as to estimate the contribution of various fractions in the total. Using a resistance model based on continuous hourly meteorological data, atmospheric dry sulfur deposition in a forest was estimated according to Vd and concentrations of both atmospheric SO2 and particulate SO24-. Meanwhile, wet S deposition was estimated based on rainfall and sulfate concentrations in the rainwater. Results showed that about 99% of the dry sulfur deposition flux in the forest resulted from SO2 dry deposition.In addition, the observed dry S deposition was greater in 2002 than in 2000 because of a higher average concentration of SO2 in 2002 than in 2000 and not because of the average dry deposition velocity which was lower for SO2 in 2002. Also,dry SO2 deposition was the dominant fraction of deposited atmospheric sulfur in forests, contributing over 69% of the total annual sulfur deposition. Thus, dry SO2 deposition should be considered when estimating sulfur balance in forest ecological systems.

  18. Sulfur isotopic composition and source identification of atmospheric environment in central Zhejiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere are significant factors leading to acidification of the atmospheric environment and worsening the pollution of acid deposition. Because of the "fingerprint" characteristics of the stable sulfur isotopic composition, sulfur isotope has been widely adopted in environmental researches concerning sulfur cycle and source identification. In this study, the atmospheric environment of Jinhua City, central Zhejiang Province, was continuously monitored, and the sulfur isotopic composition of SO2 and sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere was analyzed. The results indicate that the variation of δ34S values for SO2 ranges from 1.0‰ to 7.5‰, and annual average is 4.7‰±2.3‰, whereas that of sulfate aerosols ranges from 6.4‰ to 9.8‰,and annual average is 8.1‰±1.0‰. The δ 34S values for SO2 have significant seasonal variations, which are 7.0‰ in winter and 3.3‰ in summer. These variations cannot be attributed to a single factor, and we suggest a temperature-dependent isotope equilibrium fractionation and elevated biogenic sulfur emissions of isotopically light S in summer may be the main controlling mechanisms. Furthermore, we also discuss the δ 34S model of atmospheric SO2 oxidation to form sulfate, and suggest that heterogeneous oxidation dominates in the oxidation reactions of atmospheric SO2 in the central Zhejiang Province. We further suggest that the relative humidity in the atmosphere plays an important role in the oxidation mechanism of atmospheric SO2.

  19. Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle Effects of Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Carbonyl Sulfide(OCS) is considered to be one of the major sources of sulfur appearing in the stratosphere due to its relative inertness, about I to 10 yearsl. However, the roles of OCS as well as other reduced sulfur compounds such as carbon disulfide (CS2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and dimethyl disulfide(CH3)2S2, are not completely understood in the atmosphenc sulfur cycle. Consequently vely little information is available about the effect of sulfur compounds in the stratosphere. The ability of OCS to penetrate into the stratosphere makes it an excellent tracer for study of the role of the sulfi r cycle in stratospheric chemistry. Previously techniques such as gas chromatography and whole air sampling have been used to measure OCS analytically. Each technique had its drawbacks however, with both being quite slow, and whole air sampling being somewhat unreliable. With molecular spectroscopy, however, it has been found in recent years that the tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDL) provides a very rapid and accurate method of measuring OCS and other trace gases

  20. Study of Grain Growth of CZTS Nanoparticles Annealed in Sulfur Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Sara Lena Josefin; Crovetto, Andrea; Hansen, Ole;

    2014-01-01

    of the main limitations for this approach, and (2) that grain boundaries and defects are believed to be a site for recombination that limits the efficiency. Annealing in vacuum and/or a nitrogen atmosphere facilitates grain growth and improves the electronic properties. Conventionally selenization (annealing...... in selenium) shows the best results, however sulfurization (annealing in sulfur) has the advantage of leading to a non-toxic material. In this work, nanocrystals of CZTS with a targeted Cu-poor/Zn-rich composition are synthesized through a hot-injection method with oleylamine as the solvent. The nanocrystal...... inks are deposited through doctor blading in octanethiol, and annealed in a vacuum furnace using a graphite box with sulfur. The surface morphology and thus grain growth are studied for various annealing conditions in a 10-mbar nitrogen atmosphere with a varying amount of sulfur.The films...

  1. Homogenous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water at atmospherically relevant conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Brus, D.; K. Neitola; T. Petäjä; Vanhanen, J.; A.-P. Hyvärinen; Sipilä, M.; Paasonen, P.; Lihavainen, H.; M. Kulmala

    2010-01-01

    In this study the homogeneous nucleation rates of sulfuric acid and water were measured by using a flow tube technique. The goal was to directly compare particle formation rates obtained from atmospheric measurements with nucleation rates of freshly nucleated particles measured with particle size magnifier (PSM) which has detection efficiency of unity for particles having mobility diameter of 1.5 nm. The gas phase sulfuric acid concentration in this study was measured with the chemical ioniza...

  2. Photon and Water Mediated Sulfur Oxide and Acid Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur compounds have been observed in the atmospheres of a number of planetary bodies in our solar system including Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Europa, and Callisto. The global cloud cover on Venus located at an altitude between 50 and 80 kilometers is composed primarily of sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) and water. Planetary photochemical models have attempted to explain observations of sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides with significant discrepancies remaining between models and observation. In particular, high SO_2 mixing ratios are observed above 90 km which exceed model predictions by orders of magnitude. Work recently done in the Vaida lab has shown red light can drive photochemistry through overtone pumping for acids like H_2SO_4 and has been successful in explaining much of the sulfur chemistry in Earth's atmosphere. Water can have a number of interesting effects such as catalysis, suppression, and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical processes. We investigate the role of water complexes in the hydration of sulfur oxides and dehydration of sulfur acids and present spectroscopic studies to document such effects. We investigate these reactions using FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and will report on our findings.

  3. [CO2 Budget and Atmospheric Rectification (COBRA) Over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the CO2 Budget and Rectification Airborne (COBRA) study was to assess terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon dioxide using an air-borne study. The study was designed to address the measurement gap between plot-scale direct flux measurements and background hemispheric-scale constraints and to refine techniques for measuring terrestrial fluxes at regional to continental scales. The initial funded effort (reported on here) was to involve two air-borne campaigns over North America, one in summer and one in winter. Measurements for COBRA (given the acronym C02BAR in the initial proposal) were conducted from the University of North Dakota Citation 11, a twin-engine jet aircraft capable of profiling from the surface to 12 km and cruising for up to 4 hours and 175m/s. Onboard instrumentation measured concentrations of CO2, CO, and H2O, and meteorological parameters at high rates. In addition, two separate flask sampling systems collected discrete samples for laboratory analysis of CO2,CO, CH4, N2O, SF6, H2, 13CO2, C18O16O,O2/N2, and Ar/N2. The project involved a collaboration between a number of institutions, including (but not limited to) Harvard, NOAA-CMDL, the University of North Dakota, and Scripps.

  4. Microseepage in drylands: Flux and implications in the global atmospheric source/sink budget of methane

    OpenAIRE

    Etiope, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Klusman, R. W.; Dept. of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Co., 80401, United States

    2010-01-01

    Drylands are considered a net sink for atmospheric methane and a main item of the global inventories of the greenhouse gas budget. It is outlined here, however, that a significant portion of drylands occur over sedimentary basins hosting natural gas and oil reservoirs, where gas migration to the surface takes place, producing positive fluxes of methane into the atmosphere. New field surveys, in different hydrocarbonprone basins, confirm that microseepage, enhanced by faults and fr...

  5. Comment on 'Current Budget of the Atmospheric Electric Global Circuit'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Kevin T.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, three major issues relevant to Kasemir's new model will be addressed. The first concerns Kasemir's assertion that there are significant differences between the potentials associated with the new model and the conventional model. A recalculation of these potentials reveals that both models provide equivalent results for the potential difference between the Earth and ionosphere. The second issue to be addressed is Kasemir's assertion that discrepancies in the electric potentials associated with both models can be attributed to modeling the Earth as a sphere, instead of as a planar surface. A simple analytical comparison will demonstrate that differences in the equations for the potentials of the atmosphere derived with a spherical and a planar Earth are negligible for applications to global current flow. Finally, the third issue to be discussed is Kasemir's claim that numerous aspects of the conventional model are incorrect, including the role of the ionosphere in global current flow as well as the significance of cloud-to-ground lightning in supplying charge to the global circuit. In order to refute these misconceptions, it will be shown that these aspects related to the flow of charge in the atmosphere are accurately described by the conventional model of the global circuit.

  6. Centennial evolution of the atmospheric methane budget: what do the carbon isotopes tell us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Lassey

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how the methane source inventory and sinks have evolved over recent centuries. New and detailed records of methane mixing ratio and isotopic composition (12CH4, 13CH4 and 14CH4 from analyses of air trapped in polar ice and firn can enhance this knowledge. We use existing bottom-up constructions of the source history, including ''EDGAR''-based constructions, to assemble a model of the evolving global budget for methane and for its carbon isotope composition through the 20th century. By matching such budgets to atmospheric data, we examine the constraints imposed by isotope information on those budget evolutions. Balancing both 12CH4 and 13CH4 budgets requires participation by a highly-fractionating atmospheric sink such as active chlorine (removing at least 10 Tg yr-1, which has been proposed independently. Examining a companion budget evolution for 14CH4 exposes uncertainties in inferring the fossil-methane source from atmospheric 14CH4 data. Specifically, methane evolution during the nuclear era is sensitive to the cycling dynamics of ''bomb 14C'' (originating from atmospheric weapons tests through the biosphere. In addition, since ca 1970, direct production and release of 14CH4 from nuclear-power facilities is influential but poorly quantified. Atmospheric 14CH4 determinations in the nuclear era have the potential to better characterize biospheric carbon cycling and to better quantify the ill-determined nuclear-power source.

  7. Contribution of natural terrestrial sources to the atmospheric chloroform budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, R. C.; Abel, T.; Pan, D.; Whelan, M.

    2008-12-01

    Chloroform (trichloromethane, CHCl3) is the second largest carrier of natural chlorine in the troposphere after methyl chloride, contributing to the reactive chlorine burden in the troposphere and to ozone destruction in the stratosphere. Our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of atmospheric CHCl3 has undergone major adjustments recently, including the quantification of the total atmospheric burden of this compound, the estimated global source and sink strengths, and the relative contributions of anthropogenic versus natural contributions. Numerous natural terrestrial sources have been identified, including temperate peatlands, Arctic tundra, termite mounds, salt marshes, grasslands, forests and woodlands. However, the wide variability of fluxes within each ecosystem has complicated efforts to quantify the overall terrestrial source. In addition, the environmental and biogeochemical controls remain largely unknown. We shall present a comparison of recent CHCl3 flux measurements that cover a range of biome types and climatic conditions. To address within-biome variability, flux measurements from the Arctic tundra and temperate grasslands will be compared to common environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, soil moisture, solar insolation) and other trace gas fluxes (CH3Cl, CH4, CCl4). The generally poor correlations demonstrate that the variability of CHCl3 emissions may be affected by site-specific parameters that are not currently measured or by drastic changes in hydrologic conditions. Similar patterns are observed in laboratory incubations of tundra peat and grassland soils. We explore the possibility that the humification of plant material, which has been shown to produce organochlorine compounds through the chlorination of organic matter, may contribute to CHCl3 emissions. If this link exists, then CHCl3 production could potentially act as a proxy for organic matter degradation and carbon sequestration, essential biogeochemical and ecosystem

  8. Laboratory measurements and modeling of molecular photoabsorption in the ultraviolet for planetary atmospheres applications: diatomic sulfur and sulfur monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on diatomic sulfur (S _{2}) and sulfur monoxide (SO) are in progress. S _{2}: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S _{2} absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S _{2} from 240 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have constructed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S _{2} vapor at a temperature of 800 K. High-resolution measurements of the absorption spectrum of the strong B - X system of S _{2} were completed using the NIST VUV-FTS at Gaithersburg, Maryland. These measurements are currently being incorporated into a coupled-channel model of the absorption spectrum of S _{2} to quantify the contributions from individual band features and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the strong predissociation signature of the B - X system. A successful coupled channels model can then be used to calculate the B - X absorption spectrum at any temperature. SO: There has been a long-standing need for high-resolution cross sections of sulfur monoxide radicals in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions, where the molecule strongly predissociates, for modeling the atmospheres of Io and Venus, and most recently for understanding sulfur isotope effects in the ancient (pre-O _{2}) atmosphere of Earth. We have produced a measurable column of SO in a continuous-flow DC discharge cell, using SO _{2} as a parent molecule. Photoabsorption measurements were recently recorded on the DESIRS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, taking advantage of the high-resolution VUV-FTS on that beamline. A number of

  9. Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN: a global budget and source attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Fischer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs, is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2. PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44% of the global source, methylglyoxal (30%, acetone (7%, and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19%. A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37% and alkanes (14%. Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.

  10. Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): a global budget and source attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Millet, D. B.; Mao, J.; Paulot, F.; Singh, H. B.; Roiger, A.; Ries, L.; Talbot, R. W.; Dzepina, K.; Pandey Deolal, S.

    2014-03-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2). PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44% of the global source), methylglyoxal (30%), acetone (7%), and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19%). A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37%) and alkanes (14%). Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.

  11. Centennial evolution of the atmospheric methane budget: what do the carbon isotopes tell us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Lassey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how the methane source inventory and sinks have evolved over recent centuries. New and detailed records of methane mixing ratio and isotopic composition (12CH4, 13CH4 and 14CH4 from analyses of air trapped in polar ice and firn can enhance this knowledge. We use existing bottom-up constructions of the source history, including "EDGAR"-based constructions, as inputs to a model of the evolving global budget for methane and for its carbon isotope composition through the 20th century. By matching such budgets to atmospheric data, we examine the constraints imposed by isotope information on those budget evolutions. Reconciling both 12CH4 and 13CH4 budgets with EDGAR-based source histories requires a combination of: a greater proportion of emissions from biomass burning and/or of fossil methane than EDGAR constructions suggest; a greater contribution from natural such emissions than is commonly supposed; and/or a significant role for active chlorine or other highly-fractionating tropospheric sink as has been independently proposed. Examining a companion budget evolution for 14CH4 exposes uncertainties in inferring the fossil-methane source from atmospheric 14CH4 data. Specifically, methane evolution during the nuclear era is sensitive to the cycling dynamics of "bomb 14C" (originating from atmospheric weapons tests through the biosphere. In addition, since ca. 1970, direct production and release of 14CH4 from nuclear-power facilities is influential but poorly quantified. Atmospheric 14CH4 determinations in the nuclear era have the potential to better characterize both biospheric carbon cycling, from photosynthesis to methane synthesis, and the nuclear-power source.

  12. Reworking of atmospheric sulfur in a Paleoarchean hydrothermal system at Londozi, Barberton Greenstone Belt, Swaziland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Desiree L.; Mason, Paul R.D.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Brouwer, Fraukje M.

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous fractionation of the minor isotopes of sulfur (δ33S, δ36S) in Archean pyrite is thought to reflect photochemical reactions in an anoxic atmosphere, with most samples falling along a reference array with δ36S/δ33S ≈ -1. Small deviations from this array record microbial sulfate reduction or

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry in Giant Planets, Brown Dwarfs, and Low-Mass Dwarf Stars II. Sulfur and Phosphorus

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, C

    2005-01-01

    We use thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations to model sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in the atmospheres of giant planets, brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, and extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). The chemical behavior of individual S- and P-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of pressure, temperature, and metallicity. Our results are independent of any particular model atmosphere and the behavior of different gases can be used to constrain atmospheric structure and metallicity. Hydrogen sulfide is the dominant sulfur gas in substellar atmospheres and approximately represents the atmospheric sulfur inventory. Depending on the prevailing S and C chemistry, the abundance of minor sulfur gases may constrain atmospheric temperatures or metallicity. Disequilibrium abundances of PH3 are expected in the observable atmospheres of substellar objects, and PH3 is representative of the total P abundance in giant planets and T dwarfs. A number of other phosphorus gases become relatively abunda...

  14. Conversion of Sulfur-Dioxide in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyger, H.; Fenger, J.

    1976-01-01

    Pertinent, previous studies of the oxidation of SO2 in the atmosphere are briefly reviewed. A project dealing with the conversion in the plume from an oil-fired power station is described in greater detail. Measurements were performed from an aircraft and included continuous registration of NOx, SO...

  15. The atmospheric sulfur cycle over the Amazon Basin. II - Wet season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Bingemer, H.; Berresheim, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Lewis, B. L.

    1990-01-01

    The fluxes and concentrations of atmospheric sulfur species were determined at ground level and from aircraft over the Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season, providing a comprehensive description of the sulfur cycle over a remote tropical region. The vertical profile of dimethylsulfide (DMS) during the wet season was found to be very similar to that measured during the dry season, suggesting little seasonal variation in DMS fluxes. The concentrations of H2S were almost an order of magnitude higher than those of DMS, which makes H2S the most important biogenic source species in the atmosheric sulfur cycle over the Amazon Basin. Using the gradient-flux approach, the flux of DMS at the top of the tree canopy was estimated. The canopy was a source of DMS during the day, and a weak sink during the night. Measurements of sulfur gas emissions from soils, using the chamber method, showed very small fluxes, consistent with the hypothesis that the forest canopy is the major source of sulfur gases. The observed soil and canopy emission fluxes are similar to those measured in temperate regions. The concentrations of SO2 and sulfate aerosol in the wet season atmosphere were similar to dry season values.

  16. Atmospheric sulfur hexafluoride - Sources, sinks and greenhouse warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien D.; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Shia, George; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, Frank J.; Murcray, David G.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1993-01-01

    An estimate is obtained of worldwide production of SF6, from which a global emission rate is derived and extrapolated for the next 20 years. The atmospheric lifetime of SF6 is then estimated based on a known mechanism (e.g., photolysis and atmospheric oxidation) and/or on the mass balance method. Finally, the radiative forcing of SF6 is calculated based on recent laboratory IR absorption data, and the expected warming over the time period 1950-2010 is computed for several emission scenarios. Calculations showed that SF6 is 3 times more effective as a greenhouse gas compared to CFC 11 on a per-molecule basis. However, based on projected emission scenarios, the expected warming from SF6 through 2010 is small (0.004 C), compared to the warming from CO2 and other trace gases (0.8 C).

  17. Contribution of anthropogenic and natural sources to atmospheric sulfur in parts of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Harbert; Nochumson, D. H.; Hidy, G. M.

    This paper presents an estimate of the contributions to atmospheric sulfur of natural vs anthropogenic processes in areas of the United States. The areas were selected on the basis of population density, industrialization and potential for different kinds of geographically unique natural emissions. The sulfur emissions were estimated in part from land use practice and from geochemical arguments relating sulfur to biological carbon cycling. The natural or quasi-natural processes considered include sulfur gas production in freshwater sediments and intertidal mudflats, soil processes and vegetation. Agricultural activities and acid mine drainage were also taken into account as a perturbation to the available natural sulfur resources. The emissions appear to be heavily influenced by contributions from sulfate reduction in freshwater sediments and intertidal mudflats, and acid mine drainage. The anthropogenic emissions were calculated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's inventories in the late 1960s. The natural vs man-derived sulfur were compared for 2° longitude by 2° latitude sectors in New England, the mid-Atlantic States, the Atlantic Coastal South, the Midwest, and the arid Southwest. In the sample regions where the anthropogenic emissions exceed 50-100 × 10 3 tonne S y -1 over a 2 × 2° sector, or ≳ 15-30 kg(S) ha -1 y -1, they tend to dominate the biogenic emissions. This appears to be the case for industrialized Ohio, Illinois, and New England. If 10% of the available biogenic sulfur is released to the atmosphere, natural or quasi-natural emissions may be a significant contributor in air over Minnesota and Wisconsin, Florida, and perhaps the rural areas of Virginia and remote parts of Arizona and Utah.

  18. Attribution of atmospheric sulfur dioxide over the English Channel to dimethyl sulfide and changing ship emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) was measured continuously from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) near Plymouth, United Kingdom, between May 2014 and November 2015. This coastal site is exposed to marine air across a wide wind sector. The predominant southwesterly winds carry relatively clean background Atlantic air. In contrast, air from the southeast is heavily influenced by exhaust plumes from ships in the English Channel as well as near Plymouth Sound. A new International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulation came into force in January 2015 to reduce the maximum allowed sulfur content in ships' fuel 10-fold in sulfur emission control areas such as the English Channel. Our observations suggest a 3-fold reduction in ship-emitted SO2 from 2014 to 2015. Apparent fuel sulfur content calculated from coincidental SO2 and carbon dioxide (CO2) peaks from local ship plumes show a high level of compliance to the IMO regulation (> 95 %) in both years (˜ 70 % of ships in 2014 were already emitting at levels below the 2015 cap). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is an important source of atmospheric SO2 even in this semi-polluted region. The relative contribution of DMS oxidation to the SO2 burden over the English Channel increased from about one-third in 2014 to about one-half in 2015 due to the reduction in ship sulfur emissions. Our diel analysis suggests that SO2 is removed from the marine atmospheric boundary layer in about half a day, with dry deposition to the ocean accounting for a quarter of the total loss.

  19. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has long been based on a "big-leaf approach", with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Such models have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. We here outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems – CANopy. This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multilayer longwave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of tha canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz. As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer term eddy covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of fluxes, as well as the gradients of sensible heat fluxes. However, the model overestimates sensible heat flux against an underestimate of the radiation budget. Improved performance is expected through the implementation of a more detailed calculation of stand albedo and a more up-to-date stomatal conductance calculation.

  20. Large sulfur-isotope anomaly in nonvolcanic sulfate aerosol and its implications for the Archean atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Robina; Abaunza, Mariana M; Jackson, Teresa L; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joël; Thiemens, Mark H

    2014-08-19

    Sulfur-isotopic anomalies have been used to trace the evolution of oxygen in the Precambrian atmosphere and to document past volcanic eruptions. High-precision sulfur quadruple isotope measurements of sulfate aerosols extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1984-2001) showed the highest S-isotopic anomalies (Δ(33)S = +1.66‰ and Δ(36)S = +2‰) in a nonvolcanic (1998-1999) period, similar in magnitude to Pinatubo and Agung, the largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century. The highest isotopic anomaly may be produced from a combination of different stratospheric sources (sulfur dioxide and carbonyl sulfide) via SOx photochemistry, including photoexcitation and photodissociation. The source of anomaly is linked to super El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (1997-1998)-induced changes in troposphere-stratosphere chemistry and dynamics. The data possess recurring negative S-isotope anomalies (Δ(36)S = -0.6 ± 0.2‰) in nonvolcanic and non-ENSO years, thus requiring a second source that may be tropospheric. The generation of nonvolcanic S-isotopic anomalies in an oxidizing atmosphere has implications for interpreting Archean sulfur deposits used to determine the redox state of the paleoatmosphere.

  1. Nitrogen budget of Lago Maggiore: the relative importance of atmospheric deposition and catchment sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele TARTARI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological and chemical data of 1996 and 1997 are used to evaluate the relative contributions of atmospheric deposition and urban/industrial wastewaters to the nitrogen budget of Lago Maggiore. The atmospheric load of nitrogen was about 80% of the total input to the lake, with negligible variations in dry (1997 and wet (1996 years. A comparison of the two study years with the yearly N budgets evaluated from 1978 to 1998, showed that the N load was higher with increasing amounts of precipitation/water inflow. Soils and vegetation act as N sinks; the % retention varies between 40-60% for the forested catchments with low population density in the central-northern part of the basin, to values close to zero or even negative in the south, indicating a net leaching from the soils. The Traaen & Stoddard (1995 approach revealed that all the catchments of the major inflowing rivers were oversaturated with nitrogen. The long-term trend of nitrogen concentrations in Lago Maggiore (1955-99 is analogous to the trend for atmospheric deposition (1975-99, which is related to emissions of nitrogen oxides and ammonia in the atmosphere. The relationships between the present N load and in-lake concentrations are discussed using a budget model, which is also used to infer the pristine load of N. The close relationships between N trends in lakes Maggiore, Como and Iseo, and the geographical and anthropogenic features common to their catchments, suggest that the results obtained for Lago Maggiore can be extended to a wider area.

  2. Impact of atmospheric sulfur deposition on sulfur metabolism in plants : H2S as sulfur source for sulfur deprived Brassica oleracea L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, L.J.; Stuiver, C.E.E.; Rubinigg, M.; Westerman, S.; Grill, D.

    1997-01-01

    Brassica oleracea L. was rather insensitive to atmospheric H2S: growth was only negatively affected at greater than or equal to 0.4 mu l l(-1). Shoots formed a sink for H2S and the uptake rate showed saturation kinetics with respect to the atmospheric concentration. The H2S uptake rate was high in c

  3. The impact of atmospheric H2S on growth and sulfur metabolism of Allium cepa L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durenkamp, M; De Kok, LJ

    2002-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric H2S deposition on growth and sulfur metabolism has been studied in onion (Allium cepa L.). The H2S Uptake followed saturation kinetics with respect to the H2S concentration. The maximum H2S uptake rate (JH(2)S(max)) was approx. 1 mumol g(-1) FW h(-1) and the KH2S (H2S conce

  4. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Res...

  5. Impact of sulfate nutrition on the utilization of atmospheric SO2 as sulfur source for Chinese cabbage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Liping; Stulen, I.; De Kok, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis) to utilize atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) as sulfur (S) source for growth was investigated in relation to root sulfate (SO42-) nutrition. If seedlings of Chinese cabbage were transferred to a sulfate-deprived nutrient solution directly after ger

  6. Geological Sulfur Isotopes Indicate Elevated OCS in the Archean Atmosphere, Solving the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Danielache, Sebastian Oscar;

    2009-01-01

    Distributions of sulfur isotopes in geological samples would provide a record of atmospheric composition if the mechanism producing the isotope effects could be described quantitatively. We determined the UV absorption spectra of 32SO2, 33SO2, and 34SO2 and use them to interpret the geological...... record. The calculated isotopic fractionation factors for SO2 photolysis give mass independent distributions that are highly sensitive to the atmospheric concentrations of O2, O3, CO2, H2O, CS2, NH3, N2O, H2S, OCS, and SO2 itself. Various UV-shielding scenarios are considered and we conclude......-rich, reducing Archean atmosphere. The radiative forcing, due to this level of OCS, is able to resolve the faint young sun paradox. Further, the decline of atmospheric OCS may have caused the late Archean glaciation....

  7. OVOC (Oxygenated Volatile Organic Chemicals) in the Global Atmosphere: Atmospheric Budgets, Oceanic Concentrations, and Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne measurements of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOC), OH free radicals, and tracers of pollution were performed over the Pacific during Winter/Spring of 2001. Large concentrations of OVOC are present in the global troposphere and are expected to play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Their total abundance (SIGMAOVOC) was nearly twice that of non-methane hydrocarbons (SIGMAC2-C8 NMHC). Throughout the troposphere, the OH reactivity of OVOC is comparable to that of methane and far exceeds that of NHMC. A comparison of these data with western Pacific observations collected some seven years earlier (Feb.-March, 1994) did not reveal significant differences. Analysis of the relative enhancement of selected OVOC with respect to CH3Cl and CO in twelve plumes originating from fires and sampled in the free troposphere (3-11 km) is used to assess their primary and secondary emissions from biomass combustion. The composition of these plumes also indicates a large shift of reactive nitrogen into the PAN reservoir thereby limiting ozone formation. These data are combined with other observations and interpreted with the help of a global 3-D model to assess OVOC global sources and sinks. We further interpret atmospheric observations with the help of an air-sea exchange model io show that oceans can be both net sorces and sinks. An extremely large oceanic reservoir of OVOC, that exceeds the atmospheric reservoir by more than an order of magnitude, can be inferred to be present. We conclude that OVOC sources are extremely large (150-500 TgC y-1) but remain poorly quantified. In many cases, measured concentrations are uncertain and incompatible with our present knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. Results based on observations from several field studies and critical gaps will be discussed.

  8. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  9. Massive impact-induced release of carbon and sulfur gases in the early Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bottke, W. F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent revisions to our understanding of the collisional history of the Hadean and early-Archean Earth indicate that large collisions may have been an important geophysical process. In this work we show that the early bombardment flux of large impactors (>100 km) facilitated the atmospheric release of greenhouse gases (particularly CO2) from Earth's mantle. Depending on the timescale for the drawdown of atmospheric CO2, the Earth's surface could have been subject to prolonged clement surface conditions or multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The bombardment also delivered and redistributed to the surface large quantities of sulfur, one of the most important elements for life. The stochastic occurrence of large collisions could provide insights on why the Earth and Venus, considered Earth's twin planet, exhibit radically different atmospheres.

  10. Sulfuric acid vapor and other cloud-related gases in the Venus atmosphere - Abundances inferred from observed radio opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, P. G.; Eshleman, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that the absorbing characteristics of sulfuric acid vapor appear to reconcile what had been thought to be an inconsistency among measurements and deductions regarding the constituents of the Venus atmosphere and radio occultation, radar reflection, and radio emission measurements of its opacity. Laboratory measurements of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are used to model relative contributions to opacity as a function of height in a way that is consistent with observations of the constituents and absorbing properties of the atmosphere. It is concluded that sulfuric acid vapor is likely to be the principal microwave absorber in the 30-50 km altitude range of the middle atmosphere of Venus.

  11. Use of Atmospheric Budget to Reduce Uncertainty in Estimated Water Availability over South Asia from Different Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Dawn Emil; Pathak, Amey; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-07-01

    Disagreements across different reanalyses over South Asia result into uncertainty in assessment of water availability, which is computed as the difference between Precipitation and Evapotranspiration (P–E). Here, we compute P–E directly from atmospheric budget with divergence of moisture flux for different reanalyses and find improved correlation with observed values of P–E, acquired from station and satellite data. We also find reduced closure terms for water cycle computed with atmospheric budget, analysed over South Asian landmass, when compared to that obtained with individual values of P and E. The P–E value derived with atmospheric budget is more consistent with energy budget, when we use top-of-atmosphere radiation for the same. For analysing water cycle, we use runoff from Global Land Data Assimilation System, and water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. We find improvements in agreements across different reanalyses, in terms of inter-annual cross correlation when atmospheric budget is used to estimate P–E and hence, emphasize to use the same for estimations of water availability in South Asia to reduce uncertainty. Our results on water availability with reduced uncertainty over highly populated monsoon driven South Asia will be useful for water management and agricultural decision making.

  12. Use of Atmospheric Budget to Reduce Uncertainty in Estimated Water Availability over South Asia from Different Reanalyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Dawn Emil; Pathak, Amey; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-01-01

    Disagreements across different reanalyses over South Asia result into uncertainty in assessment of water availability, which is computed as the difference between Precipitation and Evapotranspiration (P-E). Here, we compute P-E directly from atmospheric budget with divergence of moisture flux for different reanalyses and find improved correlation with observed values of P-E, acquired from station and satellite data. We also find reduced closure terms for water cycle computed with atmospheric budget, analysed over South Asian landmass, when compared to that obtained with individual values of P and E. The P-E value derived with atmospheric budget is more consistent with energy budget, when we use top-of-atmosphere radiation for the same. For analysing water cycle, we use runoff from Global Land Data Assimilation System, and water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. We find improvements in agreements across different reanalyses, in terms of inter-annual cross correlation when atmospheric budget is used to estimate P-E and hence, emphasize to use the same for estimations of water availability in South Asia to reduce uncertainty. Our results on water availability with reduced uncertainty over highly populated monsoon driven South Asia will be useful for water management and agricultural decision making. PMID:27388837

  13. Use of Atmospheric Budget to Reduce Uncertainty in Estimated Water Availability over South Asia from Different Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Dawn Emil; Pathak, Amey; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-01-01

    Disagreements across different reanalyses over South Asia result into uncertainty in assessment of water availability, which is computed as the difference between Precipitation and Evapotranspiration (P–E). Here, we compute P–E directly from atmospheric budget with divergence of moisture flux for different reanalyses and find improved correlation with observed values of P–E, acquired from station and satellite data. We also find reduced closure terms for water cycle computed with atmospheric budget, analysed over South Asian landmass, when compared to that obtained with individual values of P and E. The P–E value derived with atmospheric budget is more consistent with energy budget, when we use top-of-atmosphere radiation for the same. For analysing water cycle, we use runoff from Global Land Data Assimilation System, and water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. We find improvements in agreements across different reanalyses, in terms of inter-annual cross correlation when atmospheric budget is used to estimate P–E and hence, emphasize to use the same for estimations of water availability in South Asia to reduce uncertainty. Our results on water availability with reduced uncertainty over highly populated monsoon driven South Asia will be useful for water management and agricultural decision making. PMID:27388837

  14. Advanced Modeling Techniques to Study Anthropogenic Influences on Atmospheric Chemical Budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Rohit

    1997-01-01

    This research work is a collaborative effort between research groups at MCNC and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The overall objective of this research is to improve the level of understanding of the processes that determine the budgets of chemically and radiatively active compounds in the atmosphere through development and application of advanced methods for calculating the chemical change in atmospheric models. The research performed during the second year of this project focused on four major aspects: (1) The continued development and refinement of multiscale modeling techniques to address the issue of the disparate scales of the physico-chemical processes that govern the fate of atmospheric pollutants; (2) Development and application of analysis methods utilizing process and mass balance techniques to increase the interpretive powers of atmospheric models and to aid in complementary analysis of model predictions and observations; (3) Development of meteorological and emission inputs for initial application of the chemistry/transport model over the north Atlantic region; and, (4) The continued development and implementation of a totally new adaptive chemistry representation that changes the details of what is represented as the underlying conditions change.

  15. Investigation on the formation and measurement of sulfur-containing aerosols in the atmosphere (Part B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas chromatographic method was developed for the routine determination of sulfur-containing acids in the atmosphere, based on the methylation of the acids. The developed analytical method was tested on the premise of the Kernforschungszentrum in Karlsruhe during the years 1979 and 1980. An additional campaign was carried out in Frankfurt/Main. With a Winkler impactor placed in front of the sampler it was shown that the contribution of acid sulfates to particles with size smaller than 0.3 μm is rather large. (orig./HP)

  16. Contribution to the study of characteristics of Pelargonium resistance to an atmospheric pollutant, sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonte, J.; Bonte, C.; de Cormis, L.; Louguet, P.

    1977-01-01

    Eleven varieties of Pelargonium, subjected simultaneously to similar conditions of sulfur dioxide pollution, are arranged in ascending order of sensitivity. There is no relation between the relative susceptibility of the varieties to SO/sub 2/, the stomatal frequency and the dimensions of the stomatal apparatus. Nevertheless, a statistical comparative study of the stomatal movements of 2 Pelargonium, one resistant, the other sensitive, has shown that the closing rate of stomata and the reduction percentage of stomatal diffusive capacity are significantly different. These characteristics might be taken into consideration in the selection of varieties resistant to atmospheric pollution.

  17. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  18. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes during heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E. J.; Sinha, B.; Hoppe, P.; Crowley, J.; Borrmann, S.; Foley, S. F.; Gnauk, T.; Van Pinxteren, D.; Herrmann, H.

    2011-12-01

    Sulfate and sulfur dioxide play an important role in environmental chemistry and climate, particularly through their effect on aerosols. Processing of aerosol through sulfate addition in clouds, which causes both hygroscopicity changes and mass increases, has been shown to modify the cloud condensation nucleus spectrum, leading to important climatological effects (Bower et al. 1997, Hegg et al. 2004). However, the uptake of sulfate and SO2 to aerosol in clouds is not well constrained, nor is it resolved for different particle types and sizes (Kasper-Giebl et al. 2000, Barrie et al. 2001). Measurements of stable sulfur isotopes can be used to investigate the chemistry of SO2 in the environment, providing insight into sources, sinks and oxidation pathways. Typical isotopic compositions for many sources have been measured, and the major current limitation is the lack of reliable fractionation factors - characteristic changes in isotopic composition caused by chemical reactions - with which to interpret the data. Laboratory values of fractionation factors for the major oxidation reactions have been measured in previous work, however there are no measurements or models to represent isotopic fractionation during heterogeneous oxidation on complex atmospheric surfaces. In this work the sulfur isotopic fractionation factors for SO2 oxidation have been measured on Sahara dust, obtained from the Cape Verde Islands, and sea salt aerosol, which was synthesised in the laboratory according to Millero (1974), modified to contain no sulfate. Sulfur dioxide with a known isotopic composition was oxidised on these surfaces under a variety of conditions including irradiation and ozonation, and the sulfur isotopic composition of the product sulfate was measured with the Cameca NanoSIMS 50. These laboratory results were then used to investigate the uptake of sulfur to particles in an orographic cloud during the HCCT campaign. The campaign took place at the Schmücke mountain in Germany

  19. Importance of secondary sources in the atmospheric budgets of formic and acetic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed budget of formic and acetic acids, two of the most abundant trace gases in the atmosphere. Our bottom-up estimate of the global source of formic and acetic acids are ~1200 and ~1400 Gmol/yr, dominated by photochemical oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds, in particular isoprene. Their sinks are dominated by wet and dry deposition. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to evaluate this budget against an extensive suite of measurements from ground, ship and satellite-based Fourier transform spectrometers, as well as from several aircraft campaigns over North America. The model captures the seasonality of formic and acetic acids well but generally underestimates their concentration, particularly in the Northern midlatitudes. We infer that the source of both carboxylic acids may be up to 50% greater than our estimate and report evidence for a long-lived missing secondary source of carboxylic acids that may be associated with the aging of organic aerosols. Vertical profiles of formic acid in the upper troposphere support a negative temperature dependence of the reaction between formic acid and the hydroxyl radical as suggested by several theoretical studies.

  20. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even tho...

  1. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition budget in a subtropical hydroelectric reservoir (Nam Theun II case study, Lao PDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adon, Marcellin; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Serça, Dominique; Guerin, Frederic; Guedant, Pierre; Vonghamsao, Axay; Rode, Wanidaporn

    2016-04-01

    With 490 km² at full level of operation, Nam Theun 2 (NT2) is one of the largest hydro-reservoir in South East Asia. NT2 is a trans-basin hydropower project that diverts water from the Nam Theun river (a Mekong tributary) to the Xe Ban Fai river (another Mekong tributary). Atmospheric deposition is an important source of nitrogen (N), and it has been shown that excessive fluxes of N from the atmosphere has resulted in eutrophication of many coastal waters. A large fraction of atmospheric N input is in the form of inorganic N. This study presents an estimation of the atmospheric inorganic nitrogen budget into the NT2 hydroelectric reservoir based on a two-year monitoring (July 2010 to July 2012) including gas concentrations and precipitation. Dry deposition fluxes are calculated from monthly mean surface measurements of NH3, HNO3 and NO2 concentrations (passive samplers) together with simulated deposition velocities, and wet deposition fluxes from NH4+ and NO3- concentrations in single event rain samples (automated rain sampler). Annual rainfall amount was 2500 and 3160 mm for the two years. The average nitrogen deposition flux is estimated at 1.13 kgN.ha-1.yr-1 from dry processes and 5.52 kgN.ha-1.yr-1 from wet ones, i.e., an average annual total nitrogen flux of 6.6 kgN.ha-1.yr-1 deposited into the NT2 reservoir. The wet deposition contributes to 83% of the total N deposition. The nitrogen deposition budget has been also calculated over the rain tropical forest surrounding the reservoir. Due to higher dry deposition velocities above forested ecosystems, gaseous dry deposition flux is estimated at 4.0 kgN.ha-1.yr-1 leading to a total nitrogen deposition about 9.5 kgN.ha-1.yr-1. This result will be compared to nitrogen deposition in the African equatorial forested ecosystems in the framework of the IDAF program (IGAC-DEBITS-AFrica).

  2. Decreased atmospheric sulfur deposition across the southeastern U.S.: when will watersheds release stored sulfate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen C.; Scanlon, Todd S.; Lynch, Jason A.; Cosby, Bernard J.

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the atmosphere lead to atmospheric deposition of sulfate (SO42-), which is the dominant strong acid anion causing acidification of surface waters and soils in the eastern United States (U.S.). Since passage of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments, atmospheric deposition of SO2 in this region has declined by over 80%, but few corresponding decreases in stream-water SO42- concentrations have been observed in unglaciated watersheds. We calculated SO42- mass balances for 27 forested, unglaciated watersheds from Pennsylvania to Georgia, by using total atmospheric deposition (wet plus dry) as input. Many of these watersheds still retain SO42-, unlike their counterparts in the northeastern U.S. and southern Canada. Our analysis showed that many of these watersheds should convert from retaining to releasing SO42- over the next two decades. The specific years when the watersheds crossover from retaining to releasing SO42- correspond to a general geographical pattern of later net watershed release from north to south. The single most important variable that explained the crossover year was the runoff ratio, defined as the ratio of annual mean stream discharge to precipitation. Percent clay content and mean soil depth were secondary factors in predicting crossover year. The conversion of watersheds from net SO42- retention to release anticipates more widespread reductions in stream-water SO42- concentrations in this region.

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfur and Nitrogen in the Remote Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Charlson, Robert; Andreae, Meinrat; Rodhe, Henning

    1985-01-01

    Viewed from space, the Earth appears as a globe without a beginning or an end. Encompassing the globe is the atmosphere with its three phases-­ gaseous, liquid, and solid--moving in directions influenced by sunlight, gravity, and rotation. The chemical compositions of these phases are determined by biogeochemical cycles. Over the past hundred years, the processes governing the rates and reactions in the atmospheric biogeochemical cycles have typically been studied in regions where scientists lived. Hence, as time has gone by, the advances in our knowledge of atmospheric chemical cycles in remote areas have lagged substantially behind those for more populated areas. Not only are the data less abundant, they are also scattered. Therefore, we felt a workshop would be an excellent mechanism to assess the state­ of-knowledge of the atmospheric cycles of sulfur and nitrogen in remote areas and to make recommendations for future research. Thus, a NATO Advanced Research Workshop '~he Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfu...

  4. Regional emission and loss budgets of atmospheric methane (2002-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, T.; Patra, P. K.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Ishijima, K.; Umezawa, T.; Ito, A.; Aoki, S.; Morimoto, S.; Kort, E. A.; Crotwell, A. M.; Ravi Kumar, K.; Nakazawa, T.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and short-term forcing of climate. Clear understanding of atmospheric CH4's budget of emissions and losses is required to aid sustainable development of Earth's future environment. We used an atmospheric chemistry-transport model (JAMSTEC's ACTM) for simulating atmospheric CH4. An inverse modeling system has been developed for estimating CH4 emissions (7 ensemble cases) from 53 land regions for 2002-2012 using measurements at 39 sites. Global net CH4 emissions varied between 505-509 and 524-545 Tg/yr during 2002-2004 and 2010-2012, respectively (ranges based on 6 inversion cases), with a step like increase in 2007 in agreement with atmospheric measurement. The inversion system did not account for interannual variations in radicals reacting with CH4 in atmosphere. Our results suggest that the recent update of EDGAR inventory (version 4.2FT2010) overestimated global total emissions by at least 25 Tg/yr in 2010. Increase in CH4 emission since 2004 originated in the tropical and southern hemisphere regions, with timing consistent with an increase of non-dairy cattle stocks by ~10% in 2012 from 1056 million heads in 2002, leading to ~10 Tg/yr increase in emissions from enteric fermentation. All 7 inversions robustly estimated the interannual variations in emissions, but poorly constrained the seasonal cycle amplitude or phase consistently for all regions due to sparse observational network. Forward simulation results using both the a priori and a posteriori emissions are compared with independent aircraft measurements for validation. By doing that we are able to reject the upper limit (545 Tg/yr) of global total emissions as 14 Tg/yr too high during 2008-2012, which allows us to further conclude that CH4 emission increase rate over the East Asia (China mainly) region was 7-8 Tg/yr between the 2002-2006 and 2008-2012 periods, contrary to 1-17 Tg/yr in the a priori emissions.

  5. Constraints on the Archean atmospheric oxygen and sulfur cycle from mass-independent sulfur records from Anshan-Benxi BIFs, Liaoning Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Archean atmospheric oxygen concentration and sulfur cycle was long debated. The banded iron formation (BIF) is a special type of the sedimentary formation, which has truly recorded the atmospheric and oceanic conditions at that time. In this study, the composition of multiple sulfur isotope (δ34S/δ33S/δ32S) for sulfides bedded in the Archean (~2.7 Ga) BIFs, in Anshan-Benxi area of Liaoning Province has been measured. The value of △33S varies from -0.89‰ to +1.21‰, which shows very obvious mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signatures. These non-zero △33S values indicate that the Archean sulfur cycles are different from what it is today, which have been deeply influenced by gas phase photochemical reactions. Algoma-type BIFs which are closely related to the volcanic activity have negative △33S value, however, Superior-type BIFs which are far away from the volcanic center have positive △33S value. The δ34S varies in a large range from -22.0‰ to +11.8‰, which indicates that the bacteria reduction activity has already existed at that time, and that the oceanic sulfate concentration has at least reached 1 mmol/L in local areas. Combined with the contemporaneous existence of the hematite, magnetite and the occurrence and preservation of the sulfur MIF, it can be inferred that the Archean atmospheric oxygen level must be at 10-2―10-3 of the present atmospheric level (PAL).

  6. A new estimation of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen budget using atmospheric observations and variational inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yver

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H2 budget with a particular focus on soil uptake and surface emissions. A variational inversion scheme is combined with observations from the RAMCES and EUROHYDROS atmospheric networks, which include continuous measurements performed between mid-2006 and mid-2009. Net H2 surface flux, soil uptake distinct from surface emissions and finally, soil uptake, biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions and N2 fixation-related emissions separately were inverted in several scenarios. The various inversions generate an estimate for each term of the H2 budget. The net H2 flux per region (High Northern Hemisphere, Tropics and High Southern Hemisphere varies between −8 and 8 Tg yr−1. The best inversion in terms of fit to the observations combines updated prior surface emissions and a soil deposition velocity map that is based on soil uptake measurements. Our estimate of global H2 soil uptake is −59 ± 4.0 Tg yr−1. Forty per cent of this uptake is located in the High Northern Hemisphere and 55% is located in the Tropics. In terms of surface emissions, seasonality is mainly driven by biomass burning emissions. The inferred European anthropogenic emissions are consistent with independent H2 emissions estimated using a H2/CO mass ratio of 0.034 and CO emissions considering their respective uncertainties. To constrain a more robust partition of H2 sources and sinks would need additional constraints, such as isotopic measurements.

  7. A new estimation of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen budget using atmospheric observations and variational inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Yver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H2 budget with a particular focus on soil uptake and European surface emissions. A variational inversion scheme is combined with observations from the RAMCES and EUROHYDROS atmospheric networks, which include continuous measurements performed between mid-2006 and mid-2009. Net H2 surface flux, then deposition velocity and surface emissions and finally, deposition velocity, biomass burning, anthropogenic and N2 fixation-related emissions were simultaneously inverted in several scenarios. These scenarios have focused on the sensibility of the soil uptake value to different spatio-temporal distributions. The range of variations of these diverse inversion sets generate an estimate of the uncertainty for each term of the H2 budget. The net H2 flux per region (High Northern Hemisphere, Tropics and High Southern Hemisphere varies between −8 and +8 Tg yr−1. The best inversion in terms of fit to the observations combines updated prior surface emissions and a soil deposition velocity map that is based on bottom-up and top-down estimations. Our estimate of global H2 soil uptake is −59±9 Tg yr−1. Forty per cent of this uptake is located in the High Northern Hemisphere and 55% is located in the Tropics. In terms of surface emissions, seasonality is mainly driven by biomass burning emissions. The inferred European anthropogenic emissions are consistent with independent H2 emissions estimated using a H2/CO mass ratio of 0.034 and CO emissions within the range of their respective uncertainties. Additional constraints, such as isotopic measurements would be needed to infer a more robust partition of H2 sources and sinks.

  8. Theoretical and global scale model studies of the atmospheric sulfur/aerosol system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasibhatla, Prasad

    1996-01-01

    The primary focus during the third-phase of our on-going multi-year research effort has been on 3 activities. These are: (1) a global-scale model study of the anthropogenic component of the tropospheric sulfur cycle; (2) process-scale model studies of the factors influencing the distribution of aerosols in the remote marine atmosphere; and (3) an investigation of the mechanism of the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS in the remote marine boundary layer. In this paper, we describe in more detail our research activities in each of these areas. A major portion of our activities during the fourth and final phase of this project will involve the preparation and submission of manuscripts describing the results from our model studies of marine boundary-layer aerosols and DMS-oxidation mechanisms.

  9. Long-term global distribution of earth's shortwave radiation budget at the top of atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hatzianastassiou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean monthly shortwave (SW radiation budget at the top of atmosphere (TOA was computed on 2.5° longitude-latitude resolution for the 14-year period from 1984 to 1997, using a radiative transfer model with long-term climatological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP-D2 supplemented by data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction – National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR Global Reanalysis project, and other global data bases such as TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS and Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS. The model radiative fluxes at TOA were validated against Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE S4 scanner satellite data (1985–1989. The model is able to predict the seasonal and geographical variation of SW TOA fluxes. On a mean annual and global basis, the model is in very good agreement with ERBE, overestimating the outgoing SW radiation at TOA (OSR by 0.93 Wm-2 (or by 0.92%, within the ERBE uncertainties. At pixel level, the OSR differences between model and ERBE are mostly within ±10 Wm-2, with ±5 Wm-2 over extended regions, while there exist some geographic areas with differences of up to 40 Wm-2, associated with uncertainties in cloud properties and surface albedo. The 14-year average model results give a planetary albedo equal to 29.6% and a TOA OSR flux of 101.2 Wm-2. A significant linearly decreasing trend in OSR and planetary albedo was found, equal to 2.3 Wm-2 and 0.6% (in absolute values, respectively, over the 14-year period (from January 1984 to December 1997, indicating an increasing solar planetary warming. This planetary SW radiative heating occurs in the tropical and sub-tropical areas (20° S–20° N, with clouds being the most likely cause. The computed global mean OSR anomaly ranges within ±4 Wm-2, with signals from El Niño and La Niña events or Pinatubo eruption, whereas significant negative OSR anomalies, starting from year 1992, are also

  10. Missing SO2 oxidant in the coastal atmosphere? – Evidence from high resolution measurements of OH and atmospheric sulfur compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Berresheim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal and seasonal variations of gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4 and methane sulfonic acid (MSA were measured in N.E. Atlantic air at the Mace Head atmospheric research station during the years 2010 and 2011. The measurements utilized selected ion/chemical ionization mass spectrometry (SI/CIMS with a detection limit for both compounds of 4.3 × 10 4 cm−3 at 5 min signal integration. The H2SO4 and MSA gas-phase concentrations were analysed in conjunction with the condensational sink for both compounds derived from 3 nm–10 μm (diameter aerosol size distributions. Accommodation coefficients of 1.0 for H2SO4 and 0.12 for MSA were assumed leading to estimated atmospheric lifetimes of the order of 7 min and 25 min, respectively. With the SI/CIMS instrument in OH measurement mode alternating between OH signal and background (non-OH signal evidence was obtained for the presence of one or more unknown oxidants of SO2 in addition to OH. Depending on the nature of the oxidant(s their ambient concentration may be enhanced in the CIMS inlet system by additional production. The apparent unknown SO2 oxidant was additionally confirmed by direct measurements of SO2 in conjunction with calculated H2SO4 concentrations. The calculated concentrations were consistently lower than the measured concentrations by a factor 4.8 ± 3.4 when considering the oxidation of SO2 by OH as the only source of H2SO4. Both the OH and the background signal were also observed to increase significantly during daytime aerosol nucleation events, independent of the ozone photolysis frequency, J(O1D, and were followed by peaks in both H2SO4 and MSA concentrations. This suggests a strong relation between the unknown oxidant(s, OH chemistry, and the atmospheric photo-oxidation of biogenic iodine compounds. As to the identity of the oxidant(s, we have been able to exclude ClO, BrO, IO, and OIO as possible candidates based on ab initio calculations. Stabilized Criegee intermediates (s

  11. Changes in Atmospheric Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) over the English Channel - 1.5 Years of Measurements from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas; Hopkins, Frances; Smyth, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) was measured continuously from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory near Plymouth, United Kingdom between May 2014 and November 2015. This coastal site is exposed to marine air across a wide wind sector. The predominant southwesterly winds carry relatively clean background Atlantic air. In contrast, air from the southeast is heavily influenced by exhaust plumes from ships in the English Channel as well as near near the Plymouth Sound. International Maritime Organization regulation came into force in January 2015 to reduce sulfur emissions tenfold in Sulfur Emission Control Areas such as the English Channel. We observed a three-fold reduction from 2014 to 2015 in the estimated ship-emitted SO2 during southeasterly winds. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is an important source of atmospheric SO2 even in this semi-polluted region. The relative contribution of DMS oxidation to the SO2 burden over the English Channel increased from ~1/3 in 2014 to ~1/2 in 2015 due to the reduction in ship sulfur emissions. Our diel analysis suggests that SO2 is removed from the marine atmospheric boundary layer in about half a day, with dry deposition to the ocean accounting for a quarter of the total loss.

  12. Ahead of his time: Jacob Lipman's 1930 estimate of atmospheric sulfur deposition for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Edward R.; Shanley, James B.

    2015-01-01

    A 1936 New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin provided an early quantitative assessment of atmospheric deposition of sulfur for the United States that has been compared in this study with more recent assessments. In the early 20th century, anthropogenic sulfur additions from the atmosphere to the soil by the combustion of fossil fuels were viewed as part of the requisite nutrient supply of crops. Jacob G. Lipman, the founding editor of Soil Science, and his team at Rutgers University, made an inventory of such additions to soils of the conterminous United States during the economic depression of the 1930s as part of a federally funded project looking at nutrient balances in soils. Lipman's team gathered data compiled by the US Bureau of Mines on coal and other fuel consumption by state and calculated the corresponding amounts of sulfur emitted. Their work pioneered a method of assessment that became the norm in the 1970s to 1980s—when acid rain emerged as a national issue. Lipman's estimate of atmospheric sulfur deposition in the 1930 is in reasonable agreement with recent historic reconstructions.

  13. Measurement of air-surface exchange of speciated nitrogen and sulfur compounds using a modified MARGA 2S: ? Concentrations and fluxes above a grass field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improved measurement methods are needed to characterize dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen compounds to assess ecosystem exposure to nutrients and acidifying compounds and to develop atmospheric deposition budgets in support of critical loads assessments. The purpose of this s...

  14. Atmospheric sulfur hexafluoride in-situ measurements at the Shangdianzi regional background station in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Yao; Lingxi Zhou; Lingjun Xia; Gen Zhang; Lifeng Guo; Zhao Liu; Shuangxi Fang

    2014-01-01

    We present in-situ measurements of atmospheric sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) conducted by an automated gas chromatograph-electron capture detector system and a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system at a regional background site,Shangdianzi,in China,from June 2009 to May 2011,using the System for Observation of Greenhouse gases in Europe and Asia and Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)techniques.The mean background and polluted mixing ratios for SF6 during the study period were 7.22 × 10-12 (mol/mol,hereinafter) and 8.66 × 10-12,respectively.The averaged SF6 background mixing ratios at Shangdianzi were consistent with those obtained at other AGAGE stations located at similar latitudes (Trinidad Head and Mace Head),but larger than AGAGE stations in the Southern Hemisphere (Cape Grim and Cape Matatula).SF6 background mixing ratios increased rapidly during our study period,with a positive growth rate at 0.30 × 10-12 year-1.The peak to peak amplitude of the seasonal cycle for SF6 background conditions was 0.07 × 10-12,while the seasonal fluctuation of polluted conditions was 2.16 × 10-12.During the study period,peak values of SF6 mixing ratios occurred in autumn when local surface horizontal winds originated from W/WSW/SW/SWS/S sectors,while lower levels of SF6 mixing ratios appeared as winds originated from N/ NNE/NE/ENE/E sectors.

  15. Atmospheric sulfur hexafluoride in-situ measurements at the Shangdianzi regional background station in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Zhou, Lingxi; Xia, Lingjun; Zhang, Gen; Guo, Lifeng; Liu, Zhao; Fang, Shuangxi

    2014-12-01

    We present in-situ measurements of atmospheric sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) conducted by an automated gas chromatograph-electron capture detector system and a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system at a regional background site, Shangdianzi, in China, from June 2009 to May 2011, using the System for Observation of Greenhouse gases in Europe and Asia and Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) techniques. The mean background and polluted mixing ratios for SF6 during the study period were 7.22 × 10⁻¹² (mol/mol, hereinafter) and 8.66 × 10⁻¹², respectively. The averaged SF6 background mixing ratios at Shangdianzi were consistent with those obtained at other AGAGE stations located at similar latitudes (Trinidad Head and Mace Head), but larger than AGAGE stations in the Southern Hemisphere (Cape Grim and Cape Matatula). SF6 background mixing ratios increased rapidly during our study period, with a positive growth rate at 0.30 × 10⁻¹² year⁻¹. The peak to peak amplitude of the seasonal cycle for SF6 background conditions was 0.07 × 10⁻¹², while the seasonal fluctuation of polluted conditions was 2.16 × 10⁻¹². During the study period, peak values of SF6 mixing ratios occurred in autumn when local surface horizontal winds originated from W/WSW/SW/SWS/S sectors, while lower levels of SF6 mixing ratios appeared as winds originated from N/NNE/NE/ENE/E sectors. PMID:25499493

  16. Riverine Response of Sulfate to Declining Atmospheric Sulfur Deposition in Agricultural Watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Mark B; Gentry, Lowell E; Mitchell, Corey A

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur received extensive study as an input to terrestrial ecosystems from acidic deposition during the 1980s. With declining S deposition inputs across the eastern United States, there have been many studies evaluating ecosystem response, with the exception of agricultural watersheds. We used long-term (22 and 18 yr) sulfate concentration data from two rivers and recent (6 yr) data from a third river to better understand cycling and transport of S in agricultural, tile-drained watersheds. Sulfate concentrations and yields steadily declined in the Embarras (from ∼10 to 6 mg S L) and Kaskaskia rivers (from 7 to 3.5 mg S L) during the sampling period, with an overall -23.1 and -12.8 kg S ha yr balance for the two watersheds. There was evidence of deep groundwater inputs of sulfate in the Salt Fork watershed, with a much smaller input to the Embarras and none to the Kaskaskia. Tiles in the watersheds had low sulfate concentrations (fertilizer. A multiple regression model of runoff (cm) and S deposition explained much of the variation in Embarras River sulfate ( = 0.86 and 0.80 for concentrations and yields; = 46). Although atmospheric deposition was much less than outputs (grain harvest + stream export of sulfate), riverine transport of sulfate reflected the decline in inputs. Watershed S balances suggest a small annual depletion of soil organic S pools, and S fertilization will likely be needed at some future date to maintain crop yields. PMID:27380080

  17. Seasonal trends of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide over North Santa Clara, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Daniellys; Morales, Mayra C; de la Torre, Jorge B; Grau, Ricardo; Bencs, László; Van Grieken, René; Van Espen, Piet; Sosa, Dismey; Nuñez, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) levels were monitored simultaneously by means of Radiello passive samplers at six sites of Santa Clara city, Cuba, in the cold and the warm seasons in 2010. The dissolved ionic forms of NO2 and SO2 as nitrate and sulfite plus sulfate, respectively, were determined by means of ion chromatography. Analysis of NO2 as nitrite was also performed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. For NO2, significant t tests show good agreement between the results of IC and UV-Vis methods. The NO2 and SO2 concentrations peaked in the cold season, while their minimum levels were experienced in the warm season. The pollutant levels do not exceed the maximum allowable limit of the Cuban Standard 39:1999, i.e., 40 μg/m(3) and 50 μg/m(3) for NO2 and SO2, respectively. The lowest pollutant concentrations obtained in the warm season can be attributed to an increase in their removal via precipitation (scavenging) while to the decreased traffic density and industrial emission during the summer holidays (e.g., July and August).

  18. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  19. Meteorological and Back Trajectory Modeling for the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A. Gebhart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS II study with field operations during November 2008 through November 2009 was designed to evaluate the composition and sources of reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. As part of RoMANS II, a mesoscale meteorological model was utilized to provide input for back trajectory and chemical transport models. Evaluation of the model's ability to capture important transport patterns in this region of complex terrain is discussed. Previous source-receptor studies of nitrogen in this region are also reviewed. Finally, results of several back trajectory analyses for RoMANS II are presented. The trajectory mass balance (TrMB model, a receptor-based linear regression technique, was used to estimate mean source attributions of airborne ammonia concentrations during RoMANS II. Though ammonia concentrations are usually higher when there is transport from the east, the TrMB model estimates that, on average, areas to the west contribute a larger mean fraction of the ammonia. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the greater frequency of westerly versus easterly winds, the possibility that ammonia is transported long distances as ammonium nitrate, and the difficulty of correctly modeling the transport winds in this area.

  20. Early Mars volcanic sulfur storage in the cryosphere and formation of transient SO2-rich atmospheres during the Hesperian

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, F; Tian, F; Dartois, E; Herri, J -M; Mousis, O

    2016-01-01

    In a previous paper (Chassefi\\`ere et al., Icarus 223, 878-891, 2013), we have shown that most volcanic sulfur released to early Mars atmosphere could have been trapped in the cryosphere under the form of CO2-SO2 clathrates. Huge amounts of sulfur, up to the equivalent of a ~1 bar atmosphere of SO2, would have been stored in the Noachian cryosphere, then massively released to the atmosphere during Hesperian due to rapidly decreasing CO2 pressure. It would have resulted in the formation of the large sulfate deposits observed mainly in Hesperian terrains, whereas no or little sulfates are found at the Noachian. In the present paper, we first clarify some aspects of our previous work. We discuss the possibility of a smaller cooling effect of sulfur particles, or even of a net warming effect. We point out the fact that CO2-SO2 clathrates formed through a progressive enrichment of a preexisting reservoir of CO2 clathrates and discuss processes potentially involved in the slow formation of a SO2-rich upper cryosphe...

  1. Atmospheric wet deposition of sulfur and nitrogen in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Xiao, Weiyang; Jaffe, Daniel; Kota, Sri Harsha; Ying, Qi; Tang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable ecological changes have been observed in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR). Some of these changes might be related to excessive deposition of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N), but the relationship has not been quantified due to lack of monitoring data, particularly S and N deposition data. In this study, we investigated the concentrations, fluxes, and sources of S and N wet deposition in JNNR from April 2010 to May 2011. The results show that SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the wet deposition were 39.4-170.5, 6.2-34.8, and 0.2-61.2 μeq L(-1), with annual Volume-Weighted Mean (VWM) concentrations of 70.5, 12.7, and 13.4 μeq L(-1), respectively. Annual wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ were 8.06, 1.29, and 1.39 kg S(N)ha(-1), respectively, accounting for about 90% of annual atmospheric inputs of these species at the monitoring site. The results of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis show that fossil fuel combustion, agriculture, and aged sea salt contributed to 99% and 83% of annual wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) and NO3-, respectively. Agriculture alone contributed to 89% of annual wet deposition flux of NH4+. Although wet deposition in JNNR was polluted by anthropogenic acids, the acidity was largely neutralized by the Ca2+ from crust and 81% of wet deposition samples had a pH higher than 6.00. However, acid rain mainly caused by SO4(2-) continued to occur in the wet season, when ambient alkaline dust concentration was lower. Since anthropogenic emissions have elevated S and N deposition and caused acid rain in JNNR, further studies are needed to better quantify the regional sources and ecological effects of S and N deposition for JNNR.

  2. Seasonal budgets of reactive nitrogen species and ozone over the United States, and export fluxes to the global atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Jinyou; Horowitz, Larry W.; Jacob, Daniel James; Wang, Yuhang; Fiore, Arlene M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Gardner, Geraldine M.; Munger, J. William

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional, continental-scale photochemical model is used to investigate seasonal budgets of O3 and NOy species (including NOx and its oxidation products) in the boundary layer over the United States and to estimate the export of these species from the U.S. boundary layer to the global atmosphere. Model results are evaluated with year-round observations for O3, CO, and NOy species at nonurban sites. A seasonal transition from NOx to hydrocarbon-limited conditions for O3 production ov...

  3. Sulfur X-ray absorption fine structure in porous Li–S cathode films measured under argon atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.mueller@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Choudhury, Soumyadip [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Physical Chemistry of Polymeric Materials ,01062 Dresden (Germany); Gruber, Katharina [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Cruz, Valene B. [Universität Ulm, Institut für Elektrochemie, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Ulm (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany); Fuchsbichler, Bernd [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Jacob, Timo [Universität Ulm, Institut für Elektrochemie, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Ulm (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany); Koller, Stefan [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stamm, Manfred [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Physical Chemistry of Polymeric Materials ,01062 Dresden (Germany); Ionov, Leonid [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Beckhoff, Burkhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present the first results for the characterization of highly porous cathode materials with pore sizes below 1 μm for Lithium Sulfur (Li–S) batteries by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. A novel cathode material of porous carbon films fabricated with colloidal array templates has been investigated. In addition, an electrochemical characterization has been performed aiming on an improved correlation of physical and chemical parameters with the electrochemical performance. The performed NEXAFS measurements of cathode materials allowed for a chemical speciation of the sulfur content inside the cathode material. The aim of the presented investigation was to evaluate the potential of the NEXAFS technique to characterize sulfur in novel battery material. The long term goal for the characterization of the battery materials is the sensitive identification of undesired side reactions, such as the polysulfide shuttle, which takes place during charging and discharging of the battery. The main drawback associated with the investigation of these materials is the fact that NEXAFS measurements can usually only be performed ex situ due to the limited in situ instrumentation being available. For Li–S batteries this problem is more pronounced because of the low photon energies needed to study the sulfur K absorption edge at 2472 eV. We employed 1 μm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} windows to construct sealed argon cells for NEXAFS measurements under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions as a first step towards in situ measurements. The cells keep the sample under argon atmosphere at any time and the X-ray beam passes mainly through vacuum which enables the detection of the low energy X-ray emission of sulfur. Using these argon cells we found indications for the presence of lithium polysulfides in the cathode films whereas the correlations to the offline electrochemical results remain somewhat ambiguous. As a consequence of these findings one

  4. Estimating Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions in China using atmospheric observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Thompson, R.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Li, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Graziosi, F.; Stohl, A.

    2013-12-01

    With a global warming potential of around 22800 over a 100-year time horizon, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the greenhouse gases regulated under the Kyoto Protocol. Global SF6 emissions have been increasing since circa the year 2000. The reason for this increase has been inferred to be due to rapidly increasing emissions in developing countries that are not obligated to report their annual emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, notably China. In this study, SF6 emissions during the period 2006-2012 for China and other East Asian countries were determined using in-situ atmospheric measurements and inverse modeling. We performed various inversion sensitivity tests, which show the largest uncertainties in the a posteriori Chinese emissions are associated with the a priori emissions used and their uncertainty, the station network, as well as the meteorological input data. The overall relative uncertainty of the a posteriori emissions in China is estimated to be 17% in 2008. Based on sensitivity tests, we employed the optimal parameters in our inversion setup and performed yearly inversions for the study period. Inversion results show that the total a posteriori SF6 emissions from China increased from 1420 × 245 Mg/yr in 2006 to 2741 × 472 Mg/yr in 2009 and stabilized thereafter. The rapid increase in emissions reflected a fast increase in SF6 consumption in China, a result also found in bottom-up estimates. The a posteriori emission map shows high emissions concentrated in populated parts of China. During the period 2006-2012, emissions in northwestern and northern China peaked around the year 2009, while emissions in eastern, central and northeastern China grew gradually during almost the whole period. Fluctuating emissions are observed for southwestern China. These regional differences should be caused by changes of provincial SF6 usage and by shifts of usage among different sectors. Fig. 1. Footprint emission sensitivity

  5. Multiple oxygen and sulfur isotopic analyses on water-soluble sulfate in bulk atmospheric deposition from the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, H.; Reheis, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfate is a major component of bulk atmospheric deposition (including dust, aerosol, fog, and rain). We analyzed sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of water-soluble sulfate from 40 sites where year-round dust traps collect bulk atmospheric deposition in the southwestern United States. Average sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions (??34S and ??18O) are 5.8 ?? 1.4 (CDT) and 11.2 ?? 1.9 (SMOW) (n = 47), respectively. Samples have an oxygen 17 anomaly (?? 17O), with an average value of 1.0 ?? 0.6???. Except for a weak positive correlation between ??18O and ??17O values (r2 ??? 0.4), no correlation exists for ??18O versus ??34S, ?? 17O versus ??34S, or any of the three isotopic compositions versus elevation of the sample site. Exceptional positive ?? 17O values (up to 4.23???) are found in samples from sites in the vicinity of large cities or major highways, and near-zero ?? 17O values are found in samples close to dry lakes. Comparison of isotopic values of dust trap sulfate and desert varnish sulfate from the region reveals that varnish sulfate has average isotopic values that are ???4.8??? lower for ??18O, ???2.1??? higher for ??34S , and ???0.3??? lower for ?? 17O than those of the present-day bulk deposition sulfate. Although other factors could cause the disparity, this observation suggests a possibility that varnish sulfate may have recorded a long-term atmospheric sulfate deposition during the Holocene or Pleistocene, as well as the differences between sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of the preindustrial bulk deposition sulfate and those of the industrial era.

  6. Multiple sulfur-isotope signatures in Archean sulfates and their implications for the chemistry and dynamics of the early atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Élodie; Philippot, Pascal; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Cartigny, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur isotopic anomalies (∆(33)S and ∆(36)S) have been used to trace the redox evolution of the Precambrian atmosphere and to document the photochemistry and transport properties of the modern atmosphere. Recently, it was shown that modern sulfate aerosols formed in an oxidizing atmosphere can display important isotopic anomalies, thus questioning the significance of Archean sulfate deposits. Here, we performed in situ 4S-isotope measurements of 3.2- and 3.5-billion-year (Ga)-old sulfates. This in situ approach allows us to investigate the diversity of Archean sulfate texture and mineralogy with unprecedented resolution and from then on to deconvolute the ocean and atmosphere Archean sulfur cycle. A striking feature of our data is a bimodal distribution of δ(34)S values at ∼+5‰ and +9‰, which is matched by modern sulfate aerosols. The peak at +5‰ represents barite of different ages and host-rock lithology showing a wide range of ∆(33)S between -1.77‰ and +0.24‰. These barites are interpreted as primary volcanic emissions formed by SO2 photochemical processes with variable contribution of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) shielding in an evolving volcanic plume. The δ(34)S peak at +9‰ is associated with non-(33)S-anomalous barites displaying negative ∆(36)S values, which are best interpreted as volcanic sulfate aerosols formed from OCS photolysis. Our findings confirm the occurrence of a volcanic photochemical pathway specific to the early reduced atmosphere but identify variability within the Archean sulfate isotope record that suggests persistence throughout Earth history of photochemical reactions characteristic of the present-day stratosphere. PMID:27330111

  7. Multiple sulfur-isotope signatures in Archean sulfates and their implications for the chemistry and dynamics of the early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Élodie; Philippot, Pascal; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Cartigny, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur isotopic anomalies (∆33S and ∆36S) have been used to trace the redox evolution of the Precambrian atmosphere and to document the photochemistry and transport properties of the modern atmosphere. Recently, it was shown that modern sulfate aerosols formed in an oxidizing atmosphere can display important isotopic anomalies, thus questioning the significance of Archean sulfate deposits. Here, we performed in situ 4S-isotope measurements of 3.2- and 3.5-billion-year (Ga)-old sulfates. This in situ approach allows us to investigate the diversity of Archean sulfate texture and mineralogy with unprecedented resolution and from then on to deconvolute the ocean and atmosphere Archean sulfur cycle. A striking feature of our data is a bimodal distribution of δ34S values at ˜+5‰ and +9‰, which is matched by modern sulfate aerosols. The peak at +5‰ represents barite of different ages and host-rock lithology showing a wide range of ∆33S between -1.77‰ and +0.24‰. These barites are interpreted as primary volcanic emissions formed by SO2 photochemical processes with variable contribution of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) shielding in an evolving volcanic plume. The δ34S peak at +9‰ is associated with non-33S-anomalous barites displaying negative ∆36S values, which are best interpreted as volcanic sulfate aerosols formed from OCS photolysis. Our findings confirm the occurrence of a volcanic photochemical pathway specific to the early reduced atmosphere but identify variability within the Archean sulfate isotope record that suggests persistence throughout Earth history of photochemical reactions characteristic of the present-day stratosphere.

  8. An empirical approach to the nucleation of sulfuric acid droplets in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Turco

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We use quantum mechanical evaluations of the Gibbs free energy of the hydrates of sulfuric acid, H2SO4. nH2O and (H2SO42 . nH2O to evaluate an empirical surface tension for sulfuric acid-water clusters containing few molecules. We use this surface tension to evaluate nucleation rates using classical heteromolecular theory. At low temperatures (T 213 K the nucleation rates obtained with the empirical surface tensions are signifi cantly greater than those using bulk values of the surface tension. At higher temperatures the difference disappears.

  9. Centennial evolution of the atmospheric methane budget: what do the carbon isotopes tell us?

    OpenAIRE

    K. R. Lassey; Etheridge, D. M.; Lowe, D. C.; Smith, A M; D. F. Ferretti

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about how the methane source inventory and sinks have evolved over recent centuries. New and detailed records of methane mixing ratio and isotopic composition (12CH4, 13CH4 and 14CH4) from analyses of air trapped in polar ice and firn can enhance this knowledge. We use existing bottom-up constructions of the source history, including "EDGAR"-based constructions, as inputs to a model of the evolving global budget for methane and for its carbon isotope composition thro...

  10. Regional source identification of atmospheric aerosols in Beijing based on sulfur isotopic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianfang, Wei; Pingqing, Fu; Xiaokun, Han; Qingjun, Guo; Yele, Sun; Zifa, Wang

    2016-04-01

    65 daily PM2.5 (aerosol particle with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) samples were collected from an urban site in Beijing in four months representing the four seasons between September 2013 and July 2014. Inorganic ions, organic/elemental carbon and stable sulfur isotopes of sulfate aerosols were analyzed systematically. The "fingerprint" characteristics of the stable sulfur isotopic composition, together with trajectory clustering modeled by HYSPLIT-4 and potential source contribution function (PSCF), were employed for identifying potential regional sources. Results obviously exhibited the distinctive seasonality for various aerosol speciation associated with PM2.5 in Beijing with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic matter, and element carbon being the dominant species. Elevated chloride associated with higher concentration of organics were found in autumn and winter, due to enhanced coal combustion emissions. The δ34S values of Beijing aerosol samples ranged from 2.94‰ to 10.2‰ with an average value of 6.18±1.87‰ indicating that the major sulfur source is direct fossil fuel burning-related emissions. Owning to a temperature-dependent fractionation and elevated biogenic sources of isotopically light sulfur in summer, the δ34S values had significant seasonal variations with a winter maximum ( 8.6‰)and a summer minimum ( 5.0‰). The results of trajectory clustering and the PSCF method demonstrated that higher concentrations of sulfate with lower sulfur isotope ratios ( 4.83‰) were associated with air masses from the south, southeast or east, whereas lower sulfate concentrations with higher δ34S values ( 6.69‰) when the air masses were mainly from north or northwest. These results suggested two main different kinds of regional coal combustion sources contributed to the pollution in Beijing.

  11. Sulfuric acid vapor in the atmosphere of Venus as observed by the Venus Express Radio Science experiment VeRa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschlisniok, Janusz; Pätzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia; Bird, Mike; Andert, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The cloud deck within Venus' atmosphere, which covers the entire planet between approx. 50 and 70 km altitude, consists mostly of liquid and gaseous sulfuric acid. The gaseous part increases strongly just below the main clouds and builds an approx. 15 km thick haze layer of H2SO4. This region is responsible for a strong absorption of radio waves as seen in VeRa radio science observations. The amount of the absorption, which is used to derive the abundance of gaseous sulfuric acid, depends on the signal frequency. VeRa probed the atmosphere of Venus between 2006 and 2015 with radio signals at 13 cm (S-band) and 3.6 cm (X-band) wavelengths. We present H2SO4 profiles derived from S-band and X-band absorption during the first occultation season in 2006. The comparison of the H2SO4 profiles derived from both frequency bands provides a reliable picture of the H2SO4 abundance. Distinct differences in the S- and X-band profiles may give a clue to increased SO2 abundances. The derived VeRa results shall be compared with results provided by other experiments onboard Venus Express as well as with previous missions.

  12. A new formulation of the atmospheric spectral energy budget, with application to two high-resolution general circulation models

    CERN Document Server

    Augier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A new formulation of the spectral energy budget of kinetic and available potential energies of the atmosphere is derived, with spherical harmonics as base functions. Compared to previous formulations, there are three main improvements: (i) the topography is taken into account, (ii) the exact three-dimensional advection terms are considered and (iii) the vertical flux is separated from the energy transfer between different spherical harmonics. Using this formulation, results from two different high resolution GCMs are analyzed: the AFES T639L24 and the ECMWF IFS T1279L91. The spectral fluxes show that the AFES, which reproduces realistic horizontal spectra with a $k^{-5/3}$ inertial range at the mesoscales, simulates a strong downscale energy cascade. % In contrast, neither the $k^{-5/3}$ vertically integrated spectra nor the downscale energy cascade are produced by the ECMWF IFS.

  13. Earth-atmosphere radiation budget analyses derived from noaa satellite data, June 1974-February 1978. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earth-atmosphere radiation budget data as determined from the Scanning Radiometers (SR) aboard NOAA operational satellites are presented in analyzed maps and profiles for the period June 1974 through February 1978. Monthly, seasonal, and annual averages are presented in two separate volumes. Volume 1 contains analyzed mapped fields and Volume 2 contains meridional profiles of zonal averages. The quantities displayed are albedo, absorbed solar radiation, outgoing longwave radiation, and net radiation. The profiles are based on zonal means at every 2.5 degrees latitude for the entire latitude circle and for three longitudinal sectors: 0 degrees-117.5 degrees E, 120 degrees E-122.5 degrees W, and 120.0 degrees W-2.5 degrees W. Albedo, absorbed solar radiation, and outgoing longwave radiation are displayed in profile form

  14. Implementation of an atmospheric sulfur scheme in the HIRLAM regional weather forecast model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekman, Annica [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    2000-02-01

    Sulfur chemistry has been implemented into the regional weather forecast model HIRLAM in order to simulate sulfur fields during specific weather situations. The model calculates concentrations of sulfur dioxide in air (SO{sub 2}(a)), sulfate in air (SO{sub 4}(a)), sulfate in cloud water (SO{sub 4}(aq)) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Modeled concentrations of SO{sub 2}(a), SO{sub 4}(a) and SO{sub 4}(aq) in rain water are compared with observations for two weather situations, one winter case with an extensive stratiform cloud cover and one summer case with mostly convective clouds. A comparison of the weather forecast parameters precipitation, relative humidity, geopotential and temperature with observations is also performed. The results show that the model generally overpredicts the SO{sub 2}(a) concentration and underpredicts the SO{sub 4}(a) concentration. The agreement between modeled and observed SO{sub 4}(aq) in rain water is poor. Calculated turnover times are approximately 1 day for SO{sub 2}(a) and 2-2.5 days for SO{sub 4}(a). For SO{sub 2}(a) this is in accordance with earlier simulated global turnover times, but for SO{sub 4}(a) it is substantially lower. Several sensitivity simulations show that the fractional mean bias and root mean square error decreases, mainly for SO{sub 4}(a) and SO{sub 4}(aq), if an additional oxidant for converting SO{sub 2}(a) to SO{sub 4}(a) is included in the model. All weather forecast parameters, except precipitation, agree better with observations than the sulfur variables do. Wet scavenging is responsible for about half of the deposited sulfur and in addition, a major part of the sulfate production occurs through in-cloud oxidation. Hence, the distribution of clouds and precipitation must be better simulated by the weather forecast model in order to improve the agreement between observed and simulated sulfur concentrations.

  15. Reactions of SIV species with organic compounds: formation mechanisms of organo-sulfur derivatives in atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passananti, Monica; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have an important impact on climate, air quality and human health. However the chemical reactions involved in their formation and growth are not fully understood or well-constrained in climate models. It is well known that inorganic sulfur (mainly in oxidation states (+IV) and (+VI)) plays a key role in aerosol formation, for instance sulfuric acid is known to be a good nucleating gas. In addition, acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds has shown to produce new particles, with a clear enhancement in the presence of ozone (Iinuma 2013). Organosulfates have been detected in tropospheric particles and aqueous phases, which suggests they are products of secondary organic aerosol formation process (Tolocka 2012). Originally, the production of organosulfates was explained by the esterification reaction of alcohols, but this reaction in atmosphere is kinetically negligible. Other formation pathways have been suggested such as hydrolysis of peroxides and reaction of organic matter with sulfite and sulfate radical anions (SO3-, SO4-) (Nozière 2010), but it remains unclear if these can completely explain atmospheric organo-sulfur aerosol loading. To better understand the formation of organo-sulfur compounds, we started to investigate the reactivity of SIV species (SO2 and SO32-) with respect to specific functional groups (organic acids and double bonds) on atmospherically relevant carboxylic acids and alkenes. The experiments were carried out in the homogeneous aqueous phase and at the solid-gas interface. A custom built coated-wall flow tube reactor was developed to control relativity humidity, SO2 concentration, temperature and gas flow rate. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics were measured and resulting products were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). The experiments were performed with and without the presence of ozone in order to evaluate any

  16. Using sulfur isotope fractionation to understand the atmospheric oxidation of SO 2

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Eliza

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate aerosol plays an important but uncertain role in cloud formation and radiative forcing of the climate, and is also important for acid deposition and human health. The oxidation of SO2 to sulfate is a key reaction in determining the impact of sulfate in the environment through its effect on aerosol size distribution and composition. This thesis presents a laboratory investigation of sulfur isotope fractionation during SO2 oxidation by the most important gas-phase and heterogeneous path...

  17. Wind structure and variability in the middle atmosphere during the November 1980 energy budget campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Carlson, M.; Rees, D.; Offermann, D.; Philbrick, C. R.; Widdel, H. U.

    1985-01-01

    Between November 6 and December 1, 1980 series of rocket observations were obtained from two sites in northern Scandinavia (68 deg N) as part of the Energy Budget Campaign, revealing the presence of significant vertical and temporal changes in the wind structure. These changes coincided with different geomagnetic conditions, i.e. quiet and enhanced. Large amounts of rocket data were gathered from high latitudes over such a short interval of time. Prior to November 16 the meridional wind component above 60 km was found to be positive (southerly), while the magnitude of the zonal wind component incresed with altitude. After November 16 the meridional component became negative (northerly) and the magnitude of the zonal wind component was noted to decrease with altitude. Time-sections of the perturbations of the zonal wind show the presence of vertically propagating waves, which suggest gravity wave activity. These waves increase in length from 1 km near 30 km to over 12 km near 80 km. The observational techniques employed Andoya (69 deg N), Norway, and Esrange (67.9 deg N), Sweden, consisted of chaff foil, instrumented rigid spheres, chemical trails, inflatable spheres and parachutes.

  18. Effects of increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen on an upland moor: nitrogen budgets and nutrient accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, M G; Caporn, S J M; Carroll, J A; Cresswell, N; Lee, J A; Reynolds, B; Emmett, B A

    2005-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of long-term (11 years) ammonium nitrate additions on standing mass, nutrient content (% and kg ha(-1)), and the proportion of the added N retained within the different compartments of the system. The results showed that more than 90% of all N in the system was found in the soil, particularly in the organic (Oh) horizon. Added N increased the standing mass of vegetation and litter and the N content (kg N ha(-1)) of almost all measured plant, litter and soil compartments. Green tissue P and K content (kg ha(-1)) were increased, and N:P ratios were increased to levels indicative of P limitation. At the lowest treatment, most of the additional N was found in plant/litter compartments, but at higher treatments, there were steep increases in the amount of additional N in the underlying organic and mineral (Eag) horizons. The budget revealed that the proportion of added N found in the system as a whole increased from 60%, 80% and up to 90% in response to the 40, 80 and 120 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) treatments, respectively.

  19. Atmospheric sulfur and climate changes: a modelling study at mid and high-southern latitudes; Soufre atmospherique et changements climatiques: une etude de modelisation pour les moyennes et hautes latitudes Sud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castebrunet, H

    2007-09-15

    The mid and high-southern latitudes are still marginally affected by anthropogenic sulfur emissions. They are the only regions in the world where the natural cycle of the atmospheric sulfur may still be observed. Sulfur aerosols are well-known for their radiative impact, and thus interact with climate. Climate can in turn affect atmospheric sulfur sources, distribution and chemistry. Antarctic ice cores provide information on the evolution of climate and sulfur deposition at the surface of the ice sheet at glacial-interglacial time scales. The aim of this thesis is to develop and use modeling towards a better understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle in antarctic and sub-antarctic regions. Ice core data are used to validate model results under glacial climate conditions. An Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) coupled to a sulfur chemistry module is used: the LMD-ZTSulfur model, version 4. An update of both the physical and chemical parts of the model. The model was first performed. The impact of there changes on modelled sulfur cycle are evaluated for modern climate. Further, boundary conditions are adapted to simulate the atmospheric circulation and sulfur cycle at the Last Glacial Maximum, approximately 20,000 years ago. In the model, sulfur is found to be highly sensitive to antarctic sea-ice coverage, which is still poorly known during the ice age. An original dataset of ice-age sea-ice coverage was developed. Its impact on the oceanic emissions of dimethyl sulfide, main precursor of sulfur aerosols at high-southern latitudes, is discussed. Using the same oceanic sulfur reservoirs as for present day climate, the model broadly reproduces the glacial deposits of sulfur aerosols on the Antarctic plateau, suggesting little impact of climate on oceanic sulfur production in the Antarctic region. Sensitivity tests were carried out to draw an up-to-date status of major uncertainties and difficulties facing future progress in understanding atmospheric

  20. The Sulfur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  1. Measurements of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide during the NASA Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation Project: Implications for the global COS budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide COS concentrations were measured by three analytical systems during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project. The three systems all used cryogenic sample preconcentration and gas chromatographic (GC) separation but differed in the method of detection. The FPD system used a flame photometric detector, the MS system used a mass selective detector, and the ECD-S system used a fluorinating catalyst followed by an electron capture detector. With the FPD system, we found a mean COS concentration of 510 ppt over the North Atlantic and 442 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. With the ECD-S system, we found a mean COS concentration of 489 ppt over the North Atlantic and 419 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. All three systems registered a latitudinal gradient in atmospheric COS of between 1.6 and 2.0 ppt per degree of latitude, with increasing COS concentrations northward which was similar to the gradient measured by Bingemer et al. (1990). It is difficult to reconcile the measured latitudinal concentration gradient with present theories of the global COS budget since the largest sink of COS is thought to be a flux to land plants, most of which are in the northern hemisphere.

  2. On the marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Denny P Alappattu; D Bala Subrahamanyam; P K Kunhikrishnan; K M Somayaji; G S Bhat; R Venkatesan; C B S Dutt; A Bagavath Singh; V K Soni; A S Tripathi

    2008-07-01

    Detailed measurements were carried out in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) which covered both Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal during March to May 2006. In this paper, we present the meteorological observations made during this campaign. The latitudinal variation of the surface layer turbulent fluxes is also described in detail.

  3. Carbon isotope excursions and the oxidant budget of the Ediacaran atmosphere and ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Kennedy, Martin J.

    2008-11-01

    A possible global drop in marine carbon isotope values to aslow as -12 Peedee belemnite (PDB), recorded in the EdiacaranShuram Formation of Oman, has been attributed to the non-steady-stateoxidation of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) resultingfrom the rise in atmospheric oxygen to near modern values atthe end of the Precambrian. Geologic constraints indicate thatthe excursion lasted between 25 and 50 m.y., requiring a DOCpool thousands of times to 10,000 times the modern inventoryto conform with carbon isotope mass balance calculations fora -12 excursion. At the consequent rates of DOC oxidation,oceanic sulfate and oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans areexhausted on a time scale of 800 k.y. Oxidant depletion isincompatible with independent geochemical and biological indicatorsthat show oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintainedor increased during the Shuram excursion. Furthermore, a DOC-drivenexcursion does not explain strong covariation between the carbonand oxygen isotope record. These indicators show that negativeisotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and other Ediacaransections are unlikely to represent a global ocean signal.

  4. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Schobesberger, S.; Junninen, H.; BIANCHI, F.; Lonn, G.; M. Ehn; Lehtipalo, K.; Dommen, J; S. Ehrhart; Ortega, I.K.; A. Franchin; Nieminen, T.; Riccobono, F.; Hutterli, M.; J. Duplissy; Almeida, J

    2013-01-01

    The formation of nanoparticles by condensable vapors in the atmosphere influences radiative forcing and therefore climate. We explored the detailed mechanism of particle formation, in particular the role of oxidized organic molecules that arise from the oxidation of monoterpenes, a class of volatile organic compounds emitted from plants. We mimicked atmospheric conditions in a well-controlled laboratory setup and found that these oxidized organics form initial clusters directly with single su...

  5. The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide since 1950, implications for the CO budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Chappellaz, J.; Martinerie, P.; Park, K.; Petrenko, V.; Witrant, E.; Blunier, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Mak, J. E.

    2011-11-01

    We present a 60-yr record of atmospheric CO concentration and stable isotopic ratios at high northern latitude based on firn air samples collected in the frame of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) project. Concentration, δ13C, and δ18O of CO from trapped gases in the firn were measured by gas chromatography coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (gc-IRMS). Using models of trace gas transport in firn, the long-term trend of atmospheric CO and its stable isotopic composition at high northern latitudes since the 1950s were reconstructed. Our best firn air scenarios suggest that δ13C decreased slightly from -25.8‰ in 1950 to -26.4‰ in 2000, then dropped to -27.2‰ in 2008. δ18O decreased more regularly from 9.8‰ in 1950 to 7.1‰ in 2008. The best firn air scenarios also suggest that CO concentration increased gradually from 1950 and peaked likely in the late-1970s, followed by a gradual decrease by present day (Petrenko et al., 2011). An isotope mass balance model is applied to quantify the temporal evolution of CO source partitioning able to explain the combined mixing ratio and isotopic ratio changes. It suggests that a slight increase followed by a large reduction in CO derived from fossil fuel combustion occurred since 1950. The increase of CO concentration from 1950 to the mid-1970s is the result of a combined increase of multiple sources. The reduction of CO emission from fossil fuel combustion after the mid-1970s is the most plausible mechanism for the drop of CO concentration during this time. The mitigation policy for CO emission from vehicle exhaust such as application of catalytic converters and the growth of diesel engine vehicles market share are the main expected reasons for the CO source strength change from fossil fuel combustion.

  6. Long-term global distribution of earth’s shortwave radiation budget at the top of atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hatzianastassiou

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The mean monthly shortwave (SW radiation budget at the top of atmosphere (TOA was computed on 2.5° longitude-latitude resolution for the 14-year period from 1984 to 1997, using a radiative transfer model with long-term climatological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP-D2 supplemented by data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR Global Reanalysis project, and other global data bases such as TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS and Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS. The model radiative fluxes at TOA were validated against Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE S4 scanner satellite data (1985–1989. The model is able to predict the seasonal and geographical variation of SW TOA fluxes. On a mean annual and global basis, the model is in very good agreement with ERBE, overestimating the outgoing SW radiation at TOA (OSR by 0.93 Wm−2 (or by 0.92%, within the ERBE uncertainties. At pixel level, the OSR differences between model and ERBE are mostly within ±10 Wm−2, with ±5 Wm−2 over extended regions, while there exist some geographic areas with differences of up to 40 Wm−2, associated with uncertainties in cloud properties and surface albedo. The 14-year average model results give a planetary albedo equal to 29.6% and a TOA OSR flux of 101.2 Wm-2. A significant linearly decreasing trend in OSR and planetary albedo was found, equal to 2.3 Wm−2 and 0.6% over the 14-year period (from January 1984 to December 1997, indicating an increasing solar planetary warming. This planetary SW radiative heating occurs in the tropical and sub-tropical areas (20° S–20° N, with clouds being the most likely cause. The computed global mean OSR anomaly ranges within ±4 Wm−2, with signals from El Niño and La Niña events or Pinatubo eruption, whereas significant negative

  7. Stability of chromium (III) sulfate in atmospheres containing oxygen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, K. T.; Rao, B. D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    The stability of chromium sulfate in the temperature range from 880 K to 1040 K was determined by employing a dynamic gas-solid equilibration technique. The solid chromium sulfate was equilibrated in a gas stream of controlled SO3 potential. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses were used to follow the decomposition of chromium sulfate. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the decomposition product was crystalline Cr2O3 and that the mutual solubility between Cr2(SO4)3 and Cr2O3 was negligible. Over the temperature range investigated, the decomposition pressure were significantly high so that chromium sulfate is not expected to form on commercial alloys containing chromium when exposed to gaseous environments containing oxygen and sulfur (such as those encountered in coal gasification).

  8. INTERMEDIATE-RANGE GRID MODEL FOR ATMOSPHERIC SULFUR DIOXIDE AND SULFATE CONCENTRATIONS AND DEPOSITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-dimensional time-dependent grid type model for two chemically reacting species which undergo atmospheric transport, diffusion and wet and dry deposition over a region of several hundred km is presented. Accuracy and sensitivity of the model are discussed. The model is app...

  9. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  10. Global atmospheric budget of acetaldehyde: 3-D model analysis and constraints from in-situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Millet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We construct a global atmospheric budget for acetaldehyde using a 3-D model of atmospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem, and use an ensemble of observations to evaluate present understanding of its sources and sinks. Hydrocarbon oxidation provides the largest acetaldehyde source in the model (128 Tg a−1, a factor of 4 greater than the previous estimate, with alkanes, alkenes, and ethanol the main precursors. There is also a minor source from isoprene oxidation. We use an updated chemical mechanism for GEOS-Chem, and photochemical acetaldehyde yields are consistent with the Master Chemical Mechanism. We present a new approach to quantifying the acetaldehyde air-sea flux based on the global distribution of light absorption due to colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM derived from satellite ocean color observations. The resulting net ocean emission is 57 Tg a−1, the second largest global source of acetaldehyde. A key uncertainty is the acetaldehyde turnover time in the ocean mixed layer, with quantitative model evaluation over the ocean complicated by known measurement artifacts in clean air. Simulated concentrations in surface air over the ocean generally agree well with aircraft measurements, though the model tends to overestimate the vertical gradient. PAN:NOx ratios are well-simulated in the marine boundary layer, providing some support for the modeled ocean source. We introduce the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1 for acetaldehyde and ethanol and use it to quantify their net flux from living terrestrial plants. Including emissions from decaying plants the total direct acetaldehyde source from the land biosphere is 23 Tg a−1. Other terrestrial acetaldehyde sources include biomass burning (3 Tg a−1 and anthropogenic emissions (2 Tg a−1. Simulated concentrations in the continental boundary layer are generally unbiased and capture the spatial

  11. Atmospheric hydrological budget with itseffects over Tibetan Plateau%青藏高原大气水汽收支特征及影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏晶瑜; 徐祥德

    2004-01-01

    Based on 1961-2000 NCEP/NCAR monthly mean reanalysis datasets, vapor transfer and hydrological budget over the Tibetan Plateau are investigated. The Plateau is a vapor sink all the year round. In summer, vapor is convergent in lower levels (from surface to 500 hPa) and divergent in upper levels (from 400 to 300 hPa), with 450 hPa referred to as level of non-divergence. Two levels have different hydrologic budget signatures: the budget is negative at the upper levels from February to November, i.e., vapor transfers from the upper levels over the plateau; as to the lower, the negative (positive) budget occurs during the winter (summer) half year. Evidence also indicates that Tibetan Plateau is a "vapor transition belt", vapor from the south and the west is transferred from lower to upper levels there in summer, which will affect surrounding regions, including eastern China, especially, the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze. Vapor transfer exerts significant influence on precipitation in summertime months. Vapor transferred from the upper layers helps humidify eastern China, with coefficient -0.3 of the upper budget to the precipitation over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze (MLRY); also, vapor transferred from east side (27.5°-32.5°N) of the upper level has remarkable relationship with precipitation, the coefficient being 0.41. The convergence of the lower level vapor has great effects on the local precipitation over the plateau, with coefficient reaching 0.44, and the vapor passage affects the advance and retreat of the rainbelt. In general, atmospheric hydrologic budget and vapor transfer over the plateau have noticeable effects on precipitation of the target region as well as the ambient areas.

  12. Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere of the former Soviet Union in 1985 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryaboshapko, A.G.; Brukhanov, P.A.; Gromov, S.A.; Proshina, Yu.V; Afinogenova, O.G. [Institute of Global Climate and Ecology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen over the former Soviet Union for 1985 and 1990 were calculated on the basis of a combination of `bottom-up` and `top-down` approaches. Sulfur dioxide emissions from combustion of hard coal, brown coal, oil products, natural gas, shale oil, peat, wood as well as from metallurgy, sulfuric acid production, and cement production were estimated. Nitrogen oxides emissions were considered separately for large power plants, small power plants, industrial boilers, residential combustion units, and for transport. The sulfur and nitrogen emissions were spatially distributed over the former Soviet Union with 1 x 1 degree resolution. Data on 721 point sources of sulfur dioxide emissions and on the 242 largest power stations as nitrogen oxides sources were used. The area sources of both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides were distributed according to the population density separately for about 150 administrative units of the former Soviet Union. 63 refs., 19 tabs.

  13. Ground-Atmosphere Interactions at Gale: Determination of the Surface Energy Budget, Thermal Inertia and Water Sorption on the Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, German; Renno, Nilton; Fischer, Erik; Borlina, Caue; Hallet, Bernard; De la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Vasavada, Aswhin; Gomez-Elvira, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the Surface Energy Budget (SEB) yields insights into the local climate and the soil-atmosphere interactions, while the analysis of the thermal inertia of the shallow subsurface augments surface observations, providing information about the local geology. The Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System have measured near subsurface thermal inertia from orbit at scales of ~104 m2 to ~10 km2. Here we report analysis of the thermal inertia at a few locations at Gale Crater at scales of 100 m2. The thermal inertia is calculated by solving the heat conduction equation in the soil using hourly measurements by the Rover Environmental Station (REMS) ground temperature sensor as an upper boundary condition. Three Sols representative of different environmental conditions and soil properties, namely, Sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), Sol 112 at Point Lake (PL) and Sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) are analyzed in detail. The largest thermal inertia (I) value is found at YKB, I = 445 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 or 445 tiu (thermal inertia unit), followed by PL with I= 300 tiu and RCK withI = 280 tiu [1]. These values are consistent with the type of terrain imaged by MastCam and with previous satellite estimates at Gale Crater [2,3]. The SEB is calculated by using all REMS data products as well as dust opacity values derived from MastCam measurements, whereas previously, the SEB has been calculated using numerical models only [4]. At each location and during the daytime, the SEB is dominated by the downwelling shortwave (SW) solar radiation (~450-500 W/m2) and the upwelling longwave (LW) radiation emitted by the surface (~300-400 W/m2). The sum of these two terms accounts for at least 70% of the net surface heating rate between 0900 and 1400 local solar time. At nighttime, the SEB is dominated by the upwelling LW radiation emitted by the surface (~50-100 W/m2) and the downwelling LW radiation from the atmosphere (~50 W/m2

  14. Atmospheric sulfur cycling in the Southeastern Pacific – longitudinal distribution, vertical profile, and diel variability observed during VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimethylsulfide (DMS emitted from the ocean is a biogenic precursor gas for sulfur dioxide (SO2 and non-sea-salt sulfate aerosols (SO42. During the VAMOS-Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx in 2008, multiple instrumented platforms were deployed in the Southeastern Pacific (SEP off the coast of Chile and Peru to study the linkage between aerosols and stratocumulus clouds. We present here observations from the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown and the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft along ~20° S from the coast (70° W to a remote marine region (85° W. While SO42− and SO2 concentrations were distinctly elevated above background levels in the coastal marine boundary layer (MBL due to anthropogenic influence (~800 and 80 pptv, respectively, their concentrations rapidly decreased offshore (~100and 25 pptv. Compared to the "mass" entrainment fluxes of SO42− and SO2 from the free troposphere (0.5 ± 0.3 and 0.3 ± 0.2 μmoles m−2 day−1, the sea-to-air DMS flux (3.8 ± 0.1 μmoles m−2 day−1 remained the predominant source of sulfur mass to the MBL. In-cloud oxidation was found to be the most important mechanism for SO2 removal and in situ SO42− production. Surface SO42− loading in the remote region displayed pronounced diel variability, increasing rapidly in the first few hours after sunset and then decaying for the rest of the time. We theorize that the increase in SO42− was due to nighttime recoupling of the MBL that mixed down cloud-processed air, while decoupling and sporadic precipitation scavenging were responsible for the daytime decline in SO42−.

  15. Sulfur isotope budget (32S, 33S, 34S and 36S) in Pacific-Antarctic ridge basalts: A record of mantle source heterogeneity and hydrothermal sulfide assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.; Hamelin, C.; Moreira, M.; Dosso, L.

    2014-05-01

    To better address how Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) sulfur isotope composition can be modified by assimilation and/or by immiscible sulfide fractionation, we report sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and copper (Cu) abundances together with multiple sulfur isotope composition for 38 fresh basaltic glasses collected on the Pacific-Antarctic ridge. All the studied glasses - with the exception of 8 off-axis samples - exhibit relatively high Cl/K, as the result of pervasive Cl-rich fluid assimilation. This sample set hence offers an opportunity to document both the upper mantle S isotope composition and the effect of hydrothermal fluids assimilation on the S isotope composition of erupted basalts along segments that are devoid of plume influence.

  16. The atmospheric HCHO budget at coastal East and West Antarctica: Impact of photochemical productions and snow emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Michel; Preunkert, Susanne; Pépy, Guillaume; Jourdain, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    HCHO year-round records are now available at three coastal Antarctic sites, Neumayer and Halley in the Weddell Sea region and Dumont d'Urville in Terre Adélie, revealing a similar seasonal pattern with winter minima and summer maxima. However, absolute values significantly differ from site to site, during summer and winter. Monthly summer means exceed 450 pptv at NM, whereas a HCHO maximum of 130 pptv is observed at HA. Summer HCHO levels at DDU are similar to those at HA although higher levels were expected in relation with a methane oxidation being promoted by a 5 times higher level of OH at DDU than at HA. On the other hand, to match observations at NM and HA, snow emissions have to be considered whereas photochemical HCHO sources and sinks alone seem to explain observations at DDU. With the aim to draw a more comprehensive picture of the HCHO budget at coastal Antarctica we reexamine and discuss the three records using 0-D and 2-D calculations. In summer, the gas phase photochemistry is at all sites dominated by the CH4 oxidation, well before the oxidation of DMS and light alkenes. The CH4 oxidation chemistry is some three times more efficient in producing HCHO at DDU than at the two other sites because of more rich oxidant air masses coming from the Antarctic plateau reach DDU. The halogen chemistry, even being more important in relation with much sea-ice at HA and NM than at DDU, remains a weak HCHO sink. HCHO snow emissions represent an important contribution at the two Weddell Sea sites whereas they contribute only weakly at DDU. Although they are probably of similar strength around the three sites, the far thinner atmospheric boundary layer at HA (and even more at NM) compared to DDU permit an efficient accumulation of HCHO emitted by this surface source. In addition these coastal Antarctic data sets will be opposed to HCHO mixing ratios and snow fluxes obtained at inland Antarctica (Dome C) within the framework of the OPALE (Oxidant Production over

  17. Estimating Effects of Atmospheric Deposition and Peat Decomposition Processes on Mercury and Sulfur Accumulation and Retention in Northern Peatlands, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, O.; Nater, E.; Toner, B. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Tfaily, M. M.; Chanton, J.; Kolka, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    Northern peatland ecosystems play an important role in mercury (Hg) and sulfur (S) co-cycling. Peatlands are sinks for total Hg and sources for methyl Hg through the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. These ecosystems are vulnerable to environmental change, and projected changes in climate for the north-central U.S. have the potential to affect Hg and S stores and cycling in the subsurface, which may stimulate the release of bioaccumulative methyl Hg to receiving water bodies. SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climate and Environmental change experiment) is an interdisciplinary study of the effects of temperature and enriched carbon dioxide on the responses of northern peatland ecosystems at the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota. In the first year of SPRUCE, we are investigating Hg and S accumulation rates in 12-m diameter experimental plots on a black spruce bog before peatland heating experiments start in 2014. Understanding Hg and S accumulation rates and their retention mechanisms in the subsurface are needed in order to reconstruct historical trends in Hg and S deposition, and predict peatland responses to climate change. In this study, we will attempt to separate the effects of atmospheric deposition vs peat humification on Hg and S retention. As such, peat cores were sampled from sixteen experimental SPRUCE plots in August 2012. These 'Time 0' peat subsamples have been analyzed for total Hg, methyl Hg and total S, and bulk density as a function of depth (50 cm), and showed lower variability. Changes in Hg and S over depth seem to be associated with the variation in humification of soil organic matter. These findings are critical to better conceptualization as well as parameterization of models that project how climate change will affect the accumulation, cycling, and export of toxic methylmercury from peatlands.

  18. Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 8. A sulfur isotopic budget balanced by differential diffusion across the sediment-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, J.P.; Martens, C.S.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The sulfur isotopic composition of the sulfur fluxes occurring in the anoxic marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, N.C., U.S.A., was determined, and the result of isotopic mass balance was obtained via the differential diffusion model. Seasonal pore water sulfate ??34S measurements yielded a calculated sulfate input of 0.6%.. Sulfate transported into the sediments via diffusion appeared to be enriched in the lighter isotope because its concentration gradient was steeper, due to the increase in the measured isotopic composition of sulfate with depth. Similarly, the back diffusion of dissolved sulfide towards the sediment-water interface appeared enriched in the heavier isotope. The isotopic composition of this flux was calculated from measurements of the ??34S of dissolved sulfide and was determined to be 15.9%.. The isotopic composition of buried sulfide was determined to be -5.2%. and the detrital sulfur input was estimated to be -6.2%.. An isotope mass balance equation based upon the fluxes at the sediment-water interface successfully predicted the isotopic composition of the buried sulfur flux within 0.5%., thus confirming that isotopes diffuse in response to their individual concentration gradients. ?? 1987.

  19. Nitrogen and Oxygen Budget ExpLoration (NOBEL) for ESA M5-call: Measurement requirements to understand the atmospheric escape/budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Dandouras, Iannis; Rème, Henri; Marghitu, Octav

    2016-04-01

    The NOBEL mission aims to study the thermal and non-thermal escape of major atmospheric components (nitrogen, oxygen, and their isotopes) from the Earth, a magnetized planet. This requires the first-time exploration of the Earth's entire exosphere as well as the first-time examination of isotope ratios in an extended altitude range from the upper ionosphere (800 km high) up to the magnetosphere. The measurement quality should allow connecting the various types of escape from the Earth to the different gravity mass-filtering and chemical reactions on a geological time scale, such that the result will be used as a good reference to understand the atmospheric/ionospheric evolution of magnetized planets based on their 17,18O/16O isotope ratio and N/O ratio. Since the solar EUV and solar wind conditions during solar maximum at present are comparable to the solar minimum conditions 1-2 billion years ago, the escaping amount and the isotope and N/O ratios should be obtained as a function of external forcing (solar and geomagnetic conditions) to allow a scaling to the past. To achieve these goals, the ion measurements in this mission should be able to separate nitrogen species (N, N2, N+ and N2+) from oxygen (O, O+), near the exobase, in the exosphere (for modelling thermal escape, hydrodynamics escape, and the pre-acceleration amount of non-thermal escape) and up in the magnetosphere (for modelling non-thermal escape and circulation of all ions). Furthermore, these aims require the capability to measure isotope ratios of cold oxygen ions and neutrals. We briefly discuss why we focus on the exosphere, on isotope ratios, and nitrogen measurements, and finally describe the current idea of a mission profile using a spinning satellite in a 500 km × 33000 km altitude high-inclination orbit.

  20. Laboratory Measurments of the 3.7-20 cm Wavelength Opacity of Sulfur Dioxide and Carbon Dioxide under Simulated Conditions for the Deep Atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Barisich, C.

    2012-10-01

    In the past two decades, multiple observations of Venus have been made at X band (3.6 cm) using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and maps have been created of the 3.6 cm emission from Venus. Since the emission morphology is related both to surface features and to deep atmospheric absorption from CO2 and SO2 (see, e.g., Butler et al., Icarus 154, 2001), knowledge of the microwave absorption properties of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus is required for proper interpretation. Except for a single measurement campaign conducted at a single wavelength (3.2 cm) over 40 years ago (Ho et al., JGR 71, 1966), no measurements of the centimeter-wavelength properties of any Venus atmospheric constituent have been conducted under conditions characteristic of the deep atmosphere (pressures from 10-92 Bars and temperatures from 400-700 K). New measurements of the microwave properties of SO2 and CO2 at wavelengths from 3.7-20 cm are now being conducted under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus, using a new high-pressure system. Initial results from this measurement campaign conducted at 430 K and at pressures up to 92 Bars will be presented. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NNX11AD66G.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Sequestration and Storage in Geothermal System: New Mitigation Strategy to Reduce H2S from the Atmosphere and Detect its Mineralization with Multiple Sulfur Isotopic Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marieni, C.; Stefansson, A.; Gudbrandsson, S.; Gunnarsson, I.; Aradottir, E. S.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the major components in geothermal fluids and is commonly emitted into the atmosphere from geothermal power plants causing potential environmental problems. Among several mitigation methods proposed to reduce the H2S emissions, is H2S sequestration into geothermal systems. Reykjavík Energy is undertaking a pilot project at Hellisheidi geothermal system (SW Iceland) called Sulfix project where H2S is being injected into the geothermal reservoir for permanent sequestration into pyrite. The SulFix project started its operation in June 2014: the soluble geothermal gases are dissolved in geothermal waste water, and injected at 8 bars into the high temperature reservoir (>200˚C) at 750 m below the wellhead. The reactions involving sulfur in the geothermal reservoir may be traced using sulfur fluid chemistry and multiple sulfur isotope systematics (32S, 33S, 34S and 36S), including mixing between the reservoir geothermal fluid and the injection fluid, sulfide mineralization and oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In this study we investigated the multiple sulfur isotope systematics upon sulfide mineralization under geothermal conditions. High temperature flow through experiments were carried out in basaltic glass at 200-250°C and ~5 mmol/kg H2S to study the fluid-rock interaction. The results indicate that the sulfide mineralization occurs rapidly under geothermal conditions, highlighting the leaching rate of iron from the basaltic glass as the mineralization rate determining factor. Moreover, the formation of sulfide may be traced using the δ34S-Δ33S relationship in the fluids and pyrite formation - for example to determine if non-reactive mixing between the injection fluids and reservoir fluids occurs at Hellisheidi. The experimental results have been further supported by geochemical modeling involving multiple sulfur isotope fractionation between aqueous sulfide species and rocks upon basalt dissolution and secondary pyrite formation.

  2. Oxidation of SO2 by stabilized Criegee intermediate (sCI radicals as a crucial source for atmospheric sulfuric acid concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of increased reaction rates of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs with SO2 to produce sulfuric acid is investigated using data from two different locations, SMEAR II, Hyytiälä, Finland, and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany. Results from MALTE, a zero-dimensional model, show that using previous values for the rate coefficients of sCI + SO2, the model underestimates gas phase H2SO4 by up to a factor of two when compared to measurements. Using the rate coefficients recently calculated by Mauldin et al. (2012 increases sulfuric acid by 30–40%. Increasing the rate coefficient for formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO with SO2 according to the values recommended by Welz et al. (2012 increases the H2SO4 yield by 3–6%. Taken together, these increases lead to the conclusion that, depending on their concentrations, the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with SO2 could contribute as much as 33–46% to atmospheric sulfuric acid gas phase concentrations at ground level. Using the SMEAR II data, results from SOSA, a one-dimensional model, show that the contribution from sCI reactions to sulfuric acid production is most important in the canopy, where the concentrations of organic compounds are the highest, but can have significant effects on sulfuric acid concentrations up to 100 m. The recent findings that the reaction of sCI + SO2 is much faster than previously thought together with these results show that the inclusion of this new oxidation mechanism could be crucial in regional as well as global models.

  3. Atmospheric deposition impacts on nutrients and biological budgets of the Mediterranean Sea, results from the high resolution coupled model NEMOMED12/PISCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richon, Camille; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Dulac, François; Desboeufs, Karine; Nabat, Pierre; Guieu, Cécile; Aumont, Olivier; Palmieri, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition is at present not included in regional oceanic biogeochemical models of the Mediterranean Sea, whereas, along with river inputs, it represents a significant source of nutrients at the basin scale, especially through intense desert dust events. Moreover, observations (e.g. DUNE campaign, Guieu et al. 2010) show that these events significantly modify the biogeochemistry of the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea. We use a high resolution (1/12°) version of the 3D coupled model NEMOMED12/PISCES to investigate the effects of high resolution atmospheric dust deposition forcings on the biogeochemistry of the Mediterranean basin. The biogeochemical model PISCES represents the evolution of 24 prognostic tracers including five nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and iron) and two phytoplankton and zooplanktons groups (Palmiéri, 2014). From decadal simulations (1982-2012) we evaluate the influence of natural dust and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition on the budget of nutrients in the basin and its impact on the biogeochemistry (primary production, plankton distributions...). Our results show that natural dust deposition accounts for 15% of global PO4 budget and that it influences primarily the southern part of the basin. Anthropogenic nitrogen accounts for 50% of bioavailable N supply for the northern part. Deposition events significantly affect biological production; primary productivity enhancement can be as high as 30% in the areas of high deposition, especially during the stratified period. Further developments of the model will include 0D and 1D modeling of bacteria in the frame of the PEACETIME project.

  4. Sulfur Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters What's New A - Z Index Facts About Sulfur Mustard What sulfur mustard is Sulfur mustard is a type of ... it is in liquid or solid form. Where sulfur mustard is found and how it is used ...

  5. Atmospheric H2S and SO2 as sulfur source for Brassica juncea and Brassica rapa: Impact on the glucosinolate composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh eAghajanzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of sulfate deprivation and atmospheric H2S and SO2 nutrition on the content and composition of glucosinolates was studied in Brassica juncea and Brasscia rapa. Both species contained a number of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates. The total glucosinolate content was more than 5.5-fold higher in B. juncea than in B. rapa, which could solely be attributed to the presence of high levels of sinigrin, which was absent in the latter species. Sulfate deprivation resulted in a strong decrease in the content and an altered composition of the glucosinolates of both species. Despite the differences in patterns in foliarly uptake and metabolism, their exposure hardly affected the glucosinolate composition of the shoot, both at sulfate-sufficient and sulfate-deprived conditions. This indicated that the glucosinolate composition in the shoot was hardly affected by differences in sulfur source (viz. sulfate, sulfite and sulfide. Upon sulfate deprivation, where foliarly absorbed H2S and SO2 were the sole sulfur source for growth, the glucosinolate composition of roots differed from sulfate-sufficient B. juncea and B. rapa, notably the fraction of the indolic glucosinolates was lower than that observed in sulfur-sufficient roots.

  6. Future projections of the surface heat and water budgets of the Mediterranean Sea in an ensemble of coupled atmosphere-ocean regional climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, C.; Somot, S.; Deque, M.; Sevault, F. [CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Calmanti, S.; Carillo, A.; Dell' Aquilla, A.; Sannino, G. [ENEA, Rome (Italy); Elizalde, A.; Jacob, D. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Gualdi, S.; Oddo, P.; Scoccimarro, E. [INGV, Bologna (Italy); L' Heveder, B.; Li, L. [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France)

    2012-10-15

    Within the CIRCE project ''Climate change and Impact Research: the Mediterranean Environment'', an ensemble of high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean regional climate models (AORCMs) are used to simulate the Mediterranean climate for the period 1950-2050. For the first time, realistic net surface air-sea fluxes are obtained. The sea surface temperature (SST) variability is consistent with the atmospheric forcing above it and oceanic constraints. The surface fluxes respond to external forcing under a warming climate and show an equivalent trend in all models. This study focuses on the present day and on the evolution of the heat and water budget over the Mediterranean Sea under the SRES-A1B scenario. On the contrary to previous studies, the net total heat budget is negative over the present period in all AORCMs and satisfies the heat closure budget controlled by a net positive heat gain at the strait of Gibraltar in the present climate. Under climate change scenario, some models predict a warming of the Mediterranean Sea from the ocean surface (positive net heat flux) in addition to the positive flux at the strait of Gibraltar for the 2021-2050 period. The shortwave and latent flux are increasing and the longwave and sensible fluxes are decreasing compared to the 1961-1990 period due to a reduction of the cloud cover and an increase in greenhouse gases (GHGs) and SSTs over the 2021-2050 period. The AORCMs provide a good estimates of the water budget with a drying of the region during the twenty-first century. For the ensemble mean, he decrease in precipitation and runoff is about 10 and 15% respectively and the increase in evaporation is much weaker, about 2% compared to the 1961-1990 period which confirm results obtained in recent studies. Despite a clear consistency in the trends and results between the models, this study also underlines important differences in the model set-ups, methodology and choices of some physical parameters inducing

  7. Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

  8. Unravelling atmospheric photolysis and ocean redox chemistry from Paleoarchean pyrite : a multiple sulfur and iron stable isotope study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galić, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis brought together four individual studies on the geochemistry of three recently obtained drill cores from the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. These data were used to provide a synthesis of the iron and sulfur cycles in the Paleoarchean, with a particular focus on the nature and o

  9. Evaluation of sulfur dioxide-generating pads and modified atmosphere packaging for control of postharvest diseases in blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postharvest diseases are a limiting factor of storage and shelf life of blueberries. Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important postharvest diseases in blueberries grown in California. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2)-generating pads (designated ...

  10. The formation of acid rain in the atmosphere, adjacent to the TTP with the joint-condensing of sulfur dioxide and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdyakov, D. V.; Gubin, V. E.; Matveeva, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    Presents the results of mathematical simulation of the condensation process of sulphur dioxide and water vapor on the condensation nuclei surface under the action of natural factors. Numerical investigations were carried out for the summer at a moderate speed of the wind. The influence of the parameter of condensation on the speed of the process of sulfuric acid drops formation in the air space was analyzed. Time ranges, sufficient for the formation of the acid rain sedimentation in the atmosphere, adjacent to the areas of thermal power station work were established. It is shown that the speed of air masses movement effects on the process of acid anthropogenic admixtures dispersion in the atmosphere. Approbation of the obtained results was carried out by checking the difference scheme conservative and solution of test problems.

  11. A Case Study of the Impacts of Dust Aerosols on Surface Atmospheric Variables and Energy Budgets in a Semi-Arid Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Xiao-Lu; GUO Wei-Dong; ZHANG Le; ZHANG Ren-Jian

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a case study investigatingthe impacts of dust aerosols on surface atmospheric variables and energy budgets in a semi-arid region of China.Enhanced observational meteorological data, radiative fluxes, near-surface heat fluxes, and concentrations of dust aerosols were collected from Tongyu station, one of the reference sites of the International Coordinated Energy and Water Cycle Observations Project (CEOP), during a typical dust storm event in June 2006. A comprehensive analysis of these data show that in this semi-arid area, higher wind velocities and a continuously reduced air pressure were identified during the dust storm period.Dust storm events are usually associated with low relative humidity weather conditions, which result in low latent heat flux values. Dust aerosols suspended in the air decrease the net radiation, mainly by reducing the direct solar radiation reaching the land surface. This reduction in net radiation results in a decrease in soil temperatures at a depth of 2 cm. The combination of increased air temperature and decreased soil temperature strengthens the energy exchange of the atmosphere-earth system, increasing the surface sensible heat flux. After the dust storm event,the atmosphere was dominated by higher pressures and was relatively wet and cold. Net radiation and latent heat flux show an evident increase, while the surface sensible heat flux shows a clear decrease.

  12. Late Budgets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asger Lau; Lassen, David Dreyer; Nielsen, Lasse Holbøll Westh

    are negative rather than positive; and when there is divided government. We test the hypotheses of the model using a unique data set of late budgets for US state governments, based on dates of budget approval collected from news reports and a survey of state budget o¢ cers for the period 1988......The budget forms the legal basis of government spending. If a budget is not in place at the beginning of the fiscal year, planning as well as current spending are jeopardized and government shutdown may result. This paper develops a continuous-time war-of-attrition model of budgeting...... in a presidential style-democracy to explain the duration of budget negotiations. We build our model around budget baselines as reference points for loss averse negotiators. We derive three testable hypotheses: there are more late budgets, and they are more late, when fiscal circumstances change; when such changes...

  13. Signatures of troposphere-stratosphere momentum coupling Implications for global atmospheric angular momentum and earth rotation budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H. A.; Mayr, H. G.; Hartle, R. E.; Kramer, L.; Stirling, R.

    1984-01-01

    During January-August 1978, the global atmospheric angular momentum (M) exhibits distinct patterns of short term momentum interchange across latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere winter-spring season, 30-50 day modulations of M are present in which momentum enhancements at mid-latitudes (20-30 deg) are closely matched by momentum depressions at high latitudes (50-60 deg). During the same interval there are no corresponding variations in M evident in the Southern Hemisphere. Conversely, during Southern Hemisphere fall-winter, similar anti-correlations in monthly scale momentum excursions are evident between mid and high latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere, the winter-spring momentum signatures are detected throughout the atmosphere, from the lower troposphere to the stratosphere. During the Southern Hemisphere fall-winter, the modulation patterns are not evident at the higher altitudes. Structural details of the momentum signatures indicate that the coupling is sometimes effective on very short time scales, e.g., 1-2 days, or less. The evidence of distinct anti-correlation between large regions has interesting implications for studies of global atmospheric circulation, and also for studies of the excitation of variations in earth rotation in response to short term modulations of M.

  14. Sensitivity of Holocene atmospheric CO2 and the modern carbon budget to early human land use: analyses with a process-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Joos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A Dynamic Global Vegetation model coupled to a simplified Earth system model is used to simulate the impact of anthropogenic land cover changes (ALCC on Holocene atmospheric CO2 and the contemporary carbon cycle. The model results suggest that early agricultural activities cannot explain the mid to late Holocene CO2 rise of 20 ppm measured on ice cores and that proposed upward revisions of Holocene ALCC imply a smaller contemporary terrestrial carbon sink. A set of illustrative scenarios is applied to test the robustness of these conclusions and to address the large discrepancies between published ALCC reconstructions. Simulated changes in atmospheric CO2 due to ALCC are less than 1 ppm before 1000 AD and 30 ppm at 2004 AD when the HYDE 3.1 ALCC reconstruction is prescribed for the past 12 000 years. Cumulative emissions of 69 GtC at 1850 and 233 GtC at 2004 AD are comparable to earlier estimates. CO2 changes due to ALCC exceed the simulated natural interannual variability only after 1000 AD. To consider evidence that land area used per person was higher before than during early industrialisation, agricultural areas from HYDE 3.1 were increased by a factor of two prior to 1700 AD (scenario H2. For the H2 scenario, the contemporary terrestrial carbon sink required to close the atmospheric CO2 budget is reduced by 0.5 GtC yr−1. Simulated CO2 remains small even in scenarios where average land use per person is increased beyond the range of published estimates. Even extreme assumptions for preindustrial land conversion and high per-capita land use do not result in simulated CO2 emissions that are sufficient to explain the magnitude and the timing of the late Holocene CO2 increase.

  15. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation Historical and Projected Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, D.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N) yr1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching 1300 mg(N) m2 yr1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, 3050 larger than the values in any region currently (2000). The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  16. CERES Top-of-Atmosphere Earth Radiation Budget Climate Data Record: Accounting for in-Orbit Changes in Instrument Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman G. Loeb

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES project provides observations of Earth’s radiation budget using measurements from CERES instruments onboard the Terra, Aqua and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP satellites. As the objective is to create a long-term climate data record, it is necessary to periodically reprocess the data in order to incorporate the latest calibration changes and algorithm improvements. Here, we focus on the improvements and validation of CERES Terra and Aqua radiances in Edition 4, which are used to generate higher-level climate data products. Onboard sources indicate that the total (TOT channel response to longwave (LW radiation has increased relative to the start of the missions by 0.4% to 1%. In the shortwave (SW, the sensor response change ranges from −0.4% to 0.6%. To account for in-orbit changes in SW spectral response function (SRF, direct nadir radiance comparisons between instrument pairs on the same satellite are made and an improved wavelength dependent degradation model is used to adjust the SRF of the instrument operating in a rotating azimuth plane scan mode. After applying SRF corrections independently to CERES Terra and Aqua, monthly variations amongst these instruments are highly correlated and the standard deviation in the difference of monthly anomalies is 0.2 Wm−2 for ocean and 0.3 Wm−2 for land/desert. Additionally, trends in CERES Terra and Aqua monthly anomalies are consistent to 0.21 Wm−2 per decade for ocean and 0.31 Wm−2 per decade for land/desert. In the LW, adjustments to the TOT channel SRF are made to ensure that removal of the contribution from the SW portion of the TOT channel with SW channel radiance measurements during daytime is consistent throughout the mission. Accordingly, anomalies in day–night LW difference in Edition 4 are more consistent compared to Edition 3, particularly for the Aqua land/desert case.

  17. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000 ACCMIP time slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of approximately 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards a potential misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores, but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double their 2000 counterpart in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental-scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~ 30–50% larger than the values in any region currently (circa 2000. However, sulfur deposition rates in 2100 are in all regions lower than in 2000 in

  18. The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide since 1950 and its implications for the CO budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Chappellaz, J. A.; Martinerie, P.; Park, K.; Petrenko, V. V.; Blunier, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Mak, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present a 60-year record of atmospheric CO concentration and isotopic ratios at high northern latitude based on firn air samples collected from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) project. Concentration, δ13C, and δ18O of CO from trapped gases in the firn were measured by gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (gc-IRMS). Based on firn diffusion models, we have reconstructed the long-term trend of atmospheric CO and its stable isotopic composition at high northern latitudes since the 1950s. CO concentration was around 140 ppbv in 1950 and increased gradually to around 160 ppbv in the mid-1970s. Since then, CO concentration gradually decreased to around 130 ppbv by present day. Our best firn air scenarios suggest that δ13C decreased slightly from -25.7% in 1950 to -26.4% in 2000, then dropped to -27.3% in 2008. δ18O decreased from 10% in 1950 to 7% in 2008. An isotope mass balance model is applied to quantify the temporal evolution of CO source partitioning able to explain the combined mixing ratio and isotopic ratio changes. It suggests that a slight increase followed by a large reduction in CO derived from fossil fuel combustion occurred since 1950. The increase of CO concentration from 1950 to the mid-1970s is the result of a combined increase of multiple sources. The reduction of CO emission from fossil fuel combustion after the mid-1970s is the main mechanism for the drop of CO concentration during this time. The mitigation policy for CO emission from vehicle exhaust such as application of catalytic converters and the growth of diesel engine vehicles market share are the main expected reasons for the CO source strength change from fossil fuel combustion.

  19. Elemental Analysis of Solid Aerosols Using AAS Technique And Estimation of their Effect on Atmospheric Radiation Budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) because of its selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility and wide dynamic concentration range was used to find out the metal constituents and concentration for 6 metals in the atmosphere of Faisalabad. The aerosol samples were collected using air volume sampler on watmann filter paper for 24 hrs per day from June 2011 to June 2012. The maximum elemental constituents and concentration for Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd in mg/kg were found to be 127.88, 1955.77, 880.99, 2075.22, 2760.44, and 802.68 respectively. The comparison of results reported in literature with the obtained results showed some differences in concentrations which could be explained on the basis of climatological and meteorological set up of the area under exploration. An attempt has been made to investigate the properties of identified trace metals in terms of their radiative absorption coefficient and the global warming effect checked by analyzing TEM micrographs. The results obtained showed complex behavior and neutral trend as a whole. (author)

  20. The impacts of summer monsoons on the ozone budget of the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xuewei; Zhu, Bin; Fei, Dongdong; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone (O3) in the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific Ocean were investigated using model simulations (2001-2007) from the Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). The simulated O3 and diagnostic precipitation are in good agreement with the observations. Model results suggest that the Asia-Pacific monsoon significantly influences the seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone. The differences of anthropogenic emissions and zonal winds in meridional directions cause a pollutants' transition zone at approximately 20°-30°N. The onset of summer monsoons with a northward migration of the rain belt leads the transition zone to drift north, eventually causing a summer minimum of ozone to the north of 30°N. In years with an early onset of summer monsoons, strong inflows of clean oceanic air lead to low ozone at polluted oceanic sites near the continent, while strong outflows from the continent exist, resulting in high levels of O3 over remote portions of the Asia-Pacific Ocean. The reverse is true in years when the summer monsoon onset is late.

  1. The earth's radiation budget and its relation to atmospheric hydrology. I - Observations of the clear sky greenhouse effect. II - Observations of cloud effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Greenwald, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky components of the earth's radiation budget (ERB), the relationship of these components to the sea surface temperature (SST), and microwave-derived water-vapor amount are analyzed in an observational study along with the relationship between the cloudy-sky components of ERB and space/time coincident observations of SST, microwave-derived cloud liquid water, and cloud cover. The purpose of the study is to use these observations for establishing an understanding of the couplings between radiation and the atmosphere that are important to understanding climate feedback. A strategy for studying the greenhouse effect of earth by analyzing the emitted clear-sky longwave flux over the ocean is proposed. It is concluded that the largest observed influence of clouds on ERB is more consistent with macrophysical properties of clouds as opposed to microphysical properties. The analysis for clouds and the greenhouse effect of clouds is compared quantitatively with the clear sky results. Land-ocean differences and tropical-midlatitude differences are shown and explained in terms of the cloud macrostructure.

  2. Effect of surface albedo, water vapour, and atmospheric aerosols on the cloud-free shortwave radiative budget in the Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Biagio, C. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); University of Siena, Department of Earth Science, Siena (Italy); Di Sarra, A. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); Eriksen, P. [Danish Climate Centre, DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ascanius, S.E. [DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Qaanaaq (Greenland); Muscari, G. [INGV, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Holben, B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This study is based on ground-based measurements of downward surface shortwave irradiance (SW), columnar water vapour (wv), and aerosol optical depth ({tau}) obtained at Thule Air Base (Greenland) in 2007-2010, together with MODIS observations of the surface shortwave albedo (A). Radiative transfer model calculations are used in combination with measurements to separate the radiative effect of A ({Delta}SW{sub A}), wv ({Delta}SW{sub wv}), and aerosols ({Delta}SW{sub {tau}}) in modulating SW in cloud-free conditions. The shortwave radiation at the surface is mainly affected by water vapour absorption, which produces a reduction of SW as low as -100 Wm{sup -2} (-18%). The seasonal change of A produces an increase of SW by up to +25 Wm{sup -2} (+4.5%). The annual mean radiative effect is estimated to be -(21-22) Wm{sup -2} for wv, and +(2-3) Wm{sup -2} for A. An increase by +0.065 cm in the annual mean wv, to which corresponds an absolute increase in {Delta}SW{sub wv} by 0.93 Wm{sup -2} (4.3%), has been observed to occur between 2007 and 2010. In the same period, the annual mean A has decreased by -0.027, with a corresponding decrease in {Delta}SW{sub A} by 0.41 Wm{sup -2} (-14.9%). Atmospheric aerosols produce a reduction of SW as low as -32 Wm{sup -2} (-6.7%). The instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF{sub {tau}}) reaches values of -28 Wm{sup -2} and shows a strong dependency on surface albedo. The derived radiative forcing efficiency (FE{sub {tau}}) for solar zenith angles between 55 and 70 is estimated to be (-120.6 {+-} 4.3) for 0.1 < A < 0.2, and (-41.2 {+-} 1.6) Wm{sup -2} for 0.5 < A < 0.6. (orig.)

  3. Comparative Aspects of Sulfur Mineralization in Sediments of a Eutrophic Lake Basin †

    OpenAIRE

    Gary M King; Klug, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The net mineralization of organic sulfur compounds in surface sediments of Wintergreen Lake was estimated from a mass-balance budget of sulfur inputs and sediment sulfur concentrations. The net mineralization of organic sulfur inputs is 80% of total sulfur) in sediment. Although sediment sulfur is predominantly organic, sulfate reduction is the most significant process in terms of the quantities of sulfur transformed in surface sediments. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average ...

  4. GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Release-3.0 data sets contains global 3-hourly, daily, monthly/3-hourly, and monthly averages of surface and top-of...

  5. Vibronic origin of sulfur mass-independent isotope effect in photoexcitation of SO2 and the implications to the early earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R; Xie, Changjian; Hu, Xixi; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-10-29

    Signatures of mass-independent isotope fractionation (MIF) are found in the oxygen ((16)O,(17)O,(18)O) and sulfur ((32)S, (33)S, (34)S, (36)S) isotope systems and serve as important tracers of past and present atmospheric processes. These unique isotope signatures signify the breakdown of the traditional theory of isotope fractionation, but the physical chemistry of these isotope effects remains poorly understood. We report the production of large sulfur isotope MIF, with Δ(33)S up to 78‰ and Δ(36)S up to 110‰, from the broadband excitation of SO2 in the 250-350-nm absorption region. Acetylene is used to selectively trap the triplet-state SO2 ( (3)B1), which results from intersystem crossing from the excited singlet ( (1)A2/ (1)B1) states. The observed MIF signature differs considerably from that predicted by isotopologue-specific absorption cross-sections of SO2 and is insensitive to the wavelength region of excitation (above or below 300 nm), suggesting that the MIF originates not from the initial excitation of SO2 to the singlet states but from an isotope selective spin-orbit interaction between the singlet ( (1)A2/ (1)B1) and triplet ( (3)B1) manifolds. Calculations based on high-level potential energy surfaces of the multiple excited states show a considerable lifetime anomaly for (33)SO2 and (36)SO2 for the low vibrational levels of the (1)A2 state. These results demonstrate that the isotope selectivity of accidental near-resonance interactions between states is of critical importance in understanding the origin of MIF in photochemical systems.

  6. Vibronic origin of sulfur mass-independent isotope effect in photoexcitation of SO2 and the implications to the early earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R; Xie, Changjian; Hu, Xixi; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-10-29

    Signatures of mass-independent isotope fractionation (MIF) are found in the oxygen ((16)O,(17)O,(18)O) and sulfur ((32)S, (33)S, (34)S, (36)S) isotope systems and serve as important tracers of past and present atmospheric processes. These unique isotope signatures signify the breakdown of the traditional theory of isotope fractionation, but the physical chemistry of these isotope effects remains poorly understood. We report the production of large sulfur isotope MIF, with Δ(33)S up to 78‰ and Δ(36)S up to 110‰, from the broadband excitation of SO2 in the 250-350-nm absorption region. Acetylene is used to selectively trap the triplet-state SO2 ( (3)B1), which results from intersystem crossing from the excited singlet ( (1)A2/ (1)B1) states. The observed MIF signature differs considerably from that predicted by isotopologue-specific absorption cross-sections of SO2 and is insensitive to the wavelength region of excitation (above or below 300 nm), suggesting that the MIF originates not from the initial excitation of SO2 to the singlet states but from an isotope selective spin-orbit interaction between the singlet ( (1)A2/ (1)B1) and triplet ( (3)B1) manifolds. Calculations based on high-level potential energy surfaces of the multiple excited states show a considerable lifetime anomaly for (33)SO2 and (36)SO2 for the low vibrational levels of the (1)A2 state. These results demonstrate that the isotope selectivity of accidental near-resonance interactions between states is of critical importance in understanding the origin of MIF in photochemical systems. PMID:23836655

  7. Amines are likely to enhance neutral and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere more effectively than ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the structure and formation thermodynamics of dimer clusters containing H2SO4 or HSO4 together with ammonia and seven different amines possibly present in the atmosphere, using the high-level ab initio methods RI-MP2 and RI-CC2. As expected from e.g. proton affinity data, the binding of all studied amine – H2SO4 complexes is significantly stronger than that of NH3•H2SO4, while most amine – HSO4 complexes are only somewhat more strongly bound than NH3•HSO4. Further calculations on larger cluster structures containing dimethylamine or ammonia together with two H2SO4 molecules or one H2SO4 molecule and one HSO4 ion demonstrate that amines, unlike ammonia, significantly assist the growth of not only neutral but also ionic clusters along the H2SO4 co-ordinate. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the difference in complexation free energies for amine- and ammonia-containing clusters is large enough to overcome the mass-balance effect caused by the fact that the concentration of amines in the atmosphere is probably 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonia. This implies that amines might be more important than ammonia in enhancing neutral and especially ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere.

  8. Amines are likely to enhance neutral and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere more effectively than ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the structure and formation thermodynamics of dimer clusters containing H2SO4 or HSO4 together with ammonia and seven different amines possibly present in the atmosphere, using the high-level ab initio methods RI-MP2 and RI-CC2. As expected from e.g. proton affinity data, the binding of all studied amine-H2SO4 complexes is significantly stronger than that of NH3•H2SO4, while most amine-HSO4 complexes are only somewhat more strongly bound than NH3•HSO4. Further calculations on larger cluster structures containing dimethylamine or ammonia together with two H2SO4 molecules or one H2SO4 molecule and one HSO4 ion demonstrate that amines, unlike ammonia, significantly assist the growth of not only neutral but also ionic clusters along the H2SO4 co-ordinate. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the difference in complexation free energies for amine- and ammonia-containing clusters is large enough to overcome the mass-balance effect caused by the fact that the concentration of amines in the atmosphere is probably 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonia. This implies that amines might be more important than ammonia in enhancing neutral and especially ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere.

  9. The biogeochemical sulfur cycle in the marine boundary layer over the Northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The major components of the marine boundary layer biogeochemical sulfur cycle were measured simultaneously onshore and off the coast of Washington State, U.S.A. during May 1987. Seawater dimethysulfide (DMS) concentrations on the continental shelf were strongly influenced by coastal upwelling. Concentration further offshore were typical of summer values (2.2 nmol/l) at this latitude. Although seawater DMS concentrations were high on the biologically productive continental shelf (2-12 nmol/l), this region had no measurable effect on atmospheric DMS concentrations. Atmospheric DMS concentrations (0.1-12 nmol/l), however, were extremely dependent upon wind speed and boundary layer height. Although there appeared to be an appreciable input of nonsea-salt sulfate to the marine boundary layer from the free troposphere, the local flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere was sufficient to balance the remainder of the sulfur budget.

  10. Participatory Budgeting

    OpenAIRE

    Innovation for Development and South-South Cooperation, IDEASS

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the principles underlying participatory budgeting. It analyzes the merits and demerits of participatory budgeting practices around the world with a view to guiding policy makers and practitioners on improving such practices in the interest of inclusive governance. This publication includes five regional surveys, and seven country case studies can be found ...

  11. Budget timetable

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a timetable for congressional action under the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Gramm-Rudman-Hollings). These deadlines apply to fiscal years (FY) 1987-1991. The Congress missed a number of these deadlines last year. The deficit reduction measures in Gramm-Rudman-Hollings would lead to a balanced budget in 1991.

  12. System Budgets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1996-01-01

    The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers.......The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers....

  13. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation historical and projected changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30–50 % larger than the values in any region currently (2000. The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of

  14. Analyzing Sulfur Dioxide Emissions of Nyamuragira Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, A. L.; Bluth, G. J.; Carn, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    Nyamuragira volcano, located in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is Africa's most active volcano, having erupted 13 times (every 1-3 years) since 1980. The eruption frequency, and the large amounts of sulfur dioxide emitted by this rift volcano, may produce a significant impact on the global sulfur budget. In this project we are attempting to quantify the sulfur dioxide emissions from this volcano over the past 20+ years using satellite data. Since 1978, satellites carrying NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments have been orbiting the earth collecting atmospheric data. These instruments use six wavelength bands located within the ultraviolet spectrum to measure solar irradiance and the energy reflected and backscattered by the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Sunlit planetary coverage is provided once per day by TOMS data. The spatial resolution of these satellites varies from 24 km (Earth Probe, 1996-1997, but raised to 39 km from 1997 to present) to 62 km (Meteor-3, 1991-1994). Nimbus-7, the satellite operating for the longest span of time (1978-1993), had a nadir footprint of 50 km. The (instantaneous) mass retrievals of sulfur dioxide cloud masses are derived using several different image processing schemes and net tonnages are calculated using a background correction. Volcanic activity associated with this volcano typically consists of long term (weeks to months), and often continuous, effusive emissions. Work to date has discovered over 120 days in which sulfur dioxide plumes were observed from the 13 eruptions (ranging from a minimum of one day to a maximum of 32 days). Most (82%) of the sulfur dioxide clouds measured are relatively low-level, below 100 kilotonnes (kt); 16% of the emissions are between 100 and 1000 kt, and 1.5% were measured to have more than 1000 kt. Current work is focusing on deriving net emission fluxes, integrating the TOMS instantaneous measurements of relatively continuous emission activity. The eruptive activity

  15. Atmospheric Corrosion of Steel A3 Deposited with Ammonium Sulfate and in the Presence of Sulfur Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye WAN; Chuanwei YAN; Chunan CAO Jun TAN; Jun TAN

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory study of the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel deposited with (NH4)2SO4 in the presence of SO2 isreported. The different levels of (NH4)2SO4 (0, 15, 30, 45, 60μg.cm-2) were added on the surface of the samplesbefore the exposure. The corrosion was investigated by a combination of gravimetry, Fourier transform infraredspectroscope and scanning electron microscopy. A detailed knowledge about the corrosion products was acquired,both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results show that the metal loss increased and the increasing tendency ofcorrosion rates slowed down with the increasing exposure time. The phase constituents of the corrosion products aremainly c-FeO(OH), γ-FeO(OH), and δ-FeO(OH).

  16. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-20

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  17. Evaluating the present annual water budget of a Himalayan headwater river basin using a high-resolution atmosphere-hydrology model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Gochis, David J.; Sobolowski, Stefan; Mesquita, Michel d. S.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the present water budget in Himalayan basins is a challenge due to poor in-situ coverage, incomplete or unreliable records and the limitations of coarse resolution gridded dataset. In the study, a two-way coupled implementation of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (v3.5.1) and the WRF-Hydro hydrological modeling extension package (WRF/WRF-Hydro) was employed in its offline configuration, over a 10-year simulation period for a mountainous and topographically complex Beas river basin (up to Pandoh) in North India. A triple nest is employed, in which the innermost nest domain had an atmospheric model grid spacing of 3 km and a grid spacing of 300 meters for the hydrological routing components. Two microphysical parameterization schemes are quantitatively evaluated in the study to reveal how sensitively and differently microphysical parameterization (MP) influence orographic-related precipitation, and in turn, how it impacts hydrological responses. Two sensitivity experiments of the surface-flow parameter and glacier wastage were also tested for uncertainty analysis in the study. The WRF-Hydro modeling system shows reasonable skill in capturing the spatial and temporal structure of high-resolution precipitation and the resulting stream flow hydrographs exhibit a good correspondence with observed streamflow at monthly timescales, although the model tends to generally underestimate streamflow amounts. The Thompson scheme fits better to the observations than the WSM3 schemes in the study. More importantly, WRF showed that for high altitude precipitation, the Beas River exhibits a high 'bias' in winter precipitation from both MPs, which is about double to triple that as estimated from valley-sited rain gauges, and remotely sensed precipitation estimates from both TRMM and APHRODITE. While the distribution of simulated daily discharge values agrees well with the gamma distribution from observed discharge. This correspondence suggests that the major

  18. Open Budget

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Government initiatives to publicize budgetary information allow for greater public supervision In an unprecedented move,four ministries under the Central Government recently posted their 2010 budgets on their official websites.

  19. Sulfur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  20. BEYOND BUDGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Cvrkalj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional budgeting principles, with strictly defined business goals, have been, since 1998, slowly growing into more sophisticated and organization-adjusted alternative budgeting concepts. One of those alternative concepts is the “Beyond budgeting” model with an implemented performance effects measuring process. In order for the model to be practicable, budget planning and control has to be reoriented to the “bottom up” planning and control approach. In today’s modern business surroundings one has to take both present and future opportunities and threats into consideration, by valorizing them in a budget which would allow a company to realize a whole pallet of advantages over the traditional budgeting principles which are presented later in the article. It is essential to emphasize the importance of successfully implementing the new budgeting principles within an organization. If the implementation has been lacking and done without a higher goal in mind, it is easily possible that the process has been implemented without coordination, planning and control framework within the organization itself. Further in the article we present an overview of managerial techniques and instruments within the “Beyond budgeting” model such as balanced scorecard, rolling forecast, dashboard, KPI and other supporting instruments. Lastly we define seven steps for implementing the “Beyond budgeting” model and offer a comparison of “Beyond budgeting” model against traditional budgeting principles which lists twelve reasons why “Beyond budgeting” is better suited to modern and market-oriented organizations. Each company faces those challenges in their own characteristic way but implementing new dynamic planning models will soon become essential for surviving in the market.

  1. Global Atmospheric Budgets of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Methyl Cyanide (CH3CN): Constraints From Aircraft Measurements Over the Western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Jacob, D.; Yantosca, R.; Singh, H.; Koike, M.

    2002-12-01

    We use a global 3-D model analysis of aircraft observations from the TRACE-P mission over the northwest Pacific in Febuary-April 2001 to improve our understanding of the atmospheric budgets of HCN and CH3CN. TRACE-P focused on characterizing Asian outflow, including a major component from seasonal biomass burning in southeast Asia. Observations in biomass burning plumes indicate molar emission ratios (relative to CO) of 0.08-0.38% for HCN and 0.03-0.21% for CH3CN. Enhancements of both gases observed in Chinese urban plumes are attributed to emissions from residential coal burning with molar emission ratios (relative to CO) of 1.3-4.4% for HCN and 0.2-0.8% for CH3CN. Observed vertical gradients of HCN and CH3CN in unpolluted marine air imply a dominant ocean sink for both gases, with deposition velocities of 0.125 and 0.132 cm s-1, respectively (saturation ratios of 0.79 for HCN and 0.88 for CH3CN). The deposition velocities and saturation ratios imply lifetimes of 3 months for HCN(aq)/CN- and 14 months for CH3CN(aq)/CN- against consumption in oceanic mixed layer. Model simulations indicate that biomass burning emission ratios of 0.26% for HCN and 0.15% for CH3CN and residential coal burning emission ratios of 1.4% for HCN and 0.5% for CH3CN offer the best fit to observed vertical distributions, HCN-CH3CN-CO relationship, and HCN columns in TRACE-P, as well as CH3CN vertical profile over the Indian Ocean and seasonal variations of HCN columns. Biomass burning and residential coal burning contribute 0.64 and 0.21 Tg N yr-1 respectively to global HCN and 0.37 and 0.08 Tg N yr-1 to CH3CN. Ocean uptake is the main sink for HCN (0.68 Tg N yr-1) and CH3CN (0.35 Tg N yr-1), resulting in tropospheric lieftimes of 5.2 and 5.6 months, respectively. Both gases can be used as biomass burning tracers in the free troposphere in TRACE-P where biomass burning emissions account for 75-85% of HCN and 75-90% of CH3CN.

  2. Open Budget

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ In an unprecedented move,four ministries under the Central Government recently posted their 2010 budgets on their official websites.This move has been greeted with mixed reactions,with some netizens complaining about a lack of details and explanations of different items.

  3. Extraterrestrial matter and atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. M.; Cziczo, D. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Thomson, D. S.; Thomson, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    In situ measurements of the composition of stratospheric aerosols detected Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ca, Ni, and other meteoritic material in a large number of particles. These particles include ablated meteoric material that has recondensed, descended from the upper atmosphere, and combined with the sulfate in the stratosphere. Along with laboratory calibrations and a knowledge of the stratospheric sulfur budget, these measurements allow estimates of the flux of extraterrestrial material reaching the present-day earth. The stratospheric particles are depleted in the more refractory elements, suggesting that some of the incoming material is not ablated. Consideration of the much larger flux of meteors in the earth's early history suggests that ablated meteoric material could have altered the properties of the early atmosphere in ways that might be relevant to the origin of life.

  4. Lunar sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  5. NEW CONSTRAINT ON ESTIMATION OF THE ANTHROPOGENIC CO_2 BUDGET : RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONCENTRATION AND δ^<13>C OF ATMOSPHERIC CO_2 DETERMINED FROM ICE CORE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    カトウ, キクオ; コマキ, カオリ; Kikuo, Kato; Kaori, KOMAKI

    1997-01-01

    Studies on ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland revealed variations in the concentration and δ^C of ancient atmospheric CO_2. Since the Industrial Revolution, addition of anthropogenic CO_2 to the atmosphere has caused a significant increase in atmospheric CO_2,accompanied by a decrease in δ^C of atmospheric CO_2. The relationship between them shows that the δ^C value of CO_2 which remained in the atmosphere is significantly larger than -25‰ of that originated from coal burning and defores...

  6. The significance of glucosinolates for sulfur storage in Brassicaceae seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Aghajanzadeh, Tahereh; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; de Kok, Luit J.

    2014-01-01

    Brassica juncea seedlings contained a twofold higher glucosinolate content than B. rapa and these secondary sulfur compounds accounted for up to 30% of the organic sulfur fraction. The glucosinolate content was not affected by H2S and SO2 exposure, demonstrating that these sulfur compounds did not form a sink for excessive atmospheric supplied sulfur. Upon sulfate deprivation, the foliarly absorbed H2S and SO2 replaced sulfate as the sulfur source for growth of B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings...

  7. Impact of biomass burning on the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fire has played an important part in biogeochemical cycling throughout most of the history of our planet. Ice core studies have been very beneficial in paleoclimate studies and constraining the budgets of biogeochemical cycles through the past 160,000 years of the Vostok ice core. Although to date there has been no way of determining cause and effect, concentration of greenhouse gases directly correlates with temperature in ice core analyses. Recent ice core studies on Greenland have shown that significant climate change can be very rapid on the order of a decade. This chapter addresses the coupled evolution of our planet's atmospheric composition and biomass burning. Special attention is paid to the chemical and climatic impacts of biomass burning on the atmosphere throughout the last century, specifically looking at the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Information from ice core measurements may be useful in understanding the history of fire and its historic affect on the composition of the atmosphere and climate

  8. Regulation of sulfur nutrition in wild-type and transgenic poplar over-expressing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol as affected by atmospheric H2S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herschbach, C; van der Zalm, E; Schneider, A; Jouanin, L; De Kok, LJ; Rennenberg, H

    2000-01-01

    This study with poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) cuttings was aimed to test the hypothesis that sulfate uptake is regulated by demand-driven control and that this regulation is mediated by phloem-transported glutathione as a shoot-to-root signal. Therefore, sulfur nutrition was investigated a

  9. INTERMEDIATE-RANGE GRID MODEL AND USER'S GUIDE FOR ATMOSPHERIC SULFUR DIOXIDE AND SULFATE CONCENTRATIONS AND DEPOSITIONS - WISCONSIN POWER PLANT IMPACT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The UWATM-SOX computer model was developed to address the acid rain problem on a mesoscale. It predicts sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate (SO4) ambient air concentrations and ground level dry and wet (rain or snow) depositions given certain emission and meteorological input data. ...

  10. Sulfur dioxide and particulates as atmospheric pollution vectors. El dioxide de Azufre la materia particulada como vectores de la contaminacion atmosferica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Samples taken from 1 st January 1990 till 31st December 1991 at different locations in Spain are presented. From these results and using priority lists and indexes suggested in the literature, the main conclusion is that sulfur dioxide and particulates are not a danger for the public health in the city of Aviles (one of the most contaminated cities in Spain). (Author)

  11. Atmospheric H2S as sulfur source for Brassica oleracea : kinetics of H2S uptake and activity of O-acetylserine (thiol)lyase as affected by sulfur nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, CEE; De Kok, LJ

    2001-01-01

    The uptake of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by shoots of curly kale (Brassica oleracea) showed saturation kinetics with respect to the atmospheric concentration. The kinetics are largely determined by the rate of metabolism of the absorbed H,S into cysteine, catalyzed by O-acetylserine (thiol)lyase, and ca

  12. Automated Budget System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Automated Budget System (ABS) automates management and planning of the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) budget by providing enhanced capability to plan,...

  13. Sulfur cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Ecological Society Symposium held jointly with the Linnean Society of London. Oxford: Blackwell. Huston MH and Smith T (1987) Plant succession: Life history and competition. American Naturalist 130: 168–198. Sulfur Cycle P A Loka Bharathi, National Institute.... Vegetatio 110: 115–147. Odum EP (1969) The strategy of ecosystem development. Science 164: 262–270. Walker KR and Alberstadt LP(1975) Ecological succession asan aspect of structure in fossil communities. Paleobiology 1: 238–257. Author's personal copy S 4 O...

  14. Oxidation of SO2 by stabilized Criegee intermediate (sCI) radicals as a crucial source for atmospheric sulfuric acid concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    M. Boy; Mogensen, D.; Smolander, S.; Zhou, L; Nieminen, T.; Paasonen, P.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Sipilä, M.; T. Petäjä; Mauldin, L.; Berresheim, H.; M. Kulmala

    2013-01-01

    The effect of increased reaction rates of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) with SO2 to produce sulfuric acid is investigated using data from two different locations, SMEAR II, Hyytiälä, Finland, and Hohenpeissenberg, Germany. Results from MALTE, a zero-dimensional model, show that using previous values for the rate coefficients of sCI + SO2, the model underestimates gas phase H2SO4 by up to a factor of two when compared to measurements. Using the rate coefficients recently calc...

  15. On the potential of ICOS atmospheric CO2 measurement network for the estimation of the biogenic CO2 budget of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kadygrov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a performance assessment of the European Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS atmospheric network for constraining European biogenic CO2 fluxes (hereafter Net Ecosystem Exchange, NEE. The performance of the network is assessed in terms of uncertainty in the fluxes using a state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric inversion system assimilating hourly averages of atmospheric data to solve for NEE at 6 h and 0.5° resolution. The performance of the ICOS atmospheric network is also assessed in terms of uncertainty reduction compared to typical uncertainties in the flux estimates from ecosystem models that are used as prior information by the inversion. The uncertainty in inverted fluxes is computed for two typical periods representative of summer and winter conditions in July and in December 2007, respectively. These computations are based on a robust Observing System Simulation Experiments framework. We analyze the uncertainty in two-week mean NEE as a function of the spatial scale, with a focus on the model native grid scale (0.5°, the country scale and the European scale (including western Russia and Turkey. Several network configurations, going from 23 to 66 sites, and different configurations of the prior uncertainties and atmospheric model transport errors are tested in order to assess and compare the improvements that can be expected in the future from (1 the extension of the network, (2 improved prior information or (3 improved transport models. Assimilating data from 23 sites (a network comparable to present day capability with the estimate of errors from the present prior information and transport models, the uncertainty reduction on two-week mean NEE should range between 20 and 50% for 0.5° resolution grid cells in the best sampled area encompassing eastern France and western Germany. At the European scale, the prior uncertainty in two-week mean NEE is reduced by 50% (66%, down to ∼ 43 Tg C month-1 (resp. 26 Tg C month-1

  16. Sulfur isotopic analysis of carbonyl sulfide and its application for biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Kamezaki, Kazuki; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) is the most abundant gas containing sulfur in the atmosphere, with an average mixing ratio of 500 p.p.t.v. in the troposphere. OCS is suggested as a sulfur source of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSA) which plays an important role in Earth's radiation budget and ozone depletion. Therefore, OCS budget should be validated for prediction of climate change, but the global OCS budget is imbalance. Recently we developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of OCS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ (Hattori et al., 2015). The first measurement of the δ34S value for atmospheric OCS coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere (Hattori et al., 2011; Schmidt et al., 2012; Hattori et al., 2012) explains the reported δ34S value for background stratospheric sulfate, suggesting that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. This new method measuring δ34S values of OCS can be used to investigate OCS sources and sinks in the troposphere to better understand its cycle. It is known that some microorganisms in soil can degrade OCS, but the mechanism and the contribution to the OCS in the air are still uncertain. In order to determine sulfur isotopic enrichment factor of OCS during degradation via microorganisms, incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus, isolated from natural soil environments (Kato et al., 2008). As a result, sulfur isotope ratios of OCS were increased during degradation of OCS, indicating that reaction for OC32S is faster than that for OC33S and OC34S. OCS degradation via microorganisms is not mass-independent fractionation (MIF) process, suggesting that this

  17. Biologically produced sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are stabil

  18. Theoretical studies of the marine sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James B.; Liu, May S.

    1985-01-01

    Several reduced sulfur compounds are produced by marine organisms and then enter the atmosphere, where they are oxidized and ultimately returned to the ocean or the land. The oceanic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) flux, in particular, represents a significant fraction of the annual global sulfur input to the atmosphere. In the atmosphere, this gas is converted to sulfur dioxide (SO2), methane sulfonic acid, and other organic acids which are relatively stable and about which little is known. SO2 is a short lived gas which, in turn, is converted to sulfuric acid and other sulfate compounds which contribute significantly to acid rain. Because of the complexity of the sulfur system, it is not well understood even in the unperturbed atmosphere. However, a number of new observations and experiments have led to a significant increase in the understanding of this system. A number of one dimensional model experiments were conducted on the gas phase part of the marine sulfur cycle. The results indicate the measured concentration of DMS and the amplitude of its diurnal cycle are in agreement with estimates of its global flux. It was also found that DMS can make a large contribution to the background SO2 concentration in the free troposphere. Estimates of CS2 concentrations in the atmosphere are inconsistent with estimated fluxes; however, measured reaction rates are consistent with the observed steep tropospheric gradient in CS2. Observations of CS2 are extremely sparse. Further study is planned.

  19. Laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity and vapor pressure of sulfuric acid vapor under simulated conditions for the middle atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave absorption measurements at wavelengths of 13.4 and 3.6 cm were made in gaseous H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere under simulated conditions for the Venus middle atmosphere. The results suggest that abundances of gaseous H2SO4 on the order of 15-30 ppm could account for the absorption observed by radio occultation measurements at these wavelengths. They also imply that such abundances would correspond to saturation vapor pressure existing at or above the 46-48-km range, which correlates with the observed cloud base.

  20. Refining of atmospheric transport model entries by the globally observed passive tracer distributions of 85krypton and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Ingeborg; Hesshaimer, Vago

    1996-01-01

    Our high precision data base of the global distribution of SF6 in the troposphere [Maiss et al., 1996] is used in a two-dimensional atmospheric transport model (2D-HD model) to study the behaviour of this new tracer in comparison to the classical global atmospheric transport tracer 85Krypton. The 2D-HD model grid has been deduced from the 3D Hamburg TM2 model with the same resolution in the vertical and meridional direction, and was designed to run on any standard personal computer. The same ...

  1. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  2. Atmospheric H2S and SO2 as sulfur source for Brassica juncea and Brassica rapa: Impact on the glucosinolate composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghajanzadeh, T.; Kopriva, S; Hawkesford, M.J.; Koprivova, A.; De Kok, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of sulfate deprivation and atmospheric H2S and SO2 nutrition on the content and composition of glucosinolates was studied in Brassica juncea and Brasscia rapa. Both species contained a number of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates. The total glucosinolate content was more than 5.5-fold h

  3. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  4. The carbon budget of the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vieira Borges

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon budget has been established for the North Sea, a shelf sea of the NW European continental shelf. The air-sea exchange of CO2 has been assessed as closing term of the budget. The carbon exchange fluxes with the North Atlantic Ocean dominate the gross carbon budget. The net carbon budget – more relevant to the issue of the contribution of the coastal ocean to the marine carbon cycle – is dominated by the carbon inputs from rivers, the Baltic Sea and the atmosphere. The dominant carbon sink is the final export to the North Atlantic Ocean. The North Sea acts as a sink for organic carbon. More than 90% of the CO2 taken up from the atmosphere is exported to the North Atlantic Ocean making the North Sea a highly efficient continental shelf pump for carbon.

  5. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative......Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...

  6. Modelling water fluxes in a pine wood soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. Comparison of a water budget and water flow model using different parameter data sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For modelling complex hydrological problems, realistic models and accurate hydraulic properties are needed. A mechanistic model (HYDRUS-1D) and a compartment model are evaluated for simulating the water balance in a soil-vegetation-atmosphere system using time series of measured water content at several depths in two lysimeters in a podzol soil with Scots Pine vegetation. 10 calibration scenarios are used to investigate the impact of the model type and the number of horizons in the profile on the calibration accuracy. Main results are: (i) with a large number of soil layers, both models describe accurately the water contents at all depths, (II) the number of soil layers is the major factor that controls the quality of the calibration. The compartment model is as an abstracted model and the mechanistic model is our reference model. Drainage values are the considered output. Drainage values simulated by the abstracted model were close to those of the reference model when averaged over a sufficiently long period (about 9 months). This result suggests that drainage values obtained with an abstracted model are reliably when averaged over sufficiently long periods; the abstracted model needs less computational time without an important loss of accuracy.

  7. Bounds on the thermodynamical properties of the fluid envelope of a planet based upon its radiative budget at the top of the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we exploit two equivalent formulations of the average rate of material entropy production in a planetary system to propose an approximate splitting between contributions due from vertical processes and those due eminently to horizontal processes. We derive an estimate of the lower bound to the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle, or of the total dissipation of the kinetic energy, based purely upon 2D radiative fields at the top of the atmosphere of the planet. Bounds on the efficiency of the planetary system are also provided, and provide insight on a previous intuition on the possibility of defining a baroclinic heat engine extracting work from the meridional heat flux. Specific results are derived for Earth-like conditions but the approach can be used to analyse general planetary systems. The possibility of providing constraints to the 3D dynamics of the fluid envelope based only upon 2D observations of radiative fluxes seems promising for the observational study of extra-solar planets and ma...

  8. Modelling water fluxes in a pine wood soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. Comparison of a water budget and water flow model using different parameter data sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; Jacques, D.; Mallants, D.

    2010-02-15

    For modelling complex hydrological problems, realistic models and accurate hydraulic properties are needed. A mechanistic model (HYDRUS-1D) and a compartment model are evaluated for simulating the water balance in a soil-vegetation-atmosphere system using time series of measured water content at several depths in two lysimeters in a podzol soil with Scots Pine vegetation. 10 calibration scenarios are used to investigate the impact of the model type and the number of horizons in the profile on the calibration accuracy. Main results are: (i) with a large number of soil layers, both models describe accurately the water contents at all depths, (II) the number of soil layers is the major factor that controls the quality of the calibration. The compartment model is as an abstracted model and the mechanistic model is our reference model. Drainage values are the considered output. Drainage values simulated by the abstracted model were close to those of the reference model when averaged over a sufficiently long period (about 9 months). This result suggests that drainage values obtained with an abstracted model are reliably when averaged over sufficiently long periods; the abstracted model needs less computational time without an important loss of accuracy.

  9. Numerical simulation of heavy precipitation events using mesoscale weather forecast models. Validation with radar data and diagnosis of the atmospheric moisture budget; Numerische Simulation von Starkniederschlagsereignissen mit mesoskaligen Wettervorhersagemodellen. Ueberpruefung mit Radar-Daten und Diagnose der atmosphaerischen Wasserbilanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keil, C.

    2000-07-01

    Convective precipitation systems contribute substantially to the summertime rainfall maximum in the northern Alpine region. The capability of mesoscale weather forecast models in capturing such heavy precipitation events is investigated. The complementary application of so far hardly used areal radar data and conventional rain gauge observations enables a case-study-type evaluation of summertime precipitation episodes. Different rainfall episodes are simulated with the former operational model (DM, meshsize 14 km) of Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD). The influence of the horizontal resolution and the parameterization of moist convection is subsequently studied with a higher resolution atmospheric model (MC2, meshsize 2 km). Diagnostic studies on the atmospheric water budget regarding the rainfall episode, which instigated the Oder-flood in summer 1997, allow an examination of the origin of the moisture and the genesis of the copious precipitation. (orig.) [German] Konvektive Niederschlagssysterne tragen im Nordalpenraum wesentlich zum sommerlichen Niederschlagsmaximum bei. Die Faehigkeit mesoskaliger Wettervorhersagemodelle, solche Starkniederschlagsereignisse zu erfassen, wird in dieser Arbeit untersucht. Durch den komplementaeren Gebrauch von, bisher kaum genutzten, flaechendeckenden Radardaten und konventionellen Niederschlagsmessungen des Bodenmessnetzes werden Modellergebnisse sommerlicher Niederschlagssysteme fallstudienhaft detailliert ueberprueft. Fuer verschiedene Starkniederschlagsereignisse werden dazu Modellsimulationen mit dem in den 90er Jahren operationellen Modell (DM, Maschenweite 14 km) des Deutschen Wetterdienstes (DWD) durchgefuehrt. Zur Untersuchung des Einflusses der horizontalen Maschenweite und der Niederschlagsparametrisierung werden ferner numerische Simulationen mit einem hoeher aufloesdenden Atmosphaerenmodell (MC2, Maschenweite 2 km) behandelt. Anhand diagnostischer Untersuchungen der atmosphaerischen Wasserbilanz laesst sich ausserdem die

  10. Are climate warming and enhanced atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen threatening tufa landscapes in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Du, Jie; Lugli, Stefano; Ren, Jinhai; Xiao, Weiyang; Chen, Pan; Tang, Ya

    2016-08-15

    Massive deposition of calcium carbonate in ambient temperature waters (tufa) can form magnificent tufa landscapes, many of which are designated as protected areas. However, tufa landscapes in many areas are threatened by both local anthropogenic activities and climate change. This study, for the first time, posed the question whether the tufa landscape degradation (characterized by tufa degradation and increased biomass of green algae) in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve of China is partially caused by regional air pollution and climate warming. The results indicate that wet deposition (including rain and snow) polluted by anthropogenic SO2, NOx, and NH3 emissions dissolves exposed tufa and may considerably reduce tufa deposition rate and even cause tufa dissolution within shallow waters. These effects of wet deposition on tufa enhanced as pH of wet deposition decreased from 8.01 to 5.06. Annual Volume Weighted Mean concentration of reactive nitrogen (including NH4(+) and NO3(-)) in wet deposition (26.1μmolL(-1)) was 1.8 times of the corresponding value of runoff (14.8μmolL(-1)) and exceeded China's national standard of total nitrogen in runoff for nature reserves (14.3μmolL(-1)), indicating a direct nitrogen fertilization effect of wet deposition on green algae. As water temperature is the major limiting factor of algal growth in Jiuzhaigou and temperature in the top layer (0-5cm) of runoff (depthalgae (p<0.05), climate warming in this region would favor algal growth. In sum, this study suggests that climate warming and enhanced sulfur and nitrogen deposition have contributed to the current degradation of tufa landscape in Jiuzhaigou, but in order to quantify the contributions, further studies are needed, as many other anthropogenic and natural processes also influence tufa landscape evolution. PMID:27110983

  11. Are climate warming and enhanced atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen threatening tufa landscapes in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Du, Jie; Lugli, Stefano; Ren, Jinhai; Xiao, Weiyang; Chen, Pan; Tang, Ya

    2016-08-15

    Massive deposition of calcium carbonate in ambient temperature waters (tufa) can form magnificent tufa landscapes, many of which are designated as protected areas. However, tufa landscapes in many areas are threatened by both local anthropogenic activities and climate change. This study, for the first time, posed the question whether the tufa landscape degradation (characterized by tufa degradation and increased biomass of green algae) in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve of China is partially caused by regional air pollution and climate warming. The results indicate that wet deposition (including rain and snow) polluted by anthropogenic SO2, NOx, and NH3 emissions dissolves exposed tufa and may considerably reduce tufa deposition rate and even cause tufa dissolution within shallow waters. These effects of wet deposition on tufa enhanced as pH of wet deposition decreased from 8.01 to 5.06. Annual Volume Weighted Mean concentration of reactive nitrogen (including NH4(+) and NO3(-)) in wet deposition (26.1μmolL(-1)) was 1.8 times of the corresponding value of runoff (14.8μmolL(-1)) and exceeded China's national standard of total nitrogen in runoff for nature reserves (14.3μmolL(-1)), indicating a direct nitrogen fertilization effect of wet deposition on green algae. As water temperature is the major limiting factor of algal growth in Jiuzhaigou and temperature in the top layer (0-5cm) of runoff (depth<1m, no canopy coverage of trees and shrubs) was significantly higher at the sites with increased biomass of green algae (p<0.05), climate warming in this region would favor algal growth. In sum, this study suggests that climate warming and enhanced sulfur and nitrogen deposition have contributed to the current degradation of tufa landscape in Jiuzhaigou, but in order to quantify the contributions, further studies are needed, as many other anthropogenic and natural processes also influence tufa landscape evolution.

  12. 2017 Budget Outlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    Executive Office of the President — This dataset includes three data files that contain an extract of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) budget database. These files can be used to reproduce...

  13. 2017 Budget Receipts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Executive Office of the President — This dataset includes three data files that contain an extract of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) budget database. These files can be used to reproduce...

  14. Fiscal Year 2015 Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset includes the Fiscal Year 2015 Council-approved operating budget for Montgomery County. The dataset does not include revenues and detailed agency budget...

  15. Atmospheric H2S and SO2 as sulfur source for Brassica juncea and Brassica rapa: impact on the glucosinolate composition

    OpenAIRE

    Aghajanzadeh, Tahereh; Kopriva, Stanislav; Malcolm J Hawkesford; Koprivova, Anna; De Kok, Luit J.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of sulfate deprivation and atmospheric H2S and SO2 nutrition on the content and composition of glucosinolates was studied in Brassica juncea and B. rapa. Both species contained a number of aliphatic, aromatic and indolic glucosinolates. The total glucosinolate content was more than 5.5-fold higher in B. juncea than in B. rapa, which could solely be attributed to the presence of high levels of sinigrin, which was absent in the latter species. Sulfate deprivation resulted in a strong...

  16. Federal budget timetable

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the federal budget timetable under the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Gramm-Rudman-Hollings). These deadlines apply to fiscal years (FY) 1987-1991. The deficit reduction measures in Gramm-Rudman-Hollings would lead to a balanced budget in 1991.

  17. Budgeting and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten

    Budgets and budget control has been known since the early 19th century1. However the use of budget control was until the beginning of the 1920ies in US primarily related to governmental units and states and to a minor extent to business units in practice. At that time James McKinsey describes...

  18. The composition, seasonal variation, and potential sources of the atmospheric wet sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition in the southwest of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiuying; Lu, Xuehe

    2016-04-01

    The composition, seasonal variation, and potential sources of sulfate (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition in precipitation in the southwest of China from 2003 to 2013 were investigated. The results showed that the concentration of SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), and NH4 (+) in rainwater were 10.57-1360, 7.16-523.71, and 7.54-1020 μeq l(-1), with an annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of 103.99, 46.73, and 97.30 μeq l(-1), respectively. The annual wet deposition of SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), and NH4 (+) was 21.66, 8.16, and 17.49 kg S (N) ha(-1), respectively. The temporal variations of the ions showed that the abrupt decreasing breakpoints were in 2008 for SO4 (2-) and in 2009 for NO3 (-) and NH4 (+), and increasing trends were observed after 2010 for the three ions. These trends reflected the effect of economy recession and the policy of controlling SO2 and NOx emissions. The acid rain type of precipitation was shifted from sulfur to a mixed one. The ions of SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), and NH4 (+) presented high values in winter and spring and low values in autumn and summer. A highly positive linear correlation between SO4 (2-) and NO3 (-) (R (2) = 0.71), SO4 (2-) and NH4 (+) (R (2) = 0.74), and NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) (R (2) = 0.84) existed while a strong negative correlation was found between the three main ionic concentrations and precipitation. The SO4 (2-) was mainly from fossil fuel combustion (60.53 %), aged sea salt (19.03 %), agriculture (11.38 %), crust (6.66 %), and biomass burning (2.40 %); the NO3 (-) was mainly from fossil fuel combustion (75.41 %), biomass burning (9.67 %), aged sea salt (7.97 %), and agriculture (6.96 %); and the NH4 (+) was mainly from agriculture (86.38 %), fossil fuel combustion (10.52 %), and aged sea salt (3.09 %). PMID:26620861

  19. The significance of glucosinolates for sulfur storage in Brassicaceae seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Luit J. eDe Kok

    2014-01-01

    Brassica juncea seedlings contained a two-fold higher glucosinolate content than Brassica rapa and these secondary sulfur compounds accounted for up to 30 % of the organic sulfur fraction. The glucosinolate content was not affected by H2S and SO2 exposure, demonstrating that these sulfur compounds did not form a sink for excessive atmospheric supplied sulfur. Upon sulfate deprivation, the foliarly absorbed H2S and SO2 replaced sulfate as the sulfur source for growth of B. juncea and B. rapa s...

  20. Influence of sulfate reduction rates on the Phanerozoic sulfur isotope record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, William D.; Halevy, Itay; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-07-01

    Phanerozoic levels of atmospheric oxygen relate to the burial histories of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur. The sulfur cycle remains poorly constrained, however, leading to concomitant uncertainties in O2 budgets. Here we present experiments linking the magnitude of fractionations of the multiple sulfur isotopes to the rate of microbial sulfate reduction. The data demonstrate that such fractionations are controlled by the availability of electron donor (organic matter), rather than by the concentration of electron acceptor (sulfate), an environmental constraint that varies among sedimentary burial environments. By coupling these results with a sediment biogeochemical model of pyrite burial, we find a strong relationship between observed sulfur isotope fractionations over the last 200 Ma and the areal extent of shallow seafloor environments. We interpret this as a global dependency of the rate of microbial sulfate reduction on the availability of organic-rich sea-floor settings. However, fractionation during the early/mid-Paleozoic fails to correlate with shelf area. We suggest that this decoupling reflects a shallower paleoredox boundary, primarily confined to the water column in the early Phanerozoic. The transition between these two states begins during the Carboniferous and concludes approximately around the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, indicating a prolonged response to a Carboniferous rise in O2. Together, these results lay the foundation for decoupling changes in sulfate reduction rates from the global average record of pyrite burial, highlighting how the local nature of sedimentary processes affects global records. This distinction greatly refines our understanding of the S cycle and its relationship to the history of atmospheric oxygen.

  1. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  2. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen-carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global

  3. Global carbon budget 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peng, S.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-05-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen-carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each

  4. Verification of uncertainty budgets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Madsen, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    , and therefore it is essential that the applicability of the overall uncertainty budget to actual measurement results be verified on the basis of current experimental data. This should be carried out by replicate analysis of samples taken in accordance with the definition of the measurand, but representing......The quality of analytical results is expressed by their uncertainty, as it is estimated on the basis of an uncertainty budget; little effort is, however, often spent on ascertaining the quality of the uncertainty budget. The uncertainty budget is based on circumstantial or historical data...... the full range of matrices and concentrations for which the budget is assumed to be valid. In this way the assumptions made in the uncertainty budget can be experimentally verified, both as regards sources of variability that are assumed negligible, and dominant uncertainty components. Agreement between...

  5. Measuring global sulfur dioxide emissions with satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide affects the weather by enhancing cloud formation, and long-term shifts in emissions can change the climate by increasing the amount of solar radiation scattered back into space. Sulfur dioxide emissions are the basis for acid rain, and the gas itself can cause respiratory problems. Despite the compound's importance to climate, the difficulties associated with accurately measuring sulfur dioxide mean that rates of emissions are generally not well understood.

  6. Plant sulfur nutrition: From Sachs to Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Together with water and carbon dioxide plants require 14 essential mineral nutrients to finish their life cycle. The research in plant nutrition can be traced back to Julius Sachs, who was the first to experimentally prove the essentiality of mineral nutrients for plants. Among those elements Sachs showed to be essential is sulfur. Plant sulfur nutrition has been not as extensively studied as the nutrition of nitrogen and phosphate, probably because sulfur was not limiting for agriculture. However, with the reduction of atmospheric sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur deficiency has become common. The research in sulfur nutrition has changed over the years from using yeast and algae as experimental material to adopting Arabidopsis as the plant model as well as from simple biochemical measurements of individual parameters to system biology. Here the evolution of sulfur research from the times of Sachs to the current Big Data is outlined. PMID:26305261

  7. Plant sulfur nutrition: From Sachs to Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Together with water and carbon dioxide plants require 14 essential mineral nutrients to finish their life cycle. The research in plant nutrition can be traced back to Julius Sachs, who was the first to experimentally prove the essentiality of mineral nutrients for plants. Among those elements Sachs showed to be essential is sulfur. Plant sulfur nutrition has been not as extensively studied as the nutrition of nitrogen and phosphate, probably because sulfur was not limiting for agriculture. However, with the reduction of atmospheric sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur deficiency has become common. The research in sulfur nutrition has changed over the years from using yeast and algae as experimental material to adopting Arabidopsis as the plant model as well as from simple biochemical measurements of individual parameters to system biology. Here the evolution of sulfur research from the times of Sachs to the current Big Data is outlined. PMID:26305261

  8. 7 CFR 3402.14 - Budget and budget narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget and budget narrative. 3402.14 Section 3402.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... budget narrative. Applicants must prepare the Budget, Form CSREES-2004, and a budget...

  9. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Revealed a Highly Active and Intensive Sulfur Cycle in an Oil-Immersed Hydrothermal Chimney in Guaymas Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent system is a typical chemosynthetic ecosystem in which microorganisms play essential roles in the geobiochemical cycling. Although it has been well-recognized that the inorganic sulfur compounds are abundant and actively converted through chemosynthetic pathways, the sulfur budget in a hydrothermal vent is poorly characterized due to the complexity of microbial sulfur cycling resulting from the numerous parties involved in the processes. In this study, we performed an integrated metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis on a chimney sample from Guaymas Basin to achieve a comprehensive study of each sulfur metabolic pathway and its hosting microorganisms and constructed the microbial sulfur cycle that occurs in the site. Our results clearly illustrated the stratified sulfur oxidation and sulfate reduction at the chimney wall. Besides, sulfur metabolizing is closely interacting with carbon cycles, especially the hydrocarbon degradation process in Guaymas Basin. This work supports that the internal sulfur cycling is intensive and the net sulfur budget is low in the hydrothermal ecosystem.

  10. The significance of glucosinolates for sulfur storage in Brassicaceae seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luit J. eDe Kok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brassica juncea seedlings contained a two-fold higher glucosinolate content than Brassica rapa and these secondary sulfur compounds accounted for up to 30 % of the organic sulfur fraction. The glucosinolate content was not affected by H2S and SO2 exposure, demonstrating that these sulfur compounds did not form a sink for excessive atmospheric supplied sulfur. Upon sulfate deprivation, the foliarly absorbed H2S and SO2 replaced sulfate as the sulfur source for growth of B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings. The glucosinolate content was decreased in sulfate-deprived plants, though its proportion of organic sulfur fraction was higher than that of sulfate-sufficient plants, both in absence and presence of H2S and SO2. The significance of myrosinase in the in situ turnover in these secondary sulfur compounds needs to be questioned, since there was no direct co-regulation between the content of glucosinolates and the transcript level and activity of myrosinase. Evidently, glucosinolates cannot be considered as sulfur storage compounds upon exposure to excessive atmospheric sulfur and are unlikely to be involved in the re-distribution of sulfur in B. juncea and B. rapa seedlings upon sulfate deprivation.

  11. Budgeting Based on Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kelt L.

    2011-01-01

    Every program in a school or school district has, or once had, a purpose. The purpose was most likely promoted, argued and debated among school constituencies--parents, teachers, administrators and school board members--before it was eventually approved. This process occurs year after year, budget after budget. In itself, this is not necessarily a…

  12. Learning From Low Budgets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Chinese filmmakers turn small-budget productions into box-office successes Organizers of China’s upcoming film festivals are finally giving recognition to the little guys—low budget films—to encourage a generation of young,talented directors.

  13. Reading Institutional Budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Barry

    2001-01-01

    Prepares two tables to illustrate how it is helpful to place worries about much smaller sums in the context of Miami University's overall academic budget; One table summarizes the academic budgets for every department during the 1997-98 academic year and a second contains the income-expense ratios for all Oxford departments over a five-year…

  14. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  15. Isotope ratio as a tracer for investigation of anthropogenic sulfur sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents studies concerned possibility of application of sulfur isotope ratio to investigate the sulfur pollution, coming from coal combustion process. The samples of hard coal and lignite, slag and ashes were taken from power station Kaweczyn and Belchatow to determine sulfur isotope ratio changes in the products of coal combustion process. Additionally, sulfur from outlet gas was absorbed to determine sulfur isotope fractionation in desulfurization process. Sulfate from outlet gases are enriched in light isotope 32S in comparison to coal which was used in power plants. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes between inlet and outlet gases was observed. The stable sulfur compositions of sulfur compounds in industrial origin, present in atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, groundwater, soil ets., may differ from those for natural sources. Sulfur isotope ratio can be treated as an environmental tracer, and may be applied to study the sulfur pollution distribution from coal combustion process, in the environment. (author)

  16. Budget brief, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The FY DOE budge totals $12.6 billion in budget authority and $11.1 billion in budget outlays. The budget authority being requested consists of $10.3 billion in new authority and a $2.3 billion reappropriation of expiring funds for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Areas covered in the Energy budget are: energy conservation; research, development, and applications; regulation and information; direct energy production; strategic energy production; and energy security reserve. Other areas include: general science, defense activities; departmental administration; and legislative proposal - spent fuel. Budget totals are compared for 1980 and 1981. A detailed discussion of the FY 1981 activities to be undertaken to carry out these activities is provided. (MCW)

  17. Budget 2011: A budget lacking in ambition

    OpenAIRE

    Dolphin, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Growth is key to the government’s plans for the recovery. Tony Dolphin, Senior Economist at the Institute for Public Policy Research looks at this year’s budget and finds that while it may promote growth now, a broader strategy may be needed in the long term.

  18. Who needs budgets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Jeremy; Fraser, Robin

    2003-02-01

    Budgeting, as most corporations practice it, should be abolished. That may sound radical, but doing so would further companies' long-running efforts to transform themselves into developed networks that can nimbly adjust to market conditions. Most other building blocks are in place, but companies continue to restrict themselves by relying on inflexible budget processes and the command-and-control culture that budgeting entails. A number of companies have rejected the foregone conclusions embedded in budgets, and they've given up the self-interested wrangling over what the data indicate. In the absence of budgets, alternative goals and measures--some financial, such as cost-to-income ratios, and some nonfinancial, such as time to market-move to the foreground. Companies that have rejected budgets require employees to measure themselves against the performance of competitors and against internal peer groups. Because employees don't know whether they've succeeded until they can look back on the results of a given period, they must use every ounce of energy to ensure that they beat the competition. A key feature of many companies that have rejected budgets is the use of rolling forecasts, which are created every few months and typically cover five to eight quarters. Because the forecasts are regularly revised, they allow companies to continuously adapt to market conditions. The forecasting practices of two such companies, both based in Sweden, are examined in detail: the bank Svenska Handelsbanken and the wholesaler Ahlsell. Though the first companies to reject budgets were located in Northern Europe, organizations that have gone beyond budgeting can be found in a range of countries and industries. Their practices allow them to unleash the power of today's management tools and realize the potential of a fully decentralized organization.

  19. FY 1997 congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This is an overview of the 1997 budget request for the US DOE. The topics of the overview include a policy overview, the budget by business line, business lines by organization, crosswalk from business line to appropriation, summary by appropriation, energy supply research and development, uranium supply and enrichment activities, uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, general science and research, weapons activities, defense environmental restoration and waste management, defense nuclear waste disposal, departmental administration, Office of the Inspector General, power marketing administrations, Federal Energy Regulatory commission, nuclear waste disposal fund, fossil energy research and development, naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, energy conservation, economic regulation, strategic petroleum reserve, energy information administration, clean coal technology and a Department of Energy Field Facilities map.

  20. Impact of biomass burning on the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dignon, J.

    1993-03-01

    Fire has played an important part in biogeochemical cycling throughout most of the history of our planet. Ice core studies have been very beneficial in paleoclimate studies and constraining the budgets of biogeochemical cycles through the past 160,000 years of the Vostok ice core. Although to date there has been no way of determining cause and effect, concentration of greenhouse gases directly correlates with temperature in ice core analyses. Recent ice core studies on Greenland have shown that significant climate change can be very rapid on the order of a decade. This chapter addresses the coupled evolution of our planet`s atmospheric composition and biomass burning. Special attention is paid to the chemical and climatic impacts of biomass burning on the atmosphere throughout the last century, specifically looking at the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Information from ice core measurements may be useful in understanding the history of fire and its historic affect on the composition of the atmosphere and climate.

  1. Budget Automation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — BAS is the central Agency system used to integrate strategic planning, annual planning, budgeting and financial management. BAS contains resource (dollars and FTE),...

  2. The global sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  3. Cyclical budget balance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    C. AUDENIS; C. PROST

    2000-01-01

    Government balances are often adjusted for changes in economic activity in order to draw a clearer picture of the underlying fiscal situation and to use this as a guide to fiscal policy analysis. International organisations estimate the cyclical component of economic activity by the current level of the output gap. Using elasticities of tax and public expenditures to GDP, they compute the cyclical part of budget balance. The structural budget balance is defined as the remainder. Our approach ...

  4. Learning From Low Budgets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2011-01-01

    Organizers of China's upcoming film festivals are finally giving recognition to the little guys-low budget films-to encourage a generation of young,talented directors.Several nominees were announced on September 10 to compete for the Small-and Medium-Budget Film Prize of the annual Golden Rooster and Hundred Flowers Film Festival,which will kick off on October 19.

  5. Gender budget pilot project

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Ursula; Pillinger, Jane; Quinn, Sheila; Cashman, Aileen

    2004-01-01

    This Report presents the findings of the first Irish research project on gender budgeting. It explores recent international and Irish experiences of strategies towards greater gender equality and develops a template for applying a gender budget approach in selected local development organisations. The research was funded by the Gender Equality Unit of the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform who have responsibility for promoting and monitoring gender mainstreaming in the Irish Natio...

  6. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA FOR REMOVAL OF SULFUR IN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    1. IntroductionThe presence of sulfur in fossil fuels contributesto corrosion of production and refining equipments,when burning these high-sulfur fuels, it will releasesulfur oxides into the atmosphere, which leading tothe formation of acid rain.Various processes have been developed for theremoval of sulfur compounds from fossil fuel.Inorganic sulfur can be reduced through physicalbeneficiation techniques, but organically boundsulfur is difficult to be removed by these ways 1142].Biological desulfurization...

  7. BUDGET AND PUBLIC DEBT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morar Ioan Dan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of public budgeting is an important issue for public policy of the state, for the simple reason that no money from the state budget can not promote public policy. Budgetary policy is official government Doctrine vision mirror and also represents a starting point for other public policies, which in turn are financed by the public budget. Fiscal policy instruments at its disposal handles the public sector in its structure, and the private sector. Tools such as grant, budgetary allocation, tax, welfare under various forms, direct investments and not least the state aid is used by the state through their budgetary policies to directly and indirectly infuence sector, and the private. Fiscal policies can be grouped according to the structure of the public sector in these components, namely fiscal policy, budgeting and resource allocation policies for financing the budget deficit. An important issue is the financing of the budget deficit budgetary policies. There are two funding possibilities, namely, the higher taxes or more axles site and enter the second call to public loans. Both options involve extra effort from taxpayers in the current fiscal year when they pay higher taxes or a future period when public loans will be repaid. We know that by virtue of "fiscal pact" structural deficits of the member countries of the EU are limited by the European Commission, according to the macro structural stability and budget of each Member State. This problem tempers to some extent the governments of the Member States budgetary appetite, but does not solve the problem of chronic budget deficits. Another issue addressed in this paper is related to the public debt, the absolute amount of its relative level of public datoriri, about the size of GDP, public debt financing and its repayment sources. Sources of public debt issuance and monetary impact on the budget and monetary stability are variables that must underpin the justification of budgetary

  8. The Nitrogen Budget of Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We comprehensively compile and review N content in geologic materials to calculate a new N budget for Earth. Using analyses of rocks and minerals in conjunction with N-Ar geochemistry demonstrates that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains \\sim7\\pm4 times present atmospheric N (4\\times10^18 kg N, PAN), with 27\\pm16\\times10^18 kg N. Comparison to chondritic composition, after subtracting N sequestered into the core, yields a consistent result, with BSE N between 17\\pm13\\times10^18 kg to 31\\pm24\\times10^18 kg N. In the chondritic comparison we calculate a N mass in Earth's core (180\\pm110 to 300\\pm180\\times10^18 kg) and discuss the Moon as a proxy for the early mantle. Significantly, we find the majority of the planetary budget of N is in the solid Earth. The N estimate herein precludes the need for a "missing N" reservoir. Nitrogen-Ar systematics in mantle rocks and basalts identify two mantle reservoirs: MORB-source like (MSL) and high-N. High-N mantle is composed of young, N-rich material subducted from the...

  9. Sulfur isotopes in coal constrain the evolution of the Phanerozoic sulfur cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2013-01-01

    reaction of sulfide with iron produces pyrite whose burial in sediments is an important oxygen source to the atmosphere. The concentrations of seawater sulfate and the operation of sulfur cycle have experienced dynamic changes through Earth’s history, and our understanding of this history is based mainly...... of the isotope record and in the absence of better information, one assumes that the isotopic composition of the input sulfate to the oceans has remained constant through time. It is argued here that this assumption has a constraint over the last 390 Ma from the isotopic composition of sulfur in coal. Indeed......, these compositions do not deviate substantially from the modern surface-water input to the oceans. When applied to mass balance models, these results support previous interpretations of sulfur cycle operation and counter recent suggestions that sulfate has been a minor player in sulfur cycling through...

  10. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  11. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine–sulfuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusuvuori, K.; P. Hietala; O. Kupiainen-Määttä; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere, sulfuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulfuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines – strong organic bases – have become the subject of interest as possible cause for such...

  12. The Carbon Budget of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    The carbon budget of a region can be defined as the sum of annual fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane greenhouse gases (GHGs) into and out of the regional surface coverage area. According to the state government’s recent inventory, California's carbon budget is presently dominated by fossil fuel emissions of CO2 (at >85% of total annual GHG emissions) to meet energy and transportation requirements. Other notable (non-ecosystem) sources of carbon GHG emissions in 2004 were from cement- and lime-making industries, livestock-based agriculture, and waste treatment activities. The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover (including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - MODIS) has been used to estimate net ecosystem fluxes and vegetation biomass production over the period 1990-2004. California's annual NPP for all ecosystems in the early 2000s, estimated by CASA at 120 million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCE) per year, was roughly equal to its annual fossil fuel emission rates for carbon. However, since natural ecosystems can accumulate only a small fraction of this annual NPP total in long-term storage pools, the net ecosystem sink flux for atmospheric carbon across the state was estimated at a maximum rate of between 15-24 MMTCE per year under favorable precipitation conditions. Under less favorable precipitation conditions, such as those experienced during the early 1990s, ecosystems statewide were estimated to have lost nearly 15 MMTCE per year to the atmosphere. Considering the large amounts of carbon stored in standing biomass of forests, shrublands, and rangelands across the state, the implications of changing climate and land use practices on ecosystems must be factored into the state’s planning to reduce overall GHG emissions.

  13. The carbon budget of California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon budget of a region can be defined as the sum of annual fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) greenhouse gases (GHGs) into and out of the regional surface coverage area. According to the state government's recent inventory, California's carbon budget is presently dominated by 115 MMTCE per year in fossil fuel emissions of CO2 (>85% of total annual GHG emissions) to meet energy and transportation requirements. Other notable (non-ecosystem) sources of carbon GHG emissions in 2004 were from cement- and lime-making industries (7%), livestock-based agriculture (5%), and waste treatment activities (2%). The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover (including those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS) was used to estimate net ecosystem fluxes and vegetation biomass production over the period 1990-2004. California's annual NPP for all ecosystems in the early 2000s (estimated by CASA at 120 MMTCE per year) was roughly equivalent to its annual fossil fuel emission rates for carbon. However, since natural ecosystems can accumulate only a small fraction of this annual NPP total in long-term storage pools, the net ecosystem sink flux for atmospheric carbon across the state was estimated at a maximum rate of about 24 MMTCE per year under favorable precipitation conditions. Under less favorable precipitation conditions, such as those experienced during the early 1990s, ecosystems statewide were estimated to have lost nearly 15 MMTCE per year to the atmosphere. Considering the large amounts of carbon estimated by CASA to be stored in forests, shrublands, and rangelands across the state, the importance of protection of the natural NPP capacity of California ecosystems cannot be overemphasized.

  14. Cloud variations and the Earth's energy budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessler, A. E.

    2011-10-01

    The question of whether clouds are the cause of surface temperature changes, rather than acting as a feedback in response to those temperature changes, is explored using data obtained between 2000 and 2010. An energy budget calculation shows that the radiative impact of clouds accounts for little of the observed climate variations. It is also shown that observations of the lagged response of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) energy fluxes to surface temperature variations are not evidence that clouds are causing climate change.

  15. Sulfur recovery further improved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsboom, J.; Grinsven, M. van; Warners, A. van [Jacobs Nederland B.V., (Netherlands); Nisselrooy, P. van [Gastec N.V., (Netherlands)

    2002-04-01

    The original 100-year-old Claus process for producing sulfur from hydrogen sulfide in acid gas is described together with improvements which have been made over the years. The most recent modification, EUROCLAUS, achieves sulfur recoveries of 99-99.9 per cent. Five commercial units are being designed.

  16. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Revealed a Highly Active Sulfur Cycle in an Oil-Immersed Hydrothermal Chimney in Guaymas Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Ying eHe; Xiaoyuan eFeng; Jing eFang; Yu eZhang; Xiang eXiao

    2015-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent system is a typical chemosynthetic ecosystem in which microorganisms play essential roles in the geobiochemical cycling. Although it has been well recognized that the inorganic sulfur compounds are abundant and actively converted through chemosynthetic pathways, the sulfur budget in a hydrothermal vent is poorly characterized due to the complexity of microbial sulfur cycling resulting from the numerous parties involved in the processes. In this study, we performed an int...

  18. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed.

  19. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  20. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  1. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  2. Public Budget Database - Budget Authority and offsetting receipts 1976-Current

    Data.gov (United States)

    Executive Office of the President — This file contains historical budget authority and offsetting receipts for 1976 through the current budget year, as well as four years of projections. It can be...

  3. AGF program budget 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program budget of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Grossforschungseinrichtungen (AGF) (Cooperative of Major Research Establishments) describes its research and development objectives and the progress of work in the major research establishments involved and states the medium-term annual financial and personnel effort. (orig.)

  4. AGF program budget 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present program budget of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Grossforschungseinrichtungen (AGF) (Cooperative of Major Research Establishments) describes its research and development objectives and the progress of work in the major research establishments involved and states the medium-term annual financial and personnel effort. (orig.)

  5. Budgeting Academic Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Watson

    2011-01-01

    There are many articles about space management, including those that discuss space calculations, metrics, and categories. Fewer articles discuss the space budgeting processes used by administrators to allocate space. The author attempts to fill this void by discussing her administrative experiences with Middle Tennessee State University's (MTSU)…

  6. Marbling on a Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Provides historical information on the art technique called marbling. Includes floating paints on water and transferring the patterns formed in the water to paper. Discusses how teachers can teach this technique with materials that fit their budgets. Describes the process in detail. (CMK)

  7. Reforming the EU Budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citi, Manuele

    The marginal involvement of the EU in redistributive policies and its limited fiscal resources have led to a lack of attention to the EU budget and its determinants. In this paper I analyse an original dataset containing yearly data on the main macrocategories of expenditure and how they have...... of the cohesion countries - have a significant role in driving the process of budgetary reform....

  8. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  9. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  10. Pakistan boosts science budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret

    2009-08-01

    Government spending on science and technology development in Pakistan will jump by about a quarter in 2009-2010 compared with the previous fiscal year, with big increases planned for nuclear physics and higher education. In late June the country's National Assembly approved a budget of 48.2bn Pakistani rupees (Rs), or about £361m, for new science projects.

  11. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  12. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Results Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (<6 μmol L-1) in the pools with low pH due to fast disproportionation of thiosulfate. In the pools with higher pH, the concentration of thiosulfate varies, depending on different geochemical pathways of thiosulfate formation. The δ34S values of sulfate in four systems were close to those calculated using a mixing line of the model based on dilution and boiling of a deep hot parent water body. In two pools δ34S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur–polysulfide – hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope (32S, 33S, 34S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆33S among

  13. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán.; Wright, Heather; Vazquez, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous "excess sulfur" problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the "petrologic estimate"), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of vapor

  14. Effects of Sulfurization Temperature on Properties of CZTS Films by Vacuum Evaporation and Sulfurization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper zinc tin sulfur (CZTS thin films have been extensively studied in recent years for their advantages of low cost, high absorption coefficient (≥104 cm−1, appropriate band gap (~1.5 eV, and nontoxicity. CZTS thin films are promising materials of solar cells like copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS. In this work, CZTS thin films were prepared on glass substrates by vacuum evaporation and sulfurization method. Sn/Cu/ZnS (CZT precursors were deposited by thermal evaporation and then sulfurized in N2 + H2S atmosphere at temperatures of 360–560°C to produce polycrystalline CZTS thin films. It is found that there are some impurity phases in the thin films with the sulfurization temperature less than 500°C, and the crystallite size of CZTS is quite small. With the further increase of the sulfurization temperature, the obtained thin films exhibit preferred (112 orientation with larger crystallite size and higher density. When the sulfurization temperature is 500°C, the band gap energy, resistivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of the CZTS thin films are 1.49 eV, 9.37 Ω · cm, 1.714×1017 cm−3, and 3.89 cm2/(V · s, respectively. Therefore, the prepared CZTS thin films are suitable for absorbers of solar cells.

  15. New law to cut 1986 budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are among the agencies whose budgets are likely to be cut 4.3% on March 1, 1986, when the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 makes its first impact.Under the law, the cuts will be implemented across the board by an order from the president. Unless Congress passes legislation to make its own cuts sometime between now and March 1, these cuts will automatically take an equal percentage from every nondefense program, project, and activity not protected from “sequestration” of funds and will automatically take a slightly higher percentage from the unprotected portions of the defense budget. Individual agencies could circumvent the across-the-board cuts by formulating their own plans to distribute their share of the reductions; however, these plans would need congressional approval. These cuts will affect budgets for the federal government in fiscal year (FY) 1986, which began on October 1, 1985. Unless revenues increase substantially, additional and mone severe belt-tightening is in store for FY 1987 and beyond.

  16. Off-Budget Operations: Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ana María Jul

    2006-01-01

    This study assesses the planning, implementation, programming, budgeting and evaluation of extra budgetary and tax expenditures for Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Mexico. The off-budget operations of these countries were analyzed against the best practices guidelines defined by the OECD on Off-budget and Tax Expenditures, Budget Transparency, and Corporate Governance of State-Owned Enterprises, as well as the recommendations included in the IMF's fiscal ROSCs. This report was presented at Public ...

  17. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  18. Effects of atmospheric fallouts of sulfur and nitrogen on soils and fresh waters in France; Effets des depots atmospheriques de soufre et d'azote sur les sols et les eaux douces en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gall, A.Ch.

    2004-11-15

    The sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, the ammonia and the chlorine emitted in the environment by human activities contribute to the soils and waters acidity. After a presentation of the acidification and the eutrophication, the author describes and qualifies the mechanisms. In a second part she discusses the mathematical models of the acidification and the eutrophication, the biological criteria and the uncertainties. The last part presents the french situation and general recommendations on land restoration. (A.L.B.)

  19. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS

    OpenAIRE

    Amrani, Alon; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Shaked, Yeala; Kiene, Ronald P.

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic emissions of volatile dimethyl sulfide (DMS) represent the largest natural source of biogenic sulfur to the global atmosphere, where it mediates aerosol dynamics and may affect climate. Sulfur isotope ratios (34S/32S) offer a way to estimate oceanic DMS contribution to aerosols. We used a unique method for the analysis of 34S/32S of DMS and its precursor, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), in a range of marine environments. Surface water collected from six different ocean provinces re...

  20. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  1. Theoretical Considerations On Local Budgets

    OpenAIRE

    Ionel Eduard Ionescu; Cristian Constantin Oprea

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of local budgets, or otherwise highlights the importance of these tools - local budgets, in the financial autonomy mechanism. Local communities know better than central authorities, their possibilities of obtaining financial resources and needs on expenses for providing local partner services. All these resources and needs are identified in local budgets.

  2. Towards a formalization of budgets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; S. Nolst Trenité; M.B. van der Zwaag

    2008-01-01

    We go into the need for, and the requirements on, a formal theory of budgets. We present a simple algebraic theory of rational budgets, i.e., budgets in which amounts of money are specified by functions on the rational numbers. This theory is based on the tuplix calculus. We go into the importance o

  3. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanqing; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán; Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous “excess sulfur” problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the “petrologic estimate”), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of

  4. The Incredible Shrinking Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.H.E. Journal, 2013

    2013-01-01

    If district technology leaders had a nickel for every time they heard the phrase "the new normal," they'd have all the money they need to run their IT departments. In an effort to help readers think about their budgets in creative and practical ways, "T.H.E. Journal" and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) recently convened a panel of CTOs…

  5. Budgeting tool for Restaurant X

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Uyen

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve profitability and advance a company’s commitment to organ-ize growth, details plans which are called budgets are required. A budgeting tool is a beneficial asset for a company because it helps the budgeting preparation process become easier and faster. Thus, the aim of this thesis is to create a budgeting tool for Restaurant X. This thesis is product-orientated. There are three tasks conducted in this thesis. First one is to cover all relevant theories about a budget. T...

  6. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  7. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  8. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Carleton R., E-mail: cbern@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 (United States); Chadwick, Oliver A. [Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 (United States); Kendall, Carol [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pribil, Michael J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ{sup 34}S VCDT) of − 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ{sup 34}S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil δ{sup 34}S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls

  9. Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} solar cells fabricated by short-term sulfurization of sputtered Sn/Zn/Cu precursors under an H{sub 2}S atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrani, Amin, E-mail: amin.emrani@gmail.com; Rajbhandari, Pravakar P.; Dhakal, Tara P.; Westgate, Charles R.

    2015-02-27

    Synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films by short-term sulfurization of sputtered Sn/Zn/Cu precursors under ambient H{sub 2}S is studied. The effect of the sulfurization processes on the film morphology, surface roughness, composition of the CZTS, and the crystallinity was investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, optical profiler, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction respectively. To further explore the CZTS layer, the following additional layers were deposited to complete the solar cells: CdS with chemical bath deposition; ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped ZnO with RF magnetron deposition; and, silver fingers as the front contact as the last layer. The optical and morphological properties of the CZTS films were investigated and compared. Subsequently, the electrical characteristics and the efficiencies of the regarding solar cells were analyzed. A maximum efficiency of 3.8% has been obtained for the fast sulfurization (30 min at 580 °C) and finally, the performance is compared with our best cell fabricated through the more common slow annealing. - Highlights: • Development of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) solar cells using elemental metal sputtering • 112-oriented CZTS films with well-defined morphology obtained • Reported efficiency of 3.8% for a short-term annealing (less than 30 min) under ambient H{sub 2}S • A detailed comparison between the fast and the more common slow annealing is reported.

  10. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  11. TRADITIONAL BUDGETING VERSUS BEYOND BUDGETING: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARDOS ILDIKO REKA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Budgets are an important part of the business environment since 1920 and are considered to be the key drivers and evaluators of managerial performance; and the key elements for planning and control. Budgets are the most powerful tool for management control; they can play an essential role in the organization’s power politics because it can increase the power and authority of top management and limit the autonomy of lower-level managers. Besides its advantages traditional budgeting presents disadvantages also. In recent years criticism towards traditional budgeting has increased. The basis of this criticism is that traditional budgeting is a relic of the past; it prevents reactions to changes in the market, it cannot keep up with the changes and requirements of today’s business world and it isn’t useful for business management. In order to eliminate criticism researchers and practitioners have developed more systematic and alternative concepts of budgeting that suits better for the needs of the modern business environment. Beyond budgeting, better budgeting, rolling forecasts, activity-based budgeting are the main alternatives developed in the last years. From the mentioned alternatives this article examines only beyond budgeting. Our paper discusses how budgeting has evolved into its current state, before examining why this universal technique has come under such heavy criticism of late. The paper is a literature analysis, it contributes to the existing managerial accounting literature and it is structured as follows. In the first part the background and evolution of budgeting is presented, followed by the analysis of related theories in traditional budgeting, emphasizing both the advantages and disadvantages of traditional budgeting. The second part of the paper continues with the discussion about alternative budgeting methods highlighting pros and cons of alternative methods, especially beyond budgeting. In the third part conducted

  12. Greenhouse gas budget of agricultural systems: real possibility or dream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.; Calanca, P.; Fuhrer, J.; Leifeld, J.; Jocher, M.; Volk, M.

    2003-04-01

    It is now widely accepted that emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) by human activities are causing an increase of global mean temperature. Model calculations have shown that the rate of increase might have a decisive influence on the stability of the climate. It is therefore crucial to slow down the increase of GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Storage of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere is mentioned as one possibility in the Kyoto protocol. Mitigation options to decrease GHG emissions in agricultural systems as well as to increase carbon stock in agricultural soils are in discussion. The quantification and verification of the GHG budget is a prerequisite to establish a trade within the Kyoto protocol. On the scientific level this comes down to a greenhouse gas budget for agricultural systems. Comparability and interpretation of GHG budgets depends on an appropriate and consistent choice of the considered system, especially the system boundaries. In this presentation we discuss the feasibility of such a budget for a the smallest unit: the yearly budget of grassland system. Differences between GHG budget and carbon budget will be assessed.

  13. FY 1987 Federal Budget Proposal: Mixed outlook for geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A new emphasis on “global geosciences” and a new start for the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX) were among the highlights for geophysics in the federal budget for fiscal year (FY) 1987 that the Reagan administration submitted to Congress on February 5, 1986. Budget increases planned for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), however, contrasted with cuts planned for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Under the proposed budget, funding for research and development (R&D) would increase significantly in FY 1987, rising 16.9% over the funding that will remain in the FY 1986 budget after March 1, 1986. On that date, cuts in the FY 1986 budget will take effect under the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, better known as Gramm-Rudman-Hollings (Eos, January 28, 1986, p. 41). Although that law was recently found unconstitutional by a special federal judicial panel, their ruling will not go into effect unless and until it is upheld by the Supreme Court, so the March 1 cuts are expected to go forward as planned. (If the Supreme Court hears the appeal, they will probably rule before early July, according to The Washington Post.) Under Gramm-Rudman-Hollings, the FY 1986 budgets of non-defense programs not protected in the law's provisions will be cut by 4.3%. Unprotected defense programs will be cut by close to 5%.

  14. BUDGET AND BUDGET EXECUTION IN THE NORTHWEST REGION OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOAN BATRANCEA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The budget is a tool multiannual financial forecasting both at micro and macro level. In this sense, regional and local government budget is a financial instrument that connects resources to use local funds in order to ensure the prosperity of the community concerned. Construction and especially budget execution highlights the effectiveness of local and regional government. Using a system of indicators correlated reveals income, expenditure and budgetary outturn.

  15. European Union Budget Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citi, Manuele

    2015-01-01

    The marginal involvement of the European Union (EU) in redistributive policies and its limited fiscal resources have led to a notable lack of attention by EU scholars towards the EU budget and its dynamics. Yet the nature of the budgetary data and their high usability for statistical analysis make...... them an excellent tool for studying and measuring policy change in the EU. In this article, I analyse an original dataset containing yearly data for the main categories of expenditure and how they have changed over the last three decades (1979–2013). Using time-series analysis, I find that the ability...

  16. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella;

    2015-01-01

    of Mangrove Lake appears to include sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur followed by the disproportionation of the elemental sulfur to sulfate and sulfide. This model also indicates that the reoxidative sulfur cycle of Mangrove Lake turns over from 50 to 80% of the sulfide produced by microbial sulfate...... that the two processes cannot be discriminated from each other....

  17. Coupling between the JULES land-surface scheme and the CCATT-BRAMS atmospheric chemistry model (JULES-CCATT-BRAMS1.0: applications to numerical weather forecasting and the CO2 budget in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Moreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the development of a new numerical system denominated JULES-CCATT-BRAMS, which resulted from the coupling of the JULES surface model to the CCATT-BRAMS atmospheric chemistry model. The performance of this system in relation to several meteorological variables (wind speed at 10 m, air temperature at 2 m, dew point temperature at 2 m, pressure reduced to mean sea level and 6 h accumulated precipitation and the CO2 concentration above an extensive area of South America is also presented, focusing on the Amazon basin. The evaluations were conducted for two periods, the wet (March and dry (September seasons of 2010. The statistics used to perform the evaluation included bias (BIAS and root mean squared error (RMSE. The errors were calculated in relation to observations at conventional stations in airports and automatic stations. In addition, CO2 concentrations in the first model level were compared with meteorological tower measurements and vertical CO2 profiles were compared with aircraft data. The results of this study show that the JULES model coupled to CCATT-BRAMS provided a significant gain in performance in the evaluated atmospheric fields relative to those simulated by the LEAF (version 3 surface model originally utilized by CCATT-BRAMS. Simulations of CO2 concentrations in Amazonia and a comparison with observations are also discussed and show that the system presents a gain in performance relative to previous studies. Finally, we discuss a wide range of numerical studies integrating coupled atmospheric, land surface and chemistry processes that could be produced with the system described here. Therefore, this work presents to the scientific community a free tool, with good performance in relation to the observed data and re-analyses, able to produce atmospheric simulations/forecasts at different resolutions, for any period of time and in any region of the globe.

  18. Coupling between the JULES land-surface scheme and the CCATT-BRAMS atmospheric chemistry model (JULES-CCATT-BRAMS1.0: applications to numerical weather forecasting and the CO2 budget in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Moreira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the coupling of the JULES surface model to the CCATT-BRAMS atmospheric chemistry model. This new numerical system is denominated JULES-CCATT-BRAMS. We demonstrate the performance of this new model system in relation to several meteorological variables and the CO2 mixing ratio over a large part of South America, focusing on the Amazon basin. The evaluation was conducted for two time periods, the wet (March and dry (September seasons of 2010. The model errors were calculated in relation to meteorological observations at conventional stations in airports and automatic stations. In addition, CO2 mixing ratios in the first model level were compared with meteorological tower measurements and vertical CO2 profiles were compared with observations obtained with airborne instruments. The results of this study show that the JULES-CCATT-BRAMS modeling system provided a significant gain in performance for the considered atmospheric fields relative to those simulated by the LEAF (version 3 surface model originally employed by CCATT-BRAMS. In addition, the new system significantly increases the ability to simulate processes involving air–surface interactions, due to the ability of JULES to simulate photosynthesis, respiration and dynamic vegetation, among other processes. We also discuss a wide range of numerical studies involving coupled atmospheric, land surface and chemistry processes that could be done with the system introduced here. Thus, this work presents to the scientific community a free modeling tool, with good performance in comparison with observational data and reanalysis model data, at least for the region and time period discussed here. Therefore, in principle, this model is able to produce atmospheric hindcast/forecast simulations at different spatial resolutions for any time period and any region of the globe.

  19. The terrestrial nitrogen budget of the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Burt, T. P.; Howden, N. K.; Whelan, M.

    2010-12-01

    This study estimates the total annual nitrogen budget of the UK from 1990 to 2020. The following inputs of nitrogen are considered: inorganic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition; food and feed imports; and biological nitrogen fixation. The outputs considered include: atmospheric emissions; direct losses of sewage and industrial effluent to the sea; fluvial losses at source; food and feed exports; and terrestrial and aquatic denitrification to N2. The study is the first to include in-stream losses and terrestrial denitrification to N2 into a national nitrogen budget: in so doing it does not have to assume the total budget is in balance following inter-annual changes. Unlike previous studies, this study is not limited to reactive nitrogen species. It is shown here that: i) Inputs of inorganic fertilizer declined significantly over the study period; atmospheric deposition showed no change and food and feed imports significantly increased. ii) Outputs of fluvial nitrogen rose significantly, but atmospheric emissions of N20 and NH3 declined dramatically, while dentrification to N2 remained steady. iii) The UK was a net source of total nitrogen in 1990 of 527 (±40%) ktonnes N/yr (22 kg N/ha/yr). By 2005, it was a net source of 172 (±106%) ktonnes N/yr (7 kg N/ha/yr). iv) The prognosis for the N budget of the UK to 2020 is critically dependent upon the future trends and trade-offs between atmospheric emissions and applications of inorganic fertilisers. If atmospheric emissions follow current trends then by 2020 the net sink of total N in the UK will be 44 ktonnes N/yr, if atmospheric emissions are restricted to current UK government emissions targets, then the UK will be a net source of Total N of 151 ktonnes N/yr as reductions in the application of inorganic fertiliser outstrip declines in atmospheric emissions.

  20. Study on the enrichment of Sulfur Hexafluoride in the tmosphere through polyimide hollow fiber membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Weixian; Wang Yaoqin; Li Weiping; Yuan Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride is per molecule the strongest greenhouse gas know, the features have brought SF6 into the climatic impact discussion aimed at reduction of emissions. The separation effects of sulfur hexafluoride in the atmosphere are studied through polyimide hollow fiber membrane with different conditions on pressure drop, gas flow and temperature. The sulfur hexafluoride concentration increased with increased pressure drop of the membrane, increased temperature and decreased non-filtrat...

  1. Study on the enrichment of Sulfur Hexafluoride in the tmosphere through polyimide hollow fiber membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Weixian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur hexafluoride is per molecule the strongest greenhouse gas know, the features have brought SF6 into the climatic impact discussion aimed at reduction of emissions. The separation effects of sulfur hexafluoride in the atmosphere are studied through polyimide hollow fiber membrane with different conditions on pressure drop, gas flow and temperature. The sulfur hexafluoride concentration increased with increased pressure drop of the membrane, increased temperature and decreased non-filtrate flow flux; the recovery of sulfur hexafluoride exceeds 93%, enrichment coefficient was 18.5; sulfur hexafluoride is not detected at the flux of the filtrate flow, which means sulfur hexafluoride is riddled by membrane. The results showed that polyimide hollow fiber membrane can effectively separate sulfur hexafluoride from mixed gas

  2. Sulfur aerosol in the clouds of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2016-08-01

    The photochemical model for the middle atmosphere of Venus (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2012] Icarus, 218, 230-246) predicts sulfur aerosol as a product of the OCS photolysis at 55-60 km. The calculated mass loading is much smaller than that of the mode 1 particles in the upper cloud layer. The chemical kinetic model for the lower atmosphere (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2013], Icarus, 225, 570-580) results in a constant mixing ratio of 20 ppm for OCS + XSX. This means the S8 mixing ratio of 2.5 ppm near the model upper boundary at 47 km. Using this abundance, the calculated profile of the sulfur aerosol has a bottom that coincides with the lower boundary of modes 2 and 3 and constitutes ∼10% of the total mass loading in the lower cloud layer. Sulfur aerosol cannot be the near UV absorber because its abundance is too low at the cloud tops and disagrees with the profile of the absorber observed by Venera 14.

  3. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to recover sulfur compounds from lunar soil using sorbents derived primarily from in-situ resources....

  4. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to capture greater than 90 percent of sulfur gases evolved during thermal treatment of lunar soils....

  5. Baseline budgeting for continuous improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilty, G L

    1999-05-01

    This article is designed to introduce the techniques used to convert traditionally maintained department budgets to baseline budgets. This entails identifying key activities, evaluating for value-added, and implementing continuous improvement opportunities. Baseline Budgeting for Continuous Improvement was created as a result of a newly named company president's request to implement zero-based budgeting. The president was frustrated with the mind-set of the organization, namely, "Next year's budget should be 10 to 15 percent more than this year's spending." Zero-based budgeting was not the answer, but combining the principles of activity-based costing and the Just-in-Time philosophy of eliminating waste and continuous improvement did provide a solution to the problem.

  6. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Pardyjak, Eric; Hartogensis, Oscar; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-01-01

    A simple model for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and the TKE budget is presented for sheared convective atmospheric conditions based on observations from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign. It is based on an idealized mixedlayer approximation and a s

  7. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Revealed a Highly Active and Intensive Sulfur Cycle in an Oil-Immersed Hydrothermal Chimney in Guaymas Basin

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ying; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent system is a typical chemosynthetic ecosystem in which microorganisms play essential roles in the geobiochemical cycling. Although it has been well-recognized that the inorganic sulfur compounds are abundant and actively converted through chemosynthetic pathways, the sulfur budget in a hydrothermal vent is poorly characterized due to the complexity of microbial sulfur cycling resulting from the numerous parties involved in the processes. In this study, we performed an int...

  8. Collection assessment and acquisitions budgets

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sul H

    2013-01-01

    This invaluable new book contains timely information about the assessment of academic library collections and the relationship of collection assessment to acquisition budgets. The rising cost of information significantly influences academic libraries'abilities to acquire the necessary materials for students and faculty, and public libraries'abilities to acquire material for their clientele. Collection Assessment and Acquisitions Budgets examines different aspects of the relationship between the assessment of academic library collections and the management of library acquisition budgets. Librar

  9. Balancing local budgets in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Attila GYÖRGY

    2014-01-01

    Local budgets in Romania are balanced with revenues transferred from state budget according to the criterions laid down in the Local Public Finance Act. These criterions are focusing on the financial capacity, population and surface, each local budget getting balancing amounts inversely with the administrative unit’s wellness and directly to size. The repartition algorithm is used for more than a decade, but periodically it was revised in order to be better folded to fiscal policy and economi...

  10. A Budget for the People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Redistributing income to improve people’s livelihoods becomes a priority of the central budget The government’s budget this year will top an unprecedented 10 trillion yuan ($1.52 trillion), an increase of 11.9 percent over that of 2010, according to the government’s annual budget report delivered to the Fourth Session of the 11th National People’s Congress on March 5.

  11. A note on budget procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Pisauro Giuseppe; Visco Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    In Italy the debate on procedures related to the State budget is recurrent and tends to focus on the legislation stage. There is a widespread dissatisfaction on the way the budget is discussed and approved by Parliament. We argue that the entire procedure, including the stages of preparation, legislation and execution, should be reconsidered. The budget process in Italy suffers mainly from excessive fragmentation at the preparation stage, where a bottom-up approach is followed. Conversely, th...

  12. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  13. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  14. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in MTBE

    OpenAIRE

    Mingqing Wu; Chunyan Chang; Tao Li; Jian Zhou; Liping Zhao

    2015-01-01

    A study is carried out on chemical constitution of sulfur compounds in MTBE and their formation mechanisms. These sulfur compounds are classified into three types: common sulfur compounds, newly formed sulfur compounds, and high boiling sulfur compounds. Common sulfur compounds which include mercaptans, low molecule sulfides and disulfides, are directly from C4, one of the stocks for production of MTBE. The newly formed sulfur compounds, with one sulfur atom and five or more total carbon atom...

  15. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ((approx)$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  16. Measurements of radioactive and stable sulfur isotopes at Mt. Everest and its geochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Thiemens, M. H.; Zhang, Q.; Li, C.; Kang, S.; Hsu, S. C.; Zhang, Z.; Su, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Himalayas were recently identified as a global hotspot for deep stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) during spring [1]. Although STT transport in this region may play a vital role in tropospheric chemistry, the hydrological cycle and aquatic ecosystems in Asia, there is no direct measurement of a specific chemical stratospheric tracer to verify and evaluate its possible impact. Here, cosmogenic 35S tracer (half-life: ~87 days) produced in the stratosphere was measured for the first time in surface snow and river runoff samples collected at Mt. Everest in April 2013 using a low-noise liquid scintillation spectroscopy [2]. Strikingly, we find extraordinarily high concentrations of 35S in these samples (>10 times higher than the southern Tibetan Plateau), verifying the Himalayas as a gateway of springtime STT. In light of this, two studies were conducted: a) Measurements of 35SO2 and 35SO42- at the southern Tibetan Plateau reveals that the oxidative life time of SO2 is reduced to 2.1 days under the influence of aged stratospheric air masses from the Himalayas. A concept box model for estimating the influence of STT on surface O3 using 35S tracer is proposed. b) Quadruple stable sulfur isotopes in a sediment core (~250 years) from the Gokyo Lake (the world's highest freshwater lake) [3] near Mt. Everest are being measured to investigate the possible impact of STT on sulfur budget at the Himalayas. The absence of sulfide suggests that bacterial sulfate reduction may be negligible in this lake. Enrichment of uranium (EF ≈ 10) in 20th century samples highlights the impact of atmospheric deposition. S-isotope sulfate anomalies are not found (∆33S and ∆36S ≈ 0‰), implying that sulfate in this lake may be mainly contributed by eolian dust or derived from rock. This is also supported by the low enrichments of most trace elements (EF ≈ 1). Rare earth elements will be used to assist in identifying the potential sources and interpreting the variation of

  17. Some thoughts on GAIA and the sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data hypothesis states that the composition, oxidation reduction state, and temperature of the troposphere are actively regulated by the biota for the biota. One of the early predictions of the Gaia hypothesis was that there should be a sulfur compound made by the biota in the oceans. It would need to be stable enough against oxidation in water to allow its transfer to the air. Either the sulfur compound itself or its atmospheric oxidation product would have to return sulfur from the sea to the land surfaces. The most likely candidate for this role was dimethyl sulfide. Another sulfur compound of interest from a Gaian viewpoint CS2 (carbon disulfide) is discussed. Theories on the production of dimethyl sulfide and carbon disulfide related to the Gaian hypothesis are examined.

  18. Effects of sulfur oxides on eicosanoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafine metal oxides and SO2 react during coal combustion or smelting operations to form primary emissions coated with an acidic SOx layer. Ongoing work in this laboratory has examined the effects of sulfur oxides on pulmonary functions of guinea pigs. We have previously reported that 20 micrograms/m3 acidic sulfur oxide as a surface layer on ultrafine ZnO particles decreases lung volumes, decreases carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, and causes lung inflammation in guinea pigs after 4 daily 3-h exposures. It also produces bronchial hypersensitivity following a single 1-h exposure. The importance of this surface layer is demonstrated by our observation that 200 micrograms/m3 of sulfuric acid droplets of equivalent size are needed to produce the same degree of hypersensitivity. This study characterized the concentration-dependent effects of in vivo exposures to sulfur oxides on arachidonic acid metabolism in the guinea pig lung, and investigated the time course and the relation between eicosanoid composition and pulmonary functions. We focused specifically on four cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, that is, prostaglandins (PG) E1, F2 alpha, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, and thromboxane (Tx) B2, and two groups of sulfidopeptide leukotrienes (C4, D4, E4, and F4). Guinea pigs were exposed to ultrafine ZnO aerosol (count median diameter = 0.05 microns, sigma g = 1.80) with a layer of acidic sulfur oxide on the surface of the particles. Lung lavage was collected after exposures, and the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites were determined using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Concentration-dependent promotion of PGF2 alpha and concentration-dependent suppression of LtB4 were observed. The increased PGF2 alpha was associated with depressed vital capacity and diffusing capacity of the lungs measured in guinea pigs exposed to the same atmosphere described in a previous study

  19. 3D modeling of satellite spectral images, radiation budget and energy budget of urban landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    DART EB is a model that is being developed for simulating the 3D (3 dimensional) energy budget of urban and natural scenes, possibly with topography and atmosphere. It simulates all non radiative energy mechanisms (heat conduction, turbulent momentum and heat fluxes, water reservoir evolution, etc.). It uses DART model (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) for simulating radiative mechanisms: 3D radiative budget of 3D scenes and their remote sensing images expressed in terms of reflectance or brightness temperature values, for any atmosphere, wavelength, sun/view direction, altitude and spatial resolution. It uses an innovative multispectral approach (ray tracing, exact kernel, discrete ordinate techniques) over the whole optical domain. This paper presents two major and recent improvements of DART for adapting it to urban canopies. (1) Simulation of the geometry and optical characteristics of urban elements (houses, etc.). (2) Modeling of thermal infrared emission by vegetation and urban elements. The new DART version was used in the context of the CAPITOUL project. For that, districts of the Toulouse urban data base (Autocad format) were translated into DART scenes. This allowed us to simulate visible, near infrared and thermal infrared satellite images of Toulouse districts. Moreover, the 3D radiation budget was used by DARTEB for simulating the time evolution of a number of geophysical quantities of various surface elements (roads, walls, roofs). Results were successfully compared with ground measurements of the CAPITOUL project.

  20. Reduced sulfur in euxinic sediments of the Cariaco Basin : Sulfur isotope contraints on organic sulfur formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Werne, J.; Lyons, T.W.; Hollander, D.J.; Formolo, M.

    2003-01-01

    Reduced sulfur accumulation in Holocene and latest Pleistocene euxinic marine sediments from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, was investigated to constrain the timing and possible pathways of organic matter (OM) sulfurization. Data were collected for a diverse suite of sulfur species, including concent

  1. The European Union Budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Šimović

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the current budgetary system of the EU, its features and the differences in it from the budgets of nation states, particularly from the standpoint of budgetary revenue and expenditure. Below there is an analysis of the system of the redistribution of EU budgetary resources via the Structural Funds, leading to different net positions of the member states in the use of budgetary resources. The object of the system is to achieve the maximum economic and social cohesion within the EU. The article points out that processes of EU enlargement and the creation of a new “financial perspective” will lead to many problems in the fulfilment of these objectives.

  2. Motivation in Beyond Budgeting: A Motivational Paradox?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandalgaard, Niels; Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    In this paper we discuss the role of motivation in relation to budgeting and we analyse how the Beyond Budgeting model functions compared with traditional budgeting. In the paper we focus on budget related motivation (and motivation in general) and conclude that the Beyond Budgeting model...... is a motivational paradox....

  3. The total phosphorus budget of a peat-covered catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Fred; Moody, Catherine S.; Clay, Gareth D.; Burt, Tim P.; Rose, Rob

    2016-07-01

    Although many studies have considered the carbon or greenhouse gas budgets of peat ecosystems, only a few have considered the nutrient budget of peat soils, and this, in turn, has limited the ability of studies to consider the impact of changes in climate and atmospheric deposition on the phosphorus budget of a peat soil. This study considered the total phosphorus (P) budget of an upland peat-covered catchment over the period 1993 to 2012. The study has shown (i) total atmospheric deposition of phosphorus varied from 62 to 175 kg P/km2/yr; (ii) the carbon:phosphorus ratio of the peat profile declines significantly from values in the litter layer (C:P = 1326) to approximately constant at 30 cm depth (C:P = 4240); (iii) the total fluvial flux of phosphorus varied from 49 to 111 kg P/km2/yr, of which between 45 and 77% was dissolved P; and (iv) the total phosphorus sink varied from -5.6 to +71.7 kg P/km2/yr with a median of +29.4 kg P/km2/yr, which is within the range of the estimated long-term accumulation rate of phosphorus in the peat profile of between 3 and 32 kg P/km2/yr. The phosphorus budget of the peat ecosystem relies on rapid recycling near the soil surface, and this means that any vegetation management may critically deprive the ecosystem of this nutrient.

  4. Service Increases Fueling Budget Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Reactionary stances against pending budget cuts should be considered to be less favorable positioning for library leaders versus more proactive and anticipatory strategies. By changing the attitudinal and service posturing of library staff and services, libraries can show themselves as a more essential function to their colleges. Budget cuts…

  5. Education Takes Hit in Budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2011-01-01

    After months of arduous negotiation and partisan squabbling, states across the country have produced budgets for the new fiscal year that in many cases will bring deep cuts to state spending, including money for schools. The budget blueprints adopted by numerous states were postscripts to divisive legislative sessions that saw newly elected…

  6. Carbon budgets in symbiotic associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscatine, L.; Falkowski, P.G.; Dubinsky, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are described which permit the estimation of daily budgets for photosynthetically fixed carbon in any alga-invertebrate symbiosis. Included is a method for estimating total daily translocation which does not involve the use of C-14. A daily carbon budget for a shallow water symbiotic reef coral is presented.

  7. Technology support for participatory budgeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Rios, Jesus; Lippa, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    and match them to the generic participatory budgeting processes. This results in a comprehensive picture of how known eParticipation technologies can be used to support participatory budgeting. The next research question (unfortunately beyond the scope of this article) is how to choose - which technologies......Participatory budgeting is a reasonably well-established governance practice, particularly in South America. It is information and communication rich - making it well suited for modern technology support; in addition, the widespread participation of many citizens is difficult to achieve without...... this support. Participatory budgeting is associated with eParticipation, where much is already known about the kinds of technologies supporting citizen participation and how they are used. This paper identifies (from the existing literature) basic processes which are common to most participatory budgeting...

  8. Iron-Sulfur-Carbonyl and -Nitrosyl Complexes: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information, materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained, are provided for an experiment on iron-sulfur-carbonyl and -nitrosyl complexes. The experiment involved (1) use of inert atmospheric techniques and thin-layer and flexible-column chromatography and (2) interpretation of infrared, hydrogen and carbon-13 nuclear…

  9. NSF and NASA budgets increased

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Research budgets of several of the federal government agencies were increased significantly over the Reagan administration's requests in the House of Representative's appropriations bill H.R. 4034. These budgets had been removed from the Reagan administration's omnibus reconciliation bill, and thus there were worries expressed that certain research funding could be in jeopardy. The rationale was that because the requests were voted on individually on the floor of the House, many sections of the budgets would be subjected to extra scrutiny, which would lead to more cuts.The National Science Foundation (NSF) budget request had been cut and reordered by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) by making sharp reductions in programs of the social sciences and in programs of science and engineering education. There were fears that these programs would be reinstated to the original request level, at the expense of the budgets of other research activities. These fears materialized, but only momentarily. Efforts to cut the research activities by the House Appropriations Committee were soundly defeated. The budget was supported, with additional increases to provide for the education programs, by a high margin, which included most Republican and Democratic members of the House of Representatives. The overall NSF budget, as passed, has a total appropriation of $1103.5 million, compared with the Administration's request of $1033.5 million (the Fiscal Year 1981 appropriation for the NSF was $1022.4 million). The House approved budget included increases of $44.9 million in research and $25.1 million in science and engineering education. Included in the research budget increase were recommendations by the House Appropriations Committee for support of the social sciences and for the international affairs programs. Also included in the recommendations was support of interdisciplinary research programs that cut across the directorates of the NSF.

  10. THE STRATEGY OF OPTIMIZATION AND INCREASE EFFICIENCY OF BUDGETED EXPENDITURES AS PART OF REGIONAL BUDGET STRATEGY

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana V. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we have considered the questions of increasing the efficiency of budgeted expenditures in the boundaries of formation of the regional budget strategy. The process of reforming of government’s budget system is vectored to introduction of the new forms of budget costs’ management and increasing its effectiveness. The main budget innovations are: state and municipal assignment, budgeting, focused on result, program-targeted budgeting. The proposed classification of budget expendi...

  11. The triple point of sulfur hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, P. M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A cryogenic fixed point cell has been filled with high purity (99.999%) sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and measured in an adiabatic closed-cycle cryostat system. Temperature measurements of the SF6 melting curve were performed using a capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometer (CSPRT) calibrated over the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) subrange from the triple point of equilibrium hydrogen to the triple point of water. The measured temperatures were corrected by 0.37 mK for the effects of thermometer self-heating, and the liquidus-point temperature estimated by extrapolation to melted fraction F  =  1 of a simple linear regression versus melted fraction F in the range F  =  0.53 to 0.84. Based on this measurement, the temperature of the triple point of sulfur hexafluoride is shown to be 223.555 23(49) K (k  =  1) on the ITS-90. This value is in excellent agreement with the best prior measurements reported in the literature, but with considerably smaller uncertainty. An analysis of the detailed uncertainty budget of this measurement suggests that if the triple point of sulfur hexafluoride were to be included as a defining fixed point of the next revision of the International Temperature Scale, it could do so with a total realization uncertainty of approximately 0.43 mK, slightly larger than the realization uncertainties of the defining fixed points of the ITS-90. Since the combined standard uncertainty of this SF6 triple point temperature determination is dominated by chemical impurity effects, further research exploring gas purification techniques and the influence of specific impurity species on the SF6 triple point temperature may bring the realization uncertainty of SF6 as a fixed point material into the range of the defining fixed points of the ITS-90.

  12. Ice core sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records from southern Greenland document North American and European air pollution and suggest a decline in regional biogenic sulfur emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasteris, D. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Burkhart, J. F.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have an important cooling effect on the Earth because they scatter sunlight back to space and form cloud condensation nuclei. However, understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle is incomplete, leading to uncertainty in the assessment of past, present and future climate forcing. Here we use annually resolved observations of sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration in an array of precisely dated Southern Greenland ice cores to assess the history of sulfur pollution emitted from North America and Europe and the history of biogenic sulfate aerosol derived from the North Atlantic Ocean over the last 250 years. The ice core sulfur time series is found to closely track sulfur concentrations in North American and European precipitation since records began in 1965, and also closely tracks estimated sulfur emissions since 1850 within the air mass source region as determined by back trajectory analysis. However, a decline to near-preindustrial sulfur concentrations in the ice cores after 1995 that is not so extensive in the source region emissions indicates that there has been a change in sulfur cycling over the last 150 years. The ice core MSA time series shows a decline of 60% since the 1860s, and is well correlated with declining sea ice concentrations around Greenland, suggesting that the phytoplankton source of biogenic sulfur has declined due to a loss of marginal sea ice zone habitat. Incorporating the implied decrease in biogenic sulfur in our analysis improves the match between the ice core sulfur record and the source region emissions throughout the last 150 years, and solves the problem of the recent return to near-preindustrial levels in the Greenland ice. These findings indicate that the transport efficiency of sulfur air pollution has been relatively stable through the industrial era and that biogenic sulfur emissions in the region have declined.

  13. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  14. Organic nitrate chemistry and its implications for nitrogen budgets in an isoprene- and monoterpene-rich atmosphere: constraints from aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations in the Southeast US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jenny A.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Travis, Katherine R.; Kim, Patrick S.; Marais, Eloise A.; Miller, Christopher Chan; Yu, Karen; Zhu, Lei; Yantosca, Robert M.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Mao, Jingqiu; Wennberg, Paul O.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; Nguyen, Tran B.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Romer, Paul; Nault, Benjamin A.; Wooldridge, Paul J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Hu, Weiwei; Shepson, Paul B.; Xiong, Fulizi; Blake, Donald R.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Misztal, Pawel K.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    Formation of organic nitrates (RONO2) during oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs: isoprene, monoterpenes) is a significant loss pathway for atmospheric nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx), but the chemistry of RONO2 formation and degradation remains uncertain. Here we implement a new BVOC oxidation mechanism (including updated isoprene chemistry, new monoterpene chemistry, and particle uptake of RONO2) in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with ~ 25 x 25 km2 resolution over North America. We evaluate the model using aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations of NOx, BVOCs, and RONO2 from the Southeast US in summer 2013. The updated simulation successfully reproduces the concentrations of individual gas- and particle-phase RONO2 species measured during the campaigns. Gas-phase isoprene nitrates account for 25-50 % of observed RONO2 in surface air, and we find that another 10 % is contributed by gas-phase monoterpene nitrates. Observations in the free troposphere show an important contribution from long-lived nitrates derived from anthropogenic VOCs. During both campaigns, at least 10 % of observed boundary layer RONO2 were in the particle phase. We find that aerosol uptake followed by hydrolysis to HNO3 accounts for 60 % of simulated gas-phase RONO2 loss in the boundary layer. Other losses are 20 % by photolysis to recycle NOx and 15 % by dry deposition. RONO2 production accounts for 20 % of the net regional NOx sink in the Southeast US in summer, limited by the spatial segregation between BVOC and NOx emissions. This segregation implies that RONO2 production will remain a minor sink for NOx in the Southeast US in the future even as NOx emissions continue to decline.

  15. Evaluation of Sulfur 'Concrete' for Use as a Construction Material on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Combining molten sulfur with any number of aggregate materials forms, when solid, a mixture having attributes similar, if not better, to conventional water-based concrete. As a result the use of sulfur "concrete" on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive environments. Consequently, discovery of troilite (FeS) on the lunar surface prompted numerous scenarios about its reduction to elemental sulfur for use, in combination with lunar regolith, as a potential construction material; not requiring water, a precious resource, for its manufacture is an obvious advantage. However, little is known about the viability of sulfur concrete in an environment typified by extreme temperatures and essentially no atmosphere. The experimental work presented here evaluates the response of pure sulfur and sulfur concrete subjected to laboratory conditions that approach those expected on the lunar surface, the results suggesting a narrow window of application.

  16. Biological conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Bioengineering Resources, Inc., Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Currently, hydrogen sulfide is removed from process gas streams by a series of reactions at high temperature to produce elemental sulfur in Claus, Stretford or other processes. These physicochemical processes have high intrinsic capital and operating costs, often are restricted by contaminants, and do not effectively remove all the H{sub 2}S. As an alternative, the anaerobic, photosynthetic bacterium, Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum, has been demonstrated to convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in a single step at atmospheric conditions. The autotrophic bacterium uses CO{sub 2} as the carbon source. Energy for cell metabolism is provided by incandescent light and the oxidation of H{sub 2}S. A bench scale study has been performed in a CSTR equipped with a sulfur separator. Optimum process conditions have been achieved to maximize cell growth and elemental sulfur production. Near total conversion of H{sub 2}S is achieved in a retention time of a few minutes. High concentrations of H{sub 2}S or organics do not affect the culture. Sulfur recovery by settling is very efficient and near theoretical yields of sulfur are achieved. Economic projections indicate that sour gas can be desulfurized for $0.08-0.12/MSCF. 13 refs.

  17. Sulfur “concrete” for lunar applications Sublimation concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form “concrete” is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  18. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  19. A Guide to Participatory Budgeting

    OpenAIRE

    Wampler, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Participatory Budgeting (PB) programs are innovative policymaking processes. Citizens are directly involved in making policy decisions. Forums are held throughout the year so that citizens have the opportunity to allocate resources, prioritize broad social policies, and monitor public spending.

  20. Pleistocene sediment offloading and the global sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, S.; Paytan, A.; Wortmann, U. G.

    2015-05-01

    Quaternary sea level fluctuations have greatly affected the sediment budgets of the continental shelves. Previous studies suggested that this caused a considerable increase in the net loss of shelf sediments. Since sediment accumulation and erosion are closely tied to the formation and re-oxidation of pyrite, we use a high-resolution record of sulfur isotope ratios (34S / 32S) of marine sulfate to evaluate the implications of the so-called "shelf sediment offloading" on the global sulfur cycle. Modeling of our δ34S record suggests that erosion during sea level lowstands was only partly compensated by increased sedimentation during times of rising sea level and sea level highstands. Furthermore, our data suggests that shelf systems reached a new equilibrium state about 700 ka, which considerably slowed or terminated shelf sediment offloading.

  1. Sulfur and carbon cycling in organic-rich marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Nearshore, continental shelf, and slope sediments are important sites of microbially mediated carbon and sulfur cycling. Marine geochemists investigated the rates and mechanisms of cycling processes in these environments by chemical distribution studies, in situ rate measurements, and steady state kinetic modeling. Pore water chemical distributions, sulfate reduction rates, and sediment water chemical fluxes were used to describe cycling on a ten year time scale in a small, rapidly depositing coastal basin, Cape Lookout Bight, and at general sites on the upper continental slope off North Carolina, U.S.A. In combination with 210 Pb sediment accumulation rates, these data were used to establish quantitative carbon and sulfur budgets as well as the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methanogeneis as the last steps in the degradation of organic matter.

  2. Pleistocene sediment offloading and the global sulfur cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Markovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary sea level fluctuations have greatly affected the sediment budgets of the continental shelves. Previous studies suggested that this caused a considerable increase in the net loss of shelf sediments. Since sediment accumulation and erosion are closely tied to the formation and re-oxidation of pyrite, we use a high resolution record of sulfur isotope ratios (34S / 32S of marine sulfate to evaluate the implications of the so called "shelf sediment offloading" on the global sulfur cycle. Modeling of our δ34S record suggests that erosion during sea level lowstands was only partly compensated by increased sedimentation during times of rising sea level and sea level highstands. Furthermore, our data suggests that shelf systems reached a new equilibrium state about 700 kyr ago, which considerably slowed or terminated shelf sediment offloading.

  3. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  4. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Alon; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Shaked, Yeala; Kiene, Ronald P.

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic emissions of volatile dimethyl sulfide (DMS) represent the largest natural source of biogenic sulfur to the global atmosphere, where it mediates aerosol dynamics. To constrain the contribution of oceanic DMS to aerosols we established the sulfur isotope ratios (34S/32S ratio, δ34S) of DMS and its precursor, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), in a range of marine environments. In view of the low oceanic concentrations of DMS/P, we applied a unique method for the analysis of δ34S at the picomole level in individual compounds. Surface water DMSP collected from six different ocean provinces revealed a remarkable consistency in δ34S values ranging between +18.9 and +20.3‰. Sulfur isotope composition of DMS analyzed in freshly collected seawater was similar to δ34S of DMSP, showing that the in situ fractionation between these species is small (<+1‰). Based on volatilization experiments, emission of DMS to the atmosphere results in a relatively small fractionation (−0.5 ± 0.2‰) compared with the seawater DMS pool. Because δ34S values of oceanic DMS closely reflect that of DMSP, we conclude that the homogenous δ34S of DMSP at the ocean surface represents the δ34S of DMS emitted to the atmosphere, within +1‰. The δ34S of oceanic DMS flux to the atmosphere is thus relatively constant and distinct from anthropogenic sources of atmospheric sulfate, thereby enabling estimation of the DMS contribution to aerosols. PMID:24167289

  5. Mobilization of sulfur by green sulfur bacteria : physiological and molecular studies on Chlorobaculum parvum DSM 263

    OpenAIRE

    Donà, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria are photolithotrophs that use inorganic sulfur compounds as electron donors for photosynthesis. Elemental, solid sulfur is one of the electron donors used. Sulfur is produced by green sulfur bacteria during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, and during the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfur and sulfate. Green sulfur bacteria have been known for long, and the genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced. Yet, it is not clear how green sulfur bacteria can access elemental s...

  6. Gender-Responsive Government Budgeting

    OpenAIRE

    Feridoun Sarraf

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of gender-responsive government budgeting, promoted in recent years by women's nongovernmental organizations, academia, and multilateral organizations, and the extent of its implementation by national governments in both advanced and developing countries. Owing to recently developed analytical and technical tools, government budget management systems in some countries can help promote gender equality-to the extent of government involvement in gender-sensitive s...

  7. Budget priorities of the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, V D

    1992-12-11

    Changes in the federal budget over the last several decades have raised current consumption at the expense of the investment needed for stronger economic growth. These changes have occurred in the budget's fiscal policy, which has reduced national saving and private investment; in its expenditure policy, which has emphasized short-term benefits rather than public investments; and in its transfer policy, which has not adequately addressed the increasing child poverty that threatens the productivity of our future labor force. PMID:17831654

  8. Voting behavior and budget stability

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Vicente; Ana-María Ríos; María-Dolores Guillamón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze how the implementation of the Budgetary Stability Law has affectedPolitical Budget Cycles generated by Spanish local governments. Specifically, we study whether the evolutionof debt, budget deficit, capital spending and current spending over the electoral cycle has changed after theintroduction of this law. We use a sample of 132 Spanish municipalities with more than 50,000 inhabitants(including the provincial capitals) during the period 1995‑2009. Our resu...

  9. US physics suffers budget setbacks

    CERN Multimedia

    Gwynne, Peter

    2007-01-01

    "The US has slashed funding for the International Linear Collider (ILC) by 75% as the budget for 2008 has been finally agreed between the Republican Bush Administration and Democratic Cngress. The new budget legislation, which US president George W. Bush is expected to signe by 31 December, will see up to 200 scientists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilag) lose their jobs." (2 pages)

  10. Budget variance analysis using RVUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, M F; Budzynski, M R

    1998-01-01

    This article details the use of the variance analysis as management tool to evaluate the financial health of the practice. A common financial tool for administrators has been a simple calculation measuring the difference between actual financials vs. budget financials. Standard cost accounting provides a methodology known as variance analysis to better understand the actual vs. budgeted financial streams. The standard variance analysis has been modified by applying relative value units (RVUs) as standards for the practice. PMID:10387247

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehhalt, D.; Prather, M.; Dentener, F.; Derwent, R.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Holland, E.; Isaksen, I.; Katima, J.; Kirchhoff, V.; Matson, P.; Midgley, P.; Wang, M.; Berntsen, T.; Bey, I.; Brasseur, G.; Buja, L.; Collins, W. J.; Daniel, J. S.; DeMore, W. B.; Derek, N.; Dickerson, R.; Etheridge, D.; Feichter, J.; Fraser, P.; Friedl, R.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Gauss, M.; Grenfell, L.; Grubler, Arnulf; Harris, N.; Hauglustaine, D.; Horowitz, L.; Jackman, C.; Jacob, D.; Jaegle, L.; Jain, Atul K.; Kanakidou, M.; Karlsdottir, S.; Ko, M.; Kurylo, M.; Lawrence, M.; Logan, J. A.; Manning, M.; Mauzerall, D.; McConnell, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Montzka, S.; Muller, J. F.; Olivier, J.; Pickering, K.; Pitari, G.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rogers, H.; Rognerud, B.; Smith, Steven J.; Solomon, S.; Staehelin, J.; Steele, P.; Stevenson, D. S.; Sundet, J.; Thompson, A.; van Weele, M.; von Kuhlmann, R.; Wang, Y.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wigley, T. M.; Wild, O.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Yantosca, R.; Joos, Fortunat; McFarland, M.

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 4 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 2414.1 Introduction 2434.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 2484.3 Projections of Future Emissions 2664.4 Projections of Atmospheric Composition for the 21st Century 2674.5 Open Questions 2774.6 Overall Impact of Global Atmospheric Chemistry Change 279

  12. Obtaining Sulfur from Sulfur Hexafluoride and Studying the Sulfur Isotopes Properties by Using Vibrational Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Egorov, Nikolai Borisovich; Akimov, Dmitry Vasilievich; Zhuravlev, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    Scheme of isotopically enriched SF[6] to elemental sulfur with orthorhombic modification conversion is offered. This scheme includes SF[6] reduction to Li2S by using lithium. The yield of isotopically enriched sulfur is not less than 97% with chemical purity not less than 99.9%. The results which show the dependence of the experimental frequencies in the vibrational spectra on the molecular weight of the sulfur isotope have been obtained.

  13. Improving the conversion efficiency of Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cell by low pressure sulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Su, Zhenghua; Zhao, Lianbo; Yan, Chang; Liu, Fangyang; Cui, Hongtao; Hao, Xiaojing; Liu, Yexiang

    2014-04-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films have been prepared by the sol-gel sulfurization method on Mo-coated substrates, and the comparative studies between the atmospheric pressure sulfurization and low pressure sulfurization was carried out. The Cu2ZnSnS4 film sulfurized at low pressure exhibits larger grain size, thinner MoS2 layer, and free of SnS secondary phase, but more ZnS on surface. The device efficiency of 4.1% using Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber from atmospheric pressure sulfurization is improved to 5.7% using that from low pressure sulfurization via the boost of open-circuit and fill factor.

  14. Interaction between atmospheric hydrogen sulfide deposition and pedospheric sulfate nutrition in Brassica oleracea L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, LJ; Westerman, S; Stuiver, CEE; Weidner, W; Stulen, I.; Grill, D

    2002-01-01

    Brassica oleracea L. is able to utilize H2S as sulfur source for growth and it can replace pedospheric sulfate as sulfur source. The foliage forms an active sink for atmospheric H2S, which is directly metabolized into cysteine and subsequently into other organic sulfur compounds. H2S exposure result

  15. 大气中碳氮硫化合物光化学反应的化学耦合作用%CHEMICAL COUPLING OF PHOTO-CHEMISTRY OF SOME CARBON NITROGEN SULFUR COMPOUNDS IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈济

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of O3,a typical photo-chemical product,and its chemical coup-ling has been studied with sensitivity analysis under a broad range of atmospheric conditions from remote ocean to heavily polluted area.The influential reactions for formation of O3 are pointed out.Under certain conditions the normalized sensitivity coefficients of O3 concentration with respect to some rate constants which reactions are very important for formation of O3 switch sign.This non-linearity phenomena cause more O3 formed by the chemical coupling of carbon and nitrogen compounds.The chemical coupling of some important photochemical products as O3,HNO3,HCHO,H2O2 with respect to DMS chemistry is weak in the atmosphere.%从遥远海洋到重污染地区,在很宽的大气条件下,用灵敏度分析法研究了光化学典型产物O3的形成机理及其化学耦合作用,指出了影响形成O3的重要反应,在一些条件下,O3浓度对一些重要化学反应的速率常数的归一化灵敏度系数异号,由于碳、氮化合物的化学耦合作用的非线性现象使O3生成增加.大气中一些重要的光化学产物如O3,HNO3,HCHO,H2O2等形成中,DMS的化学耦合是弱耦合

  16. The prevalence of Beyond Budgeting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandalgaard, Niels

      The annual budget has been criticised in recent years. The critics claim, among other things, that the annual budget is not suitable for today's business environment, that annual budgets stimulate dysfunctional behaviour and furthermore that the use of budgets is too costly. This paper examines...

  17. Russia’s State Budget in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey Belev; Tatiana Tischenko; Ilya Sokolov

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with 2012 Russia's state budget. Authors speak about general characteristics of the budget system in Russia. They analyse revenues from major taxes and main parameters of the federal budget in 2012 and for 2012-2014, explain budget expenditures and give prospects of the budgetary and tax policy in Russia..

  18. Top-down assessment of the Asian carbon budget since the mid 1990s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R.L.; Patra, P.K.; Chevallier, F.; Maksyutov, S.; Law, R.M.; Ziehn, T.; Laan-Luijkx, Van Der I.T.; Peters, W.; Ganshin, A.; Zhuravlev, R.; Maki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Shirai, T.; Ishizawa, M.; Saeki, T.; Machida, T.; Poulter, B.; Canadell, J.G.; Ciais, P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is the principal driver of anthropogenic climate change. Asia is an important region for the global carbon budget, with 4 of the world's 10 largest national emitters of CO2. Using an ensemble of seven atmospheric inverse systems, w

  19. Sulfur plant start-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Hank; Grigson, Susan [Ortloff Engineers Ltd. (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The authors discuss an Ortloff sulfur plant design concept using the Claus reaction that differs from accepted 'industry practice': cold reactor bed start-up. The process is designed to eliminate catalyst sulfation, heat damage and furnace overheating in sulfur recovery units. (UK)

  20. Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres II: H2S and SO2 Photochemistry in Anoxic Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Renyu; Bains, William

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur gases are common components in the volcanic and biological emission on Earth, and are expected to be important input gases for atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets. We study the atmospheric composition and the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets with sulfur compounds (i.e., H2S and SO2) emitted from their surfaces. We use a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry model and radiative transfer model to investigate the sulfur chemistry in atmospheres ranging from reducing to oxidizing. The most important finding is that both H2S and SO2 are chemically short-lived in virtually all types of atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets, based on models of H2, N2, and CO2 atmospheres. This implies that direct detection of surface sulfur emission is unlikely, as their surface emission rates need to be extremely high (>1000 times Earth's volcanic sulfur emission) for these gases to build up to a detectable level. We also find that sulfur compounds emitted from the surface lead to photochemical formation of element...

  1. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) may not measure all gas-phase sulfuric acid if base molecules are present

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2010-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. Using computed proton affinities and reaction thermodynamics for the relevant charging reactions, we show that in the presence of strong bases such as amines, which tend to cluster with the sulfuric acid molecules, a significant fraction of the total gas-phase sulfuric acid may not be measured by a CIMS instrument. If this is the c...

  2. Features of Budget Execution in Public Institutions’ Budgets Entirely Funded by Public and Local Budgets; Case Study in an Educational Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Budgeting, a set of steps taken by state competent bodies in order to materialize the financial policy applied by governmental authority, takes place in the following stages: setting out the budget statement, approving the budget, budget execution, budget execution completion, controlling and approving budget execution completion. Budget execution is described in specialized literature especially as a stage in the budgeting process in the components of the national public budget (public budge...

  3. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Kendall, Carol; Pribil, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S VCDT) of − 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ34S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil δ34S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls

  4. Energy, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    Global atmospheric changes due to ozone destruction and the greenhouse effect are discussed. The work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is reviewed, including its judgements regarding global warming and its recommendations for improving predictive capability. The chemistry of ozone destruction and the global atmospheric budget of nitrous oxide are reviewed, and the global sources of nitrous oxide are described.

  5. A Development of Ceramics Cylinder Type Sulfuric Acid Decomposer for Thermo-Chemical Iodine-Sulfur Process Pilot Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Fukui, Hiroshi; Ishino, Kazuo

    The hydrogen production method applying thermo-chemical Iodine-Sulfur process (IS process) which uses a nuclear high temperature gas cooled reactor is world widely greatly concerned from the view point of a combination as a clean method, free carbon dioxide in essence. In this process, it is essential a using ceramic material, especially SiC because a operation condition of this process is very corrosive due to a sulfuric acid atmosphere with high temperature and high pressure. In the IS process, a sulfuric acid decomposer is the key component which performs evaporating of sulfuric acid from liquid to gas and disassembling to SO2 gas. SiC was selected as ceramic material to apply for the sulfuric acid decomposer and a new type of binding material was also developed for SiC junction. This technology is expected to wide application not only for a sulfuric acid decomposer but also for various type components in this process. Process parameters were provided as design condition for the decomposer. The configuration of the sulfuric acid decomposer was studied, and a cylindrical tubes assembling type was selected. The advantage of this type is applicable for various type of components in the IS process due to manufacturing with using only simple shape part. A sulfuric acid decomposer was divided into two regions of the liquid and the gaseous phase of sulfuric acid. The thermal structural integrity analysis was studied for the liquid phase part. From the result of this analysis, it was investigated that the stress was below the strength of the breakdown probability 1/100,000 at any position, base material or junction part. The prototype model was manufactured, which was a ceramic portion in the liquid phase part, comparatively complicated configuration, of a sulfuric acid decomposer. The size of model was about 1.9m in height, 1.0m in width. Thirty-six cylinders including inlet and outlet nozzles were combined and each part article was joined using the new binder (slurry

  6. Martian meso/micro-scale winds and surface energy budget

    OpenAIRE

    Spiga, A.; Forget, F.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Montabone, L.; Millour, E.; Lewis, S. R.; Hinson, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Regional, diurnal and seasonal variations of surface temperature are particularly large on Mars. This is mostly due to the Martian surface remaining close to radiative equilibrium. Contrary to most terrestrial locations, contributions of sensible heat flux (i.e. conduction/convection exchanges between atmosphere and surface) to the surface energy budget [hereinafter SEB] are negligible on Mars owing to lowatmospheric density and heat capacity (e.g. Figure 2 in Savijärvi and Kauhanen, 2008)...

  7. A novel coal feeder for production of low sulfur fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.; Yu, X.L.

    1990-01-01

    A novel coal feeding system is currently undergoing testing and evaluation at the University of Cincinnati. The system consists primarily of an auger feed tube which is used to both convey and provide desulfurization of a high sulfur coal feedstock. The coal is conveyed at temperatures ranging from 350 to 550 {degrees}C and under normal atmospheric pressure. Under these mild processing conditions, the coal partially pyrolizes and emits sulfur in the form of hydrogen sulfide while maintaining a relatively high heating value in the char product. The evolved gases are evacuated from the reactor (the feed tube) to another absorbing bed where H{sub 2}S reacts with the sorbent, usually lime or limestone. The resultant sorbent utilization is substantially higher than the values found in current dry scrubbing system and the produced low-sulfur char may then be used in a conventional steam boiler.

  8. Chemisorption of sulfur on (100)Mo: growth of surface and volume sulfides, absolute calibration, thermodesorption of sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physico-chemical processes following the chemisorption of sulfur on (100)Mo, that is: growth of the surface and volume sulfides, their thermo-stability, variation of emission and catalytic properties of the surface are studied using high resolution (δ E/E ≤ 0.1%) EOS with recording of spectra directly from the specimen highly heated up to T = 2000 K. The work of yield and bound energy of sulfur atom depending on the level of Mo surface population by S atoms are determined. It is shown that Mo exposure in H2S atmosphere under T = 300-2000 K does not result in accumulation of S atoms within the specimen volume. The absolute concentration of sulfur atoms in the surface sulfide is determined and it is shown that its stoichiometry is MoS. 31 refs., 5 figs

  9. Atmospheric Wet Nitrogen and Sulfur Depositions of Fuzhou, Jian′ou and Wuyishan in Fujian%福州、建瓯和武夷山大气氮/硫湿沉降特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李爱萍; 黄广华; 高人; 马红亮; 章伟; 陈仕东; 杨智杰; 林捷; 郑群瑞

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall samples were collected in 2013 by automatic samplers of rainfall and settling parti- cle ( ASP-B, China) for Fuzhou, Jian′ou and Wuyishan in Fujian province, meanwhile pH values,ρ( NH4+ -N) , ρ ( ( NO3- -N) , ρ ( TN) , ρ ( SO2-4 -S) were analyzed, and atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur deposition fluxes and change patterns were investigated. In the three areas, the total rain-fall is respectively 1 188. 0 mm, 1 451. 1 mm and 2 423. 4 mm, with their average as 1 687. 5 mm;the yearly averaged rainwater pH values are 5. 80, 5. 37 and 5. 27. Neutral rainfall (5. 6福州>建瓯. 三地氮湿沉降以无机氮沉降为主, 且NH4+ -N较多. 硫沉降总量占氮、 硫沉降总量的百分比分别为63. 67%, 69. 31%, 75. 77%, 表明大气湿沉降是以SO2-4 -S为主.三地大气湿沉降NH4+ -N、 NO3- -N、 TN沉降通量的月变化趋势基本相似, 均在3、 4月份出现峰值, 三地大气SO2-4 -S沉降通量月变化差异较大, 峰值分别出现在6月、 4月、 5月, 可能与降雨强度和频次对氮、 硫沉降浓度的影响有关.

  10. Application of an online ion chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    In North America, the dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur deposition remains uncertain due to a lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent to develop complete annual mass budgets or of sufficient process level detail to improve current air-s...

  11. Budget deficits and public debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Student Ionut Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades, the budget deficit has become one of the characteristics of national economies. Furthermore, it finds its dimensions amplification. Despite this, more and more are the economists who dispute the need to balance the budget, arguing the need even the deficit and systematic use of in order to achieve economic equilibrium. Such guidance is substantiated by the need to promote an economic policy which ensures full use of resources and non-inflation economic growth.In these circumstances, balancing the budgest is clearly of secondary importance. In this context, it supported the need to increase expenditure at a pace faster than income growth and, implicitly , to keep budget deficits.

  12. Transfer characterization of sulfur from coal-burning emission to plant leaves by PIXE and XANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, L.M.; Zhang, G.L.; Zhang, Y.X.; Li, Y.; Lin, J.; Liu, W.; Cao, Q.C.; Zhao, Y.D.; Ma, C.Y.; Han, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics

    2009-11-15

    The impact of coal-burning emission on sulfur in camphor leaves was investigated using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and synchrotron radiation technique X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The PIXE results show that the sulfur concentrations in the leaves collected at the polluted site are significantly higher than those in controls. The sulfur XANES spectra show the presence of organic (disulfides, thiols, thioethers, sulfonates and sulfoxides) and inorganic sulfur (sulfates) in the leaves. The inorganic sulfur in the leaves of camphor tree polluted by coal combustion is 15% more than that of the control site. The results suggest that the long-term coal-burning pollution resulted in an enhanced content of the total sulfur and sulfate in the leaves, and the uptake of sulfur by leaves had exceeded the metabolic requirement of plants and the excess of sulfur was stored as SO{sub 4}2{sup -}. It can monitor the sulfur pollution in atmosphere.

  13. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perliski, Lori

    Because radiative transfer cuts across many scientific disciplines with applications including remote sensing, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and photobiology, there is a need for comprehensive books on this subject that can appeal to a wide readership. While Atmospheric Radiative Transfer takes strides toward filling this niche by addressing a broad range of topics, it is dry reading and suffers from lack of detail. The book was based on a graduate-level course taught at the University of Sciences and Technologies in Lille, France, and indeed, the text reads much like an expanded outline perhaps derived from lecture notes.Part one deals with general radiative transfer, and part two covers Earth's radiation budget, the climate system, and remote sensing techniques. The radiative transfer equation and solutions for absorbing and scattering atmospheres are discussed as are the details of absorption, such as energy levels, line strengths, line intensities, equivalent widths, and weak- and strong-line limits.

  14. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  15. Sulfur meter speeds coal blending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sulfur content has become the most important criterion that industry looks at when purchasing coal. The exact amount of sulfur in coal being processed by a preparation plant must be known and, if possible, controlled by blending coal streams of various sulfur contents. Present techniques, however, of measuring the sulfur in coal involve laborious and time-consuming sampling and chemical analysis (12 to 24 hr), and the results usually are not available until the following day. By then, the coal barges or trains are already on the way to their destinations. A new nuclear sulfur meter is expected to overcome these difficulties and help lead to true automation in coal preparation plants. Initially developed by the Bureau of Mines' Morgantown Energy Research Center (MERC) at Morgantown, W. Va., and completed after reorganization of the center by the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the meter can scan coal to produce a reading within 2 min to an accuracy of 0.04 percent sulfur. The meter is expected to soon result in an element-ash-moisture-Btu meter that would rapidly detect the sulfur, sodium, potassium, and overall mineral content of the coal, as well as its ash and Btu content

  16. Budget support, conditionality and poverty.

    OpenAIRE

    Mosley, P.; Suleiman, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of budget support aid as an anti-poverty instrument. We argue that a major determinant of this effectiveness is the element of trust – or `social capital´, as it may be seen – which builds up between representatives of the donor and recipient. Thus we model the conditionality processes attending budget support aid, not purely in the conventional way as a non-cooperative two-person game, but rather as a non-cooperative game which may mutate into a collabor...

  17. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  18. Arctic Budget Study of Inter-member Variability using HIRHAM5 Ensemble Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Nikiema, Oumarou; Rinke, Annette; Dethloff, Klaus; Laprise, Ren`e

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges in evaluating and applying atmospheric regional climate models (RCM) is the non-linear behavior of atmospheric processes, which is still not well understood. These non-linearities determine the internal variability in the model. Therefore, an ensemble of RCM simulations with different initial atmospheric conditions has been run and a diabatic budget study for potential temperature (Nikiema et al. 2010) has been applied to investigate the origin of internally generated va...

  19. An end-to-end model of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Earth-viewing nonscanning radiometric channels

    OpenAIRE

    Priestly, Kory James

    1993-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) active-cavity radiometers are used to measure the incoming solar, reflected solar, and emitted longwave radiation from the Earth and its atmosphere. The radiometers are carried by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft. Four Earth-viewing nonscanning active-cavity radiometers are carried by e...

  20. A new method for obtaining ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel via ultrasound assisted oxidative desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai Mei; B.W. Mei; Teh Fu Yen [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2003-03-01

    Due to the requirement of stringent rules for ultra-low sulfur content of diesel fuels, it is necessary to develop alternative methods for desulfurization of fossil fuel derived oil. Using appropriate oxidants and catalysts with the assistance of ultrasound irradiation, model compounds such as dibenzothiophene can be quantitatively oxidized in minutes. For diesel fuels containing various levels of sulfur content, and through the use of catalytic oxidation and ultrasonication followed by solvent extraction, removal efficiency of sulfur-bearing compounds can reach or exceed 99% in a short contact time at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. This simple approach can be the basis for obtaining ultra-low sulfur-containing diesel oil. GC-PFPD, GC MS, and GC-SIMDIS were used to monitor the change of organic sulfur compounds and hydrocarbons in diesels during the process. 35 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1997-12-31

    Based on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, a two dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the engine on the formation and growth of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols in the near field plume. The conversion of fuel sulfur to sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid in the engine is predicted to significantly increase the number density and surface area density of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols and the chemical activation of exhaust soot particulates. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of exhaust SO{sub x} emissions to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions. (author) 18 refs.; Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters

  2. pH variation mechanism of high sulfur-containing bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴华; 胡岳华; 李旺兴; 陈湘清; 曹学锋

    2015-01-01

    In order to fundamentally solve the acidification problem of high sulfur-containing bauxite during storage, by simulating the environment of minerals storage in laboratory, the acidification mechanism and influencing factors of high sulfur-containing bauxite were studied and confirmed using the single variable method to control the atmosphere, water and other variables. The results show that the acidification is mostly caused by the oxidation of sulfur-containing bauxite, which is mainly the natural oxidation of Pyrite (FeS2), then the alkaline minerals dissolute in the presence of water, leading to the acidification phenomenon, which is influenced by moisture and air flow. Finally, more acid-producing substances are formed, resulting in the acidification of high sulfur-containing bauxite. The acidification of high sulfur-containing bauxite results from the combined effect of the oxygen in the air and water, which can be significantly alleviated by controlling the diffusion of the oxygen in air.

  3. 46 CFR 148.04-20 - Sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.04-20 Section 148.04-20 Shipping COAST GUARD... Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-20 Sulfur. (a) When sulfur is loaded in a deep hold with general cargo in the 'tween deck hold above the sulfur, a dust proof wooden...

  4. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  5. The Era of Budget Hotels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    What began as an idea from an Internet posting is now set to sweep through China Asingle posting on the Internet gave birth to a large budget hotel brand.In 2001, the founder of ctrip.com, Ji Qi, noticed an online friend com-plaining that ctrip.com’s hotel reser-

  6. Kollektiivne vastutus ja gender budgeting

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Vestlusringi teemad: riigieelarve koostamisel ei arvestata soolist võrdõiguslikkust; gender budgeting kui üks soolise võrdõiguslikkuse jälgimise viise; vabaabielu võib osutuda naisele palju ebasoodsamaks kui mehele; kogukonna kollektiivne vastutus perevägivalla korral. Vt. samas: Aasta 2004 suurte mõtlejate auhinnad

  7. Programme Budgets for Graduate Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelquist, Claes G.; And Others

    The development of a methodological framework for planning, programming, and budgeting which is specific to graduate training and research activities at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden is described. This pilot project is regarded as a step towards developing and implementing a generalized approach to an output-oriented finance…

  8. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  9. For sale: Sulfur emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The allowance trading market has started a slow march to maturity. Competitive developers should understand the risks and opportunities now presented. The marketplace for sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions allowances - the centerpiece of Title 4's acid rain reduction program - remains enigmatic 19 months after the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 were passed. Yet it is increasingly clear that the emission allowance market will likely confound the gloom and doom of its doubters. The recently-announced $10 million dollar Wisconsin Power and Light allowance sales to Duquesne Light and the Tennessee Valley Authority are among the latest indications of momentum toward a stabilizing market. This trend puts additional pressure on independent developers to finalize their allowance strategies. Developers who understand what the allowance trading program is and what it is not, know the key players, and grasp the unresolved regulatory issues will have a new competitive advantage. The topics addressed in this article include the allowance marketplace, marketplace characteristics, the regulatory front, forward-looking strategies, and increasing marketplace activity

  10. Sulfur dioxide scrubbing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlstrom, D.A.; Cornell, C.F.

    1976-11-02

    Sulfur dioxide is scrubbed from stack gases in an absorption device by a sodium-based aqueous scrubbing solution, a portion of which is subsequently and continuously regenerated outside the absorption apparatus by a causticizing reaction with slaked lime. The causticized solution is routed through a settling device wherefrom a portion of the aqueous sediment is returned to the causticizing zone to provide seed crystals which encourage the formation of larger sized solid particles; also, a portion of the aqueous sediment from the settling device is continuously mechanically dewatered and then removed from the system. The liquid effluent solution from the settling device is passed to a solids-contacting and reaction device for mixing with sodium carbonate in order to reduce the calcium ion concentration and the solids content of the solution. The underflow of the solids-contacting device is conveyed back to the causticizing zone and the clarified overflow, i.e., the regenerated scrubbing liquor, is conveyed to the absorption apparatus.

  11. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  12. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  13. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  14. Dazhou Becomes China's Sulfur Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang He

    2008-01-01

    @@ Located at the juncture of Sichuan, Hubei, Shaanxi provinces and Chongqing municipality, Dazhou,which is a city in the eastem part of Southwest China's Sichuan Province and has convenient transport facilities, boasts natural gas reserves of 3.8 trillion cubic meters, of which 660 billion cubic meters have been found. It will make full use of its natural gas reserves to build Asia's largest sulfur producing base by 2010 when its annual sulfur output is expected to surpass 4 million tons.

  15. Growth of Sulfuric Acid Nanoparticles at Wet and Dry Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Škrabalová, L. (Lenka); Brus, D.; V. Ždímal; Lihavainen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol particles influence global radiative balance and climate directly through scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by acting as condensation cloud nuclei. The atmospheric nucleation is often followed by a rapid growth of freshly formed particles. The initial growth of aerosol is the crucial process determining the fraction of nucleated particles growing into cloud condensation nuclei sizes (~ 50 nm and larger). Many recent studies have suggested that the sulfuric acid ...

  16. High-resolution quadruple sulfur isotope analyses of 3.2 Ga pyrite from the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa reveal distinct environmental controls on sulfide isotopic arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, D.L.; Mason, P.R.D.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Reimer, T.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes in Paleoarchean pyrite record valuable information on atmospheric processes and emerging microbial activity in the early sulfur cycle. Here, we report quadruple sulfur isotope data (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry from pyrite in a 3.26–3.23 Ga

  17. Do oceanic emissions account for the missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Sinikka; Marandino, Christa A.; von Hobe, Marc; Cortés, Pau; Simó, Rafel; Booge, Dennis; Quack, Birgit; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Ksionzek, Kerstin; Koch, Boris P.; Bracher, Astrid; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has a large potential to constrain terrestrial gross primary production (GPP), one of the largest carbon fluxes in the carbon cycle, as it is taken up by plants in a similar way as CO2. To estimate GPP in a global approach, the magnitude and seasonality of sources and sinks of atmospheric OCS have to be well understood, to distinguish between seasonal variation caused by vegetation uptake and other sources or sinks. However, the atmospheric budget is currently highly uncertain, and especially the oceanic source strength is debated. Recent studies suggest that a missing source of several hundreds of Gg sulfur per year is located in the tropical ocean by a top-down approach. Here, we present highly-resolved OCS measurements from two cruises to the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean as a bottom-up approach. The results from these cruises show that opposite to the assumed ocean source, direct emissions of OCS from the tropical ocean are unlikely to account for the missing source. To reduce uncertainty in the global oceanic emission estimate, our understanding of the production and consumption processes of OCS and its precursors, dimethylsulfide (DMS) and carbon disulphide (CS2), needs improvement. Therefore, we investigate the influence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the photochemical production of OCS in seawater by considering analysis of the composition of DOM from the two cruises. Additionally, we discuss the potential of oceanic emissions of DMS and CS2 to closing the atmospheric OCS budget. Especially the production and consumption processes of CS2 in the surface ocean are not well known, thus we evaluate possible photochemical or biological sources by analyzing its covariation of biological and photochemical parameters.

  18. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered. PMID:26706053

  19. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    L. Rondo; Flagan, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantita...

  20. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    OpenAIRE

    Laakso, A.; H. Kokkola; A.-I. Partanen; Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hakkarainen, H.; Korhonen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an earth system model to study the radiative and climate impacts of an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM). According to our simulations, the radiativ...

  1. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    OpenAIRE

    Laakso, A.; H. Kokkola; Partanen, A.-I.; Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hakkarainen, H.; Korhonen, H.

    2016-01-01

    Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate changes occurring after an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM). According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruptio...

  2. Intercontinental transport of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide and other pollutants: An infrared remote sensing case study

    OpenAIRE

    Clarisse, Lieven; Fromm, Michael; Ngadi, Yasmine; Emmons, Louisa; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hurtmans, Daniel; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2011-01-01

    International audience Using 3 years worth of IASI (the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer aboard METOP-A) measurements, we have identified 24 major events of uplift and transport of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide. These were all first observed over East Asia, and could be traced for over 60 hours. On 7 November 2010 a sulfur dioxide plume was observed over Northeast China and tracked for five days to North America. We discuss this event in detail with respect to build up; uplift an...

  3. President's Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Executive Office of the President — Each year, after the President's State of the Union address, the Office of Management and Budget releases the Administration's Budget, offering proposals on key...

  4. Budget estimates, fiscal years 1994--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal years 1994 and 1995

  5. Sulfur fluxes and isotopic compositions of the major rivers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Lang, Y.; Tian, L.; Ding, H.; Strauss, H.; Zhao, Z.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Hu, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfur is widely distributed in the environment by volcanism, volatile emissions, precipitation, acid mine drainage and anthropogenic activity. Since the industrial revolution, the atmospheric sulfur cycle has been dominated by anthropogenic sources. Combustion of sulfur-containing fossil fuels release large quantities of sulfur dioxide into Earth's atmosphere annually. The cycling of sulfur, among those of many elements, is seriously disturbed by human activities at the earth's surface. Therefore, it is important to obtain a better understanding of sources and cycling processes of sulfur in river basins. For this purpose, we have measured the sulfur isotope composition of sulfate and its concentration for Changjiang (Yangtze River), Huanghe (Yellow River), Liaohe (Liao River), and Songhuajiang (Songhua River) in China. The sulfate fluxes of the major rivers in southern China are significantly larger as compared with the rivers in northern China. Sulfur isotopic compositions (δ34S) of sulfate in the rivers do not show a variation trend from southern to northern China. The sulfate δ34S values are 4.3‰~9.8‰ for Changjiang, 5.0‰~10.0‰ for most of river waters of Huanghe, and 2.0‰~27.0‰ for Songhuajiang. For Zhujiang (Pearl River), three sulfate δ34S values are from 1.0‰~6.9‰. The coal produced in southern China is generally of lower δ34S values as compared with that in northern China. The distributions of the sulfate δ34S values of the river waters of are generally lower in southern China, showing the contribution of atmospheric deposition of sulfur into the river water. Three main sources, atmospheric deposition (mostly anthropogenic), dissolution of sulfate evaporate, oxidation of sulfide minerals and/or sulfur-containing organic matter in soil, have been recognized for the sulfate in the rivers. Relative contributions of the different sulfur sources into the sulfate of the rivers are different, suggesting that sulfur cycling in the different

  6. Budget update: Future is looking gloomier for science

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the wheels of the new Republican-controlled Congress have been turning, it looks like belts are indeed going to be tighter around U.S. research and development budgets. In mid-March, the House Budget Committee voted to cut $100 billion over the next five years from federal agency budgets and published guidelines for how this could be done. NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Geological Survey were again mentioned as potential targets and so was the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. If the reduction bill goes the legislative mile, the appropriations committees in each house of Congress will have to figure out where the cuts will fall. Republican and Democratic members of the House Science Committee quickly jumped into the traditional fray with their respective “Views and Estimates” on how science dollars should be doled out for fiscal year 1996. President Clinton has also jumped in the budget-cutting game with the release last week of a plan to cut $13 billion from four federal agencies over the next 5 years. In the meantime, a rescission bill for FY 1995 has been on the fast track through Congress. Here are some of the latest highlights:

  7. A Punctuated Equilibrium in French Budgeting Processes

    OpenAIRE

    B. Baumgartner, Frank; Foucault, Martial; François, Abel

    2006-01-01

    We use data on French budgeting to test models of friction, incrementalism and punctuated equilibrium. Data include the overall state budget since 1820; ministerial budgets for seven ministries since 1868; and a more complete ministerial series covering ten ministries since 1947. Our results in every case are remarkably similar to the highly leptokurtic distributions that Jones and Baumgartner (2005) demonstrated in US budgeting processes. This suggests that general characteristics of adminis...

  8. Advertising budgeting practices of Belgian industrial marketers.

    OpenAIRE

    François, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The author reports on the results of a survey of a random sample of 102 belgian industrial companies, which measured which budget setting processes companies use, how they set budgets and the resulting budget composition. The objective of the study was first to compare the results with international practice, and second to try to explain their budgeting practices as a function of company, product and market characteristics measured in the same survey. The major conclusions are mixed : on the ...

  9. BUDGETING IMPLICATIONS IN "HEALTHY"FINANCIAL PLANS

    OpenAIRE

    SOLOVASTRU, Alina

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this section is the budget - a plan expressed in financial terms - and why it is important for your activity and the organization. An organization uses budgets in different ways as part of its systems planning, information, performance measurement and control. The impact of budgets in these systems is important. In this section we will see how budgets acquire meanings if are interpreted in terms of organizational objectives, culture management and staff. This section seeks to c...

  10. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

  11. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level

  12. The European aerosol budget in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J. Aan de Brugh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the aerosol budget over Europe in 2006 calculated with the global transport model TM5 coupled to the size-resolved aerosol module M7. Comparison with ground observations indicates that the model reproduces the observed concentrations quite well with an expected slight underestimation of PM10 due to missing emissions (e.g. resuspension. We model that a little less than half of the anthropogenic aerosols emitted in Europe are exported and the rest is removed by deposition. The anthropogenic aerosols are removed mostly by rain (95% and only 5% is removed by dry deposition. For the larger natural aerosols, especially sea salt, a larger fraction is removed by dry processes (sea salt: 70%, mineral dust: 35%. We model transport of aerosols in the jet stream in the higher atmosphere and an import of Sahara dust from the south at high altitudes. Comparison with optical measurements shows that the model reproduces the Ångström parameter very well, which indicates a correct simulation of the aerosol size distribution. However, we underestimate the aerosol optical depth. Because the surface concentrations are close to the observations, the shortage of aerosol in the model is probably at higher altitudes. We show that the discrepancies are mainly caused by an overestimation of wet-removal rates. To match the observations, the wet-removal rates have to be scaled down by a factor of about 5. In that case the modelled ground-level concentrations of sulphate and sea salt increase by 50% (which deteriorates the match, while other components stay roughly the same. Finally, it is shown that in particular events, improved fire emission estimates may significantly improve the ability of the model to simulate the aerosol optical depth. We stress that discrepancies in aerosol models can be adequately analysed if all models would provide (regional aerosol budgets, as presented in the current study.

  13. Sulfur dioxide oxidation induced mechanistic branching and particle formation during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Philip T. M.; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian C.; Maaß, Mona-C.; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the reaction of stabilised Criegee Intermediates (CIs) with sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), leading to the formation of a carbonyl compound and sulfur trioxide, is a relevant atmospheric source of sulfuric acid. Here, the significance of this pathway has been examined by studying the formation of gas phase products and aerosol during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene in the presence of SO(2) in the pressure range of 10 to 1000 mbar. For β-pinene at atmospheric...

  14. Teaching Budget Cuts to Third Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dale

    2011-01-01

    As a teacher in the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) for the past 16 years, this author has grown used to dismal budget cut news arriving each February. Although cuts are always frustrating and their results burdensome, his school has been able to "hang on" reasonably well. This year, however, the budget cuts were extreme. The school's budget was…

  15. Planning to Communicate: A Budget Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereef, Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Failing to have a plan to communicate with stakeholders during the budget process is a plan to fail. Without community support, getting budget approval can be difficult. Thus, school business officials must have a plan to ensure the appropriate budget message is conveyed throughout all communication channels. In fact, a communication plan is the…

  16. Earth Radiation Budget Research at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. Louis; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s research studies concentrating on satellite measurements of Earth's radiation budget started at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that beginning, considerable effort has been devoted to developing measurement techniques, data analysis methods, and time-space sampling strategies to meet the radiation budget science requirements for climate studies. Implementation and success of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was due to the remarkable teamwork of many engineers, scientists, and data analysts. Data from ERBE have provided a new understanding of the effects of clouds, aerosols, and El Nino/La Nina oscillation on the Earth's radiation. CERES spacecraft instruments have extended the time coverage with high quality climate data records for over a decade. Using ERBE and CERES measurements these teams have created information about radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and throughout the atmosphere for a better understanding of our climate. They have also generated surface radiation products for designers of solar power plants and buildings and numerous other applications

  17. Teaching the Federal Budget, National Debt, and Budget Deficit: Findings from High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Anand R.; Ahn, Meesuk; Crocco, Margaret Smith; Grolnick, Maureen; Gaudelli, William; Walker, Erica N.

    2011-01-01

    The issues surrounding the federal budget, national debt, and budget deficit are complex, but not beyond the reach of young students. This study finds scant treatment of the federal budget, national debt, and budget deficit in high schools today. It is hardly surprising that high school teachers spend so little time discussing these topics in…

  18. Another Source of Atmospheric Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于心科

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane is steadily increasin.Lacking of precise estimates of source and sink strengths for the atmospheric methane severely limits the current understanding of the global methane cycle.Agood budget of atmospheric methane can enhance our understanding of the global carbon cycle and global climate change,The known estimates of the main source and sink strengths are gresented in this paper,In terms of carbon isotopic studies,it is evidenced that the earth's primodial methane,which was trapped in the earth during its formation,may be another source of methane,with extensive,earth's degassing which is calleld the "breathing" process of the earth and played an important role in the formation of the promitive atmosphere,large amounts of methane were carried from the deep interior to the surface and then found its way into the atmosphere.

  19. Volcanoes and atmospheres; catastrophic influences on the planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    For a rare and brief instant in geologic time, we can imagine that the sulfurous, chromatic surface of Io (one of the satellites of Jupiter) lies quiet. Perhaps stars glisten brilliantly through the tenuous nigh sky. Here and there, thick icy fogs enshroud fumaroles where sulfur dioxide leaks from the underworld. Suddenly, a fissure splits the surface and billowing clouds of sulfurous gases and ice hurl orange and black ash into the atmosphere. Minute by minute, the intensity of the eruption builds; stars begin disappearing from the night sky. The rising plume inhales the nearby atmosphere, mixing it with the exhalations from the volcano. Particles of sulfur, sulfur dioxide snow and ash rise to 300 kilometers, later raining down across the planet a thousand kilometers away. 

  20. Application of an online ion-chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Walker, John T.

    2016-06-01

    The dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur atmospheric deposition remains uncertain. The lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent make it difficult to develop accurate mass budgets and sufficient process level detail is not available to improve current air-surface exchange models. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of continuous air sampling measurement techniques, resulting with instruments of sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to directly quantify air-surface exchange of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. However, their applicability is generally restricted to only one or a few of the compounds within the deposition budget. Here, the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA 2S), a commercially available online ion-chromatography-based analyzer is characterized for the first time as applied for air-surface exchange measurements of HNO3, NH3, NH4+, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-. Analytical accuracy and precision are assessed under field conditions. Chemical concentrations gradient precision are determined at the same sampling site. Flux uncertainty measured by the aerodynamic gradient method is determined for a representative 3-week period in fall 2012 over a grass field. Analytical precision and chemical concentration gradient precision were found to compare favorably in comparison to previous studies. During the 3-week period, percentages of hourly chemical concentration gradients greater than the corresponding chemical concentration gradient detection limit were 86, 42, 82, 73, 74 and 69 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. As expected, percentages were lowest for aerosol species, owing to their relatively low deposition velocities and correspondingly smaller gradients relative to gas phase species. Relative hourly median flux uncertainties were 31, 121, 42, 43, 67 and 56 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. Flux

  1. Observational Constraints on the Global Budget of Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, V.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Singh, H. B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Guenther, A. B.; de Gouw, J.; Millet, D.; Levy, H.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ethanol, an oxygenated volatile organic compound (OVOC), is used extensively as a motor fuel and fuel additive to promote clean combustion. Ethanol can affect the oxidizing capacity and the ozone-forming potential of the atmosphere. Limited available atmospheric observations suggest a global background atmospheric ethanol mixing ratio of about 20 pptv, with values up to 3 ppbv near source regions; however, the atmospheric distribution and budget of ethanol remain poorly understood. Here, we use the global three-dimensional chemical transport model MOZART-4 to investigate the global ethanol distribution and budget, and place constraints on the budget by evaluating the model with atmospheric observations. We implement a global ethanol source of 14.7 Tg yr-1 in the model consisting of biogenic emissions (9.2 Tg yr-1), industrial/anthropogenic emissions (3.2 Tg yr-1), emissions from biofuels (1.8 Tg yr-1), biomass burning emissions (0.5 Tg yr-1), and a secondary source from atmospheric production (0.056 Tg yr-1). Gas-phase oxidation by the hydroxyl radical accounts for 66% of the global sink of ethanol in the model, dry deposition 9%, and wet scavenging 25%. The simulation yields a global mean ethanol burden of 0.11 Tg and an atmospheric lifetime of 3 days. The simulated boundary layer mean ethanol concentrations underestimate observations from field campaigns over the United States by 50%, downwind of Asia by 76% and over the remote Pacific Ocean by 86%. Because of the short lifetime of ethanol, the model discrepancy over remote tropical regions cannot be attributed to an underestimate of surface emissions over continents. In these regions, the dominant model source is secondary atmospheric production, from the reaction of the ethyl peroxy radical (C2H5O2) either with itself or with the methyl peroxy radical (CH3O2). A ~500-fold increase in this diffuse source (to ~30 Tg yr-1) distributed uniformly throughout the troposphere would largely correct the observation

  2. The global carbon budget 1959–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessments of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the climate policy process, and project future climate change. Present-day analysis requires the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. Here we describe datasets and a methodology developed by the global carbon cycle science community to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, and methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF are based on energy statistics, while emissions from Land-Use Change (ELUC, including deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land cover change data, fire activity in regions undergoing deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM is computed from the concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. Finally, the global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND is estimated by the difference of the other terms. For the last decade available (2002–2011, EFF was 8.3 ± 0.4 PgC yr−1, ELUC 1.0 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1PgC yr−1, SOCEAN 2.5 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, and SLAND 2.6 ± 0.8 PgC yr−1. For year 2011 alone, EFF was 9.5 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, 3.0 percent above 2010, reflecting a continued trend in these emissions; ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, approximately constant throughout the decade; GATM was 3.6 ± 0.2 PgC yr−1, SOCEAN was 2.7 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 PgC yr−1. GATM was low in 2011

  3. Advertising Budget Allocation under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan M. Holthausen, Jr.; Gert Assmus

    1982-01-01

    This article presents a model for the allocation of an advertising budget to geographic market segments, or territories, when the sales response to advertising in each segment is characterized by a probability distribution. It is shown that allocation decisions that are based on the expected sales response may be associated with a relatively large degree of risk and, therefore, non-optimal to a risk-averse manager. The model derives an "efficient frontier" in terms of the expected profit and ...

  4. The Montana 2015 Biennium Budget

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Jeffrey; DeSoto, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Newly elected Democratic Governor Steve Bullock called for investing in Main Street, investing more in Montana’s education system, creating health care solutions that improve access for Montanans, and bringing high paying jobs to the state. The governor achieved few of his goals but the legislature did produce a balanced budget that addressed a variety of issues including Montana’s poorly funded state pension system, increased spending in a number of functional areas, provided $110 million in...

  5. Five countries pioneering accrual budgeting and accounting in central government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dees, M.; Neelissen, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    In its 2001 Budget Memorandum, the Dutch government announced that accrual budgeting and accounting would replace the current obligation-cash budgeting and accounting system in ministerial budgets and accounts in several years’ time.

  6. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  7. Innovative Concepts of Budgeting in the Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Bąk

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the current concepts of budgeting with the special focus on innovative budgets. It includes the evolution of the budgeting concept starting from the traditional one which was applied in the second half of the 20th Century and assumed the budget as the main tool for the achievement of company’s goals. The next presented method is Better Budgeting. It arouse at the nineties as the resposne for the critics of the traditional method which was accused for the fixed assumptions which were no longer matching with the fast changing competitive environment. This method assumed the high level of budget preparation as he opposite to the detailed level as well as shorter planning period. The Beyond Budgeting was the most radical method and eliminated budget as the tool supporting the management; the concept has been used from the nineties until today, by more than seventy multinational companies from beyond budgeting round table. However, Beyond Budgeting was also criticised for not being applied in the industrial sector and too theoretical approach. Therefore, Ronald Gleicha from European Business School, established a working group, which icludes the scientists and managers, in order to create by mid of 2009, the new and opitimal method, which is called Modern Budgeting.

  8. Soft Budget Constraints in Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    A soft budget constraint arises when a government is unable to commit to not 'bailout' a public hospital if the public hospital exhausts its budget before the end of the budget period. It is shown that if the political costs of a 'bailout' are relatively small, then the public hospital exhausts the welfare-maximising budget before the end of the budget period and a 'bailout' occurs. In anticipation, the government offers a budget to the public hospital that may be greater than or less than the welfare-maximising budget. In either case, the public hospital treats 'too many' elective patients before the 'bailout' and 'too few' after. The introduction of a private hospital reduces the size of any 'bailout' and increases welfare. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25740723

  9. Atmospheric chemistry of organic sulfur and nitrogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work carried out during the first year of a four year Danish-Irish contract with the European Economic Community is described. The reactions of OH radicals with dialkyl sulfides and nitroalkanes have been studied applying both an absolute technique of pulse radiolysis with kinetic spectroscopy and a relative rate method using conventional smog chamber facilities. The reactions of OH with dimethyl sulfide and nitromethane have been investigated in special detail. Rate constants for reaction of Cl atoms with the same compounds have been determing using the relative rate method. (author)

  10. Sulfur isotopic ratio of DMS and DMSP from Lake Kinneret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Adler, Michal; Said-Ahmad, Ward; Eckert, Werner; Kamyshny, Alexey; Sivan, Orit; Amrani, Alon

    2014-05-01

    Volatile Organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) such as dimethylsulfide (DMS) are an important source of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere. The main precursor of DMS is dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a common osmolyte in marine algae. Atmospheric release of VOS compounds contributes to the formation of sulfate aerosols. The latter are of global importance due to their role as cloud-condensation nuclei. VOSC are abundant in terrestrial environments as well and may be involved in important biogeochemical cycles. In lake sediments, another mechanism for the formation of DMS by H2S methylation may be important. The 34S/32S ratio (d34S values) of DMSP of marine surface water around the globe is very homogeneous ranging between +18.9 o to +20.3 o and the fractionation between DMSP and DMS is algae by using sulfur isotope ratios. Water column samples and sediment samples from Lake Kinneret were purged and trap in order to extract the VOSC and then introduced to a GC/MC-ICPMS for isotopic measurements (Amrani et al. 2013). The δ34S of DMSP in the water and sediment columns of Lake Kinneret a mesotrophic monomictic lake were measured. Our preliminary results show δ34S values for DMSP ranged between +10.3 o and +13.4 o in the water column. The sulfate δ34S values ranged between +12.6 o to +14.9 o. δ34S -DMSP in the sediment column showed similar values between +9.4 o and +13.0 o, indicating a similar sulfur source. Similar δ34S values obtain for other VOSC such as ethanethiol that contributes significantly to the VOSC of Lake Kinneret sediments. Amrani, A., W. Said-Ahmad,Y. Shaked, and R. P. Kiene. 2013. Sulfur isotopes homogeneity of oceanic DMSP and DMS. PNAS 110(46):18413-18418. Oduro, H., Kamyshny, A. Jr.,W. Guo, and J. Farquhar. 2011. Multiple sulfur isotopes analysis of volatile organic sulfur compounds and their sulfonium precursors in marine coastal environments. Marine Chemistry 124:78-89.

  11. Global model simulations of the impact of ocean-going ships on aerosols, clouds, and the radiation budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, A.; Eyring, V.; Hendricks, J.; Jöckel, P.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-07-01

    International shipping contributes significantly to the fuel consumption of all transport related activities. Specific emissions of pollutants such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) per kg of fuel emitted are higher than for road transport or aviation. Besides gaseous pollutants, ships also emit various types of particulate matter. The aerosol impacts the Earth's radiation budget directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation and indirectly by changing cloud properties. Here we use ECHAM5/MESSy1-MADE, a global climate model with detailed aerosol and cloud microphysics, to show that emissions from ships significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration of low maritime water clouds. Whereas the cloud liquid water content remains nearly unchanged in these simulations, effective radii of cloud droplets decrease, leading to cloud optical thickness increase up to 5-10%. The sensitivity of the results is estimated by using three different emission inventories for present day conditions. The sensitivity analysis reveals that shipping contributes with 2.3% to 3.6% to the total sulfate burden and 0.4% to 1.4% to the total black carbon burden in the year 2000. In addition to changes in aerosol chemical composition, shipping increases the aerosol number concentration, e.g. up to 25% in the size range of the accumulation mode (typically >0.1 μm) over the Atlantic. The total aerosol optical thickness over the Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Northeastern Pacific increases up to 8-10% depending on the emission inventory. Changes in aerosol optical thickness caused by the shipping induced modification of aerosol particle number concentration and chemical composition lead to a change of the net top of the atmosphere (ToA) clear sky radiation of about -0.013 W/m2 to -0.036 W/m2 on global annual average. The estimated all-sky direct aerosol effect calculated from these changes ranges between -0.009 W/m2 and -0.014 W/m2. The indirect aerosol effect of ships

  12. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  13. Venus lower atmospheric composition - Analysis by gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, V. I.; Carle, G. C.; Woeller, F.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The first gas chromatographic analysis of the lower atmosphere of Venus is reported. Three atmospheric samples were analyzed. The third of these samples showed carbon dioxide (96.4 percent), molecular nitrogen (3.41 percent), water vapor (0.135 percent), molecular oxygen (69.3 ppm), argon (18.6 ppm), neon (4.31 ppm), and sulfur dioxide (186 ppm). The amounts of water vapor and sulfur dioxide detected are roughly compatible with the requirements of greenhouse models of the high surface temperature of Venus. The large positive gradient of sulfur dioxide, molecular oxygen, and water vapor from the cloud tops to their bottoms, as implied by Earth-based observations and these results, gives added support for the presence of major quantities of aqueous sulfuric acid in the clouds. A comparison of the inventory of inert gases found in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars suggests that these components are due to outgassing from the planetary interiors.

  14. Monoclinic sulfur cathode utilizing carbon for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Chul; Han, Young-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries have been designed to be combined with conductive carbon because the insulating nature of sulfur causes low active material utilization and poor rate capability. This paper is the first to report that carbon can induce a phase transition in a sulfur cathode. The stable form of a sulfur crystal at ambient temperature is orthorhombic sulfur. We found that monoclinic sulfur becomes more stable than orthorhombic sulfur if carbon atoms penetrate into the sulfur at elevated temperatures and the carbon density exceeds a threshold of C0.3S8. The high stability of the carbon-containing monoclinic sulfur persists during lithiation and is attributed to locally formed linear SC3S chains with marked stability. This study provides a novel perspective on the role of carbon in the sulfur cathode and suggests control of the crystal phase of electrodes by composite elements as a new way of designing efficient electrode materials.

  15. Photoreductive degradation of sulfur hexafluoride in the presence of styrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is known as one of the most powerful greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Reductive photodegradation of SM6 by styrene has been studied with the purpose of developing a novel remediation for sulfur hexafluoride pollution. Effects of reaction conditions on the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6 are examined in this study. Both initial styrene-to-SF6 ratio and initial oxygen concentration exert a significant influence on DRE. SF6 removal efficiency reaches a maximum value at the initial styrene-to-SF6 ratio of 0.2. It is found that DRE increases with oxygen concentration over the range of 0 to 0.09 mol/m3 and then decreases with increasing oxygen concentration. When water vapor is fed into the gas mixture, DRE is slightly enhanced over the whole studied time scale. The X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis, prove that nearly all the initial fluorine residing in the gas phase is in the form of SiF4, whereas, the initial sulfur is deposited in the form of elemental sulfur, after photodegradation. Free from toxic byproducts, photodegradation in the presence of styrene may serve as a promising technique for SF6 abatement.

  16. Photoreductive degradation of sulfur hexafluoride in the presence of styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Gu, Dinghong; Yang, Longyu; Xia, Lanyan; Zhang, Renxi; Hou, Huiqi

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is known as one of the most powerful greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Reductive photodegradation of SF6 by styrene has been studied with the purpose of developing a novel remediation for sulfur hexafluoride pollution. Effects of reaction conditions on the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6 are examined in this study. Both initial styrene-to-SF6 ratio and initial oxygen concentration exert a significant influence on DRE. SF6 removal efficiency reaches a maximum value at the initial styrene-to-SF6 ratio of 0.2. It is found that DRE increases with oxygen concentration over the range of 0 to 0.09 mol/m3 and then decreases with increasing oxygen concentration. When water vapor is fed into the gas mixture, DRE is slightly enhanced over the whole studied time scale. The X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis, prove that nearly all the initial fluorine residing in the gas phase is in the form of SiF4, whereas, the initial sulfur is deposited in the form of elemental sulfur, after photodegradation. Free from toxic byproducts, photodegradation in the presence of styrene may serve as a promising technique for SF6 abatement. PMID:18574959

  17. The global carbon budget 1959–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Le Quéré

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the climate policy process, and project future climate change. Present-day analysis requires the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. Here we describe datasets and a methodology developed by the global carbon cycle science community to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, and methodology and data limitations. Based on energy statistics, we estimate that the global emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion and cement production were 9.5 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1 in 2011, 3.0 percent above 2010 levels. We project these emissions will increase by 2.6% (1.9–3.5% in 2012 based on projections of Gross World Product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the economy. Global net CO2 emissions from Land-Use Change, including deforestation, are more difficult to update annually because of data availability, but combined evidence from land cover change data, fire activity in regions undergoing deforestation and models suggests those net emissions were 0.9 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1 in 2011. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and reached 391.38 ± 0.13 ppm at the end of year 2011, increasing 1.70 ± 0.09 ppm yr−1 or 3.6 ± 0.2 PgC yr−1 in 2011. Estimates from four ocean models suggest that the ocean CO2 sink was 2.6 ± 0.5 PgC yr−1 in 2011, implying a global residual terrestrial CO2 sink of 4.1 ± 0.9 PgC yr−1. All uncertainties are reported as ±1

  18. The effect of H2SO4 – amine clustering on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtén, T.; T. Petäjä; Smith,J; Ortega, I.K.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; M. Ehn; Vehkamäki, H.; Mauldin, L.; Worsnop, D.R.; M. Kulmala

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the art method for measuring atmospheric gas-phase sulfuric acid is chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) based on nitrate reagent ions. We have assessed the possible effect of the sulfuric acid molecules clustering with base molecules on CIMS measurements using computational chemistry. From the computational data, three conclusions can be drawn. First, a significant fraction of the gas-phase sulfuric acid molecules are very likely clustered with amines i...

  19. Bisulfate – cluster based atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer for high-sensitivity (< 100 ppqV) detection of atmospheric dimethyl amine: proof-of-concept and first ambient data from boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; N. Sarnela; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J.; Rissanen, M. P.; Praplan, A.; M. Simon; A. Kürten; BIANCHI, F.; Dommen, J; J. Curtius; T. Petäjä; Worsnop, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric amines may play a crucial role in formation of new aerosol particles via nucleation with sulfuric acid. Recent studies have revealed that concentrations below 1 pptV can significantly promote nucleation of sulfuric acid particles. While sulfuric acid detection is relatively straightforward, no amine measurements to date have been able to reach the critical sub-pptV concentration range and atmospheric amine concentrations are in general poorly characterized. In th...

  20. Compositional dependence of sulfur speciation in Terrestrial and Martian magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, William; Wood, Bernard; Smythe, Duane

    2016-04-01

    The capacity of magmas to transport sulfur from mantle to crust strongly influences a planet's surface chemistry. Sulfur is perhaps exceptional among the elements in the diversity of it's chemical speciation, exhibiting four redox species at geologically relevant conditions: sulfide (2-), elemental sulfur (0), sulfite (4+) and sulphate (6+). Furthermore, the solubility of sulfur in a magma (and hence the magma's capacity for delivering mantle-derived sulfur to the crust) depends critically on it's oxidation state. Our aim with this experimental study was to quantitatively determine the chemical speciation of sulfur within several common magmas, as a function of oxygen fugacity (fO2). We have performed a series of experiments on six sulfur-bearing silicate melts, which together represent a broad range of naturally occurring compositions: two putative Martian basalts, two terrestrial MORBs (one primitive, one evolved), an andesite, and a dacite. These melts were equilibrated together (at one-atmosphere pressure, 1300°C) with various CO-CO2-SO2 gas mixtures, which imposed a range of fO2s. This range spanned -2 to +1.6 log units (relative to the Quartz-Fayalite-Magnetite or QFM buffer), and the step-size was 0.25 log units. The quenched glasses were analyzed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (specifically XANES) at the Diamond synchrotron (UK), and the spectra obtained were used to determine the species of sulfur present in each glass. The chemical composition of each glass (including their sulfur contents) was characterized by electron-probe microanalysis. Despite the generally low concentrations of sulfur in our glasses (never exceeding 0.24 wt%), we have clearly resolved the crossover between reduced (S2-) and oxidized (S6+) species for three of our basalts. The other three melts yielded more noisy XANES spectra, and as a result their redox crossovers are visible, but less clearly resolved. For every melt composition, the redox crossover is a continuous (though

  1. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...

  2. Study on Earth Radiation Budget mission scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlhopolsky, R.; Hollmann, R.; Mueller, J.; Stuhlmann, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this study is to study optimized satellite configurations for observation of the radiation balance of the earth. We present a literature survey of earth radiation budget missions and instruments. We develop a parametric tool to simulate realistic multiple satellite mission scenarios. This tool is a modular computer program which models satellite orbits and scanning operation. We use Meteosat data sampled at three hour intervals as a database to simulate atmospheric scenes. Input variables are satellite equatorial crossing time and instrument characteristics. Regional, zonal and global monthly averages of shortwave and longwave fluxes for an ideal observing system and several realistic satellite scenarios are produced. Comparisons show that the three satellite combinations which have equatorial crossing times at midmorning, noon and midafternoon provide the best shortwave monitoring. Crossing times near sunrise and sunset should be avoided for the shortwave. Longwave diurnal models are necessary over and surfaces and cloudy regions, if there are only two measurements made during daylight hours. We have found in the shortwave inversion comparison that at least 15% of the monthly regional errors can be attributed to the shortwave anisotropic models used. (orig.) 68 refs.

  3. Budget estimates. Fiscal year 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Congress has determined that the safe use of nuclear materials for peaceful purposes is a legitimate and important national goal. It has entrusted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the primary Federal responsibility for achieving that goal. The NRC's mission, therefore, is to regulate the Nation's civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, to promote the common defense and security, and to protect the environment. The NRC's FY 1998 budget requests new budget authority of $481,300,000 to be funded by two appropriations - one is the NRC's Salaraies and Expenses appropriation for $476,500,000, and the other is NRC's Office of Inspector General appropriation for $4,800,000. Of the funds appropriated to the NRC's Salaries and Expenses, $17,000,000, shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund and $2,000,000 shall be derived from general funds. The proposed FY 1998 appropriation legislation would also exempt the $2,000,000 for regulatory reviews and other assistance provided to the Department of Energy from the requirement that the NRC collect 100 percent of its budget from fees. The sums appropriated to the NRC's Salaries and Expenses and NRC's Office of Inspector General shall be reduced by the amount of revenues received during FY 1998 from licensing fees, inspection services, and other services and collections, so as to result in a final FY 1998 appropriation for the NRC of an estimated $19,000,000 - the amount appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund and from general funds. Revenues derived from enforcement actions shall be deposited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury

  4. Budget estimates. Fiscal year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Congress has determined that the safe use of nuclear materials for peaceful purposes is a legitimate and important national goal. It has entrusted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the primary Federal responsibility for achieving that goal. The NRC`s mission, therefore, is to regulate the Nation`s civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, to promote the common defense and security, and to protect the environment. The NRC`s FY 1998 budget requests new budget authority of $481,300,000 to be funded by two appropriations - one is the NRC`s Salaraies and Expenses appropriation for $476,500,000, and the other is NRC`s Office of Inspector General appropriation for $4,800,000. Of the funds appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses, $17,000,000, shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund and $2,000,000 shall be derived from general funds. The proposed FY 1998 appropriation legislation would also exempt the $2,000,000 for regulatory reviews and other assistance provided to the Department of Energy from the requirement that the NRC collect 100 percent of its budget from fees. The sums appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses and NRC`s Office of Inspector General shall be reduced by the amount of revenues received during FY 1998 from licensing fees, inspection services, and other services and collections, so as to result in a final FY 1998 appropriation for the NRC of an estimated $19,000,000 - the amount appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund and from general funds. Revenues derived from enforcement actions shall be deposited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury.

  5. The 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Composition of Bacteria Implicated in Sulfur Redox Cycles and Associated Sulfur Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, B. T.; Batts, J. E.; Krouse, H. R.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of sulfate ion to sulfide species by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is accompanied by sulfur isotope fractionation, measured in terms of changes in the δ^{34}S values for sulfate and sulfide ions relative to a defined standard. In open environments, the S-isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide can be affected by loss from the system of sulfide species as gaseous H2S, insoluble metal sulfides such as FeS2, organic complexes or by re-oxidation. The S-isotope fractionation accompanying bacterial sulfate reduction in nature is often much larger than the maxima obtained in chemical and bacterial sulfate reduction experiments in the laboratory. One mechanism postulated for the large natural S-isotope selectivity depends on repetitive reduction-oxidation cycles. In turn, this would require a level of tolerance to oxygen by SRB in the sedimentary environment, contrary to laboratory experience with SRB strains. Bird Lake (The Coorong, South Australia) is a small calcareous, evaporative lake, where average Δ^{34}S (δ^{34}Ssulfate - δ^{34}Ssulfide) values for groundwater at 16 of the 27 sites sampled periodically since 1974, vary from 15.0 ‰ to 62.3 ‰ within the range -1.8 ‰ to 70.6 ‰. Wide fluctuations in δ34Ssulfide values at individual sites are the significant factor affecting the variability of Δ^{34}S values. Values for δ18Osulfate are elevated over that of the sulfate source to an unusual extent, reflecting re-oxidation of sulfur species and O- isotope exchange between some of these species and water. One aspect of investigations at Bird Lake was the evaluation of bacterial populations in subsurface sediments and their role in sulfur cycling. To achieve this, microcosms were established with subsurface sediment and incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere, for up to 119 days. These were sampled at various times to determine sulfur species concentrations and sulfur isotope fractionation and to generate 16S rDNA clone libraries. Results

  6. The effect of motivation profile and participative budgeting on budget goal commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandalgaard, Niels; Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    2009-01-01

    The effect of participative budgeting on motivation is often considered in management accounting research. In this study we focus on dispositional factors of motivation rooted in personality that affect budgeting. Especially we focus on the effect of personality traits in the form of achievement......, power and affiliation motives on budget goal commitment in interaction with participative budgeting. The study is based on a survey among bank managers at different organizational levels of a Scandinavian regional bank and the results indicate that the effect of participative budgeting on budget goal...... commitment is moderated by the implicit power motivation of the bank manager....

  7. Sulfur monochloride in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data on the reactivity of sulfur monochloride published in the past 15 years have been reviewed and systematized. The review focuses on the synthesis of acyclic and heterocyclic compounds with the use of S2Cl2. The bibliography includes 154 references

  8. The total nitrogen budget of the UK- amounts, controls and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Burt, T. P.; Howden, N. K.; Whelan, M.

    2011-12-01

    This study estimates the total annual nitrogen budget of the UK from 1990 to 2020. The following inputs of nitrogen are considered: inorganic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition; food and feed imports; and biological nitrogen fixation. The outputs considered include: atmospheric emissions (including to N2); direct losses of sewage and industrial effluent to the sea; fluvial losses at source; food and feed exports; and terrestrial and aquatic denitrification to N2. The study is the first to include in-stream losses and terrestrial denitrification to N2 into a national nitrogen budget: in so doing it does not have to assume the total budget is in balance following inter-annual changes. Unlike previous studies, this study is not limited to reactive nitrogen species. It is shown here that: i) Inputs of inorganic fertilizer declined significantly over the study period; atmospheric deposition showed no change and food and feed imports significantly increased. ii) Outputs of fluvial nitrogen rose significantly, but atmospheric emissions of N20 and NH3 declined dramatically, while dentrification to N2 remained steady. iii) The UK was a net source of total nitrogen in 1990 of 527 (±40%) ktonnes N/yr (22 kg N/ha/yr). By 2005, it was a net source of 172 (±106%) ktonnes N/yr (7 kg N/ha/yr). iv) The prognosis for the N budget of the UK to 2020 is critically dependent upon the future trends and trade-offs between atmospheric emissions and applications of inorganic fertilisers. If atmospheric emissions follow current trends then by 2020 the net sink of total N in the UK will be 44 ktonnes N/yr, if atmospheric emissions are restricted to current UK government emissions targets, then the UK will be a net source of Total N of 151 ktonnes N/yr as reductions in the application of inorganic fertiliser outstrip declines in atmospheric emissions.

  9. Physiology of Haloalkaliphilic Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  10. Sulfur: its clinical and toxicologic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarnisky, Lioudmila A; Christopherson, Robert J; Basu, Tapan K

    2003-01-01

    Although there is no known dietary requirement for inorganic sulfur, it is an essential element for all animal species in as much as they all require the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine. There are three predominate forms of organic sulfur in animals and humans: 1). the thiomethyl of methionine residues in protein; 2). the sulfhydryl disulfides of protein; and 3). the compounds containing ester or amide bound sulfates of glycosaminoglycans, steroids, and many xenobiotic metabolites. Thus, sulfur becomes an important constituent of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and other biomolecules. Unlike mammalian species, plants can use inorganic sulfur and synthesize methionine from which are synthesized all the other important sulfur compounds. Hence, sulfur deficiency occurs mainly when plants are grown in sulfur-depleted soils and when humans and animals consume low-protein diets. In recent times, however, the increasing prevalence of refining petroleum and smelting sulfur compounds of metallic minerals into free metals are having a large impact on the balance of sulfur in the environment. Sulfur toxicity is associated mainly with high levels of the element and its toxic volatile substances in the environment. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), a major air pollutant, may adversely affect animal and human health by causing bronchitis, bronchoconstriction, and increased pulmonary resistance.

  11. Bulk sulfur (S) deposition in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiuying; Wang, Shanqian; Zhang, Wuting; Lu, Xuehe

    2016-06-01

    A systematic dataset of an observation network on a national scale has been organized to investigate the spatial distribution of bulk sulfur (S) deposition (Sdep) throughout China during 2000-2013, representing by far the most detailed data set to track the bulk sulfur deposition throughout China since 2000. Such a dataset is needed for ecosystem studies and for developing emission control policies. Bulk Sdep values showed great variations, ranging from 2.17 to 70.55 kg ha-1 y-1, with an average of 22.99 kg ha-1 y-1. The average rate of bulk Sdep located in East Coastal region (35.97 kg ha-1 y-1), Middle Yangtze region (57.90 kg ha-1 y-1), Middle Yellow River region (23.42 kg ha-1 y-1), North Coastal region (42.19 kg ha-1 y-1), Northeast region (34.28 kg ha-1 y-1), South Coastal region (36.97 kg S ha-1 y-1), Southwest region (33.85 kg ha-1 y-1) was 4.50, 7.24, 2.93, 5.28, 4.29, 4.63 and 4.24 times than that in Northwest region (7.99 kg ha-1 y-1). Bulk Sdep over China was mainly from fossil fuel combustion (76.96%), biomass burning (7.64%), crust (6.22%), aged sea salt (5.48%) and agriculture (3.68%). A systematic observation network on a national scale should be established to conduct a long-term monitoring atmospheric Sdep (including wet and dry deposition), based on exiting ecological stations administrated by different departments in China.

  12. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  13. Sulfur emission from Victorian brown coal under pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion and gasification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2013-02-01

    Sulfur emission from a Victorian brown coal was quantitatively determined through controlled experiments in a continuously fed drop-tube furnace under three different atmospheres: pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion, and carbon dioxide gasification conditions. The species measured were H(2)S, SO(2), COS, CS(2), and more importantly SO(3). The temperature (873-1273 K) and gas environment effects on the sulfur species emission were investigated. The effect of residence time on the emission of those species was also assessed under oxy-fuel condition. The emission of the sulfur species depended on the reaction environment. H(2)S, SO(2), and CS(2) are the major species during pyrolysis, oxy-fuel, and gasification. Up to 10% of coal sulfur was found to be converted to SO(3) under oxy-fuel combustion, whereas SO(3) was undetectable during pyrolysis and gasification. The trend of the experimental results was qualitatively matched by thermodynamic predictions. The residence time had little effect on the release of those species. The release of sulfur oxides, in particular both SO(2) and SO(3), is considerably high during oxy-fuel combustion even though the sulfur content in Morwell coal is only 0.80%. Therefore, for Morwell coal utilization during oxy-fuel combustion, additional sulfur removal, or polishing systems will be required in order to avoid corrosion in the boiler and in the CO(2) separation units of the CO(2) capture systems.

  14. Volatile organic compound emissions in relation to plant carbon fixation and the terrestrial carbon budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Ciccioli, P.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Biesenthal, T.; Rottenberger, S.; Wolf, A.; Vitullo, M.; Valentini, R.; Nobre, A.; Kabat, P.; Andreae, M.O.

    2002-01-01

    A substantial amount of carbon is emitted by terrestrial vegetation as biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC), which contributes to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, to particle production and to the carbon cycle. With regard to the carbon budget of the terrestrial biosphere, a release of

  15. Government presents 1979 nuclear budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal items of the nuclear budget for the fiscal year 1979 are 165,700 Million for the Science and Technology Agency for the promotion of nuclear energy development, and for the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, 3,360 Million from the general account for nuclear items, 57,500 Million from the special account for power source development and 99,900 Million for fiscal investments and loans. In the Science and Technology Agency, compared with the last fiscal year, the appropriations have been especially increased for the research and development of nuclear fusion in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In the Ministry of ITI, the distinctive budgetary features are those for streamlining the safety regulation administration, uranium extraction from sea water, and thermal effluent management. The 1979 government nuclear budget is described as follows: in the STA, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency, and National Institute of Radiological Sciences; in the MITI, general account, special account, and fiscal investments and loans; the items in other ministries. (J.P.N.)

  16. Montana’s 2015 Biennium Budget Update

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Jeffrey; Hatcher, Orry

    2016-01-01

    The 64th Montana Legislature ended its constitutionally mandated 90 day biennium session with a nearly $11 billion, two-year, all funds budget in April 2013. Aside from constructing a balanced budget the legislature attempted to resolve a number of long standing policy issues ranging from public pensions to school funding. Newly elected Democratic Governor Steve Bullock presented his budget which called for investing in Main Street, investing more in Montana’s education system, creating healt...

  17. Horse-trading over the EU budget

    OpenAIRE

    Neheider, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    About 75% of the EU budget are transfer expenditures that go to the agricultural sector and to regional policies. This has long been criticised but the structure of the EU budget has barely changed over the last decades. The EU finances are mainly based on a unanimous agreement between the heads of state or government of the EU member states. During budget negotiations, horse trading or logrolling is a common practice. Negotiators combine expenditure positions and arrangements on the revenue ...

  18. Low Budget,Big Box Office

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Chinese filmmakers are refining the art of turning a profit from small budget films ORGANIZERS of China’s upcoming film festivals are finally giving recognition to the little guys,to encourage a generation of young,talented directors producing low budget films. Several nominees were announced on September 10 to compete for the Small and Medium-Budget Film Prize at the annual Golden Rooster and Hundred Flowers Film Festival,later in the year.

  19. Sulfur dioxide initiates global climate change in four ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change, prior to the 20th century, appears to have been initiated primarily by major changes in volcanic activity. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is the most voluminous chemically active gas emitted by volcanoes and is readily oxidized to sulfuric acid normally within weeks. But trace amounts of SO2 exert significant influence on climate. All major historic volcanic eruptions have formed sulfuric acid aerosols in the lower stratosphere that cooled the earth's surface ∼ 0.5 oC for typically three years. While such events are currently happening once every 80 years, there are times in geologic history when they occurred every few to a dozen years. These were times when the earth was cooled incrementally into major ice ages. There have also been two dozen times during the past 46,000 years when major volcanic eruptions occurred every year or two or even several times per year for decades. Each of these times was contemporaneous with very rapid global warming. Large volumes of SO2 erupted frequently appear to overdrive the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere resulting in very rapid warming. Such warming and associated acid rain becomes extreme when millions of cubic kilometers of basalt are erupted in much less than one million years. These are the times of the greatest mass extinctions. When major volcanic eruptions do not occur for decades to hundreds of years, the atmosphere can oxidize all pollutants, leading to a very thin atmosphere, global cooling and decadal drought. Prior to the 20th century, increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) followed increases in temperature initiated by changes in SO2. By 1962, man burning fossil fuels was adding SO2 to the atmosphere at a rate equivalent to one 'large' volcanic eruption each 1.7 years. Global temperatures increased slowly from 1890 to 1950 as anthropogenic sulfur increased slowly. Global temperatures increased more rapidly after 1950 as the rate of anthropogenic sulfur emissions increased. By 1980

  20. 大气分层扰动位能控制方程及其应用——南海夏季风活动的能量收支%Governing Equations of Atmospheric Layer Perturbation Potential Energy and Its Applications-Energy Budget of the South China Sea Summer Monsoon Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪雷; 李建平; 郭彦

    2012-01-01

    .The conversion term (CE),which links LpPE1 and KE,is determined by the vertical velocity and atmospheric stability.Corresponding to warm air ascending or cold air descending,the conversion term is positive,indicating that ZPPE1 transforms to KE,and vice verse.At 850 hPa,the conversion term is featured by the maxima over the Intertropical Convergence Zone and most monsoon regions,and CE is also positive over the storm track region in the Northern Hemisphere and in the westerly belt in the Southern Hemisphere.This is applied to the energy budget of SCSSM activity; the conversion term grows rapidly in the phase of SCSSM revival and subsequently dominates in the active phase of SCSSM.In the active phase of SCSSM,the conversion term is about 2-3 times as much as the energy flux transported through the boundary,indicating that the conversion term plays a crucial role in SCSSM revival and active SCSSM.In addition,the condition of active SCSSM is explored,the results show that when LPPE1 equals its summer climatological normals,SCSSM tends to be active if the ascending velocity exceeds the threshold velocity.

  1. MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL FLOWS OF CONSTRUCTION ENTERPRISES BASED LOGISTICS BUDGETING

    OpenAIRE

    Bubenko, P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is the development of scientific knowledge and understandings of place value and essence of logistics budgeting.Proved that increasing the competitiveness of budgeting should improve mechanisms of logistics processes, which leads to the creation of new economic category logistics budgeting. We consider such economic categories as cash flow, budget, budgeting, logistics, analyzes and presents the advantages and disadvantages of budgeting and budgeting logistics enterprises...

  2. INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT OF SECURITY BUDGET OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Onishchenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The institutional framework from positions of different conceptual approaches was examined in the article. The attention was paid the problems of institutional support budget security in Ukraine. The institutionalization of budgetary relations and especially the formation system of institutional support was investigated. The author's approach to the nature of institutional support budget security was suggested. Institutional and legal, institutional and organizational, and staffing budget security were characterized. It is concluded that the process of institutional development budget security characterized by unacceptable levels of institutional strain.

  3. BUDGET IN DANGER : OUR LETTER TO THE MINISTERS

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In edition no. 104 of Echo we told you about the Finance Committee meeting which took place on Wednesday 16 June and the tense atmosphere that reigned during this meeting. Echoing the alarming news from most of our countries (budget cuts, restrictions, reforms), CERN’s global budget is indeed under pressure. This is extremely serious. How can we carry out our mission if our Member States do not give us the means? Basic research cannot progress with budget cuts. The Management tried to make this understood at the meeting, however, most delegations could not or would not see reason. Refusing to sit idly by, the Staff Association decided to act immediately. It sent a letter to all ministers in the twenty Member States concerned by CERN and its financing. A copy was also sent to all Finance Committee and Council delegates. We thus hope to help convince all our Member States that it is essential that they continue to invest in basic research, a breeding ground for new ideas and at the roo...

  4. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus. PMID:22496367

  5. Measurements of HCl and HNO3 with the new research aircraft HALO - Quantification of the stratospheric contribution to the O3 and HNO3 budget in the UT/LS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Voigt, Christiane; Zahn, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic and chemical processes modify the ozone (O3) budget of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere, leading to locally variable O3 trends. In this region, O3 acts as a strong greenhouse gas with a net positive radiative forcing. It has been suggested, that the correlation of the stratospheric tracer hydrochloric acid (HCl) with O3 can be used to quantify stratospheric O3 in the UT/LS region (Marcy et al., 2004). The question is, whether the stratospheric contribution to the nitric acid (HNO3) budget in the UT/LS can be determined by a similar approach in order to differentiate between tropospheric and stratospheric sources of HNO3. To this end, we performed in situ measurements of HCl and HNO3 with a newly developed Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) during the TACTS (Transport and Composition in the UTLS) / ESMVal (Earth System Model Validation) mission in August/September 2012. The linear quadrupole mass spectrometer deployed aboard the new German research aircraft HALO was equipped with a new discharge source generating SF5- reagent ions and an in-flight calibration allowing for accurate, spatially highly resolved trace gas measurements. In addition, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrous acid (HONO) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) have been simultaneously detected with the AIMS instrument. Here, we show trace gas distributions of HCl and HNO3 measured during a North-South transect from Northern Europe to Antarctica (68° N to 65° S) at 8 to 15 km altitude and discuss their latitude dependence. In particular, we investigate the stratospheric ozone contribution to the ozone budget in the mid-latitude UT/LS using correlations of HCl with O3. Differences in these correlations in the subtropical and Polar regions are discussed. A similar approach is used to quantify the HNO3 budget of the UT/LS. We identify unpolluted atmospheric background distributions and various tropospheric HNO3 sources in specific regions. Our observations can be compared to

  6. In Situ Analysis of Sulfur Species in Sulfur Globules Produced from Thiosulfate by Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Prange, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Henning; Rohde, Manfred; Dashti, Mona; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes convert thiosulfate, forming sulfur globules inside and outside cells. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the sulfur consisted mainly of sulfur chains with organic end groups similar to sulfur formed in purple sulfur bacteria, suggesting the possibility that the process of sulfur globule formation by bacteria is an ancient feature.

  7. Challenges of the surface energy budget and proposed ways forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schuckmann, Karina; Josey, Simon; Gulev, Sergey; Trenberth, Kevin; Clayson, Carol Anne; Mathieu, Pierre Philippe; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    To understand how the Earth's climate system balances the energy budget, we have to consider processes occurring at three levels: the surface of the Earth, where most solar heating takes place; the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA), where sunlight enters the system; and the atmosphere in between. At each level, the amount of incoming and outgoing energy, or net flux must, on average, be equal on longer time scales in an unchanging climate. Under the influence of external and/or internal climate forcing energy is not balanced anymore, and can hence, lead to a temporal positive or negative Earth's Energy Imbalance, which is currently estimated of the order of 0.5-1 Wm-2 (IPCC, 2013). Although it is known that the majority of this energy is stored in the global ocean (~93%), an overarching scientific challenge faced by the whole climate science community is related to achieving accuracy in the changes in storage and flows of energy throughout the climate system, hereby raising the question: "How is heat entering the global ocean?" This highlights the vital role of understanding the surface flux budget, though it is currently impossible to detect an imbalance equivalent to 1 Wm-2 via the estimation of the surface energy budget. This presentation is discussing the need of quantifying sea surface heat fluxes to the required level of accuracy needed to support the various climate science applications, which is currently a very challenging task of the surface energy budget community. The current level of uncertainties in global ocean mean and trends of heat and moisture fluxes remain higher than is required by many applications and it is still unclear which of the components of surface net heat flux contributes mostly to our uncertainties and where regionally these contributions are most significant. Using constraints on energy budget considerations, and hence, inter-comparisons to other independent observing systems as well as to re-enforce interdisciplinary collaborations for

  8. Sulfur dioxide emissions and sectorial contributions to sulfur deposition in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Richard L.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Streets, David G.; Bhatti, Neeloo

    Anthropogenic and volcanic emissions of SO 2 in Asia for 1987-1988 are estimated on a 1° × 1° grid. Anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 31.6 Tg of SO 2 with the regions' volcanoes emitting an additional 3.8 Tg. For Southeast Asia and the Indian sub-continent, the emissions are further partitioned into biomass, industrial, utilities, and non-specific sources. In these regions emissions from biomass, utilities and industrial sources account for 16.7, 21.7, and 12.2%, respectively. In Bangladesh, ˜ 90% of the SO 2 emissions result from biomass burning and nearly 20% of India's 5 Tg of SO 2 emissions are due to biomass burning. Malaysia and Singapore's emissions are dominated by the utilities with 42 and 62% of their respective emissions coming from that sector. The spatial distribution of sulfur deposition resulting from these emissions is calculated using an atmospheric transport and deposition model. Sulfur deposition in excess of 2 g m -2 yr -1 is predicted in vast regions of east Asia, India, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Indonesia with deposition in excess of 5 g m -2 yr -1 predicted in southern China. For the Indian sub-continent and Southeast Asia the contribution of biomass burning, industrial activities, and utilities to total sulfur emissions and deposition patterns are evaluated. Biomass burning is found to be a major source of sulfur deposition throughout southeast Asia. Deposition in Bangladesh and northern India is dominated by this emissions sector. Deposition in Thailand, the Malay Peninsula and the island of Sumatra is heavily influenced by emissions from utilities. The ecological impact of the deposition, in 1988 and in the year 2020, is also estimated using critical loads data developed in the RAINS-ASIA projects. Much of eastern China, the Korean Peninsula, Japan, Thailand, and large regions of India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, and sections of Vietnam are at risk due to deposition in excess of their

  9. Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Mt. Etna Eruption 2002 as Detected with AIRS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Mt. Etna, a volcano on the island of Sicily, erupted on October 26, 2002. Preliminary analysis of data taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 28 shows the instrument can provide an excellent means to study the evolution and structure of the sulfur dioxide plume emitted from volcanoes. These data also demonstrate that AIRS can be used to obtain the total mass of sulfur dioxide injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic event, information that may help us to better understand these dangerous natural occurrences in the future. The image clearly shows the sulfur dioxide plume. This image was created by comparing data taken at two different frequencies, or channels, and creating one image that highlights the differences between these two channels. Both channels are sensitive to water vapor, but one of the channels is also sensitive to sulfur dioxide. By subtracting out the common water vapor signal in both channels, the sulfur dioxide feature remains and shows up as an enhancement in the difference image. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Haverd

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of the full carbon (C-CO2 budget of the Australian continent, focussing on 1990–2011 in the context of estimates over two centuries. The work is a contribution to the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes project, as one of numerous regional studies. In constructing the budget, we estimate the following component carbon fluxes: net primary production (NPP; net ecosystem production (NEP; fire; land use change (LUC; riverine export; dust export; harvest (wood, crop and livestock and fossil fuel emissions (both territorial and non-territorial. Major biospheric fluxes were derived using BIOS2 (Haverd et al., 2012, a fine-spatial-resolution (0.05° offline modelling environment in which predictions of CABLE (Wang et al., 2011, a sophisticated land surface model with carbon cycle, are constrained by multiple observation types. The mean NEP reveals that climate variability and rising CO2 contributed 12 ± 24 (1σ error on mean and 68 ± 15 TgC yr−1, respectively. However these gains were partially offset by fire and LUC (along with other minor fluxes, which caused net losses of 26 ± 4 TgC yr−1 and 18 ± 7 TgC yr−1, respectively. The resultant net biome production (NBP is 36 ± 29 TgC yr−1, in which the largest contributions to uncertainty are NEP, fire and LUC. This NBP offset fossil fuel emissions (95 ± 6 TgC yr−1 by 38 ± 30%. The interannual variability (IAV in the Australian carbon budget exceeds Australia's total carbon emissions by fossil fuel combustion and is dominated by IAV in NEP. Territorial fossil fuel emissions are significantly smaller than the rapidly growing fossil fuel exports: in 2009–2010, Australia exported 2.5 times more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning fossil fuels.

  11. Utilization of 'elemental' sulfur by different phototrophic sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae): A sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, B; Prange, A [Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Competence Center for Microbiology and Biotechnology (CCMB), Rheydter Strasse 277, 41065 Moenchengladbach (Germany); Lichtenberg, H; Hormes, J [Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Dahl, C, E-mail: A.Prange@gmx.d [University of Bonn, Institute for Microbiology and Biotechnology, Meckenheimer Allee 168, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are generally able to use elemental sulfur as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Elemental sulfur is mainly a mixture of cyclo-octasulfur and polymeric sulfur. The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum strongly prefers the polymeric sulfur fraction showing that sulfur speciation has a strong influence on availability of elemental sulfur. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate whether polymeric sulfur is also the preferred sulfur species in other purple sulfur bacteria belonging to the families Chromatiaceae and Ecothiorodospiraceae. The cultures were fed with 50 mM of elemental sulfur consisting of 68% polymeric sulfur and 30% cyclo-octasulfur. In all cultures, elemental sulfur was converted into intra- or extracellular sulfur globules, respectively, and further oxidized to sulfate. Sulfate concentrations were determined by HPLC and turbidometric assays, respectively. However, the added elemental sulfur was only partly used by the bacteria, one part of the 'elemental sulfur' remained in the cultures and was not taken up. XANES spectroscopy revealed that only the polymeric sulfur fraction was taken up by all cultures investigated. This strongly indicates that polymeric 'chain-like' sulfur is the form preferably used by phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

  12. Enhancing effect of dimethylamine in sulfuric acid nucleation in the presence of water – a computational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Loukonen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the hydration of sulfuric acid – ammonia and sulfuric acid – dimethylamine clusters using quantum chemistry. We calculated the formation energies and thermodynamics for clusters of one ammonia or one dimethylamine molecule together with 1–2 sulfuric acid and 0–5 water molecules. The results indicate that dimethylamine enhances the addition of sulfuric acid to the clusters much more efficiently than ammonia when the number of water molecules in the cluster is either zero, or greater than two. Further hydrate distribution calculations reveal that practically all dimethylamine-containing two-acid clusters will remain unhydrated in tropospherically relevant circumstances, thus strongly suggesting that dimethylamine assists atmospheric sulfuric acid nucleation much more effectively than ammonia.

  13. Developing Carbon Budgets for Cities: Phoenix as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, M. R.; Baker, L. A.; Koerner, B. A.; Grimm, N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Studies have shown that cities can alter regional carbon dynamics through changing ecosystem productivity, overall carbon cycling rate, and total carbon storage in vegetation and soils. Furthermore, people in urban regions import a large amount of carbon in food and fuel, as well as release an exceptional amount of CO2 into the atmosphere. Numerous studies have attempted to quantify some sources and sinks of carbon in urban areas, although a complete carbon budget for a city that accounts for total inputs, outputs, and storage within the ecosystem has yet to be fully accomplished. One challenge is associated with attaining the data necessary to accurately account for all carbon dynamics in these heterogeneous and complex ecosystems. Our goal was to estimate a budget for the Phoenix metropolitan area while developing methodology to calculate carbon dynamics in urban systems that can be applied to cities across the US. Only with comparable carbon budgets for multiple cities will we finally begin to understand the influence of urbanization on carbon dynamics. Our analysis shows when calculating certain variables like transportation emissions, results can vary radically (up to 250%) depending on the data source and methodology implemented (i.e. bottom-up vs. top-down). A common assumption is that productivity and carbon storage will increase with urbanization in arid systems due to water and nutrient inputs, as well as changes in vegetation structure; however, our results indicated that this may not actually be the case in Phoenix where a large number of residents design landscapes to conserve water. Even if all urban expansion was dedicated to landscapes designed for carbon sequestration and storage, vegetation and soils will unlikely have a large effect on the C budget without significant changes in transportation and lifestyle choices.

  14. Estimating Evapotranspiration Using an Observation Based Terrestrial Water Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; McWilliams, Eric B.; Famiglietti, James S.; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Nigro, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is difficult to measure at the scales of climate models and climate variability. While satellite retrieval algorithms do exist, their accuracy is limited by the sparseness of in situ observations available for calibration and validation, which themselves may be unrepresentative of 500m and larger scale satellite footprints and grid pixels. Here, we use a combination of satellite and ground-based observations to close the water budgets of seven continental scale river basins (Mackenzie, Fraser, Nelson, Mississippi, Tocantins, Danube, and Ubangi), estimating mean ET as a residual. For any river basin, ET must equal total precipitation minus net runoff minus the change in total terrestrial water storage (TWS), in order for mass to be conserved. We make use of precipitation from two global observation-based products, archived runoff data, and TWS changes from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite mission. We demonstrate that while uncertainty in the water budget-based estimates of monthly ET is often too large for those estimates to be useful, the uncertainty in the mean annual cycle is small enough that it is practical for evaluating other ET products. Here, we evaluate five land surface model simulations, two operational atmospheric analyses, and a recent global reanalysis product based on our results. An important outcome is that the water budget-based ET time series in two tropical river basins, one in Brazil and the other in central Africa, exhibit a weak annual cycle, which may help to resolve debate about the strength of the annual cycle of ET in such regions and how ET is constrained throughout the year. The methods described will be useful for water and energy budget studies, weather and climate model assessments, and satellite-based ET retrieval optimization.

  15. 1996 Budget picture still clouded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Four months and three work stoppages into fiscal 1996, whole departments and agencies of the United States federal government remain in budgetary limbo. Five annual spending bills still await approval, and parts of nine federal departments and several agencies face the possibility of yet another shutdown, as the current continuing resolution for temporary funding expires on March 15.In the wake of the recent three-week shutdown of the federal government, congressional leaders worked in January to ease future political pain by funding a list of “essential services” for the remainder of the fiscal year. Deemed essential were government programs with the most immediate and conspicuous public impact, such as the National Parks Service and the Passport Services Office. Included on that list of essential services was the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which not only received full funding for the entire fiscal year but also got a 5.7% increase over its 1995 budget.

  16. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  17. Oxidation of molybdenite with oxygen in nitrogen-sulfuric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of bench testing on molybdenite decomposition at nitric acid discharge below stoichiometric, at atmospheric pressure with total molybdenum conversion into the solution are described. Influence of sulfuric acid mixed with nitric one on molybdenum solubility and concentrate decomposition rate is studied

  18. 40 CFR 97.140 - State trading budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State trading budgets. 97.140 Section... § 97.140 State trading budgets. The State trading budgets for annual allocations of CAIR NOX allowances...: State State trading budget for 2009-2014(tons) State trading budget for 2015 and...

  19. Quantifying the thermodynamic entropy budget of the land surface: is this useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Brunsell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As a system is moved away from a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is induced. A possible methodology to assess these impacts is to examine the thermodynamic entropy budget and assess the role of entropy production and transfer between the surface and the atmosphere. Here, we adopted this thermodynamic framework to examine the implications of changing vegetation fractional cover on land surface energy exchange processes using the NOAH land surface model and eddy covariance observations. Simulations that varied the relative fraction of vegetation were used to calculate the resultant entropy budget as a function of fraction of vegetation. Results showed that increasing vegetation fraction increases entropy production by the land surface while decreasing the overall entropy budget (the rate of change in entropy at the surface. This is accomplished largely via simultaneous increase in the entropy production associated with the absorption of solar radiation and a decline in the Bowen ratio (ratio of sensible to latent heat flux, which leads to increasing the entropy export associated with the latent heat flux during the daylight hours and dominated by entropy transfer associated with sensible heat and soil heat fluxes during the nighttime hours. Eddy covariance observations also show that the entropy production has a consistent sensitivity to land cover, while the overall entropy budget appears most related to the net radiation at the surface. This implies that quantifying the thermodynamic entropy budget and entropy production is a useful metric for assessing biosphere-atmosphere-hydrosphere system interactions.

  20. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  1. An overview of the Clinton budget plan

    OpenAIRE

    David E. Altig; Jagadeesh Gokhale

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the allocative consequences of resource shifts that would result if the Clinton administration's budget plan is adopted, examining the timing and composition of both net outlay cuts and net revenue increases represented in the budget proposal, as well as the generational impact of each.

  2. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  3. CAUT Analysis of Federal Budget 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The 2012 federal Budget marks the beginning of a painful and unnecessary fiscal retrenchment. Despite boasting one of the lowest debt-to-GDP ratios amongst industrialized countries, the Conservative government is pressing ahead with deep cuts of more than $5 billion across departmental budgets by 2014-15. For post-secondary education and research,…

  4. 7 CFR 1744.64 - Budget adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... another source, requests a deficiency loan, or scales back the project. (b) RUS may make a budget... AGRICULTURE POST-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO GUARANTEED AND INSURED TELEPHONE LOANS Advance and... description of how the adjustment will affect loan purposes. RUS will not approve a budget adjustment...

  5. 12 CFR 917.8 - Budget preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS POWERS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF BANK BOARDS OF DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT § 917.8 Budget preparation... interest by keeping its costs to an efficient and effective minimum. (b) No delegation of budget...

  6. Participatory Budgeting : Contents of CD Rom

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Anwar

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the principles underlying participatory budgeting. It analyzes the merits and demerits of participatory budgeting practices around the world with a view to guiding policy makers and practitioners on improving such practices in the interest of inclusive governance. This publication includes five regional surveys, and seven country case studies can be found ...

  7. Dealing with Budget Cuts. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Virtually every school district in the country is dealing with the need to reduce their budget. The process used to make those decisions varies from state to state but almost always includes a combination of short and long-term approaches. In many school districts the emphasis is on reducing individual budget line items and not filling vacant…

  8. Revised State Budget Sells Kids Short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children Now, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Administration's May Revision of the 2012-2013 state budget addresses a $15.7 billion shortfall through funding shifts, cuts, and new revenue sources that place children squarely in harms way. California's kids are already grossly underserved relative to the rest of the nation's children. If the May Revise budget is passed by the Legislature,…

  9. Planning Programming Budgeting Systems: PPBS and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenbach, Edward L.

    Continuous change in education is requiring educational administrators to plan for the distant future with as much precision as they now do for the immediate future. Recently, major advances in the planning-budgeting process have become available to educators in the form of PPBS. Fiduciary budgets, which have been used in most schools since the…

  10. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget...

  11. 42 CFR 457.140 - Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE... amendment that has a significant impact on the approved budget, must include a budget that describes the..., including— (1) Projected amount to be spent on health services; (2) Projected amount to be spent...

  12. CAUT Analysis of Federal Budget 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 federal Budget was delivered ironically the same day as the Parliamentary Budget Officer was in court seeking more information about the impact of the government's $5.2 billion in spending cuts announced last year. The lack of budgetary transparency and accountability has become a hallmark of the Conservative government. Anyone expecting…

  13. Sulfur cycle in the typical meadow Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland ecosystem in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingshuang; LI Xinhua

    2008-01-01

    The sulfur cycle and its compartmental distribution within an atmosphere-plant-soil system was studied using a compartment model in the typical meadow Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland in the Sanjiang Plain Northeast China. The results showed that in the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem, soil was the main storage compartment and current hinge of sulfur in which 98.4% sulfur was accumulated, while only 1.6% sulfur was accumulated in the plant compartment. In the plant subsystem, roots and litters were the main storage compartment of sulfur and they remained 83.5% of the total plant sulfur. The calculations of sulfur turnover through the compartments of the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem demonstrated that the above-ground component took up 0.99 gS/m2 from the root, of which 0.16 gS/m2 was translocated to the roots and 0.83 gS/m2 to the litter. The roots took in 1.05 gS/m2 from the soil, subsequent translocation back to the soil accounted for 1.31 gS/m2, while there was 1.84 gS/m2 in the litter and the net transfer of sulfur to the soil was more than 0.44 gS/(m2·a). The emission of H2S from the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem to the atmosphere was 1.83 mgS/(m2·a), while carbonyl sulfide (COS) was absorbed by the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem from the atmosphere at the rate of 1.76 mgS/(m2·a). The input of sulfur by the rainfall to the ecosystem was 4.85 mgS/m2 during the growing season. The difference between input and output was 4.78 mgS/m2, which indicated that sulfur was accumulated in the ecosystem and may cause wetland acidify in the future.

  14. NOAA budget would boost satellite funding but cut some key areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    The White House's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), announced on 13 February, looks favorable at first glance. The administration's request calls for $5.1 billion, an increase of $153 million (3.1%) above the FY 2012 estimated budget. However, the increase for NOAA satellites is $163 million, which means that other areas within the agency would be slated for decreased funding, including programs within the National Ocean Service (NOS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Weather Service (NWS), and some NOAA education programs. The proposed overall budget for the agency “reflects the overarching importance of weather satellites to public safety, to national security, and to the economy,” NOAA director Jane Lubchenco said at a 16 February briefing, noting that difficult choices were made regarding the budget. “Due to significant resources required for our weather satellites and the economic conditions in the country, other parts of our budget have been reduced, in some cases quite significantly,” she said. She added that the imperative to fund both the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and geostationary satellites in FY 2013 “imposes serious constraints on the rest of NOAA's budget.”

  15. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot-gas desulfurization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    twenty-five-cycle test. The sorbent was exposed for 58 consecutive days to temperatures between 600C and 800C and gas atmospheres from highly reducing to highly oxidizing without measurable loss of sulfur capacity or reactivity. In the process analysis phase of this study, a two-stage desulfurization process using cerium sorbent with SO2 regeneration followed by zinc sorbent with dilute O2 regeneration was compared to a single-stage process using zinc sorbent and O2 regeneration with SO2 in the regeneration product gas converted to elemental sulfur using the direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP). Material and energy balances were calculated using the process simulation package PRO/II. Major process equipment was sized and a preliminary economic analysis completed. Sorbent replacement rate, which is determined by the multicycle sorbent durability, was found to be the most significant factor in both processes. For large replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 250 cycles or less, the single-stage zinc sorbent process with DSRP was estimated to be less costly. However, the cost of the two-stage cerium sorbent process was more sensitive to sorbent replacement rate, and, as the required replacement rate decreased, the economics of the two-stage process improved. For small sorbent replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 1000 cycles or more, the two-stage cerium process was estimated to be less costly. In the relatively wide middle range of sorbent replacement rates, the relative economics of the two processes depends on other factors such as the unit cost of sorbents, oxygen, nitrogen, and the relative capital costs

  16. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    a twenty-five-cycle test. The sorbent was exposed for 58 consecutive days to temperatures between 600°C and 800°C and gas atmospheres from highly reducing to highly oxidizing without measurable loss of sulfur capacity or reactivity. In the process analysis phase of this study, a two-stage desulfurization process using cerium sorbent with SO2 regeneration followed by zinc sorbent with dilute O2 regeneration was compared to a single-stage process using zinc sorbent and O2 regeneration with SO2 in the regeneration product gas converted to elemental sulfur using the direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP). Material and energy balances were calculated using the process simulation package PRO/II. Major process equipment was sized and a preliminary economic analysis completed. Sorbent replacement rate, which is determined by the multicycle sorbent durability, was found to be the most significant factor in both processes. For large replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 250 cycles or less, the single-stage zinc sorbent process with DSRP was estimated to be less costly. However, the cost of the two-stage cerium sorbent process was more sensitive to sorbent replacement rate, and, as the required replacement rate decreased, the economics of the two-stage process improved. For small sorbent replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 1000 cycles or more, the two-stage cerium process was estimated to be less costly. In the relatively wide middle range of sorbent replacement rates, the relative economics of the two processes depends on other factors such as the unit cost of sorbents, oxygen, nitrogen, and the relative capital costs.

  17. Nutrient budgets for large Chinese estuaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Liu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Chinese rivers deliver about 5–10% of global freshwater input and 15–20% of the global continental sediment to the world ocean. We report the riverine fluxes and concentrations of major nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon in the rivers of the contiguous landmass of China and Korea in the northeast Asia. The rivers are generally enriched with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN and depleted in dissolved inorganic phosphate (PO43− with very high DIN: PO43− concentration ratios. DIN, phosphorus, and silicon levels and loads in rivers are mainly affected by agriculture activities and urbanization, anthropogenic activities and adsorption on particulates, and rock types, climate and physical denudation intensity, respectively. Nutrient transports by rivers in the summer are 3–4 times higher than those in the winter with the exception of NH4+. The flux of NH4+ is rather constant throughout the year due to the anthropogenic sources such as the sewer discharge. As nutrient composition has changed in the rivers, ecosystems in estuaries and coastal sea have also changed in recent decades. Among the changes, a shift of limiting nutrients from phosphorus to nitrogen for phytoplankton production with urbanization is noticeable and in some areas silicon becomes the limiting nutrient for diatom productivity. A simple steady-state mass-balance box model was employed to assess nutrient budgets in the estuaries. The major Chinese estuaries export <15% of nitrogen, <6% of phosphorus required for phytoplankton production and ~4% of silicon required for diatom growth in the Chinese Seas (Bohai, Yellow Sea, East China Sea, South China Sea. This suggests that land-derived nutrients are largely confined to the immediate estuaries, and ecosystem in the coastal sea beyond the estuaries is mainly supported by other nutrient sources such as regeneration, open ocean and

  18. Heterogeneous reactions of sulfur dioxide on dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Yunchuan

    2006-01-01

    The source of urban atmospheric particles is broad, and the major source is the building dust from urban construction. Calcium is the tagged element and Portland cement is the major component of building dust. In this study, CaO was regarded as the representative oxide of building dust,and mixtures were synthesized in terms of the major element ingredients of building dust. The heterogeneous uptake of SO2 on CaO, mixtures, Portland cement and building dust samples was investigated. In situ FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to identify the products of the reactions. In addition, the crystal phases and the surface properties of the samples were characterized by XRD patterns and BET specific surface area. The results show that in the presence of oxygen, sulfur dioxide can be adsorbed to sulfite and further catalytically oxidized to sulfate on the surface of CaO, the mixtures, Portland cement and building dust. The reactivity of SO2 on the surface of dust and oxides is basically a first order. The main ingredient of building dust sample is SiO2, and the one of Portland cement is Ca3SiO5.

  19. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The elements carbon (C) and sulfur (S) interact with each other across a network of elemental reservoirs that are interconnected by an array of physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed the biogeochemical C and S cycles. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. The element S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. This presentation describes the modern biogeochemical C and S cycles. Measurements are described whereby stable isotopes can help to infer the nature and quantitative significance of biological and geological processes involved in the C and S cycles. This lecture also summarizes the geological and climatologic aspects of the ancient C and S cycles, as well as the planetary and extraterrestrial processes that influenced their evolution over millions to billions of years.

  20. Effect of different sulfur levels from various sources on brassica napus growth and soil sulfur fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two year field study was conducted at two different locations in northern rain fed Punjab, Pakistan to assess the effect of different rates of sulfur application from various sources on soil sulfur fractions and growth of Brassica napus. The treatments included three sulfur sources i. e., single super phosphate, ammonium sulfate and gypsum each applied at five different rates (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 kg S ha/sup -1/ ). Sulfur application had a significant positive effect on the growth and yield parameters of Brassica napus. Among the sulfur sources ammonium sulfate resulted in maximum increase in plant growth and yield parameters, followed by single super phosphate. Sulfur content and uptake by crop plants was significantly higher with ammonium sulfate application as compared to other two sulfur sources. Sulfur application also exerted a significant positive effect on different S fractions in the soils. On an average, 18.0% of the applied sulfur got incorporated into CaCl/sub 2/ extractable sulfur fraction, while 15.6% and 35.5% entered into adsorbed and organic sulfur fractions in the soils, respectively. The value cost ratio increased significantly by sulfur application up to 30 kg ha/sup -1/. Among sulfur sources, ammonium sulfate performed best giving the highest net return. (author)